Lesson Plan, Day 31

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Lesson Plan, Day 31
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
• 10-REA.A1 Expand vocabulary, especially those utilized on SAT®/ACT® testing, and properly incorporate them into
writings to vary word usage
• 10-ORG.A4 Analyze grades to adjust study habits and time allocations
• 10-ORG.B4 Change pen colors to indicate change in concept
• 10-CD.D2 Analyze grade reports to create a study/action plan for continued academic improvement
• EQ: “Where do I need the most academic support and what will I do to get it?”
Lesson
1. Vocabulary
Project Week 7 SAT/ACT Vocabulary PowerPoint
Advocate – (v) [ad-vuh-keyt] urge; plead for. (The environmentalist was quick to
advocate for the preservation of the old-growth forest.)
Lethargic – (adj) [luh-thahr-jik] drowsy; dull. (He continued to feel lethargic for
days after recovering from the horrible flu.)
Scrutinize – (v) [skroot-n-ahyz] examine closely and critically. (The IRS auditor
came to scrutinize the accounts of the large corporation.)
Sporadic – (adj) [spuh-rad-ik] occurring irregularly. (The Easter eggs were hidden
at sporadic intervals.)
2. Tutorial Analysis Grade Reflection
Have students take out their AVID Academic Report from last Wednesday.
Distribute the Tutorial Analysis Grade Reflection (Part A) handout to every student.
Have the students complete the reasons why they are getting a low grade, and
specifically, what areas they will work on moving forward.
Let students know that they will be tracking their tutorial questions and where they
are getting the tutorial questions.
3. Focused Note-Taking – Changing Color
Have students take their best five pages of Cornell notes from the past two weeks.
In pairs, have them examine each other’s notes, and specifically, how they utilized
color.
Have students generate a list of best practices regarding how they used color:
• Highlighting important points, revising notes in a different color, recording
questions in a different color, etc.
Ask for a few volunteers who think they have used color very effectively.
• Use a document camera to display the notes.
• Allow the student to talk through their notes and how they use color.
Distribute II. Note-Making “Review and Revise.”
Materials/Notes
Project
Week 7 SAT/ACT Vocabulary
PowerPoint
Resources
AVID Tutorial Guide
3.5a Tutorial Analysis Grade
Reflection (Part A)
(Pgs. 182-183)
Class Set
Focused Note-Taking CD
II. Note-Making
Documentation
for Essentials
6.3, 8.4
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Lesson Plan, Day 31
AVID – 10th Grade
The addition of color should be done within 24 hours of completing the notes.
• The addition of color will be the Cornell note focus for the next month.
4. Homework
Let students know that they will need to have 10 to 18 pages of Cornell notes (based
on class expectations) for Friday.
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Lesson Plan, Day 32
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
Note: This is a great time of the year for a “Temperature Check” meeting with your tutors.
To access supporting resources for this training, click here.
1. Quickwrite
Note: This should be completed prior to today’s tutorial for 10 minutes only.
Students answer the Essential Question from today’s lesson. Collect these to be
used as evidence for certification of refinement.
For a pair-share, students share their quickwrite with a partner.
Materials/Notes
Class Set
AVID Tutorial Guide
2.8b 10 Steps of the CORNELL
WAY (Pg. 81)
AVID Tutorial Guide
2. Teacher Discussion/Note-Taking of Key Points
2.17a Three-Column Notes
Discuss with students ways to support/refine the focus area to create more rigorous (Pg. 140)
tutorials.
• For example, a TRF pre-work question can include a question that comes directly
from the Cornell notes, and the notes should be used to support the critical
Tutorial Mini-Lesson
thinking column of the pre-work. Three-column notes should be filed in the
Action Plan
content area section of the binder and be used to verify learning in content
classes. The steps listed in the three-column notes should include academic
vocabulary and be general enough to apply to a similar problem.
My Goal and Action Plan for Today’s Tutorial: Have students create a goal to address
this focus area in today’s/future tutorials. This is something that students should
commit to doing consistently to create rigor and effectiveness in tutorials.
3. Reflections
Note: This should be completed after today’s tutorial for 10 minutes of reflection.
In lieu of completing the entire reflection, have students complete only the second
prompt of the reflection: “What I learned about my Point of Confusion…” In the
remaining time, have students reflect on the handout regarding the progress in
meeting the focus area goal/action plan.
Share-Out: In groups, have tutors lead discussion about the following focus area
observation: “How did you refine the focus area in today’s tutorial?”
Select one student per group to share his/her reflection in meeting the focus area.
Documentation
for Essential
6.3
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Lesson Plan, Day 33
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
10-CR.D1 Prepare for, take, and analyze the results for the PSAT® and/or PLAN® tests
10-CR.D4 Understand the differences between various college entrance tests
EQ: “What are the similarities and differences between the PSAT and PLAN tests.”
Lesson
1. 30-Second Expert
Distribute the 30-Second Expert handout.
The topic/prompt is: the PSAT and PLAN tests.
Have the students complete the box labeled, “What do I know about this topic?”
Go over the directions for the interaction.
Students share per directions.
Students complete box for what they learned from their partner.
2. Review PSAT and PLAN Tests
Using the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) and The Plan Test handouts,
go over general information about the PLAN and the PSAT.
For more information about the PLAN, visit the ACT website (www.act.org). For
more information about the PSAT, visit the College Board website
(http://www.collegeboard.org/student/testing/psat/about.html).
Students should take notes.
3. Venn Diagram
Have students work in pairs to construct a Venn diagram, or pass out the Venn
Diagram handout, comparing and contrasting the two tests.
Once pairs have completed their Venn Diagrams, conduct a share-out to create one
class diagram.
• Optional: Have students form groups of four to six and create a giant Venn
diagram on chart paper.
4. Wrap-Up
Students should complete the summary section of their notes.
Materials/Notes
Class Set
Critical Reading
2.8 30-Second Expert (Pg. 28)
Supporting Math in the AVID
Elective
3.3e Venn Diagram (Pg. 100)
Class Set (back-to-back)
College and Careers
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude
Test (PSAT) and The PLAN Test
(Pgs. 84, 87)
Materials
Chart Paper (optional)
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Lesson Plan, Day 34
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
1. 10 Steps of the Cornell Way Action Plan
Have students get out their 10 Steps of the Cornell Way Action Plan from this past
Tuesday.
Give each student one minute in their tutorial group to share how they have done
on meeting the goals from their Action Plan.
2. Tutorials
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at implementation of the 10 Steps of
the Cornell Way process.
• Continue coaching and reminding students about utilizing Cornell notes during
the AVID Tutorial Process.
Materials/Notes
Documentation
for Essential
6.3
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Lesson Plan, Day 35
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
10-ORG.A1 Take 10 to 18 pages of quality Cornell notes per week
10-COLL.A7 Participate in group discussions and reflections based on collaborative work
EQ: “How can I continue to improve my note-taking in my academic classes?“
Lesson
1. Ice-Breaker – React and Act
Pass out a 3x5 index card to each student.
Have the students write an event, encouraging them to be creative. Some examples
include the following:
• Being surprised by a dog on your way home from school
• Making the game-winning pass at the Super Bowl
• Winning a $50,000 scholarship for college
Split the class into two random teams.
Collect the index cards, creating two separate piles.
Ask for five volunteers from each team to randomly select a card from the other
team’s pile.
Choose a time limit (from 30 seconds to one minute).
Say, “Go,” and have all 10 students act out their event simultaneously.
• They can use sounds and gestures, but no words.
The other members of their team must attempt to guess the event that each person
is acting out.
Go through two or three rounds.
2. Debrief
Have students verbally reflect on acting out the event and attempting to guess.
3. Cornell Note – Quantity Check
Have students line up silently by birth month and birth year (with absolutely no
talking).
Have the student closest to December 31st snake back down the line, until he/she is
matched up with the earliest birthday.
Each student should have a single partner.
Have the students take their binder and backpack with them and sit next to their
partner.
Have students trade binders and count the total quantity of notes over the past
seven weeks.
Have the students use the rubric to check their partner’s binder.
Materials/Notes
Class Set
Note Quantity Check
Materials
3x5 Index Cards
Documentation
for Essential
3.3
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Lesson Plan, Day 36
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
10-REA.A1 Expand vocabulary, especially those utilized on SAT®/ACT® testing, and properly incorporate them into
writings to vary word usage
10-CR.D1 Prepare for, take, and analyze the results for the PSAT® and/or PLAN® tests
EQ: “What strategies do I use when taking the PLAN test?”
Lesson
1. Vocabulary
Project Week 8 SAT/ACT Vocabulary PowerPoint
Enigma – (n) [uh-nig-muh] puzzle; mystery. (The disappearance of planes in the
Bermuda Triangle will always be an enigma.)
Lament – (v) [luh-ment] grieve; express sorrow. (The employees would not
lament the retirement of the overbearing boss.)
Ominous – (adj) [om-uh-nuhs] threatening. (The black clouds were an ominous
sign of the thunderstorm to come.)
Superfluous – (adj) [soo-pur-floo-uhs] unnecessary; excessive; overabundant.
(It was difficult to understand the story due to all of the superfluous details.)
2. Practice PLAN Test
Obtain copies of a practice PLAN test. The ACT website’s “PLAN Test Content and
Sample Test Questions” (http://www.act.org/planstudent/pdf/sample.pdf) is free
and is of appropriate length. You might also contact the school counselor for sample
tests and booklets provided to the site.
Make sure that answers are covered or removed before copying the practice test.
Distribute copies to the students for individual, quiet completion.
If there is not enough time for completion, it can be finished for homework.
3. Learning Log
In the last five minutes, have students write a reflection on their experience with
the practice test. They should focus on what they found surprising, as well as what
they felt their strengths and weaknesses were.
4. Extension Idea – AVID Test Prep™*
If your students have access to AVID Test Prep, utilize those resources on this day.
Some suggestions would be the following:
• Take one practice test section.
• Have students review question videos for incorrect answer.
• Review Study Hall lessons for problem areas.
• Use Word Smith to practice vocabulary.
* Indicates an optional activity, which can be shortened or removed, based on time constraints
Materials/Notes
Project
Week 8 SAT/ACT Vocabulary
PowerPoint
Materials
Class Set and Practice PLAN
Test
Documentation
for Essential
4.4
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Lesson Plan, Day 36
AVID – 10th Grade
For more information about bringing AVID Test Prep to your school, click here.
* Indicates an optional activity, which can be shortened or removed, based on time constraints
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Lesson Plan, Day 37
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
1. Tutorials – Focus on Steps of the Cornell Way
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at implementation of the 10 Steps of
the Cornell Way.
• Focus on utilization of notes during the AVID Tutorial Process.
2. Formal Observation – Note-Taking
Utilize the 10 Steps of the CORNELL WAY one-pager as a resource to conduct a
formal observation for the teacher, students, and tutors.
Materials/ Notes
Teacher Copy
AVID Tutorial Guide
3.18b Observation and
Feedback (Pgs. 281-282)
Reference
AVID Tutorial Guide
2.8b 10 Steps of the
CORNELL WAY (Pg. 81)
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Lesson Plan, Day 38
AVID – 10th Grade
Standard and Essential Question:
•
•
10-CR.D1 Prepare for, take, and analyze the results for the PSAT® and/or PLAN® tests
EQ: “What can I learn from examining my performance on the practice PLAN test?”
Lesson
Materials/Notes
1. Team Huddle
Have students move about the room until you give them a signal. (You many want
Reference
to use music starting and stopping as a signal.) They should have their practice PLAN Strategies for Success
tests with them.
6.8 Team Huddle (Pg. 76)
At the signal, give them a number of people to place in a group.
When the group is formed, give them a question to discuss.
Round 1 – Groups of 5 – Which section of the practice test did you find the easiest?
Why?
Round 2 – Groups of 2 – What is one thing that you need to do to improve your test
scores?
Round 3 – Groups of 4 – What specific question did you think was the most difficult
on the practice test? Why?
Round 4 – Groups of 3 – Stay in this group for the next step.
2. Triad Comparison
Triads go over questions to compare and contrast answers and strategies for the
practice PLAN test.
Students should mark group answers in a different color from individual answers.
3. Review Answers as a Class
Go over each practice PLAN question individually.
Discuss strategies and give answers.
4. Reflection
Students should pair-share what they learned and what they found interesting
about the practice PLAN test.
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Lesson Plan, Day 39
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
1. Tutorials – Focus on 10 Steps of the Cornell Way
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at implementation of the 10 Steps of
the Cornell Way. Utilize the 10 Steps of the CORNELL WAY one-pager as a resource
for the teacher, students, and tutors.
Be sure to set up a debrief time with your tutors to discuss the observations from
the week, as well as what is going well and what can be improved
Materials/Notes
Resources
AVID Tutorial Guide
2.8b 10 Steps of the
CORNELL WAY (Pg. 81)
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Lesson Plan, Day 40
AVID – 10th Grade
Standard and Essential Question:
•
•
10-CR.A2 Practice listening and note-taking skills with guest speakers from both the school and community, and
integrate information into student projects and presentations
EQ: “What additional preparation should I be doing to ready myself for college?”
Lesson
*If you are utilizing the Roadtrip Experience materials with your students, replace this
lesson with Lesson 3 of the RTN materials by logging into www.roadtripnation.org
For information about Roadtrip Nation visit http://www.roadtripnation.org/programs/
1. Guest Speaker Protocol
Remind students about the guest speaker and SLANT (Sit up, Lean forward, Ask
questions, Nod your head, Take notes).
Materials/Notes
Resources
Strategies for Success
15.2 Guest Speaker Guide
(Pg. 202)
2. Binder and Planner Check
While students are entering class, have students place their binders and agendas on
their desk.
Check binders for level of organization (everything in rings, nothing in pockets) and
check planner for completeness.
3. Guest Speaker – College Recruiter
Note: Have water and an extra copy of the Guest Speaker Guide available for the
speaker.
Before the guest speaker comes into class, make sure they know that students are
preparing for the PSAT/PLAN in the fall.
Introduce the guest speaker, giving some general information about him/her.
Turn the class over to the speaker.
Allow the speaker to discuss the campus, but encourage questions about college
entrance exams.
If you do not have tutors to grade the binders, bring randomly chosen binders to
your desk for grading, but be sure to monitor student behavior.
When the speaker has finished talking, have the class give them an AVID clap
(fireworks, whoosh, etc.).
Documentation
for Essential
3.3
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Lesson Plan, Day 41
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
10-REA.A2 Develop interpretation skills, using root word, prefix, and suffix
10-CR.A3 Write letters of appreciation to guest speakers
EQ: “How can I write more effective introductions?”
Lesson
1. Vocabulary
Project Week 9 SAT/ACT Vocabulary PowerPoint
Con = with, jointly. Examples: concur – to agree with someone; contemporary – of the
same time period as others; convention – a gathering of people with a common
interest; incongruous – not harmonious, appropriate, or fitting. (Even though the prom
dress and high tops were incongruous, they somehow created a cute look.)
Crypto = hidden, secret. Examples: cryptic – of hidden meaning; cryptography – science
of secret codes; encrypt – encode into secret code. (Because the parents did not want
the young boy to understand the serious conversation, they spoke in cryptic phrases.)
Em = into, cover with, cause. Examples: empathy – intention to feel like another
person; empower – put into power; embellish – to enhance with ornamentations. (She
decided to embellish her plain backpack with glitter, patches, and fabric paint.)
Ob = in the way, against. Examples: obscure – hard to understand; obliterate – to
remove or destroy all traces of; oblivion – being completely forgotten or unknown.
(They used masks and costumes to obscure their identities at the masquerade party.)
2. Writing Effective Introductions
Have students think-pair-share what they know about introductory paragraphs.
Write down students’ thinking about the components of an introduction.
Distribute the What Is an Introduction? handout and discuss/define: opening sentence,
forecast, and thesis.
• Have students define those terms in their own words.
Group students in fives and distribute the Sample Essays handout.
Have students review the essays and identify the opening sentence forecast and thesis
in different-colored highlighters (define yellow as opening sentence, blue as forecast,
etc.).
Discuss the effectiveness of these paragraphs.
3. Setting the Hook
Discuss the importance of the opening sentence in grabbing the reader’s attention.
Distribute the Opening Sentence Techniques: Capturing a Reader’s Attention handout
and do a jigsaw of the six methods to capture attention.
Materials/Notes
Project
Week 9 SAT/ACT Vocabulary
PowerPoint
Reference
High School Writing
4.11 Developing an
Introduction (Pgs. 139-146)
Class Set
High School Writing
4.11b What Is an Introduction?
(Pgs. 144-146)
Sample Essays
High School Writing
4.11a Opening Sentence
Techniques: Capturing a
Reader’s Attention (Pgs. 142143)
Materials
Documentation
Three Different-Colored
for Essential
Highlighters
5.1
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Lesson Plan, Day 41
AVID – 10th Grade
• Startling Information (3) and Opinion (4) can be read by the same student in the
group.
Have the group of five create a new introduction for the writing prompt using one of
the six opening sentence methods.
Have each group share their new introduction (focusing on the opening sentence).
4. Homework
Remind students that there will be a mystery check this Friday, so students need to be
prepared for a quality, quantity, binder, or planner check.
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Lesson Plan, Day 42
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
1. Tutorial Videotaping
Conduct tutorials.
During tutorials, walk around recording video of tutorial groups in action.
• Recording devices could include a video camera, smartphone, or iPad/tablet.
Make sure that you capture examples of the following:
• 30-Second Speeches
• Referring to Cornell Notes
• Questioning
Note: This video will be used on Friday.
Materials/Notes
Documentation
for Essential
8.4
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Lesson Plan, Day 43
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
10-WRI.A1 Practice strategies for pre-writing in response to various prompts for both timed writing and process
writing
10-WRI.A2 Analyze a prompt for timed writing situations
EQ: “What makes an interesting introduction?”
Lesson
1. Introduce Analyzing a Prompt
Tell students that being able to write under timed conditions is a critical skill, which
they need to master before college.
• Not being able to write in timed conditions can result in low SAT® scores, can
result in placement in remedial classes in college, and can cost hundreds of
dollars in additional college coursework and testing.
Remind students of the three phases of timed writing (from 9th Grade WAG):
• Prewriting (analyzing the prompt, brainstorming, and outlining): Use 1/6th of
their time.
• Write the essay (make it logical and well organized): Use 4/6th of their time.
• Reviewing, editing, and revising (rereading the essay, correcting errors): Use
1/6th of their time.
Pass out the Widely Held Beliefs timed writing prompt.
• Note: Possibly hand out a graphic organizer from the High School Writing
Teacher Guide to help the students organize.
Have students underline any key information or important tasks that the prompt
expects them to accomplish.
Distribute the Essential Skill 1: Analyzing a Take-Home Writing Assignment handout.
Have students highlight numbers 1, 4, 5, 8, and 9.
Discuss briefly numbers 1, 4, and 5 for an SAT or collegial timed write setting.
• While discussing 4 and 5, mention that, in a timed write situation, there is a
possibility of writing to persuade the reader to change their behavior.
2. Supporting Your Point of View
First, have the students individually determine whether they will take the position
that widely held beliefs are often wrong or widely held beliefs are often right.
Ask the students the following questions: How many plan to take the position that
widely held beliefs are often right? How many plan to take the position that widely
held beliefs are often wrong?
Materials/Notes
Resources
AVID College Readiness
3.1b Essential Skill 1: Analyzing
a Take-Home Writing
Assignment (Pg. 312)
Class Set
Widely Held Beliefs
Project
Widely Held Beliefs Brainstorm
Materials
Highlighters
Documentation
for Essential
6.2
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Lesson Plan, Day 43
AVID – 10th Grade
• If you notice that a majority of the students are voting one way or the other, let
them know that it often makes a more interesting paper if they write to the
other side of the prompt.
Divide your board in half. On one side, write the following: Widely Held Beliefs Are
Right. On the other side, write the following: Widely Held Beliefs are Wrong.
Have students collectively brainstorm as many examples as they can that support
beliefs being right or wrong.
• Encourage students to reference scientific, historical, or literary examples.
• Use the Widely Held Beliefs handout, which is a resource offering supporting
views, to help students fill in gaps.
Once complete, brainstorm a list of beliefs being right or wrong. During this
portion, you can project the Widely Held Beliefs Brainstorm.
• Be sure to praise students as they use examples from books or history.
3. Timed Writing – Introduction
Give students five to 10 minutes to plan their essay.
Tell students that they will only be writing the introduction to this timed write and
will have approximately 10 minutes to do so.
• Remind students that starting off with a phrase like, “When someone has the
same opinion, ideas, or values as most people, we tend to reasonably believe
them…,” is a very uninspiring way to begin their essay.
Stop the students after 10 minutes and have them go back and go through a
revision process on their introduction.
Collect the papers and randomly redistribute the papers.
Have the students highlight the opening sentence, thesis, and forecast.
Have them write any comments about how to improve the introduction.
If there is time, have students switch papers a second time.
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Lesson Plan, Day 44
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
Note: Make sure to conduct a Student Binder Tutor Training before having tutors grade
binders. To access resources for this training, click here.
1. Tutorials – Scripting
Conduct tutorials.
As you circulate the room, record the conversations of several presenters’
questions.
Be sure to capture the following:
• 30-Second Speech
• References to Notes
• Questioning by Group Members
The scripts (along with the video) will be used tomorrow.
Materials/Notes
Class Set
Tutorial Scripting
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Lesson Plan, Day 45
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
• 10-CD.A2 Understand the role of AVID students and display characteristics on a regular basis
• 10-COLL.A3 Practice using encouragement and positive affirmations with peers
• EQ: “How can we collectively improve our tutorial work?”
Lesson
1. Team-Builder – A Pat on the Back
Before class, print the A Pat on the Back template on cardstock, create two hole
punches at the top of the template, and tie with yarn.
• The cardstock will be hung around the neck of each student.
Give each student a copy of the A Pat on the Back template and have them hang it
from their back, along with a colored marker or pen.
Tell students that they will be going around the room and writing “edifying” remarks
on the cardstock of other AVID students.
• Encourage students to think about detailed characteristics/traits that they
admire about the other person.
2. Tutorial Video Review and Scripting
Walk students through the process of scripting the AVID Tutorial Process.
Explain the various symbols and how you would record what was said.
Ask student to focus on the overall AVID Tutorial Process and how Cornell notes
were utilized in the process.
Students should reflect on what went well and what did not.
Create groups of four, having the students discuss what went well in the group and
where groups could improve.
3. Traffic Light Reflection
Distribute a Traffic Light Reflection handout to each student.
Have the students reflect on “What they will stop doing,” “What they will start
doing less of during tutorial,” and “What they will start doing during tutorials.”
4. Portfolio Collection
Have students review the materials in their binder and take out the “best of”
artifacts.
Students should have at least the following:
• One sample page of Cornell notes from each subject area
• Several learning logs
• Notes from guest speakers
Materials/Notes
Class Set (on cardstock)
A Pat on the Back
Class Set
Tutorial Scripting Form
Traffic Light Reflection
Materials
Cardstock
Yarn
Documentation
for Essentials
3.3, 8.2
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Lesson Plan, Day 46
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
10-REA.A1 Expand vocabulary, especially those utilized on SAT®/ACT® testing, and properly incorporate them into
writings to vary word usage
10-REA.B1 Learn to determine purpose of reading, in order to correctly choose a proper method of reading
10-COLL.A4 Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any
fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence
10-COLL.A9 Refine inquiry, listening, and oral communication skills through a variety of activities, including
tutorials, presentations, Socratic Seminars, and Philosophical Chairs
EQ: “What are the differences between argumentation and persuasion?”
Lesson
1. Vocabulary
Articulate – (adj) [ahr-tik-yuh-lit] effective; distinct; using language easily and
fluently. (The skillful lawyer gave a very articulate opening statement.)
Dogmatic – (adj) [dawg-mat-ik] opinionated; arbitrary; doctrinal. (It was obvious
that he thought he was an expert on the subject by the dogmatic way he
pronounced his opinion.)
Justify – (v) [juhs-tuh-fahy] to show to be just or right; to defend. (When writing a
persuasive paper, it is always necessary to justify your opinion.)
Refute – (v) [ri-fyoot] disprove. (The man was convicted because the defense could
not refute the evidence.)
2. Persuasion or Argument
Draw a large Venn diagram on the board or on a piece of chart paper. Label one side
of the diagram “Argument” and label the other side “Persuasion.”
As a class, create a bulleted list of specific characteristics for each term. Encourage
students to provide as much information for each as possible.
• Argument: The purpose of an argument is to influence the reader by using
evidence and reasoning to express a point of view and uncover the truth for the
reader, objectively. Examples include: academic articles, speeches, proposals,
dialogues, reports, and memos.
• Persuasion: To persuade is to aggressively seek to change the reader’s opinion
and stimulate an action based on the author’s “truth.” Examples include:
editorials, advertisements, commercials, pamphlets, petitions, political
propaganda, and persuasive letters.
Once the class has come to a consensus regarding the individual characteristics of
both acts of “Argument” and “Persuasion,” challenge them to stretch their thinking
and identify characteristics that the two have in common.
Encourage students to recreate the Venn diagram in their Cornell notes.
Materials/Notes
Class Set
Artifacts
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 46
AVID – 10th Grade
Divide students into eight groups.
Give all groups the eight artifacts.
Have students jigsaw the eight artifacts.
As a group, they must determine the following:
• What is the genre of the artifact (news article, speech, memo, etc.)?
• Is the artifact argumentative or persuasive?
• What evidence is present to prove all of the above?
Artifacts 3, 4, and 6 are especially long. As a result, it might be advisable for those
articles to be given to the fastest readers, while telling them that they only need to
skim the article to determine genre, type, and evidence.
If students finish early, have them switch and do a second or third artifact.
Have students share out their findings with the rest of the group.
• Answer Key: Artifact #1: Editorial (Persuasive), Artifact #2: Report Summary
(Argumentative), Artifact #3: Proposal (Argumentative), Artifact #4: Pamphlet
(Persuasive), Artifact #5: Advertisement (Persuasive), Artifact #6: Speech
(Argumentative), Artifact #7: Political Cartoon (Persuasive), Artifact #8: News
Article (Argumentative).
3. Homework
Remind students that there will be a quality note check this Friday. Students should
make sure that they have at least one exceptional page of notes (organized,
question, summary, underlined, proof of review, etc.) and remind students of the
use of color in their note-taking and reviewing process.
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 47
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
1. Tutorials – Focus on Steps of the Cornell Way
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at implementation of the 10 Steps of
the Cornell Way.
• Focus on utilization of notes during the AVID Tutorial Process.
2. Formal Observation – Note-Taking
Utilize the 10 Steps of the CORNELL WAY one-pager as a resource to conduct a
formal observation for the teacher, students, and tutors.
Materials/Notes
Teacher Copy
AVID Tutorial Guide
3.18b Observation and
Feedback (Pgs. 281-282)
Reference
AVID Tutorial Guide
2.8b 10 Steps of the
CORNELL WAY (Pg. 81)
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Lesson Plan, Day 48
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
10-COLL.A4 Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any
fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence
10-COLL.A7 Participate in group discussions and reflections based on collaborative work
10-COMM.A6 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence concisely and logically
10-WRI.D3 Write detailed reflections on experiences, presentations, and speeches, focusing on how the
knowledge is applied to decisions
EQ: “What are the elements of an argument?“
Lesson
Materials/Notes
1. Elements of an Argument
Brainstorm the elements of an argument as a class.
Have students take Cornell notes over the “Elements of an Argument.” Emphasize
the Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning (C – E – R).
Guided Practice: Students develop their own C – E – R chain or develop one within
small groups, modeling the same format as modeled on the Elements of an
Argument PowerPoint.
Have students share their C – E – R chains with one another.
Project
Elements of an Argument
2. Syllogism*
Discuss with students how the incorporation of the syllogism method of reasoning
can help strengthen an argument.
Class Set
Parent Permission
3. Prep for Philosophical Chairs Discussion on Sex Education
Let students know that there will be a Philosophical Chairs discussion next Friday on
whether we should teach Sex Education in schools.
Due to the sensitive nature of the topic, there is a Parent Permission form to
complete before they can participate.
* Indicates an optional activity, which can be shortened or removed, based on time constraints
Syllogism (optional)
Documentation
for Essential
6.1
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 49
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
Focus Area: Focused Note-Taking (Steps 1-10): Connecting Notes to Tutorials
10-INQ.B1 Refine the 10 Steps of the Tutorial Process
10-ORG.B1-6 Focused Note-Taking System (see AVID Standards for complete standards)
EQ: “How should we use Cornell notes and our three-column notes as a learning tool during the tutorials to
support inquiry, understanding, and mastery?”
Lesson
1. Tutorials – Focus on 10 Steps of the Cornell Way
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at implementation of the 10 Steps of
the Cornell Way. Utilize the 10 Steps of the CORNELL WAY one-pager as a resource
to conduct a formal observation for the teacher, students, and tutors.
Be sure to set up a debrief time with your tutors to discuss the observations from
the week, including what is going well and what can be improved.
2. Reflection
Have students use the Reflection handout, and specifically the open-ended
reflection portion of the handout, to review their successes and struggles with
utilizing Cornell notes during tutorials.
• Remind students to take out their Action Plans and reflect on whether they
accomplished their goals.
Materials/Notes
Resources
AVID Tutorial Guide
2.17b Reflection (Pg. 142)
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 50
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
•
10-INQ.A1 Use skilled questioning to elicit deeper thinking from self and others
10-COLL.A4 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any
fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence
10-COLL.A6 Enhance understanding of collaboration by working in groups during team-building and motivational
activities or problem-solving
10-REA.B1 Learn to determine purpose of reading, in order to correctly choose a proper method of reading
10-REA.B6 Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of significant ideas expressed in written works by
identifying important ideas, recognizing inferences, and drawing conclusions
EQ: “How can I use evidence to determine what claims can legitimately be made into arguments?”
Lesson
1. Cornell Note Quality Check
Create a list of numbers assigned to typical senior courses:
• 1 – Math, 2 – English, 3 – Gov. /Econ., etc.
Roll the die and collect the best page of notes from the corresponding subject.
• For example, collect one page of notes from English if a “2” is rolled.
Think about potentially requiring the notes to have various colors, as a result of the
focus lesson from Day 31.
Grade these notes for overall quality, ensuring that they are reviewed and returned
by next Monday.
2. Review of the Week’s Curriculum
Review the last couple of curriculum days inside the AVID Elective class. Your review
should include: Argumentative vs. Persuasive (examples of each), as well as
Elements of an Argument (claim, evidence, and reasoning).
Tell students that we are going to take a more inquiry-based approach today.
However, the focus is still on forming arguments:
• Analyzing evidence critically in light of existing knowledge
• Interpreting the evidence to explain what it shows
• Developing reasoning that shows why the evidence is relevant
• Using the evidence and the explanations to solve the problem
3. “The Lunchroom Murder”
Use The Lunchroom Murder PowerPoint to model for students/with students how
to find evidence in both the picture and the story and to provide reasoning.
Have students create a C-E-R chain that illustrates their findings.
Reflect on new learning upon the completion of this activity.
* Indicates an optional activity, which can be shortened or removed, based on time constraints
Materials/Notes
Project
The Lunchroom Murder
Class Set
The Lunchroom Murder
Class Set (optional)
The Case of the Dead Musician
Documentation
for Essential
6.3
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 50
AVID – 10th Grade
4. “The Case of the Dead Musician”*
If time permits, have students solve The Case of the Dead Musician.
Discuss the questions for consideration as a class and have students create a C-E-R
chain that illustrates their findings.
* Indicates an optional activity, which can be shortened or removed, based on time constraints
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 51
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
10-REA.A1 Expand vocabulary, especially those utilized on SAT®/ACT® testing, and properly incorporate them into
writings to vary word usage.
10-REA.B3 Mark texts to track understanding of the text and questions about the reading
10-WRI.C2 Develop and strengthen writing through the creation of an argumentative essay
EQ: “How can I organize an argument essay and how will it be assessed?”
Lesson
Materials/Notes
1. Vocabulary
Cajole – (v) [kuh-johl] coax; wheedle. (The farmer used a bucket of feed to cajole the
cows back into the corral.)
Corroborate – (v) [kuh-rob-uh-reyt] confirm, support. (The man was released from
custody because the witness could corroborate his alibi.)
Dissent – (v) [dih-sent] disagree. (Two of the minority justices dissented with the
decision in the Supreme Court case.)
Spurious – (adj) [spyoor-ee-uhs] false; counterfeit; forged; illogical. (His theory could
not be proven because it was shown that his logic was spurious.)
Reference
High School Writing
7.3 Argument (Pgs. 378-384)
Class Set
High School Writing
7.3e Traditional Pattern for
Organizing the Argument
(Pg. 390)
2. Critical Reading: Traditional Pattern for Organizing the Argument
First Read: Read the Traditional Pattern for Organizing the Argument handout aloud
to the class.
Second Read: Instruct students to read the handout again silently and Mark the Text
as follows:
High School Writing
• Plus Sign (+) – To symbolize comprehension and understanding. (If you get it,
7.3g Argument: Rubric
mark it with a plus sign!)
(Pg. 393)
• Question Mark (?) – To symbolize concepts that are new, confusing, or not yet
mastered. (If you do not get it, mark it with a question mark!)
Finally, have students collaborate with a shoulder partner for clarification
purposes. Encourage them to record clarification notes in the margins of the text.
Documentation
Go over any remaining questions regarding the handout as a class after
for Essentials
collaborating.
3. Argument Rubric: GIST
Have students look over the Argument: Rubric, directing them to focus on the
column labeled “Effective.”
Individually, students need to read down the column and create a 20-word GIST
summary of the “Effective” column.
Ask a couple of students to share their GIST with the class.
Go over general argument essay expectations.
5.2, 5.5
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Lesson Plan, Day 51
AVID – 10th Grade
Let students know that they should be thinking about a topic they want to create an
argumentative paper about over the next several days.
• Possibly even do some research on a topic of interest.
4. Homework
Let students know that they will need to have 10 to 18 pages of Cornell notes (based
on class expectations) for this Friday.
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 52
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
Focus Area: Use of Resources for the Student Presenter
10-INQ.B1 Refine collaborative tutorial skills through tutor-led discussions, following the tutorial session
EQ: “How are resources used to support clarification about Point of Confusion?”
Lesson
1. Quickwrite
Note: This should be completed prior to today’s tutorial for 10 minutes only.
Students answer the Essential Question from today’s lesson. Collect these to be
used as evidence for certification of refinement.
For a pair-share, students share their quickwrite with a partner.
2. Teacher Discussion/Note-Taking of Key Points
Discuss with students ways to support/refine the focus area to create more rigorous
tutorials.
• For example, the student presenter reviews notes prior to completing the TRF
pre-work. Student presenter references notes during 30-Second Speech.
• Group members can document each time a student presenter refers to his/her
notes.
My Goal and Action Plan for Today’s Tutorial: Have students create a goal to address
this focus area in today’s/future tutorials. This is something that students should
commit to doing consistently to create rigor and effectiveness in tutorials.
3. Reflections
Note: This should be completed after today’s tutorial for 10 minutes of reflection.
In lieu of completing the entire reflection, have students complete only the second
prompt of the reflection: “What I learned about my Point of Confusion…” In the
remaining time, have students reflect on the handout regarding the progress in
meeting the focus area goal/action plan.
Share-Out: In groups, have tutors lead a discussion about the following focus area
observation: “How did you refine the focus area in today’s tutorial?”
Select one student per group to share his/her reflection in meeting the focus area.
Materials/Notes
Class Set (back-to-back)
Tutorial Mini-Lesson Action
Plan
Documentation
for Essential
8.4
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 53
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
10-WRI.B1 Refine strategies to write effective paragraphs
10-REA.B2 Read and discuss various examples of text, including articles from fiction and non-fiction
10-REA.B3 Mark texts to track understanding of the text and questions about the reading
10-REA.B4 Utilize charting of the text to track various points of view and opposing claims
EQ: “How will analyzing someone else’s argument essay impact my own writing?”
Lesson
Materials/Notes
1. Critical Reading: “We Need More Sex Education Now!”
As a class, number the paragraphs.
First Read: Read the essay in its entirety out loud to the class.
Second Read: Students read silently and Mark the Text.
• Circle key terms.
• Underline the author’s claims.
Third Read: Instruct students to use the Charting the Text Table: Analyzing the
Micro-Structure handout to chart what the author of the essay is both “saying” and
“doing.” Encourage the use of the Charting Verbs List to aid in this process.
Note: See resource pages for further instruction, if necessary.
With a partner, have students analyze the author’s use of evidence by completing
the Analyzing and Summary Evidence: Template.
Have a couple of groups share their writings with the class.
Class Set
High School Writing
7.3b “We Need More Sex
Education Now!” (Pgs. 396-397)
Critical Reading
8.1-8.2 Charting the Text
Table: Analyzing the MicroStructure and Charting Verbs
List (Pgs. 110-112)
Critical Reading
10.5 Analyzing and
Summarizing Evidence:
Template (Pg. 140)
Documentation
for Essential
5.5
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 54
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
Focus Area: Use of Resources for the Student Presenter
10-INQ.B1 Refine collaborative tutorial skills through tutor-led discussions, following the tutorial session
EQ: “How are resources used to support clarification about Point of Confusion?”
Lesson
1. Inquiry Process Action Plan
Give each student one minute in their tutorial group to share how they have done
on meeting their goals from their Action Plan.
2. Tutorials
As you monitor groups today, look for examples of the student presenters using
resources.
• Continue coaching and reminding students about using the Levels of Inquiry
process.
Materials/Notes
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 55
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
10-COLL.A8 Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and when warranted, modify one’s own views
10-COLL.A9 Refine inquiry, listening, and oral communication skills through a variety of activities, including
tutorials, presentations, Socratic Seminars, and Philosophical Chairs
10-ORG.B1 Take 10 to 18 pages of quality Cornell notes per week
10-INQ.C7 Summarize points of agreement and disagreement
EQ: “How will analyzing an argument better prepare me for a Philosophical Chairs debate?”
Lesson
1. Cornell Note Quantity Check
Before students begin the Philosophical Chairs discussion, have students place
their binders and agendas on your desk.
Remind students that the expectation for sophomores is that they take 10 to 18
pages of quality Cornell notes per week.
Ask students to get out Cornell notes for a quantity check.
As you circulate the room for the check, make sure to confirm that all notes have
Essential Questions, notes, questions, and summaries.
Place a stamp or check mark on the notes so that students can’t use them again for
future checks.
2. Philosophical Chairs Prep – “Sex Education”
Open class by having a couple students share their template from the previous
class.
Pass out the Philosophical Chairs Preparation handout.
Have students record the following Central Statement:
Sex Education needs to become a priority in public education.
Instruct students to label one side of the T-chart on their preparation sheet as
“Pro” and the other side as “Against.”
Inform students that they have 10 minutes to develop and support an argument
for both sides of the claim/central statement. Emphasize that they must complete
arguments for both sides because they do not know which side they will be
arguing. Remind students to use their text, charts, and templates to aid in this
process.
After 10 minutes, go over the Philosophical Chairs Rules of Engagement.
3. Philosophical Chairs – “Sex Education”
Number students off from 1 to 25 (according to class size). Once everyone has a
number, announce that even numbers will argue the “Pro” side and odd numbers
will argue the “Against” side.
Materials/Notes
Project
Student Success Path
12.2 Philosophical Chairs Rules
of Engagement (Pg. 189)
Class Set
Student Success Path
12.1 Philosophical Chairs
Preparation (Pg. 190)
Student Success Path
12.4 Philosophical Chairs
Reflection (Pg. 193)
Note Quantity Check
Documentation
for Essential
7.3
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 55
AVID – 10th Grade
Remind students of the following:
• Participation is required.
• Speaking turns should resemble a tennis match (from one side to the other,
back and forth).
• Three Before Me! Do not hog the speaking floor!
• If the other side persuades you, and the teacher has given the okay, you may
move according to your beliefs.
The debate should last at least 30 minutes.
Once the debate is complete, have students complete the reflection. If time allows,
it might also be a good idea to discuss as a class what went well, as well as what
needs to improve for next time.
4. Your Ticket Out the Door!
What impacted your argument the most: the essay or your own personal beliefs?
This is something that students can share verbally with you as they exit your
classroom, passing by you at the door.
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 56
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
•
10-REA.A2 Develop interpretation skills, using root word, prefix, and suffix
10-COLL.A8 Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and when warranted, modify one’s own views
10-WRI.A1 Practice strategies for pre-writing in response to various prompts for both timed writing and process
writing
10-WRI.B5 Support arguments and claims of evidence using textual sources
10-WRI.C2 Develop and strengthen writing through the creation of an argumentative essay
EQ: “What (society/community/school) issues are relevant to me?”
Lesson
1. Vocabulary
Project Week 12 SAT/ACT Vocabulary PowerPoint
An, ani, anti = against, opposite. Examples: antisocial – opposing social norms;
anarchist – a person going against the established government; antagonism – an
active opposition or hostility. (There is a historical antagonism between Israel and
Palestine.)
Dis = take away, deprive, not. Examples: discordant – disagreeable to the ears; not
harmonious; discount – to deduct or disregard; dissent – disagree. (The warm-up of
the elementary school marching band was discordant.)
Im/in = not, without. Examples: implausible – not having the appearance of truth or
plausibility; incongruous – not even or harmonious; incorrigible – not easily swayed,
bad beyond correction or reform. (Many people believe that alien life from other
planets is implausible at best.)
Re = again, back, backward. Examples: rebound – to spring back again; recount –
narrate or tell, to count again; repudiate – disown; disavow. (He could not wait to
return home and recount to his relatives the adventures of his vacation.)
2. Say Something
Have students stand up beside their seats. Tell them that we are going to play a
quick game of “Say Something.”
Ask student to think about an issue in our community, school, or society that they
would be interested in researching further and writing an argument essay about.
Take turns going around the room; everyone speaks, and once they have shared an
idea, they may sit down. If they have to pass, then they must remain standing, and
they will be revisited. No idea can be repeated.
Record all of the ideas on the board for students to see.
Once everyone has contributed an idea, ask students to take out a sheet of
notebook paper and something with which to write.
Materials/Notes
Project
Week 12 SAT/ACT
Vocabulary PowerPoint
Class Set
High School Writing
7.3a Argument: Assignment
Description (Pg. 385)
High School Writing
7.3d Pros/Cons for My
Position (Pg. 389)
Documentation
for Essential
Materials
Computers
6.5
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 56
AVID – 10th Grade
On the page, ask students to record one topic that they are interested in
researching further and writing an essay over.
3. Quickwrite
Give students three minutes to write down everything that they know about their
topic.
Once the three minutes are up, give them another two minutes to record questions
that they have regarding their topic. If they cannot come up with any questions,
then they should not be writing over that topic!
Next, ask students to write a single statement regarding their position on the topic.
This will serve as a claim/thesis.
4. Argument Assignment
Walk students through the Argument: Assignment Description form and ask them
probing questions, in order to help them to identify their audience, purpose, and
form.
Finally, allow students class time to begin researching their topic. Have them use the
Pros/Cons for My Position handout, in order to help them organize their thoughts.
They may need to record this information on a page of Cornell notes due to a lack of
space. This step needs to be completed by the next class period, so they can begin
drafting their essays.
5. Homework
Remind students that there will be a binder and planner check this Friday.
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 57
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
Focus Area: Use of Resources for the Student Presenter
10-INQ.B1 Refine collaborative tutorial skills through tutor-led discussions, following the tutorial session
EQ: “How are resources used to support clarification about Point of Confusion?”
Lesson
1. Tutorials – Focus on the Use of Resources by Student Presenter
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at the use of resources by the
student presenter.
• Focus on the types of resources being used, as well as how often they are
referencing their notes, books, etc.
2. Formal Observation – Inquiry Process
Use the Observation and Feedback form to track resource usage.
Materials/Notes
Teacher Copy
AVID Tutorial Guide
3.18b Observation and
Feedback (Pgs. 281-282)
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 58
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
•
10-WRI.B1 Refine strategies to write effective paragraphs
10-WRI.B4 Incorporate transitions to improve flow within a paragraph and logically tie together academic
arguments
10-WRI.B5 Support arguments and claims of evidence using textual sources
10-WRI.C2 Develop and strengthen writing through the creation of an argumentative essay
EQ: “How will everything that I have learned up to this point about writing an argument essay positively impact
my essay?”
Lesson
Materials/Notes
1. Rough Draft – Argumentative Essay
Have students complete a rough draft.
If they discover areas in need of more research, they should make a list of what they
need, but they should also continue with the rest of their draft for now.
Allow time for more research as students finish their initial drafts.
Refer students back to their Traditional Pattern for Organizing the Argument
handout.
Encourage students to collaborate (discuss the wording for difficult passages, play
around with the order of sentences, get advice about appeal or pro/con points,
etc.).
Reference
High School Writing
7.3 Argument (Pgs. 378-397)
Materials
Computers
Documentation
for Essential
6.5
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 59
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
Focus Area: Use of Resources for the Student Presenter
10-INQ.B1 Refine collaborative tutorial skills through tutor-led discussions, following the tutorial session
EQ: “How are resources used to support clarification about Point of Confusion?”
Lesson
1. Tutorial Feedback
Debrief any general findings from Tuesday’s Observation and Feedback with the
class to support their performance.
• Be sure to communicate any specific concerns with individuals or tutors in a oneon-one manner.
2. Tutorials – Focus on Resource Usage
As you monitor groups today, continue to look at student presenters using their
resources.
Remind your students about revisiting their Action Plans.
Be sure to set up a debrief time with your tutors to discuss the observations from
the week, including what is going well and what can be improved.
Materials/Notes
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 60
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
•
•
•
10-REA.A1 Expand vocabulary, especially those utilized on SAT®/ACT® testing, and properly incorporate them into
writings to vary word usage
10-REA.A2 Develop interpretation skills, using root word, prefix, and suffix
10-COMM.A1 Role play varying word choice, tone, and voice when speaking to an assigned audience
EQ: “In what ways can I integrate new vocabulary words to evidence my understanding of their use and
meaning?”
Lesson
1. Binder and Planner Check
While students are entering class, have students place their binders and agendas on
their desk.
Check binders for level of organization (everything in rings, nothing in pockets) and
check planner for completeness.
2. Write-Pair-Share*
Note: Students might complain that there isn’t enough time to create the skit, so
this writing piece can be removed to save time.
Distribute the List of Vocabulary Words from Weeks 7-12.
Students write a paragraph of their choosing using as many of the vocabulary words
correctly as possible.
Students then share quickwrite paragraphs with a partner.
Divide into groups of approximately four students.
3. Group Work
Note: Let students know that these mini skits are intended to be a very quick, fun
way of using vocabulary in ridiculous ways.
• For example, ordering a hamburger at a fast food restaurant with words like
ominous, lethargic, etc.
Each group is to come up with a short skit/vignette using at least 10 of the
vocabulary words.
Words must be used correctly.
All group members must have a speaking part.
They have approximately 15 to 20 minutes to complete the activity.
4. Group Presentation
Each group presents for the class.
Optional: Consider having a signal of some sort for the audience to give when they
hear a vocabulary word being used.
* Indicates an optional activity, which can be shortened or removed, based on time constraints
Materials/Notes
Materials
List of Vocabulary Words for
Weeks 7-12
[Type text]
Lesson Plan, Day 61
AVID – 10th Grade
Standards and Essential Question:
•
10-REA.A1 Expand vocabulary, especially those utilized on SAT/ACT testing and properly incorporate them into
writings to vary word usage
• EQ: “ “
Lesson
1. Vocabulary
Augment – (v) [awg-ment] increase; add to (She decided to join at least one club at
school in order to augment the extracurricular activities section of her college
application.)
Fervor – (n) [fur-ver] glowing ardor; intensity of feeling (When the home team
made the game point, the crowd was whipped into a fervor.)
Gregarious – (adj) [gri-gair-ee-uhs] sociable (The gregarious girl made a point of
welcoming all new students to the school.)
Tenacity – (n) [tuh-nas-i-tee] firmness; persistence (For students with learning
disabilities, it takes great tenacity to achieve academic success.)
Materials/ Notes
Resources
Tutorial Resource Guide
Questioning resources
(pgs. 86-88)
Class Set
Strategies for Success
What’s in a Cartoon
(pg. 98)
Materials
A cartoon that students
will find engaging
Documentation
for Essential
6.3
* Indicates an optional activity which can be shortened or removed based on time constraints
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