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NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY
Academic Catalog 2014 - 2015
www.northwood.edu
Academic Catalog
2014 - 2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION I
WELCOME ........................................................................................................................ 2
SECTION II
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION .......................................................................................... 7
SECTION III
FINANCIAL INFORMATION .......................................................................................... 12
SECTION IV
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION .................................................................................... 21
SECTION V
CURRICULUM GUIDES .................................................................................................. 26
SECTION VI
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........................................................................................................ 54
SECTION VII
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION ..................................................................... 104
SECTION VIII
STUDENT SERVICES ............................................................................................................. 111
SECTION IX
ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM ................................................................................................ 121
SECTION X
THE DEVOS GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT ............................................. 125
SECTION XI
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS ............................................... 154
SECTION XII
DIRECTORY ............................................................................................................................ 160
SECTION XIII
INDEX ....................................................................................................................................... 200
Northwood University is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or
ancestry, age, marital status, disability or veteran status. The University also is committed to compliance with all applicable laws regarding nondiscrimination. Northwood
University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (800-621-7440; higherlearningcommission.org).
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
Welcome to NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY:
Northwood University was founded on the principles of free enterprise and ethics, two principles which have stood the test of
time in regard to their impact on success and prosperity.
At Northwood, we know who our students are and we care about them. Our personalized learning communities include not
only students, but the entire faculty, administration, and staff, who care deeply about all the students who have made
Northwood their university of choice.
This is the magic of Northwood. The personal attention and caring that exists on our campuses is unique among universities,
and because of this, students thrive.
Our student body is very diverse. Northwood has a large international presence—both on our U.S. campuses and abroad.
Following graduation, our alumni are at ease in complex, multi-cultural business environments with a professional network
of friends from around the world.
At Northwood we offer high quality private business education with a proven track record of success. We promise a
challenging education and we promise to help all students discover the leader within. A college education is a major
investment. A commitment to fully engage in both academic and student life will find graduates ready to take their places
among the future leaders of a global, free-enterprise society.
At Northwood University, learning takes place in more than just the classroom. From the time students first come to our
campuses, opportunities are provided to engage in events, competitions, and organizations which will bring their academic
lessons to life. With a multitude of activities from which to choose, students realize significant personal and professional growth
which, after graduation, will set them apart as they launch their careers.
Sincerely,
President and CEO
Northwood University
WELCOME
2
NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Mission Statement
To develop the future leaders of a global, free-enterprise society.
Core Values Statement
We believe in:
• the advantages of an entrepreneurial, free-enterprise society;
• individual freedom and individual responsibility;
• functioning from a foundation of ethics and integrity;
• promoting and leveraging the global, diverse, and multi-cultural nature of enterprise.
Core Purpose Statement
To develop leaders, managers, and entrepreneurs with the character and skills to drive personal, organizational, and societal
success.
Outcomes and Attributes
A university education is more than the courses offered and the experiences made available. It is the architecture of those
elements designed to create defined results. As a learning community, we focus our efforts to the accomplishment of twelve
outcomes and attributes which become characteristics our graduates share.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Understand the tradition of freedom.
Have a broad, practical understanding of their chosen
field.
Are familiar with the ideas driving enterprise leaders.
Communicate effectively in speech and writing.
Understand complex global issues.
Have a constant attraction to new ideas.
7.
8.
Can explain their personal values.
Understand the aesthetic, creative and spiritual
elements of life.
9. Are effective self-evaluators.
10. Are action-oriented.
11. Are skilled at detecting and solving problems.
12. Seek lifelong education.
Code of Ethics
The community of students, faculty, and staff of Northwood University affirms this code of ethics as the behaviors that
advance our shared values:
FREEDOM • We will exercise personal freedom while insuring others be immune from arbitrary interference on account of
condition or circumstance, insuring that freedom will be constrained only by our responsibility for its consequences.
RESPECT • We will treat all others with consideration for their circumstances and with thoughtful regard for their value as
human beings.
EMPATHY • We will endeavor to understand the feelings, thoughts, and notions of others in order that compassion and
fairness of our actions may result.
SPIRITUALITY • We will seek the spiritual development necessary for our happiness and growth and encourage an
environment that supports this growth for all.
HONESTY • We will embrace truthfulness, fairness, probity, and demand the absence of fraud or deceit in ourselves and others
with whom we act.
ACHIEVEMENT • We will exercise our skills to create high achievement and applaud the high achievement of others.
INTEGRITY • In all our actions we shall be guided by a code of behavior which reflects our values, unimpeded by
circumstance, personal gain, public pressure, or private temptation.
RESPONSIBILITY • We will be accountable for the care and welfare of others and responsible for the intended and
unintended consequences of our actions.
ABOUT NORTHWOOD
3
The Northwood Idea
We view a Northwood University education as an investment in your future. Any person who devotes time to a Northwood
education gives up the opportunity to devote that time to other pursuits he or she might engage in during that time.
We believe:
• that competitive, productive effort can overcome obstacles, solve problems, and achieve goals;
• that human beings can make a difference in the world in which they live;
• that political and economic freedom are of paramount importance in releasing creativity and productivity;
• that sacrifice—savings—is a necessary prerequisite to progress;
• that equality of opportunity based on contribution and inequality of reward using the same criteria are not only appropriate,
but the necessary conditions;
• in a system not forced into conformity with some master plan;
• that it is the differences among us that make us interesting and useful to each other;
• in the freedom to fail. We must be free to bear the positive and negative consequences of our actions;
• that in a competitive system, all who participate benefit from it;
• in dedicating ourselves to the elimination of artificial barriers to equal opportunity for all human beings. Racial, religious,
and sexual barriers are anathema to us;
• that an understanding and appreciation of the arts and humanities is a primary source of human enrichment in the lives of
productive human beings;
• that education is never something that one person can do to another. It is, rather, something two people do together. This
means that an educational
• institution is, primarily, a facilitator of knowledge.
We practice a healthy skepticism of large and powerful government because we believe history has clearly demonstrated that such
structures move rapidly from being of the people toward being over the people, and freedom is lost in the balance. Our intolerance
of monolithic power is consistent across the business, labor, and government spectrum. We suspect, furthermore, that as a society
we cannot gain from the establishment of legal monopolies except in a very few and constrained circumstances.
This is The Northwood Idea.
History of Northwood University:
1959 Was a Very Good Year
Alaska and Hawaii became states; Jack Nicklaus won the USGA Amateur Championship; the Frisbee debuted; the space race
between the United States and the Soviet Union was running at full steam ahead; and Northwood University was born.
Northwood’s founders, Gary Stauffer and Arthur Turner, watched the space race and envisioned a new type of university—one
where management led the way. While the frontiers of space were revealing their mysteries, Stauffer and Turner understood that all
endeavors—technical, manufacturing, marketing, retail, all business types—needed management that could lead the way.
Then and Now
Northwood University educates the leaders of the future— skilled, savvy, ethically impeccable leaders who know how to get the
best from their teams and forge new processes to keep up with the expanding U.S. and global economies. These are the graduates
of Northwood.
Northwood began in a 19th century mansion in Alma, Michigan. In 1993 after years of growth backed by the solid branding of the
Northwood identity, Northwood officially became Northwood University. In 1959 and still today, The Northwood Idea of
incorporating the teachings of the American free-enterprise system into college classrooms has been an unquestionable success.
Originally a two-year college granting an associate’s degree in each of several business fields, Northwood responded fully to the
requests of both students and industry by expanding to include a four-year Bachelor’s of Business Administration degree with 16
majors, and the Master of Business Administration degree through the DeVos Graduate School.
Today, there are full-service residential campuses in Midland, Michigan and West Palm Beach, Florida; as well as Adult Degree
Program centers across the United States. The DeVos Graduate School currently offers programs in Florida, Michigan, and Texas.
The University operates International Program Centers in Malaysia, the Peoples’ Republic of China, Sri Lanka, and Switzerland.
The Alden B. Dow Center for Creativity and Enterprise located in Midland, Michigan was founded in 1978 to encourage
individuals to think creatively and to preserve the architectural concepts and philosophy of Alden B. Dow. Programming includes
ABOUT NORTHWOOD
4
Entrepreneurial Roundtables and Entrepreneurs-in-Residence. In addition, the center serves the entire University in advancing
Northwood’s thought-leadership at the intersection of creativity and enterprise.
A brief history of the origins of each campus:
THE MICHIGAN CAMPUS – 1962: As the enrollment grew, the original quarters became inadequate. In 1962, the young
college opened a brand-new, built-from-scratch campus in Midland, Michigan. Midland is 135 miles north of Detroit and is most
famous as the international headquarters of The Dow Chemical Company. The Midland Campus is 434 acres of beautiful, wooded
flatland on the banks of the Tittabawassee River.
THE TEXAS CAMPUS – 1966: Continuing its growth in enrollment, facilities, curricula, and educational leadership, Northwood
opened a second campus in the Dallas/Fort Worth suburb of Cedar Hill, in 1966. The campus is rugged, cedar-covered hills and
valleys, and includes the highest point in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex.
THE FLORIDA CAMPUS – 1982: The Florida campus in West Palm Beach began as a conference center in 1982. In the spring
of 1984, formal college classes began at this facility on 80 acres of wooded property that includes several small lakes.
Practical Education
Northwood University is a private, non-profit, tax-exempt, independent, co-educational, management-oriented university actively
allied to business and the arts. The university’s accreditation through the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central
Association extends to all locations. Thus Northwood University academic credits are widely accepted by other institutions of
higher learning throughout the United States and internationally.
Northwood translates its philosophy into practical, useful curricula that prepare students for the realities of the working world.
Northwood brings the business world into the classroom. Business professors are successful career professionals who have chosen
to direct their business talents toward preparing students to enter their professional careers.
Programs and Seminars
As campus and enrollment expansion continued at Northwood University, so did program development. As the number of curricula
grew and the BBA degree program was added, so did involvement with business and industry. Management education seminars,
short courses, and home study programs were developed to serve non-college students already at work in industry.
Industry Certifications
A major milestone occurred in the automotive area when, in the mid-1960s, the automotive industry, led by the National
Automobile Dealers Association, contributed funds for the development of the Automotive Marketing program and the Certified
Automotive Merchandiser (CAM) award program. The CAM Certificate has become the symbol of professionalism within the
automotive retailing business.
Northwood develops its curricula in response to the needs of enterprise in the global economy. Northwood University’s curricula
offer the most up-to-date programs and information. Practicing business professionals come to the classroom equipped with the
most current relevant descriptions of what is transpiring in today’s business world. Graduates of Northwood University obtain a
solid understanding of business with practical, useful management skills.
Graduates have been prepared for successful entry into the business world through a career services that are available for students
from freshmen orientation throughout their lives.
Northwood University—A Distinctive Education; An Exceptional University
Northwood was founded to prepare students for middle and upper level management positions of a “take-charge leadership” nature who
can be immediately productive to global businesses.
Most curricula have their own advisory committees of experienced business people who currently work in those sectors. Each
committee’s assignment is to ensure the currency and relevance of the studies offered. It’s a big job, but the task is eased by the fact
that many Northwood instructors are themselves experienced veterans of the industries they teach. Further, the Northwood Board of
Trustees and campus Boards of Governors, comprising business, cultural, and professional leaders from many fields, help oversee
the operations of the campus and make policy for expanding the service of the university to the business community and students.
A Northwood University education has many distinctive components. Everything we do at Northwood University is designed to
help graduates take their places as future leaders of a global, free-enterprise society.
ABOUT NORTHWOOD
5
•
Campus Life: Be it academic-based organizations like the Entrepreneurship Society or Business Professionals of America
(BPA) to Greek Life to service-based organizations like Circle K, Rotaract, the Student Athletic Advisory Council or Student
Government Association, Northwood University has ways for students to be engaged and involved on campus and in the local
community. These experiences help students learn first-hand, how businesses and people connect through shared experiences.
•
Competitive Advantage: While our student-athletes are competing on the athletic fields as part of the NCAA Division II Great
Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (GLIAC) and the NAIA Sun Conference; many of our students also compete in
academic arenas. Our national champion Mock Trial team has bested teams from Harvard, Georgetown, and Stanford while our
Competitive Speech team, American Marketing Association, BPA, DECA, and American Advertising Federation student
chapters regularly place in regional and national competitions.
•
Enterprise/Entrepreneurial Orientation: Many Northwood alumni earn their livelihoods in enterprises they own in whole or
in part. While we offer a program in Entrepreneurship, our entire curriculum is focused on enterprise models and entrepreneurial
achievements. Enterprise is a key tenet of our Mission, and we believe entrepreneurship is the essential element of our freemarket economy.
•
EXCEL: Employers constantly stress the need for employee candidates who demonstrate experiences, attitudes, and leadership
abilities beyond those provided in the classroom. The EXCEL program helps put NU graduates’ résumés at the top of the pile.
Upon graduation, other colleges issue an academic transcript listing courses taken and grades earned. Northwood students
receive two transcripts. In addition to the academic record, students earn an EXCEL transcript detailing volunteer and
leadership activities in which students have engaged. Required activities, combined with those of a student’s own initiative, lead
to an EXCEL transcript designed to impress potential employers.
•
Experiential Learning: One hallmark of the Northwood education is hands-on, experiential learning. Many of our academic
programs enhance classroom learning with large-scale, active learning student-run projects like the Stafford Dinner (Hospitality
Management), Welcome Weekend (Entertainment Sport and Promotion Management), NU International Auto Show (all
majors), and the Style Show (Fashion Marketing & Management). These events allow our students to apply what they learn in
the classroom to real situations.
•
Omniquest takes students, faculty, and staff on an intellectual journey. Each semester a book is selected for everyone in the
Northwood system to read and discuss. Past books have included The Power of Habit, Conscious Capitalism, How Will You Measure
Your Life?, and Disciplined Dreaming. Books are chosen that are engaging and likely to be of wide interest— the same that are
being read by today’s business leaders. Forums and panels are held for group discussions. This encourages readers to look at
topics from different viewpoints. Upon graduation, between the content of courses and Omniquest, students will have
internalized the best in contemporary business theory and its application.
•
Professional Development: Northwood students graduate with a superior business education that gives them a foundation of
understanding free markets, entrepreneurial endeavors, personal responsibility, and ethical behavior. And, NU students also
graduate with the ability to effectively communicate their ideas, beliefs, and experiences in an effort to promote success in their
own lives and in the lives of others. Through workshops and campus-life programming, students hone networking, interviewing
and résumé writing skills putting them one more step ahead in a competitive job market.
•
The Wall Street Journal and other business publications are available electronically to students all year long. Immersion in
these resources helps keep students on top of everything happening in business—future trends and economic policy—and learn
who is in charge of companies and corporations across the world. As a result, reading the WSJ and other trade publications
usually becomes a lifelong habit.
ABOUT NORTHWOOD
6
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
Northwood University offers a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree at the undergraduate level on two residential
campuses, over 20 Adult Degree Program (ADP) Centers in eight states, and online. The Master of Business Administration (MBA)
degree is also offered in multiple locations including on the two residential campuses. The Master of Science in Organizational
Leadership (MSOL) is offered online. Not all majors are offered at all locations. See pages 21-22 for a list of Northwood University
degree programs.
Admission Requirements
Students are admitted to Northwood University without regard to race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry,
age, marital status, disability, or veteran status.
High school graduates interested in pursuing careers in business and management who have maintained a cumulative “C” or
better average will be considered for admission into Northwood University. Students with averages below “B” may be required
to submit the results of additional entrance examinations and if admitted, may be required to enroll in and successfully complete
an Educational Success Program prior to enrolling in their first semester. ACT or SAT scores are required of all applicants.
International students must submit TOEFL scores or their equivalent. For home-schooled students, Northwood University
requires transcripts, ACT or SAT scores, and degree verification by the applicant’s home state.
One of the most important documents used to help determine admission is the applicant’s secondary school record. The
Admissions Committee carefully weighs motivation, integrity, and maturity as determined by the high school recommendation, as
well as the predicted ability to complete an intended program of study. Prior criminal convictions may result in denial of
admission.
Applicants who do not hold a high school diploma may be admitted by successfully completing the GED examination. In addition
to successfully completing the GED, ACT or SAT scores may be required.
Advanced Placement
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is a series of national examinations that measures the knowledge and skills acquired by
students who have taken AP courses. High schools administer the courses and examinations and the resulting examination scores
are sent to colleges of the students’ choice. Students with sufficiently high scores on certain AP examinations may be eligible for
specific course credit.
Participants applying for Northwood University admission should arrange to have their AP examination records sent to the
Northwood University Admissions Office. Information on the required scores and specific course credit awarded can be accessed
on the Internet at http://northwood.edu/ on the academic pages of each of the locations.
College-Level Examination Program and Defense Activities for NonTraditional Educational Support
Northwood University recognizes that some students have acquired proficiency in college-level material outside of the traditional
college classroom. The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), American Council on Education (ACE), and Defense
Activities for Non-Traditional Educational Support (DANTES) provide these students with the opportunity to demonstrate their
college-level learning through examinations that assess the knowledge taught in common college courses. Northwood awards credit
for satisfactory performance CLEP general examinations and for several of the CLEP, ACE, and DANTES subject area
examinations. CLEP, ACE, and DANTES score reports are to be sent to the Northwood University Office of Admissions. The
University limits the total number of credits that may be applied toward a Northwood University degree through the above
examinations and/or Prior Learning Assessment.
International Baccalaureate
International Baccalaureate examination scores high enough to reflect probable collegiate success are considered for transfer to
Northwood University. Information on the required scores and specific course credit awarded can be accessed on the Northwood
University website. Official scores must be submitted to the Northwood University Admissions Office.
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
7
International Student Applications
Each year, hundreds of international students attend Northwood University. Students from over 107 countries around the world
have come to our campuses. Official transcripts of all high school level and college work (when applicable) must be provided with
the application. All students who apply should be in good social and academic standing at the high school or college from which
they are coming.
Northwood University English Proficiency Policy for International Students
The Northwood University (NU) policy regarding English proficiency for international students is as follows:
In the interest of best supporting students’ academic success, Northwood University reserves the right to assess a student’s English
proficiency if a student does not demonstrate sufficient skills to be successful in his/her academic program. When assessment
results indicate that a student does not meet the University’s minimum English proficiency level, the University will require the
student to complete the appropriate level(s) of the Intensive English Program before continuing in their course of study.
I.
Waiver of English proficiency requirement
The University will waive the English proficiency requirement for:
A. students who have resided for at least three years within and are citizens of a country where English is the, or one of, the
official languages (e.g., Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland) as designated in the CIA World Factbook at:
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2098.html;
B. students who come from an accredited educational program where the student has been enrolled fulltime and taken at least
two years of post-secondary instruction conducted all in English.
In all cases, students must be able to provide documentation (which includes official transcripts) verifying these conditions.
II. Evidence of English proficiency
As evidence of language proficiency, Northwood University accepts scores from:
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System)
STEP (Japanese exam)
UCLES Cambridge exams
International Baccalaureate (IB) exams
ELS Language Centers (Level 112)
ACT or SAT scores (undergraduate admission only)
Following are the English language proficiency requirements for regular admission to Northwood University based on
official test scores from each testing service:
TOEFL
Undergraduate
Graduate
IELTS
Undergraduate
Graduate
Paper-based Computer-based Internet-based
(CBT)
(IBT)
500
173
61
550
213
80
Minimum overall band score of 6.0
Minimum overall band score of 7.0
STEP (Japanese-based exam)
Undergraduate
Grade 2A
Graduate
Grade Pre-1
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
8
International Baccalaureate
Undergraduate Score of 5 or above on English A1 or A2 Exam
UCLES Cambridge Exams
Undergraduate FCE or CAE (minimum score of C)
Graduate
CAE or CPE (minimum score of C)
ELS Language Centers
Undergraduate Successful completion of Level 112
Graduate
Successful completion of Level 112
ACT or SAT (Undergraduate only)
ACT 18 for both composite and reading sub-score
SAT 450 Critical Reading
Undergraduate students who submit standardized scores that do not meet these minimum requirements may be considered for
provisional admission. In this circumstance, the University reserves the right to:
1. require the completion and submission of a Northwood University English Placement Test prior to arrival in the U.S.;
AND
2. grant provisional admission but require the student to complete mandatory ESL coursework and/or register for a reduced course
load and/or attend mandatory tutoring/ academic assistance for a length of time to be specified by the University.
These conditions shall be communicated in writing to the applicant.
The University requires the submission of standardized exam scores unless the requirement has been waived as noted above. The
standardized exam is by far the best evidence of language proficiency in terms of application materials. However, undergraduate
students who do not submit a standardized exam score may also be considered for admission provided they:
1.
complete and submit a required Northwood University English Placement Test (EPT) that will be evaluated and scored by
a Northwood University faculty member in English. The EPT score must be administered by an NU employee or a proctor
designated by NU prior to the student’s arrival in the U.S.
OR
2.
present scores from institutional tests regarding proficiency in English. Such scores must be submitted on original
institutional letterhead and must include a written explanation of the exam format and scoring/ evaluation procedure and a
quantitative comparison of the score to that of a standardized exam score such as the Cambridge, TOEFL, IELTS, or STEP.
In the absence of standardized exam scores, the University reserves the right to deny admission on that basis alone.
Graduate student applicants to the DeVos Graduate School must submit standardized exam scores. Applications cannot be
considered without the submission of an official TOEFL, IELTS, or STEP score report. However, if an applicant’s undergraduate
coursework was delivered entirely in English, standardized exam scores may be waived if the applicant provides official
institutional documentation of delivery in English and/or agrees to a pre-admission oral interview.
Guest Student Applications
Students from another institution who wish to attend Northwood University as a guest student must complete a guest student
application through their home institution’s Registrar’s Office. Students do not need to go through the full admissions process.
Students must request in writing that the Northwood Registrar’s Office send an official transcript back to their home institution
after their stay has been completed.
Northwood students wishing to attend another institution may complete a guest student application at the Northwood Registrar’s
Office. Only credits transfer back to Northwood; grades do not transfer. Students must request in writing that the guest institution
send an official transcript back to Northwood.
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
9
International Transfer Students
A majority of international students have begun their college education at overseas institutions, and apply to Northwood University
as transfer students to earn their bachelor’s degree. If an international student applies as a transfer student, his or her transcripts and
records will be evaluated, and a Degree Completion Program (DCP) will be prepared. The DCP outlines the courses a student will
need to successfully complete to earn a degree from Northwood. Students will be permitted to transfer equivalent courses and
selected electives with grades of “C” (2.0) or better.
Programs of Study
Northwood University is a specialized business university offering many specialized business majors. At Northwood
University, students have the opportunity to start business classes their first semester. Academics combined with internships
provide students the hands-on experience needed to enter the career of their choosing. See pages 17-18 for degree program
options.
Readmission to the University
Northwood University allows a student to leave at the end of any semester and be readmitted any following semester, providing
the student is in good standing at the end of the last semester attended. The student must go through the standard admission
procedure to be readmitted. There is no application fee for this process.
Transfer Students
Northwood University strongly encourages students who have followed an approved course of study at another college or
university to apply for admission. Students transferring without degrees will have their transcripts evaluated by the registrar for
equivalent Northwood credit. Students in this category will be permitted to transfer equivalent courses and selected electives with
grades of “C” (2.0) or better. All students who apply for transfer admission should be in good academic and social standing at the
college from which they are transferring.
Our transfer program is designed to allow each student to transfer the maximum number of credit hours that will facilitate a
program of study.
Students accepted to Northwood University with an associate’s degree from a regionally-accredited college or university will
receive:
•
immediate junior status, although more than the full two academic years may be required to complete all requirements for
the degree depending on the major.
•
acceptance of all credits with the degree package.
Transfer students who wish to complete academic minors/concentrations should meet with an academic advisor to determine
what additional courses are needed.
Veterans
Northwood University is recognized as a Military-Friendly School. The University is approved to provide training for Veterans
on the residential campuses, in our Distance Education Online program, for our MBA program, and at most of our Adult Degree
Program Centers. Each program has a professional Veterans Certifying Official eager to help students get started achieving their
educational goals.
Northwood University is a participant in the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the Yellow Ribbon Program. Student work with the VA
Certifying Official for their particular program or location for assistance with questions regarding VA benefits. Students may also
visit the VA website at: http://www.northwood.edu/militaryveterans.
When to Apply
Students are encouraged to apply after completion of their junior year of high school to gain acceptance, if qualified, on their first
choice campus. Northwood University has residential campuses located in Midland, Michigan and West Palm Beach, Florida. When
enrollment limits have been reached on any campus, acceptance may be offered at the other campus.
Applicants to Northwood University may obtain application forms from the Office of Admissions of any Northwood campus.
Completed applications should be forwarded to the Office of Admissions on the Northwood campus of the applicant’s choice.
Applicants can also apply online at no charge at www.northwood.edu.
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
10
The applicant’s final high school transcript must be sent by his or her school to the Office of Admissions. Transfer students must
provide official transcripts of all college or university work completed, along with their final high school transcript.
Northwood requires that all applicants take either the American College Testing (ACT) exam or the Scholastic Assessment Test
(SAT). International students are required to provide evidence of English proficiency (as outlined in the International Student
Applications section) exam score with their application. Official transcripts of all previous high school and college work should
accompany the application.
All international applicants should contact [email protected], phone 989-837-4451, or gain online information at
www.northwood.edu. The international admissions form is also available online.
Commitment Deposit Policy
Michigan and Florida campuses:
Resident Students:
$250 deposit for entering students applied in this manner:
$100 refundable housing security deposit $150 tuition deposit
Commuter Students: $150 deposit for entering students to be applied toward tuition costs.
This policy also applies to readmits and transfer students. The entering freshman deposit is refundable until May 1 of the year
of admission.
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
11
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Northwood University provides exceptional value with respect to other private and many public universities for room, board, and
tuition charges.
All applicable charges must be paid prior to validation of registration for each semester.
While the University reserves the right to change these charges or procedures upon 30 days’ notice, every effort will be made to
maintain these costs throughout the academic year. At publication date of this catalog, charges are as follows:
Traditional Students
Fall Semester (16-Week) Charges 2014-2015
Item
Tuition
(12-17 cr. hrs.)
Room
Board
Student Fee
Technology Fee
State Tax
MI
$10,975.00
2,425.00
2,230.00
413.00
178.00
$16,221.00
TX
$10,975.00
FL
$10,975.00
2,670.00
2,360.00
413.00
413.00
178.00
178.00
141.60
$11,556.00 $16,737.60
Note: Tuition is $845 per credit hour for fewer than 12; $585 for over 17 credit hours per semester; and $732 per credit hour for
compressed sessions, practicums, and internships. Summer tuition for on-campus, face-to-face courses is $732 per credit hour.
Special lab or equipment fees may be appropriate in some cases. Textbook charges depend on the class requirements could be
approximately $627 per semester.
Full tuition entitles the student to register for 12 to 17 credit hours inclusive during a 16-week semester. Credit hours greater than
17 are charged at $585 per credit hour.
Certain special and course fees, as follows, are charged at all campuses. In addition, a campus may have a special offering for
which an appropriate fee may be charged. Applicable information is available from the Business Office of that campus shortly
before the beginning of each term.
Application fee due with application (non-refundable)* $30
Graduation fee $80
Health insurance plan $1,149
Housing Security Deposit (refundable—included in tuition deposit) $100
Late payment fee $200
Late registration fee $200
Fee per credit hour for students taking fewer than 12 hours $845
Fee per credit hour for students taking more than 17 credit hours $585
Credit hour fee to audit courses (no college credit) $423
Comprehensive Exam fee to test out of a course per credit hour $75 (not available for all courses; students may not test out of
courses that they have previously failed)
Car permits (per year) $50
Car permits (additional or replacement) $15
*Applicants may also apply online at no charge at www.northwood.edu
Car Permits
Any student who wishes to have a car on campus must make an application to Campus Security. There is a non-refundable fee per
semester and upon approval will be issued a car permit to be attached to his or her car in the manner prescribed in the student
handbook. Failure to do this will result in a penalty, and the student will be required to remove the car from the campus. This
privilege may be forfeited without refund if campus driving rules are violated.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
12
Deposits on Accounts
Students may at any time prior to registration make deposits to their accounts in the Business Office and such credit will be
deducted from their total charges on the day of registration.
Financial Requirements
Students who owe balances and who, within 30 days of the beginning of any semester, have not made arrangements with the
Business Office to make payments may not continue in class. If a financial obligation remains at the end of the semester, an official
transcript will not be released, until the obligation has been fulfilled.
A monthly late fee may be added on the unpaid balance of all accounts over 30 days past due. A $35.00 service charge will be
added to each check coming back dishonored from the bank. An additional $10.00 will be assessed if not paid in 10 days.
All unpaid Medical Center charges, parking, residence hall charges, library fines, etc., will incur an additional $10.00 charge if not
paid during the semester and/or are turned over to the Business Office for collection.
All checks are to be made payable in U.S. funds.
Housing Security Deposit – A housing security deposit of $100.00 is required from all residential students. The University will
hold this amount until the end of the academic year or until the student moves out of University housing. It will not be returned if
the room is damaged or dirty. This deposit is included in the tuition deposit on all campuses.
Refunds
Prepayments will be refunded in full on all payments made prior to validation day, with the exception of application fees and
tuition deposits. Any changes of classes must be done during the drop and add period. All charges stand after that time.
For any student withdrawing from college, the following policy applies:
Days after classes start Refund amount
1 - 3 days
100% credit of all charges
4 - 11 days
90% credit of tuition and board
12 - 22 days
80% credit of tuition and board
23 - 33 days
70% credit of tuition and board
34 - 44 days
60% credit of tuition and board
45 - 55 days
50% credit of tuition and board
56 - 66 days
40% credit of tuition and board
More than 66 days
0% credit of tuition and board
Refund calculations will be based upon the date the student begins the official withdrawal process. Days listed above are calendar
days and include weekends and holidays. In cases where a student stops attending all his/her classes without officially
withdrawing, refund calculations will be done at 50 percent (50%) unless the student attended a class later than 55 days after the
start of classes. If the student attended any class later than 66 days after the start of classes, there will be no refund.
Fees and room charges are non-refundable after the third day classes start. Students who move off campus after classes begin
forfeit charges per the housing contract guidelines.
MBA and Adult Degree Program – All MBA and Adult Degree Program (ADP) students should review their respective
section for the refund policy that applies to MBA and ADP courses.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
13
Return of Title IV Aid Policy for Federal Financial Aid Recipients
As prescribed by law and regulation, Federal Title IV funds will be returned to the applicable sources in the following order:
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, Federal Direct PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Federal
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and other Title IV Aid Programs. Examples of this refund policy are
available at the financial aid offices on each campus.
Textbooks
The textbooks for all classes will be available in the bookstore and must be paid for in full at the time of purchase. Cost per semester
for 2014-2015 will be approximately $627, depending on the courses in which the student is enrolled.
Veterans
Any student eligible for veterans’ benefits must contact the Northwood veterans’ office for initiation and certification of benefits to
the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. It is the student’s obligation, on a semester-by-semester basis, to notify the Northwood VA
Certifying Official of his or her class schedule and any change in the schedule (i.e. withdrawals, drop/add) throughout a semester.
Academic Probation Policy for Students with VA Benefits
The Florida State Approving Agency has imposed the following requirements for students to receive veterans’ benefits.
Satisfactory Grade (Cumulative Grade Point Average and Probation) – All students receiving veterans’ benefits must maintain a
cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Failure to maintain that GPA will result in the student being placed on probation. A student
will be allowed 2 semesters including the summer session to raise the cumulative GPA to that required for graduation and come off
probation. If the student fails to come off probation, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (USDVA) will be notified of
termination in writing.
Failing Grade and Last Date of Attendance – A student receiving veterans’ benefits and earning a failing grade(s) must inform
the Northwood University Veterans’ Certification Office in writing of the last date of attendance in that class or classes. Failure to
notify the Veterans’ Certification Office will result in the Veterans’ Certification Office informing the USDVA that the last date of
attendance in that class or classes was the first day of the class.
Withdrawal and Last Date of Attendance – A student receiving veterans’ benefits who withdraws from a class or classes officially
must inform the Veterans’ Certification Office of the withdrawal from the class(es). A student who is receiving veterans’ benefits
and fails to withdraw officially or who walks away from a class or classes without informing the Veterans’ Certification Office in
writing will cause the Veterans’ Certification Office to inform the USDVA that the last date of attendance in the class(es) was the
first day of the class.
Credit for Previous Training – All students who are requesting veterans’ benefits when enrolling here will be given credit for
previous training, where appropriate. The total length of the program of study will be reduced proportionately. The student and the
USDVA will be advised in writing of the credit given to the student and the appropriate reduction in the total length of the program.
All students receiving veterans’ benefits must have transcripts and other documents showing credit for previous training sent to the
Northwood University Registrar’s Office for evaluation by the end of the second semester. Failure to do so will result in no further
certification for veterans’ benefits until those transcripts have been provided.
Withdrawals
Any student withdrawing from Northwood must first notify the University, stating the reason or reasons, and all refunds that are due
will be based on the approval of the University in accordance with established policy. Refunds will be calculated based upon the
date that the student provides official written notification of his or her intent to withdraw. Completing the withdrawal form in the
appropriate offices provides written notification. The appropriate offices are Academic Dean or Registrar.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
14
FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION
Northwood strives to provide adequate financial aid opportunities to all students of academic ability and personal promise, based
on financial need. With the cooperation of business, individuals, state, and federal governments, Northwood has developed a
comprehensive program of financial aid to help students complete their college education. Please go to the financial aid page at
www.northwood.edu for additional information.
Students seeking financial aid should first apply for admission to the Northwood campus of their choice. Applicants for financial
assistance should direct all questions to the financial aid office on their campus. The financial aid office on the Michigan campus
is located in Miner Hall and on the Florida campus in the Turner Education Center.
Students also should submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) from the U.S. Department of Education.
Applications may be completed on the web at www.fafsa.gov. If the student does not have access to the Internet, the forms are
available from high school guidance offices or from the Northwood financial aid offices. This information is treated in the strictest
confidence by the University. All financial aid forms should be submitted after January 1 and prior to April 1 for maximum
consideration. FAFSA applications received by the processor after April 1 will be considered on a funds-available basis. Students
must complete a new FAFSA each academic year. Award eligibility is determined on an annual basis.
To be considered for eligibility for federal and/or state funds, a student must be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen as defined in
the federal regulations; meet standards of satisfactory academic progress; be accepted as a regular student in a degree program; not
be in default on a federal student loan or have made satisfactory arrangements to repay; not owe a repayment on a federal student
grant or have made satisfactory arrangements to repay it; and be registered for selective service, if male between the ages of 18 and
25. For the purposes of determining financial aid eligibility, a student is considered to be full time when enrolled for 12 credit hours
or more, three-quarter time when enrolled for 9-11 credit hours, half time when enrolled for 6-8 credit hours, and less than half time
when enrolled for fewer than 6 credit hours. Any change to a student’s eligibility criteria may result in a change in financial aid
eligibility at any time. The financial aid office must be informed of changes to eligibility criteria (i.e., enrollment, outside resources,
etc.) so financial aid award adjustments can be made and are subject to award fund availability.
Students should note that the Tax Reform Act of 1986 amended the Internal Revenue Code section pertaining to the taxability of
scholarships. Effective January 1, 1987, only the amount of a scholarship that is used for qualified tuition and related expenses (e.g.,
tuition, fees, books, supplies, and equipment) is excluded from gross income. Any scholarship funds used for non-course related
expenses (e.g., room and board, etc.) are taxable and should be included in the student’s gross income. Students should keep
accurate records of all these funds and expenses for tax purposes.
Award Disbursement
Federal, state, and most institutional financial aid is divided equally between the semesters of enrollment and will be credited to the
student’s account upon verification of enrollment for that period. Revisions of awards or late awards will be applied throughout the
year as required due to fluctuations in eligibility. Some financial aid funds may require adjustment due to being restricted to direct
costs (i.e., tuition, fees, housing and meal plan charges, etc.) that show directly on the student’s Northwood University account.
Federal Direct Loan funds will be credited to the student’s account. The student is responsible for all charges not covered by
financial aid. If the student’s credits exceed their charges, the student has an option of receiving a refund check for the credit
balance, or retaining the credit balance on his or her student account to pay future costs if the business office is notified in writing.
Overpayments resulting from full or partial cancellation of aid will normally result in a debit balance on the student’s account and
must be paid back according to the repayment policies of the University. It is the student’s responsibility to verify the accuracy of
billings, financial aid, and refund transactions.
Award Adjustments
All financial aid awards are subject to adjustment and revision if changes to eligibility are required. Some financial aid funds may
require adjustment due to being restricted to direct costs (i.e., tuition, fees, housing and meal plan charges, etc.) that show directly
on the student’s Northwood University account. In such cases, federal sources will have priority in the package, state aid will
have second priority, private donor funds restricted to direct costs will have third priority, and Northwood University institutional
financial aid sources will receive fourth priority. Every effort will be made to maximize financial aid eligibility, however, award
funds received from outside sources may affect/reduce eligibility for Northwood institutional financial aid funds.
Statement of Financial Aid Rights and Responsibilities
Students have the right to be informed of and to apply for all financial aid programs for which they are eligible. Northwood
University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution and employer, complying with federal and state laws prohibiting
discrimination including but not limited to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. It is the policy of Northwood University
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
15
that no person on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, disability, or
veteran status shall be discriminated against in receiving financial assistance or in educational programs or activities receiving
federal financial assistance.
Students have the right to know how financial need and award packages will be determined and to request a review of the
financial aid package should circumstances change to negatively affect the family’s ability to meet costs of attendance. Students
have the responsibility to notify the University should new resources become available during the academic year that were not
originally considered in the student’s financial aid package.
Students who borrow while in attendance at the University have a right to full disclosure of the terms and provisions of loan
programs, including typical repayment schedules. Students must repay their loans on a timely basis and keep the University
informed of their current address. Northwood notifies the student when electronic student loan funds are applied to his or her
student account. Students have 14 days from the date of notification to cancel all or a portion of the loan funds. The business
office must receive this request in writing.
Students have the right to be informed of financial aid policies and have the responsibility to be aware of all published financial aid
policies and to comply with these policies. Students have the responsibility to submit accurate information on all documents
relating to the financial aid application process.
Northwood Institutional Aid
Listed below are some of the awards provided by Northwood to eligible full-time traditional undergraduate students. Most
Northwood awards are restricted to direct costs (e.g., tuition, fees, campus housing charges, campus meal plan, etc.) and may affect
eligibility for other need-based aid and aid restricted to direct costs; adjustments may be required. Institutional awards may be
renewable each year for up to four years, or eight semesters, provided students meet the renewal conditions established for each
award. Learn more about these awards and others by visiting the financial aid section of the Northwood website at
www.northwood.edu.
•
Northwood Merit Scholarships – Eligibility for the Presidential Scholarship, Freedom Scholarship, Free-Enterprise
Scholarship, Entrepreneur Scholarship, and the Liberty Scholarship is limited to students who have demonstrated excellent
academic and extracurricular performance. They are renewable provided the student maintains the required grade point
average.
•
Private Donor Scholarships – Primarily for upper class students, the scholarship committees on each campus award these
scholarships based on academic performance. Selections are based on requirements specified by donors and information
provided by students. Scholarship applications, descriptions of scholarships, and instructions for application are available
December 1 of each year. Visit the Financial Aid section of our website (www.northwood.edu) for more information or to
apply online.
•
Northwood Grants – Awarded annually to students based on demonstrated annual financial resulting from completion of the
FAFSA every year.
•
Athletic Scholarships – These awards are determined by the coaching staff and are applied according to the policies of the
Athletic Department.
•
Family Tuition Scholarships – For new incoming fall students: If two or more dependent students from the same family
attend full-time in the traditional program for the fall and spring semesters, each student will receive $1,500 for the spring
semester.
•
Alumni Scholarships – For new incoming fall students who are dependents of a Northwood University alumnus.
State of Michigan Financial Assistance
Learn more about these state aid programs by visiting Northwood’s Michigan Financial Aid website pages at
www.northwood.edu.
•
Michigan Competitive Scholarships – These are awarded by the State of Michigan to Michigan residents on the basis of
demonstrated need and a qualifying ACT test score. First-time students who feel they should qualify for the competitive
scholarship should file their financial aid forms no later than March 1 every year. Awards may be renewed for ten (10)
semesters if the student shows need, maintains a 2.0 GPA, and meets the standards of satisfactory academic progress as
defined by the University. Awards are restricted to tuition and mandatory fees.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
16
•
Michigan Tuition Grants – These are awarded by the State of Michigan to Michigan residents who have demonstrated
financial need. The award may be renewed for ten (10) semesters if the student continues to demonstrate need and meets the
standards of satisfactory academic progress as defined by the University. Students should file their financial aid forms no later
than March 1. Awards are restricted to tuition and mandatory fees.
State of Florida Financial Assistance
Learn more about these state aid programs by visiting Northwood’s Florida Financial Aid website pages at
www.northwood.edu.
•
Bright Futures Scholarship – These lottery-funded scholarships are awarded to Florida high school graduates who
demonstrate high academic achievement. This scholarship program has three award levels: the Florida Academic Scholars
Award, the Florida Medallion Scholars Award, and the Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars Award. The state determines
eligibility for these awards. Contact your high school guidance counselor for further information and application. Students must
complete the FAFSA every year to receive this award.
•
Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG) – These grants are based on financial need and state-mandated regulations.
Students must meet the Florida residency requirements for state aid and enroll full time. To apply, students must complete a
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Initial consideration will be given to students whose FAFSA is received
on a first-come, first-served basis each year.
•
Access to Better Learning and Education Grant (ABLE) –
This is a tuition assistance program awarded to Florida residents who meet all program requirements. Students must
complete the FAFSA every year to receive this award.
Federal Student Aid (All locations)
Learn more about these federal student aid programs by visiting the Financial Aid section of the Northwood website at
www.northwood.edu. Additional Federal Student Aid information can be found at www.federalstudentaid.gov for the following
awards. Students may be selected for a process known as verification which could require students to provide additional
documentation (such as tax transcripts, verification of household size, etc.) to the financial aid office.
•
Federal Pell Grant – This award is based solely on financial need as determined by the Pell Grant regulations. Students will
be notified of their eligibility for the Pell Grant directly from the federal government by the Student Aid Report (SAR). Upon
verification of enrollment, funds will be credited to the student’s institutional account. Pell funds are available only to students
seeking their first bachelor’s degree. The amount of Federal Pell Grant funds a student may receive over their lifetime is
limited by federal law to be the equivalent of six years of Pell Grant funding. Please go to www.studentaid.gov for details on
the Federal Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility Used (LEU).
•
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) – Receipt of these funds is limited to students who
demonstrate exceptional financial need and who are eligible for a Pell Grant. Awards are subject to the availability of funds.
•
Federal Work Study (FWS) – This is a need-based employment assistance program. Contact the financial aid office for
postings of available work study positions. Students are paid by check biweekly for the hours worked. Awards and earnings are
subject to job availability and the availability of funds.
•
Federal Direct Loans (subsidized and unsubsidized) – These are fixed rate loans based on need as determined through filing
the FAFSA and the student’s cost of attendance as determined by the school. Loan funds are obtained through the Department
of Education upon completion of a Master Promissory Note (MPN) and entrance loan counseling. Students making satisfactory
academic progress and are enrolled at least half time per semester may borrow up to $3,500 per year as a freshman, $4,500 per
year as a sophomore, and $5,500 per year as a junior and senior depending on financial need. Independent students or students
whose parents are denied the Federal Direct PLUS Loan may borrow additional funds under the Federal Direct Unsubsidized
Stafford Loan program. Loan limits for these additional funds are $4,000 per year for freshmen and sophomores and up to
$5,000 per year for juniors and seniors. First-time Direct Subsidized loans borrowed on or after July 1, 2013 are limited to a
maximum period of time (measured in academic years). Students may not receive Direct Subsidized Loans for more than 150
percent of the published length of their program of study.
•
Federal Direct PLUS Loans – Parents who want to borrow to help pay for their children’s education may use this loan
program. Federal Direct PLUS Loans are limited to the cost of attendance minus other aid received and dependent on the
parent’s credit history.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
17
•
Master Promissory Note (MPN) and Loan Counseling – All Federal Direct Loan funds received must be repaid once students
ceases half-time attendance and are subject to the terms and conditions stated in the MPN. Also, first-time Federal Direct Loan
borrowers are required by federal regulations to complete entrance loan counseling prior to receiving their first loan proceeds.
All students receiving Federal Direct Loans are required by federal regulations to complete exit loan counseling prior to
graduating or withdrawing from the University. Students must contact the University if there are any changes to enrollment and
plans to continue at Northwood.
Student Employment
In line with its philosophy of preparing young people for the world of work, Northwood assists students in finding employment
during their college years. All Northwood campuses participate with the federal government in the Federal Work Study Program. A
student who qualifies for need-based aid under federal methodology (using FAFSA information) has the opportunity for
employment while enrolled on the Northwood campuses. Many other Northwood students maintain part-time jobs in the
community while in school. For additional information regarding Federal Work Study, please contact your campus financial aid
office.
Other Sources of Assistance
These sources of aid are completely independent of Northwood University. Eligibility depends entirely on specific circumstances
and the program requirements.
Application should be made directly to the specific organization:
• Church Groups
• Veterans’ Educational Benefits
• Business Organizations
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Fraternal Organizations
• Social Services
• Civic Organizations
• Bureau of Indian Affairs
• Professional Groups
Useful website links can be found in the Financial Aid section of the Northwood website – www.northwood.edu.
Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Undergraduate Financial Aid
Recipients
This policy reflects the standards that are used to measure Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) at Northwood University for
purposes of financial aid eligibility. Federal regulations require that the university establish and implement a policy to measure if a
financial aid recipient is making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree. Satisfactory academic progress is measured by
evaluating both GPA achievement (qualitative measurement) and pace (quantitative measurement) to ensure successful program
completion within the maximum timeframe allowed. The standards are subject to change per federal regulations. The Financial Aid
Office would notify students if any changes were to occur.
A student receiving federal, state and/or Northwood financial aid must maintain satisfactory academic progress to retain financial
aid eligibility. Some scholarship, grant, and loan programs may impose higher standards of performance. Each student’s academic
record will be reviewed annually at the end of the Spring semester. Students who do not maintain satisfactory progress will have
their financial aid eligibility suspended.
Courses taken during compressed sessions will be counted at the time of review occurring after the Spring semester. All English as
a Second Language, Intensive English Program, and/or remedial/developmental coursework is considered part of the student’s
cumulative academic record.
Transfer Student Eligibility – Transfer students enrolling at Northwood are considered to be making satisfactory academic
progress. All transfer hours accepted toward completion of the student’s program must be counted as both hours attempted and
hours completed for measurement of maximum time frame (150%) and minimum GPA requirements (see GPA table below).
Treatment of Grades – For purposes of this policy, the following grades are considered attempted and completed: A, B, C, D, I,
P, or a Z, including pluses and minuses. Grades of W and F are considered attempted and not completed. A grade of X (audit)
will not be considered as attempted or completed.
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18
Repeat Courses – Repeat classes are assessed as new classes. Initial and repeated enrollments in the same course count as hours
attempted each time the course is taken. A student may receive financial aid for repeating a failed class until it is passed. A student
may receive financial aid for repeating a previously passed course once.
Maximum Timeframe/Credits (Quantitative – 150%): The length of eligibility is based on a student’s total academic record
starting with the entry date at Northwood and includes all Northwood attempted hours, transfer hours from other institutions,
advanced standing credit, prior learning assessment credit and test outs. A student may receive financial aid for no more than a
maximum of 150% of their published program length. For example, if the length of an academic program is 123 credit hours, the
maximum timeframe during which a student may be eligible for financial aid must not exceed 185 total credit hours.
In the event a student decides to add a second major or completely change his or her major, the published program length of the
student’s current program is used at the time of the evaluation.
Pace of Progress Toward Degree Completion (Quantitative): Students must earn at least 67% of credit hours attempted.
Minimum GPA Requirements (Qualitative: The following table details the minimum cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)
requirements for cumulative hours earned (including transfer hours).
Cumulative Semester
Hours Earned
1-15
16-29
30-59
60 or more
Minimum Cumulative GPA
1.70
1.80
1.90
2.00
Students must achieve and maintain a 2.0 minimum cumulative grade point average at the end of the second academic year,
or have an academic standing consistent with the minimum GPA requirements listed above.
Change of Satisfactory Academic Progress Status – Although a student’s cumulative grade point average or earned credits may
change within a semester (e.g. by recording a final grade in place of a grade of I), the student’s academic progress status is not
reevaluated or changed during the semester. It will be reevaluated at the time of the next review.
Financial Aid Suspension and Probation – Students that do not maintain satisfactory academic progress will be placed on
financial aid suspension and notified in writing. Probationary status will be considered upon appeal.
Financial Aid Suspension: In the event the student’s aid is suspended, the student has a right to appeal. The appeal process
is described below. If the student’s appeal is denied, the student remains on Financial Aid Suspension until he/she meets
the requirements for reinstatement.
Financial Aid Probation: If the student’s appeal is granted, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation and may
receive aid for one (1) semester. At the end of that semester, progress will be reviewed, and the student must be making
satisfactory academic progress or must be successfully following an Academic Performance Improvement Plan in order to
continue receiving aid. If the student fails to meet the requirements, the student’s aid is suspended again. To regain
eligibility the student must meet the requirements for reinstatement as described below.
Appeal Process – A student whose aid has been suspended and has documentable mitigating circumstances, such as a death in
the family or an illness, may appeal his/her aid suspension. The student’s appeal must include why he/she failed to make
satisfactory academic progress and what has changed that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the
end of the semester. To appeal, a student must submit, to the Academic Dean’s Office, a Satisfactory Academic Progress appeal
form with non-returnable supporting documentation. The appeal and documentation must be submitted within 14 calendar days
of the date of the financial aid suspension notification. The date the documents are considered submitted is the receipt or
postmarked date of the final documentation. The appeal form can be downloaded from the Northwood website.
The Academic Dean, after consulting with the Financial Aid Director, will notify the student in writing of the appeal decision. In the
event the appeal is granted, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation. Please note: If an appeal is granted, the
student MUST meet with his/her academic advisor to develop an Academic Performance Improvement Plan.
If the appeal is denied, the student will remain on Financial Aid Suspension until he or she meets the requirements for
reinstatement.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
19
Reinstatement of Financial Aid Eligibility – Students who have had their financial aid suspended will have their progress
reviewed at the end of each future semester until the standards of progress are met. To reestablish satisfactory status, the
student must meet all GPA (qualitative) and maximum timeframe/pace (quantitative) standards in this policy or
successfully meet the standards in the student’s Academic Performance Improvement Plan. Aid granted after
reinstatement would begin the next semester of enrollment following reinstatement and will be based on funds available
at that time.
Refunds for Recipients of Federal Financial Aid
As prescribed by law and regulation, Federal Title IV funds will be returned to the applicable sources in the following order:
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, Federal Direct Plus Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Federal
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), other Title IV Aid Programs, other federal sources of aid, state sources of
aid. Examples of this refund policy are available at the financial aid offices on each campus.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
20
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
A Northwood University Undergraduate Degree
The Northwood University Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree delivers contemporary business theory coupled with
practical application. In addition, ample cross-major experiential learning opportunities enhance and solidify classroom activities
while providing students with leadership skill-building experiences. Required general education courses present an intellectual
understanding of society and culture.
•
Academic major program and major concentration program requirements consist of a minimum of 24 semester hours within the
designated major or major and concentration. Nine major credit hours must be completed at Northwood.
•
Students can choose to complete additional majors. Those who desire to complete a second major should see an Academic
Advisor for assistance as additional coursework will be required.
•
A minor is 18 or more credit hours in a defined discipline and includes a six-credit residency requirement. Courses from the
business core, general education core, and electives may be counted toward completion of the requirements, with at least onehalf the minor credits being at the 3000/4000 level.
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) Degree Requirements
The BBA degree requires a minimum of 123 semester credit hours. Thirty-one semester credits must be earned at Northwood. A 2.0
cumulative grade point average overall is required.
Northwood University Degrees/Majors
Northwood University offers a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree at the undergraduate level on the residential
campuses, over 20 Adult Degree Program (ADP) Centers in eight states, five International Program Centers, and online. A Master
of Business Administration (MBA) degree is offered on the residential campuses and at other locations. The Master of Science in
Organizational Leadership is offered online. Not all majors are offered at all locations. The Associate of Arts general education and
business core requirements provide the basis for a Bachelor of Business Administration degree and is appropriate for students who
may be required to enroll in an Associate of Arts program to realize scholarship, employment or reimbursement opportunities.
MAJORS (FLORIDA, MICHIGAN & ADP SITES)
Accounting
Advertising & Marketing
Aftermarket Management
Automotive Marketing & Management
Computer Information Management
Economics
Entertainment, Sport & Promotion Management
Entrepreneurship
Fashion Marketing & Management
Finance
Franchising Management
Health Care Management
Hospitality Management
Innovation Marketing & Management
Insurance Risk Management
International Business
Management
Management Information Systems
Maritime Business & Management
Marketing
Operations & Supply Chain Management
Sustainability Management
CAMPUS
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online (transfers)
FL, MI
FL, MI
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI
MI
MI
FL, MI, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, Online
FL, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, ADP, Online
FL, MI, Online
Students may choose one or combine any two of the undergraduate majors above and may earn a single or double major in four years. Ask
your admissions representative or academic advisor for details and requirements.
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
21
Not all online majors are available in all states. Students are encouraged to check with their admissions representative about whether a
specific online major is available in their state.
MAJORS (FLORIDA, MICHIGAN & ADP SITES)
Four Year BBA/MBA Program
CAMPUS
FL, MI, TX
MAJORS (TEXAS)
Accounting
Management
Marketing
MINORS
Minors are offered in all major fields. Some minors may require specific coursework.
DEVOS GRADUATE SCHOOL (Florida, Michigan, Texas)
Master of Business Administration (12-Month Accelerated; 24-Month Traditional, Evening or Weekend; 24-Month Executive)
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership
General Education
Northwood University’s general education courses are a foundation of the University’s twelve outcomes and attributes for its
graduates. Our graduates communicate effectively in speech and writing; understand complex global issues; can explain their
personal values; understand the aesthetic, creative, and spiritual elements of life; are skilled at detecting and solving problems; and
are effective self-evaluators. Through the general education core, students gain exposure to a wide range of subjects in the
behavioral and social sciences (psychology and history, for example); English, economics, philosophy, and other humanities
subjects; and mathematics and the natural sciences.
Through the general education core, students will:
•
•
•
•
•
Build strong communication skills.
Develop essential quantitative skills.
Enhance their ability to find information, think critically, and solve problems.
Broaden their perspective of cultures within the U.S. and globally.
Explore interests outside their major.
Northwood University’s general education curriculum provides the knowledge and skills necessary to excel as a business
professional and leader.
General Education Core Courses:
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ENG 1150 Composition I
ENG 1200 Composition II
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal Relations or Advanced Studies in English or Language Elective
HIS 2100 Foundations of Modern World I
HIS 2150 Foundations of Modern World II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications or MIS 1600 Advanced Office Applications
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150 College Algebra
MTH 2310 Statistics I
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
PHL 3100 Ethics
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
PSC 2010 Intro to American Government
SPC 2050 Speech
3000/4000 Level NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 Level PSY or SOC Elective
3000/4000 Level HUM Elective
3000/4000 Level Elective – Civic Literacy
3000/4000 Level Elective – Global Understanding
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
22
Business Core
All undergraduate students take the business core which, in addition to the general education core, provides a foundation of the
University’s 12 outcomes for its graduates. These courses provide students with the common body of knowledge needed for
creative and responsible citizenship and leadership roles in business and society, domestic and worldwide.
Through the business core, students will:
•
•
Develop a fundamental knowledge of the principles of the essential business disciplines of accounting, finance, management,
and marketing.
Build a practical understanding of the dynamic business environment and successful adaptation to organizational and
industry changes as a business professional.
Business Core Courses:
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial Accounting
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law
3000/4000 Business Elective
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
Major Core
All students must choose an academic major or a major concentration which comprises a minimum of 24 hours in a specific
discipline. Faculty who have appropriate credentials and related industry experience provide a theoretical as well as practical
approach to major courses. Students are engaged in classes in their majors from their first semester at Northwood University.
Honors Program
The Northwood University Honors Program’s general academic mission is to emphasize critical analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
of course content. Its professional mission is to provide a more comprehensive exploration of disciplines used within various
professions. The Honors Program enhances personal growth by creating a community of likeminded students dedicated to
maximizing the value of their education.
The Honors Program began in Fall 1991. In it, honors sections of a variety of courses are offered. Faculty members are carefully
selected for their expertise and their creative use of teaching resources, materials, and innovative teaching strategies. Honors
course offerings will generally apply to all majors and will not extend the time required to complete a Northwood degree.
However, the character and course offerings of the Honors Program do vary on each campus.
Honors courses offer an enhanced range and depth of study through increased quality of work, not quantity of work. Honors
courses are also characterized by enhanced discipline-specific and interdisciplinary combinations of the following traits:
•
•
•
•
Critical thinking skills—emphasizing reasoning and synthesis, evaluating credibility, intellectual curiosity, consideration of
alternatives
Discipline-specific/general research skills—stressing independent research and learning, utilizing primary and secondary
sources, originality in research and writing
Variation in learning experiences—encouraging collaborative learning, out-of-classroom experiences, frequent studentfaculty interaction, and discussion-based learning
Limited size—honors courses are capped at an enrollment of 20, allowing greater faculty-student interaction, participation
and discussion, and encouraging self-directed learning.
Qualifications – See the Northwood University website for Honors Program qualifications.
Honors Scholarship – Honors students who have completed 15 or more semester credit hours in honors courses at Northwood
University may apply for honors admission to either Semester in Asia or Semester in Europe. Honors admission automatically
provides a scholarship that adjusts the study abroad program fee to the fee level students would otherwise pay for the combination
of residential tuition, fees, and room and board on the Northwood campus they attend. Scholarship amounts will be adjusted in
proportion to the individual program fees. The Honors scholarship may only be used once. Students cannot receive multiple honors
scholarships for study abroad.
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
23
Honors Program Participation and Recognition – Honors students can participate in honors courses at three levels and earn three
types of recognition. All honors courses are designated on the student’s academic transcript, as is successful completion of an
Honors Certificate or Honors Diploma.
•
Any student enrolled in an honors class is an Honors Participant. Students may do this as long as they meet the minimum
requirements for enrollment in the program
•
Any student who successfully completes 12 semester credit hours of honors courses in certain categories will have completed
the Honors Certificate.
•
Any student who successfully completes 24 semester hours of honors courses in certain categories will have completed the
Honors Diploma.
The Honors Certificate and Honors Diploma (available only on the Michigan campus at this time) require the completion of a BBA
degree with cumulative grade point of 3.25. For details see the Northwood University website.
More information about the Honors Program is available from the Director of the Honors Program on the Michigan campus, or
from the Academic Dean’s office on the Florida campus.
Study Abroad Programs
Making a decision to explore the world beyond the borders of your home country is an important step for any student. Study abroad
is an experience that will enrich students personally, professionally, and academically, and is something that no amount of
classroom experience can simulate or replace. Study abroad helps students develop a higher level of maturity and self-confidence,
and can also help students better appreciate other cultures, make lasting global friendships, understand historical events, and
develop a greater awareness of global business and enterprise.
Northwood University is committed to offering a number of faculty led group study abroad opportunities to its students. Groups of
10 to 30 students typically participate in individual study abroad programs. The University currently offers two extended study
abroad programs: Semester in Europe and Semester in Asia. In addition, a variety of short-term study abroad programs in Europe,
Asia, and Latin America occur annually, on a biennial, or one-time, basis. Information on all study abroad programs is available on
the University’s website.
All study abroad programs carry academic credit. Academic credit for study abroad programs entails participation in the travel
period and class work may include written papers, oral reports, daily journals, research projects, group projects, quizzes, and
written exams both before and after the travel period. The subject matter of academic credit varies according to the expertise and
experience of the faculty leader and nature of the study abroad program.
It is very important that students who are interested in a study abroad experience to consult with an academic advisor early in their
Northwood years to determine how and when academic credit associated with study abroad programs can most appropriately fit
within their curriculum.
General Eligibility Guidelines for Study Abroad Programs
1.
Successful completion of at least 30 semester credit hours at Northwood University or, for transfer students, completion of the
equivalent 30 semester credit hours and at least one semester at Northwood University. Students typically apply for study
abroad programs as juniors or seniors.
2.
Fulfillment of any course prerequisites for academic credit associated with study abroad programs.
3.
A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 (4.0 scale). Individual programs may establish higher cumulative GPA requirements.
Students on academic probation are not eligible for study abroad programs. Note: If a student is in good academic standing
when he or she applies for study abroad, but is placed on academic probation between the time of acceptance into the program
and the starting date of the specific program, the student becomes ineligible to participate in study abroad.
4.
Individual programs may establish additional eligibility requirements.
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
24
Honors Scholarship for Study Abroad Programs
Honors students who have completed 15 or more credit hours in honors courses at Northwood University may apply for honors
admission to either Semester in Asia or Semester in Europe. Honors admission automatically provides a scholarship that adjusts
the study abroad program fee to the fee level students would otherwise pay for the combination of residential tuition, fees, room and
board on the Northwood campus they attend. Scholarship amounts will be adjusted in proportion to the individual program fees.
The honors scholarship may only be used once. Students cannot receive multiple honors scholarships for study abroad.
Semester-Length Study Abroad Programs
Semester in Asia – Students study and travel in Southeast Asia for a five to six week summer program. Students may earn 3-15
credits. Formal classes are supplemented by study tours, industry and cultural visits, and opportunities to meet with students and
industry leaders from host countries such as Thailand, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Students are typically expected to complete
academic class work prior to and after the travel period. Admission to the program is competitive. Semester in Asia is typically
offered in the summer.
Semester in Europe – Students study and travel in western and central Europe for an eight to ten week program. Students earn 15
credits. Formal classes are supplemented by study tours, industry and cultural visits, and opportunities to meet with students and
industry leaders from host countries such as France, Germany, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Austria, and Hungary. Students will
complete academic class work prior to and after the travel period. Admission to the program is competitive. Semester in Europe is
typically offered in the fall semester.
Short-Term Study Abroad Programs
Several short-term study abroad programs are also available for students. Students earn three (3) credits. The travel portion of these
programs typically lasts from one to two weeks, and some programs are adaptations of the compressed courses or compressed
sessions held between regular semesters or during summer sessions. In the past, Northwood faculty have led short-term programs to
locations as varied as Argentina, Australia, the Czech Republic, China, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, France, Germany,
Ireland, Mexico, Romania, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Short-term programs require a series of on-campus formal class
meetings and orientation sessions prior to the onset of travel. Students are typically expected to complete academic class work prior
to and after the travel period.
Exchange Programs
An exchange program is one in which colleges and universities agree to exchange students over a specified period of time. Students
who participate in exchange programs travel to the foreign institution— known as the host institution—to study and live for a
specified period of time, usually a semester or a year, and transfer the academic credit back to their home institution. In exchange,
students from the foreign host institution come to the home institution for a period up to one year. Northwood University has
exchange agreements with colleges and universities in France, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Malaysia, Romania, Serbia,
and the Dominican Republic. Northwood University also offers one way exchange program where NU students will study at our
partner universities in London, Florence, and Rome. Information on all exchange programs is available on Northwood’s website
and through the International Programs Office.
Unlike group study abroad programs, where a group of Northwood University students travel together with a faculty member,
individual exchange students apply directly to the host institution through the International Programs office. Participation in an
exchange program allows not just for study at a foreign institution, but also for a deeper cultural immersion. Students who
participate in exchange programs invariably return to the U.S. with a profound appreciation for the richness and diversity of other
cultures and customs. Students also develop a higher level of intellectual and emotional maturity and often new language and
interpersonal skills.
Like study abroad, all exchange programs carry academic credit. It is very important that students who are interested in exchange
programs consult with an academic advisor early in their Northwood years to determine how and when academic credit transferred
from host institutions can most appropriately fit within their curriculum.
General Eligibility Guidelines for Exchange Programs
Most host institutions will assume that students have completed basic coursework in areas like English, Computer Science,
Mathematics, Economics, Accounting, Management, and Marketing before participating in an exchange program. Thus, the
eligibility standards for exchange programs are different than for group study abroad programs.
1.
Successful completion of at least 60 semester hours at Northwood University, or, for transfer students, successful completion of
the equivalent of 60 semester hours and at least one semester at Northwood University. Students typically apply for exchange
programs as juniors or seniors.
DEGREE PROGRAM INFORMATION
25
2.
Fulfillment of all course prerequisites for academic credit offered within exchange programs.
3.
A cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 (4.0 scale). Students on academic probation are not eligible for exchange programs. Note:
Students must be in good academic standing during the program itself. If students are in good standing when they apply for
exchange programs, but are put on academic probation between the time of application and the starting date of the program, the
student becomes ineligible to participate in the exchange.
4.
Specific exchange programs may have additional eligibility requirements (these will be noted in the host institution’s application
and information).
Students who wish to participate in exchange programs must have a written recommendation from Northwood University to the host
institution and must coordinate their application through the International Programs Office.
CURRICULUM GUIDES
Curriculum guides are student completion guides for bachelor degree programs. The official curriculum guides for each campus and
catalog year are available from admissions and academic offices at each campus or location. To fulfill graduation requirements, students
are required to complete the curriculum guide that is in effect at the time they are admitted to the University. However, if a student has
stopped attending Northwood for a period of 5 years or more, upon readmission to the University, the student’s transcript will be
reevaluated on the program requirements currently in force.
The student may be responsible for taking additional course work if requirements have changed significantly.
Northwood University is devoted to continuous improvement of all programs and reserves the right to revise all curriculum guides or
academic programs. These enhancements could cause changes in students’ programs of study.
The Curriculum Guides in this catalog reflect what is correct at the time of publication. Each curriculum guide pertains to all locations
unless otherwise designated. Students should obtain a date-specific curriculum guide from their campus Registrar or Academic Office.
CURRICULUM GUIDES
26
Accounting (FL, MI, ADP)
The Accounting program prepares students for the field of accounting and prepares graduates to sit for the CPA examination in
most states, and to begin a career in public or corporate accounting.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FLORIDA AND MICHIGAN CAMPUSES:
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
MIS 1600 Advanced Office Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ENG 1150 Composition I
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ENG 1200 Composition II
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
3000/4000 HUM Elective
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
ACC 3110 Intermediate Accounting I
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3210 Financial Management
LAW 3025 Business Law I
3000/4000 Elective
ACC 3120 Managerial/Cost Accounting
ACC 3400 Federal Taxation
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ACC 3115 Intermediate Accounting II
SPRING
3000/4000 Business Elective (MI) or
LAW 3050 Business Law II (FL)
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
ACC 3500 Accounting Information Systems
ACC Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
ACC 4010 Auditing
ACC 4220 Advanced Accounting
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
ACC 4080 Accounting Ethics
ACC 3000/4000 Elective
3
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
30
123
27
Accounting (TX)
The Accounting program prepares students for the field of accounting and prepares graduates to sit for the CPA
examination in most states, and to begin a career in public or corporate accounting. The following curriculum guide
applies to Texas students who began their studies in the traditional program before the 2014-2015 academic year.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or
minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1600 Advanced Office Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
3000/4000 Humanities - Fine Arts Elective
HIS 2160 Foundations of the Modern World
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Intro. to American Government
ACC 3110 Intermediate Accounting I
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1150 College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
MIS 1200 Introduction to Programming
Languages
HIS 2175 History of the United States
of America
SPC 2050 Speech Communication
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ACC 3115 Intermediate Accounting II
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3210 Financial Management for Majors
LAW 3025 Law for Accounting Majors
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
ACC 3120 Managerial/Cost Accounting
Accounting Elective
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
ACC 3400 Federal Taxation
ACC 3500 Accounting Information Systems
3000/4000 Natural Science Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
Accounting Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Adv. Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
ACC 4080 Accounting Ethics
ACC 4220 Advanced Accounting
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
ACC 4010 Auditing
ACC 4070 Federal Tax Research
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
30
123
28
Advertising & Marketing
The Advertising & Marketing program offers a unique curriculum. The curriculum provides overview of marketing research,
promotions, pricing, product development, and sales; along with the specific knowledge of advertising (creative or research teams
and/or account management) and provides the graduate with the skills necessary to direct, control, and supervise these functions.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ENG 1150 Composition I
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
LAW 3000 Business Law I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
ADV 2100 Adv. Sales & Media Planning
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
MTH 2310 Statistics I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
ADV 2310 New Media Strategies & Tactics
MKT 3050 Consumer Behavior
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
MKT 4230 Marketing Research
ADV 4100 Advertising Campaigns
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ADV 1100 Principles of Advertising
ADV 1110 Copywriting
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ADV 2150 Creative Process & Design
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
MTH 3340 Statistics II
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
ADV 4790 Current Issues in Advertising
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
3
1
30
123
29
Aftermarket Management
With an emphasis on value chain management, the Aftermarket Management program is a program covering all aspects
of the automotive and heavy-duty aftermarkets. Also included are specialties such as motor sports, classic vehicles, and
vehicle customization and restoration, to name a few. A wide variety of typical management roles, such as sales and
marketing, operations, finance, and supply chain management are available to our graduates throughout the entire
distribution chain consisting of manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling, and retailing.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (126
credits) including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an
additional major or minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
AMM 1100 Introduction to the Automotive
& Heavy Duty Aftermarket
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
AMM 2050 Automotive Retail/Wholesale
Management
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MKT 3350 Lean Distribution
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
AMM 1120 Aftermarket Manufacturing
Management
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
AMM 2100 Heavy Duty Parts & Service
Marketing
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
MKT 3450 Logistics
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
AMM 3990 Internship (Required)
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
AMM 4040 Aftermarket Field Sales Management
AMM 4120 Current Issues in Global Aftermarket
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
AMM 4130 Aftermarket Management Research
AMM 3500 Supply Chain Management
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
1
16
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
30
126
30
Automotive Marketing & Management
The Automotive Marketing and Management program focuses on the various aspects of the automotive marketing function
including dealership advertising, finance and insurance, budgeting and forecasting, parts and service, and used car management.
A computer simulation in which class members are challenged to rescue a troubled dealership is completed during the final
semester.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of course work (126 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
AM 1320 Role and Function of the American
Automobile Dealership
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
AM 2650 Dealership Fixed Operations
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
AM 3650 Dealership Legal Issues/Finance
& Insurance
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
AM 2640 Dealership Variable Operations
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
AM Elective
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
AM 3630 Dealership Accounting
FDN 3100 Career Development
AM 3990 Internship (required)
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
AM 4650 Dealership Financial Statement
AM Elective
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
AM 4670 Dealership General Management
or AM 4660 Dealership Management for
International Students
AM Elective
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
126
31
Economics
The Economics program focuses on important aspects of economic theory, philosophy, and application, including
courses in intermediate theory, development of economic thought, economic forecasting and research, and
monetary theory.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123
credits) including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an
additional major or minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
LAW 3000 Business Law I
MTH 3100 Calculus I
ECN 3310 Money & Banking
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
MTH 2310 Statistics
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
ECN 3010 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
3
3
3
3
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
ECN 4500 Introduction to Econometrics
ECN 4400 Austrian Economic Theory
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
MTH 3200 Calculus II
ECN 3510 Development of Economic
Thought
SPRING
3000/4000 Business Elective
MTH 3340 Statistics II or 3000/4000 NSC
or MTH Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
ECN 3020 Intermediate Macroeconomics
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
ECN 4890 Research Methods
ECN 4100 International Finance
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
30
123
32
Entertainment, Sport & Promotion Management
The Entertainment, Sport & Promotion Management program focuses on the national and global expansion of entertainment and
sport and its impact on cultural, social, and economic issues at regional, national, and international levels.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (127 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ESM 1010 Introduction to Sport &
Entertainment Management
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
ESM 3010 Sport & Entertainment Marketing
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ESM 1030 Sport & Entertainment
Communication & Public Relations
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ESM 2050 Sport & Entertainment Facility
& Event Management
SPRING
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
ESM Elective Tier 1 or Tier 2
FDN 3100 Career Development
ESM 3040 Practicum II (required)
ESM 3990 Internship (required)
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
3000/4000 Elective
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
ESM Elective Tier 1 or Tier 2
ESM 4040 Governance & Legal Aspects of
Sport & Entertainment
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
ESM 4300 Senior Seminar in Sport &
Entertainment
3
15
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
1
3
30
1
31
4
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
1
16
ESM 2040 Practicum I (recommended)
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
ESM 3520 Sales & Revenue Generation
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
ESM Tier 1 Elective
3
3
3
3
30
127
33
Entrepreneurship
The Entrepreneurship program focuses on business enterprise models and entrepreneurial bases. By combining a
rigorous academic curriculum, leadership development, experiential learning, and relationships with industry leaders,
graduates prepare to become tomorrow’s entrepreneurs.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (126
credits) including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an
additional major or minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ENG 1150 Composition I
ETR 1010 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
SPC 2050 Speech
ETR 1200 Successful Business Models
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ENG 1200 Composition II
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ETR 2010 Entrepreneurial Marketing
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
FIN 3010 Financial Management
ETR 2200 Entrepreneurship Distribution
Strategies
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
ETR 3010 New Venture Finance
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
ETR 3300 Business Plan Development
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
ETR 3990 Internship (Required)
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communications & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
ETR Elective
ETR 4010 Risk Analysis & Sources of Capital
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
ETR Elective
ETR 4200 New Venture Business Case
Senior Project
3
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
30
126
34
Fashion Marketing & Management
The Fashion Marketing & Management (FMM) program focuses on the highly complex world of fashion marketing. Fashion
courses include textiles, fashion promotions, history of fashion, buying, theory and practice, and apparel analysis. The program
includes a career-related externship.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (126 semester credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
FMM 1010 Introduction to Fashion
Merchandising
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
FMM 2010 Fashion Promotions & Visual
Merchandising
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
FMM 3020 History of Fashion
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MKT 2010 Principles of Selling
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
FMM 2050 Textiles
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
FMM 3110 Apparel Analysis
FDN 3100 Career Development
FMM 3990 Internship (required)
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
FMM 4030 Merchandise Buying
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Business Elective
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
FMM 4120 Theories & Practice of Fashion
Merchandising
3000/4000 Business Elective
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
30
126
35
Franchising Management
The Franchising Management program focuses on course work designed to prepare graduates for careers in the multi-trillion
dollar industry of franchising. As the only undergraduate program providing a major in franchising management in North
America, students build relationships with industry leaders, receive experiential learning opportunities and are prepared to make a
difference in the industry. Whether students are interested in becoming franchisees, working for franchisors, or launching their
own franchise concept, the program prepares students to go business for themselves, but not by themselves.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 semester credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
FRA 1010 Principles of Franchising
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR – FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ETR 2010 Entrepreneurial Marketing
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
FRA 3000 Legal and Compliance Issues
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
LAW 3500 Commercial and Real Estate Law
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
FRA 4100 International Franchising
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Elective
SPRING
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ENG 1200 Composition II
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ETR 1200 Successful Business Models
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
SPRING
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
MKT 2010 Principles of Selling
LAW 3000 Business Law I
SPRING
3000/4000 Humanities Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
ETR 3010 New Venture Finance
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
FRA 4200 Current Issues and Trends in
Franchising
3000/4000 Elective
3
3
3
3
3
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
15
30
123
CURRICULUM GUIDES
36
Finance
The Finance program focuses on course work designed to place graduates in financial service industry careers. Specialty
areas include securities, banking, insurance, credit, trusts, taxes, and financial advising. Graduates are prepared to sit for
the Series 7 Examination.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or
minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1600 Advanced Office Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
FIN 1010 Introduction to Finance
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3210 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
FIN 3750 Capital Markets & Analysis
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
FIN 4100 Chartered Financial Analyst Topics or
FIN 4150 Certified Financial Planner Topics
FIN 4550 Corporate Investment Decisions
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Algebra or
MTH 1150 College Algebra (or Calculus)
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
SPC 2050 Speech Communications
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
MTH Elective
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
FIN 2600 Financial Institutions &
Simulation
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
FIN 3600 Real Estate Finance & Analysis
FIN 3760 Applied Financial Analysis &
Portfolio Management
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
FIN 4010 International Finance
FIN 4850 Corporate Financing
Decisions & Valuation
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
30
123
37
Health Care Management
The Health Care Management program provides a comprehensive approach to management in the health care industry. The broad
areas of study include cultural and organizational behavior, human resources and business management. Students in the program
acquire knowledge and skills with a strong focus on critical health care topics including finance, budgeting, accounting,
marketing, legal and ethical issues. This program provides strong emphasis on the development of leadership skills necessary to
manage effectively in professional health care environments.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
HCM 1010 Introduction to Health Care Mgt.
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ENG 1150 Composition I
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
HCM 2010 Economics of Health Care
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
HCM 4030 Marketing Management for Health
Care Industry
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 HUM Elective
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
Health Care Management Elective
SPRING
HCM 3000 Health Care Accounting,
Budgeting & Financial Management
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Elective
HCM 4060 Industry Trends in Health Care
Management
3
1
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
16
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
HCM 4010 Health Care Quality Management
3000/4000 Elective
SPRING
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
HCM 3030 Human Resource Management for
the Health Care Industry
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
30
123
38
Hospitality Management
The Hospitality Management (HOS) program [formerly Hotel, Restaurant, and Resort Management (HRM)] focuses on
the largest components of the highly competitive service economy. Hospitality Management courses include facilities
engineering, food and beverage management, human resource management, and current hospitality industry issues. The
program includes a career-related internship.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (128 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or
minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
HOS 1010 Introduction to Hospitality
Management
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
HOS 2050 Food and Beverage Management
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Math or
MTH 1150 College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
HOS 1030 Sanitation
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
HOS 2100 Facilities Engineering
HRM 2040 Practicum I (required)
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
HOS 3050 Hospitality Operations
Management
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
HOS 3100 Resort and Club Management
FDN 3100 Career Development
HRM 3040 Practicum II (required)
HRM 3990 Internship (required)
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
HOS 4100 Human Resource Applications
HOS 4050 Cost and Budgeting (MI) or
HOS 4150 International Tourism (FL)
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
HOS 4180 Special Events & Meeting
Planning
HOS 4500 Current Issues in the
Hospitality Industry
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
1
30
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
1
3
31
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
30
128
39
Insurance Risk Management
The Insurance Risk Management program focuses on insurance and its application as a career path. Courses include
principles of insurance, agency operations, claims, underwriting, proposals, insurance code, and actuarial science. The
Insurance Risk Management major prepares students to enter the insurance industry. A career-related internship is
highly recommended.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (124
credits) including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an
additional major or minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
INS 1100 Principles of Insurance
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MKT 2010 Principles of Selling
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
INS 2100 Principles of Commercial Insurance
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1600 Advanced Office Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
INS 1200 Principles of Personal Insurance
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
INS 2500 Claims and Underwriting
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3
3
3
3
3
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3210 Financial Management for Majors
INS 3000 Agency Operations
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
MGT 3500 Operations Management
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
3000/4000 Humanities Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
INS 3500 Actuarial Science
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies
in English or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Elective
FIN 4550 Corporate Investment Decisions
INS 3100 State Insurance Code
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Elective
INS 4850 Insurance Proposals and Negotiations
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
32
31
124
40
Innovation Marketing & Management
The Innovation Marketing & Management program focuses on courses and hand-on projects that will train students to implement
new products in different markets and how to operate when business environments are changing. The graduates of this major will
have a competitive advantage in jobs involving start-up companies, venture capital investments and with companies that want to
change their business directions.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
IMM 1100 Foundations of Innovation
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
ENG 1200 Composition II
ETR 2010 Entrepreneurial Marketing
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ETR 1200 Successful Business Models
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
3000/4000 Business Elective
HUM 3100 Creativity
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 4240 Marketing Management
NSC 4060 Science and Technology
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
IMM 3200 Innovation Processes
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ETR 4010 Risk Analysis & Sources of Capital
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
IMM 41110 Ideas to Market Project I
NSC 3200 Understanding Biotechnology
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
IMM 4210 Ideas to Market Projects II
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
32
15
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
MKT 4230 Marketing Research
IMM 3050 Demographic Data Mining
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
3
3
3
3
3
1
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
123
41
International Business
International Business is an interdisciplinary program that focuses on the emerging global business environment. International
business courses include trade, finance, law, marketing, management, culture, world geography, and comparative economic
systems.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
INB 1100 Introduction to International
Business
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
Foreign Language I
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
Foreign Language III
ECN 3000 International Trade
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
LAW 4050 International Law
MGT 4030 International Management
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
SPC 2050 Speech
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
ECN 3410 Comparative Economic Systems
Foreign Language II
SPRING
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
Foreign Language IV
MKT 3100 International Marketing
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
FIN 4010 International Finance
3000/4000 Elective
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
30
123
42
Management (FL, MI, ADP)
The bachelor’s program in Management focuses on the broad functional disciplines of management and prepares
graduates with a diverse background in general management and industry who have developed strong ethics, outcomes,
and who are ready to lead.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or
minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
Elective
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
MGT 2500 Human Resource Management
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MGT 3500 Operations Management
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
Elective
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
Elective
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
MGT 3700 Practice of Management &
Leadership
FDN 3100 Career Development
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Elective
MGT 4300 Management of Information
Technologies
CURRICULUM GUIDES
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies
in English or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Elective
MGT 4030 International Management
3
3
3
3
3
1
30
123
43
Management (TX)
The bachelor’s program in Management focuses on the broad functional disciplines of management and prepares graduates with a
diverse background in general management and industry who have developed strong ethics, outcomes, and who are ready to lead.
The following curriculum guide applies to Texas students who began their studies in the traditional program before the 2014-2015
academic year.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
Elective
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1150 College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MIS 1200 Introduction to Programming
Languages
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2160 Foundations of the Modern World
MTH 2310 Statistics I
Elective
MGT 2500 Human Resource Management
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2175 History of the United States of America
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
MGT 3500 Operations Management
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Humanities - Fine Arts Elective
MGT 4300 Management of Information
Technologies
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
SPC 2050 Speech Communication
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 SOC or PSY Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
MGT 3700 Practice of Management and
Leadership
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Natural Science Elective
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Elective
MGT 4030 International Management
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
30
123
44
Management Information Systems
The Management Information Systems (MIS) program focused on the application of information technology to support business
activities and a host of business management courses that help students build their management potential. As a global economy,
there is a growing demand for graduates who have the analytical skills and business background to make business processes more
productive. MIS students learn to analyze organizational information needs, and then design a computer-based system to meet
these needs, and finally, direct the implementation and operation of the system.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MIS 1600 Advanced Office Applications
MIS 1110 Introduction to Management
Information Systems
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
MIS 2140 Business Applications Programming
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MIS 3300 Project Management
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
MIS 4110 Systems Project I
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MIS 1800 Collaboration and Web Programming
MIS 1300 Information Technology Infrastructure
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
MTH 2310 Statistics I
MIS 2150 Business Applications
Programming II
SPRING
3000/4000 Business Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
MIS 3250 ERP Business Applications - SAP
MIS 3400 Systems Analysis & Design
FDN 3100 Career Development
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Elective
MIS 4210 Systems Project II
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
3
1
30
123
45
Maritime Business & Management – Port and Terminal Management Track
The Maritime Business & Management (MBM) program is designed to offer the marketplace uniquely trained management
professionals who can meet the increasing demands for qualified marine operations managers and entrepreneurs who understand
the complex and interrelated fields of port management, marine shipping, passenger and related industries, and the recreational
marine management industries. The Port and Terminal Management track prepares students for positions in port operations,
logistics, port safety and security, finance, human resources, marketing and sales, and government relations. The program
includes two career-related internships.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (129 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
MBM 1010 Introduction to Maritime Industries
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
MBM 2010 Port and Terminal Management I
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
MBM 1000 Maritime Terminology and Basic
Ship Design
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
MBM 2100 Maritime Regulations I
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
SPC 2050 Speech
MBM 2990 Maritime Business & Mgt. Internship I
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
MBM 3100 Maritime Regulations II
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MBM 3010 Port and Terminal Management II
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MBM 3110 Port and Terminal Cargo Operations
MBM 3210 Port and Terminal Passenger
Operations
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
3000/4000 Elective
MBM 3990 Maritime Business & Mgt. Internship II
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
MBM 3600 Maritime Logistics and Supply Chain
Management
FIN 4200 Economics and Finance of Port and
Terminal Operations
FDN 3100 Career Development
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
MBM 4110 Port and Terminal Design and
Planning
MBM 4210 Security and Risk Management for
Port Terminals
3
1
16
33
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
31
129
46
Maritime Business & Management – Operations and Fleet Management Track
The Maritime Business & Management (MBM) program is designed to offer the marketplace uniquely trained management
professionals who can meet the increasing demands for qualified marine operations managers and entrepreneurs who understand
the complex and interrelated fields of port management, marine shipping, passenger and related industries, and the recreational
marine management industries. The Operations and Fleet Management track allows students to focus on logistics and supply
chain, cargo operations, fleet management, trade and sales agreements, marketing, human resources, finance, and government
relations as well as the offshore oil and gas industry. The program includes two career-related internships.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (129 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
MBM 1010 Introduction to Maritime Industries
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
MBM 1000 Maritime Terminology and Basic
Ship Design
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
MBM 2100 Maritime Regulations I
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
MBM 2030 Ship Design and Construction
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
MBM 2130 Fleet and Vessel Operations and
Management
MBM 2990 Maritime Business & Mgt. Internship I
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
MBM 3100 Maritime Regulations II
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MBM 3130 Maritime Risk, Safety and Security
Management
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MBM 3000 Elective
MBM 3600 Maritime Logistics and Supply Chain
Management
PHL 3100 Ethics
SPC 2050 Speech
3000/4000 Elective
MBM 3990 Maritime Business & Mgt. Internship II
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
MBM 4130 Fleet and Vessel Cargo Operations
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
MBM 4230 Fleet and Vessel Passenger
Operations
MBM 4330 Fleet and Vessel Maintenance and
Repair
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
33
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
3
3
31
129
47
Maritime Business & Management – Recreational Marine Industries Track
The Maritime Business & Management (MBM) program is designed to offer the marketplace uniquely trained management
professionals who can meet the increasing demands for qualified marine operations managers and entrepreneurs who understand
the complex and interrelated fields of port management, marine shipping, passenger and related industries, and the recreational
marine management industries. The Recreational Marine Industries track prepares students for management and operations
positions in retail, sales, repair and refit, manufacturing, marketing, human resources, client relations, finance and entrepreneurial
ventures. The program includes two career-related internships.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (129 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
MBM 1000 Maritime Terminology and Basic
Ship Design
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MKT 2010 Principles of Selling
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
MBM 2050 Boat and Yacht Sales, Brokerage, and
Marine Surveying
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
MBM 1100 Marine Recreation and Small
Commercial Watercraft
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
MBM 2150 Boat Management and Marine
Maintenance
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
SPC 2050 Speech
MBM 2990 Maritime Business & Mgt Internship I
SPRING
MBM 2100 Maritime Regulations I
FIN 3310 Economics and Finance in the
Recreational Marine Industry
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
3000/4000 Elective
MBM 3990 Maritime Business & Mgt Internship II
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
AMM 4100 Recreational Marine Industries
Aftermarket
3000/4000 Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
3
3
3
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
HOS 4400 Marine Tourism Management
MBM 3000/4000 Elective
3
3
1
16
32
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
33
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
1
16
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
MBM 3050 Marina Operations Management
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MTH 2310 Statistics I
3
3
3
3
31
129
48
Marketing (FL, MI, ADP)
The Marketing program focuses on the various aspects of the marketing function, including business-to-business marketing,
marketing research, integrated marketing, and marketing management. Students develop a marketing plan as a capstone
marketing project.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or
minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
ADV 1100 Principles of Advertising
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1100 Finite Math or
MTH 1150 College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of
Macroeconomics
MKT 2010 Principles of Selling
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of
Managerial Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech Communications
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
MKT 2200 Sales Management
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
MTH 2310 Statistics I
3000/4000 NSC or MTH Elective
3000/4000 HUM Elective
MKT 3000 E-Commerce
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
32
3
3
3
3
3
16
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding
Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
MKT 4240 Marketing Management
15
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
3
1
15
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
MTH 3340 Statistics II
MKT 3100 International Marketing
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Elective
MKT 4230 Marketing Research
3
16
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
LAW 3000 Business Law I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American Government
MKT 3050 Consumer Behavior
3
3
30
123
49
Marketing (TX)
The marketing major focuses on the various aspects of the marketing function, including business-to-business marketing,
marketing research, copywriting, and marketing management. Students develop a marketing plan as a capstone marketing
project. The following curriculum guide applies to Texas students who began their studies in the traditional program before
the 2014-2015 academic year.
Upon registering for classes, students will pick a major and a concentration. Each concentration has a four-year plan or
curriculum guide associated with it. See http://www.northwood.edu/tx/academics/ for curriculum guides for the specific
concentrations listed at the bottom of this guide. The curriculum guide acts as your plan of study. Academic advisors are
available to assist you with questions that arise regarding your degree path.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2010 Principles of Selling
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 1150 College Algebra
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MIS 1200 Introduction to Programming
Languages
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of
Financial Accounting
HIS 2160 Foundations of the Modern World
MTH 2310 Statistics I
MKT 2200 Sales Management
SPC 2050 Speech Communication
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MKT 3100 International Marketing
MKT 3000 E-Commerce
3000/4000 SOC or PSY Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 Natural Science Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Relations or Advanced Studies in
English or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3000/4000 Business Elective
MKT 4240 Marketing Management
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
3000/4000 Elective
MKT 4490 Advanced Marketing Strategies
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
32
3
16
15
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
1
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2175 History of the United States of
America
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
MKT 3050 Consumer Behavior
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
MKT 3450 Logistics
3000/4000 Humanities - Fine Arts Elective
MKT 4220 Marketing Research Seminar
3
3
3
3
30
123
50
Operations and Supply Chain Management
Operations and Supply Chain Management is a key element in the improvement of productivity in business around the globe.
This program emphasizes four of the most widely used elements of Operations and Supply Chain Management in business today.
They are supply chain management, Six Sigma, project management, and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). In the global
economy, there is a growing demand for graduates who have the analytical skill and business background to make business
processes more efficient and effective.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or minor
should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MIS 1600 Advanced Computer Applications
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra (ACT 24-28/MTH 0980)
OPS 1100 Introduction to Operations
Management
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
MTH 2310 Statistics I
OPS 1200 Business Process Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
ENG 1200 Composition II
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
OPS 2350 Statistics for Quality Engineering
3
3
3
3
3
16
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
MIS 3250 ERP Business Applications
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
3000/4000 Humanities Elective (HUM, ART,
LIT)
MTH 3340 Statistics II
OPS 3500 Purchasing
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
31
3
3
3
3
3
15
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
OPS 4500 Operations & Supply Chain
Management Capstone
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
SPRING
MGT 4300 Management of Information
Technologies
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
OPS 3600 Supply Chain Management
MIS 3300 Project Management
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Org. Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English
or Second Year Language Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
OPS 4100 Statistics for Continuous
Improvement
OPS 4200 Lean Six Sigma
3
3
3
3
3
1
30
123
51
Sustainability Management
The Sustainability Management program is designed to offer the marketplace uniquely trained management
professionals who can address the increasing demand for sustainability experts who understand the complex and
interrelated environmental issues intertwined in our global business, political and social environments. Students learn to
apply these skills in any area of business including service and hospitality, manufacturing, real estate, logistics, retail
services and general management.
The following guide outlines the suggested sequence for a student to complete four (4) years of coursework (123 credits)
including general education, business core, and major requirements. Students who want to pursue an additional major or
minor should consult with an academic advisor to determine the best education plan.
FRESHMAN YEAR - FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
ENG 1150 Composition I
MTH 1100 Finite Math or MTH 1150
College Algebra
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
NSC 1100 Introduction to Ecological Principles
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
ENG 1200 Composition II
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
NSC 2200 Current Topics in Environmental
Science
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
SPC 2050 Speech
LAW 2500 Environmental Regulation and
Public Policy
ECN 2700 Economics of Business Sustainability
15
JUNIOR YEAR - FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
LAW 3000 Business Law I
SUS 3010 Resource Management I
3000/4000 HUM Elective
3000/4000 Business Elective
3
3
3
3
3
SPRING
SUS 3020 Resource Management II
FIN 3700 Finance for Sustainability
3000/4000 PSY or SOC Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
3000/4000 Elective
FDN 3100 Career Development
15
SENIOR YEAR - FALL
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
ENG 4010 Communication & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies
in English or Language Elective
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
SUS 4100 Sustainable Urban Design &
Construction
SUS 4150 International Commerce &
Sustainability
3
3
3
3
SPRING
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
3000/4000 Civic Literacy Elective
4000 Sustainability Elective
SUS 4850 Capstone Project in Sustainability
Management
32
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
31
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
15
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
CURRICULUM GUIDES
3
1
16
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR - FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
MTH 2310 Statistics I
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
MGT 2400 Sustainable Enterprise Strategies
3
3
3
3
30
123
52
Four Year BBA/MBA Program
The Northwood University Four Year BBA/MBA Program is an intensive program of study that allows high-achieving and
focused students to complete their BBA degree in three years and their MBA degree in one additional year. The program
allows for and encourages students to participate in co-curricular programming such as varsity athletics, Greek life, business
clubs, and academic, service, and social organizations while at Northwood University. Students must apply to be accepted into
this accelerated program. Current admission criteria for the program are on the Northwood University website.
Multiple majors are available and can be viewed at http://www.northwood.edu/academics/four-year-bba-mba-program.aspx.
The Management curriculum guide is an illustration and students wishing to pursue this option must apply in advance for
acceptance. Information on this process is available from admissions representatives or academic advisors.
MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM:
FIRST YEAR FALL
MGT 2300 Principles of Management
MTH 1150 College Algebra or MTH 1100
Finite Math or MTH 3100 Calculus I
ENG 1150 Composition I
ECN 2210 Principles of Microeconomics
MIS 1050 Basic Computer Applications
MKT 2080 Principles of Marketing
FDN 1100 First Year Seminar I
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
SPRING
ECN 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics
ENG 1200 Composition II
MTH 2310 Statistics I
SPC 2050 Speech
NSC 2100 Environmental Science
PSC 2010 Introduction to American
Government
FDN 1200 First Year Seminar II
19
SECOND YEAR FALL
ACC 2410 Fundamentals of Financial
Accounting
HIS 2100 Foundations of the Modern World I
3000/4000 NSC/MTH Elective
3000/4000 Psychology or Sociology Elective
MGT 2500 Human Resource Management
3000/4000 Elective
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
19
SPRING
ACC 2415 Fundamentals of Managerial
Accounting
HIS 2150 Foundations of the Modern World II
MGT 3500 Operations Management
3000/4000 Elective
3000/4000 Elective
LAW 3000 Business Law I
FDN 3100 Career Development
18
SUMMER or COMPRESSED COURSES
3000/4000 Humanities Elective
PHL 3100 Ethics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
19
3
3
6
THIRD YEAR FALL
FIN 3010 Financial Management
3000/4000 Elective
MGT 4250 Organizational Behavior
3000/4000 Elective
MGT 3700 Practice of Mgt. & Leadership
PHL 4100 Philosophy of American Enterprise
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
SUMMER or COMPRESSED COURSES
ENG 4010 Communications & Interpersonal
Relations or Advanced Studies in English or
Language Elective
ECN 4010 Economics of Public Policy
SPRING
3000/4000 Elective
MGT 4800 Strategic Planning
3000/4000 Global Understanding Elective
MGT 4030 International Management
MGT 4300 Management of Information
Technology
3000/4000 Elective
SEMESTER HOURS TO GRADUATE
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
123
3
3
6
Notes:
•A maximum of 19 credits are to be taken in semester.
•Any courses taken in a compressed or summer session are in addition to the base tuition that the student pays for a semester.
CURRICULUM GUIDES
53
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
This section lists current descriptions for all undergraduate courses; the descriptions appear in alphabetical order according to their
course letter designations. These descriptions include any prerequisites (requirements students must satisfy before registering for
the course), co-requisites (requirements students must satisfy while taking the course), and the number of credit hours for each
course.
Students should be aware that the courses listed here are subject to change. Many courses are regularly offered in the fall, while
others are offered in the spring or summer. However, semester enrollment, course demand, changes in faculty, and other factors will
sometimes affect the offering of courses. In addition, new courses may have been added and changes in existing courses may have
occurred since the printing of this catalog. Not all courses are offered at every location. The curriculum guides for the various
academic programs detail the courses offered by semester at each location.
ACCOUNTING (ACC)
ACC 2410 FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Theory and practice of measuring and interpreting financial data for business units: basic concepts, principles, and procedures.
Financial statement preparation and analysis.
ACC 2415 FUNDAMENTALS OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Introduction to cost behavior, budgeting, responsibility accounting, cost control techniques, and product costing. Use of budgets
and methods of measuring performance.
Prerequisite: ACC 2410
ACC 3110 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 3 credits
The first of two intermediate accounting courses that describes accounting theory and principles for defining, measuring, and
reporting financial information with an emphasis on assets. Provides an opportunity to understand the challenges and limitations of
accounting standards in order to critically evaluate and understand financial accounting. This course requires the use of
spreadsheets for problem solving and analysis.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
ACC 3115 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 3 credits
The second of two intermediate accounting principles courses that describes accounting theory and principles for defining,
measuring, and reporting financial information with an emphasis on liabilities and equity. Additionally, accounting for
investments, leases, debt, and earnings per share will be considered. Provides an opportunity to understand the challenges and
limitations of accounting standards in order to critically evaluate and understand financial accounting. This course requires the use
of spreadsheets for problem solving and analysis.
Prerequisite: ACC 3110
ACC 3120 MANAGERIAL/COST ACCOUNTING 3 credits
The managerial use of accounting data to make business decisions, particularly in the areas of product cost, resource allocation,
performance evaluation, and on the accounting systems managers use to assist them in their decisions. Concepts relating to
manufacturing and service entities will be covered.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
ACC 3400 FEDERAL TAXATION 3 credits
Introduces a broad range of tax concepts and types of taxpayers; emphasizes the role of taxation in the business decision-making
process; provides opportunities to conduct basic tax research and tax planning; and requires preparation of basic tax returns.
Coverage includes professional standards and ethics; the interrelationship and differences between financial accounting and tax
accounting; taxation of individuals, corporations, and partnerships.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
ACC 3500 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 credits
A study of accounting information systems (AIS) tracing the capture of accounting data, processing of that data into information,
and reporting that information in various business environments. Areas of study include an introduction and discussion of the AIS
role in management decision making; internal controls for public and private enterprises, including computer and technology
controls; analysis of business processes and how they are integrated; and systems studies, including the analysis, design,
development, implementation, and operation of AIS.
Prerequisite: ACC 3110
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
54
ACC 3800 TAXATION OF INDIVIDUALS 3 credits
An in-depth study of individual taxation examining the tax rate structure and applicable federal tax laws, as well as determining
income, deductions, and tax credits for a variety of different scenarios.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
ACC 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in accounting. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
ACC 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours with an approved employer) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job experience. A
contracted and supervised work program is arranged between the student, employer, and the university to meet program objectives.
ACC 4010 AUDITING 3 credits
Fundamental procedures, principles, and philosophy of independent and internal auditing. Professional ethics, audit reports, audit
work papers, internal controls, evidence, proper disclosure, statistical sampling and testing, and general audit procedures are
emphasized. Other assurance and attestation services will be introduced, and the accountant’s professional obligations for all
attestation services will be discussed in view of the accountant’s liability to clients and third parties.
Prerequisite: ACC 3500
ACC 4040 GOVERNMENTAL AND NON-PROFIT ACCOUNTING 3 credits
This course is a comprehensive review of the accounting principles, reporting (including tax requirements), and procedures for
governmental units and not-for-profit entities. Topics covered include the study of the accounting cycle, budgeting, fund
accounting, accounting for state and local governments, accounting for colleges and universities, hospital units, voluntary health and
welfare organizations, and other not-for-profit entities. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board objectives of accounting
and financial reporting for governmental entities and not-for-profit entities will be examined.
Prerequisite: ACC 3115
ACC 4060 FRAUD EXAMINATION 3 credits
Defines fraud and examines the nature of those who commit fraud, how it is prevented, detected, and investigated, the different
types of fraud and their impact, and methods of resolution, legal and otherwise.
Prerequisite: ACC 4010
ACC 4070 FEDERAL TAX RESEARCH 3 credits
Students complete a series of case studies and exercises requiring the familiarization with the most important elements of Federal
Tax Law and utilize the Internal Revenue Code and other resources, such as online professional research sites. Students will gain
experience in locating, understanding, and interpreting source material and in communicating the results of their research.
Prerequisite: ACC 3400 or ACC 3800
ACC 4080 ACCOUNTING ETHICS 3 credits
Develops students’ understanding of the accountant as a financial watchdog for the investing public. This is done through
philosophical rigor and analysis of case studies. Students will explore the accounting profession’s ethical responsibilities, the
accountant’s role in corporate governance, and corporate codes of conduct. Recent examples of unethical corporate behavior are
examined and students offer prescriptions for preventing similar incidents. The course deliberately emphasizes the importance of
personal integrity for enabling professional ethical conduct.
Prerequisite: ACC 3115
ACC 4100 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS AND VALUATION 3 credits
This course focuses on users of financial statements and how these users evaluate and value a business based on financial
information available. The objective is to use various analytical tools as well as perform other quantitative and qualitative analyses
when making judgments concerning the financial condition of a company. Upon completion of this course a student should be
equipped with the skills necessary to analyze financial information for decision making.
Prerequisite: ACC 3115
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
55
ACC 4150 ESTATE PLANNING THEORY 3 credit
This course introduces fundamental tax, financial, and legal questions encountered in estate planning; provides an overview of
inter vivos planning in today’s changing environment; analyzes post mortem strategies and the administration of estates; and
covers planning for medical and health related issues and incapacitation. Emphasis is placed on various planning techniques used
in estate planning including the use of trusts and charitable planning.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415 and LAW 3000 or LAW 3025
ACC 4220 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Accounting for business combinations and consolidations, interim and segment reporting, accounting for foreign currency
transactions, the translation and re-measurement of foreign currency financial statements, and an introduction to governmental and
not-for-profit accounting.
Prerequisite: ACC 3115
ACC 4250 INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Course topics include the history and evolution of international accounting and the international standards used today. Students
compare and contrast various countries’ accounting standards and study the harmonization efforts and standards promulgated by the
International Accounting Standards Board. Current international accounting issues will be examined. The course will examine the
impact on the financial reporting environment of International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS), as well as its relationship to
U.S. GAAP.
Prerequisite: ACC 3115
ADVERTISING (ADV)
ADV 1100 PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 3 credits
An introduction to the principles of advertising and public relations as related to marketing and business management practices in
enterprise. In this course students will participate in a detailed study of the principle functioning groups of advertising
professionals: advertisers/clients, advertising agencies, advertising media, and advertising suppliers of special services such as
artists, photographers, talent, production suppliers, and research. Students will study how each group is interdependent and how
all are vital parts of the process of commercial marketing communications. Students will also gain an understanding and
appreciation of the roles of professionals in terms of strategies, tactics, execution, and results, as well as how advertising relates
to the public, government, and consumers. Additionally, the course will take a comprehensive and practical look at the nature,
scope, and use of public relations skills.
ADV 1110 ADVERTISING RESEARCH AND COPYWRITING 3 credits
Orients students to the purpose and role of research in making conceptual and creative recommendations. Included in this course are
the development and implementation of primary and secondary research to create effective copy for printed and electronic media.
This course takes an in-depth look at how research is used to build a strategy and how data are then used to create proper
messaging/copywriting for ads, commercials, and promotional materials. This is a writing course, therefore, students will write
advertising copy for various media. Students will also gain an orientation to the developmental steps of creative thinking, strategy,
and copywriting for ads, commercials, and promotion materials.
ADV 2100 ADVERTISING SALES AND MEDIA PLANNING 3 credits
Students examine various media available to the contemporary advertiser, including traditional media newspapers, magazines, outof-home, radio, television, direct mail, and new media opportunities in the constantly evolving digital environment, as well as
related initiatives such as viral marketing and guerrilla marketing. In addition to analysis of the message delivery platform, research
techniques that support message placement including primary and secondary research methodologies are examined as students
become familiar with construction of a media plan. Students will discover the relationship between financially accountable budget
planning and the media mix with the goal of reaching maximum communications objectives. Students will experience what it is like
to be on the other side of the table as they learn how to sell the various media outlets and media planning strategies to buyers.
ADV 2150 ADVERTISING CREATIVE PROCESS AND DESIGN 3 credits
An examination of the nature and importance and applications of the creative process, complemented by a series of exercises,
discussions, and exposure to a variety of stimuli organized and presented in such a way as to help each student maximize his/her
creative abilities at work, at home, and in the community. In this course students will analyze elements of an ad including layout,
fonts, color, casting, lighting, and images, and how these communicate with a target audience.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
56
ADV 2310 NEW MEDIA STRATEGIES AND TACTICS 3 credits
The advertising field today deals with communicating with a target audience through many other adverting vehicles rather than the
traditional print and broadcast. Guerilla marketing, the digital age of advertising, and interactive and viral advertising are now
considered mainstream media when communicating with a target audience. This course introduces students to the concepts and use
of new media including: viral marketing, digital media, guerilla marketing, social networking, and viral advertising. Through this
course students will learn forms of media and unconventional systems for communication/promotions that rely on time, energy, and
imagination rather than a big marketing budget.
Prerequisite: ADV 1100
ADV 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in advertising. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
ADV 4100 ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS 3 credits
Students will review historical and contemporary advertising and marketing communication campaigns, analyze consumer,
business-to-business, national, and local campaigns including volunteer, not-for-profit public service advertising. Students work in
team groups to create and present a completely integrated advertising campaign supporting and coordinating all strategy, creative,
media, and sales promotion aspects for final recommendation. Students on each team grade the work of their teammates within the
group. This is the capstone course of Northwood’s Advertising Program. This is a practical knowledge and hands-on course.
Prerequisites: ADV 1110 and ADV 2100
ADV 4790 CURRENT ISSUES IN ADVERTISING 3 credits
Examination of and discussion about major issues confronting the advertising industry—especially those issues being fueled by the
dramatic changes that are sweeping over business generally and the advertising industry specifically. This is a discussion-based
course that requires student to be aware of the changes happening daily in the industry.
AFTERMARKET MANAGEMENT (AMM)
AMM 1100 INTRODUCTION TO THE AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY DUTY AFTERMARKET 3 credits
Each step of the automotive and heavy duty aftermarket distribution system and interrelations of all segments from manufacturer to
consumer are explored. The course includes the aftermarket history, industry terminology, distribution
channels, sales organization, trade associations, the trade press, and aftermarket trends.
AMM 1120 AFTERMARKET MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT 3 credits
The aftermarket management manufacturing functions are examined including market planning, sales training and management,
advertising, selecting and directing employees, establishing and controlling budgets, executive responsibilities, managing for
profit, trade shows and clinics, market research, branding, remanufacturing, and manufacturer representative firms.
Prerequisite: AMM 1100
AMM 2050 AUTOMOTIVE RETAIL/WHOLESALE MANAGEMENT 3 credits
The organization, capitalization, layout, product lines, inventory control, purchasing, personnel, financial control, and other
management topics for the wholesale and retail segments of the automotive aftermarket are explored. Functions of consumeroriented marketing are looked at for all segments. Includes retail attitude, pricing and promotion, retail/ wholesale combinations,
identity and store image, influence of aesthetics and design, purchasing procedures, employee hiring and personnel management,
and merchandising and display.
Prerequisite: AMM 1100
AMM 2100 HEAVY DUTY PARTS AND SERVICE MARKETING 3 credits
The functions of each step of heavy duty aftermarket parts and service marketing and interrelations of all segments from
manufacturer to consumers are explored, including industry terminology, channels of distribution, financial implications and supply
chain marketing techniques, and aftermarket trends. The management of heavy duty aftermarket manufacturing is also examined,
including market planning, sales training, market research, branding, remanufacturing, and manufacturer representative firms. This
course also covers the function of the warehouse distributor within the automotive aftermarket.
Prerequisite: AMM 1100
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
57
AMM 3500 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Explores the principal concepts of supply chain management, including generation of requirements, sourcing, pricing, and postaward activities. The supply chain management philosophy includes all internal functions plus external suppliers involved in the
identification and fulfillment of needs for materials, equipment, and services. The course also covers basic principles and
philosophies of quality control and quality management, the concept of the extended enterprise, and the importance of establishing
the proper relationship with supplier companies. The basic three-tier supply chain typical of automotive manufacturing will be
examined in detail.
Prerequisite: MKT 3450
AMM 3600 LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Focuses on management of the flow of products from raw materials sourcing and acquisition through delivery to the final user.
Current topics include logistics and transportation planning, information technology, response-based strategies, third party logistics,
and relationship management. This course also covers the role of logistics and distribution in the marketing process.
Prerequisite: AMM 2050
AMM 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in aftermarket management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
AMM 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: AMM 2050 and faculty approval
AMM 4040 AFTERMARKET FIELD SALES MANAGEMENT 3 credits
The examination of the field sales manager’s job activities. Subjects include selling skills, expense management, time
management, merchandising/advertising plans, sales report writing/sales forecast plans, trade show management, and human
resource skills.
AMM 4100 RECREATIONAL MARINE INDUSTRIES AFTERMARKET 3 credits
The organization, capitalization, layout, product lines, inventory control, purchasing, personnel, financial control and
other management topics for the wholesale and retail segments of the recreational marine industries aftermarket are
explored. Functions of consumer-oriented marketing are looked at for all segments.
AMM 4120 CURRENT ISSUES IN GLOBAL AFTERMARKET 3 credits
A current issues study confronting the aftermarket with emphasis on the changing distribution channels and their effect on
manufacturing. Concepts included are traditional and retail distribution and how these changes will be managed in the multinational business environment.
AMM 4130 AFTERMARKET MANAGEMENT RESEARCH 3 credits
Individual research assignments and projects based on the establishment of a new, student-selected aftermarket business are
required, with instructor guidance and supplementary material provided. Includes location and business type, advertising,
merchandising and promotion, personnel requirements, pricing and inventory, building, design and layout, product and service
selection, and financial considerations.
Prerequisites: AMM 2050 and AMM 3500
ART (ART)
ART 3050 BEGINNING DRAWING 3 credits
Drawing fundamentals are explored through hands-on studio experience, introducing a variety of materials and mediums.
Techniques include contour drawing, sighting and modeling, creating three-dimensionality (shading, chiaroscuro), understanding
positive and negative space, creating texture, and mastering linear and aerial perspective. Elements of design and composition are
taught through exercises in still life, landscape, portraiture, and on-site drawing. Works of master artists will be presented along
with interaction with guest artists which will require some written work. Course may include various field trips to local sites.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
58
ART 3080 PAINTING 3 credits
The color wheel and impact of color choices will be explored exposing students to a working knowledge of color terminology;
primary, secondary and tertiary colors, while also introducing color scheme and theory. Analogous, complementary, neutral, and
monochromatic color concepts will be taught through hands-on painting experiences. Physical properties of color (hue, value,
intensity, tint, and tone) are discussed as well as the elements and principles of art (line, color, shape, pattern, rhythm, unity,
balance, and composition). The student will have opportunities to implement various paint and color techniques through multiple
exercises. Field trips to local studios and museums may be incorporated into the syllabus. Course may include various field trips to
local sites.
AUTOMOTIVE MARKETING & MANAGEMENT (AM)
AM 1320 ROLE AND FUNCTION OF THE AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE DEALERSHIP 3 credits
An introductory course for students in automotive marketing and management. Studies the role and function of the automobile
dealership by examining several key factors including the relationship between the manufacturers and their dealers, possible career
paths within the automotive industry, finding the right location, and facilities planning. Cash flow planning, vehicle floor planning,
and marketing topics will be discussed.
AM 2520 INDEPENDENT DEALERSHIP OPERATIONS 3 credits
Focuses on the non-franchise independent automobile dealer. These dealers are essential to the long-term survival of the American
automobile industry. The disposition of used vehicles is necessary to accommodate the sale of new vehicles and these dealers have
unique requirements that make them important organizations to study. Among the issues that this class will consider are the role of
sales and salespeople, advertising, marketing, auctions, reconditioning of vehicles for resale, wholesalers, vehicle pricing, financing
- including sub-prime and dealer financing, lot location and display.
Prerequisite: AM 1320
AM 2540 CURRENT ISSUES IN DEALERSHIP TECHNOLOGY 3 credits
A study of the current trends in technology available to dealers including computer systems to retain and utilize financial and
customer data including service history; business development centers to create a stronger bond with customers and prospects;
computer software to develop strong advertising campaigns using the Internet and other electronic media; and customer relationship
management tools to maximize customer retention and to develop directed prospecting systems. This course examines virtual
dealership models and virtual selling techniques.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
AM 2560 STRATEGIC SALES AND MARKETING ISSUES 3 credits
Automobile dealers must develop a successful market strategy for their dealership to differentiate themselves from their
competitors. This course covers the differences between sales and marketing, the functions of a successful marketing campaign,
creating and sustaining a brand identity, creating customer value, the differences between conquest sales and fresh sales, and a
discussion of various buyer profiles.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
AM 2640 DEALERSHIP VARIABLE OPERATIONS 3 credits
Study of the vital role successful new and used vehicle departments play in the profitability of American franchise automobile
dealerships. Topics covered include selection and motivation of employees, directing the sales staffs, evaluating advertising media
basics, sales promotion, facilities planning, inventory control, maximizing inventory turn methods, wholesaling practices, trade-in
appraising, vehicle reconditioning for retail sales, and the role of auctions in maintaining proper inventory balance. This course
utilizes the ERA computer system.
Prerequisite: AM 1320
AM 2650 DEALERSHIP FIXED OPERATIONS 3 credits
Study of the management of the mechanical service department, the body shop department, and the parts department of American
franchised automobile dealers. This class emphasizes repair order generation and control, shop utilization, scheduling of work,
employee selection and motivation, technician productivity and efficiency, body shop estimating techniques, and dealing with
insurance companies. This course also emphasizes the relationship between the parts and service departments, retail counter sales,
wholesale parts sales, inventory ordering and turn, stock and non-stock parts numbers, level of service, stock order performance,
and part phase-in/phase-out criteria. This course utilizes the ERA computer system.
Prerequisite: AM 1320
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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AM 3020 INTERNATIONAL SUMMER UNIVERSITY 3 credits
The International Summer University (ISU) is a two week, international marketing program sponsored by the Ostfalia University
of Applied Sciences in Wolfsburg, Germany. While the general emphasis is on marketing, it does focus on automotive
applications. Students attending this conference will be assigned case studies in marketing issues and team assignments designed
to demonstrate their capability in analytical problem solving. The course includes visits to several organizations and a formal
presentation of the final project on the City of Wolfsburg to the Lord Mayor of Wolfsburg in the City Council chambers.
Prerequisites: 60 credit hours completed
AM 3040 GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE ISSUES 3 credits
An examination of the critical decision making process manufacturers go through when allocating resources for new product
launches while looking for the best return on their investment. American manufacturers are entering developing markets where a
large, new customer base has yet to be established. This means more new products will go to the BRIC markets (Brazil, Russia,
India, and China) rather than the United States. Market strategies of the major global manufacturers and their potential in those
markets is analyzed. Each market is analyzed while concentrating on the advantages and disadvantages from a manufacturing and
consumer point of view.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
AM 3630 DEALERSHIP ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Focuses on the application of the basic accounting principles to the retail automobile dealership. Transactions are traced from the
source documents through the accounting records into the financial statements. Students prepare and analyze all standard
dealership operating and reporting documents. Included in the course is exposure to computerized accounting through the use of an
ERA computer system.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
AM 3650 DEALERSHIP LEGAL ISSUES/FINANCE AND INSURANCE 3 credits
A review of the many federal, state, and local regulatory agencies and laws dealerships must respond to including the Internal
Revenue Service, state and local Departments of Revenue, Federal Trade Commission, Fair Labor Standards Act, Truth in
Advertising, Truth in Lending, OSHA, EPA, and other agencies. Also includes an in-depth study of the dealership finance and
insurance departments, with special emphasis on products offered in these departments and the profit potential.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
AM 3680 ADVANCED DEALERSHIP FIXED OPERATIONS 3 credits
A comprehensive analysis of successful fixed operations management and its contribution to the viability and profit performance
of the entire dealership. This is achieved by examining the processes and economics of the mechanical service, body shop, and
parts departments of American franchised dealerships as both traditional stand-alone departments and also as a unified business
unit. The investigation of operational and financial considerations underlying essential concepts includes: repair order generation,
technician and shop efficiency and productivity, scheduling, body shop estimating techniques, parts inventory strategies, part
phase-in/out criteria, and level of service. Special attention is given to advanced issues intended to build competitive advantage
for the entire dealership in the current business environment, such as adoption of lean production techniques, sources and uses of
working capital, and strategies to retain/regain market share relative to aftermarket competitors. This course includes an ERA
computer lab section.
Prerequisite: AM 2650
AM 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in automotive marketing and management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
AM 3980 RETAIL AUTOMOTIVE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 credits
A focus on workflow within the retail/wholesale value chain to achieve maximum product exposure. Students are challenged by an
extensive case study requiring skills related to all value chain components. This is a highly intense class with limited enrollment.
AM 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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AM 3995 DIRECTED STUDY 3 credits
A focus on the uniqueness and diversity of American franchise automobile dealerships in a major metropolitan market. The student
will gain an understanding of dealership design, management and operation, customer relations, inventory control, and other
dealership activities through visitation and observation of dealerships in operation, and by talking directly to dealers and managers
at various dealerships. The class will visit a minimum of six dealerships during the semester. Attention will be given to comparing
and contrasting different dynamics of dealership operation such as size (large versus small), brand (import versus domestic), and
age (older versus newer). The student will be required to select one dealership for an in-depth case study.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
AM 4020 DEALERSHIP VALUATION, DEALER DEVELOPMENT, SUCCESSORSHIP ISSUES 3 credits
A discussion regarding the important topics of determining the value of a business, specifically an automobile dealership,
transferring ownership of that business through buy-sell agreements and the role that the manufacturers play in keeping dealerships
from failing. Discusses how manufacturers have a vested interest in seeing their franchise dealerships succeed. Likewise, they are
very protective of who owns and manages these dealerships. For these reasons, the manufacturers have instituted programs aimed at
helping dealerships remain profitable and have incorporated into the language of the franchise agreement the right to approve
successors to existing dealer principals.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours completed
AM 4100 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH TOPICS 3 credits
Requires selecting a specific, research area of interest as the project. Potential topics include: personnel issues, the heavy duty truck
sector, publicly owned dealerships, global marketing strategies, or other areas as approved by the department chair. Students must
have an approved abstract outlining the nature and topic of the research prior to beginning. The research project and methodology
must be approved by the department chair.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours completed
AM 4650 DEALERSHIP FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS 3 credits
Covers the importance of employing sound business and financial practices in the operation of a profitable automobile dealership.
This class will discuss topics such as sound credit practices, insurance requirements, inventory control, wholesale and retail
financing practices, and budgeting and forecasting techniques. This class concentrates on studying in-depth the dealership financial
statement, examining it by use of established ratios and percentages and other analytical tools, in order to make sound business
decisions.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours completed
AM 4651 DEALERSHIP ACCOUNTING & FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS 3 credits
This course explores ways and means of mining a dealership’s data management systems (DMS) to improve operational
performance. Study begins by tracing the entry of individual transactions from source documents through the dealership’s
accounting records and into the resulting management reports and financial statements. Students will prepare and analyze standard
dealership operating and reporting documents with emphasis on financial statement analysis as a management tool. This course is
offered in conjunction with a required lab section.
Prerequisites: ACC 2410 and AM 3680
AM 4660 DEALERSHIP MANAGEMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 3 credits
Designed to be a capstone course for international students studying the American franchise automobile dealership. The focus is
on studying current trends and developments, doing research in relevant topics, and individual and team case studies. Experts from
outside the classroom are brought in to discuss important topics of current concern. Students will also be encouraged to visit
dealerships located near the campus to observe their operations.
Prerequisite: 90 credits completed and international students
AM 4670 DEALERSHIP GENERAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
A capstone course for automotive marketing and management which includes a study of current retail marketing and management
enterprises, inventory control, personnel management, customer care, and financial controls, as well as a review of the function and
management of each of the five basic dealership departments. This course will utilize the ERA computer system to evaluate critical
dealership operational and financial performance.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours completed
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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ECONOMICS (ECN)
ECN 2210 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 3 credits
An examination of general microeconomic theory with an emphasis on supply and demand, opportunity cost, consumer choice, the firm,
the market structures and regulations, allocation of resources, capital, interest, profit, labor unions, income analysis, energy, national
resource economics, and public policy.
ECN 2220 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 3 credits
An examination of general macroeconomics theory with an emphasis on government spending and taxation, national income
accounting, economic fluctuations, macroeconomics theory, fiscal policy, monetary policy, the banking system, economic
stabilization, international trade, economic growth, and comparative economic systems.
ECN 2700 ECONOMICS OF SUSTAINABILITY 3 credits
Explores the relationships between economics and our natural environments and social institutions. Students study market and nonmarket values for environmental and enterprise services, approaches to measure sustainability, roles of business, government and
non-profit sectors fostering sustainability, and the emerging role of environmental economics in strategic business planning.
Fundamentals of environmental economics are applied to real-world environmental and business problems.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and ECN 2220
ECN 3000 INTERNATIONAL TRADE 3 credits
Examines the basis of trading among nations with emphasis on resources, foreign exchange, balance of payments, investments,
tariffs, import quotas, export controls, nationalism, free trade, protectionism, and the institutions aiding in world trade.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 3010 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 3 credits
A study of resource allocation, scarcity, income distribution, consumer choice; theory of the firm, market structures, factor
markets, welfare economics, and general equilibrium.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210, 2220, and MTH 3100
ECN 3020 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 3 credits
A study of income theory, employment, interest rates, and price level determination. The role of government and its influence on
these variables via monetary and fiscal policies will be studied.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 3110 ECONOMIC HISTORY 3 credits
A study of significant periods and development in the evolution of economic activity in the U.S. with special emphasis on the place
of the American business community and its relationship to the world economy from 1607 to date.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 3310 MONEY AND BANKING 3 credits
Examines the role of money and financial institutions in the U.S. economy. Includes an analysis of the role of the Federal Reserve
and the impact of monetary policy on interest rates, exchange rates, inflation, and a comparison of different institutional
arrangements in financial markets.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and ECN 2220
ECN 3410 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 credits
An analysis of the various systems of economic organization; comparison of socialist methods of economic management with the
operations of the market economy; overview of the current economies of several nations.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 3510 DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 3 credits
An analysis of the theories advanced from the Greeks to the contemporary schools of economic thought and their effects on
present-day economic policies designed to give students an appreciation for the intellectual foundation of the discipline.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 3710 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 3 credits
Applies tools of economic analysis to issues of environmental pollution and resource depletion. Students will learn techniques for
evaluating current resource use and compare various regulatory and incentive-based public policy alternatives for improvement.
Applications include solid waste management, air and water pollution, energy, wildlife habitat, population, and trans-boundary
pollution.
Prerequisite: ECN 2210
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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ECN 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in economics. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
ECN 3990 ADVANCED TOPICS - POLITICAL ECONOMY 3 credits
Course includes an analytical and critical paper written after attendance at the annual summer “Freedom Seminar” or through
arranged directed study.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 4010 ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC POLICIES 3 credits
A study of both the short-term and long-term economic consequences of public policies as they relate to individuals and
organizations. Policies examined include public pensions, health insurance, health and safety regulation, environmental protection,
energy, industrial policy, and taxation.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 60 credit hours completed.
ECN 4250 CASES AND PROBLEMS IN GLOBAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 credits
The case study method is used to analyze the global environment confronting the entrepreneur engaged in cross-border
enterprise. Important course components include public policy, markets, labor, and financial forces.
Prerequisite: ECN 3000
ECN 4400 AUSTRIAN ECONOMIC THEORY 3 credits
Provides a general overview of how a generalized understanding of human action under subjective preferences can be used to
deduce a wide range of economic phenomena.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and ECN 2220
ECN 4500 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 3 credits
Introduces students to the basics of econometrics and regression analysis to evaluate economic problems. Familiarizes students to
basic applied econometrics theories and techniques that can be used with commonly available computer software. A strong
emphasis is placed on applications to relevant real-world data and to the recognition and understanding of common statistical
problems.
Prerequisites: 60 credits hours completed, ECN 3010, and MTH 2310
ECN 4890 RESEARCH METHODS 3 credits
This course is based on the belief that in order to learn economics, a student must do economics. Provides a framework within
which the students learn to understand and evaluate economic research, while completing an original research paper under the
supervision of the instructor.
Prerequisite: ECN 4500
ENGLISH (ENG)
ENG 0900 DEVELOPMENTAL COMPOSITION 3 credits
A developmental course for students who demonstrate a need for extra assistance in collegiate writing based on English ACT or
SAT scores or a placement exam.
ENG 0990 ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES (EAP) 3 credits
Designed to address the needs of international undergraduate transfer students identified as needing English as a Second
Language (ESL) instruction based on TOEFL or IELTS scores or a placement exam, the course’s objective is to strengthen the
student’s ESL/EAP skills in order to prepare them for academic success in an American university. This course covers grammar,
writing, listening, speaking, and reading, with special emphasis on meeting the academic expectations of upper level classes.
The course helps students gain confidence and competency in daily communications and personal interactions during the
completion of their degree program.
ENG 1150 COMPOSITION I 3 credits
Uses a variety of genres to introduce students to rhetorical awareness focusing on audience and purpose. Readings in fiction and/or
nonfiction are used to support writing strategies. A researched argumentative paper using APA documentation is required during the
freshman composition sequence in either Composition I or Composition II or both.
Prerequisite: ENG 0900 or minimum ACT English score of 18 or minimum SAT verbal score of 421
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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ENG 1200 COMPOSITION II 3 credits
Uses analytical, interpretive readings as a basis for refining critical thinking and writing skills. Readings in fiction and/or
nonfiction are used to support writing strategies. A researched argumentative paper using APA documentation is required during
the freshman composition sequence in either Composition I or Composition II or both.
Prerequisite: ENG 1150
ENG 3110 WORLD LITERATURE I 3 credits
This course focuses on global literature from ancient times through the 1500s. Works of fiction and nonfiction from a
variety of global cultures are included.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
ENG 3120 WORLD LITERATURE II 3 credits
This course focuses on global literature from 1600 to the present. Works of fiction and nonfiction from a variety of global
cultures are included.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
ENG 3200 REPORT WRITING AND APPLIED BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3 credits
Focus on improving writing ability with various types of business communications and reports for practical purposes consistent
with business norms and conventions. Enhance written communication skills including executive summaries, business
correspondence and reporting, and presentation of research findings. Includes collecting, organizing, interpreting facts, and
presenting the findings in a well-documented report. Professional techniques of structuring and presenting business data are
emphasized.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
ENG 3600 APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS 3 credits
Students learn techniques and psychology of effective domestic and cross-cultural business communication, with emphasis on
business letters, reports (oral and written), memoranda, and electronic submissions.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
ENG 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE 3 credits
In these courses, students refine their reading, writing, and thinking abilities through responding, interpreting, analyzing, and
evaluating literature. The English department chair, arts and sciences division chair, and academic dean on each campus are
responsible for approving specific courses for this elective.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
ENG 4010 COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS 3 credits
Examines the fundamental connection between the use of language and the way people communicate, think, and act. To understand
the deeply symbolic nature of language, students study modern semantics and focus on how to interpret spoken and written words,
especially by examining how the meaning of words is influenced by physical, verbal, and historical contexts. Students increase their
self-awareness and their abilities to communicate, think, and act effectively and ethically.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
ENTERTAINMENT, SPORT & PROMOTION MANAGEMENT (ESM)
ESM 1010 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Orients students to the field of sport and entertainment management and provides an overview about how to manage sport and
entertainment enterprises for the major and non-major student.
ESM 1030 SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 3 credits
Emphasizes academic and skill development with the purpose of adding value to the organization. There is a focus on
understanding the difference between interpersonal, mass communications, and public relations. Theoretical foundations of
interpersonal communication including dyadic and small group communication will be explored. Theoretical foundations of mass
communications and the mass media industry, including both the print and electronic media relative to the understanding of
business decisions concerning market share and viewer ratings.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
64
ESM 2010 SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT 3 credits
Explores and develops knowledge about the sociological impacts of sport and entertainment across genders, ethnicities, religions,
and disabilities. Students learn to understand sociological phenomena and how they affect participation and behavior; identify and
understand the internal and external factors that shape sport and entertainment in a culture; understand how sport and entertainment
mirrors the society in which it exists; and develop an understanding regarding the differences between entertainment and
recreational sport, as well as highly organized competitive programs in high school, college, and professional levels to a culture.
ESM 2040 PRACTICUM 1 credit
This is a 50 hour practicum completed on a part-time basis. The practicum includes coursework and are generally with businesses
near the campus. Students will gain experience by job shadowing and/or providing assistance for the organization. Directed and
evaluated by the chair with appropriate supervision by an on-site professional.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
ESM 2050 FACILITY AND EVENT MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course gives the student an overview of the three major components of facility management. The three components are event
management, risk management, and facility management. This course surveys the working components of new facility design and
planning.
ESM 2550 EVENT AND PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course is designed to give students experience in planning and executing sporting events, entertainment events, corporate
events, trade shows, or exhibitions with emphasis on preplanning, budget preparation, advertising, and public relations. Designing,
planning and developing an integrated marketing campaign will be explored to develop an understanding about contract
negotiations and supplier agreements.
ESM 3010 SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING 3 credits
Explores marketing principles and resources for sport and entertainment marketing. Includes how increasing attendance and
revenue is achieved by developing an understanding of the how, who, what, and where to market information.
Prerequisite: MKT 2080
ESM 3030 SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS 3 credits
Integrates marketing principles specifically for the sports and entertainment marketing field. Strategic market segmentation,
understanding media outlets, ratings and shares, and understanding budget and marketing constraints will be emphasized.
Additional emphasis is put on the difference between interpersonal, mass communications, and public relations.
ESM 3040 PRACTICUM II 1 credit
This is a required 50 hour practicum completed on a part-time basis. The practicum includes coursework and are with businesses
within close proximity to the campus. Students will gain experience by job shadowing and/or providing assistance for the
organization. Directed and evaluated by the chair with appropriate supervision by an on-site professional.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
ESM 3070 APPLIED RECORD & FILM INDUSTRY MARKETING 3 credits
This course is a unique combination of marketing theory and applied concepts specific to the record and film industry. Topics
include press kit development, music and film sales and distribution, advertising and promotion, film premier public relations,
sponsorship development, theater fundraising and development, and live concerts.
ESM 3300 SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT SPONSORSHIP AND FUNDRAISING 3 credits
Focuses on three interrelated areas: 1) Sport and entertainment sponsorship basics including marketing issues, strategic
communication through sponsorship, sponsorship value, and sponsorship evaluation; 2) Various public and fundraising techniques
utilized by sport and entertainment managers; and 3) Integrating sport and entertainment sponsorship marketing and public
relations as a concept of value-added marketing.
ESM 3520 SALES AND REVENUE GENERATION IN SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT 3 credits
The course explores income opportunities within the sports and entertainment industry. This includes sponsorships, ticketing, tax
incentives, public financing, auxiliary events, event recruiting, fundraising, non-profits, personal seat licensing, and luxury suites.
Students will be introduced to selling techniques, proposal writing and presentation development.
ESM 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in entertainment, sport, and promotion management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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ESM 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The (400 hours) full-time internship is designed to provide students with valuable work experience in a sport and entertainment
management industry. The experience must be directed and evaluated by the chair with appropriate supervision by the on-site
professional. Final agreements for the internship are to be completed by the ESPM department chair.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
ESM 4020 SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT ECONOMICS 3 credits
Provides students with an introduction to financial planning and budgeting, sport organization funding, and the fundraising process.
Students analyze demand curves, supply curves, and market equilibrium curves in relation to pricing and utility or products or
services. Students learn how to maximize residuals generated by product or service production.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and ECN 2220
ESM 4030 FACILITIES AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 credits
In-depth investigation of event, risk, and facility management. This course delves into the budgeting and financials of facility
concession and sport merchandising. Specific attention will be given to private and public entertainment facilities and their
similarities and differences. This course also surveys the working components of new facility design and planning, overall layout
and traffic flow, the process of mega-shelters in catastrophic events, and the possibilities of expansion/renovations in existing
venues.
ESM 4040 GOVERNANCE AND LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT 3 credits
Students become familiar with the various agencies governing professional, collegiate, high school, and amateur level sports. This
course explores various areas of law in relation to sport and entertainment industry, including both state and federal legislations.
Students will investigate liability and contract law related sport and the sport industry. The course explores collective bargaining
agreements in relation to labor law.
Prerequisite: LAW 3000
ESM 4070 AGENTS, PRODUCTION & ARTIST MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course focuses on the roles and activities of the music and film agent, managers, and artist representation through case studies,
market research, and trend analyses. This course covers forming the artist-manager relationship, creating the artist’s career plan and
image, selecting a development team, securing a contract with a record label, and handling money and success will be studied.
ESM 4080 ENTERTAINMENT LAW 3 credits
A study of the legal issues in the film, television, and music businesses and covers the entertainment industry structure; First
Amendment issues, legalities of agency/talent representation, contracts, bankruptcy, torts/defamation, copyright issues and
trademarks, and unfair competition.
ESM 4100 SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP 3 credits
Enhances student awareness of how ethical behavior and decision-making impacts the leadership roles of the sport and
entertainment manager. Leadership is explored from two different perspectives: 1) Focus on determinants and consequences of
individual motivation and attitudes in organizations; 2) Theory related to those responsible for guiding people toward
organizational goals.
Prerequisite: 90 credits completed or department chair approval
ESM 4300 SEMINAR IN SPORT AND ENTERTAINMENT MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This is a capstone course for students who have completed all of the ESM core course requirements. Students apply their internship
experience and develop a sport and entertainment management project related to strategic management concepts.
Prerequisites: 90 credits completed and 21 ESM credits completed
ENTREPRENEURSHIP (ETR)
ETR 1010 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 credits
An introduction to the creative and innovative managerial practices of successful entrepreneurship. This course reviews the
significant economic and social contributions entrepreneurs provide to society, the intense lifestyle commitment, and the skills
necessary for entrepreneurial success. Provides an overview of the entrepreneurial process.
ETR 1200 SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS MODELS 3 credits
A survey course of successful entrepreneurial business models and the initial challenges these business models encountered.
Students review and evaluate the business models of some of the world’s great entrepreneurs such as Astor, Lowell, Swift,
Rockefeller, DeVos, Walton, and Gates. Explores how to use a company’s business model to identify resource requirements, focus
risks, and diagram revenue streams.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
66
ETR 2010 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING 3 credits
This course reviews and applies entrepreneurial marketing approaches used by successful entrepreneurs. These include utilizing
industry sector trends, identifying emerging customer niches, developing new products/services, using guerilla marketing
strategies, and Internet and social marketing strategies. Methods to research industry sector trends, identify emerging needs,
develop new product and service ideas, and evaluate their feasibility, competitive advantage, and potential profitability. Explore
the relationship between a well-developed marketing plan and successfully raising start-up capital.
Prerequisite: MKT 2080
ETR 2200 ENTREPRENEURIAL DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES 3 credits
This course reviews and explores the various distribution strategies available to entrepreneurs to deliver products and services in
the 21st century. These include traditional layered distribution, franchise development and/or purchase, multi-level marketing,
direct Internet, and direct distribution models including 800 numbers and advertising-based response approaches. Also included are
the factors to consider when selecting a business location, deciding to build, buy or lease space, as well as tradeoffs and process of
signing a lease for company space.
Prerequisite: ETR 2010
ETR 3010 NEW VENTURE FINANCE 3 credits
The application of prerequisite accounting and finance course material to the challenges and specific needs of entrepreneurial
ventures. The course emphasizes importance of managing cash flows, ratio analysis, pro forma development, and the basics of deal
structure and harvesting a business venture. Students will identify and interpret sources of information from company financial
reports, financial publications, industry benchmarks, the media, and web sites.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010 or FIN 3210
ETR 3100 ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP 3 credits
This course explores how to identify and develop solutions to the most common leadership and personal challenges faced by
entrepreneurs when starting new ventures or launching new products. Promotes a deeper understanding of what is required to
be a successful entrepreneur. Highlights the skills and tools necessary to start a new business and explores alternatives to
common pitfalls.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
ETR 3200 RISK ANALYSIS AND BUSINESS MODEL CREATION 3 credits
This course reviews financial tools and industry benchmarks used to identify and manage start-up risks. Applies completed
objectives from core finance courses to the specific needs of entrepreneurial ventures. Stresses the importance of using a
company’s business model to identify resource requirements, focus risks, and diagram revenue streams. Surveys lessons from
successful entrepreneurial business models used by some of the world’s greatest entrepreneurs.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010 or FIN 3210
ETR 3300 BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT 3 credits
An introduction to the process of researching, writing, and presenting a business plan. Students identify and screen ideas using a
business feasibility study that describes the product features, market opportunity, customer profile, sales forecast, competitive
advantage, and profit potential. Following a successful feasibility study students may use business plan software as each develops
their own complete business plan. Exceptional students may be granted permission to identify and work with a small business
owner to help them develop a business plan that potentially expands their current business.
Prerequisite: ETR 3010
ETR 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in entrepreneurship. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
ETR 3990 ENTREPRENEURSHIP HONORS INTERNSHIP 3 credits
Exceptional students may apply during their junior or senior year for this real-world based internship. Students will work with an
entrepreneur, CEO or executive manager, or a new business incubator or innovation project. Their supervisor must monitor and
assess the student’s work.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
ETR 4010 RISK ANALYSIS AND SOURCES OF CAPITAL 3 credits
This problem and case-driven course applies many of the objectives from ETR 3010 and core finance courses to the specific needs
of small businesses and high growth startups. Financial tools, analysis techniques, and industry benchmarks are used to evaluate,
fund, manage, and value entrepreneurial ventures. Valuation options are explored, including the basic valuation techniques
imbedded in ‘Crystal Ball’ or a similar commonly accepted valuation software.
Prerequisite: ETR 3010
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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ETR 4030 ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESS MODEL CREATION AND EVALUATION 3 credits
This case-driven course applies many of the completed objectives from ETR 1200 and other management core courses. This course
explores ways entrepreneurs maximize wealth and economic value.
ETR 4040 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF A FAST-GROWING NEW VENTURE 3 credits
This case-based course applies techniques to design, develop, implement, monitor, and revise new enterprise business strategy.
Methods to formulate, implement, and evaluate the strategic management process are analyzed. The congruity and interaction
between a proposed strategy and the environment in which a new business is expected to operate are explored in detail. Heavy
emphasis is placed on the venture’s core competencies, competitors, customer needs, industry, available resources, and operating
constraints.
Prerequisite: ETR 3010 or Department chair approval
ETR 4050 SEMINAR IN FAMILY BUSINESS GROWTH AND SUCCESSION PLANNING 3 credits
Explores the issues associated with business growth, estate, and succession planning within a family-owned business. Special
attention is paid to intergenerational changes of management control and their implications for business sustainability and
continuity.
Prerequisite: ETR 3010 or Department chair approval
ETR 4060 INTERNATIONAL ENTREPRENEURIAL PROCESS 3 credits
Focuses on an understanding of business methodologies needed to create new venture opportunities in and between foreign markets.
Explore entrepreneurial and practical aspects of importing, exporting, and offshore outsourcing. Student teams will research foreign
business climates, cultures, and market trends within countries that have unilateral or multilateral free-trade agreements with the
United States (e.g., NAFTA) or other counties.
Prerequisites: ETR 3010 and ECN 3000 or department chair approval
ETR 4070 ENTERPRISE LAW—FROM CREATION TO HARVEST 3 credits
Students will learn and apply the legal considerations affecting an entrepreneurial enterprise throughout the life cycle of an
organization (pre-startup, launch, growth, maturity, and harvest). Teams of students will complete a series of legal tasks and
develop work products necessary to define, create, and operate an entrepreneurial venture.
Prerequisite: ETR 3010 and LAW 3000 or LAW 3025 or Department chair approval
ETR 4080 SOCIAL AND CREATIVE ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 credits
Explores how entrepreneurial work habits and managerial expertise can be applied to help community service organizations to be
more effective at helping to solve social problems and creative arts entrepreneurs to be able to financially support their artistic
endeavors. Students create project teams that possess a strong sense of mission by participating in real-world community service
activities. A mix of enterprising leaders engaged in social and creative arts enterprises will visit with the students to provide them
with insights into their organizations’ challenges, setbacks, and successes.
ETR 4100 ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities to operate new and small businesses. Students develop an
understanding of how to manage growth through planning, budgeting, and execution skills. Heavy emphasis is placed on the
venture’s core competencies, competitors, customer needs, industry dynamics, available resources, and operating constraints.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours completed
ETR 4200 NEW VENTURE BUSINESS CASE 3 credits
Students integrate course material from all completed entrepreneurship courses. Students research, prepare, and present a
comprehensive business plan for a new venture idea of their choice. The plan extends the outline used in ETR 3300 by adding
increased market research, complex financial analysis, detailed capitalization explanation, a fundraising plan, and potential harvest
strategy.
Prerequisite: ETR 3300 and ETR 3010
EXECUTIVE FITNESS (EXF)
EXF 1150 TENNIS 1 credit
Designed to teach the rules, terminology, and strategy of tennis. During the course, different fundamental aspects of tennis will be
taught to allow students to actively learn and participate. The class usually begins with a brief lecture followed by class activity
for the duration of the period.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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EXF 1420 SWIMMING 1 credit
Instruction on the basic skills of swimming and water safety. Students will learn the following strokes: elementary backstroke,
freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, and sidestroke.
EXF 1510 WEIGHT TRAINING 1 credit
Designed to teach proper forms of weight lifting and weight training. Students will develop individual training programs and learn
to strengthen various parts of the body. Topics will include functional anatomy during various lifts, the physiology of training
methods, and the biomechanics of the body during training.
EXF 1600 DANCERCISE 1 credit
Teaches students how to coordinate aerobic fitness and conditioning activities with music. Proper cardiovascular exercises will
be demonstrated and students will complete these exercises coordinated to music. Students will learn to monitor their own
cardiovascular health indicators.
EXF 1700 CREATIVE DANCE 1 credit
Introduction to creative dance with a focus on providing an open, inviting atmosphere for dance and movement exploration, as well
as the experience of dance improvisation, composition, and choreography. This course also includes an introduction to the basic
elements of modern dance techniques.
EXF 1800 SCUBA 2 credits
Consists of evenly divided pool and classroom sessions. Students learn the theory of diving and all safety aspects of the sport. Each
diver must provide a mask, fins and snorkel, SSI Log Book, and the Sport Diver Manual with workbook.
Prerequisite: Average swimming abilities and good general health
EXF 1810 SCUBA II 1 credit
Leads to certification. Consists of pool and classroom review of diving safety skills and a review of Scuba I. Divers participate in a
minimum of 6 open water lake dives to complete the requirements for the Scuba School International “Open Water Diver”
certification. Each diver must provide a mask, fins, snorkel, wet suit, mitts, boots, and chemical glow lights.
Prerequisite: EXF 1800 or certification from a nationally recognized scuba diving association
EXF 1900 BOWLING 1 credit
Teaches the rules, terminology, skills, and strategy of bowling. Students actively participate and learn the different fundamental
elements of bowling.
EXF 2001 FIRST AID 1 credit
Trains students on how to respond in emergency situations and give care to an adult who needs assistance. Upon satisfactory
completion of the course each student will receive a first aid certification card that is valid for 3 years from the date of course
completion.
EXF 2010 CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION—ADULT 1 credit
Teaches students how to respond in emergency situations and give care to an adult who needs assistance or cardio pulmonary
resuscitation (CPR). Upon satisfactory completion of the course each student will receive an adult CPR certification card that is
valid for 1 year from the date of course completion.
EXF 2015 CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION—CHILD & INFANT 1 credit
The child and infant CPR class prepares students to respond in emergency situations and give care to an infant or child who needs
assistance or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Upon satisfactory completion of the course each student will receive an infant
and child CPR certification card that is good for 1 year from the date of course completion.
EXF 2020 PROFESSIONAL LIFESTYLE 1 credit
Presents students with lifestyle issues that can affect health and job performance. Topics include anatomy and physiology,
nutrition, cardiac function, stress recognition and management, and health and wellness issues.
EXF 2400 BASKETBALL (CO-ED) 1 credit
Presents the rules, terminology, and strategy of basketball. Students actively participate and learn different fundamental aspects of
basketball including ball handling and shooting techniques, and offensive and defensive team strategies.
EXF 2500 VOLLEYBALL (CO-ED) 1 credit
Introduction to the fundamental skills and strategies of organized volleyball designed to further develop individual skills for the
beginner and/or intermediate player. Students will also learn to practice effective communication with teammates.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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EXF 2620 AMERICAN FLAG FOOTBALL (CO-ED) 1 credit
Teaches the rules and techniques of standard American football and incorporates them into a flag football format.
EXF 2630 SOCCER (CO-ED) 1 credit
An introduction to the fundamental skills, rules, and strategies of organized soccer and is designed to further develop individual skills for
the intermediate player. Students will work on the development of individual skills and team communication and strategies: dribbling,
passing, trapping, heading, shooting, goalkeeping, and team strategies in offense and defense.
EXF 2700 KUNG-FU 1 credit
Students learn the 400-year-old, seven-star praying mantis-style Chinese martial arts. During the course of training, students study
the basic self-defense technique, theories, and history of the mantis system.
EXF 2710 ADVANCED KUNG-FU 1 credit
Designed for those students who have completed the previous Kung Fu class training and wish to advance their martial arts
techniques.
Prerequisite: EXF 2700
EXF 2720 TAI CHI FOR HEALTH, WELLNESS, AND SELF-DEFENSE 1 credit
Introduces students to the ancient martial art of Tai Chi. Short lectures will make students aware of its history, current research into
its health benefits, appreciation of the Chinese cultural aspects, as well as its utility in the workplace for both stress reduction and
employee fitness. Students learn Tai Chi stretching, exercises, breathing techniques, and form training. Self-defense applications of
the form will also be covered.
EXF 2730 ADVANCED TAI CHI FOR HEALTH, WELLNESS, AND SELF-DEFENSE 1 credit
Continues to perfect the techniques and applications started in EXE 2720. Students will finish the second half of the Wu Tai Chi
Form.
Prerequisite: EXF 2720
EXF 2800 GOLF 1 credit
Instruction in the basic principles of golf along with a thorough coverage of rules and etiquette.
FASHION MARKETING & MANAGEMENT (FMM)
FMM 1010 INTRODUCTION TO FASHION MARKETING AND MERCHANDISING 3 credits
This introductory class provides an exposure to merchandising terminology. Activities and operations that make up the apparel
fashion work will be explored as will discussions regarding the entrepreneurs who influence the industry. Career possibilities are
presented with an overview of the raw materials, designing, and manufacturing, plus the wholesale and retail markets.
FMM 2010 FASHION PROMOTIONS AND VISUAL MERCHANDISING 3 credits
Various components of a manufacturer’s or retailer’s promotional techniques, including visual merchandising, are studied. In
addition, forms of advertising and special events are studied to evaluate their applications to various situations.
Prerequisite: FMM 1010
FMM 2050 TEXTILES 3 credits
A thorough study of all aspects of the textile industry including fiber, fabrics, prints, finishes, care, and legislation will take place in
this course. Students will study the impact of textiles on global economies as well as environmental issues through a variety of
teaching methods.
Prerequisite: FMM 1010
FMM 3020 HISTORY OF FASHION 3 credits
This course will survey the evolution of apparel and accessories from the Egyptian period to today’s current fashions and
relationships therein. The course stresses the social, economic, and political factors which have influenced fashion throughout the
ages as well as noting construction, design methods, and terminology.
FMM 3110 APPAREL ANALYSIS 3 credits
Students conduct a thorough study of the primary and secondary levels of the industry from raw materials to the finished product
and quality levels to costing of materials. Industry terminology, global, and environmental issues will be explored as they pertain
to the apparel industry.
Prerequisites: FMM 1010 and 2050 and 3020
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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FMM 3120 TEXTILES AND APPAREL ANALYSIS 3 credits
Explores multiple factors including cost of materials, brand names, and quantities that affect the designing, manufacturing, and
pricing of fashion merchandise. Students will study the processing of textiles from fibers to fabrics and processing to care and
legislation. This course engages students in the overall workings of the textile industry as it relates specifically to the apparel and
soft goods industries.
Prerequisites: FMM 1010
FMM 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in fashion marketing and management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
FMM 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The 400 hours internship is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training in their area(s) of interest. A
contract between the University, students, and employer as well as a complete list of goals and objectives provides the ground
work for this experience. A daily log, periodic evaluations, study of the company, and personal self-reflection are designed to
provide the student with a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
FMM 4030 MERCHANDISING BUYING 3 credits
Students will participate as a “buyer” through a buying and merchandise assortment planning experience. Students will learn to
bridge the gap between the principles of retail buying and mathematical formulas and concepts. The career of a buyer and their
responsibilities will be explored.
FMM 4120 PRACTICES AND THEORIES OF FASHION MERCHANDISING 3 credits
Successful fashion manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers are studied along with career opportunities in these areas. The multiple
factors, such as cost of materials, brand, names, quantities, and sourcing that affect the designing, manufacturing, and pricing of
merchandise are explored. Information and experiences will come from interaction with professionals in these areas. A cumulative
and thorough application of all facets of the student’s program is exhibited through a variety of projects concluding with a major
business plan.
Prerequisites: FMM major with 90 credit hours completed and ACC 2415
FINANCE (FIN)
FIN 1010 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE 3 credits
Designed to build an understanding of the various banking and finance industries through an examination of the segments of these
industries and appraisals of the financial and management skills that future managers need to succeed. The course pedagogy is
enhanced with student-led discussion regarding current events in global financial markets. Students gain insights into the
development and characteristics of the different industries through popular trade magazines, newspapers, Internet sources, and text.
FIN 2600 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND SIMULATION 3 credits
Introduction to the commercial banking function and the operations and management of state and national banks. Emphasis on the
general management functions, with special attention to management of deposits, loans, investments, liquidity, trusts, and other
service functions. A bank simulation is included as a practical application of banking principles, including information provided by
banks, competitors, and bank regulatory agencies.
Prerequisite: ACC 2410
FIN 3010 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Study of the theoretical and conceptual framework financial managers use to reach decisions. Particular emphasis is given to the
finance function and its relevance to the management of an enterprise. Analysis, problem solving techniques, and decision-making
tools are emphasized. Differences between multinational and domestic financial management, such as currencies, political, and
economic risks are discussed. Stocks, bonds, and interest rates are evaluated as they relate to the basic financial analysis of
investments.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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FIN 3210 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Required for students seeking a degree with a major or concentration in finance or accounting or is recommended for those students
pursuing a minor in accounting or finance. Study of the theoretical and conceptual framework financial managers use to reach
decisions. Particular emphasis is given to the finance function and its relevance to the management of an enterprise. Analysis,
problem solving techniques, and decision-making tools are emphasized. Differences between multinational and domestic financial
management, such as different currencies, political, and economic risks are discussed.
Prerequisite: ACC 2415
FIN 3310 ECONOMICS AND FINANCE IN THE RECREATIONAL MARINE INDUSTRY 3 credits
This course will examine some of the key economic and financial issues associated with the recreational marine industry.
Topics include economic trends in boat and personal watercraft construction and sales, recreational fishing and marine
tourism, and marine aftermarket and marine recreational activity, financial concepts and statements, budgeting, revenue and
cost analysis, capital investments, funding development, contract management, and terms and performance measurements.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210, 2220, FIN 3010
FIN 3600 REAL ESTATE FINANCE & ANALYSIS 3 credits
A comprehensive overview of the various types of real estate markets in the United States and how purchases and sales are
financed. Students examine both standard and creative financing/structuring techniques used with residential real estate and income
real estate properties. Purchase, sale, lease, and underwriting issues as well as real estate investment analysis techniques will be
fully explored. The effects of market and economic conditions on the real estate markets are analyzed.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010 or 3210
FIN 3700 FINANCE FOR SUSTAINABILITY 3 credits
This course will examine the principles of finance for effective management decision-making following a triple-bottom-line
approach. The focus is on understanding and analyzing financial information including triple bottom line accounting practices,
green investing, cash and capital budgeting and management, human resource management, carbon credits and other similar
markets, and stakeholder issues.
Prerequisites: ACC 2410, ACC 2415 and FIN 3010
FIN 3750 CAPITAL MARKETS & ANALYSIS 3 credits
An introduction to the basics of investing with emphasis on equities, debt, preferred stocks, convertible securities, rights and
warrants, options, mutual funds, and fixed and variable annuities. The market on which each is traded, as well as fundamental and
technical analysis, will be researched.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: FIN 3010 or 3210
FIN 3760 APPLIED FINANCIAL ANALYSIS & PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Continuation of FIN 3750 with particular emphasis on the intricate nature of assets contained in sophisticated securities.
Concentration will be on the management of portfolios with special emphasis on growth strategies, income strategies, retirement
planning, tax-advantaged investing, stock brokerage trends, and overall financial planning.
Prerequisite: FIN 3750
FIN 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in finance. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
FIN 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
FIN 4010 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 3 credits
A comprehensive overview of the international monetary system in terms of its institutional structure, participants and their
motivations, markets, and products, as well as currency exposure and techniques in risk management.
Prerequisites: FIN 3010 or FIN 3210 and ECN 3000
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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FIN 4100 CHARTERED FINANCIAL ANALYST (CFA) TOPICS 3 credits
Emphasizes various finance topics contained in the course of study for the CFA designation. This designation is a rigorous 3-year
graduate program of study desired by experienced financial professionals. It is considered to be the ultimate credential for the
financial professional throughout the industry. Finance majors who aspire to become an analyst and/or the corporate fields should
take this course.
Prerequisite: FIN 3760; Co-requisite: FIN 4550
FIN 4150 CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (CFP) TOPICS 3 credits
Emphasizes various topics contained in the course of study for the CFP designation. The CFP designation is an industry program of
study that is desired by those selling financial planning services, and is usually taken soon after beginning one’s career. The CFP is
a necessary credential for the financial planner throughout the financial planning industry. Students who aspire to becoming a
personal financial planner should take this course.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010 or 3210
FIN 4200 ECONOMICS AND FINANCE OF PORT AND TERMINAL OPERATIONS 3 credits
Ports require significant infrastructure and complex relationships with governments and private industry. This course will
examine some of the key economic and financial issues associated with port and terminal operations. Topics include
economics of port and terminal operations, global demand for shipping and passenger transport, commercial geography,
government versus private ownership, financial concepts and statements, budgeting, revenue and cost analysis, capital
investments, funding development, contract management, terms and performance measurements, risk management, and
pricing and tariff structures.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210, 2220, FIN 3010
FIN 4230 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING 1 - 3 credits
Designed for senior level students not majoring in finance who will be graduating and leaving the University to pursue their chosen
careers, this course will introduce the basic financial planning tools that are needed to acquire a comfortable financial life in the
future. Skill topics will include saving, non-retirement and retirement investing, mutual fund/ stock investments, house
purchasing/renting, and changing the financial plan as the student’s career and family situations advance throughout life. Courses
offered for more than one credit will delve further into the course topics based on the number of credit hours.
Prerequisite: 90 credit hours completed
FIN 4550 CORPORATE INVESTMENT DECISIONS 3 credits
Emphasizes case/discussion methods to develop an in-depth expansion on the basic concepts presented in FIN 3010/3210. This
course extends the financial analysis of a business to valuing complex capital budgeting and corporate strategies. Issues such as
building the financial component of a business plan and using financial management techniques to identify corporate
problems/opportunities and fix or pursue them. Options for various capital structures and the financing thereof are pursued in
depth.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010 or 3210
FIN 4850 CORPORATE FINANCING DECISIONS AND VALUATION 3 credits
A capstone finance course that builds on the financial concepts learned in previous courses and presents an integrated approach to
corporate financing decisions and corporate valuation. This is a case discussion and application course covering various financing
and valuation approaches and the application of these methodologies in the contemporary business environment.
Prerequisite: FIN 4550
FOUNDATIONS (FDN)
FDN 1100 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR I 1 credit
This course prepares students to take personal responsibility for their learning and academic success at Northwood University with
an emphasis on holistic factors including how to acquire and apply knowledge, critical thinking, problem-solving, and effective
communication skills. Includes an overview of University resources that support student success. Also includes an introduction to
the institutional philosophy as it pertains to “The Northwood Idea,” emphasizing the role of the individual and limited government
in a free-enterprise society.
FDN 1200 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR II 1 credit
Building on FDN 1100, this course emphasizes the relationship between student success and institutional culture and philosophy
as it pertains to “The Northwood Idea.” An introduction to the role of government, individual freedom and responsibility, property
rights, and the free-enterprise system of capitalism.
Prerequisite: FDN 1100 or 15 credit hours completed
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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FDN 3100 CAREER DEVELOPMENT 1 credit
Designed to provide juniors and seniors with research skills and methodology to gain information and understanding about
specific industries and enterprises in which the students are interested in seeking employment. Students will learn about the
importance of non-verbal interaction, interviewing techniques, resume and cover letter writing, and negotiation skills.
FRANCHISING MANAGEMENT (FRA)
FRA 1010 PRINCIPLES OF FRANCHISING 3 credits
This course is an overview of the concepts and principles of franchising as they pertain to the economic sustainability of both the
domestic and global markets. In route, students will study the history and development of franchising models and businesses
derived from those models, including single-unit and multi-unit franchises. The importance of operations manuals will be cover as
well. International franchising is introduced as a viable means for start-up franchises, as well as expansion of existing franchise
businesses. Students will learn the proper franchising terminology so that they will be able to converse intelligently throughout the
franchising community.
FRA 3000 FRANCHISING LAW AND COMPLIANCE ISSUES 3 credits
Overview of specific legal and compliance issues in franchising and franchise business structure, including contractual negotiations,
human resource management, environmental compliance, liability, and federal and state law regarding disclosure documents. Case
law, as well as case studies of legal and compliance issues will be used to illustrate developments and legal precedents in franchises.
Prerequisites: FRA 1010 and LAW 3000
FRA 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
FRA 4100 INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISING 3 credits
Examines the history and role of international franchising, including the growth of overseas franchising and the legal requirements
for international franchises. Includes an overview of the role of culture, local requirements and local markets in successful
franchise operations. Case studies of successful international franchising are part of the course as well.
Prerequisite: FRA 3000
FRA 4200 CURRENT ISSUES AND TRENDS IN FRANCHISING 3 credits
This course gives an overview of contemporary issues and trends in franchising. Includes contemporary developments in
franchising strategy, operations, legal issues, finance, marketing and management of franchises. Explores new markets for
franchising and career opportunities in contemporary franchising, including multi-unit franchises.
Prerequisite: FRA 4100
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (HCM)
HCM 1010 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 3 credits
Overview of key issues in the management and administration of comprehensive health care facilities. Focuses on the
administrator’s relationship to the medical and nursing professions and assesses the attributes of the various types of health service
organizations.
HCM 1020 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND CULTURE IN HEALTH CARE 3 credits
Analysis of problems and issues associated with management of health care organizations and distinguishes between various types
of organizations. This course focuses on hospitals, mental care centers, long-term care facilities, managed care organizations, and
community clinics. Introduction to special terminology, culture, and behavior patterns that characterize health care with emphasis
on implications for administration of health care institutions.
HCM 2010 ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE 3 credits
Analysis of economic factors bearing on the costs and affordability of health care. Covers public perceptions, attitudes, and
political pressures as they affect demand for health services; reimbursement policies shaping service delivery; competition and
alternative delivery systems; managed care and other government and private payer attempts to control costs; and overview of the
medical cost containment crisis.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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HCM 2030 HISTORY OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Students will have the opportunity to follow the strategic trends of the health care industry since its entry into the business arena.
An assessment of post-World War II changes in health care, managed care, and managed competition will be addressed. Changes
in incentives for physicians, hospitals, and health care providers will be discussed. An assessment of new technology and
techniques introduced into the health care industry will also be addressed.
HCM 2990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Faculty approval
HCM 3000 HEALTH CARE ACCOUNTING, BUDGETING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Application of accounting, budgeting and financial management concepts and techniques to managerial decision making in the health care
industry. Examines how private and public agencies determine program priorities, allocate resources to execute programs and obtain funds
through taxation, bond issues, and other means. Explores cash flow problems related to third-party payments. Uses case study analysis to
determine financial techniques and reporting for health care providers.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010
HCM 3030 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY 3 credits
Analyzes special problems of forecasting, planning, staffing, and developing human resource management in health care
institutions. Explores legal aspects of human resource management and administration in the industry with an emphasis on
compliance.
HCM 3040 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS 3 credits
Basic principles of law applicable to the business world, emphasizing contract, sales, bailments, negotiable instruments, agency,
partnerships, corporations, insurance, and real estate.
HCM 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in health care management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
HCM 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
HCM 4010 HEALTH CARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Comprehensive examination of those systems that measure and maintain quality in health care. Continuous improvements of the
Total Quality Management discipline as it applies to health care.
HCM 4020 CURRENT TOPICS IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT 3 credits
The analysis, discussion, and reporting from current literature of significant trends, controversial issues affecting health care,
and application of advanced decision-making techniques to those issues.
HCM 4030 MARKETING MANAGEMENT FOR THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY 3 credits
Application of marketing concepts and techniques within and to health care institutions. Comprehensive overview of market
analysis for new and on-going products and services.
HCM 4060 INDUSTRY TRENDS IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This capstone course for Health Care Management majors focuses on the application of the principles, concepts, and theories
underlying the discipline. Emphasis is on the application of high-ordered thinking and decision-making techniques regarding
industry trends in Health Care Management.
Prerequisites: HCM 3000, HCM 4010, HCM 4030
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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HISTORY (HIS)
HIS 2100 FOUNDATIONS OF THE MODERN WORLD I 3 credits
Introduces students to the historical development of Western civilization and its traditions. Major themes include the evolution of
social, economic, religious, and political systems to fit the changing conditions of each age, and the expression of changing values
and beliefs through intellectual and artistic endeavors. The course traces the development of Western civilization from ancient Near
Eastern cultures to the beginning of the modern era in the 1600s.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
HIS 2150 FOUNDATIONS OF THE MODERN WORLD II 3 credits
Introduces students to the historical development of Western civilization and its traditions. Major themes include the evolution of
social, economic, religious, and political systems to fit the changing conditions of each age, and the expression of changing values
and beliefs through intellectual and artistic endeavors. The course traces the development of Western civilization from the
beginning of the modern era in the 1600s to the present.
Prerequisites: HIS 2100
HIS 2160 FOUNDATIONS OF THE MODERN WORLD 3 credits
Introduces students to the historical development of Western civilization and its traditions. Major themes include the evolution of
social, economic, religious, and political systems to fit the changing conditions of each age, and the expression of changing values
and beliefs through intellectual and artistic endeavors. The course traces the development of Western civilization from the
beginning of the modern era in the 1600s to the present.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
HIS 2175 THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 3 credits
The history of the United States is presented beginning with the European background and first discoveries. The pattern of
exploration, settlement, and development of institutions is followed throughout the colonial period and the early national
experience. The course continues through the Civil War, Reconstruction, the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries and the development of
the United States as a world power. The study includes social, cultural, economic, intellectual, and political aspects of American
life.
Prerequisite: ENG 1200
HIS 3010 THE FOUNDING OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC 3 credits
Covers the historical development of the United States from colonial times through the beginning of the 19th century, with
emphasis on the historical context of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution as examples of the unique
expressions of American political, social, and economic systems. The course will focus on primary sources and on selected
individuals who helped formulate these ideals.
Prerequisite: HIS 2150 or HIS 2160
HIS 3100 AFRICANS IN AMERICA 1607 – 1861 3 credits
Examines the experiences of Africans in America from the founding of the first colonies to the Civil War as evidenced through
the historical, economic, political, social, religious, and literary values of the period. The course is focused on democracy,
economics, freedom, leadership, identity, race, and racism from 1607 to 1861.
HIS 3130 THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 3 credits
Examines the American Civil War, including its causes, the military, political, social and economic aspects of the war, and its
continuing legacy. The course also covers Reconstruction following the war.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HIS 3150 THE ERA OF THE VIETNAM WAR 3 credits
Examines the Vietnam War, including its causes, the military, political, social and economic aspects of the war, and its continuing
legacy for both Vietnam and the United States.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HIS 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in history. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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HIS 4020 CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES 3 credits
An examination of the historical basis and context for contemporary global issues. Topics may include political, economic,
scientific, technological, cultural, and social challenges.
Prerequisite: HIS 2150, HIS 2160, or HIS 2175
HIS 4040 EUROPEAN CULTURAL HISTORY 3 credits
Explores the development of European history and culture through focused visits to historical and cultural sites such as museums,
historical parks, memorials, military sites, and cathedrals; and through film and performance. Taught during the annual Semester in
Europe program.
Prerequisite: HIS 2100 or HIS 2150
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (HOS)
[Formerly Hotel, Restaurant, and Resort Management (HRM)]
HOS 1010 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Designed to build an understanding of the hospitality industry by examining the management skills needed to succeed in the
industry. The student will also gain an insight in the development of the industry through popular trade magazines, guest speakers,
and field trips.
HOS 1030 SANITATION 3 credits
Provides foodservice personnel with basic sanitation principles; understanding personal hygiene; sanitizing of eating and drinking
utensils; food bacteriology; emergency pathogens; prevention of illnesses; HACCP, accident prevention; employee training;
sanitary and safe foodservice operation. Also includes information regarding alcohol: serving alcohol responsibly; safety of the
customer, legalities of the employer, and lawsuits and violations of the state liquor code; how alcohol affects the body; the law and
your responsibility; reasonable care; establishing policies and procedures; designing an alcohol responsible program; and checking
age identification.
HOS 1031 SERVE SAFE ALCOHOL SEMINAR 1 credit
Emphasis on alcohol law and the responsibility of the server. Includes information regarding alcohol: serving alcohol responsibly;
safety of the customer, legalities of the employer, and lawsuits and violations of the state liquor code; how alcohol affects the body;
the law and your responsibility; reasonable care; establishing policies and procedures; designing an alcohol responsible program;
and checking age identification. Students will have the opportunity to earn the national Serve Safe Alcohol certification.
HOS 1032 FOOD SERVE SAFE CERTIFICATION 2 Credits
Provides foodservice personnel with basic sanitation principles; understanding personal hygiene; sanitizing of eating and drinking
utensils; food bacteriology; emergency pathogens; prevention of illnesses; HACCP, accident prevention; employee training;
sanitary and safe foodservice operation. Also includes information regarding alcohol: serving alcohol responsibly; safety of the
customer, legalities of the employer, and lawsuits and violations of the state liquor code; how alcohol affects the body; the law and
your responsibility; reasonable care; establishing policies and procedures; designing an alcohol responsible program; and checking
age identification.
HOS 2040 PRACTICUM I 1 credit
Designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training, exposure to organizational, management, internal workings,
and services offered through an approved organization. A contract between the college, student, and employer provides the
beginning groundwork. Goals, evaluations, a review of skill, and a study of the organization are designed to provide a realistic
learning experience.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
HOS 2050 FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Designed to move the student through the various management steps involved in food service. Food production issues are studied
from a managerial point of view. Standards in food production and beverage service are a focal area of the course. This course is
designed to build the skills necessary to operate a successful and profitable food service operation.
HOS 2100 FACILITIES ENGINEERING 3 credits
Introduces students to facilities engineering and why hospitality managers need to be aware of basic engineering principles
and tools to enable them to make decisions regarding the operations of their facility.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
77
HOS 2980 BEVERAGE SEMINAR 1 credit
Exploration of various wines/beers from around the world. Class includes beverage evaluation and tasting for serious
students who will benefit professionally from this knowledge. Primarily for Hotel/Restaurant students, but others will be
considered.
HOS 3040 PRACTICUM II 1 credit
Designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training, exposure to organizational, management, internal
workings and services offered through an approved agency. A contract between the university, the student, and the employer
provides the beginning groundwork. Goals, evaluations, a review of skill and a study of the organization are designed to
provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: 30 credit hours completed
HOS 3050 HOSPITALITY OPERATION MANAGEMENT 3 credits
The class covers the study of broad-based hotel and motel management operations reviewing development, pre-opening,
marketing, departmental operations, and organizational structure. Includes work in training, staffing, work improvement
techniques, motivating, organizing, planning, and scheduling.
HOS 3100 RESORT & CLUB MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Introduces the student to these exciting and dynamic segments of the industry and the many challenges in operations. Students will
explore the many career choices available after visits to various properties and the behind-the-scenes look at how they are run.
HOS 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in hotel, restaurant, and resort management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
HOS 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisites: Faculty approval and 60 credit hours completed
HOS 4050 HOSPITALITY COSTING, PRICING, AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Designed to move the student through the various management steps involved in developing a financially successful hotel,
restaurant, resort, spa or other hospitality business. This course presents methods and principles for accurately pricing goods and
services, controlling costs, and maximizing profits. Hotels, restaurants, and resorts are studied from a managerial point of view to
keep costs low and margins high. Budgeting and financing standards set in the hospitality industry are a focal area of the course.
Prerequisite: FIN 3010 or FIN 3210
HOS 4100 HUMAN RESOURCES APPLICATION 3 credits
Strong human resource management is critical for the survival of any company. This course will discuss and highlight ways that the
new or even experienced manager can stay ahead of the workforce challenges. Current articles and group projects will supplement
the classroom experience.
HOS 4150 INTERNATIONAL TOURISM 3 credits
Focuses on the economic, social, cultural, and environmental considerations of international travel and tourism. The course is
designed to create sensitivity to and an awareness of the differences in cultures in regard to a worldview of hospitality
management.
HOS 4180 SPECIAL EVENTS AND MEETING PLANNING 3 credits
Provides students with the basic understanding of the management process as it relates to planning and operation of special events
and meetings. This course is designed to develop skills, strategies, knowledge, and understanding about planning, organizing,
scheduling, marketing, and implementing meetings and special events for various groups.
HOS 4400 MARINE TOURISM MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Focuses on the economic, social, cultural and environmental considerations of travel and tourism involving marine and coastal
activities. The course will focus on marine oriented resort management, chartering and bareboating, charter fishing, SCUBA,
snorkeling and underwater exploration, tour boats and tour operations, recreational marine craft rentals, personal boating
instruction, and other marine orientated tourist activities.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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HOS 4500 CURRENT ISSUES IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY 3 credits
Explores the dynamics and implications of current societal and professional issues while developing leadership styles and
identifying current trends. The course focuses on examining current trends that will impact the profession and help students
understand the relevance of trends to their professional development.
HUMANITIES (HUM)
HUM 3010 IDEAS THAT SHAPED AMERICA 3 credits
Explores ideas from America’s European heritage that shaped modern America. Course taught only in the Semester in
Europe Study Abroad program.
HUM 3020 SURVEY OF WESTERN ART 3 credits
Explores Western art through first-hand visits to European cultural centers and classroom lectures during the Semester in
Europe Study Abroad program.
HUM 3100 CREATIVITY 3 credits
An overview of the creative process and its relationship to both personal and professional achievement. Theories of creativity are
summarized, covering such topics as the creative personality, creative problem solving, and creative team work. Students will
acquire the resources and techniques for stimulating creative thinking and facilitating creative problem solving. The course will
encompass both individual and group exercises to stimulate creative thinking.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3110 THE SEARCH FOR MEANING THROUGH THE HUMANITIES 3 credits
An examination of the human search for meaning through perennial questions and their possible answers as expressed in
intellectual, artistic, and social endeavors.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3120 INTRODUCTION TO ART 3 credits
A survey of visual media, past and present, with particular emphasis on expressionism and realism and how they mirror
society. Technique as well as theory is covered.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3130 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC 3 credits
The study of music from the past and present, and its impact on our culture. Included is a survey of music from historical
periods and the relationship of this auditory art form to other areas of the humanities.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3140 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ART 3 credits
A chronological survey of major art movements beginning with Romanticism and culminating in the most recent
developments in painting and sculpture.
HUM 3150 INTRODUCTION TO FILM ART 3 credits
A survey of past and present films with particular emphasis on the elements of form and style. A history of film and survey
of genres and styles is included.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3200 CRITICAL APPRECIATION OF THE ARTS 3 credits
Focuses on the special role of the arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, music, dance, film, and
photography as forms of human expression. Attention is given to definitions of art and various critical approaches to the arts
in order to establish a foundation for critical response.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3210
GENERAL HUMANITIES 3 credits
Beginning with the advent of the Renaissance, this course traces the humanistic aspects of our intellectual development, as
that development is manifested in painting, sculpture, architecture, music, literature, philosophy, political theory, and
spiritual experience.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
79
HUM 3220 DESIGN PRINCIPLES 3 credits
Exploration of human reaction to visual stimuli and the role of design to solve problems and make decisions in business and
personal life. The goal is that students will make better functional, practical, and economic visual judgments.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
HUM 3230 UNDERSTANDING WESTERN ARCHITECTURE 3 credits
This course is a comparative examination of the built environment as a cultural, technological, and artistic achievement.
Basic design and technical concepts that allow buildings to stand up will be explored. In addition, the history of architectural
development in the West, from prehistoric times to the present, will be surveyed. The focus is on architecture as an
expression of culture, a systematic statement of values.
Prerequisites: HIS 2100, HIS 2150
HUM 3500 HONORS SEMINAR 3 credits
Critical study of various forms of artistic expression to sharpen students’ ability to form divergent points of view.
Prerequisites: 60 credit hours completed and approval of academic dean
HUM 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in humanities. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
INNOVATION MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT (IMM)
IMM 1100 FOUNDATIONS OF INNOVATION 3 credits
The emphasis of the course is to explain the value and importance of innovation and its role in a competitive global economy.
An introduction to the principles and concepts of innovation and the role of innovation in society in general Basic skills and
elements of the innovation process are described and practiced by reviewing the theoretical bases and models of innovation
processes, as well as case studies of relevant innovations in business. Students will learn about science and technology based
“megatrends” and identify areas attractive to them to practice innovation. Basic knowledge of physics, chemistry and
biology will be covered that will allow students to comprehend the innovations brought by nano-science, biotechnology and
new materials scientific fields. The students will be exposed to the discovery-driven planning which is a practical tool that
acknowledges the difference between planning for a new venture and planning for a more conventional line of business. In
addition, students will participate in design challenges, learn from failure, value diverse perspectives in approaching
problems, and generate ideas that demonstrate both incremental and radical inventiveness.
IMM 3050 DEMOGRAPHIC DATA MINING 3 credits
This course is a continuation and expansion of concepts covered in statistics classes using demographic databases for
business applications. It explores advanced sources of demographic data, measures, and methods to analyze the levels and
changes of demographic settings. It considers applications of demographic techniques in marketing, management and in
business forecasting. It provides practical case-studies based experience in applying demographic knowledge and methods.
It includes hypothesis testing of proportions, means and variances of one and two populations, including matched pairs,
correlation, simple linear regression, chi-square tests, multiple regression.
Prerequisite: MTH 2310
IMM 3200 INNOVATION PROCESSES 3 credits
This course covers incremental and disruptive innovations, consumer behavior and market growth trends. Students are
challenged to identify areas where innovations can be lucrative and will develop their own innovation using web/patent
searching software. The projects will stimulate creative thinking and teach students how to extract concepts from relevant
technical content. Students will appreciate the process necessary to quickly conceive and validate the ideas, and to become
competent project leaders. The course provides basic knowledge of financial evaluation of the new product, culminating
with a rudimentary individual business plan evaluation report for the student’s innovation.
Prerequisite: IMM 1100
IMM 3990 INNOVATION INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A
contract between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a
study of the organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisites: Faculty approval and 60 credit hours completed
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
80
IMM 4110 IDEAS TO MARKETS PROJECT I 3 credits
A project-team based cohort course in which the idea of the product/application can be generated by the students, by an
external company, or by an organization. The project may focus on an idea, a redesign of an existing product, a new product,
or a new application for an existing product. Specific objectives for each team will be assigned by the instructor, in
consultation with the project teams. This class will focus on collecting and analyzing data, creating a physical or conceptual
prototype, and preparation of a marketing plan.
Prerequisites: IMM 3200, MKT 4230 and MKT 4240
IMM 4210 IDEAS TO MARKETS PROJECT II 3 credits
Continuation of project-team based cohort course in which the idea of the product/application can be generated by the
students, by an external company, or by an organization. The project and specific objectives for each team will have already
been assigned by the instructor in IMM 4110. This class will focus on designing the product/application, and identifying
financial, manufacturing, distribution and promotion channels through the development of a three year rudimentary business
plan. The students will gain experience in multiple phases of the commercialization of innovation.
Prerequisite: IMM 4110
INSURANCE RISK MANAGEMENT (INS)
INS 1100 PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE 3 credits
Introduces the student to understanding the nature of risk and how insurance can manage risk. Overview of the insurance
industry and its nature and structure and how insurance organizations are regulated. Case studies will be utilized in
understanding the challenges of IM and the role of regulation. Case studies will be used to evaluate the financial strength of
industry organizations.
INS 1200 PRINCIPLES OF PERSONAL INSURANCE 3 credits
Introduces the student to the concept of personal insurance studying life, health, disability and long term care insurance. The
student gains the prospective of managing personal risk associated with personal insurances.
Prerequisite: INS 1100
INS 2100 PRINCIPLES OF COMMERCIAL INSURANCE 3 credits
Introduction to the concept of commercial insurance. The student will gain an understanding of insurance to manage
commercial risk. Students will evaluate appropriate levels of coverage, and insurance contracts for greater understanding of
insurance language. Course will cover property, liability, auto.
Prerequisite: INS 1100
INS 2500 CLAIMS AND UNDERWRITING 3 credits
Designed to introduce the student to the concept of the underwriting process. Students study how underwriters decide on the
cost of the risk and price it accordingly. Actuarial science is studied in relationship to cost structure. Students gain knowledge
in the underwriting process and understand how an offer is made to a prospective client by assessing and appraising the risk
involved in the offer. Students use software in the finance lab to work on proposals based on statistical methods is assessing
probability of loss. Students will work in teams on case studies to create underwriting scenarios using data and circumstances
in real life situations in the pricing of insurance. The study of claims is designed to introduce students to the claims (property
and liability) process, claims adjusting and extent of the companies’ liability to the claimant. This course is designed to have
the student understand the investigative nature of claims. Students also study the concept of depreciation, replacement costs
and the cash value of assets using financial formulas that are industry/company specific. Special attention will be given to the
two sides of claims, representation of the company and representation of the client (public adjustors).
Prerequisites: MIS 1050, INS 1200 and INS 2100
INS 3000 AGENCY OPERATIONS 3 credits
An overview of managing agency operations. Students will examine the operations in their entirety; claims, underwriting,
reinsurance, finance, actuarial importance, insurance regulation and strategic planning for the insurance industry. Emphasis
will be placed on regulatory compliance. Global markets will be studied as a means to understand competition and designing
strategic plans to overcome the competition. Student teams will design and set up agencies.
Prerequisites: INS 1200 and INS 2100
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
81
INS 3100 STATE INSURANCE CODE 1 credit
Designed to make students aware of how this code is designed and how it affects property insurance. Insurance code
language is defined. Common insurance policy provisions are examined and explained. This class is mandatory for students
taking the property insurance exam in Michigan, Florida and Texas.
Prerequisite: INS 3000
INS 3500 ACTUARIAL SCIENCE 3 credits
An overview of actuarial science and its application to risk management. Students will be introduced to mathematical and
statistical methods used to assess risk, and the role of actuarial science in the insurance industry.
Prerequisite: MTH 2310
INS 3990 INSURANCE INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship is designed (400 hours of employment) to provide the student with supervised on-the-job experience within
the industry and discipline. A contracted and supervised work program is arranged between the student, employer and
university to meet program objectives.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
INS 4850 INSURANCE PROPOSALS AND NEGOTIATIONS 3 credits
A capstone course that integrates holistic insurance risk management components to develop and negotiate proposals. Student
teams will be presented with data and a situation that demands insurance protection. Students will design and build proposals
to be presented to management for managing risk. Students will utilize software, financial formulas and negotiation skills to
prepare their presentations. Strong emphasis in understanding the role of regulatory compliance and exposure to
underwriting process.
Prerequisites: SPC 2050 and INS 3000
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (INB)
INB 1100 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 3 credits
This is a survey course that acquaints students with the salient components of the discipline and the curriculum. It covers the various
functional areas of International Business such as trade, finance, law, management, and marketing. It also examines the importance
of culture and its impact on human behavior, and brings home to students the importance of understanding cultural differences for
the successful pursuit of a career in international business. The course introduces students to career opportunities in the international
business field.
INB 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in international business. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
NOTE: Below are other required major courses in the interdisciplinary International Business curriculum:
ECN 3000 INTERNATIONAL TRADE 3 credits
Examines the basis of trading among nations with emphasis on resources, foreign exchange, balance of payments, investments,
tariffs, import quotas, export controls, nationalism, free trade, protectionism, and the institutions aiding in world trade.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
ECN 3410 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 credits
An analysis of the various systems of economic organization; comparison of socialist methods of economic management
with the operations of the market economy; overview of the current economies of several nations.
Prerequisites: ECN 2210 and 2220
FIN 4010 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 3 credits
A comprehensive overview of the international monetary system in terms of its institutional structure, participants and their
motivations, markets, and products, as well as currency exposure and techniques in risk management.
Prerequisites: FIN 3010 or FIN 3210 and ECN 3000
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
82
LAW 4050 INTERNATIONAL LAW 3 credits
Overview of the international legal environment, including an emphasis on common and code law systems and their impact
on the conduct of international business. Explores international jurisdiction, world legal agreements and bodies, treaty
agreements, and treaty law.
Prerequisites: LAW 3000 and ECN 3000
MGT 4030 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Familiarizes students with the evolution of the multi-national enterprise over the past century, and addresses the challenges today’s
managers of such enterprises. Discusses the various aspects of the complex task of managing and leading a multi-national enterprise
such as strategy formulation, structuring organizations, liaising with external stakeholders, ensuring ethical conduct, and providing
inspirational leadership. Knowledge and skills are imparted through the use of experiential learning tools such as simulations and
case discussions.
Prerequisites: MGT 2300 and MKT 2080
MKT 3100 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 3 credits
Addresses global issues challenging today’s international marketer. Discusses the various strategic, tactical, and operational
components of the international marketing function. Explores in detail the practical aspects of international marketing such as
exports and imports, international marketing research, and the development of a comprehensive marketing plan.
Prerequisites: MKT 2080
12 credits of Spanish or other foreign language:
SPN 2010 SPANISH I 3 credits
The first of a two semester sequence designed specifically for beginning university students with no previous language
study. Emphasis is placed on acquisition and application of basic language skills.
SPN 2015 SPANISH II 3 credits
Continuation of the first year language sequence in Spanish. Course design places emphasis on development of the target
language in the five goal areas of foreign language education: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and
communities.
Prerequisite: SPN 2010
SPN 3010
SPANISH III 3 credits
The first of a two semester sequence designed for students who have a background of at least one year of college level Spanish or its
equivalent. The objective is to further acquisition and application of the target language at the intermediate level. Authentic materials in
the target language reflect contemporary topics relevant to contemporary global issues.
Prerequisite: SPN 2015
SPN 3015 SPANISH IV 3 credits
Completes the second year language sequence in Spanish. Course emphasis is placed on continued development of
proficiency in the target language through grammar review, composition, selected readings, small group discussion, and
short speeches on topics of interest.
LAW (LAW)
LAW 2500 ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY 3 credits
This course will provide an overview of environmental law, regulation and international policies, focused on those areas that
directly impact on commercial and industrial enterprise. The course will also help students understand the relationship
between environmental protection and societal, political, economic and ethical concerns that shape regulatory policy.
Prerequisites: NSC 2200 and MGT 2400
LAW 2800 MOCK TRIAL I 1 credit
Emphasis is placed on building the skills necessary to compete in American Mock Trial Association Invitational Tournaments.
Each student will be a part of a team responsible for the development of a case to be tried in a court of law including opening
statement, introduction of testimony, physical, and demonstrative evidence, direct and cross examination of witnesses, closing
arguments, etc. Students will participate in competitions both on and off campus.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
83
LAW 2810 MOCK TRIAL II 2 credits
Emphasis is on continuing development of skills necessary to compete in regional American Mock Trial Association Invitational
Tournaments. Students who have taken LAW 2800 will have already competed at invitational tournaments sponsored by the
American Mock Trial Association. During this course, as a member of the Regional Team, students will perform the same skills
introduced in the LAW 2800 course at a higher level. Students will participate in competitions both on and off campus.
Prerequisite: LAW 2800
LAW 2820 MOCK TRIAL III 2 credits
Emphasis is on continuing development of skills necessary to compete in the national American Mock Trial Association
Invitational Tournament. Students who have taken LAW 2800 will have competed at Invitational Tournaments and those
who have taken LAW 2810 will have competed at the Regional Tournament. During this course, as a member of the
Regional, National and Championship Team(s), students will consistently perform the skills introduced in LAW 2800 and
LAW 2801 at a higher level reflecting their prior experience. Students will participate in competitions both on and off
campus.
Prerequisites: LAW 2800 and 2810
LAW 3000 BUSINESS LAW I 3 credits
Basic principles of law applicable to the business world emphasizing ethics, the U.S. judicial system, contracts, sales,
property, agency, and business organizations. The goal of the course is to provide the basic knowledge and understanding of
legal theories and practical applications of rules/laws as they pertain to the decision-making aspects of administration and
professional conduct in business.
LAW 3025 BUSINESS LAW FOR ACCOUNTING MAJORS 3 credits
The course will focus on two main areas. First, the course will undertake a critical exploration and examination of the regulation of
the accounting profession. This will include research, application, and evaluation of the regulation of for-profit financial accounting,
auditing of private and public entities, not-for-profit financial accounting, and taxation. Second, students will focus on specific areas
of business law most applicable to the practicing accountant, including business organizations, securities law, and professional
liability. Additionally, basic principles of law applicable to the business world, emphasizing contracts and sales, as well as
period after sales, bailments, negotiable instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, insurance, and real estate will be
examined.
LAW 3026 BUSINESS LAW FOR ACCOUNTING MAJORS 1 credit
The course will focus on specific areas of business law most applicable to the practicing accountant, including business
organizations, securities law, and professional liability. Additionally, basic principles of law applicable to the business
world, emphasizing contracts and sales, as well as period after sales, bailments, negotiable instruments, agency,
partnerships, corporations, insurance, and real estate will be examined.
Prerequisite: LAW 3000
LAW 3050 BUSINESS LAW II 3 credits
An in-depth study of law with special emphasis on those points of law that would be of particular importance to students
planning careers in accounting, especially those considering qualifying as Certified Public Accountants. Provides students
with the basic knowledge and understanding of legal theories and practical applications of rules/laws as they pertain to the
decision-making aspects of administration and professional conduct of business, especially in the accounting industry.
Prerequisite: LAW 3000 or LAW 3025
LAW 3500 COMMERCIAL AND REAL ESTATE LAW 3 credits
This course provides an overview of real estate transactions and acquisitions for commercial real estate, including site
selection, appraisals, purchase contracts, lease negotiations and contracts, mortgage financing, loan documentation, escrows
and titles. Transactions related to franchise agreements will be a specific feature of the course.
Prerequisite: LAW 3000
LAW 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in law. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
84
LAW 4050 INTERNATIONAL LAW 3 credits
Overview of the international legal environment, including an emphasis on common and code law systems and their impact
on the conduct of international business. Explores international jurisdiction, world legal agreements and bodies, treaty
agreements, and treaty law.
Prerequisites: LAW 3000 and ECN 3000
MANAGEMENT (MGT)
MGT 2300 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Foundation course that provides an overview of the principles, concepts, and theories underlying the management discipline.
Students learn the specialized vocabulary necessary for the practice of management. Origins, history, and antecedents of the
management discipline and its relationship to the other disciplines that are the components of a business education.
MGT 2400 SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE STRATEGIES 3 credits
This course will allow students to gain an understanding of the decision-making process in sustainable organizations and
industries, including the theories supporting sustainable management and the concepts of triple-bottom-line management.
Students will apply the core management functions and practices learned in previous business core courses to sustainable
organizations. A systems approach will be used to help students develop the ability to analyze whole systems.
Prerequisites: MGT 2300, ECN 2210 and ECN 2220
MGT 2500 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Provides students with a broad understanding of the behavioral, structural, operational, and legal aspects of managing an
organization’s human resources and the interrelationship between managerial functions and human resource policies.
Examines the human resource functions of job analysis and design, recruitment, training and development, compensation and
benefits, appraisal, and retention. Traces the evolution of the discipline and highlights certain landmark events that have
impacted human resource management. Discusses the function of the various governmental agencies responsible for ensuring
legal compliance.
MGT 3200 MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATIONS 3 credits
Students develop the techniques of sending and receiving skills necessary for effective communication in the global business
environment. Topics covered include: writing effective business letters, memos, e-mails, and reports; group dynamics and
effective meetings; nonverbal communication; listening; perception and semantics; and oral reporting.
Prerequisite: ENG1200.
MGT 3500 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Deals with the strategic/operational activities that relate to the creation of goods and services through the transformation of
inputs to outputs. Students will be able to formulate strategies that increase productivity and quality so as to maximize a
firm’s profitability in a global marketplace and for the benefit of society.
Prerequisites: MGT 2300 and MTH 2310
MGT 3700 PRACTICE OF MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 3 credits
Builds on the foundations of management theory and concepts contained in MGT 2300. It teaches students the practical
elements of management and leadership through analysis, discussion, and reporting of significant trends and key issues from
current literature. Examines advanced techniques in decision making and their applications in organizations. Using
experiential learning tools, students learn management principles and identify important concepts related to leadership,
emotional intelligence, diversity, organizational change, and sustainability.
Prerequisites: MGT 2300 and MKT 2080
MGT 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in management. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
MGT 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A contract
between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a study of the
organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Faculty approval
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
85
MGT 4030 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Familiarizes students with the evolution of multinational enterprises over the past century, and addresses the challenges today’s
managers of such enterprises. Discusses the various aspects of the complex task of managing and leading a multinational enterprise
such as strategy formulation, structuring organizations, liaising with external stakeholders, ensuring ethical conduct, and providing
inspirational leadership. Knowledge and skills are imparted through the use of experiential learning tools such as simulations and
case discussions.
Prerequisites: MGT 2300 and MKT 2080
MGT 4250 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 3 credits
Examines how the behavior of individuals and the relationships among individuals and groups within an organization impact
its effectiveness. Draws upon the theories and models that constitute the core of the discipline, and also examines current
topics and areas of interest. Develops the skills and tools necessary to effectively manage change within an organization and
evolve into successful leaders in a complex, global environment.
Prerequisite: MGT 2300
MGT 4300 MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES 3 credits
Students learn how to use and manage information technologies to revitalize business processes, improve business decision
making, and gain a competitive advantage. Major emphasis is placed on the essential role of the Internet and networked
technologies in order to create efficiencies that will help contribute to business success in the global economy.
Prerequisites: MGT 2300 and MIS 1050 or MIS 1600
MGT 4360 STRATEGIC RISK MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Examines the risk management process in detail and its application in an organization. The course covers principled holistic risk
management (pure and speculative risk) and why organizations have risk managers. Includes the administrative and strategic
aspects of global strategic risk management examining how a risk manager operates within a complex organization. The application
of risk management tools will be discussed such as risk mapping, loss forecasting, application of total quality management
principles, integrated risk financing, financial reinsurance, captives/risk retention groups, and benchmarking. The course will also
examine the specific issues of managing risk globally and other pertinent issues faced by risk managers.
MGT 4800 STRATEGIC PLANNING 3 credits
Integrates the various theories, concepts, and models covered in previous management courses and other courses dealing with
other functional areas, and presents a comprehensive view of the competitive environment of today’s global business
enterprise. Through the use of experiential learning tools such as simulations and case discussions, students learn the skills
necessary to formulate and implement strategy and exercise effective leadership in diverse organizational settings and
business environments.
Prerequisites: 90 credit hours completed, MGT 2300, and FIN 3010 or FIN 3210
MGT 4810 BUSINESS SEMINAR 3 credits
This course is utilized in study abroad programs and allows students to study a wide scope of international business practices
including financial, retail, industrial, manufacturing, and service industries.
Prerequisite: MGT 2300
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS)
MIS 1050 BASIC COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 3 credits
Students gain the computer skills needed to succeed in their academic careers and in today’s workplace. Major topics
include basic computer operations and software productivity tools: word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics,
and email. Students learn the mechanics of using Microsoft Office productivity tools; how to select the most appropriate
productivity tool for a task; and how to efficiently use these tools to store data, analyze data, and communicate information.
MIS 1110 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 credits
Explores current Information Systems concepts and technologies. Students learn how information systems give a business
or organization a competitive edge by providing technologies that help managers plan, control, and make decisions.
Includes topics such as hardware and software components of an information system, e-business concepts and
implementation, and a survey of common information systems used today.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
86
MIS 1200
INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 3 credits
Introduces students to fundamental programming concepts and techniques. Topics include the development and documentation of
logic, syntax, programming control structures, data structures, programming paradigms, and a survey of modern programming
languages. Focuses on the problem solving process as it applies to the development of computer programs. In a hands-on
environment, students will design, code, and test simple programs. An introductory programming course which does not require
any prior programming experience.
Prerequisite: MIS 1050 or MIS 1600
MIS 1300
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE 3 credits
Students will develop a thorough understanding of the current operating systems, networks, and communications
infrastructure. Includes an understanding of the functions of operating systems, fundamental automated data and voice
communications concepts and terminology, and modes of data transmission, transmission media, and different types of
networks.
MIS 1600
ADVANCED OFFICE APPLICATIONS 3 credits
Students learn how to accomplish specific business processing objectives by organizing and manipulating data in an
electronic spreadsheet and a database. Covers both intermediate and advanced features of spreadsheets and database
management programs. Emphasis will be placed on the efficient utilization of spreadsheets and databases to produce
information that is meaningful in making business decisions. Students gain hands-on experience using current spreadsheet
and database programs.
MIS 1800
COLLABORATION AND WEB PROGRAMMING 3 credits
Introduces students to basic elements of collaborative tools and web programming concepts. Students use these tools to
develop skills in business process integration with web applications.
MIS 2140
BUSINESS APPLICATION PROGRAMMING I 3 credits
Introduces students to the elements of business programming using a selected programming language. Study of the program
development cycle and practice designing and writing business application programs. In designing programs, students will learn to
identify program requirements, data requirements, user interface requirements, and the programming processes needed to develop a
solution. Based on their designs, students will code, test, and evaluate their programs.
MIS 2150
BUSINESS APPLICATION PROGRAMMING II 3 credits
Advances the student’s knowledge of programming concepts and design principles acquired in MIS 2140. Students will
develop more advanced algorithms and use more complex data structures. Concepts of GUI, web enabled, and event-driven
programming will be utilized.
Prerequisite: MIS 2140
MIS 3100 GRAPHICS AND WEB DESIGN 3 credits
Focuses on web concepts and high quality web design as well as digital image/graphic design and manipulation for the web and
print media. Important issues such as sequential communication, editorial design, and visual communication for the web will be
studied and applied within this course. Students will integrate text, digital images/graphics, and other design applications into
website design. Website and digital image design will be applied using the most powerful and up to date industry software (Adobe
Creative Suite).
Prerequisites: MIS 1050 or MIS 1600
MIS 3200
DATABASE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION 3 credits
The design, implementation, and maintenance of databases play a key role in the success of modern information systems.
Students examine the logical design and physical organization of data in an enterprise database. Various approaches to data
management are covered including relational database management systems. Topics include the advantages of using database
management systems, the proper design and implementation of a database, accessing and manipulating data using Structured
Query Language (SQL), and the role of a database administrator.
Prerequisite: MIS 2140
MIS 3250 ERP BUSINESS APPLICATIONS—SAP 3 credits
Introduces students to the concepts used with Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). Students examine the relationships and
interdependence of programs used to create information systems for organizations. Customer relationship, supply chain,
production, and financial system models will be featured. Implementation issues are examined for SAP including technical
structure.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
87
MIS 3300 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Students will examine the significant role that project management plays in the successful completion of an information technology
project. The skills, tools, and best practices used to effectively manage a project from its inception to successful closure will be
discussed. Students will learn how to control the scope, time, cost, and quality of projects, and gain hands-on experience using
project management software.
Prerequisite: MIS 1050 or MIS 1600
MIS 3400 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 3 credits
Examines the various tools and methodologies for the development and implementation of a business information system.
Students will also examine the logical and physical organizations of data in an enterprise database. The systems approach is
covered in detail in conjunction with current concepts of systems analysis and design. The life cycle concept, the importance
of implementing controls during the planning, analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of a management
information system to solve business management problems are highlighted.
MIS 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in management information systems. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
MIS 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A
contract between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a
study of the organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
MIS 4000 ADVANCED INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECT 3 credits
Capstone course for the MIS concentration and is designed to consolidate the business and information systems knowledge
acquired during the completion of the program. The skills, tools, and best practices used to effectively manage a project from its
inception to successful closure will be discussed. Student teams will manage an information systems project that improves
business operations. Students will apply project management best practices as they work through the project life cycle. This
course promotes the development of consultative communications skills and interpersonal skills with team members and other
project stakeholders.
Prerequisite: MIS 3400
MIS 4110 SYSTEMS PROJECT I 3 credits
Students majoring in MIS apply the concepts learned in prior courses along with new knowledge about computer system analysis
and design to step through the entire systems development life cycle in a team environment. A business process will be analyzed
and documented for a selected business. Emphasis will be placed on the overall design of a business information system using a
macro perspective as well as interaction with other systems. The analysis of the business process and the data design will be
completed within this course.
Prerequisite: MIS 3400
MIS 4210 SYSTEMS PROJECT II 3 credits
Students majoring in MIS work within assigned teams to develop the business systems designed in MIS 4110 Systems Project I
course. Students will use various programming languages and database systems to develop components of the designed business
application. The project plan will be utilized to track the progress of the project timeline and costs. Documentation will be
developed for both users and developers for the project. A project implementation plan will be developed for the completed
project.
Prerequisite: MIS 4110
MARINE BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT (MBM)
MBM 1000 MARITIME TERMINOLOGY AND BASIC SHIP DESIGN 3 credits
This course will provide students with an introduction to marine and nautical terminology used throughout the industry. This
terminology will be applied to the basic understanding of ship design, construction and equipment. Topics include basic
nautical terminology, categories and types of boats, ships, tankers and freighters, International Association of Classification
Societies, various types of hull designs and structures, various types of propulsion systems, various ship framing, structures
and decks, key concepts of ship stability and maneuvering, current navigational and communications equipment utilized on
ships, and basic anchorage and berthing requirements and processes.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
88
MBM 1010 INTRODUCTION TO MARITIME INDUSTRIES 3 credits
This course will provide a general overview of the shipping, passenger and offshore operations industries. This course
includes the history of maritime shipping and trade, an overview of ports and waterways, international shipping lanes, an
overview of the oil and gas industry, an overview of other offshore industries including commercial fishing, research, and
mining, current economic environment and political conditions, economic considerations of shipping, transportation and
offshore operations, land bridge considerations and processes, risks and threats to maritime operations, opportunities and
future projections.
MBM 1100 MARINE RECREATION AND SMALL COMMERCIAL WATERCRAFT 3 credits
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of recreational watercraft including yachts, powerboats, sailboats, personal
watercraft, self-propelled craft and emerging water recreational equipment. Topics include identifying and understanding the
differences between boats and yachts, hull designs and materials, propulsion systems including inboard, outboard, I.O. and jet, sails
and sailing systems, propulsion systems maintenance, rigging, steering systems, battery power and bilge systems, boat maintenance
and upkeep, trailering, self-propelled watercraft, and U.S. Coast Guard regulations and safety requirements.
MBM 2010 PORT AND TERMINAL MANAGEMENT I 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to the operational components and complexities of managing freshwater and marine ports and
terminals. Topics in this course include an overview of duties and responsibilities, port authority and terminal operator, legal
obligations and power of ports and terminals, role of port authorities, port ownership, deregulation of port and terminal ownership
and activities, customs house broker, terminal labor and human resource management, customer service, and competition.
Prerequisite: MBM 1000
MBM 2030 SHIP DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 3 credits
This course will provide detailed information on the various types of ship design and construction processes necessary to
meet the varied requirements of maritime business. Topics in this course include the history of ship design, hull construction
and types, propulsion systems, tank vessel designs and cargo systems, passenger vessel designs, cargo ship designs and cargo
systems, and various other types of work and service vessels.
Prerequisite: MBM 1000
MBM 2050 BOAT AND YACHT SALES, BROKERAGE, MANAGEMENT AND MARINE SURVEYING 3 credits
This course will review the considerations, requirements and processes for selling, surveying and managing recreational boats and
yachts within the private ownership marine sector. Topics include the review of types of watercraft and major manufactures,
business and professional regulation regarding boat and yacht sales and brokerage, sales facilities, sales and marketing concepts,
financing, trade-ins, insurance and VAT planning, surveying concepts, regulations and processes, sea trials, yacht and crew
management services, chartering private vessels, and vessel transport and delivery
Prerequisites: MBM 1000 and MBM 1100
MBM 2100 MARITIME REGULATIONS I 3 credits
This course will provide an introduction of key domestic and international laws, treaties and policies affecting marine
operations. Topics include U.S. maritime regulations (federal Registers, CFRs, NAVIC), International Maritime
Organization (IMO), International Labor Organizations (MLC 2006), Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), International
Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL),U.S. coastal zone laws and international protected and
economic zones, flag and port state control, (USCG, Classification Societies and Flags), International Ship and Port Security
(ISPS), and International Safety Management (ISM).
MBM 2130 FLEET AND VESSEL OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course will provide an overview of the fundamentals of operating and managing various types of marine vessels and
marine operations. Topics in this course include commercial geography, global demand, customer-oriented management,
crew management, ship maintenance and drydocking, vessel repair, conversion and upgrades, vessel purchasing and
chartering, operational costs, collision and salvage, risk management, marine protection and indemnity insurance, and key
financial, economic and budgeting considerations.
Prerequisite: MBM 1000
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
89
MBM 2150 BOATYARD MANAGEMENT AND MARINE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR 3 credits
This course will cover the key elements required to operate and manage shipyards focused on the repair and upkeep of large, motor
and sailing yachts. Topics in the course include an overview of facilities and services, wet and dry docks, covered bays and yard
storage, boat lifting and moving equipment, repair and refitting including hull repair, paint, mechanical, electrical, piping,
carpentry, metal fabrication, fuel systems, propulsion, electronics, interior amenities, mast and rigging, quality control, long-term
storage, subcontracting, human resource considerations, staffing and management, customer services and sales, and risk
management and environmental regulations.
Prerequisites: MBM 1000 and MBM 1100
MBM 2990 MARITIME BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP I 3 credits
Students will be required to complete a minimum of 400 hours of supervised activity pertaining to their MBM track within an
approved offshore, port or terminal operation. Students will be exposed to a variety of activities and management functions
at all levels of the operation, some at sea. A contract between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork.
This internship should occur during the summer between the sophomore and junior years.
MBM 3010 PORT AND TERMINAL MANAGEMENT II 3 credits
This second course will focus on specific functions within the port/terminal. Topics include types of terminals such as liquid bulk,
dry bulk, general cargo, container, roll-on/off, cruise and passenger, terminal infrastructure, configuration and equipment, terminal
operating systems, process of cargo movement, safe working in terminals, measuring and benchmarking terminal performance,
managing maintenance, and management of information systems.
Prerequisite: MBM 2010
MBM 3050 MARINA OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course will cover the key elements required to operate and manage marinas, with a focus on recreational motor and sailing
vessels. Topics in the course include facility overview and component considerations including docks (fixed and floating), fueling,
indoor/outdoor storage, ownership and leasing (private versus public), customer services, boat rentals and memberships, liveaboard, long-term occupancy considerations, facility rental for associated businesses such as charter and recreational operations,
staffing, human resource management and staff training, ancillary amenities including maintenance, restaurant, hotel and ship
stores, and risk management and environmental regulation.
MBM 3100 MARITIME REGULATIONS II 3 credits
This course will go into depth on key maritime domestic and international regulations required of all port, shipping and
offshore operations. Topics include admiralty law including jurisdiction of admiralty courts, international trade and shipping
laws, maritime liens, salvage, and sovereign immunity, International Labor Organization (MLC 2006), Advanced SOLAS
and SEMS, Advanced MARPOL, customs liabilities for environmental damage, Standards for Training, Certifications and
Watchstanding (STCW), CFR’s including 30 (offshore), 33 (pollution), 46 (shipping) and 49 (transportation), and U.S and
international regulations specific to tankers, cargo, passengers and oil/gas industries.
Prerequisite: MBM 2000
MBM 3110 PORT AND TERMINAL CARGO OPERATIONS 3 credits
This course will provide an in-depth look at the terminal infrastructure, systems and processes necessary for managing the various
types of cargo that move through ports. Topics include terminal infrastructure, configuration and equipment, terminal operating
systems, descriptions of the types of cargo and cargo carriers, management of information systems, and specific regulatory, safety
and risk management issues.
Prerequisite: MBM 3010
MBM 3130 MARITIME RISK, SAFETY AND SECURITY MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course will examine the issues related to maritime operations and the inherent need to manage and anticipate the risks,
safety and security issues associated with land and sea-based operations. Topics in this course include natural and human
threats to maritime operations, International Ship and Port Security (ISPS), Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard,
Immigration and Customs policies and practices, vessel emergency, safety and security systems and procedures, and crew
training and required certifications.
MBM 3210 PORT AND TERMINAL PASSENGER OPERATIONS 3 credits
This course will provide an in-depth look at the terminal infrastructure, systems and processes necessary for managing commercial
and private movement of individuals travelling through ports. Topics include terminal infrastructure, configuration and equipment,
terminal operating systems, descriptions of the various types of passenger travel, management of information systems, and specific
regulatory, safety and risk management issues.
Prerequisite: MBM 3010
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
90
MBM 3600 MARITIME LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Focuses on management of the flow of products from raw materials sourcing and acquisition through delivery to the final
user. Topics include logistics and transportation planning, information technology, response-based strategies, third-party
logistics, relationship management , and the role of logistics and distribution in the marketing process.
MBM 3990 MARITIME BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP II 3 credits
Students will be required to complete a minimum of 400 hours of supervised activity pertaining to their MBM track within an
approved offshore, port or terminal operation. Students will build upon their experience from the first internship, some in a
land-based management office. A contract between the University, student, and employer provides the groundwork. This
internship should occur during the summer between the junior and senior years.
Prerequisite: MBM 2990
MBM 4110 PORT AND TERMINAL DESIGN AND PLANNING 3 credits
With the continued expansion of marine transport, new port design and construction, as well as port redesign and upgrades, will be
essential for long-term service of the industry. This course will look at the current design considerations, as well as future issues
associated with industry expansion and climate change. Topics include locations of new ports and port expansions, facility
requirements including yard, stack and storage space, and equipment, links to intermodal transportation hubs for truck, rail and air,
access to channels and basins, economic and financial feasibility considerations, projections for future sea transport, coastal
stability, climate change and sea level rise considerations, construction techniques, designs and materials, specific considerations for
container, passenger, liquid bulk, dry bulk and fishing operations, berthing structures, environmental impacts, and local, state and
federal government issues.
Prerequisite: MBM 3010
MBM 4130 FLEET AND VESSEL CARGO OPERATIONS 3 credits
This course will examine the requirements and processes for transporting various types of cargo between ports, both within
U.S. waters and internationally. Topics in this course include types of cargo, information systems and booking processes,
contract management, freight documentation, bills of lading and manifest, tariffs and the Federal Maritime Commission, U.S.
Customs, import and export of goods, stevedoring and terminal services, Charter parties, non-vessel operators and common
carriers, and insurance and cargo claims.
Prerequisite: MBM 2130
MBM 4210 SECURITY AND RISK MANAGEMENT FOR PORT AND TERMINAL OPERATIONS 3 credits
The movement of goods and passengers through national and international waters can pose significant risks to land and sea workers
and passengers. Ports also pose potential risks to a country or region’s security. This course will examine the health, safety and
security issues that are currently being managed by port authorities, as well as examining future threats and concerns.
Prerequisite: MBM 3010
MBM 4230 FLEET AND VESSEL PASSENGER OPERATIONS 3 credits
This course will examine the requirements and processes for transporting people between ports, both within U.S. waters and
internationally. Topics in this course include types of passenger operations and ships, information systems and booking
processes, tariffs and the Federal Maritime Commission, the role of international maritime organizations for cruise operators,
U.S. Customs and Immigration and other regulations for commercial U.S. small and large passenger vessels, stevedoring and
terminal services, crew positions, qualifications, training and certifications, and safety and security requirements and
procedures.
Prerequisite: MBM 2130
MBM 4300 OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY 3 credits
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of offshore oil and gas exploration, extraction and pipeline transport.
Topics include drilling geology and reservoir formations, planning and drilling offshore wells on inner and outer continental
shelves, drilling rig types and equipment, drilling bits, fluids, casings and cementing, directional and horizontal drilling, well
control, managing drilling operations, pipeline installation, operation, maintenance and abandonment, safety and security
issues, drilling and support operation staffing, drilling problems and solutions, support operations and logistics, emergency
management, and government regulations and policies.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
91
MBM 4330 FLEET AND VESSEL MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR 3 credits
This course will cover vessel mechanical operating requirements, repair and maintenance protocols, repair and maintenance
facilities, specific repair processes, and financial issues. Topics in this course include class rules and Coast Guard
requirements, routine maintenance considerations, types of shipyards, shipyard management and processes, steel repairs and
processes, aluminum repairs and processes, and inclining and light weight surveys.
Prerequisite: MBM 2130
MBM 4400 COMMERCIAL AND RECREATIONAL FISHING INDUSTRY 3 credits
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the international commercial fishing industry. Topics in this course
include global fisheries: types, geography, global demand and fish stocks, trends in fish stock populations, types of
commercial fishing vessels and techniques including bottom and mid-water trawls, dredge, gillnetting, harpooning, jig,
longlining, pole/troll, trolling, seine net and purse seining, and traps and pots, national and international regulations, treaties
and government oversight, sales, processing and distribution of catches, exclusive economic zones and marine reserves,
licensing and permitting, crew and personnel requirements and considerations, risk management, aquaculture, and
sustainability issues and certifications.
MBM 4500 CRUISE LINE INDUSTRY 3 credits
This examines this fast growing global tourist industry, with a concentration on general management and ship operations.
Topics in this course include an overview of the cruise industry, principles and practices, cruise geography, onboard
facilities, economic and financial considerations and analysis of operations , customer service and market expectations, sales
and marketing, cruise design and itinerary planning, port of call contracts and shore excursions, hotel and hospitality
operations management, passenger services, protocol and etiquette, shipboard culture and working in multicultural
environments, and overall best practices.
MARKETING (MKT)
MKT 2010 PRINCIPLES OF SELLING 3 credits
Explores the psychology of selling, the customer-centric organization, the sales process, sales techniques, ethical and legal issues
in sales, and career opportunities associated with selling as a professional career. Experiential learning takes place during role
playing and simulated sales presentations.
Prerequisite: MKT 2080
MKT 2080 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3 credits
Explores the development of marketing principles and the role of marketing in an enterprise economy. Reviewing current
articles and case studies develops an understanding of marketing principles.
MKT 2200 SALES MANAGEMENT 3 credits
Planning, implementing, and controlling the firm’s professional sales assets. Explores the recruitment, selection, and
motivation of the internal sales force, the distributor network, and the use of manufacturing representatives. Addresses time
and territory management, compensation, training, budgeting, and the evaluation of selling efforts. Emphasizes the
integration of the sales function into the firm’s strategic planning and implementation processes. Case studies are used
extensively to explore the concepts.
Prerequisite: MKT 2010
MKT 3000 E-COMMERCE 3 credits
Discusses the rapid evolution of the marketplace because of the emergence of e-commerce and the tools facilitating this evolution,
such as the Internet. Covers the impact of these tools and the changes they invoke on organizations, careers, and in general, on the
conduct of business in the global marketplace. Use of these tools with special emphasis on utilization in value chain integration and
enterprise resource planning. The development of an e-commerce strategic plan is a capstone element of this course.
Prerequisites: MKT 2080
MKT 3050
CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 3 credits
Consumer behavior theory, including the introduction of behavioral models to investigate the consumer psychology. Application of
consumer behavior principles to customer satisfaction, market planning, and merchandise mix decisions. Ethical, diversity, and
international issues are also explored.
Prerequisite: MKT 2080
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
92
MKT 3100 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 3 credits
Addresses global issues challenging today’s international marketer. Discusses the various strategic, tactical, and operational
components of the international marketing function. Explores in detail the practical aspects of international marketing such as
exports and imports, international marketing research, and the development of a comprehensive marketing plan.
Prerequisites: MKT 2080 and MGT 2300
MKT 3350 LEAN DISTRIBUTION 3 credits
Lean distribution is based on the Toyota Production System and is a philosophy of a set of methods for dramatically reducing
time from customer order to building and shipping a product that costs less, uses less space, and is of superior quality. Covers
the history, philosophy, and core methodologies of lean distribution.
Prerequisite: MKT 2080
MKT 3450 LOGISTICS 3 credits
Provides a management guide to the flow of products from suppliers to manufacturers, manufacturers to distributors,
distributors to retailers, and manufacturers to retailers. Logistics will be discussed and described in all phases of the
transportation system including rail, truck, air, and water borne shipments. Help engage students in the overall workings of
logistics including an overview of employment opportunities in logistics management.
Prerequisite: MKT 2080
MKT 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in marketing. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
MKT 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A
contract between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a
study of the organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
MKT 4220 MARKETING RESEARCH SEMINAR 3 credits
Examines the role of research in the solution of marketing problems. Development of research and survey instruments and use of
a software computer package to analyze data. Student teams will identify a research problem, gather and analyze data, and
integrate results in a research report.
Prerequisites: MTH 2310 and MKT 2080
MKT 4230 MARKETING RESEARCH 3 credits
Examines the role of research in the solution of marketing problems, with emphasis on available data analysis, nonparametric statistical procedures, sampling, variable analysis, and field research methodology. Development of research and
survey instruments and use of a software computer package to analyze data. Student teams will identify a research problem,
gather and analyze data, and integrate results in a research report presented in class.
Prerequisites: MTH 3340 and MKT 2080
MKT 4240 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 credits
A case-based, capstone course that builds upon previous classes in marketing principles and marketing research. Course includes
development of a market plan and managerial analysis of marketing policy, strategy, organization, administrative structures to
facilitate the marketing function, procedures in demand analysis, product planning policy, pricing, and physical distribution.
Emphasizes the integration of these marketing activities and their planning and direction.
Prerequisite: MKT 4220 or MKT 4230
MKT 4490 ADVANCED MARKETING STRATEGIES 3 credits
An integrative, dynamic view of advanced marketing strategies across a broad spectrum of theories and concepts designed to
prepare the CEO, president, executive, and business owner entrepreneur for critical thinking and action. Involves critical selection
for a framework of developing marketing strategies to yield a distinctive competitive and comparative advantage, brand strategy,
pioneering growth, analysis of markets, and defensive marketing strategies. Strategic-level marketing topics and tools
emphasis will be on the role of marketing capabilities in creating, leveraging, and appropriating value in the marketplace.
Prerequisites: MKT 3100 and MKT 4220
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
93
MATHEMATICS (MTH)
MTH 0980 DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS 3 credits
A developmental math course for students who have not been placed directly in college algebra or finite math. This course
is delivered in modules, each module focusing on a different required competency. Students will be required to complete
each module at an 80 percent (80%) mastery level in order to complete this course. Students not completing all modules
successfully in one semester will be required to enroll in the course the following semester until all modules have been
mastered.
Prerequisite: ACT Math score of 23 or less or equivalent SAT Math score
MTH 1100 FINITE MATHEMATICS 3 credits
Uses elementary functions to explain mathematical models. Quadratics, systems of equations, and mathematical models of business
finance are used to facilitate understanding mathematical techniques used in business and other applications. Additional topics are
selected to prepare students for the statistical and quantitative reasoning used by professionals. Probability concepts and summation
notation are explored to provide a strong basis for statistics. Also covered are the logic and set theory concepts used in quantitative
reasoning.
Prerequisite: Minimum ACT Math score of 24 or minimum SAT Math score of 550 or MTH 0980 or successful
completion of the placement examination
MTH 1150 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 credits
Completes the sequence of algebraic topics necessary for a mathematically literate person. An understanding of the Real Number
System is extended to complex numbers required to solve quadratic equations. Students will learn how to solve quadratic equations
using the quadratic formula, how to solve logarithmic and exponential equations, how to solve systems of equations in two or more
variables using matrix operations, how to solve a system of linear inequalities, and how to apply the notation and principles of
sequences and series. A modeling approach is used with an emphasis on functions and applied problem solving.
Prerequisite: Minimum ACT Math score of 24 or minimum SAT Math score of 550 or MTH 0980 or successful
completion of the placement examination
MTH 2310 STATISTICS I 3 credits
A thorough treatment of descriptive statistics; an introduction to the concepts of probability, probability distributions, and
sampling distributions; and an introduction to inference through estimation by confidence intervals. Students will determine
which statistical technique is appropriate depending on the data type and level of measurement, analyze the data, and then
interpret the results. Appropriate technology and/or software will be required.
Prerequisites: MIS 1050 or MIS 1600 and MTH 1100 or MTH 1150
MTH 3100 CALCULUS I 3 credits
The basics of differential and integral calculus and its application in solving problems. Linear and nonlinear functions are reviewed;
the concepts of limits and continuity, derivatives of functions and their applications, finding maxima and minima, and definite and
indefinite integrals are covered.
Prerequisite: MTH 1100 or MTH 1150 or ACT Math score of 29 or higher or equivalent SAT Math score
MTH 3200 CALCULUS II 3 credits
Understanding and utilization of multivariable calculus and matrix algebra techniques commonly used in business,
economics, and the social sciences.
Prerequisite: MTH 3100
MTH 3340 STATISTICS II 3 credits
A continuation and expansion of concepts covered in MTH 2310. It includes hypothesis testing of proportions, means and
variances of one and two populations, including matched pairs, correlation, simple linear regression, chi-square tests,
multiple regression, forecasting, statistical process control, and analysis of variance. Appropriate technology and/or software
will be required.
Prerequisite: MTH 2310
MTH 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in mathematics. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
94
NATURAL SCIENCE (NSC)
NSC 1100 INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES 3 credits
Course Description: this course is designed as an introductory course presenting the main concepts of ecosystem function
and ecological interrelationships. Students will develop an understanding of the complex relationships between physical,
chemical and biological components of ecosystems. This understanding will provide the basis for later application of human
interaction and sustainability concepts to the natural world.
NSC 2100 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 3 credits
Designed to give an overview of basic environmental principles. Concepts central to the biological and physical sciences will
be covered to provide a background for understanding the environment. The basic environmental issues of human population
growth, biodiversity, natural resources and energy use, and their role in the wellbeing of the environment will be highlighted.
Ethical, social, economic, and political interrelationships will also be discussed. This material will provide a good foundation
for sound decisions regarding environmental issues.
NSC 2200 CURRENT TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 3 credits
This course will familiarize students with the current and predicted environmental issues facing the human population and the
global ecosystem. Emphasis will be placed on the ecosystem approach to environmental problem-solving, highlighting the
interrelationships between scientific, social, political, economic and ethical viewpoints. Emphasis will be placed on critical
and global thinking. This course will provide the basis for current environmental issues and problems, and prepare students
for more in-depth analysis of global sustainability topics in later courses .
Prerequisite: NSC 1100
NSC 3100 CLIMATE CHANGE 3 credits
Examines the current scientific knowledge of climate change and its implications for society as a whole. Specific topics include:
energy balance, components of climate, measuring climate, and modeling climate. The consequences of climate change
from biological, social, and economic perspectives will be examined, as well as political, corporate, and individual
responses to this issue.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 3200 UNDERSTANDING BIOTECHNOLOGY 3 credits
Biotechnology is the latest technological revolution to transform many facets of our society. Its impacts on the environment,
agriculture, nutrition, industry, and health will advance social and individual health and technology beyond anything imaginable.
This course reviews the science behind biotechnology including cell biology, genetics, genetic behavior, and genetic manipulation.
It presents the technologies and laboratory processes that enable biotechnology discovery and development. Finally, it explores
specific applications of biotechnology including food, human health, industrial, and environmental applications.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 3250 BIODIVERSITY 3 credits
Examines the three components of biodiversity: species diversity, genetic diversity, and ecosystem diversity, including the
implications and impacts that human activities are having on each of them. Specific concepts of evolution, speciation, adaptive
radiation, biogeography, and ecology are also addressed. The value of biological diversity is examined from both an economic as
well as an ecological perspective.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 3330
TROPICAL NATURAL HISTORY 3 credits
Examines the various tropical ecosystems of the world with a primary focus on the neotropical rainforests. Examines the climate,
geology, geography, ecology, biodiversity, economic potential, and environmental concerns of these ecosystems. Their values,
including ecological, economic, and cultural, will be examined in order to establish a framework to understand the urgent need for
their conservation for future generations and the health of the planet in general.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 3400
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY IN MEXICO 3 credits
A broad presentation of environmental science, integrating technical and social concepts and issues as they relate to the
Mexican environment. The ecological, economic, social, and ethical aspects of current issues are scrutinized from a
scientific base.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
95
NSC 3450
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY IN SOUTHEAST ASIA 3 credits
A broad presentation of environmental science, integrating technical and social concepts and issues in the Southeast Asian
environment. The ecological, economic, social, and ethical aspects of current issues are scrutinized from a scientific base.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in natural science. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
NSC 4020 OCEANOGRAPHY 3 credits
A broad presentation of oceanographic concepts and processes, including exploration, physical, chemical, and biological
aspects. Current societal issues pertaining to the world’s oceans will also be covered.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 4030 FIELD ORNITHOLOGY 3 credits
An overview of the scientific study of birds and the important contributions to the field made by amateur birders. The course
focuses on the field identification of local and regional species plus an overview of worldwide groups. In addition, this
course includes ecological, behavioral, and biological topics including anatomy, territoriality and nesting, migration, trophic
interactions, and conservation. The recreational and economic impacts of bird watching and feeding are addressed.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 4040 ECOLOGY 3 credits
Students study and become familiar with the geology, indigenous plants, animals, and various ecosystems representative of the
region, and identify the relationships involved between the living and nonliving factors in their environment.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
NSC 4060 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 3 credits
A science course aimed at the non-science major. An overview of various scientific disciplines and processes, the creation
and commercialization of scientific knowledge, and the impact of scientific discovery on business and society. The course
provides students with basic information necessary to work in a technology-based environment.
Prerequisites: NSC 2100 and 60 credit hours completed
OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (OPS)
OPS 1100 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course deals with the strategic and operational activities that relate to the creation of goods and services through the
transformation of inputs to outputs. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to formulate strategies that increase
productivity and quality so as to maximize a firm’s profitability in a global marketplace and to benefit society. This course
introduces other topics in the Operations and Supply Chain Management curriculum. The objective will be to provide a
cohesive “big picture” so that students will be able to understand how all of the elements of Operations and Supply Chain
Management tie together.
OPS 1200 BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course will examine the global competitive environment that requires organizations to view their operations in terms of
business processes. Students will also learn to develop information systems to support these processes. Current, leading
software will be utilized to study systems integration and development.
Prerequisite: OPS 1100
OPS 2350 STATISTICS FOR QUALITY ENGINEERING 3 credits
This course applies the concepts of Statistics to the quality management functions within an organization. When students
have completed this course, they will be prepared to succeed on the American Society for Quality Certified Quality Engineer
exam. Topics covered will include: Introduction to Quality Management, Quality Systems Requirements, Measurement Systems
Analysis; Process Capability Analysis; Process Control; and Reliability and Risk Management.
Prerequisite: MTH 2310
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
96
OPS 3500 PURCHASING 3 credits
This course will provide students with the understanding of purchasing and inventory management. Working from an ERP
perspective, the course will focus on examining the day to day processes of organization, analyzing material and process flows,
enhancing the value added procedures and eliminating waste, redundancy, and bureaucracy to streamline supplier selection,
supplier negotiations, logistics, and procurement in a global free enterprise system. Upon completion of the Purchasing and
Supply Chain Management courses, students will be prepared to write the written examination for the Certification in
Production and Inventory Management (CPIM).
Prerequisites: OPS 1100, MIS 3250, and MIS 1600
OPS 3600 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final
product delivery. Course topics will include supply chain network design, facility planning, capacity planning, globalization and
outsourcing, information technology, and global issues in supply chain management. Upon completion of the Purchasing and
Supply Chain Management courses, students will be prepared to write the written examination for the Certification in Production
and Inventory Management (CPIM).
Prerequisites: OPS 3500 and MIS 3250
OPS 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A
contract between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a
study of the organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
OPS 4100 STATISTICS FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT 3 credits
This course will provide hands-on experience in the arena of Designed Experiments for process improvement and optimization. The
DMAIC (Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) process will be covered in detail. Students will learn to identify sources of
variation, analyze variation, reduce variation, and tie these concepts to Six Sigma methodology which can be applied in any
business setting and to any business process. When the course is successfully completed, students will be prepared to be
examined for Six Sigma Green Belt certification.
Prerequisite: OPS 2350
OPS 4200 LEAN SIX SIGMA 3 credits
This course will provide an overview of the principles of Lean manufacturing, both internal at a company and throughout its
supply chain. Topics covered will include value stream mapping and identifying waste. Students will gain experience with pull
production/ just-in-time continuous flow systems. They will develop an understanding of the relationship between reducing
work in process inventory and managing quality. The relationship between lean manufacturing and six sigma implementation
will also be explored.
Prerequisite: OPS 2350
OPS 4500 OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE 3 credits
This course will provide the student with cumulative case study experience for the Operations and Supply Chain
Management major. Students will use the knowledge gained in the previous nine classes in the Operations and Supply Chain
Management program to develop operational strategies for business applications. Simulations and industry projects will be
utilized in this capstone course.
Prerequisites: All OPS courses
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE)
PE 1010 INTERCOLLEGIATE FOOTBALL 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
97
PE 1020 INTERCOLLEGIATE BASKETBALL 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1030 INTERCOLLEGIATE BASEBALL 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1040 INTERCOLLEGIATE GOLF 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1050 INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of the
game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in the
intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1060 INTERCOLLEGIATE LACROSSE 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1070 INTERCOLLEGIATE TRACK 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1080 INTERCOLLEGIATE SOFTBALL 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1090 INTERCOLLEGIATE VOLLEYBALL 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1100 INTERCOLLEGIATE CROSS COUNTRY 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of
the game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements. Participation in
the intercollegiate series is subject to varsity squad and conference rules.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1130 PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of the
game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
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PE 1260 SOCCER 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of the
game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1290 CHEERLEADING 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of the
game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PE 1300 HOCKEY 1 credit
This course provides a study of the theory and principles of sports; rules techniques and equipment related to the conduct of the
game; and etiquette, sportsmanship, and the appreciation of competition as character-building elements.
Prerequisite: Coach approval
PHILOSOPHY (PHL)
PHL 3000 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3 credits
Essence and meaning of religion as a pervasive phenomenon in human societies; faith and reason, nature of divinity, arguments for
and against God’s existence, religious knowledge and experience, morality, and the problem of evil.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
PHL 3100 ETHICS 3 credits
Study of moral decision making and theories that define our responsibilities. This course will examine sources for moral
value e.g. law, authority, culture, tradition, religion, the problems associated with ethical subjectivism, as well as prominent
historical approaches to ethics in the West.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
PHL 3300 LOGIC 3 credits
Entails a thorough study of traditional Aristotelian logic, propositional logic, induction, informal fallacies, and scientific
method. Topics discussed include: use and misuse of statistics, tools of basic economic analysis, memory training,
fundamental principles of formal deductive reasoning, and rules of argumentation.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
PHL 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in philosophy. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
PHL 4100 PHILOSOPHY OF AMERICAN ENTERPRISE 3 credits
Examines the role of freedom, individual responsibility, property rights, entrepreneurship, and free markets in moral,
intellectual, and economic development. Course materials draw on philosophical arguments, economic theory, and historical
examples to demonstrate how these factors work together to create civil society.
Prerequisites: 90 credit hours completed, ECN 2210, ECN 2220
PHL 4105 CRITICAL PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS 3 credits
Critical philosophical problems of civilization with emphasis on their current status are explored. Problems include the relationship
of the increase of knowledge and the use of science and technology in our societies, human rights, war, peace, poverty, prosperity,
private property, government control, religion, and other selected philosophical problems with international significance,
implications, and relationships.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC)
PSC 2010 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 3 credits
A survey of the institutions of American government including: legislative, executive, and judicial branches; interpretation of
the Constitution and the Bill of Rights; federalism; political parties; the federal bureaucracy; elections; and interest groups.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
99
PSC 3000 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 3 credits
A philosophical examination of major social and political concepts such as freedom, authority, justice, law, obligation and rights.
Emphasis on important philosophers and ideologies in the history of political philosophy.
Prerequisite: 60 credit hours completed
PSC 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in political science. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
PRIOR LEARNING (PL)
PL 1010 PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT 1 credit
A writing course that explores learning styles, the writing process, and portfolio development to verify college-level learning. A
portfolio with the following elements will be produced: autobiography, resume, areas of study, documentation/verification items,
and evaluation breakdown from the prior learning assessment evaluator(s). Graded pass (P)/fail
(F) only.
Prerequisite: Approval of advisor
PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)
PSY 3000 PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits
Provides students the opportunity to analyze their own personalities, interpersonal relationships, and values by reviewing major
psychological theories. Experiential exercises are integrated throughout the course to apply theory to “real life” situations.
PSY 3010
APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY 3 credits
An overview of major psychological concepts and techniques that is relevant to the application of organized knowledge about human
behavior to improve productivity and personal satisfaction on the job. Classical theories of human behavior are summarized covering such
topics as perception, learning, personality, conflict, motivation, team work, empowerment, and wellness. Business psychology is
applicable in any work setting, such as a company, government agency, hospital, hotel/restaurant, or educational institution.
PSY 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in psychology. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
SOCIOLOGY (SOC)
SOC 3000 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3 credits
Introduces students to the field of sociology and the sociological perspective. Provides students with three important tools: a basis
for understanding how society operates; an understanding of the core sociological concepts, methods, and theories; and the ability
to understand society from an objective point of view. Topics for this course include sociological theory, groups, family,
bureaucracies, social class, power, deviance, interaction, inequality, organization, socialization, minority relations, community, and
social change.
SOC 3010 WORLD CULTURE AND CUSTOMS 3 credits
Designed to give students a global perspective by examining cultural regions of the world. Students will explore and analyze
geography, economics, history, religion/philosophies, and value system, as well as cultural factors such as language, art, and music.
The rationale for this course is to prepare students for the ever-growing interdependence of the world in which they live and work,
and to help prepare them to be responsible and participating citizens of the 21st century global society.
SOC 3020 WOMEN IN AMERICAN CULTURE 3 credits
Examines the changing image of women—women as seen by other women, women as seen by men, and individual women as they
see themselves.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
100
SOC 3450 CULTURE OF LEADERSHIP 3 credits
An analysis of organizational factors that influence leadership and management skills. Key aspects include formal and informal
groups, norms, sanctions, organizational change, morale, function of committees and teams, role of unilateral decisions, team
work, empowerment, and ethical philosophy. Includes a self-appraisal of leadership and management strengths and areas for
development.
SOC 3500 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3 credits
Study of how humans are affected by and can change culture. Topics include ethnography, language and communication,
ecology and subsistence, kinship and family, identity, roles and groups, globalization and culture change, and applied
anthropology. Theoretical and historical analysis will build upon or serve as a foundation for SOC 3010 which has a more
contemporary focus.
SOC 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in sociology. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
SPANISH (SPN)
SPN 2010 SPANISH I 3 credits
The first of a two semester sequence designed specifically for beginning university students with no previous language
study. Emphasis is placed on acquisition and application of basic language skills.
SPN 2015
SPANISH II 3 credits
Continuation of the first year language sequence in Spanish. Course design places emphasis on development of the target language in the five goal
areas of foreign language education: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.
Prerequisite: SPN 2010
SPN 3010
SPANISH III 3 credits
The first of a two semester sequence designed for students who have a background of at least one year of college level Spanish or its
equivalent. The objective is to further acquisition and application of the target language at the intermediate level. Authentic materials in
the target language reflect contemporary topics relevant to contemporary global issues.
Prerequisite: SPN 2015
SPN 3015 SPANISH IV 3 credits
Completes the second year language sequence in Spanish. Course emphasis is placed on continued development of
proficiency in the target language through grammar review, composition, selected readings, small group discussion, and
short speeches on topics of interest.
Prerequisite: SPN 3010
SPEECH (SPC)
SPC 2050 SPEECH 3 credits
Introduces students to the basics of public speaking. How can stage fright be handled? What techniques are necessary to
engage an audience? How can the needs of different audiences be considered? How can visuals be designed and used
effectively? What can be done so that verbal and nonverbal delivery is fluent? Addressing these questions requires students to
examine their personal presentations in order to set improvement goals. The study will help engage students in the overall
workings of public speaking. The course requires strict attendance, formal presentations, and impromptu presentations.
SPC 2800 COMPETITIVE SPEECH I 1 credit
Emphasis is placed on building the skills necessary to compete in speech and Competitive Speech tournaments. The course
includes selection of a speech category and topic, research, organizing and writing.
SPC 2810 COMPETITIVE SPEECH II 1 credit
Emphasis is placed on continuing to build and improve the skills necessary to compete in speech and Competitive Speech
tournaments. The course includes selection of a speech category and topic, including research, organizing and writing. New
topics must be selected for each subsequent enrollment in Competitive Speech courses.
Prerequisite: SPC 2800
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
101
SPC 2820 COMPETITIVE SPEECH III 1 credit
Emphasis is placed on continuing to build and improve the skills necessary to compete in speech and Competitive Speech
tournaments. The course includes selection of a speech category and topic, including research, organizing and writing.
Prerequisite: SPC 2810
SPC 2830 COMPETITIVE SPEECH IV 1 credit
Emphasis is placed on continuing to build and improve the skills necessary to compete in speech and Competitive Speech
tournaments. The course includes selection of a speech category and topic, including research, organizing and writing
Prerequisite: SPC 2820
SPC 3000 ADVANCED COMPETITIVE SPEECH 3 credits
Course designed for students who have completed Competitive Speech I – IV, and who have a high level of achievement in
Competitive Speech competitions. Students serve as mentor and coach to lower-level students, under the guidance of the
Director of Competitive Speech.
Prerequisites: SPC 2050, SPC 2830, Instructor approval
SPC 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 credits
Various topics in speech. These may be one-time or occasional course offerings.
Prerequisite: Dependent on specific course content
SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT (SUS)
SUS 3010 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE I 3 credits
This course will examine the use of key natural resources and processes required for any enterprise; energy, water and raw
materials. It will review the availability of these resources, measure their sustainability based on current global utilization and
explore existing and emerging technologies and practices employed to manage these resources.
Prerequisite: NSC 2200
SUS 3020 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE II 3 credits
This course will review existing uses, issues and limitations of using natural resources. It will then explore the challenges of
waste management, the development of sustainable supply chain processes and the development and integration of new
technologies.
Prerequisite: SUS 3010
SUS 3990 INTERNSHIP 3 credits
The internship (400 hours of paid employment) is designed to provide the student with supervised on-the-job training. A
contract between the college, student, and employer provides the groundwork. Objectives, evaluations, written log, and a
study of the organization are designed to provide a realistic learning experience.
Prerequisite: Department chair approval
SUS 4100 SUSTAINABLE URBAN DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 3 credits
This course will focus on the broader concepts of sustainable design and development. Focus will be on how cities and
residents can integrate natural surroundings and local resources into sustainable living designs. Students will learn about the
most current trends in the integration of transportation, living environments, building design, landscaping, growth
management, and land-use planning and zoning laws into sustainable urban designs. Student will research existing and
planned communities incorporating these concepts.
Prerequisites: LAW 2500, SUS 3020 and FIN 3700
SUS 4150 INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE AND SUSTAINABILITY 3 credits
With more than 4 billion people living in the emerging markets, businesses are looking to this sector as the fastest growing
marketplace. Without well-developed sustainable planning, this growing population will tax resources well beyond supply
and accelerate global environmental stresses. Companies, governments and non-government organizations must play a
significant role in providing the means to raise the standard of living for this population in a manner that is effective,
profitable and sustainable.
Prerequisites: SUS 2500, SUS 3020 and SUS 3700
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
102
SUS 4200 CASE STUDIES IN SUSTAINABILITY 3 credits
This course will build on the theory and concepts developed in SUS 4100 Sustainable Enterprise Strategies by focusing on a
variety of sustainable business policy strategies in varying types of business enterprises. The triple-bottom-line approach will
be used to evaluate how these strategies elevate the economic value of the business, improve the health of the environment
and increase social capital within a community.
Prerequisites: SUS 4100 and SUS 4150
SUS 4850 CAPSTONE PROJECT IN SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT 3 credits
This course will require students to draw upon the entire content of the major in order to develop a strategic plan for a
fictitious business operation or for an actual business. Students will work in teams to analyze operations, develop
methodologies for conducting risk assessments, identify and analyze life-cycle functions, recommend existing technologies
and processes, and development methodologies for assessment.
Prerequisites: senior status and successful completion of all SUS courses.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
103
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION
Northwood University Notification of Rights Under FERPA and
The Directory Information Public Notice
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records.
These rights are outlined below:
1.
The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day that Northwood University receives
a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar’s Office a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish
to inspect. The Registrar’s Office will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the
records may be inspected.
2.
The right to request an amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading.
Students may ask Northwood University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write to
the Registrar’s Office, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.
If Northwood University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, Northwood University will notify the
student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request
for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the
right to a hearing. If Northwood University still decides not to amend the record, the student has the right to place a statement
with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information.
3.
The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to
the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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School officials with legitimate educational interest. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official
needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility;
Other schools to which a student is transferring;
Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;
Accrediting organizations;
To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific state law.
A school official is a person employed by Northwood University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff
position; a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a person serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or
grievance committee.
4.
The right to refuse to permit Northwood University to designate certain personally identifiable information about the student as
directory information that is not subject to the above restrictions on disclosure. Northwood University may, within its
discretion, release some or all directory information as it determines is appropriate. Northwood University has designated the
following information about a student as directory information: name, address, telephone listing, email address, major field of
study, year in school, enrollment status, participation in officially recognized activities and athletics, weight and height of
members of athletic teams, photographs, dates of attendance, diplomas received, awards received, and the name of the last
previous school attended by the student, and other similar information that would not generally be considered harmful to a
student, or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. If a student does not wish to have the student’s information designated as
directory information and disclosed, the student must request and complete a Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory
Information from the Registrar’s Office and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office within two weeks from the
beginning of each semester. Please note that a request to block the designation of information as directory information may
apply to all categories listed above and to all requests for directory information from within and outside the Northwood
University community. This notification will remain in effect until the student informs the Registrar’s Office in writing to
remove the block to designation and disclosure.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION
104
5.
The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Northwood University to
comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA are:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-8520
Absence Policy
Attendance is expected as a sign of your interest and seriousness as a student. Excessive absences can have an adverse effect on
overall course achievement. Students should refer to their course syllabi for faculty absence policies.
Academic Appeals
There are academic appeal processes available to provide for appropriate processing of academic grievances. The “statute of
limitations” for academic appeals is 30 days following the grievance.
Academic appeals must first be presented to the Academic Dean’s Office. Students who are not satisfied with the Dean’s decision
may submit a last appeal to the Executive Vice President and Chief Academic Officer, who is the final arbiter of all academic
matters. This appeal must be in writing and should explain all particulars, including reference to the previous level of appeal. This
appeal should be sent by electronic mail to the Executive Vice President and Chief Academic Officer at the corporate headquarters
of the University in Midland, Michigan. The Executive Vice President and Chief Academic Officer will invite written input from
others involved in the previous appeal based on copies of the appeal that will be provided to them. Copies of their responses will be
sent to the person appealing, who will then have up to 10 days to respond in writing to their responses. Following this exchange, a
written decision will be rendered.
Academic Progress
Continued matriculation at Northwood University requires satisfactory academic progress demonstrated by the student in
achieving basic scholastic goals. Academic achievement in any semester that results in a cumulative GPA below 2.0 places a
student on academic probation. All campuses and academic programs have advising systems to assist the student in raising the
earned cumulative GPA so that at scheduled graduation time the student will have had an opportunity to earn the necessary
minimum 2.0 GPA and successfully complete [grade of 0.7 (D-) or better] all required courses in the curriculum.
During periods of academic probation, students may not carry more than 13 credits in order to achieve more concentration on less
course work.
There is a sliding academic dismissal level of performance, based on the cumulative GPA and the number of hours earned, to which
every student is subject, and which can only be exempted on a semester-by-semester basis by the campus academic dean. The
dismissal process follows.
Academic Dismissal
Students accepted on academic probation are subject to review at the end of the first semester of attendance. Failure to achieve
a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above will lead to consideration for academic dismissal at the end of the first semester of study at
Northwood University.
All students, whether new or continuing, must meet the following criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) or be
subject to academic dismissal. At the end of each academic year, the Academic Dismissal Committee will review the record of
each student who has not met criteria for SAP.
Pace of Progress Toward Degree Completion (Quantitative) - Students must earn at least 67% of credit hours attempted.
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Minimum GPA Requirements (Qualitative) - The following table details the minimum cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)
requirements.
Semester Hours Earned
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16-29
30-59
60 or more
Minimum Cumulative GPA
1.70
1.80
1.90
2.00
The final academic dismissal decision rests with the campus Academic Dean and Campus President. Dismissals will be
communicated in writing to the student. Upon dismissal, a student is no longer eligible to attend Northwood University.
Academic dismissal appeals must be submitted in writing to the Executive Vice President and Chief Academic Officer of
Northwood University who makes the final determination in the case of an appeal.
Academic Honors
Northwood University recognizes outstanding academic achievement of students at the end of each semester through the
following honors a student may earn:
The President’s List: Full-time students who in any semester have earned a cumulative GPA of “A” (3.85 or above) and who
have no Is or Fs or ungraded courses will be on the President’s List for that semester.
The Dean’s List: Full-time students who in any semester have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.25 to 3.84 and who have no Is or
Fs or ungraded courses will be on the Dean’s List for that semester.
Academic Responsibility of the Student
Students must become familiar with the University’s academic and other policies, curriculum requirements, and associated
deadlines. While these are normally outlined in the University catalog, there may be amendments, updates, and corrections
which the University will communicate through separate means, such as other publications and on the University website.
Such changes to policies, procedures, and rules become effective for all students at the time of their implementation. The
academic staff will advise students on all matters related to their programs of study and will aid students in the interpretation of
policies whenever necessary. However, it is ultimately each student’s responsibility for meeting all pertinent and most current
requirements for the degree and the policies related thereto.
Students also have responsibility to actively use their Northwood University email and the University website as it is a major
communication resource and is often our primary communication with our students.
Students who travel on behalf of Northwood University to industry shows and competitive events must have a 2.3 or higher
cumulative GPA at the time the trip information is due to the Academic Office.
Course Offering Changes
Courses to be offered each semester are indicated in class schedule listings available on each campus and on the Northwood
website. Northwood may drop any course from the schedule of academic offerings if the enrollment is not sufficient to warrant its
instruction.
Course Load
The normal course load for Northwood undergraduate students is 15 to 16 credit hours per semester. Students who wish to enroll for
more than 18 credits per semester, must apply to the Registrar or Academic Dean for permission to take an overload.
Credit Hour Policy
Northwood University complies with the federal credit hour definition for all of its credit-bearing academic courses in all delivery
formats and modalities. This policy provides consistent standards across campuses and program areas and meets the requirements
specified by the Higher Learning Commission and federal regulations. Northwood adheres to these standards to ensure that students
have an equivalent opportunity to achieve the Student Learning Outcomes in the respective courses. Courses offered in timeframes
shorter than a semester or delivered in modalities other than traditional face to face format must have an equivalent number of hours
dedicated to instruction and student work as that spent in a semester-based class.
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Disability Services Eligibility
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Disabilities Act of 1973, Northwood
University provides accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Students are urged to make their needs known as
soon as they are admitted to the University. Refer to http://www.northwood.edu/ for more detailed information regarding services
and service contacts at specific locations.
Northwood University will make every reasonable effort to accommodate the needs of disabled students, on all campuses and at
every instructional center. However, not all of the previously existing buildings have been retrofitted to American with Disability
Act (ADA) standards.
Also under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973), Northwood University provides academic accommodations for students
with learning deficiencies.
Grading Policy
To be considered in good academic standing, students must maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA. The cumulative GPA is
calculated from the grades received for courses completed. The designations of W, P, I, or Z are not included in the GPA
calculation. However, these grade designations are counted when calculating the cumulative completion percentage for financial aid
recipients. This policy is in effect for all certificate, diploma, and degree-seeking students. Following is the grading system of the
University.
Letter
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
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Z
Honor Points
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
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2.3
2.0
1.7
1.3
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Interpretation
Excellent
Above Average
Average
Unsatisfactory
Failure
Pass
Incomplete
Withdrawn
No Credit/Audit
Deferred
Interpretation
A = Excellent: This grade reflects achievement of the highest order. Assignments and tests are structured to permit clear
differentiation at this upper, narrow range. Rarely would more than 10 percent (10%) of a group be capable of achieving this level,
as assignments and tests are structured to challenge the most capable students.
B = Above Average: This grade reflects achievement clearly above average standards. This level of achievement is one that
stretches the person of average ability to accomplish it. Persons achieving in this range exhibit good comprehension of the subject
matter with minor flaws.
C = Average: This grade reflects average, ordinary achievement. Achievement and performance at this level are satisfactory and
meet minimum standards. More flaws are evident, some of a serious nature. The greatest proportion of grades falls in this range,
unless there is an extraordinary group distribution.
D = Unsatisfactory: This grade reflects poor, unsatisfactory achievement below minimum standards. Major flaws are present, but
there is some competence to reflect segments of course content. A grade of D- is the minimum passing grade.
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F = Failure: This grade reflects poor, unsatisfactory achievement below minimum standards. Achievement is very flawed with little
competence to reflect segments of course content. No credit hours are earned. A course in which a grade of F is earned must be
retaken and successfully completed if that course is required for the curriculum in which the student is enrolled (see Repeating
Courses).
P = Pass: This grade reflects completion of a course with a pass/fail option or a test out with an earned grade of at least a C. No
honor points are awarded.
I = Incomplete: This grade reflects an extraordinary, uncontrollable interruption in completion of course requirements. It is not to
be used in the case of a missed test, term paper, etc., unless the incomplete work is caused by the student’s hospitalization or an
extreme emergency that takes the student away from classes for a week or more. All incompletes are subject to review by the
Registrar. Incompletes not made up become Fs at the end of 90 days.
W = Withdrawn: This grade reflects student withdrawal from a class by the end of the designated last day to withdraw from a class
(eleventh week of the semester for standard 15 week semester courses). Student withdrawals occurring after those times are
recorded as F. Withdrawals from the University (and all courses) before final exams result in grades of W.
X = No Credit/Audit: This grade should be used to reflect the presence of a student in a course on an audit basis. The student has
completed course work but has elected that no college credit be attached. Not all courses are available on an audit basis. Where
audits are available, charges are one-half of normal tuition.
Z = Deferred grade: This grade is used to reflect an internship that is still in progress. The Z grade will be replaced when a grade
is submitted; if no grade is submitted, the Z grade becomes an F.
Grade Appeals
Northwood faculty have the authority and obligation to assign appropriate grades and to conduct classes within the context of
University academic policies. Hence, the first level of grade appeal is to the professor whose decision is questioned.
Students who are not satisfied with the decision of the professor to whom they appealed may subsequently appeal to the faculty
department or division chair and then to the Academic Dean’s Office. The Academic Dean’s Office makes the final decision in all
grade appeal cases.
The “statute of limitations” for grade appeals is 30 days following the grievance.
Graduation
Graduation Requirements
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Completion of a minimum of 123 semester hours.
Completion of 31 semester hours of academic credit at Northwood University.
Successful completion of the program requirements.
An overall cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better.
Application for graduation.
Recommendation of the faculty with approval by the Board of Trustees.
Graduation with Distinction
In addition to semester honors, Northwood recognizes students who have maintained high academic achievement throughout
their education through the following graduation honors. A student is required to earn 31 semester hours of credit through
Northwood University to be eligible for one of these graduation honors. Degree honors are awarded as follows:
Cum Laude: A cumulative GPA of at least 3.5.
Magna cum laude: A cumulative GPA of at least 3.7.
Summa cum laude: A cumulative GPA of at least 3.9.
Graduation Honors – Valedictorian/Salutatorian
The valedictorian shall be that student in the traditional undergraduate program graduating class who has earned a minimum
of 61 credits at Northwood University and has maintained the highest cumulative GPA in the graduating class. In the event
of a tie for highest cumulative GPA, the student with the greatest number of earned Northwood credits will be valedictorian
and the other student will be salutatorian.
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The salutatorian shall be that student in the traditional undergraduate program graduating class who has earned a minimum of
61 credits at Northwood University and has maintained the second-highest cumulative GPA in the graduating class. In the
event of a tie for second highest cumulative GPA, the student with the greatest number of earned Northwood credits will be
salutatorian.
Online Registration
Students register for classes using their Web Advisor on the my.northwood.edu portal. Registration information is posted on
my.northwood.edu.
Through registration information postings (or supplementary emails), the student receives a registration time slot, a schedule of
upcoming classes, and instructions for online registration. It is the student’s responsibility to follow these instructions and register
or make schedule adjustments at the times specified. Students can access their my.northwood.edu portal from any computer with
Internet access. They do not have to be on campus to register.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the act of taking the words, ideas, strategies, formulas, compositions, research, or creative ideas of another and
presenting them as if they were your own. In any presentation, creative, artistic, or research, it is the ethical responsibility of each
student to identify the conceptual sources of the work submitted. Failure to do so is dishonest and is the basis for a charge of
cheating or plagiarism, which is subject to disciplinary action. Plagiarism can be either intentional or unintentional, but in either
case is a serious offense. Academic integrity is an important value at Northwood University. We consider all forms of cheating a
serious academic infraction. Plagiarism and cheating may lead to expulsion from the University.
Repeating Courses
Courses for which a student has earned a grade of F must be repeated if the course is required in the student’s curriculum plan. A
failed course may be repeated at another institution and transfer credit will be awarded; however, the Northwood cumulative grade
point average will not be affected. Students are encouraged to repeat a failed course at Northwood. Students who wish to improve
their achievement level may elect to retake a course at Northwood if they earned a C- or below in that course; courses in which
grades of C or better are earned may not be retaken. The letter grade earned in the most recent attempt will replace the prior grade
in the calculation of cumulative credit totals and grade point average, even if that grade is lower than the previous grade. All grades
will be included on a student’s transcript.
Schedule Adjustment
Using their my.northwood.edu account, students may adjust their schedule by dropping or adding courses during the specified
schedule adjustment period.
Student Awards
At each Northwood campus, an awards system of academic, curriculum, leadership, and other factors is used to recognize
outstanding achievements by graduates. Trophies, cash, and other forms of recognition are used to express honor and appreciation.
The faculty, students, and student groups develop the rules and conduct the elections for the various awards.
Each campus has a separate listing of the awards for each year. A special Honors Convocation is held to formally present these
awards.
Student Complaints
Northwood places high importance on obtaining feedback from students and responding to areas of concern in a timely manner.
Complaints are addressed informally and formally. Each campus/program area has a process for collecting, analyzing and
addressing formal student complaints. Formal complaints must be in writing.
Northwood logs complaints and ensures timely tracking of response(s) and outcomes for each. The university regularly reviews
complaints to determine potential systemic issues/themes and identify opportunities for improvement. Northwood communicates the
process through a variety of means including student orientation and Student Handbooks.
Students with a formal complaint or wishing to learn more about the complaint process should contact the respective Campus
President at the Residential Campuses or the respective Deans of the DeVos Graduate School of Management, Adult Degree
Program, or International Programs.
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Student Records
The Registrar’s Office on each campus is responsible for maintaining academic records on each student. Records include
documents such as the original application; letter of acceptance to Northwood; results of orientation placement tests;
standardized test results; midterm and final grades; transfer credit evaluations; letters of award, honor, or probation; and
cumulative transcripts. Grades are available through Web Advisor.
Official student transcripts will be sent to third parties only upon receipt of a signed request from the student. Some restrictions
may apply.
The student can obtain unofficial transcripts by forwarding a completed transcript request form to the Registrar’s Office on each
campus pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, Federal Law 93-380. Unofficial transcripts are also
available on Web Advisor.
Test-Out Policy
Students may attempt to test out of certain courses, for a fee, with a maximum of 30 credits permitted. Credit for the course will be
granted if a grade of C or better is achieved, but no honor points will be awarded. Test-outs may be attempted only once and may
not be used to repeat a course.
Transferability of Credit
As an institution regionally-accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, Northwood University’s academic credit is recognized
by other regionally- accredited institutions. However, the receiving institution makes the determination as to whether credits count
toward a student’s desired degree or program of study.
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STUDENT SERVICES
The Student Services Department provides programs, resources, services, and personnel primarily concerned with providing a
value-added experience to the educational opportunities outside of the classroom. Often, academic and non-academic opportunities
overlap and Student Services, with associated departments, is staffed with professionals who are advocates for students and their
needs. They are ready to assist students in resolving conflict and removing barriers to find ways to improve academic performance
and the educational experience.
Activities
Northwood University believes that a successful student is one that is well rounded with a passion for being involved, accepting
new challenges, and making a difference. These students are better prepared for the challenges they may face in the business world
post-graduation. Northwood University provides countless opportunities for its students to get involved and make the most of their
educational experience.
Activities range from professional and social clubs to music and drama groups, intercollegiate, intramural, and club sports,
recreational activities, social activities, and more. Participation in co-curricular activities allows students to use their leisure time
productively while making new friends, developing their leadership skills, and their ability to be effective in group situations.
Northwood recommends that students involved in all co-curricular activities maintain an above average grade point average.
EXCEL: The Student Development Program
Employers of Northwood University graduates constantly stress their desire to have employee candidates who demonstrate a variety
of experiences, positive attitudes, and leadership abilities beyond those gained within the classroom and reflected on the academic
transcript. EXCEL is a value-added program beyond the academic curriculum that enhances the employability of Northwood
University graduates and provides valuable experiences and dimensions beyond the classroom.
Through EXCEL, students participate in valuable, documentable activities, resulting in a Student Development Transcript that is
issued whenever an academic transcript is issued. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five credits of co-curricular
activities each year. Activities, along with certain honors and awards, are reflected on the Student Development Transcript. The
EXCEL program is intended to provide opportunities to expand students’ Northwood University education well beyond the
classroom requirements, enrich their lives and experiences, and improve their prospects for employment after graduation.
Florida Campus Organizations and Activities
Current organizations and activities on the Florida campus include:
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Advertising Club
Auto Show
Business Etiquette Dinner
Campus Ministries
Career Fair Series
Career Workshops
Class Councils
Cultural Heritage Series
DECA – Distributive Education Clubs of America
Dodgeball Tournaments
Dress for Success Fashion Extravaganza
Empower Series
EXCEL Weeks
Entrepreneurship Society
Fishing Club
Habitat for Humanity
Halloween Horror Nights
Homecoming Week
HOST Club
International Business Club
International Week
Intramural Sports
Kickball Tournaments
Leadership and Film Series
Leadership Symposium
STUDENT SERVICES
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Lessons in Leadership Series
Locks of Love
Marathon of the Palm Beaches
Movies on the Lawn
Music Masters Series
Northwood Ambassadors
Northwood Idol
Northwood Nights Programming Board
NUsletter / Publications
Paint Your Heart Out
Phi Beta Lambda
Planet Earth Series
Poker Tournaments
Power Plays Series
Relay for Life
Roommate Game
Rotaract
Seahawks in the Community
South Florida Adventures
Sport and Entertainment Association
Spring Fling Week
Spring Training Baseball Games
Student Alumni Network
Student Government Association
Student Judicial Board
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Survivor
Talent Shows
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Unity in the Community Day
Winter Carnival Bobsled Race
Students with interests in specific areas outside their curriculum are encouraged to form other organizations to pursue those
interests. The staff and faculty of the University will cheerfully provide assistance in establishing such groups.
Michigan Campus Organizations and Activities
Current organizations and activities on the Michigan campus include:
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Alcohol/Drug Educational Programs
Alpha Chi Omega – National Social Sorority
Alpha Chi Rho – National Social Fraternity
Alpha Gamma Delta – National Social Sorority
Alpha Kappa Psi – National Co-ed
Professional Business Fraternity
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alumni – Student Alumni Network
Ambassador Club
American Advertising Federation –
College Competition
American Marketing Association – AMA
Automotive Industry Show
Big Brothers/Big Sisters
Blood Drives (one per semester)
Business Professionals of America – BPA
Cause for Paws
Cheerleaders
Church Reloaded
Circle K
Cultural Activities – Art, Music, Dance, Lectures,
Movies
DECA – Distributive Education Clubs of America
Delta Mu Delta – National Business
Administration Honorary Society
Delta Sigma Theta – National Public Service
Sorority
Delta Zeta – National Social Sorority
Distinguished Teachers Spring Luncheon for
NU Honors Students nominees
Economic Association
Emerging Leaders
Entertainment, Sport & Promotion
Management Association (ESPMA)
Entrepreneurship Society
EPIC (Gay Straight Alliance)
Fashion Group
Finance Association
Fishing Club
Greek Week
Hockey – Men’s Club
Homecoming – Fall Semester &
Basketball Homecoming
Honorary Accounting Society of
Northwood University – HASNU
Honors Convocation – Spring Semester
Hospitality Enterprise
STUDENT SERVICES
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Intercollegiate Sports
Intercultural Club
Inter-fraternity Council – Social Fraternities
International Students’ Club
Intramural Sports
Investment Club
Iota Phi Theta
Kappa Sigma
Leaders of Tomorrow
Leadership Opportunity
Lectures – Informational and Motivational
Michigan Academy of Science, Arts & Letters
Minority Business Leaders of NU
Mock Trial Team
National Society of Leadership Success
Northwood Hospitality Enterprises – NUHE
NU-CARS (Club for Automotive Related Studies)
NU Dance Team
NU Kick-Off Party
NU Players – Theater Group
Omniquest Panels – Each Semester
Opening Convocation – Fall Semester
Order of Omega
Pack Pride Family Day
Panhellenic Council – Social Sororities
Phi Beta Sigma
Phi Delta Theta – National Social Fraternity
Publications – Student Newspaper and Yearbook
Rake a Difference
Rotaract
Salvation Army Children’s Christmas Party
SAP University Alliance
Senior Reception/Dance – Spring Semester
Ski Club
Sophomore Class – All Sophomores
Spring Fling/Pride Day
Stafford Scholarship Fundraising Dinner
Student Alumni Network
Student Athletic Advisory Committee (SAAC)
Student Government Association
Style Show
Tau Kappa Epsilon – National Social Fraternity
The Automotive Group (TAG)
TOMS
Transfer Club
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Values Emphasis Program – Spring Semester
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Zeta Phi Beta
Students with interests in specific areas outside their curriculum are encouraged to form other organizations to pursue those
interests. The staff and faculty of the University will provide assistance in establishing such groups.
Bookstore
The Bookstore carries textbooks for each semester, as well as supplies such as pens, pencils, notebooks, Northwood clothing, and
Northwood souvenirs. Personal checks are accepted only for the amount of the sale. VISA, MasterCard, American Express, and
Discover cards, as well as cash, are also accepted. A receipt is required for all refunds. Textbook returns for Adult Degree Program
books are two days from the purchase date.
Career Services Center
A fundamental aim of the Northwood philosophy is that every student be involved in a program that leads toward a satisfying and
productive career. To facilitate career opportunities, Northwood has a Career Services Center which coordinates and assists the
effort on each campus to bring together our students and alumni with potential employers. The campus Career Services Center
serves all Northwood students and alumni.
It Starts at New Student Orientation
The career-development process begins at Northwood with new student orientation and follows students throughout their academic
careers at the University and beyond. While attending Northwood, students have the opportunity to explore many companies and
career paths. These opportunities are presented during the academic process as well as through company presentations outside the
classroom.
The First Step to Career Assistance
During a student’s first year of study, they are encouraged to begin work on their career path. Seminars, informational meetings,
and personal consultations are available to explain the career search function. Resume and cover letter writing assistance, the
interview process with mock interviews, as well as what a new employee can expect on the first job are covered in special
workshops presented throughout the year by the Career Services Center.
Some Northwood curricula require an internship (400 hours) before completion of requirements for the Bachelor of Business
Administration degree. The Career Services Center works closely with curriculum chairs, employers, and students to aid in
completion of this requirement, including the addition of new employer partnerships every academic year.
Company Representatives Visit Northwood
Through the years, Northwood University has developed close, long-term relationships with many firms that represent our various
curricula. Representatives from these firms visit the campuses to interview those who are about to graduate and are looking for
employment. Additionally, off-campus interviews are scheduled depending on the requirements of the recruiting firm. The track
record of Northwood graduates is very good and employers come to Northwood campuses looking for the best. They are seldom
disappointed because Northwood students have been prepared to assume roles in several fields and have the right portfolio of skills,
attitudes, and values.
The on- and off-campus recruiting schedules are supplemented by companies who contact the Career Services Center about
positions that are currently available. Through the Experience Network (Northwood’s online job database), opportunities with
firms are posted (internship, co-op, part-time, and full-time). Students and alumni are able to upload resumes and apply for
positions based on meeting all qualifications. The recruiting firm reviews the resumes and selects candidates for interviews
directly or via the Career Services Center. Additionally, students are also given the opportunity to participate in University
sponsored career fairs and networking opportunities.
Publications, Research, and Services
The Career Services Center also supports and contributes to the Career Services Alcove Collection in the Cook Library (FL),
Strosacker Library (MI), as well as the respective Career Services Center offices, where a comprehensive cross-section of career
assistance information is maintained: books, periodicals, professional journals, video and audio tapes, computer search systems, as
well as reference materials specifically geared to help students research companies.
The Experience Network is available to traditional, Adult Degree Program (ADP), graduate students, and graduates from all
Northwood programs. For the convenience of all Northwood students, the Career Services Center also has information and
resources posted on the Northwood University website—www. northwood.edu (click on the appropriate campus).
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Counseling, Academic Advising, and Orientation
Academic advising is provided for each Northwood student. Advisors help each student to establish educational programs and
plans. Individual attention is given to a course of study selection commensurate with the student’s potential, area of interest, and
academic background. Strength in the breadth of educational study is encouraged together with the intended area of specialization.
Continued advisement throughout the student’s program at Northwood is available to aid the student in self-appraisal and the
development of traits and abilities of self-discipline that would identify those values necessary for successful academic
performance. Special advising is available for international students.
Northwood can assist students with any personal issues that affect their academic progress. The Student Services staff members
are available for private discussion with students, parents, and others on a variety of topics, including social life, housing
situations, financial matters, and health.
The Michigan campus has a Student Counseling Assistance Program with professional personal counseling available to all
Northwood students. The counseling staff from J&A Counseling and Evaluation has on-campus office hours available to provide
confidential counseling for personal, psychological, social, and behavioral concerns, as well as issues with the use of alcohol or
other drugs.
The Florida campus has a Student Support Center to provide confidential, individual, and group counseling for people
experiencing personal, developmental, or psychological concerns related to their educational progress and personal growth.
Referrals to outside services are provided when necessary.
All first-year students are required to register and to participate in a two-semester foundations (FDN) course. This on-campus
instruction course is called First Year Seminar I and First Year Seminar II; they are part of the curriculum for all incoming
students.
Orientation sessions are scheduled throughout the summer and immediately prior to the fall semester. FDN 1100 continues during
fall semester for all freshman students. Students receive additional information on the University environment and holistic factors
that aid in their success to include problem solving, communication, and critical thinking components.
Freshmen continue with Seminar II, FDN 1200, in the spring semester. This course provides an emphasis on institutional culture
and philosophy as it pertains to “The Northwood Idea.” Additional areas will cover free markets, skills needed for success,
Northwood University Outcomes, and the Code of Ethics.
The counseling/advising program interfaces the academic and personal lives of students. This comprehensive program takes a
developmental approach by helping each student to explore his or her academic, career, and life goals, as well as the potential
barriers blocking the fulfillment of those goals. This complex process involves the selection of appropriate courses and curricula
consistent with diagnosed skills, and of remediation work when necessary, plus the assertiveness skills and self-management skills
necessary to resolve personal problems and interpersonal conflicts.
Cultural Arts Events
Cultural Arts Events provide opportunities for Northwood students to understand and appreciate the importance of the arts and
humanities in their personal lives and their value as a business tool. Programs are guided by Northwood’s principle, “The Arts Make
Good Business Partners,” and focus on exposing students to various art forms while relating their experiences to creativity and
entrepreneurship. Guests from business, industry, the arts, and government provide campus activities throughout the year. Among
the wide variety of experiences offered to students to support the philosophy are art exhibitions, guest lecturers, performing artists,
musical events, and competitions. Social activities include dinners, dances, receptions, and other forms of entertainment, which
generally are sponsored both by the University and student activity groups.
Food Services
Modern dining room facilities are provided for students. Meals are served regularly three times a day with the exception of
Saturday and Sunday, when brunch and dinner are served. Students with special dietary needs may see the Food Service Director
for assistance.
All resident students have housing and meals as a part of their plan. Non-resident students (commuters) may also purchase a
meal plan for each semester. Please contact the Food Service Department on your campus for specific arrangements.
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Housing
Unmarried students under the age of 20 (on the Michigan campus) or 21 (on the Florida campus) as of the first day of classes of the
beginning school year, not living within the commuting area and not having completed the freshman year or equivalent, are
required to live in on-campus housing. Others may reside in the community upon approval or permission from the Dean of
Students. Waivers to the housing requirement are considered on an individual basis. Specifics on the criteria and process are
available from the Student Services Office of each campus.
Northwood maintains campus housing units. Separate units are available for men and women on both residential campuses
(Michigan and Florida). Resident Housing Directors and/or Head Residents and Resident Assistants provide supervision and
guidance in all units. Visitation hours are established by the University and are published by the Housing Office at each campus.
For health reasons, no pets may be kept in on-campus housing.
Each room has an assigned landline phone number provided by a phone service company with the installation charge and monthly
fee provided by the University. Students must provide their own landline phone.
Because the demand for on-campus housing on the Michigan and Florida campuses is greater than the supply, sophomores, juniors,
and seniors who wish to reside on campus must participate in a housing sign-up process to determine housing assignments. The
sign-up process is conducted during Spring Semester for the following school year.
Along with the housing staff, student organizations play an integral part in the planning and implementation of resident events and
activities. Northwood takes the responsibility for placing all required resident students in housing. Assigned occupants of each
room are financially responsible for keeping the room and its contents in good order and free from damage either by themselves or
their guests. Residents are liable for damage to University property. If a student does not return the room in good order, their room
deposit fee will be debited for the cost of the repairs.
Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics
In recognition of the need for healthful, competitive physical activity, organized sports participation is encouraged on the
residential campuses. Because of varying facilities and interests, each campus has developed its own varsity sports and intramural
programs. It is planned that, as physical education facilities grow, all forms of recreation will be available, with emphasis on
lifelong participation and interest.
Florida – “Seahawks”
The Florida campus is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), The Sun Conference, which
includes Ave Maria University, Edward Waters College, Embry Riddle University, Florida Memorial University, Johnson and
Wales University, Savannah College of Art and Design, Southeastern University, St. Thomas University, Thomas University,
University of South Carolina Beaufort, Warner University, and Webber International University.
The Florida campus Seahawks offer varsity and junior varsity baseball, men’s and women’s golf, softball, men’s and women’s
soccer, men’s and women’s basketball, junior varsity men’s basketball, volleyball, men’s and women’s cross country, cheerleading,
and men’s and women’s tennis. For more specific information about Seahawks athletics, see gonorthwood.com.
Intramural team sports offered on the Florida campus are flag football, dodgeball, indoor soccer, basketball, and softball. Other
recreational sports include kickball, outdoor soccer, arena football, outdoor basketball, tennis, racquetball, bocce ball, badminton,
sand volleyball, indoor volleyball, whiffle ball, powder-puff football (women only), and billiards. All sports offered are co-ed with
potential of having a separate league/game for men and women if there are enough participants. One of the main goals with the
intramural program is to offer at least two team sports each semester.
Michigan – “Timberwolves”
Northwood University (Michigan) is a Division II member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The
Timberwolves compete in the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (GLIAC). Conference members include Ashland,
Ferris State, Findlay, Grand Valley State, Hillsdale, Lake Erie, Lake Superior State, Michigan Technological, Northern Michigan,
Ohio Dominican, Saginaw Valley State, Tiffin, Walsh, and Wayne State,.
Varsity sports on the Michigan campus include football, men’s and women’s tennis, women’s volleyball, men’s and women’s
soccer, men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, men’s and women’s golf, women’s softball, men’s and women’s track and field,
and men’s and women’s cross country. For more specific information about the Timberwolves’ varsity teams, see
gonorthwood.com.
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The Michigan campus intramural programs and sports include: flag football, soccer, badminton, 4-on-4 volleyball, basketball,
whiffle ball, dodge ball, tennis, bocce ball, ultimate Frisbee, softball, and floor hockey. In addition to these sports there are
numerous one-day tournaments including powder-puff football, table tennis, 3-on-3 basketball, and slow-pitch softball. The
Michigan campus also participates in regional intramural tournaments against other universities in sports such as flag football and
basketball. Club sports exist on the Michigan campus for baseball, men’s lacrosse, men’s soccer, and hockey. These clubs compete
on an informal basis with clubs from other colleges and universities.
Learning Resource Centers
Northwood University Learning Resource Centers provide a variety of programs and services to help students succeed and excel
academically. All students are encouraged to participate in LRC programs and services, regardless of current class status or level of
achievement. All programs are available to Northwood students free of charge.
Florida campus students may participate in accounting, mathematics, and writing tutoring labs, facilitated course-specific study
groups, athlete study groups, and student success groups, individual appointments, and workshops, which teach effective strategies
for planning, studying, and test taking. The LRC also offers an internal website with resources such as current LRC Lab schedules
and writing, study, and test-taking tips and techniques. The Florida LRC office is located in the Cook Library.
Michigan campus students may choose from three types of tutoring in the Timberwolf Learning Resource Center (TLRC). Drop-in
tutoring is available without an appointment for accounting principles, algebra, and writing assignments. Students may also sign up
for a one-on-one tutor for any subject or join a tutor-led study group which meets weekly. In addition, student tutors periodically
present study skill seminars on APA format, use of Excel, time management, scholarship thank you letters, and more. Details are
available in the TLRC in Lower Strosacker and on my.northwood.edu.
Library
The mission of the Northwood libraries is “to enhance the learning environment by supporting instructional services, promoting
information literacy, and developing leaders who are independent, life-long learners.” Each of the Northwood University campuses
has its own library. Online library services across the Northwood system provide access to thousands of full text magazines,
newspapers, journals, and specialized business information sources. Whether on campus or off campus, students can access
resources 24 hours a day, seven days a week, through the library web pages via the Blackboard Course Management system.
Assistance in using the collections and services is readily available at library reference desks through “Ask a Librarian” and coursespecific resource guides on the library web pages. The ValCat library catalog provides access across the collections of each
Northwood location.
The Dr. and Mrs. Peter C. Cook Library opened in the fall of 1986 and is conveniently located on the first floor in the Johann M.
and Arthur E. Turner Education Center on the Florida campus. The Cook Library houses a collection of over 15,000 print
volumes and maintains 30 periodical subscriptions. Our digital collection boasts over 40 databases. Electronic resources are
available for research. Copier, computers, printers and Wi-Fi are available. Cook Library is a member of several library
consortiums, VLC; OCLC, and Lyrasis.
The Strosacker Library on the Michigan campus is centrally located in the upper level of the Strosacker building. It has a book
collection of approximately 36,000 volumes, as well as 240 periodical titles. The library acquires materials for a well-rounded
education with emphasis on business management and economics. Special curriculum collections include accounting; advertising;
automotive & automotive marketing; entertainment, sport & promotion management; Entrepreneurship & franchising; fashion
marketing & management; finance; and hospitality. Strosacker Library is a member of the OCLC library cooperative, which
provides global access to library materials through interlibrary loan. The library is a member of the Valley Library Consortium,
which provides access to the holdings of regional academic and public libraries using the online catalog of materials (VALCAT).
Reporting
The following reports are mandated by the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990 and the Equity in
Athletics Disclosure Act of 1994 and are available upon request to all current students, prospective students, and the public:
•
Campus Security Report – This report discloses data on crimes committed on campus, as well as campus safety
policies and procedures. The report may be viewed at http://www.northwood.edu/compliance.
•
Equity in Athletics Report & Athletics Revenue and Expense Report – These reports provide information on the
intercollegiate athletic programs at the University. Specifically, they disclose data on student athlete participation, coaches’
participation, recruiting expenses, athletic aid, average coaches’ salaries, operating expenses, and overall athletic revenues and
expenses. These reports are available annually after October 15 and can be requested in the following locations: the University
Title IV Compliance office and the Florida campus Financial Aid office.
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Student Life Centers:
Michigan
The Hach Student Life Center is a 62,217 square foot recreation facility built in 2002 to respond to the growing recreational,
social, and educational needs of Northwood University. The Center is a recreational, intramural, and fitness complex built to
complement the Bennett Sports Center. The center features three multi-purpose basketball, volleyball, and badminton courts
that are utilized for a wide range of sports, a four-lane running track, a fitness center equipped with circuit weight training
systems, elliptical trainers, stair steppers, bikes, dumbbells, benches and mats, a multi-use/wellness room, and locker rooms
equipped with shower and sauna facilities. The lobby area serves as a check-in point and houses a health food snack bar and
leisure areas equipped with network connections for laptop computers.
24-Month Evening MBA program students can currently purchase a membership for $90 per semester. Membership for 12Month Daytime MBA program students is included in the cost of the program.
Florida
The Countess de Hoernle Student Life Center (SLC), is the newest building to the Florida campus. The SLC has variety of
indoor amenities including the arena/gymnasium, the Richard and Helen DeVos Fitness Center & the Valarie & Dan Young
Multipurpose Room/Aerobic Room. The SLC also has conference rooms an athletic training room and multiple classrooms. It
is the home arena for the Men’s & Women’s Seahawk basketball and volleyball teams. Numerous recreational and academicrelated functions are also hosted in the SLC throughout the school year. As a multi-purpose building for students, the SLC is a
building where students can study, exercise, or just lounge around.
Student Medical Services
In compliance with federal regulations, Northwood requires that all students have healthcare insurance. The university makes
available two policies, one that provides students with healthcare coverage and a second that provides accidental injury only
coverage.
Students who have their own health insurance coverage will be allowed to opt out of the NU healthcare insurance plan. Every
student will have accidental injury only coverage as part of their student package to supplement their own/family health insurance
coverage or NU healthcare insurance plan. For more information, see: http://www.studentinsurance.com/Schools/MI/Northwood/
All Northwood University campuses accommodate the handicapped.
Florida – First Aid kits are located in the Residential Offices, Student Life Center Welcome Desk, and the Security Office. Student
Services Staff and Trainers are able to provide doctor referrals to any students that need assistance.
Michigan – The Health Center, staffed by a registered nurse and a physician in the office on a limited basis, is open at designated
times for advice concerning illnesses and injuries, with limited first aid treatment and physician referral available. MidMichigan
Medical Center is nearby and available 24 hours/day for emergencies.
Soliciting, Selling, Publicizing
No student, student organization, or outside organization shall engage in advertising or selling any goods, services, or tickets;
solicit for any purpose whatsoever on Northwood University’s property or in University operated buildings; without first
obtaining the written approval. Contact the Dean of Students who will obtain approval from the Director of Compliance &
Tax Matters. Food that is sold on campus must be purchased or have approval through Food Services. For additional details,
please reference the Student Handbook.
Student Publications
Opportunities for student-produced publications exist on both campuses. Examples include annual, quarterly, monthly, or weekly
publications such as campus newspapers, newsletters, and yearbooks. On Northwood’s Michigan campus, students produce a
newspaper, which is edited, managed, and published by students under the direction of a faculty advisor. The publications serve as
a practical workshop and professional experience for journalism and advertising students.
Security
Each campus engages a professionally licensed security service provider to perform specific guard and patrol responsibilities.
Campus security officers are supervised by the Director of Security and are responsible for securing buildings and grounds, traffic
regulations, and parking control. Officers are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to respond to requests for assistance from
students, faculty, and staff. Campus security personnel have the authority to enforce all campus policies and state laws. These
officers do not carry weapons nor do they have arrest powers. Northwood University maintains a very strong relationship with city
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and county law enforcement agencies. These agencies are contacted to assist with some on-campus complaints. The city and county
agencies also notify Northwood University officials of off-campus incidents that involve Northwood students.
Students are expected to assume responsibility for their property and personal safety by making sound decisions and reporting any
concerns to security immediately. Crimes should be reported to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in
providing timely warning notices to the campus community when appropriate. Proactive methods employed by campus security
against personal property theft include parking lot and building patrols, campus escorts (as requested), routine lighting and
emergency equipment checks, and identification engraving on personal items. Firearms and other weapons are prohibited on
Northwood University property.
It is the policy of Northwood University to comply with all applicable features of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security
Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, or commonly known as the Clery Act. Timely Notifications/Crime Alerts will be utilized
in an effort to notify campus and/or community members of certain crimes in and around the University community. Specific
protocols and campus crime reporting are outlined on the University compliance webpage at www.northwood.edu/compliance.
It is also the policy of Northwood University to comply with all applicable features of the Higher Education Opportunity Act for
reported missing students. Northwood University has established a missing student protocol for the notification procedures for
students who live in on-campus housing and who have been reported missing for more than 24 hours. Specific protocols are
outlined on the University compliance webpage at www.northwood.edu/compliance.
Student Conduct
A student may be placed on probation if his or her social conduct does not meet the standards of good conduct set up by the
administrative officials and published in the Student Handbook which is distributed to all incoming students.
Disregard for others and their property, policies, rules, and regulations of the University may lead to social probation, the extent
and seriousness of which will be in relation to the offense. A fine or other penalty may be imposed.
A student may be suspended or dismissed for either academic or social cause. Each student’s case will be handled individually. A
student may be considered for readmission after suspension by petitioning administrative officials. It is the policy of the University
to maintain a learning and work environment that is free from harassment because of an individual’s race, gender, color, religion,
creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, disability, or veteran status. The University prohibits any and all forms of
harassment because of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, disability, or veteran
status.
It shall be a violation of University policy for any student, teacher, administrator, or other school personnel to harass a student
through conduct of a sexual nature, or regarding race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital
status, disability, or veteran status. The policy can be located at http://www.northwood.edu/ compliance or a paper copy may be
obtained from the Human Rights Officer in the Human Resources Department, Northwood University Administrative Center,
Midland, Michigan. The telephone number for this office is (989) 837-4345.
Manners and Good Grooming
Good manners are never old fashioned. Pleasantness and consideration have their own reward and cost little. Respect for the
rights of others first and one’s self second is the essence of good manners.
Good grooming is the result of planning and the adherence to basic health rules. Higher education is the place to experience new
ideas, changing attitudes, new friends, and to develop a good grooming identity. One’s dress expresses one’s personality. Attire
should be appropriate and tasteful at all times, whether in the workplace, the classroom, the dining area, or the living areas.
Northwood is a business university; its faculty and staff members are expected to be well-groomed in accordance with business
standards; its students are expected to dress in a manner that does not cause classroom distraction.
Policies:
Alcohol/Drugs
The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, Subtitle D, Section 5152, and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of
1989, PL No. 101-226, require that Northwood University maintain an environment free from the unlawful manufacture,
distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of controlled substances or alcohol.
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The University recognizes its obligation to support the law and is aware of the damaging impact illegal drugs can have on our
culture and especially its young people.
The President or Campus President may elect to expel a student for any criminal behavior or convictions that indicate behavior that
is threatening to other students.
The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited while on University
property, attending Northwood events, or performing work-related duties.
Pursuant to applicable procedures, policies, or appropriate collective bargaining agreements governing employee or student
discipline, involvement in the unauthorized use, sale, manufacturing, dispensing, or possession of controlled substances or alcohol
on Northwood University premises or during Northwood University activities, or working under the influence of such substances,
will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal or expulsion.
Any employee or student who is convicted of violating any criminal drug/alcohol statute when such violation occurs at Northwood
or as a part of any school activities must notify the University no later than five (5) days after such conviction. Failure to provide
such notice may subject the employee or student to dismissal or expulsion. The employee shall notify his or her immediate
supervisor, who will report the incident to the Human Resources Department. The student will notify the Dean of Students.
Northwood University supports programs aimed at the prevention of substance abuse by Northwood employees and students. The
University provides preventive educational programs for students and refers employees and students experiencing substancedependency related problems for counseling and assistance.
Drug and Alcohol Prevention Counseling
Northwood encourages faculty, staff, and students with alcohol or other drug-dependency problems to contact community
counseling centers for assistance. Confidential substance abuse counseling may be arranged by contacting the Human Resources
Director, the Vice President of Finance, or the Campus President. Students may contact the Student Assistance Counselor, Director
of Counseling Services, or a staff member in the Student Services office.
Penalties for Violation
Misuse of alcohol and drugs interferes not only with students’ academic performance, but with their emotional, physical, mental,
and social development as well. Based on this realization, the federal government has recently enacted several laws in an effort to
address these issues. Northwood University supports these policies. Therefore, the possession, use, or distribution of substances
that violate state or federal laws is subject to disciplinary action by Northwood University.
Specific sanctions for a campus are outlined in each campus’ Student Handbook. These sanctions can include, but are not limited to
the following:
Penalty for alcohol use/abuse and/or possession
First Offense
• Confiscation of alcohol and disposal
• Disciplinary probation with contract
• Notification of parents
• Referral to Student Assistance Counselor (A $50 fine will be added if non-compliant)
• Referral to athletic director and coach if student is an intercollegiate athlete
• Loss of alcohol privileges if living in a “21” apartment, and possible reassignment to a non-designated apartment
• 10 supervised community service or program completion hours (minimum $50 fine if not completed as directed)
Second Offense
• Notification of parents
• Counseling, outpatient, or inpatient rehabilitation program
• Possible suspension
• Confiscation and disposal of alcohol
• 15 supervised community service hours (minimum $75 fine if not completed as directed)
• Possible referral for substance abuse evaluation through the Counseling office and required participation in a substance abuse
class (minimum 6 hrs.)
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Third Offense
• Notification of parents
• Suspension or dismissal
• Proof of completion of an alcohol rehabilitation program for readmittance consideration (off campus)
• Confiscation and disposal of alcohol
Penalty for drug use and/or possession, or drug paraphernalia
First Offense
• Confiscation and destruction of drugs and/or paraphernalia
• Disciplinary probation with contract (period of time determined by Dean of Students)
• Notification of parents
• Referral to Student Assistance Counselor (A $50 fine will be added if non-compliant)
• Mandatory substance abuse evaluation and mandatory participation in a substance abuse class (minimum 6 hrs.)
• 20 supervised community service or program completion hours
• Referral to athletic director and coach if student is an intercollegiate athlete
• Possible suspension or dismissal
Second Offense
• Notification of parents
• Counseling, outpatient, or inpatient rehabilitation program (successful completion of a program)
• Possible suspension or dismissal
• Confiscation and destruction of drugs and/or paraphernalia
• Completion of a community off campus substance abuse program before readmission to the University
Third Offense
• Notification of parents
• Immediate permanent dismissal with no appeal
• Confiscation and destruction of drugs and/or paraphernalia
The Student Drug Assistance program varies from campus to campus. On the Michigan campus, the program is a confidential,
professional counseling service. The Florida campus uses part-time counselors. These counselors are available on a scheduled basis
to make initial evaluations and to refer students on a 24-hour-a-day basis to local agencies for further evaluation and treatment.
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ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM
Northwood University’s Adult Degree Program
For over 30 years, Northwood University has provided options for working adults to complete a Bachelor of Business
Administration Degree. The Adult Degree Program is a degree program offered to working adults that are seeking professional
improvements by returning to school. Students may complete their degree requirements at one of our program centers located in
eight states or online. Courses are offered in a variety of formats to meet the needs of working adults including evening, weekend,
and online.
Contact Information:
Adult Degree Program
Northwood University
4000 Whiting Drive
Midland, MI 48640
Toll Free (800) 622-9000 www.northwood.edu/adults
Admissions Process
•
Request official transcript(s) from applicable institutions and have them mailed to the ADP Registrar at 4000 Whiting Drive,
Midland, MI 48640 as soon as possible to have credits evaluated.
•
Students who have received an associate’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university will receive a credit
evaluation that identifies equivalencies and electives acceptable for transfer.
•
Courses completed after the associate’s degree was awarded may be transferable as long as a grade of “C” (2.0) or better has
been earned and if applicable to the curriculum.
Students transferring without an associate’s degree will have their transcripts evaluated for equivalent Northwood credit. Students
in this category will be permitted to transfer equivalent courses and electives with grades of “C” (2.0) or better.
Once admitted, the student will receive a curriculum guide indicating exactly which courses must be completed for graduation.
Prior Learning Assessment
Adult Degree Program students may earn college credit for their prior learning. To apply for prior learning credit, the student
should have significant work experience and a minimum of 3-5 years of related and documented management experience. A
maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be awarded (Texas maximum is 15 credits). Prior learning is evaluated much like that
of coursework. The evaluator awards credit where appropriate. Prior learning assessments must be submitted within 120 days of
beginning Northwood’s coursework. Students interested in prior learning credit will complete a 1 credit online course during their
first
semester at Northwood University in which they will develop their portfolio.
Degree Offerings
Northwood University’s Adult Degree Program offers a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with the following majors:
Accounting, Aftermarket Management, Automotive Marketing & Management, Health Care Management, Management,
Management Information Systems, and Marketing. For degree requirements and courses please see section beginning on page 17.
To be awarded the bachelor’s degree, an individual must complete a minimum of 31 semester hours with Northwood University and
have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above. Majors vary by location—visit www.northwood.edu/adults for a list of programs available
near you. Associate of Arts degrees are also offered at the 3 military sites: Selfridge, New Orleans, and Fort Worth and some
corporate locations. To be awarded the associate’s degree, an individual must complete a minimum of 15 semester hours with
Northwood University and have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above.
Semester Hour Requirements
•
A minimum of 123 semester credit hours are needed to obtain a BBA from Northwood University.
•
A minimum of 31 credits must be completed with Northwood University to be eligible for residency and academic honors.
•
Students may incorporate additional minors or majors, but this will involve additional coursework.
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Academic Honors
• For academic honors, a student must complete the minimum of 31 credit hours with Northwood University and meet honors
criteria as prescribed below:
•
•
•
Cum Laude – 3.50 cumulative GPA to 3.69 cumulative GPA
Magna Cum Laude – 3.70 cumulative GPA to 3.89 cumulative GPA
Summa Cum Laude – 3.90 cumulative GPA to 4.00 cumulative GPA
Transfer Coursework
•
•
All transfer coursework (if applicable) must be college level; remedial or developmental coursework is not considered college
level.
All transfer coursework (if applicable) must meet GPA requirements set by Northwood University.
Course Delivery Options
•
•
•
•
•
•
Night courses (on- or off-campus)
Weekend courses (on- or off-campus)
Online courses
On-campus daytime classes
Limited credit by examination, such as the CLEP general and subject exams
Hybrid/blended combination of online and face-to-face
Northwood University offers online classes in an asynchronous format. By taking coursework asynchronously, students have
the flexibility to engage in their courses at both the time and place that is most convenient for them. By design, this delivery
format allows for expanded interaction and participation and, therefore, all students participate in the discussions and feedback
sessions.
Throughout the duration of the course, students will engage in a minimum of 45 hours of online interactive learning. Students
should plan on an average of 5-7 hours of online instructional engagement per week. Students should also plan on an average
of 10-12 additional hours per week for individual coursework such as reading the textbook, research, or writing papers. Each
online student works with a Program Center Manager/Advisor who provides guidance from admission to graduation. They
review delivery expectations, course outlines, and course shell templates so students are fully prepared to be successful in
their online courses.
Northwood University is devoted to continuous improvement and reserves the right to revise all curriculum guides or academic
programs. These enhancements could cause changes but not additions to the student’s program of study. To fulfill graduation
requirements, students are to complete the curriculum guide that is in effect at the time they are accepted for admission to
Northwood University.
Locations
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Michigan: Alpena, Bay City, Flint, Gaylord, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Livonia, Macomb, Midland, Saginaw, Selfridge
(Military), and Troy
California: Cerritos
Florida: West Palm Beach
Illinois: Glen Ellyn
Kentucky: Louisville, Toyota (Georgetown – Employees only), Ford Fern Valley and Ford West Port (Ford –
Employees only)
Louisiana: New Orleans (Military)
Texas: Cedar Hill, Fort Worth (Military)
Online
Refund Policy
Students must notify their Adult Degree Program Center Manager of any changes to their enrollment. This date will be the
withdrawal date used in processing any refunds.
All courses dropped prior to the start of the course will be refunded in full. Definition of a week: 7 days starting on the first
scheduled meeting of a class.
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8-Week Course:
(based on the actual start date of the course)
•
•
•
90% if withdrawal is during the first week of class
75% if withdrawal is during the second week of class
50% if withdrawal is during the third week of class
16-Week Course:
(based on the actual start date of the course)
• 90% if withdrawal is during the first or second week of class
• 75% if withdrawal is during the third or fourth week of class
• 50% if withdrawal is during the fifth or sixth week of class
Compressed Course:
(based on the actual start date of the course)
• 75% if withdrawal is prior to second class meeting
• 0% if after second class meeting begins
Refunds for Recipients of Federal Financial Aid:
Return of Title IV Aid Policy for Federal Financial Aid Recipients
As prescribed by law and regulation, Federal Title IV funds will be returned to the applicable sources in the following order:
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, Federal Direct PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Academic
Competitiveness Grant, National SMART Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and then other
Title IV Aid Programs. Examples of this refund policy are available at the Financial Aid Offices on each campus.
Military Program Centers
The Military Program Centers are located at Selfridge ANGB, Michigan; Naval Support Activity, New Orleans, Louisiana; and
Naval Air Station/JRB, Ft. Worth, Texas, and offer coursework in evening and weekend time modules. These are traditional,
resident programs with the same admission and graduation requirements as the campus resident programs. The programs are
controlled and supervised by the Associate Dean of the Adult Degree Program.
Academic and Grade Appeals
Three levels of academic appeals are possible to provide for appropriate processing of academic grievances. The “statute of
limitations” for academic appeals is the 30 days following the grievance. Northwood faculty has the authority and obligation to
assign appropriate grades and to conduct classes within the context of the Academic Policies section of this catalog. Hence, the first
level of academic appeal is to the professor whose decision is questioned.
Students who are not satisfied with the decision of the professor to whom they appealed may subsequently appeal to the campus
Academic Dean or, in the case of all Adult Degree Program students, to the Adult Degree Program Associate Dean who serves on
the Academic Council.
Students who are not satisfied with the Dean’s decision may submit a last appeal to the Executive Vice President and Chief
Academic Officer (EVP/CAO), who is the final arbiter of all academic matters. This appeal must be in writing and should explain
all particulars, including reference to the previous two levels of appeal. This appeal should be sent by registered mail to the
EVP/CAO at the corporate headquarters of the University in Midland, Michigan. The EVP/CAO will invite written input from
others involved in the previous appeals based on copies of the appeal that will be provided to them. Copies of their responses will
be sent to the person appealing, who will then have ten days to respond in writing to their responses. Following this exchange, a
written decision will be rendered.
Executive and Continuing Education
The Executive and Continuing Education division of Northwood University is led by the Vice President of Strategic and Corporate
Alliances. Its focus is to deliver a wide variety of training and seminar programs to all levels in the world of business. Constituents
and clients across the country can avail themselves of the service offered through this department of Northwood University.
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Included in the offerings are both stand-alone seminars and packaged programs that lead to certificates in a wide variety of business
disciplines. Certificate programs are available in business administration, finance, automotive, and hospitality.
Each area offers a number of current management training seminars to participants either on our campuses, or custom-designed at
any site. Short courses and online training are available as well.
For information concerning Executive and Continuing Education, contact:
Executive and Continuing Education Department
(800) 684-2786 • (989) 837-4323
[email protected]
Northwood University
4000 Whiting Drive
Midland, MI 48640
Northwood University’s University of the Aftermarket
The University of the Aftermarket is an educational alliance of the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association (AAIA),
Automotive Warehouse Distributors Association (AWDA), and Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association (MEMA). Its
mission is further strengthened by its affiliation with Northwood University, a private, accredited university that grants bachelor and
master’s degrees in a variety of specialized managerial and entrepreneurial business disciplines.
The University of the Aftermarket’s mission is to meet the continuing management, business, and leadership education and
development needs of professionals working within the motor vehicle aftermarket. The University achieves this mission through the
creation, promotion, and management of industry-wide and custom educational programs in a variety of online, collaborative, and
custom conference formats. Successful completion of these programs culminates in earning the widely recognized and respected
Automotive Aftermarket Professional or Master Automotive Aftermarket Professional certificates. For more information and to
view the course calendar, please visit www.universityoftheaftermarket.com.
For more information, contact:
Director
University of the Aftermarket
(800) 551-2882 • (989) 837-4326
[email protected]
ADULT DEGREE PROGRAM
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THE DEVOS GRADUATE SCHOOL
DeVos Method
The DeVos Graduate School regards management as an art that requires the ability to understand and utilize information,
assumptions, contexts, processes, human factors, and work group designs to exercise responsible and effective decisions so as to
influence others and organizations.
Our basic approach—our core understanding—is that effective management education focuses on the use of data rather than
beliefs, must be integrative, is student-centered, and action-oriented.
Using Data Rather than Beliefs
Students will use first- and second-hand information. Quantitative and qualitative data will be used from which interpretations and
judgments may be made. The key initiative is for students to develop their own logic and reasoning in solving problems, become
aware of their personal biases, and develop the ability to manage them.
Integrative
The emphasis in the classroom is to have students look and see across the functions of an organization. Rarely is a cause found in
one silo of a firm, and rarely can a solution be implemented that can be applied in only one area. The goal for students is to be able
to see, interpret, fix, and manage across the entire organization or firm. This integrative approach is achieved by readings, case
selection, and faculty member focus.
Student-centered
The focus is on developing effective behaviors in the classroom that can be transferred to the workplace. Attention is paid to the
reasoning and thinking of the student and the ability of the student to effectively engage others. Faculty members are committed to
getting to know each student so as to be able to pay attention to the behavioral and attitudinal expressions of each student with
regard to effective management.
Action-oriented
We do not expect students to develop simple or elegant solutions. We help students develop an understanding of the complexity of
business problems while finding solutions that can address similar problems in the workplace. Students are encouraged to see
through the protagonist’s eyes through cases and to take on a variety of roles and responsibilities in simulation exercises. In each
case, the focus is upon having the student be responsible for designing what needs to be done, implementing the details of the
decision, and assessing risks.
Our methodologies include requiring student initiative and action, supporting mentoring relationships with faculty, expecting
students to learn in cohort groups, and be responsible for the learning and personal development of the other members.
A Message from the Dean
Welcome to the DeVos Graduate School at Northwood University. We hope these pages help you understand who we are and
how we are different from other graduate business programs.
At DeVos, we believe that management is not about buzzwords, fads, formulas, beliefs, or simplistic answers. We believe
management is about finding and fixing problems, not as an individual doing tasks, but rather, through others, as part of an
organization. Our goal is to create highly effective business leaders through a process of personal and professional transformation
based on our integrative curriculum and problem-based learning methodology.
The DeVos Graduate School is committed to its students and to developing the future leaders of a global, free-enterprise society.
Please take the time to explore DeVos and see if we fit your education needs.
Lisa Fairbairn, Ph.D.
Dean
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History of the DeVos Graduate School
By 1989, Northwood Institute had served the academic community for 30 years with flexible and innovative programs matched to
real needs. During much of our institution’s third decade, our undergraduate faculty and other academic committees explored the
idea that, despite an obvious proliferation of MBA programs worldwide, we were uniquely qualified to serve real marketplace
needs for MBA programs designed to make a difference.
An effort was launched to make that belief a reality in early 1990. In that year, a three-person task force, chaired by a newly
appointed Dean of Graduate Studies, set about designing an Executive MBA program to serve identified needs within the state of
Michigan. From the outset, it was assumed that the design would mirror Northwood’s very successful undergraduate programs by
innovatively meeting real marketplace needs.
The design would also lend itself to continual adaptation by an eminently qualified graduate faculty to be identified later. The task
force also sought the advice of a team of its own graduates who had earned MBA degrees from many distinguished American
universities, and by two consultants, Dr. Joseph H. Rogatnick (Ph.D., Wharton School), whose career included a professorship at
Boston College, diplomatic and business service, and the CEO position of Boston College’s graduate school in Brussels; and Dr.
William D. Guth (D.B.A., Harvard, M.A.), who chaired the Management/Organizational Behavior Department at NYU, and
subsequently served as NYU’s Director of the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies.
Northwood submitted its plan for the Executive MBA program in the spring of 1992 to its regional accreditors, The North Central
Association of Colleges & Schools, who sent a team of individuals to visit us that summer. Following a favorable recommendation
from the team, we received full approval from the Association at its quarterly meeting that November. Immediately thereafter, the
Graduate School of Business was established as a new entity of the institution, and the first, three full-time faculty members were in
place by December 1. Northwood’s President and CEO, Dr. David E. Fry, announced that the first MBA classes would be held
without delay in January 1993, and that the institution would simultaneously change its name to Northwood University. Initial
classes were held in Detroit, Flint, Lansing, and Midland for about 75 students.
In September 1993, the graduate school received a substantial gift from the Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation and was
established as The DeVos Graduate School. Since its startup, the graduate school has more than quadrupled its faculty and
enrollments, moved into a beautiful new home on the Michigan campus, and added a separate 15-Month Full-time MBA program
which is uniquely designed to simulate business experience. Five years after its inception, the innovation and intensity of the DeVos
Graduate School’s executive program earned recognition by Business Week magazine with its listing among top Executive
Programs (Business Week On-Line, October 20, 1997). In spring 2000, it added the Managerial MBA program, offering a range of
management education designed to fit the unique needs of today’s new middle and executive level managers.
Fall 2001 marked the beginning of a unique partnership with the HantzGroup with the development of an in-house Executive MBA
program. This program was designed to meet the needs of the dynamic managerial and leadership roles of individuals in the
financial services sector. In summer 2004, The Dow Chemical Company and the graduate school joined hands to launch a Global
Executive MBA program. Custom designed for Dow, the program was only available to those employees identified as future
leaders of the company.
In September 2007, the DeVos Graduate School introduced the innovative Evening 24-month MBA program of study. This
program delivered a dynamic, integrated management curriculum to enhance the leadership and management skill sets of today’s
globally minded business professionals.
The Dealership Executive MBA Program (Fall 2008), and the Aftermarket Executive MBA Program (Summer 2009), were
designed with the career demands of upper-echelon executives in mind. These programs provided customized curriculums that
afforded professionals aligned with the retail automotive and aftermarket industries the opportunity to further develop the skills
needed to compete in the ever-changing automotive marketplace and motor vehicle aftermarket arena. Leaders from any
undergraduate discipline gain an edge over the competition and become part of a diverse global network through their DeVos
experience.
The DeVos Graduate School expanded its 24-Month Evening MBA program by launching the MBA in Cedar Hill, Texas (fall
2009); at the Florida campus (fall 2010); and in Grand Rapids, Michigan (spring 2011). These programs follow the same format as
the existing Midland, Lansing, and Troy, Michigan 24-Month Evening MBA program with a unique cohort-based curriculum
developed to meet the needs of individuals with significant professional work experience. 24-Month Evening MBA students seek to
gain the additional knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to advance in their respective careers.
The DeVos Graduate School broadened their offering by launching a Weekend MBA program in spring of 2013. The Weekend
MBA program was implemented to be conducive to the schedule of the working professional; allowing course work on average of
two weekends per month in comparison to the weekly meetings of the Evening MBA Program.
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Additionally, the DeVos Graduate School launched the online Master of Science in Organizational Leadership (MSOL). This was a
milestone for the DeVos Graduate School as this broadened the graduate program beyond the MBA. The program is offered using
the online / virtual classroom incorporating asynchronous and synchronous learning technology to create a robust learning
environment and like a traditional education, the MSOL degree can be completed at the pace of each individual student.
The most recent partnership for Northwood University and the DeVos Graduate School of Management is with the General Motors
Corporation. The DeVos Graduate School launched their first General Motors Executive MBA program in spring 2014. This
program offers a hybrid model of learning; including online and classroom participation. The GM/DeVos Executive MBA Program
is an intensive opportunity for dealership and corporate General Motors employees to enhance their education and careers with
industry specific course learnings and connections.
Future MBA offerings will begin in January 2015 with online programming, as well as the Motor Vehicle Aftermarket Executive
MBA.
The DeVos Difference
Northwood University's DeVos Graduate School is a specialized business school focused on developing the future leaders of a
global, free-enterprise society. We provide dynamic graduate degree programs for adults designed to strategically expand your
managerial and leadership skill sets, equipping you with the necessary tools to lead and drive change in your career and life. You
will find yourself in the unique position of having choices in your career and entrepreneurial endeavors that you had not previously
thought possible with a graduate business degree from Northwood University.
Our MBA and MSOL programs work with the demands of today's competitive marketplace, and most importantly work with you!
The DeVos Graduate School's Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs and Master of Science in Organizational
Leadership (MSOL) program were created with the understanding you are unique. Whether it is through our 12-month accelerated
MBA program, our 24-month evening/weekend,/traditional/online MBA programs, our 30-month executive program, or our online
MSOL program, we are here for you. You demand specific professional and personal elements that will enable greater satisfaction
in your career, higher earning potential, and a more fulfilled life. The journey from discovery to transformation begins here.
DeVos Academic Outcomes
Statement of Purpose:
At the DeVos Graduate School of Management, our purpose is to create highly effective leaders through a process of personal and
professional transformation based on our integrative curriculum and student-centered learning methodology.
Successful degree completion will provide students with:
• The management skills to find and fix problems and capitalize on opportunities by leveraging their integrated business
knowledge and working effectively with others.
• The leadership skills to create a vision and influence others to follow, and to raise the performance of all members of the
organization.
Specifically, graduates will achieve the following outcomes:
Business Acumen
Successful students will demonstrate the ability to use business concepts to effectively identify and provide solutions to complex
problems within organizations.
Critical Thinking
Successful students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate alternative explanations of organizational issues and their
potential solutions.
Personal Effectiveness
Successful students will demonstrate the personal behaviors necessary to effectively lead, implement and assess activity within and
across organizations.
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GRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY
The Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program
Each DeVos MBA program allows students to continually practice, assess, and refine their management skills. Students learn to
analyze issues from a cross-functional perspective. Rather than concentrations or majors, each program focuses on increasing
analytical and critical thinking skills that center on the scrutinized business as a whole. These skills are developed through a
combination of case analysis, business and management simulations, workshops, as well as interaction with executive students and
alumni.
The DeVos curriculum is designed to provide students with global management skills throughout each course and activity. Because
knowledge of global issues is fundamental to success in today’s business community, there is little distinction between international
and domestic business in the DeVos MBA Management issues transcend the organization itself, reaching beyond the front door to
encompass the global marketplace. As such, it is no longer acceptable to offer only a course or two in international business.
Students are exposed to a wide array of opportunities to practice using the management tools and skills required to develop their
professional potential. Upon completion of the program, students are able to:
• Find and fix organizational problems
• Capitalize on opportunities
• Drive necessary changes
• Create a vision to influence others
Our MBA programs are delivered in a cohort format and require 36 semester hours of coursework. A typical semester includes
courses from the following modules:
• Leadership I: Human Behavior
• Leadership II: Managing and Leading People
• Critical Thinking, Reasoning & Analysis I: Fundamental Concepts & Approaches to Decision Making
• Critical Thinking, Reasoning & Analysis II: Process Improvement for Managers
• Measurement I: Financial Reporting
• Measurement II: Corporate Financial Decision Making
• External Environment: Global Markets, Policy and Regulation
• Satisfying Customers I: Strategy & Marketing Perspective
• Satisfying Customers II: Strategy & Marketing Practicum
• Satisfying Shareholders: Corporate Strategy
• Integration & Implementation: Critical Case Application
• Management & Leadership Capstone
Academic Calendar
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Summer 2015
August 25 – December 21, 2014
January 12 – May 10, 2015
May 26 – August 2, 2015
12-Month Accelerated Program
Midland, Michigan; Cedar Hill, Texas; West Palm Beach, Florida
The DeVos Graduate School’s 12-Month Accelerated MBA Program utilizes a student-centered, discussion-based learning
approach that immediately involves students in real-world managerial situations. This program was designed for students with
varying degrees of work experience who have the ability to attend courses during the day on a full-time basis, over a 12-month
period.
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12-Month Accelerated Program Specifications
Program Start:
Length of Program:
Total Credits
Degree:
Class Size:
Curriculum:
Program Location:
Financial Aid:
Scholarships:
Fall (August)
12 months
36
Master of Business Administration:
Focus Integrated Management
30-35 students
100% case study-based,
student-centered discussion
Midland, Michigan; Cedar Hill,
Texas; West Palm Beach, Florida
Eligible students may qualify for loans
Merit scholarships available
Contact Information (Admissions):
Email: [email protected]
Web:
www.northwood.edu/graduate
24-Month Evening Program
Midland, Lansing, Troy, and Grand Rapids, MI; Cedar Hill, TX; West Palm Beach, FL
The 24-Month Evening MBA was developed to meet the needs of individuals with significant professional work experience. 24Month Evening MBA students seek to gain the additional knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to advance in their
respective careers. The 24-Month Evening MBA program is delivered one evening per week at each location.
Courses will run one night a week, Monday-Thursday from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Each course will also have a weekly activity
equivalent to 2 hours of in-class time which will be referred to as a practical application experience.
24-Month Evening MBA Program Specifications
Program Start:
Length of Program:
Total Credits:
Degree:
Class Size:
Curriculum:
Program Locations:
Avg. Entering GPA:
Typical Candidate:
Financial Aid:
Scholarships:
Fall (August); Spring (January)
24 months (6 semesters)
36
Master of Business Administration: Focus Integrated Management
20-35 students
100% case study-based, student-centered discussion
Midland, Lansing, Troy, Grand Rapids, MI; Cedar Hill, TX; and West Palm Beach, FL
3.15/4.0 Scale
Managers, entrepreneurs/business owners
Eligible students may qualify for loans
Merit scholarships available
Contact Information (Admissions):
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.northwood.edu/graduate
24-Month Traditional Program
The Traditional MBA is designed to meet the needs of students with varying degrees of work experience. The program is tailored
for individuals who seek to gain additional knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to advance in their respective careers.
The Traditional MBA program meets twice each week, over a 24-month period.
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24-Month Traditional MBA Program Specifications
Program Start:
Length of Program:
Total Credits:
Degree:
Class Size:
Curriculum:
Program Locations:
Avg. Entering GPA:
Typical Candidate:
Financial Aid:
Scholarships:
Fall (August)
24 months (6 semesters)
36
Master of Business Administration
20-35 students
100% case study-based, student-centered discussion
Varies by semester
3.15/4.0 Scale
Aspiring managers, entrepreneurs/business owners with varying degrees of work experience
Eligible students may qualify for loans
Merit scholarships available
Contact Information (Admissions):
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.northwood.edu/graduate
24-Month Weekend Program
Midland, Lansing, Troy, and Grand Rapids, MI; Cedar Hill, TX; West Palm Beach, FL
The 24-Month Weekend MBA was designed to meet the needs of working professionals. The program provides students a high
quality graduate level business education in a convenient, manageable delivery. The Weekend MBA program consists of four
weekend meetings per eight week course, over a 24-month period.
24-Month Weekend MBA Program Specifications
Program Start:
Length of Program:
Total Credits:
Degree:
Class Size:
Curriculum:
Program Locations:
Avg. Entering GPA:
Typical Candidate:
Financial Aid:
Scholarships:
Spring (January)
24 months (6 semesters)
36
Master of Business Administration
20-35 students
100% case study-based, student-centered discussion
Midland, Lansing, Troy, Grand Rapids, MI; Cedar Hill, TX; and West Palm Beach, FL
3.15/4.0 Scale
Managers, entrepreneurs/business owners with at least 3 years of work experience
Eligible students may qualify for loans
Merit scholarships available
Contact Information (Admissions):
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.northwood.edu/graduate
30-Month Executive Program
The Executive MBA was designed to educate and transform leaders and future leaders from both corporate and industry
perspectives. Our problem-based learning methodology results in a transformational learning experience that enables students to
immediately apply their learning to their businesses. The Executive MBA program is delivered online with six week-long onsite
residencies.
30-Month Executive MBA Program Specifications
Program Start:
Length of Program:
Total Credits:
Degree:
Class Size:
Curriculum:
Program Locations:
Avg. Entering GPA:
Typical Candidate:
Financial Aid:
Fall (August); Spring (January)
30 months
36
Master of Business Administration
20-35 students
100% case study-based, student-centered discussion
Varying locations
3.15/4.0 Scale
Executives, managers and business owners with significant industry and corporate experience
Eligible students may qualify for loans
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Contact Information (Admissions):
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.northwood.edu/graduate
Visit our website for location specific Admissions contact information: www.northwood.edu/graduate.
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MBA Course Descriptions (All MBA Formats)
MBA 612 LEADERSHIP I: Human Behavior 3 credits
This course is designed to help the student develop the capabilities to observe and affect individual and group behavior within an
organizational setting. Specifically, the course will address motivation and commitment, gender and generational differences,
interpersonal communication, managing expectations, and emotional intelligence. The student will learn to understand self as well
as others toward the goal of effectively managing relationships with a wide range of people in an organizational setting.
MBA 614 LEADERSHIP II: Managing and Leading People 3 credits
The focus of this course is on the behaviors of effective leaders. Specifically, the course will address the ideas of leadership versus
management, transitions into leadership roles, power and influence, and contemporary practices in management and leadership that
affect individual behavior in order to improve organizational performance. Additionally, several challenges of managing the
corporation are also addressed, including change management, ethical decision making, and managing conflict in the workplace.
MBA 622
CRITICAL THINKING, REASONING & ANALYSIS I: Fundamental Concepts & Approaches to
Decision Making 3 credits
This course is designed to raise the critical thinking skills of the student. Emphasis is placed on developing the skills to identify
problems, evaluate alternative actions, and to justify and defend decisions. The goal is for each student to develop the ability to
apply thinking and reasoning skills to business decisions and to develop the skills to influence others.
MBA 624
CRITICAL THINKING, REASONING & ANALYSIS II: Process Improvement for Managers 3
credits
This course exposes the student to problem-solving philosophies including Lean Thinking, Six Sigma, and Theory of
Constraints. The module includes several team-based, business simulations and exercises where students are given the
opportunity to implement their problem-solving and critical thinking learnings in a dynamic and complex business
environment.
MBA 632 MEASUREMENT I: Financial Reporting 3 credits
This course focuses on developing the student’s ability to read and interpret reported financial information through deliberate
review of accounting fundamentals, application of accounting principles, and evaluation of accounting rules. Students will
consider accounting information for the purpose of decision making and will consider what financial information measures
and what it can or cannot reveal. Additionally, students will explore principles of internal control, external auditing, and
corporate fraud for the purpose of developing an understanding that reading and interpreting reported financial information
is valuable only when data, reporting, and assumptions are true and valid.
MBA 634 MEASUREMENT II: Corporate Financial Decision Making 3 credits
In this course, students will review tools used to measure and review internal performance for the purpose of effective
managerial decision making. These tools include: budget development, budget performance review, time-value of money,
and discounted cash flow. Specific emphasis is also placed on the role of effective corporate governance in ensuring the
availability of information for decision making and the appropriate use of that information.
MBA 644 EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT: Global Markets, Policy and Regulation 3 credits
Building on the overarching principle that management decisions and actions are impacted by conditions in which a manager is
operating, this course focuses on the macro setting external to the firm. In addition to the traditional economic focus of
macroeconomics, regulation, international trade and finance, and public policy issues, the module incorporates a study of
the definition, scope, and dimensions of national culture. Throughout the module, emphasis is on integrating an
understanding of how the external environment sets the context for leadership, strategy, and managerial effectiveness.
MBA 652 SATISFYING CUSTOMERS I: Strategy & Marketing Perspective 3 credits
The focus of this course is on achieving sustainable strategic differentiation at the line-of-business level. This requires the
simultaneous evaluation and management of the organization’s internal (processes, structures, resources) and external (competitors,
suppliers, other stakeholders) environment in an effort to satisfy the selected primary customer needs that guide the business
strategy. A methodology that systematically aligns the customer needs, internal measurable outcomes, and operational activities is
employed.
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MBA 654 SATISFYING CUSTOMERS II: Strategy & Marketing Practicum 3 credits
Building on Satisfying Customers I, the focus of this course is on achieving sustainable marketing differentiation by managing the
marketing function within the organization. Areas to be investigated include: internal/external assessment (customers,
competitors, collaborators, company, context), creating value (market segmentation, target market, positioning), and managing the
marketing mix (product, place, price, promotion) to capture and sustain value for the firm.
MBA 664 SATISFYING SHAREHOLDERS: Corporate Strategy 3 credits
Building on the Satisfying Customers and Measurement Modules, this course develops the student’s ability to anticipate, evaluate,
and respond to shareholder expectations using strategy and measurement concepts. This requires the student to develop the ability to
simultaneously evaluate and manage the organization’s internal and external environment. Skills to satisfy shareholders include:
articulating vision, choosing boundaries and lines-of-business, and identifying and managing capabilities/resources across multiple
lines-of-business. The integration of the concepts of free cash flow projection and company valuation explores how strategy drives these
measures, which in turn drive value back to the shareholder.
MBA 664 GM GM CORPORATE & ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY 3 credits
Using GM strategy as a foundation, this course develops the student’s ability to anticipate, evaluate, and respond to
shareholder expectations. Skills to satisfy shareholders include: articulating vision, choosing boundaries and lines-ofbusiness, and identifying and managing capabilities/resources across multiple lines-of-business. The integration of the
concepts of free cash flow projection and company valuation explores how strategy drives these measures, which in turn
drive value back to the shareholder.
MBA 676 INTEGRATION & IMPLEMENTATION: Critical Case Applications 3 credits
This course focuses on the development of the student’s ability to synthesize, integrate, and implement concepts and skills across
the spectrum of managerial and leadership roles and responsibilities, incorporating learning from all prior MBA courses. The
course content is centered upon the in-depth preparation of cases for cohort-based discussion and written submission, with
emphasis on developing plans for the implementation and control of decisions in an ambiguous context. Ultimately, the course
engages the student to reflect on their DeVos experience, learnings, and personal transformation and envision how this integration
results in the wisdom to acknowledge and change the way he or she sees and deals with the complex business world and
opportunities presented by it.
MBA 679 MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP CAPSTONE 3 credits
The five-day capstone learning event provides the opportunity for students to integrate and apply all of the knowledge and
skills acquired throughout their MBA program. Students will be able to see how they perform in a fast-paced, quickchanging business environment where they make true to life decisions and quickly see the results for those decisions. A
comprehensive balanced scorecard measurement system is used so that students can see and understand the strong intended
and unintended interplay of their actions among the various functional areas. Students will be placed in teams of
approximately 15 members with each member taking on a specific role. This course brings students from all DeVos
programs and locations together for an opportunity to learn and work with one another in this complex and dynamic
business simulation.
MBA 699 GM EXECUTIVE CAPSTONE PROJECT (Independent Study) 6 credits
Working with a faculty sponsor, students will find and fix a critical business problem or opportunity that exists in their
current organization. The problem or opportunity must be one that is inter-functional in nature, and extend beyond the
student’s immediate horizontal and vertical responsibility. This course is an individualized tutorial between a student and a
designated faculty member. The capstone project must be approved by a supervisor two levels above that which the student
reports to as well as a DeVos Graduate School faculty advisor. The final project must demonstrate a minimum EBIT benefit
of $50,000 and should be designed into the project scope.
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GRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC MATTERS
Introduction
The DeVos MBA Program is unique in design. Each course builds upon previous courses. Through the cohort programs, the
participatory case method builds a strong colleague relationship and support system with classmates. Further, the program has
specific and aggressive educational goals which must be accomplished in an accelerated learning environment. A high degree of
commitment is expected of each student to maximize personal and professional growth.
Assessment of Performance
Successful completion of each course in the DeVos MBA program requires demonstration of mastery in business acumen,
critical thinking, and personal effectiveness skills. This will be evaluated through written assignments, as well as
participation in cohort learning discussions, each of which comprise 50% of the course grade and to enhance your own skills in
contributing to a group discussion. You will receive feedback periodically throughout the course on your contributions in the
following categories:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Actively listens
Facilitates the process
Engages others
Offers opinion/perspective
Asks questions
Provides applied examples
Takes risks/challenges ideas
Links discussion to conceptual learning and conceptual frameworks
Persuades others
Explains/teaches
Understands the “big picture”
Intervenes when appropriate to enhance class process
Contribution Approaches
During each class period, you should be actively engaged in the discussion of the readings, cases, exercises, and applied experiences
that relate to the subjects we are studying. This is an opportunity to examine your role as a group member,
CONTRIBUTION GRADING CRITERIA
The following criteria will be used in determining your contribution grade for each course. Please note that your attendance and
active participation in class meetings impacts your ability to demonstrate business acumen, critical thinking and personal
effectiveness. Please follow up with the faculty member for clarification about your feedback and opportunities for improvement.
Business Acumen <70% Demonstrates no competence in course concepts, either by lack of connecting concepts to contribution or by frequently misrepresenting concepts when used. 70%-­‐79% Demonstrates little competence in course concepts, either by rarely connecting concepts to contribution or by occasionally misrepresenting concepts when used, OR contributes in a way that is disconnected from the purpose of the conversation. 80%-­‐89% Occasionally demonstrates competence and accuracy in using course concepts OR makes frequent effort to use course concepts, but with limited competence and/or accuracy. 90%-­‐100% Frequently uses a wide range of concepts from the class materials, demonstrating competence and accuracy in the use of concepts consistently. THE DEVOS GRADUATE SCHOOL
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Critical Thinking <70% Does not accept critical thinking, frequently accepting or representing opinion as fact rather than exploring or challenging ideas. May contribute in a way that is disconnected from the conversation. Personal Does not engage in Effectiveness the conversation of the cohort leading to a lack of impact or influence on the cohort. Contribution may have a negative effect on the quality of the cohort learning. 70%-­‐79% Rarely demonstrates critical thinking, frequently accepting or representing opinion as fact rather than exploring or challenging ideas, OR contributes in a way that is disconnected from the purpose of the conversation. 80%-­‐89% Occasionally engages in activities designed to cause depth of thinking, including occasional questions, or efforts to address the unknown or challenge assumptions. 90%-­‐100% Frequently asks and makes an effort to explore relevant, thought-­‐provoking questions to advance the conversation and encourage deeper exploration of concepts. Infrequent contribution effort leading to little impact or influence on the cohort, OR contributing in a way that is disconnected from the purpose of the conversation. Contribution effort may occasionally have a negative impact on self and others. Infrequent contribution effort, however, positive impact and influence on the class discussions when contributions are made. Consistently uses a wide range of contribution approaches, leading to clearly positive influence and impact on the class discussions and the learning of self and others. Academic Integrity
Academic honesty and integrity are fundamental to the educational process of The Richard DeVos Graduate School of
Management. Academic dishonesty includes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Submitting the work of another, as one’s own
Allowing one’s own work to be submitted, in part or total, as the work of another
Completing any assignment for another student
Allowing any assignment to be completed for oneself, in part or total, by another
Interfering, in any way, with the resources or work of another person
Fabricating or falsifying data or results
If an instructor, administrator, or another official of the Graduate School discovers a case of academic dishonesty, the culpable
student may receive a failing grade on the assignment or for the course. The Academic Dean will be notified of this incident in
writing and will determine whether the circumstances also warrant dismissal from the program.
Course Completion
A grade of incomplete may be earned for unfinished course work and is at the discretion of the faculty. The student must satisfactorily
complete all work required by the instructor in the time line determined by the faculty member, with a maximum of 90 days of the end of
the course. Circumstances requiring an extension of this period need approval by the Academic Dean prior to the expiration date. Failure to
meet these requirements will result in the student receiving an “F” for the course.
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Grading Scale
If your professor uses a point system for grades, a percentage of the points you earned in the class will be converted into a letter
grade and will use the following interpretation:
Percentage
94-100
Grade
A
Points
4.0
Interpretation
Demonstrates comprehensive acquisition of all skills articulated in
course learning objectives
90-93
A3.7
Demonstrates proficient acquisition of most skills articulated in
course learning objectives
87-89
B+
3.3
Demonstrates proficient acquisition of many of the skills articulated
in course learning objectives
83-86
B
3.0
Demonstrates acceptable acquisition of skills articulated in course
learning objectives
80-82
B2.7
Does not demonstrate acceptable acquisition of some skills
articulated in course learning objectives
70-79
C
2.0
Does not demonstrate acceptable acquisition of many skills
articulated in course learning objectives
Below
F
0.0
Does not demonstrate acceptable acquisition of most skills
70%
articulated in course learning objectives
Demonstration of skill level is weighted approximately 50% for contribution to classroom discussions and 50% for written
analysis. All written work should be submitted in electronic form and it will be processed through a program to insure
originality of work.
Grade Appeals
The Graduate School recognizes that the faculty member is responsible for the evaluation of the student’s course work and is the
sole judge of the grade earned by the student. Except in the case of a potential calculation error for a course grade, appeals must
focus on specific course assignments or other graded components, including participation grades. If a student disagrees with a
specific grade received, it is his/ her responsibility to formally contact the faculty member, by correspondence, to request a review
within 7 days of receiving the grade in question. If the overall grade in the course is in question, the student must contact the faculty
member, by correspondence, to request a review of the calculation of the total course grade within 30 days of the posted grade. The
faculty member will communicate the results of the grade review and his/her decision to the student.
If the student does not agree with the decision, s/he can formally request, via correspondence, a mediation meeting with the
Academic Dean. Correspondence should include the reason for the request for mediation, reasons for disagreement with the faculty
member’s decision and copies of the documentation submitted to the faculty member. The Academic Dean will schedule a meeting,
acting as mediator not arbitrator, between the faculty member and student. If the two parties reach agreement, the Academic Dean
will submit documentation to the student file indicating this decision.
If it has not been resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the final step is for the student to submit a letter of appeal requesting a
formal and definitive decision from the Academic Dean. This correspondence must clearly state why the student believes that a
resolution cannot be reached among the two parties. The Academic Dean will formally submit a decision based on the mediation
meeting and submitted materials. The grade review is considered to be closed once this decision has been made.
Academic Probation & Dismissal
A student must maintain a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.000 to remain in the program. A CGPA will be calculated
for each student at the end of the each semester. Students not maintaining a CGPA of 3.000 will be placed on academic probation.
If the student entered the program or has already been placed on probationary status and they do not maintain a CGPA of 3.000,
they will be academically dismissed from the program at the end of the semester. Students must achieve a CGPA 3.000 for the
awarding of the MBA degree.
In addition, receiving an “F” in any course will result in immediate academic dismissal.
Appeals should be directed, in writing, within 48 hours of receipt of the dismissal letter, to the Academic Dean who will consider
the merits of the appeal. A response will be sent via email. A final appeal can be made to the Chief Academic Officer of Northwood
University within 48 hours of receipt of the appeal decision. The decision of the Chief Academic Officer will be sent via email and
will be final.
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To help ensure successful completion of the MBA program, it is highly recommended that students actively monitor their
cumulative grade point average and seek mentoring, if needed, from Program Center Managers, faculty, or the Academic Dean.
Leave of Absence & Withdrawal Process
A leave of absence must be requested by a student when personal circumstances interfere with their ability to make satisfactory
progress toward degree completion. A leave of absence is requested from and granted by the Academic Dean. If a student is
granted an immediate leave of absence during a semester, the student must withdraw from all current courses as well as program
of study. Re-entry into the program will require modifications to the original program of study. A student who takes an
unauthorized leave of absence will be considered to have voluntarily withdrawn from the program.
Students who wish to withdraw from their program with a grade of “W” must contact their Program Center Manager to officially
begin the process prior to:
•
•
8 Week Course: Friday of Week 6
16 Week Course: Friday of Week 12
Graduation Requirements
Successful completion of the MBA program requires a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or greater for all course work. In
order to receive a diploma, transcript or any confirmation of program completion, accounts receivables have to be at a zero
balance.
To maintain satisfactory progress in the program, students are expected to enroll in the prescribed course schedule each semester.
All course work requirements must be completed within five years of the student’s program start date.
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GRADUATE SCHOOL FINANCIAL POLICIES
Refunds
Prepayments will be refunded in full on payments made prior to first day of class, with the exception of application fee and commitment
deposits. All charges stand after that time. All graduate programs are lockstep, cohort based programs. Individual classes may not be
dropped. Students may only withdraw completely from the program.
Week 1 of semester – 100% credit of tuition
Week 2 of semester – 0% credit of tuition
NOTE: Weeks listed above begin Monday and run through Sunday and include holidays.
Refund calculations will be based upon the date the student begins the official withdrawal process.
Refunds for Recipients of Federal Financial Aid
Please contact the Financial Aid Office for information.
Payments
Payment must be received by the due date each term. Payment received after the due date is subject to a late fee of $200.00. A monthly
service charge will be added on the unpaid balance to accounts over thirty days old. A service charge will be added to all multiple
payment arrangements. A $35.00 service charge will be added for each check returned unpaid by the bank, and an additional $10.00 if
not paid in ten days. All unpaid fines (parking, library) or other college expenses will have an additional $10.00 charge if not paid during
the term or are turned into the Business Office for collection. All checks are to be made payable in U.S. funds. The student is responsible
for any exchange fees or bank charges associated with non-U.S. checks.
Any student whose account has been written off to collection will not be allowed to take classes until balance has been paid.
Scholarships
Students that fall below a 3.00 in a given semester will forfeit all future allocations of scholarship awards.
Student Resources
The DeVos Graduate School has locations in Midland, Michigan; West Palm Beach, Florida; and Cedar Hill, Texas. These locations
include computer labs, lounges, and breakout rooms for student use. The University-provided computers have all of the necessary
software applications that students need to complete their course work. Also, students may bring personal laptops and connect to the
Internet through Northwood’s wireless network.
In addition to campus locations, DeVos also has satellite locations in Grand Rapids, Troy, and Lansing, Michigan; Cedar Hill, TX. These
locations are equipped with wireless network capabilities, meeting spaces, and breakout rooms for student use.
All DeVos MBA students are given access to both an Internet and intranet account at the University as well as an email account.
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)
All students have the opportunity to take the official Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) and/or Graduate Record
Examinations (GRE) General Test for additional scholarship award and admission consideration. The GMAT or GRE must be
taken and official score report received by DeVos prior to program start date.
Students may be eligible to receive a scholarship award for either the GMAT or GRE General Test. Students are not eligible
for both.
GRE Codes
4199 Northwood University, DeVos Graduate School
www.ets.org/gre
1-866-473-4373
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GMAT Codes
59P-X5-32 Northwood University, DeVos Graduate School
12-Month Accelerated MBA Program
59P-X5-17 Northwood University, DeVos Graduate School
24-Month Evening MBA Program
1-800-717-GMAT (4628)
www.mba.com
Registration
Graduate students are registered for their courses initially with the completion of the Program Registration Form prior to their first
semester. For each semester that follows and through the program end date, students are automatically registered for their courses by
the Registrar’s Office in compliance with their program of study.
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)
International graduate student applicants to the DeVos Graduate School must submit standardized exam scores. Applications cannot be
considered without the submission of an official score report. However, if an applicant’s undergraduate coursework was delivered
entirely in English, standardized exam scores may be waived provided the applicant provides official institutional documentation of
delivery in English and/or agrees to pre-admission oral interview. The code for reporting TOEFL scores to the DeVos Graduate
School is 0267.
EXAM
MINIMUM SCORE
GRADUATE (MBA)
TOEFL
550 (Paper)
213 (Computer-based)
80+ (Internet-based)
IELTS
7.0 overall band score
STEP
(Japanese-based exam)
Grade Pre-1
International Baccalaureate (IB) –
Undergraduate only
Not accepted for
graduate admission
UCLES Cambridge Exams
CAE or CPE
(minimum score of C2)
ELS Language Centers
Level 112
Transcripts
(Requested through the Admissions Process)
An official transcript from all undergraduate institutions attended, including the institution where a baccalaureate degree was awarded
are required. Photo copies or student-issued transcripts are not acceptable for admission. You may submit an unofficial copy of your
transcript for review, however, DeVos still requires an official transcript to make an admission decision.
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To meet graduate school application deadlines, please allow adequate transcript processing time. Registrars should send official
transcripts in sealed envelopes to the graduate school.
Office of Graduate Admissions
The Richard DeVos Graduate School of Management
Northwood University
4000 Whiting Drive
Midland, MI 48640-2398
USA
Official transcripts are those sent directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions by the issuing institution. Student copies will be
accepted on a temporary basis to expedite processing, but your admission will not be finalized until we receive official transcripts. The
presence of a “seal” does not make a transcript “official” for admission purposes if it has not been directly conveyed to Northwood.
All documents submitted to the graduate school become the property of Northwood University and cannot be returned to the applicant or
released to other institutions.
Transcripts
(Requested by the Student)
The DeVos Graduate School cannot submit official transcripts for students or alumni that have an outstanding accounts receivable
balance or write-off. In addition, only unofficial transcripts can be issued directly to the student. When making your request for a DeVos
Graduate School transcript, please complete the official transcript release form and submit to:
DeVos Graduate School
Northwood University
Attention: MBA Registrar
4000 Whiting Drive
Midland, MI 48640
Phone: (989) 837-4121
Toll Free: (800) 622-9000
Transcript Request Forms can be found online at the following link under Student Resources http://www.northwood.edu/graduate/
Currently there is no charge for transcripts; however, fees may be subject to change.
Transfer Credits
Due to the unique nature of our program design, we do not accept coursework completed at other colleges and universities.
Tuition Charges
All figures based on the 2014-2015 Academic Year:
12-Month Accelerated MBA Program Semester Cost:
$11,056.00
12-Month Accelerated MBA program semester cost includes:
• Applies to 9-15 credits
• Program consists of 3 semesters
24-Month Evening, Weekend, Traditional, Online MBA Program Semester Cost:
$5,528.00
24-Month MBA program semester cost includes:
• Applies to 3-6 credits
• Program consists of 6 semesters
TOTAL MBA PROGRAM COST:
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Included in the MBA total program cost:
• Tuition
• Instructional fees
• Instructional materials
TOTAL PROGRAM COST:
$33,168.00
TOTAL EXECUTIVE MBA
PROGRAM COST:
$33,168.00*
Included in the Executive MBA total program cost:
• Tuition
• Instructional fees
• Instructional materials
• *Onsite fees & services are additional (billed separately)
FUNDING YOUR GRADUATE EDUCATION
General Funding Information
Students seeking financial aid should first apply for admission to the MBA program. Applicants for financial assistance should
direct all questions to Northwood University’s Financial Aid Office (989) 837-4438, identifying themselves as DeVos Graduate
School applicants.
Northwood University offers several means of funding your education. The resources available guide you as steps to securing
funding for your education. Additional resources, lender information, Student Loan Code of Conduct, and all necessary forms
can be found on our website: http://www.northwood.edu/graduate/financialaid/fundingyoureducation/ .
Scholarships
The DeVos Graduate School has limited scholarship opportunities available to eligible students formally admitted to the 12Month Accelerated and 24-Month Evening, Traditional, Weekend and Online MBA Programs.
Early Decision Scholarship
All application materials (including application fee) must be received by the Early Decision Scholarship deadline in order to be
considered for the scholarship award. Applicants must also be accepted and have all commitment materials (including
commitment deposit and Program Registration Form) submitted by the Early Decision deadline in order to be eligible for this
scholarship. If a student receives 100 percent(100%) tuition reimbursement, he/she is NOT eligible for the Early Decision
Scholarship Award.
Early Decision Scholarship Award Amount: $1,050.00
Early Decision Scholarship Deadline: Three months prior to the start of the semester
Merit Scholarships
The DeVos Graduate School offers a cumulative scholarship system for 12-month and 24-Month MBA Program students. To be
eligible for Merit scholarships, students must enter and remain in good academic standing.
The DeVos Merit Scholarship system allocates awards based on three criteria. These components include a student’s cumulative
GPA of ALL undergraduate academic transcripts, demonstrated leadership attributes, and official Graduate Management
Admissions Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores. Each Merit component enables qualified
applicants to maximize their scholarship award. Detailed Merit Scholarship award criteria include the following:
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Cumulative Grade Point Average
Scholarship award is based on the cumulative GPA of ALL undergraduate transcripts.
3.25 - 3.6
3.61 - 4.0
$1,050.00
$2,100.00
Leadership
Scholarship award consideration is based on the student’s submitted resume, interview, and letters of recommendation. The
amount will be awarded at the discretion of the scholarship committee. If you receive any tuition reimbursement from your
employer, you are ineligible for this scholarship.
Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) & Graduate Record
Examination (GRE)
All students have the opportunity to take the official Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) and/or Graduate Record
Examinations (GRE) General Test for additional scholarship award and admission consideration. The GMAT or GRE must be taken
and official score report received by DeVos prior to program start date.
GMAT awards will be allocated based on the following score ranges:
500 – 550
560 – 610
620 +
$1,050.00
$2,100.00
$3,150.00
Based on the unique nature of the GRE General Test, a sliding scale comparison chart is used to score the exam. For more details and
information on scholarship eligibility, please contact your DeVos representative.
Students may be eligible to receive a scholarship award for either the GMAT or GRE General Test. Students are not eligible for both.
DeVos Merit Scholarship Facts
Students will be automatically considered for Merit Scholarship if committed one month prior to the start of the term.
In order to be eligible for Leadership Merit Scholarship components, a student must NOT receive any tuition reimbursement.
If a student receives less than 75 percent (75%) tuition reimbursement, the student will be considered for the GPA and GMAT/GRE
Merit Scholarship component. Students would also be eligible for the Early Decision Scholarship, unless the amount exceeds the total
program cost.
If a student receives 75 percent (75%) or more tuition reimbursement, he/she is not eligible for the GPA, GMAT/GRE, or Leadership
Merit Scholarship.
The total scholarship award will be allocated equally over each semester of the student’s prescribed program of study (12-Month
Accelerated MBA Program students: 3 equal installments; 24-Month Evening, Traditional, Weekend and Online MBA Program
students: 6 equal installments).
Private Donor Scholarships
Many Northwood friends and affiliates have generously provided funding for private scholarships for students.
Application available at www.northwood.edu.
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Master of Science in Organizational Leadership (MSOL) Program
The Master of Science in Organizational Leadership (MSOL) at Northwood University is designed to help you unleash the human
potential within your organization while positioning yourself for professional advancement.
The MSOL offers participants a chance to prepare for personal and professional advancement for themselves, their communities, and
their organizations. The program design examines the behaviors that facilitate effective personal and organizational leadership and
learning, as well as collaborative problem-solving strategies and practices. Prospective students must have earned a bachelor’s degree
and have at least three years of work experience prior to enrolling in the program.
The program is ideal for individuals who want to upgrade their knowledge and skill-sets in a multi-disciplinary program and earn a
graduate credential. Courses are offered by outstanding faculty who are both practicing leaders in their fields and exceptional educators
who bring real-world experience and opportunities into the learning environment. The program is offered using the online / virtual
classroom incorporating asynchronous and synchronous learning technology to create a robust learning environment.
A Master of Science in Organizational Leadership prepares you to:
• Synergize the power of your peers and encourage positive change within an organization
• Make ethical leadership choices
• Master techniques of collaborative team communication
• Implement creative and cooperative problem-solving strategies
• Use various intellectual and technical tools to foster competitive advantage
DeVos MSOL Competencies
Successful degree completion will provide students with:
• The management skills to find and fix problems and capitalize on opportunities by leveraging their integrated business
knowledge and working effectively with others.
• The leadership skills to create a vision and influence others to follow, and to raise the performance of all members of the
organization.
Specifically, students will achieve the following competencies:
Leadership
A competent practitioner in the leadership process with demonstrable working knowledge of:
• Ethical Leadership Process & Practice
• Individual and organizational behavior
• Planning, critical thinking and decision-making
Measurement
A competent practitioner of measurement with a demonstrable working knowledge of:
• Collecting, reporting, analyzing and evaluating data
• Individual / organizational and financial measurement practices
• Performing assessment and evaluation
Organizational Transformation & Effectiveness
A competent practitioner and facilitator of organizational effectiveness with a demonstrable working knowledge of:
• Concepts and practice organizational behavior and development
• Foundations of organizational history, philosophy
• Organizational transformation practices and emerging trends
Effective Communication
A competent practitioner of effective communication with a demonstrable knowledge of:
• Individual and organizational communication concepts and practices
• Appropriate and skillful use of verbal and written communication
• Active listening, effective negotiation and presentation skills
Innovation & Technology
A competent practitioner and user of technology & innovative practice with a demonstrable working knowledge of:
• The relationship of innovation and technology
• Application of innovation & technology for individual organizational effectiveness
• Application of current resources and recognition of emerging trends
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DeVos MSOL Overview
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership prepares you to:
• Synergize the power of your peers and encourage positive change within an organization
• Make ethical leadership choices
• Master techniques of collaborative team communication
• Implement creative and cooperative problem-solving strategies
• Use various intellectual and technical tools to foster competitive advantage
The MSOL program is delivered in an online format that requires 30 credit hours of course work. Atypical semester includes courses
from the following modules:
• Organizational Leadership
• Measurement Concepts & Analysis
• Organizational Transformation & Effectiveness
• Organizational Communication
• Technology & Innovation
• Legal Environment in Organizations
• Global Perspective
• Organizational Cultures & Systems
• Organizational Strategy
• Capstone in Organizational Leadership
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership (MSOL) Program Specifications
Program Start:
Fall, Spring and Summer
Length of Program:
20 Months*
Total Credits
30
Degree:
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership
Class Size:
20 students
Curriculum:
Leadership
Program Location:
Online
Financial Aid:
Eligible students may qualify for loans
*Program may be completed at the student’s own pace
Contact Information (Admissions):
Email: [email protected]
Web:
www.northwood.edu/graduate
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Master of Science in Organizational Leadership Course Descriptions
MSOL 6050 ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP
3 Credits
This course examines leadership principles and theoretical concepts in the context of present day organizations. Organizational
behavior at the individual, team and corporate level is examined with the purpose of developing the knowledge and skills
necessary for a successful leadership role. Students will examine their own leadership styles and tendencies and develop a
personal action plan for leadership development.
MSOL 6100 MEASUREMENT CONCEPTS AND ANALYSIS
3 Credits
This course introduces data analytical techniques that can be used to develop the skills and instincts necessary to make good datainformed decisions and become a more effective organizational leader. Key concepts include techniques used to collect, organize
and structure data for analysis including sampling, levels of measurement, measurement scales and the evaluation of survey
worth. Emphasis is placed on exploring numerical data and their properties, measures of central tendency, covariance,
correlation, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions and confidence interval estimation.
MSOL 6150 ORGANIZATIONAL TRANSFORMATION AND EFFECTIVENESS
3 Credits
This course presents a perspective of theories of organizations through an historical and developmental context, as well as through
current practices and their application to organizational transformation in one or more current settings. The future of
organizational effectiveness will be considered with respect to trends and possibilities for the 21st century. Understanding these
contexts is accomplished through the reading of primary texts, independent study of particular aspects of this history and class
discussion.
MSOL 6200 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 3 Credits
This course will examine the process of communicating within an organization; viewing organizations as instruments to achieve
other ends. It will demonstrate how communication within an organization affects us as individuals at the group, community,
national and international levels. Students will realize that to understand the dynamics of power, it is impossible to ignore the
organizational communication process. The role organizations play in shaping social structures and influencing social change
through their communicative processes will be explored.
MSOL 6250 TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION
3 Credits
This course offers students an evolutionary process perspective on technology and innovation. The focus is on processes to help
organizations better understand and deploy technology and innovation. The course explores the strategic use of technology and
innovation with a goal to develop competency, understanding the methodologies and critical thinking needed to achieve a
sustainable competitive advantage.
6350 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS 3 Credits
This course will examine a variety of organizational legal structures and considerations that impact decision making at all levels
and phases of an organization’s existence. The course will also investigate the relationship and differences between legal and
ethical obligations while further defining and refining the analytical process for ethical considerations at the individual, team and
organizational levels.
MSOL 6400 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
3 Credits
The course introduces students to the fundamental theoretical and institutional constructs that impact business activity in today's
globalized society; as well introducing the methods businesses use to solve problems within these constructs. Students will learn
and apply fundamental concepts of economics, finance, law and marketing in the global context through practical application
based on knowledge acquired via assigned readings, course discussion, problem sets and case studies.
MSOL 6450 ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURES & SYSTEMS 3 Credits
The course examines capabilities and competencies needed to interact with different societal cultures and what skills it takes to
build effective local organizational cultures. This course examines organizational culture from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Key models of organizational culture and current research studies are investigated with an emphasis on how culture develops and
evolves and its relationship to leadership and organizational effectiveness.
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MSOL 6500 ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY 3 Credits
This course will review organization planning processes and then examine the planning process from a strategic perspective.
Students will learn how to apply a variety of tools and techniques for decision-making and will develop strategic approaches to
management decisions. This course is designed to encourage students to think strategically and operationally about organizations
in an increasingly diverse management environment.
MSOL 6800 CAPSTONE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP 3 Credits
The capstone is an independent, supervised body of work covering a topic selected by the individual learner. It provides the
opportunity to identify and research a leadership topic or issue and explore it in detail. The final outcome is a written document of
particular value to the learner. The capstone requires effective demonstration of mastery over the competency areas and their
relationship to organizational leadership. As such, the capstone serves as evidence of the value of the learners’ experience in the
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership program and will be a valuable addition to their legacy as leaders.
DeVos MSOL Academic Matters
Introduction
The Master of Science in Organizational Leadership (MSOL) is a degree program for professionals who recognize that individual
and organizational success is about making a contribution. The MSOL offers participants a chance to prepare for personal and
professional advancement for themselves, their communities and their organizations. The program design examines the behaviors
that facilitate effective personal and organizational leadership and learning, as well as collaborative problem-solving strategies
and practices.
Assessment of Performance
Successful completion of each course in the DeVos MSOL program requires demonstration of competence related to the five
program domains: Leadership, Measurement, Organizational Transformation & Effectiveness, Innovation & Technology, and
Effective Communication. Competence will be evaluated through written assignments, contribution in class discussions and all
other related course activities.
Contribution Approaches
Students are expected to be engaged online a minimum of three days per week and to contribute in a meaningful way. If a student
feels that s/he has an impossible conflict, s/he should consult the instructor ahead of time. Late submission may also result in
point deductions. It is not possible to make up the specific learning that is created as a result of the Discussion Forums. Students
should expect to spend 10-15 hours per week completing readings, writing papers, and contributing in the Discussion Forums.
Attendance
To comply with federal regulations governing financial aid and Veterans education benefits, we are required to report students
who stop attending or who have never attended class. Attendance is defined as logging in and making a meaningful contribution
in an academic-related activity such as submission of an assignment, an assessment, engagement in a study group or an online
discussion, etc. This includes not completing any assigned activities or not logging into the course on a regular basis as
specifically promulgated in each course syllabus. If a student does not perform the assigned attendance requirement in the first
week or if a student stops attending at any point in the course (for at least a one week period), the instructor can drop the student
without notice.
Academic Integrity
Academic honesty and integrity are fundamental to the educational process of The Richard DeVos Graduate School of
Management. Academic dishonesty includes:
• Submitting the work of another, as one’s own
• Allowing one’s own work to be submitted, in part or total, as the work of another
• Completing any assignment for another student
• Allowing any assignment to be completed for oneself, in part or total, by another
• Interfering, in any way, with the resources or work of another person
• Fabricating or falsifying data or results
If an instructor, administrator, or another official of the Graduate School discovers a case of academic dishonesty, the culpable
student will receive a failing grade for the course and will be dismissed from the program.
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Course Completion
A grade of incomplete may be earned for unfinished course work and is at the discretion of the faculty. The student must
satisfactorily complete all work required by the instructor in the time line determined by the faculty member, with a maximum of
90 days of the end of the course. Circumstances requiring an extension of this period need approval by the Dean prior to the
expiration date. Failure to meet these requirements will result in the student receiving an "F" for the course.
Grading Scale
If your professor uses a point system for grades, a percentage of the points you earned in the class will be converted into a letter
grade and will use the following interpretation:
Percentage
Grade
Points
94-100
A
4.0
90-93
A-
3.7
87-89
B+
3.3
83-86
B
3.0
80-82
B-
2.7
70-79
C
2.0
Below 70%
F
0.0
Interpretation
Demonstrates comprehensive acquisition of all skills
articulated in course learning objectives
Demonstrates proficient acquisition of most skills articulated
in course learning objectives
Demonstrates proficient acquisition of many of the skills
articulated in course learning objectives
Demonstrates acceptable acquisition of skills articulated in
course learning objectives
Does not demonstrate acceptable acquisition of some skills
articulated in course learning objectives
Does not demonstrate acceptable acquisition of many skills
articulated in course learning objectives
Does not demonstrate acceptable acquisition of most skills
articulated in course learning objectives
Grade Appeals
The Graduate School recognizes that the faculty member is responsible for the evaluation of the student’s course work and is the
sole judge of the grade earned by the student. Except in the case of a potential calculation error for a course grade, appeals must
focus on specific course assignments or other graded components, including participation grades. If a student disagrees with a
specific grade received, it is his/her responsibility to formally contact the faculty member, by correspondence, to request a review
within 7 days of receiving the grade in question.
If the overall grade in the course is in question, the student must contact the faculty member, by correspondence, to request a
review of the calculation of the total course grade within 7 days of the posted grade. The faculty member will communicate the
results of the grade review and his/her decision to the student. An overall course grade of “F” will elevate to Dismissal.
If the student does not agree with the faculty member’s decision, s/he can formally request, via correspondence, a mediation
meeting with the Dean. Correspondence should include the reason for the request for mediation, reasons for disagreement with
the faculty member’s decision and copies of the documentation submitted to the faculty member. The Dean will schedule a
meeting, acting as mediator not arbitrator, between the faculty member and student. If the two parties reach agreement, the Dean
will submit documentation to the student file indicating this decision.
If it has not been resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the final step is for the student to submit a letter of appeal requesting a
formal and definitive decision from the Dean. This correspondence must clearly state why the student believes that a resolution
cannot be reached among the two parties. The Dean will formally submit a decision based on the mediation meeting and
submitted materials. The grade review is considered to be closed once this decision has been made.
Academic Probation & Dismissal
A student must maintain a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.000 to remain in the program. A CGPA will be calculated
for each student at the end of the each semester. Students not maintaining a CGPA of 3.000 will be placed on academic probation.
If the student entered the program or has already been placed on probationary status and they do not maintain a CGPA of 3.000,
they will be academically dismissed from the program at the end of the semester. Students must achieve a CGPA 3.000 for the
awarding of the MBA degree.
In addition, receiving an “F” in any course will result in immediate academic dismissal. A student wishing to dispute an “F”
grade should include that in their dismissal appeal.
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Appeals should be directed, in writing, within 48 hours of receipt of the dismissal letter, to the Dean who will consider the merits
of the appeal. A response will be sent via email.
A final appeal can be made to the Chief Academic Officer of Northwood University within 48 hours of receipt of the appeal
decision. The decision of the Chief Academic Officer will be sent via email and will be final.
To help ensure successful completion of the MBA program, it is highly recommended that students actively monitor their
cumulative grade point average and seek mentoring, if needed, from the Graduate Programs Manager, faculty, or the Dean.
Financial aid probation and suspension should be directed to the Financial Aid Department. Please see financial aid section for
details.
Withdrawal Process
Students who wish to withdraw from their program with a grade of “W” must contact their Program Manager to officially begin
the process prior to:
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8 Week Course: Friday of Week 6
Graduation Requirements
Successful completion of the MSOL program requires a cumulative grade point average of 3.000 or greater for all course work. In
order to receive a diploma, transcript or any confirmation of program completion, account receivables have to be at a zero
balance.
All course work requirements must be completed within five years of the student’s program start date.
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MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP
FINANCIAL POLICIES
Refunds
Prepayments will be refunded in full on payments made prior to late validation day, with the exception of application fee and
commitment deposits. Any change of classes must be done during the drop and add period (the first three days of classes for any
semester). All charges stand after that time.
• 90% week 1
• 75% week 2
• 50% week 3
For any student completely withdrawing from the college, the following policy applies:
On 1 - 3 days after classes start 100% credit of all charges
From 4 - 11 days after classes start 90% credit of tuition and board
From 12 - 22 days after classes start 80% credit of tuition and board
From 23 - 33 days after classes start 70% credit of tuition and board
From 34 - 44 days after classes start 60% credit of tuition and board
From 45 - 55 days after classes start 50% credit of tuition and board
From 56 - 66 days after classes start 40% credit of tuition and board
More than 66 days after classes start 0% credit of tuition and board
Refund calculations will be based upon the date the student begins the official withdrawal process. Days listed above are calendar
days and include weekends and holidays. In cases where a student stops attending all of his/her classes without officially
withdrawing, refund calculations will be done at 50% unless the student attended a class later than 55 days up to 66 days after the
start of classes, the refund will be calculated at 40%. If the student attended later than 66 days after the start of classes there will
be no refund.
NOTE: Weeks listed above begin Monday and run through Sunday and includes holidays.
Refund calculations will be based upon the date the student begins the official withdrawal process.
Refunds for Recipients of Federal Financial Aid
Federal law specifies how Northwood determines the amount of Title IV aid you can earn if you completely withdraw from
school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG),
National SMART Grants, TEACH Grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS Loans, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
(FSEOGs), and Federal Perkins Loans.
Please contact your Financial Aid Department for additional details.
Payments
Payment must be received by the due date each semester. Payment received after the due date is subject to a late payment fee of
$200.00. A $35.00 service charge will be added for each check returned unpaid by the bank, and an additional $10.00 if not paid
in ten days. All unpaid fines (parking, library) or other college expenses will have an additional $10.00 charge if not paid during
the term or are turned into the Business Office for collection. All checks are to be made payable in U.S. funds. The student is
responsible for any exchange fees or bank charges associated with non-U.S. checks. Any student whose account has been written
off to collection will not be allowed to take classes until the balance has been paid.
Financial Aid
To be eligible for federal aid, you must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Assistance (FAFSA). You can complete
a (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. In order to electronically sign the (FASFA), please apply for a federal PIN at
www.pin.ed.gov (only for students that have not previously applied). You may request a paper FAFSA by calling 1-8004FEDAID, and mail it to the federal processor. If you choose to get a paper copy, it will add approximately four weeks to the
application process. Students must complete a new FAFSA each academic year. Award eligibility is determined on an annual
basis. Apply as soon as possible after January 1 of each year.
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If you have questions when completing your FAFSA, you can get free help by contacting the Federal Student Aid Information
Center at 1-800-4 FEDAID or by contacting Northwood University Financial Aid Office. If you are using FAFSA on the web,
you can also get help online. Be sure to include Northwood University’s school code on your FAFSA. The FAFSA School codes
for the DeVos Graduate School: Michigan campus 004072; Florida campus E00586; Texas 013040.
After submitting your FAFSA to the federal government for processing, you will be notified by email that the application has
been made available to Northwood. Be sure Northwood’s school code is on the SAR (Student Aid Report). If there is anything
missing or needed to complete your FAFSA, you will receive a letter from the Financial Aid Office instructing you on what needs
to be completed. After the student has been accepted, and the Financial Aid Office has received his/her SAR from the Department
of Education and any requested documentation from him/her, the Financial Aid Office will email the student notifying them of
their award letter. The award letter includes the types and amounts of aid that he/she may receive. The student will also be able to
view his/her award information in WebAdvisor at my.northwood.edu.
Loans
Here is a brief summary of the different types of loans. Paperwork is available online and through the Financial Aid Office. Please
note that first time borrowers who receive loans are required to complete the Master Promissory Note and participate in Entrance
Counseling before loan proceeds will be released. You can complete these steps by visiting www.studentloans.gov. Upon
completion of your education, the student will be required to participate in Exit Counseling as well. Both of these requirements
may be conducted online or in person at the Financial Aid Office.
Federal Direct Loans
Unsubsidized
Federal Direct Loans are low-interest loans for student borrowers to help pay the cost of a college education. The lender is the
U.S. Department of Education rather than a bank or other financial institution. Unsubsidized loans are not based on financial need
and interest is charged during all periods, even during the time a student is in school.
If you are a first time borrower, you must:
• Complete a Master Promissory Note (MPN) online at www.studentloans.gov. You will need your Federal PIN number
to login to complete the MPN.
• Complete Entrance Counseling online at www.studentloans.gov.
• If you do not wish to borrow the entire amount listed on your Financial Aid Award Letter, please fill out the Direct Loan
Change Form. This form can be found on www.northwood.edu under Financial Aid Forms.
Students must be enrolled at least half-time; be a US citizen or eligible non-citizen; and be maintaining satisfactory academic
progress. Eligibility is also affected by cost of attendance.
Graduate students annual loan limits: $20,500.00 unsubsidized.
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans have a fixed interest rate of 5.41%. The maximum aggregate amount for graduate students is
$138,500.00.
Loan fees will be deducted prior to disbursement (1.072% effective July 1st, 2013). Loan repayment begins six months after the
student graduates, falls below half-time enrollment, or withdraws from school. No prepayment penalties.
Federal Direct Plus Loan for Graduate Students (Grad PLUS):
Federal Direct PLUS Loans are unsubsidized loans for the graduate/professional students. PLUS loans help pay for educational
expenses up to the cost of attendance minus all other financial assistance. Interest is charged during all periods. The borrower
must be a credit worthy U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen. Borrowers can defer repayment if the student is enrolled at least halftime (6 hours), and for an additional 6 months after the student graduates or drops below half-time enrollment. The student must
request each deferment period separately. Other deferments are available and there are no prepayment penalties. If the Federal
Direct PLUS Loan is denied, the student is eligible to borrow additional Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans.
The current interest rate is a fixed rate of 6.41%. Loan fees may be deducted prior to disbursement (4.288% effective July 1st,
2013). Repayment begins 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed. Deferments are available upon request. No prepayment
penalties.
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Award Disbursement
Federal, state, and most institutional financial aid is divided equally between the periods of study and will be credited to the
student’s account upon verification of enrollment for that period. Revisions of awards or late awards will be applied throughout
the year.
The student is responsible for all charges not covered by financial aid. If there are more credits than charges, a refund check will
be issued for the balance. Overpayments resulting from full or partial cancellation of aid will normally result in a debit balance on
the student’s account and must be paid back according to the repayment policies of the University. The student is responsible to
verify the accuracy of billings, financial aid credits, and refund checks.
Statement of Financial Aid Rights and Responsibilities
Students have the right to be informed of and to apply for all financial aid programs for which they are eligible. Northwood
University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution and employer, complying with federal and state laws prohibiting
discrimination including but not limited to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. It is the policy of Northwood University
that no person on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, disability, or veteran status
shall be discriminated against in receiving financial assistance or in educational programs or activities receiving federal financial
assistance.
Students have the right to know how financial need and award packages will be determined and to request a review of the
financial aid package should circumstances change to affect negatively the family’s ability to meet costs of attendance. Students
have the responsibility to notify the University should new resources become available during the academic year that were not
originally considered in the student’s financial aid package.
Students who borrow while in attendance at the University have a right to full disclosure of the semesters and provisions of loan
programs, including typical repayment schedules. Students must repay their loans on a timely basis and keep the University
informed of their current address. Northwood notifies the student when electronic student loan funds are applied to his/her
student account. Students have 14 days from the date of notification to cancel all or a portion of the loan funds. The business
office must receive this request in writing.
Students have the right to be informed of financial aid policies and have the responsibility to review all published financial aid
policies and to comply with these policies. Students have the responsibility to submit accurate information on all documents
relating to the financial aid application process.
Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for DeVos Graduate Financial Aid Recipients
This policy reflects the standards that are used to measure satisfactory academic progress (SAP) at Northwood University for
purposes of financial aid eligibility. Federal regulations require that the university establish and implement a policy to measure if
a financial aid recipient is making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree. Satisfactory academic progress is measured by
evaluating both GPA achievement (qualitative measurement) and pace (quantitative measurement) to ensure successful program
completion within the maximum timeframe allowed. The standards are subject to change per federal regulations. The Financial
Aid Office would notify students if any changes were to occur.
A student receiving federal, state and/or Northwood financial aid must maintain satisfactory academic progress to retain financial
aid eligibility. Some scholarship, grant, and loan programs may impose higher standards of performance. Each student’s academic
record will be reviewed at the end of each semester. Students not meeting the minimum SAP requirement will be placed on
warning status for one (1) semester (see Financial Aid Warning section below). Students who fail to regain satisfactory status
after one (1) semester of warning status will have their financial aid eligibility suspended.
Courses taken during compressed or mini sessions will be counted at the time of review occurring after each standard semester
(Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters). All English as a Second Language and remedial coursework is considered part of the
student’s cumulative academic record.
Transfer Student Eligibility – Transfer students enrolling at Northwood are considered to be making satisfactory academic
progress. All transfer hours accepted toward completion of the student’s program must be counted as both hours attempted and
hours completed for measurement of pace of progress (quantitative – see below).
Treatment of Grades - For purposes of this policy, the following grades are considered attempted and completed: A, B, C, or I,
including pluses and minuses. Grades of W and F are considered attempted and not completed.
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Repeat Courses - Repeat classes are assessed as new classes. Initial and repeated enrollments in the same course count as hours
attempted each time the course is taken. A student may receive financial aid for repeating a failed class until it is passed. A
student may receive financial aid for repeating a previously passed course once.
Pace of Progress Toward Degree Completion (Quantitative) - Students must earn at least 67% of credit hours attempted.
Minimum GPA Requirements (Qualitative) - Students must achieve and maintain a 3.0 minimum cumulative grade point
average.
Change of Satisfactory Academic Progress Status - Although a student's cumulative grade point average or earned credits may
change within a semester (e.g. by recording a final grade in place of a grade of I), the student's academic progress status is not reevaluated or changed during the semester. It will be re-evaluated at the time of the next review.
Financial Aid Warning, Suspension, and Probation - Students that do not maintain satisfactory academic progress are notified
in writing.
Financial Aid Warning: If a student with a satisfactory status prior to a review does not meet all of the standards of this policy at
the time of the review, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Warning. A student placed on Financial Aid Warning will be
allowed to continue to receive financial aid for the next semester he/she attends. No appeal is necessary. However, the student is
strongly encouraged to meet with his/her academic advisor for guidance. At the end of that semester, the student’s progress will
be re-evaluated. If the student meets all qualitative and quantitative standards, the student would regain satisfactory status. If these
standards are not met, the student’s financial aid will be suspended.
Financial Aid Suspension: In the event the student’s aid is suspended, the student has a right to appeal. The appeal process is
described below. If the student’s appeal is denied, the student remains on Financial Aid Suspension until he/she meets the
requirements for reinstatement.
Financial Aid Probation: If the student’s appeal is granted, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation and may
receive aid for one (1) semester. At the end of that semester, progress will be reviewed, and the student must be making
satisfactory academic progress or must be successfully following an Academic Performance Improvement Plan in order to
continue receiving aid. If the student fails to meet the requirements, the student’s aid is suspended again. To regain eligibility the
student must meet the requirements for reinstatement as described below.
Appeal Process – A student whose aid has been suspended and has documentable mitigating circumstances, such as a death in
the family or an illness, may appeal his/her aid suspension. The student’s appeal must include why he/she failed to make
satisfactory academic progress and what has changed that will allow the student to achieve satisfactory academic progress. To
appeal, a student must submit, to the Financial Aid Director, a Satisfactory Academic Appeal form with non-returnable
supporting documentation. The appeal and documentation must be submitted within 14 calendar days of the date of the financial
aid suspension notification. The date the documents are considered submitted is the receipt or postmarked date of the final
documentation. The appeal form can be downloaded from the Northwood.edu website.
The Financial Aid Director will notify the student in writing of the appeal decision. In the event the appeal is granted, the student
will be placed on Financial Aid Probation. Please note: If an appeal is granted, the student MUST meet with the Financial
Aid Director to develop an Academic Performance Improvement Plan required to regain financial aid eligibility.
If the appeal is denied, the student remains on Financial Aid Suspension until he or she meets the requirements for reinstatement.
Reinstatement of Financial Aid Eligibility - Students who have had their financial aid suspended will have their progress
reviewed at the end of each future semester until the standards of progress are met. To re-establish satisfactory status, the student
must meet all GPA (qualitative) and maximum timeframe/pace (quantitative) standards in this policy or successfully meet the
standards in the student’s Academic Performance Improvement Plan. Aid granted after reinstatement would begin the next
semester of enrollment following reinstatement and will be based on funds available at that time.
Treatment of Federal (Title IV) Aid when a Student Withdraws
Federal law specifies how Northwood determines the amount of Title IV aid you can earn if you completely withdraw from
school. The Title IV programs that you might be eligible to receive as a DeVos Graduate student that are covered by this law are
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans and/or Federal Direct PLUS Loans.
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Students wishing to officially withdraw from Northwood must provide the Registrar or Academic Dean’s Office with a written
notification of their intent to withdraw. The date of notification is the date Northwood will use for determining the amount of
federal (Title IV) aid for which the student remains qualified. Northwood has no “leave of absence” policy. Students that need an
academic leave will be treated as a withdrawn student. In the event, the student does not provide official notification of
withdrawal, the notification date to be used in the Title IV calculation will be the latter of the midpoint of the semester or his/her
last day in an academically related activity, as documented by the Registrar’s Office.
In the event the student withdraws (officially or unofficially), Northwood will determine the amount of Title IV aid that he/she
has earned up to that point in the term. This is determined by a specific formula. If you received less assistance than the amount
that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess
funds must be returned by Northwood and/or you.
The amount of assistance that the student has earned is determined on a pro-rata basis. For example, if you completed 30 percent
(30%) of your semester you earn 30 percent (30%) of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have
completed more than 60 percent (60%) of the term, you will earn all the assistance that you were scheduled to receive for the
term. If you did not receive all of the funds that were earned, you may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement. An example of a
Title IV calculation is available in the Financial Aid Office.
If your post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, Northwood must get your permission before it can disburse them. The
student may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds so that he/she won’t incur additional debt. Northwood may
automatically use all or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition, fees, and room and board
charges. However, Northwood would need the student’s permission to use the post-withdrawal grant disbursement for any other
school charges.
If the student receives excess Title IV funds that must be returned, Northwood must return a portion of the excess equal to the
lesser of: your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds, or the entire amount of excess funds.
Northwood must return this amount even if we did not keep this amount on your student account. The excess financial aid will be
returned to the applicable financial aid programs within 45 days of your official notification date or the date Northwood
determined the student withdrew (unofficially). Funds must be returned to the federal Title IV programs in the following order, up
to the net amount disbursed from that source: Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, Federal Direct PLUS Loans.
If Northwood is not required to return all of the excess funds, the student must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that
the student must return, he/she repays in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, you make scheduled payments
to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that the student must return is called an
overpayment. The maximum amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the grant funds you received or were
scheduled to receive. The student must make arrangements with Northwood or the Department of Education to return the
unearned grant funds.
The requirements for federal Title IV aid when the student withdrew are separate from Northwood’s institutional refund policy.
Therefore, the student may still owe funds to Northwood to cover unpaid institutional charges. Northwood may also charge the
student for any Title IV aid that we were required to return. Northwood’s institutional refund policy is available on the Business
Office web pages.
If you have questions regarding financial aid, contact Northwood University’s Financial Aid Office by phone: (989) 837-4438.
Veterans’ Benefits
Any student eligible for veterans’ benefits must contact the Business Office Manager, (989) 837-4219, for initiation and
certification of benefits to the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is the student’s obligation, on a semester-by-semester basis, to
notify the Northwood VA Certifying Official of his/her class schedule and any change in the schedule (withdrawals, drop/add),
throughout a semester.
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ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
Northwood University believes it has a responsibility to its students and the industries and communities it serves to provide the highest
standard of educational excellence possible. One measure of how well an educational institution meets this responsibility is in its
accreditations and approvals by outside education associations and governmental interests. Because each Northwood campus is served,
at least partially, by different governmental agencies and academic accrediting bodies, and because all have been in existence for varying
lengths of time, the accreditations and approvals vary from one campus to another.
All Northwood University campuses have the following accreditations and
approvals:
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Northwood University is regionally-accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association (800621-7440, www.higherlearningcommission.org).
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Northwood University was granted candidacy status for business specialty accreditation by the International Assembly for
Collegiate Business Education (IACBE) in July 2010 (www.iacbe.org).
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Northwood University received candidacy status for business specialty accreditation from the Accreditation Council for
Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) in June 2013 (www.acbsp.org).
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The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) certified school for nonimmigrant foreign students (F-visa);
Department of State (DoS) designated exchange visitor program sponsor for exchange visitors (J-visa); Citizenship and
Immigration Services (USCIS)/ Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE); and Student and Exchange Visitor Program
(SEVP) as a higher education institution for international students.
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Respective state offices for Veterans Administration programs as a higher education institution for degree-seeking qualified
veterans and dependents.
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The U.S. Bureau of Internal Revenue as a tax-exempt institution as provided for in Section 501 (c) (3) and other applicable
parts of the Internal Revenue Code for higher education organizations.
Northwood University memberships are represented in such educational and
professional organizations as:
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American Accounting Association
American Advertising Federation
American Association of Collegiate Registrars
and Admissions Officers
American Certified Fraud Examiners
American College Health Association
American College Personnel Association
American Hotel and Lodging Association
American Institute of Certified Public Accountants
American Library Association
American Management Association
American Marketing Association
American Marketing League Association
American Payroll Association
American Taxation Association
Association for Communications
Technology Professionals in Higher
Education
Association for Higher Education and Disability
Association for Leadership Educators
Association for the Tutoring Profession
Association of College and Research Libraries
Association of College and University Housing
Officers International
Association of College and
University Telecommunications
Administrators
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
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Association of Professional Researchers for
Advancement
Association of University Programs in
Health Administration
Association of Veterans Educators Certifying Officials
Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association
College and University Personnel Association
for Human Resources
Council for Adult and Experiential Learning
Council for Advancement and Support of Education
Council for the Advancement of Experiential Learning
Council for Higher Education Accreditation
Council for Hotel and Restaurant and Institutional
Education
Data Processing Management Association
Educause
Family Enterprise Research Scholars
Family Firm Institute
Global Consortium of Entrepreneurship Centers
Illinois Association for College Admissions Counseling
Intercollegiate Press Association
International Assembly for Collegiate
Business Education
International Council on Hotel, Restaurant &
Institutional Education
International Leadership Association
Mathematical Association of America
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Motor and Equipment Manufacturing Association
National Academic Advising Association
National Advertising Federation
National Association for Campus Activities
National Association for College Admission Counseling
National Association for Developmental Education
National Association of College Admissions Counselors
National Association of College Auxiliary Services
National Association of College Stores (through
its bookstore provider)
National Association of College and University
Business Officers
National Association of Colleges and Employers
National Association of Educational Buyers
National Association of Independent Colleges
and Universities
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
National Association of International Educators
National Association of Graduate
Admissions Professionals
National Association of College and
University Mail Services
National Association of Student Financial
Aid Administrators
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National Association of Student Personnel
Administrators
National Association of Veterans Programs
Administrators
National Automobile Dealers Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Honors Council
National College Learning Center Association
National Cooperative Education Association
National Council of Teachers of English
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics
National Council of Women of the United States
National Home Fashions League
National Restaurant Association
Newspaper Association of America
Organization of American Historians
Photographers’ Association of America
Society for College and University Planning
Society for Human Resources
Specialty Equipment Market Association
The Fashion Group
University Risk Management and Insurance Association
Northwood is a fully cooperative participant in the programs of:
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American College Testing (ACT)
College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB)
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES)
Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association
Northwood University, Florida Campus
The Florida campus has, in addition to general approvals previously listed, this specific approval:
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Licensed in the State of Florida by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education, September
1983.
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Licensed by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education. Additional information regarding
the institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission at 325 West Gaines Street, Suite 1414, Tallahassee, FL 323990400, toll free telephone number 850-245-3200.
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Northwood University’s Entertainment, Sport & Promotion Management (ESPM) program on the Florida campus has
achieved national approval under the Sport Management Program Review Council’s (SMPRC) standards.
The Florida Campus is represented in the following organizations:
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American Society for Training and Development
Association of Fundraising Professionals
Automotive Sales Council
Business Development Board
Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches
City of West Palm Beach, City Green Task Force
Club Managers Association of America
College Reading and Learning Association
Collegiate DECA
Council for Advancement and Support Education
Florida Association of College Stores
Florida Association of Collegiate Registrars
and Admissions Officers
Florida Association of Physical Plant Administrators
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
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Florida Association of Private Colleges and
University Registrars
Florida Association of Student Financial Aid
Administrators
Florida Cooperative Education and Placement
Association
Florida Housing Officers Organization
Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants
Florida Library Association
Florida Sun Conference
Forum Club of the Palm Beaches
Gold Coast Public Relations Council
Heavy Duty Business Forum
Higher Education Partners of South East Florida
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Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Palm Beach County
Human Resource Association of Palm Beach County
LYRASIS
National Association of Career Development
National Association of Colleges and Employers
National Association of Student Personnel
Administrators
National Intramural Recreational Sports Association
North American Society for Sport Management
Online Computer Library Center
Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce
Palm Beach County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau
Palm Beach County Hotel and Lodging Association
Palm Beach County Library Association
Palm Beach County Sports Commission
Palm Beach Cultural Council
Palm Beach Education Commission
Palm Beach Round Table
Private Colleges and Universities of Florida
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Professional Association of Resume Writers and
Career Coaches
Public Relations Society of America
Society for Human Resource Management
Southeast Florida Library Information Network
Southern Association of College Admissions
Counselors
Southern Association of College and University
Business Officers
Southern Association of Collegiate Registrars
and Admissions Officers
Southern Association of Financial Aid Administrators
Sport & Recreation Law Association
Sport Management Association
Sports Lawyers Association
The Sun Conference
Transportation Safety Equipment Institute
Women’s Chamber of Commerce of Palm Beach
County
Northwood University, Michigan Campus
The Michigan campus has, in addition to general approvals previously listed, these specific approvals:
•
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•
•
Approved by the Michigan Department of Education as a higher education institution eligible for state assistance programs for
grants, loans, and scholarships.
Certified by the Michigan Department of State, the Michigan Corporation and Securities Commission, and the State Board of
Education as a non-profit, tax-exempt Corporation for educational purposes under Act 327, Public Acts of 1931, as amended.
Listed in the Education Directory, Part III, Higher Education, and is qualified for participation in certain federally approved
assistance programs administered by the United States Office of Education.
The Timberwolf Learning Resource Center is certified by the College Reading & Learning Association (CRLA).
The Michigan Campus is represented in the following organizations:
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Adcraft Club of Detroit
Alpha Mu Alpha (National Marketing
Honorary Society)
American Culinary Association
American Economic Association
American Marketing Association/Michigan Chapter
American Political Science Association
American Statistical Association
Association for Business Simulation and
Experiential Learning
Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
of Michigan
Central Association of College and University
Business Officers
Collegiate DECA
Detroit Economic Club
Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletics Conference
Industrial Marketers of Detroit
Institute of Management Accountants
Library Orientation Exchange
Mackinac Center for Public Policy Analysis
Meeting Professionals International Michigan Chapter
Michigan Academic Library Council
Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters
Michigan Association for College Admissions
Counseling
Michigan Association for Counseling and Development
Michigan Association of Certified Public Accountants
Michigan Association of Collegiate Registrars
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
•
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and Admissions Officers
Michigan Association of Minority Business Students
Michigan Association of Physical Plant Administrators
Michigan Campus Compact
Michigan Chamber of Commerce
Michigan College and University Placement
Association
Michigan College Personnel Association
Michigan Collegiate Telecommunication Association
Michigan Council of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional
Education
Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics
Michigan Health Council
Michigan Historical Commission
Michigan Hospital Association
Michigan Hotel and Lodging Association
Michigan Library Association
Michigan Lodging Association
Michigan Personnel and Guidance Association
Michigan Press Association
Michigan Restaurant Association
Michigan Society of Association Executives
Michigan Student Financial Aid Association
Michigan Tutorial Association
Mid-American College Health Association
Mid-American Greek Council
Midland Area Chamber of Commerce
Midland Artist Guild
Midland Tomorrow
156
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Midwest Accounting Society
Midwest Business Administration Association
Mont Pelerin Society
Nurse Directed College Health
Philadelphia Society
SEMA Businesswomen’s Network
•
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•
Service Members Opportunity College
Southern Political Science Association
Special Libraries Association
The Michigan Women’s Studies Association
Women’s Automotive Association International
Women’s Car Care Council
Northwood University, Texas
In Texas, Northwood University has, in addition to general approvals previously listed, these specific approvals:
•
•
Approved by the State of Texas as a not-for-profit corporation and an institution of higher learning, February 7, 1966.
Approved as provided under Sections 1776, Title 39, U.S. Code Veterans Administration in State of Texas, fall 1981.
Other Licensure and Approvals
Northwood University is currently licensed by the Board of Regents of the State of Louisiana. The State Board of Regents renews
licenses every two years. Licensed institutions have met minimal operational standards set forth by the state, but licensure does not
constitute accreditation, guarantee the transferability of credit, nor signify that programs are certifiable by any professional agency
or organization.
Northwood University is also authorized to operate as a degree-granting institution in the following states:
California
Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education
2535 Capital Oaks Drive, Suite 400
Sacramento, CA 95833
(916) 431-6959
www.bppe.ca.gov
Kentucky
Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education
1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 320
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 573-1555
www.cpe.ky.gov
Illinois
Illinois Board of Higher Education
431 East Adams, 2nd Floor
Springfield, IL 62701-1404
(217) 782-2551
www.ibhe.org
Northwood University Board of Trustees
Daniel G. DeVos, Chairman, Grand Rapids, MI
Lambert E. Althaver, Cass City, MI
Melanie Bergeron, Lansing, MI
Phillip D. Brady, Washington, DC
Irma B. Elder, Troy, MI
James C. Fabiano II, Bay City, MI
Richard J. Garber, Saginaw, MI
Robert J. Grubb, Longmont, CO
John R. Hantz, Southfield, MI
Lyttleton T. Harris IV, Houston, TX
John A. Hohman, Sand Point, MI/Stuart, FL
Edward J. McBrien, Chicago, IL
Patricia L. Naegele, Midland, MI
Terry Neese, Oklahoma City, OK
William A. Parlberg, Frankenmuth, MI
Patricia Riley, Sunrise, FL
O. Temple Sloan III, Raleigh, NC
Maureen L. Smith, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Kathleen M. Vertin, Harsens Island, MI
Noelle M. Walsh, Midland, MI
Allen B. West, Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Albert F. Zehnder, Frankenmuth, MI
Trustees Emeriti
Robert M. Fairchild, Westlake, OH
John J. Ferron, Bloomfield Hills, MI
Lynn Ferron, Bloomfield Hills, MI
Jerome M. Fullinwider, Dallas, TX
Louis J. Furlo, Sr., Saginaw, MI/Palm Beach, FL
Christi Harris, Addison, TX
Marjorie McIntyre Hohman, Sand Point, MI/Stuart, FL
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
Leo C. Jerome, Lansing, MI
Terence F. Moore, Midland, MI
Robert E. Rossiter, Birmingham, MI
Harriet Stout, Indianapolis, IN
Macauley Whiting, Jr., Vero Beach, FL
Macauley Whiting, Sr., San Francisco, CA
157
Florida Board of Governors
Maureen L. Smith, Chairwoman, Fort Lauderdale, FL
James J. Arrigo, West Palm Beach, FL
James (JT) Bruce, Pompano Beach, FL
Thomas DeRita, Jr., Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Richard M. DeVos, Vero Beach, FL and Holland, MI
Debra Elmore, Delray Beach, FL
Tom Feltenstein, West Palm Beach, FL
Charles Laser, Deerfield Beach, FL
John W. McGowan, Stuart, FL
Frank E. McKinney, Delray Beach, FL
Michael T. Nichols, West Palm Beach, FL
Pat A. Riley, Sunrise, FL
Karen E. Stedman, Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Allen B. West, Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Governors Emeriti
Louis J. Furlo, Sr., Palm Beach, FL and Saginaw, MI
Mary T. Smith, St. Mary’s, GA
Leo A. Vecellio, Jr., Palm Beach, FL
Michigan Board of Governors
William A. Parlberg, Chairman, Frankenmuth, MI
Sid W. Allen, Midland, MI
David P. Bellos, Fairfield, OH
Nick Busscher, Holland, MI
James Fabiano II, Freeland, MI
Cassie Gambrell, Midland, MI
Victor L. George, Grand Blanc, MI
Robert J. Grubb, Longmont, CO
William R. Kohls, Beaver Island, MI
Erin Mazurek, Detroit, MI
Denise McDonald, Saginaw, MI
Sandy Morrison, Bloomfield Hills, MI
William E. Mulvihill, Jr., Berkley, MI
David H. Murdoch, Midland, MI
Elyse M. Rogers, Midland, MI
Magen Samyn, Bay City, MI
Gary Short, Bay City, MI
Justine Stauffer, Chicago, IL
Doug Turnbull, Auburn Hills, MI
Steven A. Turner, Scottsdale, AZ
Mike Weinert, Midland, MI
Richard E. Williams, Grandville, MI
Robert W. Wilson, Jeddo, MI
Texas Board of Governors
Jeff Sullivan, Chairman, Dallas, TX
Michael Arani, Richardson, TX
Stan Baxter, Frisco, TX
Chuck Canfield, Dallas, TX
Stephanie Curtis, Dallas, TX
Rob Franke, Cedar Hill, TX
Christi Harris, Dallas, TX
James Olan Hutcheson, Dallas, TX
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
Mike Moore, Arlington, TX
C.D. Shamburger, Dallas, TX
Amanda Skinner, Cedar Hill, TX
Beth Susens, Dallas, TX
Martha Tiller, Dallas, TX
Nina Vaca, Dallas, TX
Bill Wallace, Addison, TX
Jerry White, Cedar Hill, TX
158
Texas Board of Governors Advisory Board
Mark Yanke, Past Chair, Houston, TX
Mary Allen, Dallas, TX
Donna Arp, Colleyville, TX
Carolyn Farb, Houston, TX
Landa Miller, Dallas, TX
Andy Stasio, Dallas, TX
Charles F. Tupper, Jr., Dallas, TX
Alden B. Dow Center for Creativity & Enterprise Advisory Board
Tim Faley, Ann Arbor, MI
Steven Gosney, Venice, FL
Jim Hop, Midland, MI
Craig McDonald, Midland, MI
Jennifer McFarland, West Palm Beach, FL
Chip Reeves, Midland, MI
Caryn Shick, Midland, MI
Ronald Sekerak, Cedar Hill, TX
Ex-officio:
Keith A. Pretty, Midland, MI
Kristin Stehouwer, Midland, MI
Friends of Northwood University
Formerly known as the National Women’s Board - supporting the students, programs, and projects of Northwood University,
nationally and world-wide since 1969.
National Chairs
Debra Gunn Downing
Lynn & J Ferron
M.L. & Christi Harris Speer
Venita & Lyttleton Harris IV
Marjorie & John Hohman
Patricia L. Naegele
Susanne Forbes Dicker
Harriet Cracraft Stout
2005-2006
2003-2005
2001-2003
1999-2001
1995-1999
1993-1995
1990-1993
1987-1990
ACCREDITATIONS, APPROVALS, AND MEMBERSHIPS
Joan Swalwell
Mary Jane Bostick
Louise Phipps Crandall
Senator Margaret Chase Smith
Kathleen Dalby
Jane Murchison Haber
Clara VanderKloot
1985-1987
1983-1985
1981-1983
1978-1981
1976-1978
1973-1976
1969-1973
159
DIRECTORY
(as of September 15, 2014)
Officers of the University
Keith A. Pretty............................................................................................................................ President and Chief Executive Officer
B.S., Western Michigan University
J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Kristin Stehouwer ................................................................................................Executive Vice President / Chief Operating Officer /
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Chief Academic Officer
Arnold D’Ambrosio .......................................................................................................... Vice President of Alumni and Advancement
B.A., Gannon University
Tom L. Duncan ....................................................................................................................................... President – Northwood Florida
B.A., Evangel University
M.A., University of Missouri – Columbia
Ph.D., University of Arizona
Kevin Fegan .............................................................................................................................................. President – Northwood Texas
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Ed.D., Wayne State University
Larry Lindsey ............................................................................................................................. Interim President – Michigan Campus
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Timothy Nash .......................................................................................................... Vice President Strategic and Corporate Alliances /
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
David E. Fry Endowed Professorship
M.A., Central Michigan University
Ed.D., Wayne State University
Brian Sandusky ................................................................................................................... Vice President of Enrollment Management
B.B.A., Davenport University
M.A., University of Phoenix
Ph.D., Northcentral University
W. Karl Stephan ................................................................................................ Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer
B.A., Yale University
M.B.A., University of Chicago
Central Administration
Keith A. Pretty............................................................................................................................ President and Chief Executive Officer
B.S., Western Michigan University
J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Kristin Stehouwer ................................................................................................Executive Vice President / Chief Operating Officer /
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Chief Academic Officer
Sue Nowicki ........................................................................................................................................... Assistant to President and CEO
A.B.S., Delta College
B.B.A., Northwood University
Joshua Allen.................................................................................................................................................................... Web Developer
Gregory Alles ........................................................................................................................................... Senior Systems Administrator
B.S., Saginaw Valley State University
Patricia Armstrong ............................................................................................................... Director of International Student Services
B.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Michigan State University
Betty Beckham............................................................................................................................................................... Payroll Manager
David Bender .......................................................................................................................................... Director of Asset Management
A.A., Delta College
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Wayne State University
Tina Brisbois ............................................................................................................................................ Director of Academic Records
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
DIRECTORY
160
Ron Browne .................................................................................................................. Associate Director of Instructional Technology
B.A.A., Central Michigan University
Andrew Chartier ........................................................................................................................................................ Network Engineer
B.A.S., Davenport University
Pamela Christie ........................................................................................................................................ Director of Human Resources
B.B.A., Northwood University
Jeanna Cronk ..................................................................................................................... Learning Management System Coordinator
A.A., Delta College
B.S.E., M.A., Central Michigan University
Brian Cruickshank ...................................................................................................................... Director of University of Aftermarket
B.A., The Ohio State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Arnold D’Ambrosio .......................................................................................................... Vice President of Alumni and Advancement
B.A., Gannon University
Christopher Deming .................................................................................................................................... Associate Alumni Director
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Theresa Dennings ...................................................................................................... Associate Director of Systems and Programming
B.S.B.A., M.S.A., Central Michigan University
Eric Dinnan ......................................................................................................................................................... Computer Technologist
B.B.A., Northwood University
Ronald Dubrul .................................................................................................................................................... Physical Plant Director
A.S., Mid Michigan Community College
B.S., Central Michigan University
Julie Endres .............................................................................................................................. Executive Director of Alumni Relations
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Joy Feeney ....................................................................................................................................................................... Web Developer
A.B.A., B.B.A., Davenport University
M.S., Keller Graduate School of Management
William Gagliardi ..................................................................................................................... Associate Vice President of Marketing,
B.A., Alma College
Communications, and Public Relations
Joseph Gonzales .......................................................................................................................................................... Graphic Designer
A.A.S., Delta College
Todd Grzegorczyk............................................................................................................... Academic Management System Developer
B.S., Kettering University (General Motors Institute)
John Gustincic .........................................................................................Director, Alden B. Dow Center for Creativity and Enterprise
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
J.D., Michigan State University
Kyle Hercliff ........................................................................................................................................................... Programmer Analyst
B.B.A., Northwood University
Lori Isenhart ................................................................................................................................................ Human Resources Manager
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
John Kilbourn ............................................................................................. Coordinator of Media Services and Interactive Television
Austin Malloy ........................................................................................................ Admissions Representative, International Programs
B.A., Grand Valley State University
M.A., University of Washington
Justin Marshall ........................................................................................................ Director of Advancement Operations and Systems
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Mark Martin ................................................................................................................ MI Campus and System Director, Financial Aid
B.S., Ferris State University
M.B.A., Eastern Michigan University
Marcella Matzke .................................................................................................................... Human Resources Information Specialist
B.B.A., Northwood University
Warren Mault ............................................................................................................................................ Senior Advancement Officer
B.B.A., Northwood University
Tricia Mead ............................................................................................................................ Director of Compliance and Tax Matters
B.B.A., Northwood University
Lisa Moseler...................................................................................................................................... Director of Advancement Services
B.A., Central Michigan University
Jeffrey Muetzel ....................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Technical Services
B.S., Saginaw Valley State University
DIRECTORY
161
Timothy Nash ...................................................................................................... Vice President of Strategic and Corporate Alliances /
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
David E. Fry Endowed Professorship
M.A., Central Michigan University
Ed.D., Wayne State University
Stephanie Osborn ............................................................................................................................................. Graphic Media Manager
A.A.S., Delta College
B.B.A., Northwood University
Brian Parr .................................................................................................................................................. Senior Advancement Officer
B.L.S., Hillsdale College
M.S., Indiana University
John Paulus .................................................................................................................................................. Senior Programmer Analyst
B.S., Ferris State University
Mariana Prosic-Dvornic ........................................................................................................................ Director of Northwood Gallery
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Belgrade
Kimberly Randall ................................................................................................................................................ Systems Administrator
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Mamiko Reeves ..................................................................................................................................... Dean of International Programs
B.A., Nanzan University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Susan Ridgway .............................................................................................................. Business Office Manager and System Director
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Dale Robbins ............................................................................................................................................... Media Services Coordinator
A.A.S., Delta College
Ron Roth .......................................................................................................................................................... Multi Media Coordinator
B.S., Northern Michigan University
Ann Salva ............................................................................................................................... Information Technology Office Manager/
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Executive Assistant, Finance
Brian Sandusky ................................................................................................................... Vice President of Enrollment Management
B.B.A., Davenport University
M.A., University of Phoenix
Ph.D., Northcentral University
Jay Schwellenbach ................................................................................................................................................. Programmer Analyst
B.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
Stephen Schwerin ................................................................................................................................................ Systems Administrator
B.S., Ferris State University
Rebecca Simons ............................................................................................................................ Visual Communications Coordinator
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Jacob Sinacola ............................................................................................................. Associate Director of Web and Digital Services
B.S., Saginaw Valley State University
M.S., University of Michigan – Flint
Rachel Spears ......................................................................................................................................................... Programmer Analyst
A.B.S., Delta College
B.B.A., Northwood University
W. Karl Stephan ................................................................................................ Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer
B.A., Yale University
M.B.A., University of Chicago
Daniel Toland ...................................................................................................................Director of Community College Partnerships
B.S., Michigan State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Rachel Valdiserri......................................................................................................................... Director of Institutional Effectiveness
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Stephen Vanchhawng ..................................................................................................................... Director of International Education
B.A., Anderson University
M.A., Miami University
Jason vonReichbauer ................................................................................. Michigan Campus/System Director of Safety and Security
B.S., Central Michigan University
M.S., Ferris State University
Diana Vreeland ........................................................................................................................... Director of Intensive English Program
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Cheryl Warner ........................................................................................................................................................................ Controller
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
DIRECTORY
162
Judy Weirauch ...................................................................................................................................................................... Accountant
A.A., Delta College
B.S., Ferris State University
Casey Williams ................................................................................................................................................... Help Desk Coordinator
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Robert Wisler ................................................................................................................................. Director of Information Technology
B.S., University of South Florida
M.B.A., Northwood University
Davis Yost ......................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Security and Networks
B.B.A., Northwood University
Michigan Campus, Administrative Staff
Larry Lindsey .......................................................................................... Interim President – Michigan Campus and Dean of Students
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Douglas Hentschel ............................................................................................................................................. Interim Academic Dean
B.A., Kalamazoo College
M.S., Clemson University
Tamara Angell ........................................................................................................................................... Office Manager, Admissions
B.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
A.B.S., Delta College
Erick Arnold .................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Football Coach
B.A., Albion College
Jeffrey L. Bennett ..................................................................................................... Director of Automotive Technology Management
B.A., Kenyon College
M.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Jordan Bischel ....................................................................................................................................................... Head Baseball Coach
B.B.A., St. Norbert College
M.S.Ed., Missouri State University
Katherine Bischel ........................................................................................................................................... New Student Coordinator
B.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse
M.S., Northwest Missouri State University
Doug Carter ........................................................................................................................... Head Men’s and Women’s Soccer Coach
B.S., University of Surrey – London, England
Zane Colestock ...................................................................................................................... Head Men’s and Women’s Tennis Coach
B.A., Olivet College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Stephen Cripe ....................................................................................................................................................... Head Athletic Trainer
B.S., Manchester College
M.S., Michigan State University
Cassandra Crumal ....................................................................................................................................... Assistant Volleyball Coach
B.A., College of William and Mary
Jeff Curtis .......................................................................................................................................... Head Women’s Basketball Coach
B.A., Alma College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Brett Devereaux.............................................................................................................................................. Assistant Athletic Trainer
A.A., A.B.S., Delta College
B.A., Albion College
M.A.T., University of Findlay
Joseph Di Benedetto ................................................................................................ Assistant Athletic Director – Facilities and Events
B.S., Florida Atlantic University
Kate Dornbos .................................................................................................................................................. Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.A., Hope College
M.A., Western Michigan University
Makenna Doyle ............................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.A., Albion College
Ron Dubrul ........................................................................................................................................................ Director, Physical Plant
A.S., Mid Michigan Community College
B.S.B.A., Central Michigan University
DIRECTORY
163
Lorie Ermak ........................................................................................................ Director of Timberwolves Learning Resource Center
B.A., Central Michigan University
M.A., Western Michigan University
Carmel Evon .............................................................................................................................................................. Assistant Registrar
A.A., Alpena Community College
B.A., M.A., Central Michigan University
Scott Fisher ............................................................................................................................................................. Strength Coordinator
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Brenda Fitak ......................................................................................... Student Employment / Private Donor Scholarship Coordinator
A.S.A., Delta College
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Brandon George ........................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
James Goodridge ................................................................................................................................................ Head Volleyball Coach
A.A., Tallahassee Community College
B.S., Florida State University
M.A., University of Central Florida
Rebecca Grai ............................................................................................................................................................ Head of Circulation
B.B.A., Northwood University
Leonard Haynes .............................................................................................................................................. Assistant Football Coach
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Salem International University
Chad Heeb .................................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
B.A., St. John Fisher College
M.Ed., Argosy University
Samantha Hoyt ............................................................................................................................ Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach
B.S., Michigan Technological University
Barry Huckeby ..................................................................................................................................Men’s Assistant Basketball Coach
M.Ed., Indiana Wesleyan University
B.S.E., Miami University – Oxford Campus
Marlene Hulbert .............................................................................................................................................Student Services Manager
Aaron Jones .................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative, Transfer Programs
B.S., Central Michigan University
Philip Joyce ........................................................................................................................................Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
B.B.A., Northwood University
Jack King ....................................................................................................................Automotive Corporate and Admissions Manager
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Kathryn King................................................................................................................................................ Admissions Representative
B.B.A., Western Michigan University
Emily Kuiper ................................................................................................................................................ Admissions Representative
B.A., Western Michigan University
Jennifer LaBo .................................................................................................................................. Assistant Director of Financial Aid
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Jameson Lemons .......................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
B.A., University of Michigan
Maria Leone.................................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.A., Bowling Green State University
M.B.A., Tiffin University
Malen Luke ...................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Westminster College
M.Ed., Edinboro University
Gail Maday ........................................................................................................................................... International Academic Advisor
B.B.A., Northwood University
David Marsh ................................................................................................................................................................. Athletic Director
B.B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.Ed., Springfield College
Kelsey McCabe ............................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.A., Michigan State University
Travis McCurdy .......................................................................................................................................... Sports Information Director
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
DIRECTORY
164
Christie McDonald ......................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Financial Aid
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Kelly Meerman ............................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.S., Grand Valley State University
Nicholas Messing ............................................................................................................................ Associate Director of Financial Aid
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Dustin Miller .................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Football Coach
B.A., Bethany College
M.Ed., Wichita State University
Nathaniel Miller ................................................................................. Assistant Track and Cross Country Coach / Club Soccer Coach
B.S., Grand Valley State University
Susan Mishler ............................................................................................................................................... Director of Health Services
A.A.S., Delta College
B.S.N., Ferris State University
James Moreno ............................................................................................................................. Head Track and Cross Country Coach
B.S., M.S., University of Central Missouri
Laura Nash ................................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
B.B.A., Northwood University
Jennifer Newell ............................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.B.A., Northwood University
Keri Nieto ...........................................................................................................................Director of Admissions – Michigan Campus
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Danielle Oest ................................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.S., Carroll University
Dean Pappas .......................................................................................................................... Head Women’s and Men’s Soccer Coach
Sara Pawlaczyk ............................................................................................................................. Athletic Administrative Coordinator
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Penny Perlberg ...................................................................................................................................... Data Transmission Coordinator
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Meaggan Pettipiece ................................................................................................................................................ Head Softball Coach
B.S., M.S., California University Pennsylvania
Jeffrey Pierce ................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Ferris State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Krista Plummer ........................................................................... Assistant Athletic Director / Compliance/Sr. Woman Administrator
B.S., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., Tiffin University
Susan Poli-Smith ............................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Admissions
B.A., Central Michigan University
Erin Polterak ........................................................................................................................................................ Financial Aid Advisor
B.B.A., Northwood University
Kyle Powell ...................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Football Coach
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Jeff Rekeweg ............................................................................................................................................ Head Men’s Basketball Coach
B.S.B.A., University of Nebraska
Susan Ridgway .......................................................................................... MI Campus Business Office Manager and System Director
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Patrick Riepma ................................................................................................... Head Football Coach and Associate Athletic Director
B.A., Hillsdale College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Zachary Riepma .............................................................................................................................................. Assistant Football Coach
B.A., Hope College
Darcie Roberts ............................................................................................................................. Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach
B.A., Alma College
John Rogers .................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., West Chester University
Gregg Sauve ...................................................................................................................................................... Assistant Softball Coach
B.S., Michigan State University
Kyle Schroeder ................................................................................................................................................ Assistant Baseball Coach
B.A., Luther College
M.S., Northwest Missouri State University
DIRECTORY
165
Joey Shepherd .......................................................................................... Coordinator of Residential Facilities and Student Discipline
B.A., Berea College
Karla Spaeth ............................................................................................................................................ Director, Facilities and Events
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Gregory Stiffler ............................................................................................................................................... Director, Career Services
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Teresa Sullivan .......................................................................................................................... Director of Residence and Student Life
B.A., M.A.T., Saginaw Valley State University
Amanda Swafford .......................................................................................................................................... Assistant Academic Dean
B.S., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Kayla Swan ..................................................................................................................................................... New Student Coordinator
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Victor Theisen ............................................................................................................................ Physical Plant and Custodial Manager
Marisa Toschkoff .................................................................................................................. Assistant Director of Academic Records /
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Michigan Campus Registrar
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
David Turner ............................................................................................................................. Head Men’s and Women’s Golf Coach
B.A., Central Michigan University
Andrew Wonnacott ................................................................................................................................................... Academic Advisor
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Denise Zimmer ............................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.B.A., Northwood University
Rochelle Zimmerman ......................................................................................................................Reference and Periodical Librarian
A.A., Delta College
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.L.I.S., Wayne State University
Jason vonReichbauer ..............................................................................................................................System and Michigan Campus
B.S., Central Michigan University
Director of Safety and Security
M.S., Ferris State University
Michigan Campus, Faculty
Thomas Alexander ...................................................................................................................................................................... Finance
B.S., University of Michigan
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Mohammad AlQudah ................................................................................................................ Department Chair – Math and Science
B.S., Yarmouk University, Jordan
M.S., Jordan University of Science & Technology
M.A., Ph.D., Central Michigan University
Melvin Billik ........................................................................................................................................................................ Mathematics
B.A., New York University
M.S., Michigan State University
Elgie Bright ............................................................................................ Department Chair – Automotive Marketing and Management
B.A., Adrian College
M.B.A., Northwood University
William Brown ...................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.B.A., M.B.A., Harding University
Jamie Burns .................................................................................................................................... Division Chair – Arts and Sciences;
A.B., Duke University
Department Chair – Language Arts
M.A., D.A., University of Michigan
Rebecca Chakraborty ............................................................................................................................................................ Economics
B.A., Calcutta University
M.A., University of Pittsburgh
Jay Chandran ............................................................................................... Department Chair – International Business; Management
B.S., M.A., Bangalore University
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida
Margaret Colarelli ........................................................................................................................ Language Arts; History; Humanities
B.A., Hamilton College
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago
DIRECTORY
166
Christin Greiman ................................................................................................................................................................ Management
B.S., Hope College
M.B.A., Northwood University
Mariana Grigoras ................................................................................................. Department Chair – Social Science and Humanities
M.A., University of Bucharest
Stelian Grigoras............................................................................................................................ Environmental Science; Mathematics
B.S., M.S., University of Bucharest
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago
Shauna Hanisch-Kirkbride ............................................................................................................................... Environmental Science
B.S., University of Montana
M.P.A., Boise State University
Ph.D., Michigan State University
Clifford Harris.................................................................................................................................................... Economics; Philosophy
B.A., Oakland University
M.A., Walsh College
Patricia Hart Timm ............................................................................................................................. Department Chair – Accounting
B.A., Michigan State University
M.S., Ferris State University
Douglas Hentschel ............................................................................................................................................ Interim Academic Dean;
B.A., Kalamazoo College
Department Chair – Operations and Supply Chain Management
M.S., Clemson University
James Hop ....................................................................................... Department Chair – Entrepreneurship and Franchise Management
B.A., Hope College
M.B.A., Northwood University
Nasim Hosein ................................................................................................................................... Department Chair – Marketing and
B.S., University of Manitoba
Integrated Marketing Communications
M.B.A., Athabasca University
Ph.D., Ramkhamhaeng University, Thailand
Preston James IV ................................................................................................................. Department Chair – Entertainment, Sport,
B.A., Emporia State University
and Promotion Management
M.B.A., J.D., University of Kansas
DeLois Leapheart ............................................................................................................................................................................. Law
B.A., University of Michigan
J.D., The Ohio State University
Carolina Lopez ................................................................................................................................................................. Language Arts
B.Arch., Universidad Nacional Pedro Henriquez Urena, Dominican Republic
M.Arch., Ed.D., University of Florida
Mark Lund........................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.S., Wheaton College
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University
Jennifer Luzar .................................................................................................................................................................. Language Arts
B.A., Western Michigan University
M.S., Indiana University
Dale Matcheck ....................................................................................................................................... Department Chair – Economics
B.A., University of Michigan
Ph.D., Cornell University
Kevin McCormack ............................................................................................................. Operations and Supply Chain Management
B.A., University of Pittsburgh
M.B.A., New York University
Ph.D., Fordham University
Carol Meinhardt .............................................................................................................................................................. Language Arts
B.A., M.A., Central Michigan University
Glenn Moots........................................................................................................ Department Chair – Philosophy and Political Science
B.A., University of Michigan
M.S., Walsh College
M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University
Geraldine Moultine ............................................................................................................................................................. Mathematics
B.S., M.A.T., Central Michigan University
Ed.D., Wayne State University
DIRECTORY
167
Chandran Mylvaganam ..................................................................................................Division Chair – Management and Marketing
M.A., University of Rochester
M.B.A., York University
Ph.D., University of Manitoba
Jill Ouellette .................................................................................................. Department Chair – Fashion Marketing and Management
B.A., Adrian College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Jiwoo Park ................................................................................................................................. Integrated Marketing Communications
B.A., Michigan State University
M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Jeffrey Phillips .................................................................................................................................................................. Language Arts
B.A., M.A., Central Michigan University
Marvin Rapp .................................................................................................................................................................... Language Arts
B.A., Colgate University
M.S., State University of New York (SUNY)
Anastasia Romanchuk ..................................................................................................................................................... Language Arts
B.A., McMaster University
M.A., Central Michigan University
David Sanford .................................................................................................. Department Chair – Management Information Systems
B.A., M.A., M.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Barbara Sumi ......................................................................................................................................................... Accounting; Finance
B.A., Sophia University, Japan
M.S., Central Michigan University
Julie Tkach....................................................................................................................... Department Chair – Hospitality Management
B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
Elmer Tofteland .................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
A.A., Mott Community College
B.A., M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Alexander Tokarev ................................................................................................................................................................ Economics
M.S., UCTM, Bulgaria
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
Donna M. Wagner ......................................................................................................... Department Chair – Aftermarket Management
B.S., University of Mount Union
M.B.A., Bowling Green State University
Weikang Wang .............................................................................................................................. International Business; Management
B.A., Anhui University, People’s Republic of China
M.S., Washington State University
M.B.A., Henderson State University
Cornelia D. Webb ........................................................................................................................................................................ Finance
B.S., Central Michigan University
M.S.M., Walsh College
Ph.D., Capella University
Dennis Witherspoon ................................................................................................................................... Department Chair – Finance
B.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Joseph Wulffenstein ................................................................................................................... Division Chair – Quantitative Studies;
B.B.A., M.S., Walsh College
Management Information Systems
Michael Wynn ......................................................................................................... Entertainment, Sport, and Promotion Management
B.A.Ed., M.S.Ed., Wayne State College
Michigan Campus, Adjunct Faculty
Khristopher Alvarez .......................................................................................................................................... Environmental Science
B.S., University of Michigan
Ph.D., Open University
Katie Beckman ............................................................................................................................................................................. Speech
B.S.E., M.A., Central Michigan University
Alisha Beckrow ...................................................................................................................................................................... Advertising
B.A., Western Michigan University
M.A., Saginaw Valley State University
DIRECTORY
168
Karen Bork ....................................................................................................................................................................................... Law
A.B., University of Michigan
J.D., University of Michigan Law School
William L. Brown .................................................................................................................................................................. Accounting
B.B.A., M.B.A., Harding University
Todd Brundrett ..................................................................................................................................................................... Psychology
B.S., Central Michigan University
M.A., Wayne State University
Michael Cesal............................................................................................................................................. Political Science, Philosophy
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Western Michigan University
Ph.D., Temple University
Christopher Chandler........................................................................................................................................................... Advertising
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
James Cleary ......................................................................................................................................................................... Advertising
B.B.A., University of Norte Dame
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Taffy Cline ........................................................................................................................................................ Hospitality Management
B.B.A., Northwood University
Kimberly Clouse .......................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., University of Akron
M.A., Central Michigan University
Earle Crosswait ................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Michael Curry ........................................................................................................................................................................ Economics
B.A., Grand Valley State University
M.A., Walsh College
Marcilyn Daniels ............................................................................................................................................ Advertising; Management
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
Melody DeBolt ............................................................................................................................................................. Executive Fitness
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Tammy DeRuyter ........................................................................................................................................... Entrepreneurship; History
B.B.A., Baylor University
M.A., Fuller Theological Seminary
M.A., Central Michigan University
Michael Decker ................................................................................................................................................. Management; Marketing
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Jill Dougherty .............................................................................................................................................................. Executive Fitness
B.A., Central Michigan University
Mariana Prosic-Dvornic ......................................................................................................................................................... Sociology
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Belgrade
Justin Ebel ................................................................................................................................................................................... Finance
A.A., Delta College
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Ph.D., Moscow State University
David Emmel ................................................................................................................................................................ Entrepreneurship
B.S., Ferris State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Chris Emmons ..................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.S.B.A., M.A., Wayne State University
Benjamin Faulk ..................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.S., Pensacola Christian College
M.A.C.T., Samford University
June Feeney ...................................................................................................................................... Management Information Systems
M.S., Central Michigan University
Thomas Fischer ................................................................................................................................................ Hospitality Management
Sarah Fisher......................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.A., Michigan State University
M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison
DIRECTORY
169
Nicole Fox............................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.B.A., Western Michigan University
M.B.A., Otterbein University
Amy Geer ............................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Timothy Gerstenberger ......................................................................................................................................... Career Development
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
John Grether ........................................................................................................................................................... Economics; Finance
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
J.D., Michigan State University
Danielle Harris .............................................................................................................................. Entertainment & Sport Management
B.S., Bowling Green State University
M.A., Kent State University
Cheryl Hassen-Swarthout .................................................................................................................................................... Psychology
B.A.A., M.A., Central Michigan University
Karen Hubner ....................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
James Johnson ................................................................................................................................. Accounting; Law; Political Science
B.S., Eastern Michigan University
J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Cynthia Keefe ..................................................................................................................................................................................... Art
B.A., M.A., Vermont College of Norwich University
Mary Klaus ....................................................................................................................................................................... Language Arts
B.S., M.S., University of Missouri – Columbia
M.A., Murray State University
Brian Koss ...................................................................................................................................................................... Political Science
B.A., Oakland University
M.A.P., University of Akron
Robin Koss ........................................................................................................................................................ Management; Marketing
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Jeremiah Lee .................................................................................................................................................................... Language Arts
B.A., DePauw University
Michael Lewandowski ........................................................................................................................... Human Resource Management
B.S., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Lance Lewis ..................................................................................................................................................................................History
B.S., M.S., Kansas State University
M.A., Norwich University
M.L.S., Fort Hays State University
Ph.D., Michigan State University
Christina Little ................................................................................................................................................. Management; Marketing
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Thomas Luptowski ........................................................................................................................................................ Political Science
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
M.A., Western Michigan University
Mark Marciniak ....................................................................................................... Marketing; Entertainment and Sport Management
B.A., M.A., E.D.S., Central Michigan University
Carrie McAllister ............................................................................................................................................................. Language Arts
B.A., University of Michigan
M.A., University of Michigan – Flint
Matthew McMaster........................................................................................................... Law; Entertainment and Sport Management
B.B.A., Georgia State University
J.D., Ave Maria School of Law
D. Nena Meath .................................................................................................................................................................................. Law
B.B.A., Sam Houston State University
J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Carol Messing ................................................................................................................................................................... Language Arts
B.A., M.S., Brooklyn College
DIRECTORY
170
Margaret Mieske ..................................................................................................................................... English as a Second Language
B.S., M.S., Central Michigan University
Mark Minbiole..................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.B.A., University of Michigan
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Christopher Opperman ................................................................................................................................... Hospitality Management
B.B.A., Northwood University
John Pafford .................................................................................................................................................................................History
B.S., Academy New Church College
Ph.D., International College
Christina Pashby ................................................................................................................................................................... Psychology
B.A., New York State University
M.S., Purdue University
Susan Polito ................................................................................................................................................................................... Drama
Sarah Prielipp ................................................................................................................................................................... Language Arts
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Donna Rapp ............................................................................................................................................................................. Marketing
B.A., University of Michigan
M.A., Central Michigan University
Earl Reynolds ...............................................................................................................................................................................History
B.A., Thomas A. Edison State College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Heather Rose ....................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.B.A., Adrian College
M.S.A., Central Michigan University
Barbara Sanford .............................................................................................................................. Management Information Systems
B.A., M.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.L.I.S., Wayne State University
Sebastian Scheibert ............................................................................................................................................................. Management
B.S., M.S., Case Western Reserve University
M.B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
Robert Sparling ........................................................................................................................................................................... Finance
B.S.E.G.N., University of Michigan
M.S., Carnegie Mellon University
Kerrie Spinney..................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.S., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Elizabeth Thomas ................................................................................................................................................................... Economics
B.S., Northern Michigan University
Marisa Toschkoff ................................................................................................................................................................ Management
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Paula Ulmer ........................................................................................................................................................................... Humanities
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.L.A., Southern Methodist University
Danielle Waller ................................................................................................................................................................. Language Arts
A.A., St. Clair County Community College
B.A., M.A., Central Michigan University
Rachel Chipman-Wulffenstein........................................................................................................ Management Information Systems
B.B.A., M.S., Saginaw Valley State University
Erin Zimmer ..................................................................................................................................................... Management; Marketing
B.S., Michigan Technological University
M.B.A., University of Connecticut
Joan Zito ........................................................................................................................................... Management Information Systems
B.B.A., B.A., Baker College
DIRECTORY
171
Northwood – Florida, Administrative Staff
Tom L. Duncan ....................................................................................................................................... President – Northwood Florida
B.A., Evangel University
M.A., University of Missouri – Columbia
Ph.D., University of Arizona
Susan Dennett ................................................................................................................................................................. Academic Dean
B.A., Oakland University
M.S., Florida State University
Robert Cabello.............................................................................................................................................................. Dean of Students
B.G.S., University of Michigan
M.A., Eastern Michigan University
J.D., Indiana University
Kent Baker ....................................................................................................................... Head Track and Field / Cross Country Coach
A.B., University of Michigan – Ann Arbor
Teresa Calhoun ............................................................................................................................... Assistant Business Office Manager
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Carla Cavalie ................................................................................................................................................ Admissions Representative
B.S., Nova Southeastern University
Bradley Cocking ........................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
B.A., M.A., Rowan University
Hollie Crotts......................................................................................................................................................... Financial Aid Director
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Nicholas Davidson ........................................................................................................................................................ Athletic Director
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Douglas Doran .................................................................................................................................................... Director of Admissions
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Robert Doran ................................................................................................................ Computer Technologist/Interactive Room Tech
Mary Frazier ............................................................................................................................................ Senior Advancement Director
Heather Gray ........................................................................................................ Admissions Representative, Adult Degree Programs
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Lynette Harville............................................................................................................................... Director Learning Resource Center
B.A., Otterbein University
M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Arizona State University
Lori Huertas ................................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative
B.A., University of South Carolina
M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University
Angela Jones .............................................................................................................................................................. Assistant Registrar
B.B.A., Florida Atlantic University
Jeremiah Kennedy ................................................................................................................................................ Head Baseball Coach
B.S., Dallas Baptist University
Roland Massimino.......................................................................... Director of Basketball Operations/ Men’s Head Basketball Coach
B.S., University of Vermont
M.A., Rutgers University
Suzi McCreery ............................................................................................................. Director of Special Events and Public Relations
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University
Courtney McDaniel ........................................................................................................................... Head Women’s Basketball Coach
B.S., University of Tennessee – Knoxville
Brandon Miller .......................................................................................................................... Head Men’s and Women’s Golf Coach
B.S., Florida Technology
M.A., University of North Carolina at Pembroke
Lindsay Moccia .............................................................................................................................................. Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., Barry University
Dawn Musgrave-Demarest ....................................................................................................................................................... Registrar
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Angel Nacianceno ........................................................................................................................................... New Student Coordinator
B.S., M.S., Florida International University
Ivette Noto .......................................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Admissions
A.A., Palm Beach Community College
B.S., University of Florida
DIRECTORY
172
Ted Nowell ..................................................................................................... Assistant Baseball Coach/Game Operations Coordinator
B.B.A., Northwood University
Danny O’Connor ............................................................................................................................................. Business Office Manager
A.S., Ocean County College
B.S., Georgian Court College
Kevin Petrovsky ........................................................................................................................................... Associate Academic Dean;
A.S., B.S., Florida Institute of Technology
Division Chair – Management and Marketing;
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Chair – Environmental Science and Sustainability
Maryellen Powers ........................................................................................................ Assistant Track and Field/Cross Country Coach
B.S., Boston University
Margaret Reichert........................................................................................................................................... Career Planning Director
A.A., Suny College of Technology
B.A., Suny University
M.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University
Regina Ricketts ..........................................................................................................Program Center Manager, Adult Degree Program
B.S., Palm Beach Atlantic University
M.A., Argosy University
Michael Sawney ...................................................................................................... Academic Advisor/International Student Specialist
B.A., B.S.W., Florida Atlantic University
M.S.W., Barry University
Phillip Shipley .............................................................................................................................................. Director of Residential Life
B.A., M.S., University of Charleston
Samuel Smeed ............................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
B.S., Devry University
Thomas Storrison ......................................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative
B.A., Siena Heights University
M.A.Ed., University of Phoenix
Brandon Strassburger ............................................................................................................................... Coordinator of Campus Life
B.B.A., Northwood University
Kenneth Sullivan ...............................................................................................................................Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
M.A., Central Michigan University
Kristopher Swogger ........................................................................... Assistant Athletic Director for Compliance/Academic Advising
B.S., Florida State University
M.S., Florida International University
Allison Tardonia ................................................................................ Senior Advancement Director – Signature Programs and Events
B.S., Montclair State University
Christopher Taylor ............................................................................................................................................ Head Volleyball Coach
B.S., Western Michigan University
M.Ed., University of Louisiana at Monroe
Richelle VanWagoner .................................................................................................................................................... Athletic Trainer
B.S., University of Central Arkansas
M.S., Indiana University – Bloomington
Kurt Wyzkiewicz ............................................................................................................ Information Technology Campus Coordinator
B.B.A., Northwood University
Joseph Zakowicz ........................................................................................................................................... Head Men’s Soccer Coach
B.S., Mid-Continent University
Northwood – Florida, Faculty
Dennis Bechtol ................................................................................................................ Department Chair – Entertainment, Sport, and
A.A., Miami Dade College
Promotion Management
B.S., Florida State University
M.A., University of South Florida
Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Timothy Gilbert.................................................................................... Department Chair – Automotive Marketing and Management;
B.A., University of California – Los Angeles
Interim Department Chair – Franchise Management
M.B.A., Pepperdine University
Justin Harmon ............................................................................................... Entertainment, Sport, and Promotion Management; Law
B.S., Georgetown University
J.D., Tulane University
DIRECTORY
173
Edward Howell .................................................................................................................. Department Chair – Economics and Finance
B.A., Vanderbilt University
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
Gary Mazza ................................................................................................................................. Department Chair – Mathematics and
B.A., M.S., West Virginia University
Management Information Systems
Jennifer McFarland .................................................................................................... Department Chair – Advertising and Marketing
B.J., University of Missouri – Columbia
M.B.A., Lynn University
Michael Olsher ........................................................................................................................... Department Chair – Entrepreneurship;
B.A., University of Pittsburgh
Interim Department Chair – International Business
M.B.A., New York University
Ph.D., Fordham University
Kevin Petrovsky ........................................................................................................................................... Associate Academic Dean;
A.S., B.S., Florida Institute of Technology
Division Chair – Management and Marketing;
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Department Chair – Environmental Science and Sustainability
Cheryl Pridgeon ............................................................................................................................. Division Chair – Arts and Sciences,
B.A., Henderson State University
Communications, and Quantitative Studies;
M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University
Department Chair – Humanities and Philosophy
Lisa Prue ............................................................................................................................................... Department Chair – Accounting
B.B.A., M.AC., Florida Atlantic University
Judith Schwartz..................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.S., M.TX., Florida Atlantic University
Robert Sundwick ........................................................................................................... Department Chair – Aftermarket Management
B.S., Ferris State University
M.A., Western Michigan University
Michael Tuttle ....................................................................................................................... Interim Department Chair – Management
B.A., M.B.A., Michigan State University
James B. Ward ................................................................................................................ Department Chair – Hospitality Management
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University
Florida Campus, Adjunct Faculty
Sushma Alankar ......................................................................................................................... Adult Degree Program - Mathematics
B.S., M.S., Florida Atlantic University
Holly Allen ............................................................................................................................................................................... Sociology
B.A., University of Massachusetts
M.A., Bowling Green State University
Brian Bastin ......................................................................................................................................................... Automotive Marketing
B.B.A., Stetson University
M.B.A., University Miami
Nicholas Bergan...................................................................................................................................................................... Economics
B.A., Saint Louis University
M.S., Florida State University
Kelly Blaggie ........................................................................................................................................................... Career Development
B.A., North Carolina State University
M.A., University of South Florida
Ronald Capute ........................................................................................................... Adult Degree Program - Philosophy; Economics
B.A., Saint Joseph’s University
M.A., Temple University
M.B.A., New York Institute of Technology
David Childers .............................................................................................................................................................................. Speech
A.A.S., Delta College
A.B., Henry Ford Community College
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Robert Gillan ....................................................................................................................................................................... Management
A.A., Queensborough Community College
M.B.A., University Miami
Abbe Greenberg .......................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., University of Pennsylvania
M.C.I.S., Rutgers University
DIRECTORY
174
Danny Kind .......................................................................................................................................................... Adult Degree Program
B.B.A., University Miami
M.B.A., Seton Hall University
Betty Lasley ................................................................................................................................................................................. English
B.A., College of William and Mary
M.A., Western Maryland College
Donna Link ..................................................................................................................................................................... English; Speech
B.A., M.A., Olivet Nazarene University
John Long ......................................................................................................................................................................................... Law
B.S.B.A., J.D., Georgetown University
Jaime Marulanda ................................................................................................................................................ Adult Degree Program
B.S., Florida International University
M.I.S.M., University of Phoenix
Gary McLeary .................................................................................................................................. Management Information Systems
B.S., University of South Florida
M.S., American Intercontinental University
Marshall Newell................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Ph.D., Capella University
Christopher Nippert ............................................................................................................................. Entrepreneurship; Management
B.A., Eckerd College
M.B.A., Thunderbird School of Global Management
Johnny Ortiz ............................................................................................................ Adult Degree Program - Management; Marketing
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Christina Ostergaard .............................................................................................................................................................. Marketing
B.B.A., Florida Atlantic University
M.B.A., Lynn University
Sherry Penn-Crawford ........................................................................................................................................... Speech; Psychology
B.A., University of Louisville
M.A., University of Florida
Ph.D., Union Institute & University
Thomas Perugini .............................................................................................................................................. Hospitality Management
A.S.C., B.S., Johnson & Wales University
M.B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University
Ira Raab ......................................................................................................................................................................... Political Science
J.D., Brooklyn Law School
M.B.A., Adelphi University
M.S., Long Island University Zeckendorf Campus
Samantha Ragland ...................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., Western Kentucky University
M.A., Syracuse University
Christopher Rodgers....................................................................................................................................................................History
A.A., Palm Beach State College
B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University
Donna Rogers ............................................................................................................. Adult Degree Program - Environmental Science
B.S., M.S., University of Michigan
Joseph Rooney .................................................................................................................................................. Hospitality Management
M.S., Florida International University
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Faye Rosenberg ................................................................................................................................................................................ Law
B.A., University of Rochester
J.D., Emory University
Morris Samit ................................................................................................................................................................. Entrepreneurship
A.B., Temple University
M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania
Pearl Saunders............................................................................................................................................................................. English
B.A., Ph.D., St. Louis University
M.Ed., University of Missouri
M.A., Ed.S., Southern Illinois University
DIRECTORY
175
Kivette Sinclair .................................................................................................................................................................... Management
A.B., University College of the Carribean
M.S., Florida International University
Christopher Snyder................................................................................................................................................................. Marketing
B.A., M.B.A., Indiana Institute of Technology
George Stalliard ............................................................................................ Adult Degree Program - Human Resource Management
B.S., M.S., University of Central Texas
Sc.D., Nova Southeastern University
George Stamas ............................................................................................................................................... Entrepreneurship; Finance
B.A., Washington and Lee University
M.M., Northwestern University
Glenn Swift ...................................................................................................................................................................................History
B.B.A., Stetson University
M.A., University of Central Florida
Kyle Tadman ................................................................................................................................................................................History
B.A., B.A., University of Iowa
M.A., Western Illinois University
Glen Weeks ................................................................................................................................. Adult Degree Program - Management
B.S., Auburn University
M.S., M.B.A., University Miami
Thomas Wonnell ................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.S., Friends University
M.B.A., Wichita State University
M.ACC., D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Robin Zide ........................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Otto von Feigenblatt ............................................................................................................................................................... Sociology
B.S., University of Asia Pacific
M.A., Chulalongkorn University
Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University
Northwood – Texas Operations, Administrative Staff
Kevin Fegan .............................................................................................................................................. President - Northwood Texas
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Ed.D., Wayne State University
Terry Silva ...................................................................................................................................... Academic Dean - Texas Operations
A.A., San Antonio College
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Amber University
Ed.D., Argosy University
Mayowa Alalade ................................................................................................................ Computer Technologist - Texas Operations
B.S., University of Ibadan
Michael Anguiano .......................................................................................................................... Director of Military Operations and
A.A., A.S., Mt. San Jacinto Community College District
Program Center Manager - Ft. Worth ADP
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Donna Card-Sessoms ............................................................................................................ Admissions Representative - Texas ADP
B.S., Syracuse University
M.A., University of Phoenix
Diana Cavazos-Garcia ........................................................................................Assistant Program Center Manager - Ft. Worth ADP
B.B.A., Northwood University
Nikki Ceaser .......................................................................................................... Admissions Representative - Texas MBA Program
B.S., Northwestern State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Edward Downing................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative - Texas ADP
B.A., Houston Baptist University
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Sarah Lack ......................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager - Cedar Hill ADP
B.B.A., Northwood University
Sandra Popham ................................................................................................. Assistant Program Center Manager - Cedar Hill ADP
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
DIRECTORY
176
Northwood – Texas Operations, Full-Time Faculty – Adult Degree Program
Carla Allen ............................................................................................................................................................................. Accounting
B.B.A., M.P.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Steven Tidwell ..................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Amberton University
D.B.A., Argosy University
David Spaulding ...................................................................................................................................................................... Marketing
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Northwood – Texas Operations, Full-Time Faculty – MBA Program
Adam Guerrero ..................................................................................................................................................... Texas MBA Program
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., M.B.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas
Tara Peters ............................................................................................................................................................ Texas MBA Program
B.B.A., Texas Wesleyan University
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Ph.D., Union Institute & University
Northwood – Texas Operations, Adjunct Faculty
Sabine Adams .............................................................................................................................................................................. Finance
B.A., University of Virginia
M.A., University of Texas at Dallas
Opeyemi Akinjayeju .............................................................................................................................................................. Economics
B.A., Montclair State University
M.S., Georgia Southern University
James Bellamy ..................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Amberton University
Paul Benson ........................................................................................................................................................................... Humanities
B.A., Pacific Lutheran University
M.A., Colorado State University
Ph.D., University of North Texas
Gary Brahl ............................................................................................................................................................................. Advertising
M.Lib., Southern Methodist University
Steven Brazill .................................................................................................................................................... Management; Marketing
B.A., Hillsdale College
M.B.A., Texas A&M University - Commerce
Dennis Brock .......................................................................................................................................................................... Economics
B.S., M.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Charmelia Butler.............................................................................................................................. Management Information Systems
M.A., M.B.A., Webster University
Anthony Chaney ...........................................................................................................................................................................History
B.A., Southern Methodist University
M.A.T., World Learning, Inc./School for International Training
Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas
Adam Childers....................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.B.A., Abilene Christian University
Mathew Dromey ...................................................................................................................................................................... Marketing
B.A., University of South Florida
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Diane Feffer ............................................................................................................................................................................. Marketing
B.B.A., M.B.A., University of North Texas
Lynda Folts ................................................................................................................................. Environmental Science; Sustainability
B.A., National Labor College
M.S., Ph.D., Stephen F. Austin State University
DIRECTORY
177
Evgeniy Gentchev ................................................................................................................................................. International Business
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
James Gibbons.................................................................................................................................................Management; Philosophy
B.S., Stephen F. Austin State University
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Diane Gill ......................................................................................................................................................................................History
B.A., M.Ed., University of Texas at Arlington
Cathy Godbois ........................................................................................................... Mathematics; Management Information Systems
B.A., M.S., University of Texas at Arlington
Necmettin Gormus ................................................................................................................................................ Texas MBA Program
B.B.A., M.A., Texas Tech University
Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington
Geoffrey Grimes .......................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., Austin College
M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University
Chad Hansen ..........................................................................................................................................................................Philosophy
B.A., California State University, Northridge
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas
Robert Harris ................................................................................................................................................................. English; Speech
B.A., North Texas State University
M.L.I.A., Southern Methodist University
Kouri Hastings....................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.B.A., M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Ellen Hays .................................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., Pensacola Christian College
M.Ed., Dallas Baptist University
Martha Heimberg ....................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University
Lea Holland ...................................................................................................................................... Management Information Systems
B.A., Rice University
M.S., University of Texas at Dallas
Lisa Johnson ................................................................................................................................................................................ English
B.A., M.A., M.Ed., Northern Arizona University
John Joiner ................................................................................................................ Management, Management Information Systems
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., University of Phoenix
Douglas Keenan ................................................................................................................................ Management Information Systems
A.A., B.S., M.S., Eastern Kentucky University
Ph.D., University of North Texas
Faye King .............................................................................................................................................................Psychology; Sociology
B.A., North Texas State University
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington
Gerald Kissel .................................................................................... Entertainment, Sport, and Promotion Management; Management
A.B., University of Detroit
M.B.A., University of Dallas
M.S., St. Thomas University
Ed.D., Temple University
Jane Konditi......................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.B.A., Texas Wesleyan University
M.B.A., Texas Woman’s University
Ph.D., University of North Texas
Alaina Lansing........................................................................................................................................................................ Economics
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Michael Lansing ............................................................................................................................................... Hospitality Management
B.A., M.B.A., Lamar University
J. Michael Latham ................................................................................................................................................ Texas MBA Program
B.S., Texas A&M University
M.S., University of Texas at Dallas
Jamie Laws ............................................................................................................................................................................ Accounting
B.B.A., M.S., University of Texas at Arlington
DIRECTORY
178
Lavelle Lemonier................................................................................................................................................... Texas MBA Program
B.A.A.S., Lamar University
M.B.A., Capella University
Alice Lubbe .......................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.A., Texas Tech University
M.S., University of Texas at Arlington
James Lytle .................................................................................................................................................................................. Finance
B.S., Sam Houston State University
M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
M.B.A., Baylor University
Kyle McClure .......................................................................................................... Entertainment, Sport, and Promotion Management
M.S., Baylor University
Timothy McRay..................................................................................................................................................... Texas MBA Program
B.S., Letourneau University
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Scott McVittie ............................................................................................................................................................................... Speech
B.A.E., Kearney State College
M.S.Ed., University of Nebraska Omaha
Ed.D., University of Arkansas
Amanda Medina .................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
B.B.A., M.S., Texas A&M University
Beverly Miller ......................................................................................................................................................Psychology; Sociology
B.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Psy.D., Phillips Graduate Institute
LaSonya Moore ................................................................................................................................ Management Information Systems
M.B.A., LeTourneau University
Tiffani Owensby .................................................................................................................................................................. Mathematics
B.A., Southeastern College
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Jimmy Phillips ........................................................................................................................................................................Philosophy
B.A., East Texas Baptist University
M.DIV., Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
Steven Pillion ....................................................................................................................................................................... Management
A.A., Allan Hancock College
B.S., California State University
M.P.A., Troy State University
Sha-Shonda Porter ...................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., Burlington College
M.F.A., Goddard College
D.A., Union Institute & University
James Pulis........................................................................................................................................................................................ Law
B.A., University of North Texas
J.D., University of Texas at Austin
Melinda Rodgers ............................................................................................................................................. History; Political Science
B.S., University of Texas at Tyler
M.P.A., University of North Texas
Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas
K. Paul Rome ......................................................................................................................................................... Texas MBA Program
B.B.A., Brock University
M.B.A., McMaster University
D.B.A., Argosy University
Thurman Schweitzer................................................................................................................................................................... Science
B.S., M.C.R.P., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Ron Sekerak.................................................................................................................................................................. Entrepreneurship
B.S., M.S.E., University of Michigan
M.B.A., Stanford University
John Sparks ........................................................................................................................................................................... Advertising
B.S., University of Texas at Austin
M.B.A., University Miami
Patrick Sullivan ................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.A., San Jose State University
M.B.A., University of Nebraska Omaha
DIRECTORY
179
James Teeter ........................................................................................................................................................................ Mathematics
B.A., B.S., University of Texas at Arlington
M.S., M.S., M.S., Texas A&M University – Commerce
Derrick Thompson ....................................................................................................................................................................... Speech
B.A., California State University, Long Beach
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Michael Thompson .............................................................................................................................................................. Management
B.B.A., M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Adult Degree Program, Administrative Staff
Rhonda Anderson ...........................................................................................................................................................Associate Dean
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Linda Henderson ............................................................................................................................................................ Academic Dean
B.A., Northern Michigan University
M.Ed., Wayne State University
Ph.D., Michigan State University
Terry Silva ........................................................................................................................................ Academic Dean, Texas Operations
A.A., San Antonio College
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Amber University
Ed.D., Argosy University
Kelly Austin ................................................................................................................................................... Contact Center Supervisor
B.S., Oakland University
Sarah Boothe ............................................................................................................................................................ Associate Registrar
B.S.E., Central Michigan University
Elizabeth Bryce ............................................................................................................................................ Director of Career Services
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Wendy DiGirolamo ..................................................................................................................................................... Record Specialist
A.S., Delta College
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Marcia Farah ................................................................................................................................................................ Faculty Manager
B.A., M.Lib., University of Michigan – Flint
Kerry Hannah ...................................................................................................................................................... Instructional Designer
B.A., Spring Arbor University
M.S., Walden University
Ellen Iwanow ............................................................................................................................................................... Record Specialist
B.S., Michigan State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Todd Lake .......................................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Admissions
B.S., University of Wisconsin
Timothy Lamb ................................................................................................................................... Associate Director of Admissions
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Michelle Rottiers ........................................................................................................................................... Contact Center Supervisor
B.B.A., Northwood University
Michael Sullivan ................................................................................................................................................. Director of Admissions
B.A., M.A.T., Saginaw Valley State University
Adult Degree Program Locations
CALIFORNIA
Judy Fox .......................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Cerritos, California
DISTANCE EDUCATION
Kimberly Bryant ............................................................................................................ Program Center Manager, Distance Education
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Nicole Gonzalez .............................................................................................. Assistant Program Center Manager, Distance Education
B.A., Albion College
DIRECTORY
180
FLORIDA
Heather Gray .................................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative, Florida
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Regina Ricketts .................................................................................................................................. Program Center Manager, Florida
B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University
M.A., Argosy University
ILLINOIS
Ann Marie Rosen ................................................................................................................................ Regional Development Manager
A.A.S., Alfred State College
B.S., M.Ed., State University College at Buffalo
KENTUCKY
James Croan ........................................................................................................................... Director, Illinois and Kentucky Outreach
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S., Indiana Wesleyan University
Melissa Glaser ............................................................................................................... Assistant Program Center Manager, Louisville
B.A., Bellarmine University
LOUISIANA
Karen Camburn ....................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, New Orleans
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
MICHIGAN
Brett Blythe ....................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Virtual Program
B.A.A., Central Michigan University
Andrea Bonkowski ............................................................................................ Program Center Manager, Macomb University Center
A.A., Macomb Community College
B.B.A., Walsh College
Jack Bronka .................................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Selfridge
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., University of Utah
Barbara Christensen .................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Midland
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Charlotte Colosimo ............................................................................................................................ Admissions Representative, Troy
B.A., Cleary University
Rachel Charbonneau ........................................................................................ Program Center Manager, Bay City and Grand Rapids
B.A., M.Ed., Saginaw Valley State University
Stephanie Cramton ......................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Saginaw
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Melissa Horn ........................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Bay City and Saginaw
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Valisa Maki ........................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Grand Rapids
B.B.A., Western Michigan University
Laura Nash ....................................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Gaylord
B.B.A., Northwood University
Lisa Shankus .......................................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Troy
B.S., Central Michigan University
Christopher Stokdyk........................................................................................................................ Program Center Manager, Lansing
B.S., Indiana University
M.S., Michigan State University
Michele Tippman ........................................................................................................................ Program Center Manager, Alpena CC
B.S., Juniata College
M.S.W., University of Michigan
Tammy Walsh ....................................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Flint
A.G.S., Suomi College
B.B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
Katrina Wesley ................................................................................................................................. Program Center Manager, Livonia
B.B.A., Jackson State University
M.B.A., University of Phoenix
DIRECTORY
181
TEXAS
Michael Anguiano .......................................................................................................................... Director of Military Operations and
A.A., A.S., Mt. San Jacinto Community College District
Program Center Manager, Ft. Worth
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Donna Card-Sessoms ....................................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Texas
B.S., Syracuse University
Ed.M., University of Phoenix
Diana Cavazos-Garcia ................................................................................................... Assistant Program Center Manager, Ft. Worth
B.B.A., Northwood University
Edward Downing.............................................................................................................................. Admissions Representative, Texas
B.A., Houston Baptist University
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Sarah Lack .................................................................................................................................... Program Center Manager, Cedar Hill
B.B.A., Northwood University
Sandra Popham ............................................................................................................ Assistant Program Center Manager, Cedar Hill
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Adult Degree Program, Full-Time Faculty
Carla Allen ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Texas
B.B.A., M.P.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Patrick Callaghan ............................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.A., Albion College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Ph.D., Wayne State University
David Spaulding ............................................................................................................................................................................. Texas
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., University of Alabama at Birmingham
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Steven Tidwell ................................................................................................................................................................................ Texas
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Amberton University
D.B.A., Argosy University
Adult Degree Program, Adjunct Faculty
Abdel Abdelrahman .................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.Com., Ain Shams University, Egypt
M.S., Johnson and Wales University – Providence
Jason Ainsworth ................................................................................................................................................................ Grand Rapids
B.A., Spring Arbor University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Karalee Alvey ...................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., Anderson University
Troy Alvey ........................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., University of Louisville
Norman Auspitz ...............................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.S., Drexel University
Andrew Bahrou ................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.S., Wayne State University
M.S., University of Delaware
Michelle Balee ............................................................................................................................................................................. Lisle, IL
B.A., Spring Hill College
M.A., Saint Louis University
Ph.D., New York University
Don Ball ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Selfridge
B.A., Mercy College of Detroit
M.A., University of Phoenix
D.M., Capella University
Phillip Barnhart ............................................................................................................................................................................... Flint
B.A., Bennington College
M.F.A., Naropa University
M.Lib., University of Michigan – Flint
DIRECTORY
182
Kimberly Bateman ..................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
A.B., Oakland Community College
B.B.A., Northwood University
B.I.S., M.L.I.S., Wayne State University
M.H., Tiffin University
Robert Benson ............................................................................................................................................................. New Orleans, LA
B.S., University of Southern Mississippi
M.B.A., University of New Orleans
Robert Bethel .................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.A.S., Westmoreland County Community College
B.S., Robert Morris College
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Gloria Bey .......................................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
B.B.A., Texas Wesleyan University
M.B.A., Hardin-Simmons University
John Black ........................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Wayne State University
Helen Bojarczyk ............................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.A., M.A., Central Michigan University
Ph.D., Oakland University
Paul Bojarczyk ................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., Michigan State University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
James Bonfiglio ................................................................................................................................................................. Ft. Worth, TX
B.S., Indiana University – Bloomington
M.M., University of Dallas
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
James Boswell ........................................................................................................................................................... Distance Education
B.A., College of William and Mary
M.L.I.A., Harvard College
J.D., University of Georgia
Carl Bourdelais ............................................................................................................................................................................ Alpena
B.S., M.B.A., Southern New Hampshire University
Cheval Breggins................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.A., Oberlin College
M.B.A., University of Phoenix
Ph.D., Northcentral University
Gaylynn Brenoel ......................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
A.A., Florida Community College
M.B.A., Jacksonville University
Clare Brinkman................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Mari Broman ............................................................................................................................................................ Distance Education
B.G.S.W., M.S.W., Wayne State University
Brennan Brown ........................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
M.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Kristen Brown .......................................................................................................................................................... Distance Education
B.A., Michigan State University
M.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Scott Brown ......................................................................................................................................................................... Cerritos, CA
A.A., Saddleback University
B.S., Pepperdine University
M.B.A., University of La Verne
Michelle Buchard ............................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., University of Michigan
M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Nancy Burns ..................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Ph.D., Capella University
DIRECTORY
183
Douglas Butler ........................................................................................................................................................................... Selfridge
B.B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Christopher Caracci ................................................................................................................................................ Distance Education
B.A., M.A., Catholic University of Leuven
B.S., Saint Meinrad College
M.B.A., Rollins College
David Caracci ........................................................................................................................................................... Distance Education
B.B.A., Northwood University
Philip Celestin .................................................................................................................................................................... Grand Rapids
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A, Western Michigan University
James Court ............................................................................................................................................................................... Bay City
B.S.B.A., Central Michigan University
M.A.C.T., Florida International University
Michael Crawford ............................................................................................................................................................................ Flint
B.F.A., University of Michigan
M.S., Ferris State University
Thomas Crossen ............................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.B.A., University of Toledo
Burke Cueny ..................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Central Michigan University
Michael Curry ........................................................................................................................................................................... Selfridge
B.A., Grand Valley State University
M.A., Walsh College
Gary Cusick ......................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., University of Louisville
M.A., University of Kentucky
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison
Eddie Davis ................................................................................................................................................................................ Selfridge
B.S., Mississippi Valley State University
M.S., Naval Postgraduate School
Jackson Davis ............................................................................................................................................................................. Lisle, IL
B.S., Purdue University
M.B.A., Catholic University of Leuven
M.B.A., University of Chicago
Mary Davis.................................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
A.G.T., A.G.S., Mid Michigan Community College
B.S., M.S., Central Michigan University
Alexander DePetro ........................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.A., University of Detroit
M.B.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University
Richard Downing ........................................................................................................................................................................ Lansing
B.A., Eastern Illinois University
M.B.A., University of Phoenix
Bruce Dutra ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Flint
B.A., University of Delaware
M.A., Ph.D., Purdue University
Paul Dyar ..........................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., Bellarmine University
LL.M., University of Florida
J.D., University of Kentucky
Christine Eckerle........................................................................................................................................................................ Midland
B.S., M.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
David Eder ................................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.S., M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
David Edward ...................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.S., West Virginia University
M.B.A., University of Louisville
DIRECTORY
184
Isra El-Beshir.................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.B.A., Grand Valley State University
M.A., Wayne State University
Christopher Enge ....................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
B.S., Millikin University
M.B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
D.J., Stanford University
Aaron Ensley .................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.A., Washtenaw Community College
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Michael Erickson........................................................................................................................................................................ Midland
B.S., M.S., M.B.A., University of Maryland University College
Michael Evans ............................................................................................................................................................................ Midland
B.A., M.S., University of Reading
Ph.D., University of Nottingham
Alfred Ferry ................................................................................................................................................................. New Orleans, LA
B.S., Spring Hill College
M.A., University of New Orleans
J.D., Loyola University
Jennifer Fisch-Ferguson .................................................................................................................................................................. Flint
B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.A., University of Michigan – Flint
Melissa Force ............................................................................................................................................................ Distance Education
B.Acc., M.S., Walsh College
D.B.A., Lawrence Technological University
Tonya Fountain ........................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., D.M., University of Phoenix
Gary Franchy ................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.A., University of Detroit Mercy
M.A., Wayne State University
Sarah Gardner............................................................................................................................................................................ Midland
A.A., Delta College
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.Econ., Walsh College
Eric Glohr .................................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Michigan State University
Steven Gorham ........................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
B.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Judith Grenkowicz ....................................................................................................................................................................... Alpena
B.S., Ferris State University
M.B.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Ed.D., Northern Illinois University
Bryan Harrison ................................................................................................................................................................. Grand Rapids
A.A., Grand Rapids Community College
B.S., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
William Hart ............................................................................................................................................................................... Saginaw
B.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Spring Arbor University
Jack Hill ............................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.S., Lawrence Technological University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Ph.D., Wayne State University
Cathleen Hohner ...................................................................................................................................................... Distance Education
B.S., Saint Joseph’s University
M.B.A., Pace University
Dean Holsworth ................................................................................................................................................................. Grand Rapids
B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Central Michigan University
DIRECTORY
185
David Hopkins .................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., Michigan State University
M.A., Wayne State University
Jeffrey Hustick ................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.S., University of Detroit
M.B.A., Wayne State University
Aamir Ismail ...................................................................................................................................................................... Grand Rapids
B.Com., University of Karachi
M.B.A., Adamson University
M.B.A., Western Michigan University
Kathy Jegla ....................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.B., Lansing Community College
B.G.S., M.A., Oakland University
Shanna Johnson ........................................................................................................................................................................... Alpena
B.B.A., Western Michigan University
Scott Joyner ................................................................................................................................................................................. Lansing
B.A., M.A., Michigan State University
Cynthia Keleman.............................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., Madonna University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Bradley Keller .................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.Acc., M.Acc., Walsh College
Gary Fife ............................................................................................................................................................................ Ft. Worth, TX
B.S., Texas A&M University – Commerce
M.S., Troy State University
Anna Fleenor ....................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., M.S.A.D., Midway College
Javier Garza ........................................................................................................................................................................ Cerritos, CA
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles
M.A., University of Southern California
James Gibbons................................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
B.S., Stephen F. Austin State University
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Steven Goldman .................................................................................................................................................................. Cerritos, CA
B.S., M.S., University of Illinois
Heather Gonzalez ........................................................................................................................................................ New Orleans, LA
B.G.S., University of New Orleans
M.A.F.M., Devry University – Chicago
Jessica Hapke....................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.S., Howard Payne University
M.B.A., Tarleton State University
John Hardy ........................................................................................................................................................................ Ft. Worth, TX
B.A., University of Texas at Austin
M.S., Frostburg State University
Alayna Heinonen ..............................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., Western Kentucky University
M.A., Ph.D., University of Kentucky
Pamela Hrabal ................................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
A.A., Tarrant County College
B.S., Tarleton State University
M.Ed., Texas Woman’s University
Traci Hubbell..................................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
B.A., University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
M.A., University of Denver
Evelyn Kaufman ............................................................................................................................................................................... Ford
B.B.A., North Carolina Central University
M.B.A., Pfeiffer University
Michael Kendall ............................................................................................................................................................................... Flint
B.B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
M.A., Central Michigan University
DIRECTORY
186
Aaron Kenyon ............................................................................................................................................................................. Lansing
B.S., Central Michigan University
J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Petros Keshishyan ............................................................................................................................................................... Cerritos, CA
B.S., California State University, Northridge
M.B.A., University of California, Irvine
Nathan Kessler ............................................................................................................................................................................ Lansing
A.B.S., Lansing Community College
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Richard Ketrow .......................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
A.A., Charles M. Mott Community College
B.A., Spring Arbor University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Ph.D., Western Michigan University
Dennis Kimble .................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.S., Oakland University
M.A., Central Michigan University
Bonnie Kincaid ................................................................................................................................................................................. Flint
B.A., M.P.A., University of Michigan – Flint
Ph.D., Capella University
Denise Kotowicz-Jirsa.............................................................................................................................................. Distance Education
B.A., Elmhurst College
M.B.A., DePaul University
Rick Kwan ........................................................................................................................................................................................ Flint
B.S., Benedictine College
M.B.A., St. Mary’s University
Walter Langley .................................................................................................................................................................... Cerritos, CA
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Pepperdine University
Daniel Laub ......................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.S., Northern Kentucky University
M.S., University of Kentucky
Michael Laverty ....................................................................................................................................................... Distance Education
B.A., University of Notre Dame
M.B.A., Keller Graduate School
Barbara Law ............................................................................................................................................................. Distance Education
M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
Elena Lazzari ............................................................................................................................................................................... Livonia
B.A., University of Michigan – Dearborn
M.A., Wayne State University
Andre Lee.......................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., Michigan State University
M.P.A., Cornell University
D.P.A.S., Nova University
Mark Lee ........................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.M., Northwestern University
Bernard Lehenbauer.................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
B.A., Southern Methodist University
M.P.P., University of Texas at Dallas
Brooklyn Lehner ........................................................................................................................................................................ Midland
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., University of Toledo
Stacy Leingang ............................................................................................................................................................ New Orleans, LA
B.A., Our Lady Holy Cross
J.D., Loyola University – New Orleans
Bethany Lienhart ........................................................................................................................................................................ Lansing
A.B.A., Mid Michigan Community College
B.S.B.A., M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Robert Livingston ............................................................................................................................................................... Cerritos, CA
B.S., M.S., University of San Francisco
DIRECTORY
187
Barbara Lomonaco ..........................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Southern Methodist University
Paul Londrigan ................................................................................................................................................................................. Flint
B.B.A., M.A., Western Michigan University
Victoria Louden................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.S., Arkansas State University
M.A., Webster University
Steven Loy ......................................................................................................................................................................................... Flint
B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
M.S., University of Toledo
Douglas Mace.............................................................................................................................................................................. Saginaw
B.A., Spring Arbor University
M.S., University of Vermont
LaPrelle Mainor ................................................................................................................................................................ Ft. Worth, TX
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Texas Wesleyan University
James Makowske.......................................................................................................................................................................... Alpena
A.S., Thomas Nelson Community College
B.S., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Florida Institute of Technology
Joseph Mann ................................................................................................................................................................ New Orleans, LA
B.A., University of West Florida
M.B.A., Southern New Hampshire University
Loraine Mault ............................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
B.S., M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
David McDonagh......................................................................................................................................................................... Livonia
A.A.S., Owens Community College
B.S., M.B.A., J.D., University of Toledo
Janis McFaul ............................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.B.A., Walsh College
M.S., Central Michigan University
Ph.D., Union Institute & University
Karen McGuire ........................................................................................................................................................ Distance Education
B.B.A., M.B.A., Central Michigan University
M.S.O.E., Ferris State University
Robert McKizzie ............................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
B.S., Texas Weslyan University
M.B.A., LeTourneau University
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
Thomas McQuaid ........................................................................................................................................................ New Orleans, LA
B.S., Tulane University
M.A., University of New Orleans
M.B.A., J.D., Loyola University – New Orleans
Frederick Mobley .............................................................................................................................................................. Ft. Worth, TX
B.S., University of Arizona
M.A., Webster University
Anthony Momany ............................................................................................................................................................. Grand Rapids
B.B.A., M.B.A., Grand Valley State University
Christopher Monk...................................................................................................................................................................... Saginaw
B.S., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale
M.A., Spring Arbor University
William Motz ..................................................................................................................................................................... Grand Rapids
B.A., M.B.A., Michigan State University
Stanley Murray ........................................................................................................................................................ Distance Education
B.S., Miami University
Clayton Nepveux ......................................................................................................................................................... New Orleans, LA
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S., Troy State University – Dothan
William Newman ......................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.S., University of California, Los Angeles
M.B.A., Loyola Marymount University
DIRECTORY
188
Kevin O’Hare ............................................................................................................................................................................. Lisle, IL
B.A., Depaul University
M.S., M.B.A., Benedictine College
Julie Oldham ............................................................................................................................................................................... Lansing
B.A., Michigan State University
M.S., Walsh College
Akram Owens ...................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
A.A.S., Kentucky College of Technology
B.S., McKendree University
M.A., Webster University
Anthony Owens ................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.S., M.S., Sullivan University
Ed.D., Spalding University
Phillip Palajac ................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S.B.A., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Jeffrey Parlow ........................................................................................................................................................................... Macomb
B.S., Michigan Technological University
M.A., Walsh College
Philip Perkins .............................................................................................................................................................................. Lansing
B.S., Purdue University
M.B.A., Western New England College
Clair Perry .................................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
B.S., M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Joseph Pichla .............................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
B.B.A., M.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
Steven Pillion ..................................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
A.A., Allan Hancock College
B.S., California State University
M.P.A., Troy State University
Agnes Pitlik .......................................................................................................................................................................... Cerritos, CA
B.B.A., University of Guam
M.H.R., University of Oklahoma
Jeffrey Podorsek ............................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., Lawrence Technological University
M.A., University of Detroit
David Potts .................................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
B.A., Oakland University
J.D., Wayne State University
Susan Praski ..................................................................................................................................................................................... Flint
B.S., Rochester College
M.B.A., Baker College
Shawn Premer ............................................................................................................................................................................. Lansing
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Cornerstone University
Todd Price .......................................................................................................................................................................... Grand Rapids
B.A., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., Ferris State University
William Pringle .......................................................................................................................................................................... Saginaw
B.A., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., California State University
Linda Puzey ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., University of Missouri
M.S., Lawrence Technological University
M.B.A., Oakland University
David Ragland ..................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., American Intercontinental University
Laura Rauwerda ............................................................................................................................................................... Grand Rapids
B.S., Grand Valley State University
M.A., Western Michigan University
DIRECTORY
189
April Riedy........................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
B.S., M.A., Eastern Michigan University
Paul Robb.................................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University
Donna Rochester .............................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.S., M.S., Central Michigan University
Edward Rosebach ............................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
A.S., Massasoit Community College
B.A., Bridgewater State College
C.E.R., Harvard University
Walter Rudin .................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.B., University of Michigan – Dearborn
M.S., Kettering University
Eileen Sandlin ............................................................................................................................................................................ Selfridge
B.A., University of Michigan – Dearborn
M.A., Michigan State University
Anthony Santilli................................................................................................................................................................. Grand Rapids
B.S.E., Wayne State University
M.Ed., Grand Valley State University
Julie Kay Satariano ............................................................................................................................................................. Cerritos, CA
B.A., University of Southern California
M.A., Depaul University
Jody Sauer ................................................................................................................................................................ Distance Education
B.A., Lake Superior State University
M.A., Eastern Michigan University
Donna Schiele ................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Thurman Schweitzer......................................................................................................................................................... Ft. Worth, TX
B.S., M.C.R.P., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale
John Sciarrino ........................................................................................................................................................................... Macomb
B.A., Wayne State University
M.B.A., Keller Graduate School of Management
Cynthia Sekerke ................................................................................................................................................................ Ft. Worth, TX
B.A., California Baptist University
M.Ed., Southeastern Louisiana University
Grace Shore ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Mary Sidney............................................................................................................................................................................... Macomb
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Rebecca Slack ............................................................................................................................................................................. Midland
B.B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
M.B.A., Baker College
Eric Smith ......................................................................................................................................................................................... Ford
B.S., Western Kentucky University
M.B.A., Sullivan University
Kent Snyder ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.A., Macomb Community College
B.B.A., M.S., Walsh College
Eileen Sparks .................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.A., Detroit Institute Technology
M.S., Wayne State University
Ph.D., Union Institute
Kerrie Spinney............................................................................................................................................................................ Saginaw
B.S., Saginaw Valley State University
M.A., Central Michigan University
James Steward .............................................................................................................................................................................. Alpena
B.A., Oakland University
M.S., Walsh College
DIRECTORY
190
Maureen Stobb .................................................................................................................................................................. Ft. Worth, TX
B.A., The College of New Jersey
J.D., University of Notre Dame
Ellen Strom ....................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., M.S., Grand Valley State University
William Sweeney ......................................................................................................................................................... New Orleans, LA
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S., Troy State University
Cynthia Swiantek ............................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.B.A., Western Michigan University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Sharon Taboada ................................................................................................................................................................ Grand Rapids
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Keith Tatarelli .................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., Wayne State University
J.D., University of Detroit Mercy
Kemal Tekinel ............................................................................................................................................................................. Lansing
B.S., The Near East University
M.B.A., University of Saint Francis
Stacey Tetloff .............................................................................................................................................................................. Saginaw
B.A., University of Michigan – Flint
M.A., Chatham University
Laurie Thiel ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.A.S., Macomb Community College
B.B.A., M.S., Walsh College
Michael Thomas ......................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
B.E., Monash University
M.A., Ashford University
Jane Tiller .................................................................................................................................................................... New Orleans, LA
B.A., Ph.D., University of New Orleans
M.A., Mississippi State University
Greg Touchette ................................................................................................................................................................................. Flint
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Samuel Unsworth .............................................................................................................................................................. Ft. Worth, TX
B.A., American Public University System
M.S., Texas A&M University – Commerce
Adam Vallus .................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., University of Phoenix
M.A., Michigan State University
M.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Kathleen Vaught ........................................................................................................................................................................ Lisle, IL
B.A., Santa Clara University
J.D., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale
Harry Veryser .................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., M.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Paul Veryser ..................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.S., The American University
M.B.A., University of Michigan
Barbara Vogler ........................................................................................................................................................................... Midland
A.A., St. Petersburg College
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida
Michael Wade ...................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan University
M.B.A., Webster University
David Wagner ........................................................................................................................................................... Distance Education
B.B.A., Ferris State University
M.B.A., Tiffin University
Kay Wagner ................................................................................................................................................................................ Midland
B.S., M.S., Saginaw Valley State University
DIRECTORY
191
Tommie Walker................................................................................................................................................................................ Troy
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., University of Phoenix
Mary Ward ....................................................................................................................................................................................... Flint
M.A., University of Detroit Mercy
Katherine Watkins ...........................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., Miami University – Oxford Campus
J.D., Northern Kentucky University
Cynthia Weeks.................................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.A., Presbyterian College
Ph.D., Princeton University
Shelly Wells .................................................................................................................................................................................. Lansing
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Mary Welsh ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
B.B.A., M.S., D.M., Walsh College
Gerald Weyand ................................................................................................................................................................................ Flint
B.S., United States Air Force Academy
M.A., North Carolina State University
M.S., University of Texas at Dallas
William Wooten................................................................................................................................................................. Ft. Worth, TX
B.B.A., Prairie View A&M University
M.B.A., Naval Postgraduate School
Robert Wright ..................................................................................................................................................................Louisville, KY
B.A., Centre College
LL.M., University of New Hampshire School of Law
J.D., University of Louisville
Wendy Wright ..................................................................................................................................................................... Cerritos, CA
B.A., University of Laverne
M.B.A., Claremont Graduate University
Donna Yelinek .................................................................................................................................................................................. Flint
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A.D., Central Michigan University
Brian Zepke ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Troy
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S., Walsh College
Theodore Zimbo .............................................................................................................................................................................. Troy
B.B.A., M.Acc., University of Michigan
DeVos Graduate School, Central Administration Staff
Lisa Fairbairn .................................................................................................................................................................................. Dean
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University
Elizabeth Bryce ............................................................................................................................................ Director of Career Services
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.S.A., Central Michigan University
Rachelle Butts ..................................................................................................................................... Director of Graduate Admissions
B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.B.A., Madonna University
Lake Hamilton ........................................................................................................................................ Director of Graduate Programs
A.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
DeVos Graduate School, Administration
Karen Baird ............................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Troy MBA Program
B.A., Adrian College
M.A., Wayne State University
Nikki Ceaser ............................................................................................................ Admissions Representative, Texas MBA Program
B.S., Northwestern State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Brandi Cramer ............................................................................................................................................ Graduate Program Manager
A.A., Delta College
B.B.A., Northwood University
DIRECTORY
192
Nicole Keel .............................................................................................................. Admissions Representative, Virtual MBA Program
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Mckenna Long ...................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Lansing MBA Program
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
Allison Ouellette ........................................................................................................ Admissions Representative, Troy MBA Program
B.A., Michigan State University
Scott Pontious .............................................................................................................................. Assistant Graduate Program Manager
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., Northwood University
Shauna Vanderstel ..................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Grand Rapids MBA Program
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Laura White......................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Midland MBA Program
A.B.S., Delta College
B.B.A., M.B.A., Northwood University
Michael Wright ..................................................................................................... Admissions Representative, Florida MBA Program
B.B.A., Northwood University
DeVos Graduate School, Faculty
William Bateman..................................................................................................................................................... Finance; Leadership
B.B.A., Western Michigan University
M.S., Walsh College
D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University
Cathy Bush............................................................................................................................................ Leadership; Marketing; Strategy
B.S.B.A.V., M.B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Central Michigan University
Lisa Fairbairn .......................................................................................................................................................... Marketing; Strategy
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University
John Grether ........................................................................................................................ Critical Thinking; Economics; Integration
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., Central Michigan University
J.D., Michigan State University
Adam Guerrero ................................................................................. Critical Thinking; Accounting; Economics; Finance; Integration
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.A., M.B.A., University of Texas at Arlington
Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas
Kruti Lehenbauer ............................................................................. Accounting; Critical Thinking; Economics; Finance; Integration
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas
Tara Peters............................................................................................................................ Critical Thinking; Integration; Leadership
B.B.A., Texas Wesleyan University
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
Ph.D., Union Institute and University
L. Todd Thomas ................................................................................................................................................. Integration; Leadership
B.S., Morehead State University
M.A., Auburn University
M.S., Ph.D., Indiana University
DeVos Graduate School, Michigan Adjunct Faculty
Georgia Abbott ...................................................................................................................................................... Fieldwork Consultant
B.A., Kalamazoo College
M.B.A., DeVos Graduate School, Northwood University
John Baxter ......................................................................................................................................................... Economics; Leadership
B.S., Michigan State University
M.M., Northwestern University
Jay Chandran ......................................................................................................................................................................... Leadership
B.S., M.A., Bangalore University, India
M.B.A, Ph.D., University of South Florida
Scott Daunheimer ......................................................................................................................................................... Critical Thinking
M.S., Iowa State University
M.S.E., University of Michigan
Kristine Donnelly ................................................................................................................................................... Accounting; Finance
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., Wayne State University
DIRECTORY
193
Ronald Fountain ...................................................................................................................................................... Marketing; Strategy
B.S., Valdosta State University
M.B.A., D.M., Case Western Reserve University
Daniel Holloway ...................................................................................................................................................... Marketing; Strategy
B.S.B.A., Saint Joseph’s College
M.B.A., City University
D.B.A., Walden University
Noah Izzat ............................................................................................................................................. Leadership; Marketing; Strategy
B.A., Michigan State University
M.B.A., DeVos Graduate School, Northwood University
Thomas Kratzin........................................................................................................ Critical Thinking; Economics; Corporate Strategy
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Hanover
David Lyman ............................................................................................................................................ Critical Thinking; Leadership
B.A., Dakota Wesleyan
M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska
David Olson ............................................................................................................................................................. Marketing; Strategy
B.S.O.E., Wayland Baptist University
M.B.A., DeVos Graduate School, Northwood University
David Rausch .............................................................................................................................. Critical Thinking; Marketing; Strategy
M.B.A., Samford University
Ph.D., Andrews University
Matthew Thibaudeau ............................................................................................................................................. Accounting; Finance
A.A., B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., DeVos Graduate School, Northwood University
Laurence Wood ...................................................................................................................................................................... Leadership
B.A., Bates College
J.D., Western New England College
DeVos Graduate School, Florida Adjunct Faculty
Dennis Barber ........................................................................................................................................ Economics; Corporate Strategy
B.B.A., East Carolina University
M.A., Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Jeffrey Blum ........................................................................................................................................................... Accounting; Finance
B.A., J.D., University of Pittsburgh
LL.M., George Washington University
Mark Bush .............................................................................................................................................................. Accounting; Finance
B.S.B.A., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., DePaul University
Edward Howell ........................................................................................................................................................ Economics; Finance
B.A., Vanderbilt University
M.A., Middle Tennessee State University
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University
David Kahn ............................................................................................................................................................................. Leadership
B.S., University of Florida
M.S., Troy State University
Ph.D., Barry University
Michael Olsher ....................................................................................................................................................... Accounting; Finance
B.A., University of Pittsburgh
M.B.A., New York University
Ph.D., Fordham University
Cheryl Pridgeon ........................................................................................................................................................... Critical Thinking
B.A., Henderson State University
M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University
Martha Rader ........................................................................................................................................ Corporate Strategy; Leadership
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.B.A., DeVos Graduate School, Northwood University
Thomas Walker ........................................................................................................................................Strategy; Finance; Economics
B.S., University of Wisconsin – Madison
M.A., Wayne State University
DIRECTORY
194
DeVos Graduate School, Texas Adjunct Faculty
Necmettin Gormus ................................................................................................. Critical Thinking; Economics; Finance; Integration
B.B.A., M.A., Texas Tech University
Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington
J. Michael Latham ................................................................................................................................... Critical Thinking; Economics
B.S., Texas A&M University
M.S., University of Texas at Dallas
Lavelle Lemonier.................................................................................................. Accounting; Critical Thinking; Finance; Leadership
B.A.A.S., Lamar University
M.B.A., Capella University
Timothy McRay....................................................................................................................................................... Marketing; Strategy
B.S. Letourneau University
M.B.A., Dallas Baptist University
K. Paul Rome ............................................................................................................................................................. Corporate Strategy
B.B.A., Brock University
M.B.A., McMaster University
D.B.A., Argosy University
International Program Centers
Northwood University – Changchun, P.R. China, Administrative Staff
Ke-Tian .................................................................................................................. Vice President, Jilin University – Lambton College
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Jilin University
Post-Doctorate, Quebec University
Haitao Chi ............................................................................................................ Academic Dean, Jilin University – Lambton College
B.Tech., Memorial University of Newfoundland
M.B.A., Northwood University
Northwood University – Changchun, P.R. China, Faculty
David E. Armstrong .................................................................................................................................................................. Business
B.A., M.A., York University, Toronto
M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California
Gerard L. Breissan ........................................................................................................................................... Hospitality Management
Kieran Forde ............................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.A., National University of Ireland
M.A., University of Limerick
Arnel E. Genzola ......................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.Sc., West Visayas State University
M.A., University of San Agustin
Ph.D., University of the Philippines
Roy L. Kirby .............................................................................................................................................................................. Business
B.A., Memorial University of Newfoundland
M.A., Carleton University
M.Ed., University of Ottawa
Ph.D., University of Arizona
Carol A. Kirby ........................................................................................................................................................................... Business
B.A.Ed., First Class Memorial University of Newfoundland
M.A., Carleton University
M.Ed., University of Ottawa
Ph.D., University of Arizona
Gandhi Mohan........................................................................................................................................................................... Business
B.C.A., National Institute of Technology
M.A., Annamalai University
Post-Graduate, Annamalai University
Elizabeth Patience ..................................................................................................................................................................... Business
B.B.A., George Washington University
M.B.A., University of North Carolina
DIRECTORY
195
Maggie Qin............................................................................................................................................................................. Accounting
B.B.A., Northwood University
M.Acc., University of Melbourne
Brian Seville ............................................................................................................................................................................... Business
B.A., B.Comm., Sir George Williams University
M.A., Central Michigan University
M.B.A., University of Toronto
Wanbin Shen ............................................................................................................................................................................. Business
B.A., Jilin Foreign Language College of Technology and Sciences
M.S., Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences
Ph.D., Chinese Academy of Sciences
Josh Stuckey .............................................................................................................................................................................. Business
B.Comm. (H), University of Windsor
C.M.A., A.C.M.A.
Jixin Wang ................................................................................................................................................................................. Business
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Jilin University
Northwood University – Wuxi, P.R. China, Administrative Staff
Huiming Zhou ...................................................................................................... Dean, Jiangnan University North American College
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Jiangnan University
Song Sufeng ......................................................................................................................................................... Vice Dean (Academic)
B.A., Beijing Language University
M.Edu., University of Sydney
Northwood University – Wuxi, P.R. China, Faculty
Carl Bamford............................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., Haaga-Helia University of Applied Science, Finland
Chen Yongjie ............................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., Haaga-Helia Universtiy of Applied Sciences, Finland
M.A., Qinghua University, Beijing
Ph.D., East China Normal University SI
Elizabeth Cockrell ....................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., Connecticut College
M.A., University of Maine
Dengke Tian ..............................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., China Three Gorges University
M.A., Computer Engineering – Jiangnan University
Qian Shi .....................................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., Suzhou University
Andrew Slipchenco ..................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., Carleston University
M.A., Careleton University
Steven Warrener ......................................................................................................................................................................................
B.A., South Florida University
M.B.A., Florida University
Northwood University – Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Administrative Staff
Chan Yu Lee ................................................................................................................................................................... Academic Dean
B.A., M.A., University of Iowa
Terrie Teoh .................................................................................................................... Head of Program – American Degree Program
Northwood University – Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Adjunct Faculty
Yasmin bt. Abd. Aziz ................................................................................................................................................................ Statistics
B.A., California State University, Chico
M.S., Iowa States University
Lee Yin Ling ............................................................................................................................................................... Computer Science
B.S.C., Souteast Missouri State University
M.A., University Tun Abdul Razak
DIRECTORY
196
Yusri Binti Kusaini .................................................................................................................................................... Computer Science
B.S.C., California State University, Chico
M.A., University of Kentucky
Shameela Devi ..................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.S. (Hons), M.S., University of Putra
Kuan Chin Hoay.......................................................................................................................................................................... Physics
B.S., M.A., University Technology, Malaysia
Lee Chan Yu ........................................................................................................................................................... Philosophy; Religion
B.A., University of Iowa
M.A., University of Iowa
Lim Siow Fei ........................................................................................................................ Communication; Sociology; Anthropology
B.A. (Hons), University Malaya
M.S., University Putra Malaysia
Tan Lee Mei ............................................................................................................................................................................. Marketing
B.S., M.B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Khor Kok Keat ....................................................................................................................................................................... Economics
B.S., University of London
M.A., University of Utara, Malaysia
Alison Chiu Sian Nee ............................................................................................................................................................. Economics
B.S., The Queen University of Belfast
M.A., University Malaya
Shanta Nagendran............................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.S., M.S., Southwest Texas State University
Roseliza bt. Mohd. Ramly ............................................................................................ American Politics; Comparative Governments
B.S., University of Wisconsin – Superior
M.A., Wichita State University
Siew Chow Yuen.................................................................................................................................................................... Accounting
Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administrators (ICSA-UK), Stamford College
M.B.A., University of Wales
Kevin Lowrence........................................................................................................................................................................... Biology
B.S., M.S., University Kebangsaan, Malaysia
Tan Khet Woon ................................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.A., University of Montevallo
M.B.A., Asia Pacific Institute, New Zealand
Shobana Thrumalingam ....................................................................................................................................................... Psychology
B.A., Oklahoma State University
M.Ed., University Malaya
Kee Hooi Ling .......................................................................................................................................................................... Chemistry
B.A., Berea College
Ph.D., University Malaya
Selvapandian Prescilla Premila ............................................................................................................................................. Chemistry
B.Sc. (Hons), UKM, Malaysia
M.S., University of Hull, UK
Liew Fon Sam ...................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.Sc., M.S., Alabama State University
Northwood University – Colombo, Sri Lanka, Administrative Staff
Inderjit Chander ................................................................................................... Academic Head – Northwood University Programs
M.B.A., Aston University, UK
L.L.B., University of Wolverhampton, UK
M.C.M.I. UK (Member, Chartered Management Institute)
Northwood University – Colombo, Sri Lanka, Adjunct Faculty
Marcelline Alexander Croos .............................................................................................................................................. Management
A.C.M.A., UK (Chartered Institute of Management Accountants)
M.B.A., University of Sikkim, Manipal, India
Dilhan Goonetilleke...................................................................................................................... Operations Management; Economics
M.A., University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
M.B.A., Postgraduate Institute of Management (PIM), Sri Lanka
DIRECTORY
197
Dhammike Gunathilleke........................................................................................................................................................ Hospitality
Management Diploma, Sri Lanka Institute of Tourism and Hotel Management
C.E.M.B.A., Open University, Sri Lanka
C.H.E., American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute
C.I.E.H. Level 4, Trainer Charter, Charted Institute of Environmental Health, UK
Wilfred Jayasuriya ...................................................................................................................................................................... English
B.S., University of Colombo
Ph.D., University of Uppsala, Sweden
Chatura Liyanage .................................................................................................................................................. Accounting; Finance
B.B.M., University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka
M.B.A., University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
Nagarajah Nirmalan ............................................................................... Information Technology; Management Information Systems
B.Sc. (Hons), London Guildhall University, UK
M.P.M., University of Southern Queensland, Australia
Rajee Ravichandran .............................................................................................................................. Human Resource Management
M.B.A., Postgraduate Institute of Management (PIM), Sri Lanka
HRM Professional, Institute of Personnel Management, Sri Lanka
Bruno Silva ....................................................................................................................................................... Marketing, Management
M.C.I.M., UK (Member, Chartered Institute of Marketing)
B.A., International University of America, UK
M.S., Henley Business School, UK
Sathika Wickremesinghe .................................................................................................................................................... Management
B.Sc., Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
M.B.A., Cardiff University, UK
Hasitha Wijesundara .............................................................................................................................................. Finance; Economics
B.Sc., University of Kalaniya
Attorney-at-Law, Sri Lanka Law College
L.L.B., Open University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
M.Sc., University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
Northwood University – Montreux, Switzerland, Administrative Staff
Ulrika Bjorklund ............................................................................................................................................................ Academic Dean
Diploma, Hotel Administration, Hotel, and Tourism College, Switzerland
Rebecca Wallace .................................................................................................. Assistant Academic Dean and NU Program Manager
B.Sc., University of Edinburgh, Scotland
Ph.D., University of Sheffield, England
Northwood University – Montreux, Switzerland, Faculty
Stefano Battaglia .................................................................................................................................... Human Resource Management
B.Sc., University of Bologna, Italy
M.Sc., University of Bradord, England
Ph.D., University of Strathclyde, Scotland
Xavier Bouillot........................................................................................................................................................................... Business
B.A., Institute of Hainaut, Belgium
M.B.A., Open University Business School, England
Jean-Philippe Challandes ......................................................................................................................... Political History; Philosophy
B.A., M.A., University of Geneva, Switzerland
Ph.D., University of Brasilia, Brazil
Denis Ducatel ..................................................................................................................................................................................... Arts
B.A., M.A., University of Paris – Sorbonne, France
Bettina Grassmann ........................................................................................................................................................................... Arts
B.A., University of Saskatchewan, Canada
M.A., Concordia University, Canada
Leonila Guglya ................................................................................................................................................................................. Law
B.L., University of Kiev, Ukraine
M.Law, University of Geneva, Switzerland
L.L.M., S.J.D., Central European University, Hungary
Dominique Jordan.................................................................................................................................................................. Economics
B.Sc., University of Buckingham, England
M.B.A., Edinburgh University Management School
DIRECTORY
198
David McPartland ...................................................................................................................................................................... Strategy
B.A., Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology
B.A., Athlone Institute of Technology
M.S., National University of Ireland Galway
Sandra Rebelo ..................................................................................................................................................................... Mathematics
B.Sc., Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Portugal
M.B.A., University of California, San Diego
Gedeon Tumong .......................................................................................................................................................................... Finance
B.A., M.B.A., American College of Switzerland
DIRECTORY
199
INDEX
Absence Policy .....................................................................................................................................................................................105
Academic Appeals ...............................................................................................................................................................105, 123, 136
Academic Probation
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................136
Students with VA Benefits .............................................................................................................................................................14
Undergraduate (see Academic Progress)......................................................................................................................................105
Academic Dismissal
Graduate .......................................................................................................................................................................................136
Undergraduate ..............................................................................................................................................................................105
Academic Information
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................134
Academic Appeals
Dismissal .......................................................................................................................................................................136
Grade .............................................................................................................................................................................136
Academic Dismissal .............................................................................................................................................................136
Academic Probation ..............................................................................................................................................................136
Course Descriptions
MBA ..............................................................................................................................................................................132
MSOL ............................................................................................................................................................................145
Graduation Requirements .....................................................................................................................................................137
Leave of Absence ..................................................................................................................................................................137
Undergraduate ..............................................................................................................................................................................104
Absence Policy .....................................................................................................................................................................105
Academic Appeals
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................123
Traditional .............................................................................................................................................................105, 108
Academic Dismissal .............................................................................................................................................................105
Academic Honors .................................................................................................................................................................106
Academic Probation (see Academic Progress) .....................................................................................................................105
Awards (see Student Awards) ...............................................................................................................................................109
Course Descriptions ................................................................................................................................................................54
Course Load ..........................................................................................................................................................................106
Course Offering Changes ......................................................................................................................................................106
Curriculum Guides ..................................................................................................................................................................26
Drop or Add Courses (see Schedule Adjustment) ................................................................................................................109
Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ........................................................................................................104
Grading Policy ......................................................................................................................................................................107
Graduation Requirements
Adult Degree Program (see Semester Hour Requirements) ..........................................................................................121
Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................................108
Honors
Academic Honors (Traditional, Adult Degree Program) ......................................................................................106, 122
Graduation with Distinction ..........................................................................................................................................108
Honors Program ..............................................................................................................................................................23
Plagiarism .............................................................................................................................................................................109
Readmission ............................................................................................................................................................................10
Records (see Student Records) .............................................................................................................................................110
Accounting
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................54
Curriculum Guide
Florida & Michigan ................................................................................................................................................................27
Texas .......................................................................................................................................................................................28
Accreditations, Approvals, & Memberships ........................................................................................................................................154
Florida Campus ............................................................................................................................................................................155
Michigan Campus .........................................................................................................................................................................156
Texas Operations ..........................................................................................................................................................................157
INDEX
200
Activities, Student ................................................................................................................................................................................111
Florida Campus ............................................................................................................................................................................111
Michigan Campus .........................................................................................................................................................................112
Adding or Dropping Classes (see Schedule Adjustment) ....................................................................................................................109
Administrative Staff
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................................180
Central Administration .................................................................................................................................................................160
DeVos Graduate School ...............................................................................................................................................................192
Florida Campus ............................................................................................................................................................................172
International Program Center .......................................................................................................................................................195
Michigan Campus .........................................................................................................................................................................163
Texas Operations ..........................................................................................................................................................................176
Admissions
General Information .........................................................................................................................................................................7
International Student Applications ...................................................................................................................................................8
International Transfer Students ......................................................................................................................................................10
Transfer Students ............................................................................................................................................................................10
Adult Degree Program .........................................................................................................................................................................121
Academic Appeals ........................................................................................................................................................................123
Degree Offerings ..........................................................................................................................................................................121
Honors (see Academic Honors)....................................................................................................................................................122
Locations ......................................................................................................................................................................................122
Personnel ......................................................................................................................................................................................180
Prior Learning Assessment ...........................................................................................................................................................121
Refund Policy ...............................................................................................................................................................................122
Advanced Placement ................................................................................................................................................................................7
Advertising
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................56
Advertising & Marketing
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................29
Aftermarket Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................57
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................30
Alcohol/Drug Policy ............................................................................................................................................................................118
Appeals, Academic
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................................123
Undergraduate, Traditional...........................................................................................................................................................105
Asia, Semester in..............................................................................................................................................................................24, 25
Athletics, Intercollegiate & Intramural ................................................................................................................................................115
Automotive Marketing & Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................59
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................31
Bachelor of Business Administration Degree ........................................................................................................................................21
Curriculum Guides .........................................................................................................................................................................26
Board of Governors, Florida ................................................................................................................................................................158
Board of Governors, Michigan ............................................................................................................................................................158
Board of Governors, Texas ..................................................................................................................................................................158
Board of Trustees .................................................................................................................................................................................157
Bookstore .............................................................................................................................................................................................113
Campuses
Florida ..............................................................................................................................................................................................5
Michigan ...........................................................................................................................................................................................5
Texas ................................................................................................................................................................................................5
Car Permits .............................................................................................................................................................................................12
Career Services Center .........................................................................................................................................................................113
Center for Creativity & Enterprise, Alden B. Dow..................................................................................................................................4
Advisory Board Members ............................................................................................................................................................159
INDEX
201
Central Administration .........................................................................................................................................................................160
Certifications (see Industry Certifications) ..............................................................................................................................................5
Cheating (see Plagiarism) ....................................................................................................................................................................109
Code of Ethics ..........................................................................................................................................................................................3
College Work Study (see Federal Work Study).....................................................................................................................................17
Commitment Deposit Policy ..................................................................................................................................................................11
Conduct, Student ..................................................................................................................................................................................118
Continuing Education Program (see Executive and Continuing Education) .......................................................................................123
Counseling
Academic and Personal ................................................................................................................................................................114
Alcohol and Drug .........................................................................................................................................................................119
Loan (see Master Promissory Note and Loan Counseling) ............................................................................................................18
Course Descriptions
Graduate
MBA .....................................................................................................................................................................................132
MSOL ...................................................................................................................................................................................145
Undergraduate ................................................................................................................................................................................54
Course Load .........................................................................................................................................................................................106
Course Offering Changes .....................................................................................................................................................................106
Cultural Arts Events .............................................................................................................................................................................114
Curriculum Guides .................................................................................................................................................................................26
Dean’s List (see Academic Honors) ....................................................................................................................................................106
Degrees
Bachelor of Business Administration .............................................................................................................................................21
Requirements for Graduation ................................................................................................................................................108
Master of Business Administration ..............................................................................................................................................128
Requirements for Graduation ................................................................................................................................................137
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership..........................................................................................................................143
Requirements for Graduation ................................................................................................................................................148
Deposits on Accounts.............................................................................................................................................................................13
DeVos Graduate School .......................................................................................................................................................................125
Disabilities, Students with (see Disability Services Eligibility) ..........................................................................................................107
Dismissal ......................................................................................................................................................................................105, 136
Drop and Add (see Schedule Adjustment) ...........................................................................................................................................109
Drug Policy ..........................................................................................................................................................................................118
Economics
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................62
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................32
Employment, Student .............................................................................................................................................................................18
English
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................63
Enterprise/Entrepreneurial Orientation ....................................................................................................................................................6
Entertainment, Sport & Promotion Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................64
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................33
Entrepreneurship
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................66
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................34
Ethics, Code of .........................................................................................................................................................................................3
Europe, Semester in .........................................................................................................................................................................24, 25
EXCEL Program ..............................................................................................................................................................................6, 111
Exchange Programs................................................................................................................................................................................25
Executive Fitness Course Descriptions ..................................................................................................................................................68
INDEX
202
Faculty
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................................182
DeVos Graduate School ...............................................................................................................................................................193
Florida Campus ............................................................................................................................................................................173
International Program Center .......................................................................................................................................................195
Michigan Campus .........................................................................................................................................................................166
Texas Operations ..........................................................................................................................................................................177
Fashion Marketing & Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................70
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................35
Federal Financial Assistance ..........................................................................................................................................................17, 150
Fees ........................................................................................................................................................................................................12
FERPA .................................................................................................................................................................................................104
Finance
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................71
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................37
Financial
Car Permits .....................................................................................................................................................................................12
Deposits on Accounts .....................................................................................................................................................................13
Refunds .....................................................................................................................................................13, 20, 122, 123, 138, 149
Requirements ..................................................................................................................................................................................13
Return of Title IV ...........................................................................................................................................................................14
Textbooks .......................................................................................................................................................................................14
Tuition
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................140
Undergraduate, Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................12
Withdrawals
Adult Degree Program ..........................................................................................................................................................122
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................137
Undergraduate, Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................14
Financial Aid
Award Disbursement
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................151
Undergraduate, Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................15
Federal Financial Assistance ..........................................................................................................................................................17
Florida Financial Assistance ..........................................................................................................................................................17
Loan Counseling .............................................................................................................................................................................18
Michigan Financial Assistance .......................................................................................................................................................16
Northwood Financial Assistance ....................................................................................................................................................16
Other Sources .................................................................................................................................................................................18
Probation
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................152
Undergraduate, Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................19
Rights and Responsibilities
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................151
Undergraduate, Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................15
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................151
Undergraduate, Traditional .....................................................................................................................................................18
Florida
Board of Governors ......................................................................................................................................................................158
Campus .............................................................................................................................................................................................5
Personnel ......................................................................................................................................................................................172
Food Services .......................................................................................................................................................................................114
Four Year BBA/MBA Program Curriculum Guide ...............................................................................................................................53
Friends of Northwood University ........................................................................................................................................................159
FSAG (Florida Student Assistance Grant) .............................................................................................................................................17
FSEOG (Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant)..........................................................................................................17
INDEX
203
Governors, Boards of ...........................................................................................................................................................................158
Grades, Distribution of (see Student Records).....................................................................................................................................110
Grading Policy, Undergraduate............................................................................................................................................................107
Graduate School ...................................................................................................................................................................................125
Academic Calendar ......................................................................................................................................................................128
Academic Matters .........................................................................................................................................................................134
Academic Probation ..............................................................................................................................................................136
Attendance ............................................................................................................................................................................146
Course Completion ...............................................................................................................................................................135
Financial Aid.........................................................................................................................................................................149
GMAT ...................................................................................................................................................................................142
Grading Scale ........................................................................................................................................................................136
Grading System (Contribution Grading Criteria) .................................................................................................................134
Graduation Requirements .....................................................................................................................................................137
Leave of Absence ..................................................................................................................................................................137
Refunds .................................................................................................................................................................................138
Scholarships ..........................................................................................................................................................................141
Transcripts ............................................................................................................................................................................140
Tuition ...................................................................................................................................................................................140
Course Descriptions
MBA .....................................................................................................................................................................................132
MSOL ...................................................................................................................................................................................145
DeVos Difference .........................................................................................................................................................................127
DeVos Method .............................................................................................................................................................................125
History ..........................................................................................................................................................................................126
Outcomes ......................................................................................................................................................................................127
Programs of Study ........................................................................................................................................................................128
MBA
12-Month Accelerated Program (Daytime) ...................................................................................................................128
24-Month Evening Program ..........................................................................................................................................129
24-Month Traditional Program .....................................................................................................................................129
24-Month Weekend Program ........................................................................................................................................130
30-Month Executive Program .......................................................................................................................................130
MSOL ...................................................................................................................................................................................143
Graduation Requirements
MBA .....................................................................................................................................................................................137
MSOL ...................................................................................................................................................................................148
Grooming and Manners .......................................................................................................................................................................118
Guest Student Applications ......................................................................................................................................................................9
Guides, Curriculum ................................................................................................................................................................................26
Health Care Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................74
Curriculum Guide ...........................................................................................................................................................................38
Health Centers ......................................................................................................................................................................................117
History Course Descriptions ..................................................................................................................................................................76
History of the Graduate School ............................................................................................................................................................126
History of Northwood University ............................................................................................................................................................4
Home-Schooled Students, Admission Requirements ..............................................................................................................................7
Honors Program .....................................................................................................................................................................................23
Honors Scholarship ................................................................................................................................................................................23
Hospitality Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................77
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................39
Housing, Student ..................................................................................................................................................................................115
Cost (All Campuses) ......................................................................................................................................................................12
Security Deposit .............................................................................................................................................................................12
Humanities Course Descriptions ............................................................................................................................................................79
Industry Certifications..............................................................................................................................................................................5
Intercollegiate & Intramural Athletics .................................................................................................................................................115
INDEX
204
International Business
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................82
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................42
Jobs, Student
Career Services Center .................................................................................................................................................................113
Student Employment ......................................................................................................................................................................18
Language Arts Course Descriptions
English ............................................................................................................................................................................................63
Speech ..........................................................................................................................................................................................101
Law Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................83
Learning Resource Centers ..................................................................................................................................................................116
Library ..................................................................................................................................................................................................116
Loans, Student
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................150
Undergraduate, Traditional.............................................................................................................................................................17
Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................85
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................43
Texas .......................................................................................................................................................................................44
Management Information Systems
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................86
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................45
Manners and Grooming .......................................................................................................................................................................118
Marketing
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................92
Curriculum Guide
Florida and Michigan ..............................................................................................................................................................49
Texas .......................................................................................................................................................................................50
Mathematics Course Descriptions .........................................................................................................................................................94
Medical Services ..................................................................................................................................................................................117
Memberships ........................................................................................................................................................................................154
Michigan
Board of Governors ......................................................................................................................................................................158
Campus .............................................................................................................................................................................................5
Personnel ......................................................................................................................................................................................163
Michigan Financial Assistance ..............................................................................................................................................................16
Mission Statement ....................................................................................................................................................................................3
Natural Science Course Descriptions .....................................................................................................................................................95
Nontraditional Programming
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................................121
Executive and Continuing Education ...........................................................................................................................................123
University of the Aftermarket ......................................................................................................................................................124
Northwood Code of Ethics .......................................................................................................................................................................3
Northwood Core Purpose Statement ........................................................................................................................................................3
Northwood Core Values Statement..........................................................................................................................................................3
Northwood Idea, The ...............................................................................................................................................................................4
Northwood Institutional Aid ..................................................................................................................................................................16
Northwood Outcomes and Attributes ......................................................................................................................................................3
Northwood University, Florida ................................................................................................................................................................5
Northwood University, Michigan ............................................................................................................................................................5
Northwood University, Texas ..................................................................................................................................................................5
Northwood’s History................................................................................................................................................................................4
Officers of the University ....................................................................................................................................................................160
Omniquest Program .................................................................................................................................................................................6
INDEX
205
Online Registration ..............................................................................................................................................................................109
Operations & Supply Chain Management
Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................................................................96
Curriculum Guide
Florida, Michigan, and ADP ...................................................................................................................................................51
Organizations, Student
Florida ..........................................................................................................................................................................................111
Michigan .......................................................................................................................................................................................112
Orientation ...........................................................................................................................................................................................114
Pell Grant ...............................................................................................................................................................................................17
Personnel
Adult Degree Program
Adjunct Faculty.....................................................................................................................................................................182
Administrative Staff ..............................................................................................................................................................180
Adult Degree Program Locations .........................................................................................................................................180
Full-Time Faculty .................................................................................................................................................................182
Texas Operations, Adjunct Faculty ......................................................................................................................................177
Texas Operations, Full-Time Faculty ...................................................................................................................................177
Central Administration .................................................................................................................................................................160
Florida
Adjunct Faculty .....................................................................................................................................................................174
Administrative Staff ..............................................................................................................................................................172
Faculty ..................................................................................................................................................................................173
Michigan
Adjunct Faculty .....................................................................................................................................................................168
Administrative Staff ..............................................................................................................................................................163
Faculty ..................................................................................................................................................................................166
Officers of the University .............................................................................................................................................................160
Texas Operations
Adjunct Faculty .....................................................................................................................................................................177
Administrative Staff ..............................................................................................................................................................176
Full-Tim Faculty ...................................................................................................................................................................177
Philosophy Course Descriptions ............................................................................................................................................................99
Physical Education Course Descriptions ...............................................................................................................................................97
Placement, Advanced ...............................................................................................................................................................................7
Plagiarism.............................................................................................................................................................................................109
Political Science Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................................................................99
President’s List (see Academic Honors) ..............................................................................................................................................106
Privacy, Student Records (FERPA) .....................................................................................................................................................104
Probation, Academic
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................136
Students with VA Benefits .............................................................................................................................................................14
Undergraduate (see Academic Progress)......................................................................................................................................105
Probation, Financial Aid
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................152
Undergraduate, Traditional.............................................................................................................................................................19
Program Descriptions
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................................121
BBA Degree ...................................................................................................................................................................................21
MBA Degree ................................................................................................................................................................................128
MSOL Degree ..............................................................................................................................................................................143
Programs and Seminars ............................................................................................................................................................................5
Psychology Course Descriptions .........................................................................................................................................................100
Publications, Student ............................................................................................................................................................................117
Refunds
Adult Degree Program ..................................................................................................................................................................122
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................138
Undergraduate, Traditional.......................................................................................................................................................13, 20
Repeating Courses................................................................................................................................................................................109
INDEX
206
Requirements
Graduation
Adult Degree Program (see Semester Hour Requirements) .................................................................................................121
Graduate School ....................................................................................................................................................................137
Military Program Centers .....................................................................................................................................................123
Undergraduate, Traditional ...................................................................................................................................................108
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Graduate Financial Aid Recipients ...............................................................................................................................................151
Undergraduate ..............................................................................................................................................................................105
Undergraduate Financial Aid Recipients........................................................................................................................................18
Security ................................................................................................................................................................................................117
Soliciting, Selling, Publicizing.............................................................................................................................................................117
Spanish Course Descriptions ...............................................................................................................................................................101
Speech Course Descriptions.................................................................................................................................................................101
State Licensures ...................................................................................................................................................................................157
Student Conduct ...................................................................................................................................................................................118
Student Development Transcript (EXCEL) .........................................................................................................................................111
Student Employment ..............................................................................................................................................................................18
Student Life Centers.............................................................................................................................................................................117
Student Loans
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................150
Undergraduate, Traditional.............................................................................................................................................................17
Student Publications .............................................................................................................................................................................117
Student Records ...................................................................................................................................................................................110
Student Services ...................................................................................................................................................................................111
Bookstore ......................................................................................................................................................................................113
Counseling, Academic Advising, and Orientation .......................................................................................................................114
Cultural Arts Events .....................................................................................................................................................................114
EXCEL Program ......................................................................................................................................................................6, 111
Food Services ...............................................................................................................................................................................114
Housing ........................................................................................................................................................................................115
Intercollegiate/Intramural Athletics..............................................................................................................................................115
Library ..........................................................................................................................................................................................116
Medical .........................................................................................................................................................................................117
Study Abroad Programs .........................................................................................................................................................................24
Semester in Asia .............................................................................................................................................................................25
Semester in Europe .........................................................................................................................................................................25
Test-Out Policy ....................................................................................................................................................................................110
Texas
Board of Governors ......................................................................................................................................................................158
Campus .............................................................................................................................................................................................5
Personnel ......................................................................................................................................................................................176
Textbooks (Costs) ..................................................................................................................................................................................14
Transfer Students ...................................................................................................................................................................................10
Trustees, Board of ................................................................................................................................................................................157
Tuition and Fees
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................140
Undergraduate, Traditional.............................................................................................................................................................12
University of the Aftermarket ..............................................................................................................................................................124
Veterans’ Benefits
Graduate School ...........................................................................................................................................................................153
Undergraduate ................................................................................................................................................................................14
Withdrawals ...........................................................................................................................................................................................14
INDEX
207
NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY
Academic Catalog 2014 - 2015
www.northwood.edu
Academic Catalog
2014 - 2015

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