Volume 101 - Issue 4 - Minnesota State Academy for the Deaf

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February '76
Vol. 101, No.4
COVER: .. The Battle of Gettysburg" July 3, 1863
Upper right: Union President Abraham Lincoln
Lower left: Confederate President Jefferson DavIS
Published at the
\n""EWTA SC'1I00L FOR THF OE.'F
FARm.U·LT. \IIY'IESOTA 550Z1
Published at the Minnesota School for the Deaf. on the first of eact'l month 'rom
October to June. inclusive. with December and January combined. Second class
postage paid at Faribault, Mlnn Subscription price: S2 a year payable In ad_
vance. Address all communicatiOns to: THE COMPANION
55021. Return postage guaranteed.
Faribault. MInn.,
Bicentennial Series"Looking back"
Reprinted by permission of Dr. Wesley Lauritsen from his book "1863-1963"
THE MINNESOTA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF
THE BEGINNING
Minnesota became a state on Ma)' 11, 1858. In that year,
during the session of the first state legislature, definite action was taken looking toward the establishment of a school
f,or the deaf children of Minnesota.
The Honorable George E. Skinner, one of Faribault's representatives in the state legislature, asked that a "deaf
and dumb asylum" be located in Faribault. The legislature
decided that this institution should be located in Faribault if
the citizens of the town would provide 40 acres of land within two miles of town for a site.
Citizens promptly donated 40 acres a mile or so west of
town for the institution. Here the matter rested for five
years. That no action was taken during these five years is
not surprising when we recall that this was the time of the
Civil War and that there was a savage Indian 'outbreak in
the state.
When the Legislature met in January, 1863, Senator Berry
of Faribault introduced a bill providing for the inauguration
of the proposed school for deaf and blind children.
SUPERINTENDENT CHOSEN
One of the first steps was to appoint a superintendent for
the new school. A number of applications were received. Mr.
Mott went to Ohio where he met Rosewell H. Kinney, one of
the teachers at the Ohio School for the Deaf at Columbus.
Mr. Kinney was highly necommended and was appointed to
be the first superintendent of the Minnesota School for the
Deaf.
SCHOOL BUILDING RENTED
On returning to Faribault Mr. Mott at once began looking
for a place in which to open the school. There was no money
available to put u,p a building on the 40 acres of land donated by citizens. There was an urgent need to open the
new school and Mr. Mott did the only thing he could: rented a building in town. The rental was $150 a year. The building was located on Front and Main Street and had formerly
been the store and dwelling hous'e of Major Fowler. This is
now Central Avenue and Division Street.
The building W3IS furnished and made ready for the opening of school on the second Wednesday of September, 1863.
The names and addresses of 48 deaf persons were obtained
and a circular of information was sent out to them.
del' twelve years of age.
II. The payment of twenty dollars in advance will be required of each pupil, that being the estimated cost of provisions for each to January 1, 1864.
III. Each pupil should come with sufficient clothing to
last one year, or with money to procure it. He should also
have a trunk with a good lock and k,ey, and large enough to
contain all his clothing. Each article should be distinctly
marked with his name. The wardrobe of the male and female, respectively, may consist of about the following articles: For males-three coats, three vests, three pairs of
pantaloons, six shirts, six pairs of socks, three pairs of
shoes, two hats, or caps, and a palm leaf hat, two pairs of
mittens, or gloves, two fine combs, two pairs of wooden
combs, two pairs of suspenders, and three pocket handker_
chiefs.
For females-four dresses, one bonnet, and one sun bonnet,
three changes of underclothes, three pairs of winter stockings, and three of summer, ditto; thl'ee pairs of shoes, two
night gowns and caps, four pocket handkerchiefs, one shawl,
one or two pairs of gloves, two hair combs, one coarse and
two fine combs. In addition to the above outfit, a small sum
of money should be deposited with the principal to meet incidental expenses, repairs of shoes, postage, etc., any part
of which remaining on hand at the end of the session will he
returned.
IV. Except in case of sickness all pupils are expected to
remain at the Institution from the commencement to the
close of each sessIon, at which time parents or friends
should be prepared to take them home to spend the vacation.
SCHOOL OPENS SEPTEMBER 9, 1863
The doors to the Minnesota State Institute for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb were opened to students for
the first time on Wednesday, September 9, 1863. Superintendent Kinney was in charge. Five :pupils were enrolled on
the first day and three more entered in the course ()f a few
months. These eight pioneer pupils were:
Cora A. Ho,we, Medicine Lake, Hennepin County
Almira M. Taylor, ShelbyviHe, Blue Earth County
James A. Brannan, St Paul, Ramsey County
William Cooper, Faribault, Rice County
George A. Harmon, Dodge City, Steele County
TERMS OF ADMISSION
Thomas Kell, Richfield, Hennepin County
1. Applicants should not be under eight years of age
over thirty. Children possessing weak constitutions, or
who have failed to attain the ordinary growth and vigor of
mind and body, should not be brought to the Institution un-
John B. Sentell, Faribault, Rice Oounty
1101'
Olive A. Wilcox, Owatonna, Steele County
Continued on page 2
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Continued from page 1
LOOKING BACK
The legislative act of March 4, 1863 stated that only in.
digent deaf and blind were to have the benefits of the school
free. Others weve expected to pay for their board. This restriction crippled the usefulness of the school and the commissioner.'! made a str,ong plea to the legislature to eliminai;e
thi.'! point. The follo,wing passage is part of the r,eport:
"Your commissioners trust that in your future action you
will recognize the principle that the unfortunate within its
borders are the peculiar care of the state. That while you
abate nothing of your efforts to educate and elevate those
who can see, speak, and hear, you will be SUre to be just and
generous to those who cannot, and the word indigent will
never reappear in an appropriation for their relief."
NORTH WING, PERMANENT BUILDING
OCCUPIED
March 17, 1868 was not only St. Patrick's Day but it was a
RED LETTER day in the history of the Minnesota School
for the Deaf. On that day the furniture and household goods
were transported from the old building in town to the first
permanent building on the present campus site.
We quote from an early history: "Who can picture the
delight of one and all, from the superintendent down to the
youngest pupil, at taking possessio'n of their warm, bright,
and roomy home on the hill and bidding adieu forever to the
old wooden structure, with its cold draughts, its rats and
mice and the hundred and one other discomforts that had
been'endured for five years." That old building has long since
disappeared and no trace of it remain.'!.
'!'his new building was the north wing of the "Big House
on tbe Hill" that was to be knQ\vn as Matt Hall. When
school opened in the fall 53 students were in the attendance.
The building had been planned to accommodate 50.
The school adminstration then asked the legislature for
money to build a south wing. Money was appropriated to lay
the foundation and building up to first story level.
The honor of being the first graduate of the school goes
to Anna Barnes of Dundas. She was graduated in 1869.
In 18170 George A. Harmon of Dodge Center and ~o.ra
Howe of Plymouth were graduated and given regular dIplomas. Certificates of honorable discharge were tha~ year
given to William Cooper, Andrew Nilson, and AlmIra M.
Taylor.
Mr. Harmon became a teacher in the vocational depart-
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Scott Hoehn itIustrated (made a picture out of) his name.
Can you make a picture out of your name?
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February 1976 • The Companion
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MOTT HALL COMPLETED AND OCCUPIED
The main building at the School for the Deaf, to be known
as Matt Hall, was completed and ready for occupancy in the
fall of 1879. The exterior walls were built of :;;plendid blue
limestone from the Faribault quarries, showing the natural
rock face on the body of the walls. In the center of the roof
ro,se a cupola of liberal dimensions, the top of the dome at
the base of the flagstaff being :..50 feet above the surface of
the ground. The entire cost of the building with impro·vement
was about $150,000.
In his 1879 annual report Superintendent Noyes noted that
during that year over 6,000 deaf-mute children had been under instruction in the United States and Canada and that the
expense ran to $1,500,000, or about $250 per capita. Today
(1963) the per capita expense runs close to $2,500. At the
time the report was written there were 93 children enrolled
at the school and more expected daily so the enrollment
would be over 100. Mr. Noyes stated that there were 100
more in the state who had not been educated.
As a matter of record it should be noted that up to May,
1889 Superintendent Noyes was also head of the state departments for the blind and the feeble-minded located in Faribault. The groups were housed in different buildings. In that
year Professor J.J Dow, who had been principal of the
department for the blind, was named superintendent of the
School for the Blind, and Dr. George H. Knight, who had
been head of the. department f,or the feeble-minded, was
named superintendent of the School for Idiotic and Imbeciles,
as it was then called. Then Superintendent Noyes was able
to give full attention to growing School for the Deaf.
ELECTRIC LIGHTS
FIRST GRADUATES
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ment of the school and Miss Howe joined the academic faculty. Those two were the first of a long list of graduates who
returned to their alma mater to teach.
While waiting for the completion of the south wing of the
building, conditions grew more and more uncomfortable in
the north wing. At one time there were 76 students there.
The superintendent had to turn down many who desired to
enter.
~J"
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The 1889 legislature appropriated money for an electric
light plant at the school. The boys' gymnasium in the basement of the shop building was remodeled into a new enginedynamo ro_c~n. In the fall of 1890 the work was completed
and a report published shortly thereafter said, "That subtle
and mysterious agent, electricity, has since lighted our
great buildings." Now we take electricity for granted. In
those day it was lJ.pparently one of the wonders of the
world.
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titled, "Looking Back' which will contain excerpts from this book. Weare
grateful to Dr. Lauritsen for his permission to reprint these excerpts. We
hope you will find them interesting, and
perhaps at times, amusing. It is fun to
note Jh.e ch;mges that have taken place:
Published at the
the length of the school year and
MINNESOTA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF times of vacations; in the clothing lists;
FARIBAULT, MI~NESOTA 55021
in arrangements, for payment of board
and' room, etc. We will also have a look
at various people who have helped our
Acting Editor
Mrs. Cara Conklin school ·became what it is today. All of
OIur buildings have been named for peoGraphic Arts Instructor
Mr. John Mathews pIe instrumental in helping build our
school. All these stories will be told.
Graphic Arts Instructor
We hope you enjoy the series.
Mr. Richard Wilson
We wish to thank our chaplains and
Photography Instructor Mr. David Lee
assistant Sister Marita, for the lovely
Proofreaders
Miss Betty Gruss Christma.s program. Father Pouliot and
Mrs. Cara Conklin Pastor Long did the narration, with
.signing by students Brenda Wernimont,
Marcia Bayne, Jeff Rademacher and
Neal Polzin. The actors were all from
the Lower and Middle School Department a.od all did a p'ood job. Also thanks
to the sign choirs from the churches, to
Inside the ·front cover of the last issuE'
Miss Deborah Johnson for the piano acof the COMPANION, you noticed a list
companiment and Miss Dement for her
Jf administrators of our school.. Thl~
choir directing.
list was taken from a book by Dr.Wesley
Miss Johnson was .still a student
Laurit~en, "Minne30ta School for the
teacher at that time, and now is a fullDeaf" - a history 'Which was compiled
fledged teacher on our staff. She is refor our centennial in 1963.
placing Mrs. Thill, who resigned last
Now it is the Bicentennial Anniverfall, and is teaching seventh grade in
sary of our country, and we thought it
the Middle School. We are happy to
would be interesting to look back into welcome her to our staff.
the history of our school. In this issue
Quinn Hall is sporting a "new look"
and the next issues throughout this
school year, you will find an article enContinued on page 4
FROM THE PRINCIPAL'S
OFFICE - Ed Nagy
~PANION
I-~:::::='~:~~:NDAR
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APRIL 5-9 -
~ APRIL 12-13 -
Regular school week
Regular school days
~ WEDNESDAY, April 14 ~
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MONDAY, April 19 -
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Students released at noon for Easter r~
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Vacation
ETUESDAY, April 20 ~ THURSDAY, May 27 -
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1975·76
Students return after 1 :00 p.m.
Classes resume 8 :00 a.m.
Primary students off for summer vacation
after 2 :00 p.m.
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2 :00 p.m. Awards program
All students except seniors off for summer vacation after
awm..ds prgrams, approximatly 3 :00 p.m.
8 :00 p.m. Baccalaureate
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WORK EXPERIENCE
I would like to urge parents of students at M.S.D. to consider having their
children involved in summer w.ork experiences.
Summer johs can be a wonderful experience for a deaf boy or girl to .gain
valuable information about the world of
w,ork, All too often our children go
through their high school years without
having the kinds of opportunities and
experiences as their hearing brothers and
si'sters. Things such as handling a paper
route, doing odd jobs for neighhorhood
families, doing stock work in a local
store, cutting grass and doing gardening £'01' elderly people and other kinds
of activiti,els for pay can teach many of
the principles that we 'Would like our
3tudents to learn. These are similar to
jobs that their friends have during the
summertime and in :m,ost case's deaf boy.;
and girls can do the same jobs and do
them just as well.
In school we are constantly calling
attention that as they near graduation
our students will have important decisions to face regardoing what they hope
to do after leave school. As all schooling is pointed toward having them bec·ome good decision makers and economically indep:mdent, work in many different .forms lies ahead of them. It often is
difficult to relate the classroom activities to the world of work because our
students often do not have the same kind
of experinec2s that hearing 'students do
and they should.
I would like to ask each parent to stop
and think a minute of the kind of jobs
that may be available at home and talk
to your son or daughter during the next
few months to get them ready for Looking for a job. Even if they are not successful in finding a job, the activity of
looking for a job, meeting different people and going through thi3, will be valuable.
PARENT WORKSHOPS
We have always had the problem of
trying to arrang;e parent conferences
because of the distance that the parents
live f1"ol11 school. To help in transmitting
information about the school and keeping better informed on what the parents
may want to know about the clasS'e'S and
activities her'e we are trying to set up
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CO?1-tinued on page 4
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Februa?'y 1976 • The Companion
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3
Nohel Prize to Deaf Man
Continued from page S
P ARENT WORKSHOPS
Saturday workshops in different locations throughout the state to handle
questions that might come up from parents and friends.
At the present time we have requeste:l
monies under a Federal Title I project
so we woulcl be ill'ble to send a team of
a teacher, houseparent and administrator out to three or four different locations throughout the state to meet with
parents. This meeting would take place
probably on a Saturday and we would
attempt to use a school building 01'
church, recreation hall or other convenient place to meet with the most number
of parents from the surrounding area.
During this time the school people could
inform the parents ahout new changes
in the school program and also talk
specifically about children to the parcnts in private convcrsation.
At the present time we will not know
if we have money to do this until our
pl'oject g,ets approved, but I would
welcome any suggestions from parents
as to topics that they would like to
discuss in these meetings and also if
you have suggestions as to where the
meetings should be held, plea,5e contact
me. We will need to set up a schedule
as to the town and the location of a
building in the town to have these parent workshops. Any information on this
from you would be appreciated.
Continued from page 3
SCHOOL CORNER
these days. Our staff painters have been
busy in the hallways, putting on a
pretty, light green to coordinate with
our carpeting. Everyone seems very
happy with it. We welcome visitors and
staff members from other buildings to
come and have a look,
Mrs. Conklin and Miss Gruss took two
of Miss Gruss' class members to show a
local ladies' group a little glimpse of our
school. The ladies were really impressed
with the communkation skills of these
youngsters; their reading ability, their
lipreading and speech, and their signing.
The explanation was made that all of
these, along with writing, are a part of
total communication. Oh, yes - the two
" stRrs" were Tonya Schulz and Edc
Keath, both in first grade.
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EASTER VACATION
APRIL 15·19
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February, 1976 • The Companion
The foUowing article is reprinted from
the Faribault Daily News. We are
pleased with the recognition given to
Mrs. Schow, who is a former employee
at MSD. She was' at one time head
housemother in Pollard Hall, and als'o
serve:l as dietitian and head housekeeper
for the school.
St. Lucas resident honored for
being a toastmaster
The January 1976 issue of "The
Toastmaster," an international publi
cation directed to Toastmaster Club
and their members throughout the world,
cited Flor,ence' Schow, a resident at the
St. Lucas Convalescent & Geriatric Care
Center,as "one of the action people in
Toastmasters."
What made the story unique is that
Florence Schow is an 86-year-old widow
and like millions of other elderly people
throughout the country, she is confined
to a convalescent center.
The story pointed out that the one
thing that separates Florence Schow
from 'other people her age is that she is
a Toastmaster. The local club president,
Eugene Stinson, was quoted as saying
that Florence Schow had won every
award the club has to offer its members.
He also said that he was curious as to
her motivation for joining the formerly
all-male group. According to the article,
Florence Schow had held a secret desire
nver the years to become a member of
the organization which until rec·ently
excluded women from membership. When
the local club relaxed its membership
l:ules recently, Florence Schow was
among the first women to apply for
membership.
The article concluded by stating that
the world-wide Toastmasters organization joins the local Faribault club in
saluting Florence Schow as a "real
toastmaster. "
An Australian-born chemist who has
been dea,f since childhood was one of
five scientists who were awarded Nobel
prizes in physics and chemistry.
John Ware up Cornforth, 58, a research professor at the University of
Sussex in Brighton, England, was
a.warded the Nobel prize in chemistry
for his work in stereochemistry, the
science of how the spatial arrangement
of atoms or their geometry controls the
chemiclal and physical reactions and
properties of the entir-e molecule. He
will share the $143,000 prize with a
Yugoslav chemist who was jointly
named for independent work in the
same field.
Cornforth is a serious thinker who
gets many ideas while gardening, in the
bathtub, or on long walks, according to
his wife who act as his spokeman. She
is also a research chemist and aids her
husband in his work. Cornforth was educated in his native Sydney, Australia,
and then at Oxford University in England. He joined the University of Sussex
last June. His wife notes that his deaf.
ness "has some advantages. He can't be
interrupted easily."
DEAF CANDIDATE BARRED
A clause in the Arizona Constitution
barred a deaf man from candidacy for
the Arizona Legislature. Larry Stewart,
an Associate Professor at the University
of Arizona in deaf education. He is deaf
and communicates by means of sign
language.
According to the American Annals of
Deaf, he had obtair,ed the backing of
community leaders and was ready to
announce his candidacy when a final
che( k of the Arizona CO'nstitution
(adopted in 1912) turned up a provision
that all State officers and members of
the legislature must be able to conduct
the affairs of their ,offices in the English ·language. So Stewart never got
into the race.
Reprinted from the H&S (Hearing and
Speech/Action)
REISSUE OF THE
TWO DOLLAR BILL
Secretary of the Treasu·ry William E.
Simon in November 1975, announced the
reissuance of the $2 bill as a Federal
Reserve Note, Series 1976. The new note
will be issued on April 13, 1976 (Thomas
Jefferson's birthday), and will feature
an engraving of Thomas Jefferson from
a portrait painted in the early 1800's by
Gilbert Stuart. The back of the note wm
incorporate' .a rendition of the "The Sign-
ing of the DeclalTation of Independem:e",
painted by John Trunball during the
post - RevoluHonary War period and
which now hangs in the Turnbull Gallery
at Yale University.
James Conlon, Director of the T:r.easury's Bureau of Engl1aving and' Printing, estimated the new $2 note will result
in a savings of $4-7 million per year in
printing of $1 notes.
An average of 1.6 billion one donal'
notes are printed per year, which accounts
for 5·5-60 pJercent of the total volume of
currency printed. The new $2 note is
expected to replace about one-half of
the "ones" in circulation over a period
of the next sev,eral years. Conlon emphasized that the new note would be printed
in sufficient volume, 400 million per
year, to assure wide availability. This
production volume is sixty times greater
than the average annual production of
the previous $2 U.S. note, last issued
in 1966.
The two-dollar bill was first issued as
U.S. currency in i86Z, and in subsequent
years the bills were issued under a variety of authorities as U.S. Notes, Silver
Certificates, Treasury Notes, and National Currency, using a number of dif.
ferent portraits. A relatively small number of $2 notes were produced annually
until August 10, 1966, when the Treasury Department announced that the
printing of the bill would be discontinued.
In his announcement today. Secretary
Simon stated that "the American people
are the key to the success of this program. The reissue of the $2 bill can add
a new conven~ence to our currency system and help in reducing the cost of government."
"While the design of the new note is
CO"nsistent with the nation's bicentennial", the Secretary added, "it is not solely
a bicentennial commemorative, but rather the two-dollar bill fulfills as permanent and practical role in the use of
American currency. Additionally as twodollar bilLs gradually come to be substituted for ones, fewer pieces of currency
will need to be carried by individuals and
small cash transactions will be greatly
facilitated."
John \Varner, Adminstrator of the
American Revolution Bicentennial Administrahon said, "With the reissue of
the $2 bill bearing the portrait of
Thomas Jefferson and the signing of the
Declaration of Independence we continue
to reaffirm our pride in this document - the touchstone for the definiti'on
of America. The circulation of this new
bill during our 200th anniversary Y'€ar of
the signing of the Declaration of Independence will serve as continuing re-
mindel' to all of the courageous men who
gave us a legacy which we now pa:ss on
to Americans in our c.entury IlL"
The authority to determine the denomination and design of all U.S. currency
is given to the Secretary of the Treasury
through the Federal Reserve Act as
passed by Congress in 1913.
THE HILL SPEAKS OUT
FOR HEARING ALERT
HEA!UNG ALERT!, the Bell Association's national public information campaign, has emba:rked upon another coulTse
of action to alert the public to the early
danger signals and steps to undertake in
the event that a child may suffer from a
hearing disorder.
Public selTVice announcements recorded
by eight senators and three congres'smen
have been distributed to 1000 radio stations across the country. Ranging in
length from 20- to 60-second spots;, these
recordings urge the early detectio'n and
treatment of heaTing loss to ensure every
deaf child the best possible opportunity
to di"velop good eral communication
and language skills. They also offer free
educational information on hearing impairment to anyone writing to HEARING ALERT! Washington, D.C. 20007.
Dwring the past year, HEARING
ALERT! has supplied parents, pediatricians otolaryngologists, hospitals, preschools, speech and hearing clinics, and
thousand's of health organizations with
essential information on early detection.
Inclu.ded in each HEARING ALERT! kit
is: Statements on Deafness-general information on incidence, effects of hearing
loss, and educational needs, Here's InfO'rmation on Hearing Alert-introduces the
problem of hearing loss and suggests
where to go for help, Speech and Hearing Checklist-describes averag,e behavior of normal-hearing children from 3
months to 5 years, and Can Your Baby
Hear?-a simple checklist for parents
of the warning signs of heari-ng 10ss in
babies.
HEARING AJLERT! is just one of the
many 'S'ervices that the non-profit Alexander Graham Bell Association provides.
Through its offical journal, The Volta
Rf'liiew, N E:wsounds, the monthly newsletter and the answering of requests for
information and guid,ance, the Association
continues to educate the public on matters of vital concern to the hearing impaired community. "Only through public
recognition of its services through either
written or ora.! responses, can the Bell
Association continue these programs and
publications. If you hear a messag'e, a
note to the congressman and your local
radio station will help support these
campaigns for early detection of hearing
loss." - George W. Fellendorf, Ed. D.,
Executive dir€lCtor, The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc.
North Carolina Expands Services
for Deaf Children
To provide badly needed additional
facilities for the education of hearing
impaired children, the North Carolina
General Assembly in 1971 appropriated
$4,770,000 for a third residential school.
That school is now in operation in
Greensboro. The facility in Raleigh has
been closed. In 1973 the General Assembly appropriated $522,000 for a network
or satellite classes in communities
around the state. There are now 17 such
classes. In 1975 $2,000,000 was appropriated to provide transporation to and
from schools for deaf childre-n.
CAPTIONING OF TV
PROGRAMS
Many people wondered why more
commerical TV stations do not have
captioned programs for the deaf audience. The Publk Broadcasting Service
(PBS) has pointed out that there are
two types 'Of captions: (l) "Open" captions, which appear on all TV screens
whether wanted or not; and (2) 'closed"
captions which are converted to electonic 00des by the broadcaster and in
order w see them, a special decoding
device is needed.
"Open" captions are objected to by
many hearing viewers because they c~m­
sider them a distraction, therefore,
broadcasters and producers are reluctant
to use them.
To institute "closed" capt~oning there
is a need for special equipment to be
dev_loped and tested, low cost decoder
mass-produced and available to the public, and broadcasters must be persuaded
to hire the captioning staff.
The Public Broadcasting Service tested two systems and transmitted 13
clO'sed-captioned TV programs in 1974
to a test audience. PBS had 40 special
decoders in use at 12 experimental test
sites. These deaf viewers reacted favorably to the programs. Over 90 percent
said they could not have understood the
programs without captions and 95 percent wished to own a decoder.
It is the hope of PBS that decoders
will be available to the 20 .milion hearing impaired persons in the United
States within three years. The estimated
cost of a decoder is expected to be
Continued on page 7
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February 1976 •
The Companion
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AT P,OLLARD HALL
TATE HALL NEWS
lVII's. Helen Miller
Mrs. Harriette Yolz
Greetings Everyone! Here we arc into
:l new year and it s('·ems like school has
just started. Time passes so rapidly, must
te because there are so many things hap~
pening at Pollard Hall.
Weare happy to welc·ome two new
students, John and Michelle. Both are
from the same area so they know one
another. John is a day student and Michelle wiII live in Pollard Hall. Debbie and
:YIichelle are roommates and we hope
they will become good f'riends.
Tim's family has moved near-by so
he will not have such a long ride on the
weekends.
Did you see our Gingerbread House?
Father Pouliot brought it for the children. It seems one of his parishioners
had rec·eived it and after showing it to
all the students in their schools asked
what he would suggest doing with it,
thus our students were the recipients.
It was completely edible and truly a
work of art and was a conversation
piece at each meal as the children stopped by the buffet in the dining room to
look and sometimes "snitch' a piece of
candy.
Wally had a "super' birthday, his
friend Jeannie made a bear birthday
~ake for him. He received gifts and the
~raditional spanking and enjoyed every
ninute of it, later he spent a week-end
with his friend Mike.
Eric and Debbie were our other birthday people. They each had a beautifully
decorated cake and gifts also, and enjoyed sharing with their friends. Peter,
Chad and Janice all had special Christmas treats to share-thank you so much.
One Saturday, the students, housemothers and our good friend -Mike spent
an interesting afternoon at Cedar Mall
in Owatonna. They saw Santa Claus and
rec,eived a treat, visited a toy store and
a pet shop, then ate supper before returning to Pollard Hall. Everyone reported a good time including the housemothers.
The fifth year boys and girls have
completed their volleycomb schedule and
are now practicing basketball. They look
forward to these activities and I am
sU:'e they are learning good sportsmanship, which is what it is all about.
Bl'enda, Debbie, Helen, Laura, Tonya,
Cantin/ted on p:LJC ,
6
February 1976 • The Companio!l
It is going to seem like olLl news to
..n
BUZZING AROUND
FRECHETTE
By Edward Yarger
go back to activities before Christmas,
Thanksgiving vacation was enjoyed by
when we are now in the month of Jan- all including the houseparents. The
uary, but such a short time has elapsed weather dIdn't cooperate during the vaca·
si'nce our vacation, it is all I have to
tion so only half the students returned
report at present.
on Sunday after Thanksgiving.
The girls were so busy preparing for
They all settled down to routine work
Christmas, buying and making gifts in but their minds were really on Christmas
the craft room, also making decorations and all were hoping for snow so they
for their rooms. Each day a few new could get their snowmobiles out, Have
things went up until it wa's completed. fun becau;;e when you return we will all
They really do a beautiful job on their have to settle down to the serious busirooms, and especially the bulletin nelss of education, espically to you senboards. Some of the rooms have winter i'ors who have just five months to abs'QTb
scenes that can be left through the cold all the knowledge you can and set your
weather. We had a lot of last minute sights on the goal.
wrapping of boxes to complete. The pIasAll of us in Frechette enjoyed the holiter gifts must be very carefully taken days with family and .friend's.Mrs. Shevcare of, and in spite of cautio'n, we had Un, A-2, spent Thanksgiving with her
several broken gifts. That brings a tear
parents and family members in Detroit.
to the eye of a little one who planned
She reported all is well and the flight
something special for mother.
was beautiful. The rest of us stayed
The Senior Citizens Group were enter- home and stuffed ourselve;;.
tained in the Knight;; of Columbus hall
Christmas shopping is in full swing.
by our Catholic Sign Choir. The girl's Many younger boys are making presents
giving of their time were Bonita Kroll, in art class. Jan Paquette of A_2 has
Sharon Saldana, Martha O'Dell, Diane been taking the boys to the craft room
Le Febvre, Debbie Moeckel, and Sharon and they have really made some beautiRademacher. Local people have been ful gifts.
touched by the beauty of the songs in
Recent birthday parties in Frechette:
sign.
Bruce Crary B-'Unit) brought the cup
On December 6th, those wonderful cakes and ice cream for his unit, Roger
ladies in the kitchen fixed a lunch for Oakland (A-2) treated his friend3 and
everyone for after the movie "Snow Damon Bever (A-i), also shared his
Treasure". We bad dellcious Poor Boy birthday goodies with his group. A letter
Sandwiches, potato chips cookies, carrot want to know what's going on at home
sticks and punch-and enough for sec- and they like to know they are loved.
onds for everyone.
Sports again dominates the scene for
Each area in Tate had their 'separate all age groups - Basketball, Volleyball
Christmas parties on Thursday December and wrestling lead the list.
18th, enjoying food and gifts. They were
Teen Center is held on Tuesdays and
also able to stay up as long as they wish- Thursdays. We have machines that dised since 'School was to be for such a pense pop, candy, and pastry; the seniors
short tiine the following day. Some of sell pizzas and they can be baked in the
the girls said they wei'e going to stay up oven in the commons area. They play
until the crack of dawn, but I guess ping pong, cards, pool, games and have
they wandered off to bed long before lots of conversation.
that. Even the little ones had cake and
Saturd1ay night, Dec. 6th, we had a
punch and got to stay up later.
movie for all the boys and girls in
Mrs. Venero taught some of
the Frechette and Tate. With the help of
South Wing girl;; how to make peanut Tate Hall supervisors and· Frechette
brittle. It was very good and surely did Hall supervisors a very delicious lunch
not last long. I hope they remember was served, consisting of ham, lettuce,
how now. Many of the housemothers tomato, and mayanaise sandwiches, potato chips, chocolate chip cookies and
bring treats for their groups.
All the houseparents on campus got Kool-aid. The party was a success and
together for a Christmas coffee - each everyone had that happy feeling. The
one bringing a sample of their baking houseparents also enjoyed the lunch.
A new boy, Mark Epstein from Duluth,
efforts and we had a beautiful selection
Continned on page 7'
Continued on page 7
Continued from page
~
AT POLLARD HALL
Joyce and Michelle ar,e taking swimming
instruction nmv, such a fun time for alT.
We saw several basketball games before the holidays and plan to attend
more as the season progresses.
The film "Jungle Book" was shown
for us and along with all the "Christmas
Specials" there was much to view in the
evenings, but the hi~h point is still
"Story Hour" with Miss Dement. She
shows slides and interprets the story
and the children lov,e it.
Jamie's Grandmother 'sent money for
another special treat, this time he chose
ice cream to share, so he and I went
downtown and purchased it. Our thanks
to trus gracious lady and to all our parents who share so generously. If any,one
\\'ould care to contribute, we can use
popcorn and oil at this time.
Our nightwatch, Mrs. Schwab, brought
a box of beautifully decorated cookies
with a note "to my other family." All
of us want to say "thank you" again.
Most of the students brought toys
they received for Christmas and are enjoying playing with them.
Everyday that it snows, brings more
excitement. The children can hardly wait
to get out on the playground to slide.
They may not stay out very long, if it
is extremely cold but they are out for
a time, at least.
Mrs. Driessen, one of our housemothers on first floor, is out with an injury.
We hope she will soon be back with us.
We all miss her and wish her a speedy
re~overy.
Plea'se remember to write at le2st
once a week; "Happiness" is a letter
from home.
Continued from page 6
TATE HALL NEWS
of cookies and bars. It is nice to get
together.
With all the activities our girls are
engaged in volleycomb, volleyball,
basketball, teen center, girl scouts
craft room - we almost need a computer
to keep track of who is supposed to be
where. The older girls are hard at work
now practicing basketball after school
and some of the evenings. 'We have an
"A", "B", and "C" team. Our grade
school sports are co-ed this year, and
we play against teams with boys on
them too, so it is very different. VI' e
haven't won many games, but we are
having fun. 'Almost all of the girls are
involved.
We celebrated three birthdays, two
in November and one in Decembel'
Stacy Hinz, Lisa Ernst and Joy Cady
are now one year older. Debra Huncha
had a birthday January 3rd and brought
pizza for her class.
Vle have an air hockey game in Tate
Hall and it is making the rounds of the
dorms. It is very heavy and difficult to
move, so the men tell me, so it stays in
one dorm for a long time. It is a fun
game and all girls al'e enjoying it, even
the housemothers get a chance to play at
times.
The parents of all of the students have
been saving Campbell soup labels, and
other type of coupons. We have filled
several barrels with mostly the labels,
and we are hoping at the final count
there is sufficient to get the item we
were working toward. At present time,
I have no idea what it is, but I am sure
we will be informed. I wanted to make a
point of thanking everyone for religiously saving their coupons, and bringing them to the different dorms. The
first floor girls worked very hard getting the coupons' clipped and counted.
You never saw such busy little angels.
Joy Cady furnished a popcorn treat for
them.
Before Christmas the South Dakota
School for the Deaf came to visit us
bringing their basketball team and
cheerleaders. We house the cheerleaders
in Tate Hall and the boys are housed in
Frechette Hall.
We had a party with
food and dancing in the Commons area
in Frechette. On January 10th, the
Wisconsin School for the Deaf came to
Faribault with their wrestling team
and cheerleaders. We had the 'same arrangement, food and movie this time.
There is a lot of interest in the wrest_
ling matches, wrestling being comparatively new for us. The students are
eager to go to the matches and watch
very attentively.
VIr e are going to lose one of our deaf
hous-eparents to the school department.
She is Paula Mathews who is -so' good
with the girls, always willing to do more
than just her job all the time for the
welfare of the deaf. Weare going to
miss her, but thankful she is not going
any further than the school.
We wish to thank the Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary No. 20 for their
check of $10.00 to buy treats for the
giJ'ls in Tate Hall. We are using it to buy'
some packaged mixes that can be done
up by the girls themsdves.
Continued from page 6
FRECHETTE HALL NEWS
joined our group in B Unit. Mark knew
the other boys from Duluth who arrived
earlier. :Mark is interested in sports and
hopes to get started in baJsketball.
A-I and A-2 really have the Christmas
look, tree and all. Two trees were put up
and decorated in the common,;; but I
guess some of our boyls don't believe ill
Santa Claus and dismantled them a little
earl~·.
Two new supervisors have joined
Frechette: Ernst Graf was born in Trogen, Switerzland and attended school
there. He received his B.A. degree from
Trogen College in chemistry and physics.
While on vacation in Rome, Italy he met
a girl from Faribault, Jan Caron, who is
now Mrs. Graf. Ernst works in B Unit
and also other unit when needed. He is
in charge of activities in the commons
area and supervises teen center. He came
to Faribault in 1974 and worked at the
State School and Hospital. He also attended Mankato State and has an M.S.
degree in languages. Mr. Graf's hobbies
are reading, travel and he likes to study.
He want to continue his studies at the
University of Minnesota and is interested in medicine and biochemistry
Ernst's parents and an 18 year old sister
live in Switzerland. ,His sister plans to
visit him next summer.
Bruce Kramer is a graduate of B.A. in
Faribault and studied 2 years at
Mankato State and St. Cloud. Bruce is
very interested in sports and as this is
an important part of his duties, he is
well qualified. His hobbies are skiing
and softball. Mr. Kramer has always
lived in Faribault with his parents but
at present is looking for an apartment.
Bruce is active in the Department of
Natural Resources and is a work shop
leader for orienteering federation. He
does map and compass work in wilderness areas. He has conducted a training
program and 2 workshops and hopes to
get some student involvement later in
field work. This would be very interesting and educational for our students.
A Merry Christmas and a Happy New
Year to all employees, students, teachers and par,ents from all of us at Frechette Hall for "1976".
Continued from page 5
TV PROGRAMS
minimal. PBS will build a captioning
e,enter, with trained staff, as a model
for the broadcasting industry.
We believe that Senator Charles Per('y
of Illinois is correct in saying, 'The new
system has the potential to achieve
w:despread use and to diminish greatly
the communication gap that affects one
out of every ten Americans."
.
February 1976 • The Companion
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Class 10-4 Holds a Snow Contest
On Monda,y Nov. 17, we decided to
have a second snowfall contc<";. Mr.
Rohm made the paper to put the guesses
on. We ,asked each teache·r and student
to guess the day and time the snow
would start.
Kathy took the paper to Mrs.
Sturmer, Mrs. Terrasi and Miss Dingman. Dori took the paper to Mr. Freund
and Mr. Sandberg. Cliff took the paper
to Mr. Moon, 'Mrs. Sandberg, Mr. Bonheyo, Mr. Potter and Mr. Carlson. Karen
took the paper to Miss Loomis, Miss Cole
aJ1d Mr. Singer.
Three classes did not answer before
the next snow fall. They were classes
10-2, 11-1, and 12-3.
When the papers were returned, we
put the guesses in a notebook under the
right day. Seven people picked Nov.
20th.
It started to snow at lOam on Nov.
20th, Here are the picks in order for the
Nov. 20th.
Miss Dingman
2am
Mr. Moon
3am
Sluzy Viktora
3pm
Cindy Lozenski
4 :30pm
Cindy Wiiliamson
5pm
nebra Christian.son
6 :30pm
JoAnn Erickson
10pm
The wi'nner is Suzy Viktora who missed by 5 hours. SeclOnd place goes to
Cindy Lozenski who missed by 6Vz
hours. There was a tie for third place
between Mr. Moon and Cindy Williamson. They missed by 7 hours.
In Faxibault, we .sot about 2-3 inches
of snow. Some pari:.::; of Minnesota got a
lot more. Minneapolis got about 6 inches.
Albert Lea got about 1-2 inches. Duluth
got 10 inches.
Many public school::; were closed earlyMSD stayed open. It looks like winter is
finally here. The high temperature today
was only 30 degrees.
Haunted House
By the Stud:ents
Miss' K'eszler's eighth grade cla.5s decided to make a haunted house in room
204 in Noyes Hall. First we made spider
webs usirlg string. Nan made black
pa.per spiders for the webs. Then we put
newspapers on the windows to make the
room dark. We tore newspaper and
threw it on the floor. We put newspapers on the walls to look like old wallpaper.
8
_
February 1976 • The Companion
N an was a witch. She showed the
other classes where to go. She W3S the
leader. She explained what was happening.
In the closet we had a yellow lightbulb.
Diane turned the light on and off and
banged on the top of the cabinet in the
closet. Roger stood in the dark closet
with a rope around his neck. Some people ,came in thp dark closet. He grabbed
some people. He made the other people
scarfd. His fac,e, neck and feet had red
lipstick on to look like blood.
Joey was a vampire. He scared other
people. He drank blood and bit Mary in
the neck. He ran around the room. He
slept in the coffin on the table.
Mary lay on the floor. She was bleeding from her storr.ach and neck. She
grabbed people's; feet when they walked
by her.
Carolyn was a monster. She stamped
out her hiding place and raised her
false arms to scare the people, but the
witch told her to go back to her hiding
pla.ce.
We made a man with no hea.d. We
stuffed newspaper in clothes and put
them on a chair. Then we hung a hat
from the ceiling. The man was reading
the newspaper. Our cla,5s enjoyed scaring people.
Carolyn Mielke
Joey Maxson
Roger Oakland
Diana Fulton
Nanette Richard
Mary Hess
FIELD TRIP NEWS
Dick Jones, IDS Representative in Faribault, gave us free tickets to visit the
IDS Observation Tower. We ate our
sa~k lunch at the top of the IDS building
on the 51st floor. We sat at tables next
to the windows. It took us a long time
to eat lunch because we kept looking out
to the windows>. It took us a long time
very small when we looked down.
We went back to Dayton's and looked
at all the Christmas toys and decorations. We saw many things that we liked.
\Ve were very tired when we got home.
On Tuesday, December 9, our class,
Randy Ambuehl, Brad Augustin, Andy
Brekke, Laura Lang, Dale Manteufel,
and Telly Schulz, went to IMinneapolis
with our teachers, Mrs. Petersen, Mrs.
Maday, and Miss Debbie Johnson, our
student teacher.
We had a fun time! First we went to
Dayton's Christmas Show. .Jt was very
pretty. We saw Santa Clam;! Thel'e were
many other Hoys and girls there too.
Then we went to the IDS building. Mr.
NEWS
By Brenda Cook. Grade -t
Last Friday I went home. I ate hamburger and french fries and drank some
coke. Lana, Peggy, Paula, Penny and I
went out for "trick or treat." I have
much candy.
Lane, Janice, Penny, Terry and I
went to the Ha.unted House. I was
afraid of the mummy and the other
monsters. _\ boy pushed Terry and the
wolfman caught her. Then I went home.
I watched T.V. "Scream, Dracula,
Scream." I saw a vampire kill many women. I ate some ice cream and some
candy. 1 went to bed at 12:30.
Saturday morning 1 woke up at 9:45.
Then my aunt and grandma came to my
house.
!Saturday afternoon Paula, Lana,
Peggy, Penny and 1 went roller skating.
Then we walked in the field. 1 ran and
fell. Lana pushed me. 1 fell in the mud.
My overalls were dirty. We walked on
the railroad tracks. 1 arrived home. 1 ate
some supper. 1 watched "The Absent
Minded Professor." 1 ate some popcorn
and went to the basement. 1 went to bed
at 11:30.
Sunday moming 1 ate some breakfast
Sundayaftel'l1oon 1 watched football.
The Vikings won. The score was 28 to
17.1 was happy.
Monday afternoon 1 went to Pollard
Hall.
She said, OK. She showed me how.
Ron and his friends went hunting.
Each one shot seven rabbits. There were
twenty one rabbits altogether.
Wednesday noon 'Dan and '1 rode on
a snowmobile. Chris, Ann and Paul rode
on the toboggan. Then Dan taught mp.
how to drive up and down the hill. I
praetic,ed driving up and down the hill.
Monday night Mother, Father, Chris
and 1 went to the movie, "The Other
Side Of The Mountain". It was a true
story. It was about a girl who was going
to the American Olympics. She skied
and fell down the hilL She went to the
hospital. Later her boyfriend took her
out of the hospital to get her to help
herself. Later her boyfriend died in an
airplane crash. Her family cried. It was
a very good movie.
THE SPILLED MILK
MERRY CHRISTMAS
(Written from a picture)
Scott Norby - Grade 4
The boy is named John. John dropped
the milk on the floor. John said "Oh!"
Mother was cross with John. Maybe
John cried. John felt sad because Mother
was cross. John's clothes got wet. John
was sorry'. Mother said "OK."
WINTER CAMPFIRE
Timmy Braam -
5th Grade
Some animals were cold and made a.
ca.mpfire. They brought food to eat. It
was snowing so they made a big fire.
The dog and the mous,e cooked some hot
dogs for the other animals. The mouse
put some hot dogs on a fork. The baby
kangaroo put some marshmallows on a
fork. The bird ate some marshmallows.
Tne panda tried to keep his paws ;warm.
One bird 'S'at down on the giraffe's head,
but the other bi,rd stole the marshmallows.
The tig,er smelled some hot dogs. The
lion and the S'heep waited for food to eat.
CHRISTMAS VACATION
Francis Steff] -
7th Grade
On Friday, December 19, my Mom and
Father picked me up and we went to
Minneapolis. We stopped at Uncle John's
Restaurant. 1 ate three pancakes and
one egg. Then my Moth2r went to
Dayton's. My Father and 1 went to the
doctor for a checkup. We arrived home
at 7:30. It was surprising that 1 had
two big presents for me.
Saturday, December 20, Ron, Pat and
I watched the Vikings football g'ame on
T.V. Chuck Foreman made four touchdowns. The Vikings won 35 to 13.
Tuesday morning 1 asked my Mom if
1 could learn to make scrambled eggs,
Frank Hawk - Grade 4
Original Language (corrected)
(written from a picture)
A family is coming to Grandma and
Grandpa's house. Grandma and Grandpa are happy because the family is
coming. The boy's 'name is Mike. The
girl's name is Jane. Daddy is holding
some proese-nts in the brown bag. M'Jther
likes Grandma_ Mother and Daddy are
visiting at Grandma and Grandpa's.
Mike and Jane will open some presents.
WINTER CAMPFIRE
Laura Schoenbauer -
5th Grade
Some a.nimals were cold. The animali:l
wae a lion, a giraffe, a dog, a mouse, a
panda, a kangaroo, a sheep, a tiger, and a
bird. They made a big fire to keep warm.
The dog bl'ought hot dog for all to eat.
The kaJlgaroo brought marshmallows.
All the animals were hung'1'Y.
They ,could not wait for the good food.
The sheep and the giraffe waited and
waited for the food. The pa'nda kept his
paws warm while he waited for his food.
The mouse help'ed the dog ~ook the hot·
dogs.
NEWS
Brenda Cook
Grade 4.
After school 1 went to Pollard Hall.
changed my clothes.
1 ate two cookies and went outside. I
played with Evel Kniev:el motorcycle.
Mike and 1 played tag. Then 1 played
on the monkey bars. I went in to Pollard Hall. I waahed my face and hands.
I watched "Flintstones" on T.V. after
supper 1 brushed my teeth and put on
my pajamas. 1 watched "The Police
Story.' 1 ate one cookie. Then 1 went
to bed.
This morning 1 changed my sheets. 1
put on my 'school dresa. 1 ate some
breakfast. iI ate some cereal, scrambled
eggs, toast and drank some milk.
We will go to the library this after_
noon.
NEWS
Mark :3anow, Grade 2
Peter w~nt to the infirmary this morning. He came late to school again. He
got some medicine.
Miss Ashcra.ft came to help us with
project LIFE. Russ was first.
We will go to the library after lunch
this afternoon. We will say, "Happy
New Year" to Mrs. Kruger. We will get
different books.
We will go to church school thia afternoon. This will be for the first time in
the new year, 1976.
We played outside for a short time
after school yesterday. We coasted down
the hill on our sJ.eds. We watched a
circus on T.V. Then we took a shower,
ate supper and put on our warm pajamas. We watched T.V. We saw The
Litte Howse on the Prairie. We ate a yellow apple. It was g00d.
Yesterday, aiter ILnch, two men came
to paint the hall in school. It is a light
green color now. They are painting
ag'ain this morning. We clan smell the
new paint.
CHRISTMAS VACATION
By Stacy Hinz, 7th Grade
On December 24 we went to the
Christmas program in church. 1 signed
for the people. When it was finished, we
looked for David. Dad and I couldn't find
him. He was in the car. We went home.
We waited for Grandpa and Grandma to
come to our house.
Finally they came. We started to open
the presents. I got Lite Brite, Tumble
Stones, a ring, a bracelet and a camera.
We played and had fun.
On December 25 we went to Grandma
Rolla's house. 1 got a shirt and a manicure set. We played a game called Tag.
About 11 :30 we went home.
On December 30 we went to Grandma
Hinz's house. Lori and David got two
presents. Avis and Fry gave me $25.00.
1 will save it for college.
On December 31 we went ke skating,
but there was snow covering the- ice. We
threw the snow off the ice. We didn't
finish but we will next time. We played
and played. Then we went to Grandma
ContinU6·d
on lJUge
February 1976 • The Companion
10
9
Cont'inued from page 9
Hinz's house again. Avis, Fry, Chrissy,
Kurt, and Eric were there. Gr3Jldpa and
Grandma Hinz gave me a present. I
playe'd outside with the kids. It was fun.
I bti'mped the car, but I did not get hurt.
Whe'n we drove'home, we saw 13 deer. I
saw two fawns. Father and Mother deer
were eating hay.
WIN'(ER CAMPFIRE
Lisa Ernst -
5th Grade
The lion, giraffe, dJog, mop'Oe, panda,
sheep, tiger, and birds made a
fi're. It was :snowing and it was cold:
Some animals brought food. The dog
brought some hot dogs. The mother kangaroo brought some marshmallows and
the baby kangaroo cooked marshmallows.
Soon all the animals had some food.
and were happy.
~angaroo,
NEWS
Debbie Demmer -
Grade 4
After school I changed clothes. I put
on my pants and shirt for play. I got
some candy and I played outside. I sat
on the swing fast. Peter kicked my. leg.
This morning my ear hurt because my
hearing aid made much noise. Jimmy
fell. His hearing aid fell on the grass.
Russ found and put on his hearing aid.
Jimmy went to the hospital. Scott,
Brenda and Frank are coloring in books.
I'm waiting f,or Helen Huncha.
After while I will color in a book.
Thank you for my paper to write. I
am finished writing. I will drink some
water.
Original LauJuage from a Picture
THE TWO BOYS
Jimmy O'Malley -
Grade 4
I saw a mother and two boys. Mother
said, "Clean up, boys.' One boy felt cross
and not happy. The other boy said, "Shut
up!" to his brother. Two boys' room
was messy. The one boy did not feel
funny. Mother cleaned up every day.
The hays did not have fun now. Mother
said, "Oh boys, stop it!"
CHRISTMAS
Daniel Bahl
During vacation we wa.tched the Vikings on T.V. The Vikings lost. The referee got hit in the head. Sozpeone threw
a bott1e at the referee. I was sad because
the Vikings lost. Tal'kenton's father
died. He had a heart attack.
I helped Doug aJld Ann. They moved
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February 197fl • The Compaion
Please Read this . . .
CHAPTER 337-H.F. NO. 67
An act relating to handicapped persons; providing an interpreter in
aU proceedings.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE O~ THE STATE OF MINNESOTA:
Section 1. [546;42] HANDICAPPED PERSONS: INTERPRETERS.
For the purposes of sections 1 to 3 a handicapped person is one who because of a hearing, speech or other communication disorder, or because
of the inability to speak or comprehend the English language, is unable
to understand the proceedings in which he is required to participate, or
when named as a party to a legal proceeding, is unable by reason of such
deficiency to obtain due process of law.
Sec. 2. [546.43] PROCEEDING WHERE INTERPRETER AP·
POINTED. Subdivision 1. In a civil action in which a handicapped person is a litigant or witness, the presiding judicial officer shall appoint
.
a qualified interpreter to serve throughout the proceedings.
Subd.,2. In a proceeding before a board,. commission. agency, or licensing authority of the state, or of a political subdivision of the state,
where a witness or the principal party in interest is a handicapped person, all of the proceedings that are pertinent shall be interpreted in a
language the handicapped pe~'son understands by a qualified interpreter
appointed by the board, commission agency, or licensing authority.
Sec. 3. [546.44] QUALIFIED INTERPRETER. Subdivision 1. No
person shall be appointed as a qualified interpreter pursuant to sections
1 to 3 unless he is readily able to communicate with the handicapped person, translate the proceedings for him, and accurately repeat and translate the statements of the handicapped person to the officials before
whom the proceeding is taking place.
Subd. 2. A qualified interpreter appointed pursuant to the provisions
of sections 1 to 3, before entering upon his duties shall take an oath that
he will, to the best of his skill and judgment, make a true interpretation
to the handicapped person being examined of all the proceedings, in a
language which the person understands. and that he will repeat in the
English language the statements of the handicapped person to the court
or other official before whom the proceeding is taki..'1g place.
Subd. 3. The fees and expenses of a qualified interpreter shall be
determined by the presiding official and paid by the court, board, commission, agency or licensing authority before whom the proceeding is
taking place.
Approved June 5, 1975.
..................................................~
to Maplewood. I helped them carry
things. Doug gave me some money.
Then we WEnt out to eat. I ate a "Pig
in a blanket".
On Christmas day Julie and Randy
came to my house. We had ma.ny presents under the Christmas tree. We
opened the gifts. I got many clothes, a
model car,snow boots, and a Viking
Shirt.
On Friday morning', January 2, I went
sking. I was so cold, I went in the house
and wa.':;ched T.V.
Eaturday morning we went up to
Appleton. It was storming in Appleton.
•••
•
or.....
I saw my Grandma and Grandpa. We
slept there OVErnight.
CHRISTMAS VACATION
Julie Hanno'n - Grade 6
We
We
We
We
went ice skating.
went sledding.
tode on a snowmobile.
made a Santa Claus
NEWS
Jamie Torgerson -
Grade 3
We wat~hed Inside Out on T.V. in
Pollard Hall resterda¥. We went to Gym
Class with Mrs. Maday. Joyce wrote on
the blackboard in Pollard Hall after
school.
Today is Tue'sday. Timmy has some
new bl-own and tan shoes.
Miss Johnson came to visit in o'ur
room. She will stay all week.
Tomorrow we will g{) to Assembly.
Maybe we will playa game.
intenruent of the Minnesota School for
the Deaf. Rec,eived her B.A. from the
University of~ Minnesota in 1908, her
Ph.D. from Columbia in 1912. She taught
at the Minnesota School three different
times between 1911-1922 for a total of 7
years, She then taught at the Illinois
School for the Deaf until she retired in
1956. She married G<>rdon Munro in 1956
and moved- to California.
NEWS
She is survived by her husband,
Gordon Mumo and a brother I. Nesbitt
Tate, Pittsburg, pennsylvania. There
m~y be a memorial service in the spring
in Faribault.
Tate Hall and Tate Field ((football
field) on the Minnesota School for the
Deaf campus are named after her father, James N. Tate. In 1970 Mrs. Munro
in memory of her father donatej the
mon-ey for the scoreboard and bleachers
for the ~linne::ota School for the Deaf'.
Keith Wiemelt -
Grade 5
Wednesday morning we went to a
Thanksgiving program, and we gave
mo'ney for C.A.R.E. Then I went home.
We had a Thanksgiving dinner on
Thursday. My aunt, mcle, and cousins
came to my house.
I played outside with Glenn on Friday.
We went slidi'ng It 'was fun.
O'n Saturday we went swimming in
Faribault at the Western Motel. Our
relativ,es stayed there and invite::! 0103 to
the pool. We had a nice time.
I wa.tehed T,V. on Sunday.
Where Am I?
.-O~.)O:JO)t:Q~)O:J~~~)O:JQJ"
J-oey Maxson
Randolp,h Cagers Trip MSD 76-53
The skunk went to another place. Some
people smelled the skunk. The doctor
picked up the skunk and threw it on the
ground. The do~tor heard the skunk say,
"Ouch." The skunk heard the doctor
laugh, and the doctor saw the skunk run
away.
Poor shooting and turnover'S were
costly to the Minnesota School f.or the
Deaf TTojans again last night as they
fell to Randolph 76-53 in a Centennial
Conference basketball game.
The Trojans hit the nets at a low 33
per cent rate, and suffer:ed from 27
turnovers as they dropped their fifth
game in eight outings. The win kept
Randolph in a tie for the Centennial
conference lead witb a 4-1 record.
Randolph sur,ged to a 13-0 lead and
held a 15-2 advantage after the first
eight minute'S'. The Trojans closed the
gap to 25-19 in the second quarter, but
Randolph scored 10 of the final 11 points
of the half to regain command.
Randolph then scored the first seven
noints of the second half to insure theIr
;eventh win again'st four losses for the
season. Their 46-B3 rebound advantage
was a primary reason for winning last
night.
MSD's Scott Kuehn led all scorers
with 15 points and grabb2d 12 rebounds,
while teammate Guy John'son c,ontributect
11 points. Trojan coach Ron Mitche:l
cl'edited Kuehn's brother Pat with playing a fine all-round game ill a reserve
role.
Randolph placed five players in double
figures, paced by Randy Evenson with
12 po.ints.
Where Am I?
Carolyn Mielke
I saw a woman fall down on the ic;e.
I heard the woman say, "Help." The woman fell down on the sidewalk. I am a
Girl Scout.
Superintendent at Braille School
As many of the parents heard at our
recent holiday programs, Mr. Brasel
has been appointed Superintendent of
the Minnesota Braille and Sight Saving
School, in additio'D to his position as our
own MSD Superintendent.
DEATH
Mrs, Elizabeth (Tate) Munro passed
away in Laguna Beach, California, January 9, 1076. She was born March 5,
18137 at the School for the Deaf in Fulton, Missouri, where her father was 'superintendent. She mOv:ed to Faribault
in 1896 when her father became super-
MSD Five Whips Baptist
The Minnesota ,school for the Deaf
put together four good quarters of bas-
ketball to defeat Rosemount Baptist 6648 in a Cent:mnial Conference game.
The two teams battled it out on even
terms throughout the first half. which
ended with MSD in front 33-30. But the
Trojans came out of the lo'eker room
fired up and poured it to their guests in
the third quarter.
With MSD leading 35-32, the Trojans
scored 11 unanswel-ed points to open a
46-32 advantag,e, and Baptist didn't
threaten after that.
Sophomore guard Scott Kuehn was
the difference as he scored 20 points and
pulled down 23 r;ebounds. He had s-upport from Guy Johnson with 15 ani
Doug Marquardt with 13. Marquardt
also had 10 rebounds, and according to
MSDCoach Ron Mitchell, provided the
leadership on the court that the Trojans
have been looking for.
The Trojans had their best 'shooting
night of the season (42 per cent), but
again turnovers hurt as they committed
29 violations. But they were also able to
capitalize on Baptist's mistakes.
"Rosemount didn't shoot well in the
second half, but I would like to think
it was our defense that helped hold them
down," commented Mitchell. "The boys
really came out of the dressing room
fired up, and I am sure that was the
difference."
Darrell :Murphy scored 16 points to
lead the Rosemount delegation, but he
was also whilstled for five personal fouls
and a pair of technicals. Teammate Rick
Johnson added 12 points.
Randolph Defeats MSD Girls
RANDOLPH - MSD's best effort of
the season wasn't quite good enough to
defeat Randolph Tuesday in a girl's
Centennial Conferenc-e basketball game.
Randolph took an early 9-4 lead and held
on for a 43-33 victory.
-Shereoe Fairbanks and Margie Crowley
had outstanding games for the 1r,ojans
to keep their team in competition. Fairbanks puleed down 18 rebounds, while
Cwwley provided most of the offense
with 17 points. Denise Otterson added
10 points to the .MSD cause.
oMSD battled back and pulled to within three points of the Rockets at 19-16,
but Randolph answered with the next
seven points. The Trojans ran into problems when they could not hit their free
throws, while getting into foul trouble
themselves. They had to play the final
quarter with three young B squad girls,
who all held their own in a reser've role.
Continued on Pag_e_ 12
February 1976 • The Companion
11
Continued ITom page 9
Hinz's house again. Avis, Fry, Chrissy,
Kurt, and Eric were there. Grapdpa and
Grandma Hinz gave me a present. I
playe'd outside with the kids. It was fun.
I bu'fUped the car, but I did pOt get hurt.
When we drove'home, we saw 13 deer. I
saw two fawns. Father and Mother deer
were eating hay.
WIN~ER CAMPFIRE
Lisa Ernst - 5th Grade
The lion, giraffe, dlog, mot'se, panda,
kiangaroo, sheep, tiger, and birds made a
fire. It was 'S'!1owing and it was cold:
Some animals brought food. The dog
brought some hot dogs. The mother kangaroo brolught some marshrruallows and
the baby kaIllgaroo cooked marshmallows.
Soon all the animals had some food.
and were happy.
NEWS
Debhie Demmer -
Grade 4
After school I changed clothes. r put
on my pants and shirt for play. I got
some candy and I played outside. I sat
on the swing fast. Peter kicked my. leg.
This morning my ear hurt because my
hearing aid made much noise. Jimmy
fell. His hearing aid fell on the grass.
Russ found and put on his hearing aid.
Jimmy went to the hospital. SCott,
Brenda and Frank are coloring in books.
I'm waiting for Helen Huncha.
AfteT while I will color in a book.
Thank you for my paper to write. I
am finished writing. I will drink some
water.
Original LanJuage from a Picture
THE TWO BOYS
Jimmy O'Malley -
Grade 4
I saw a mother and two boys. Mother
said, "Clean up, boys.' One boy felt cross
and not happy. The other boy said, "Shut
up!" to his brother. Two boys' room
WafS messy. The one boy did not feel
funny. Mother cleaned up every day.
The b'oys did not have fun now. Mother
said, "Oh boys, stop it!"
CHRISTMAS
Daniel Bahl
During vacation we wa.tched the Vikings on T,V. The Vikings lost. The referee got hit in the head. SOlpeone threw
~ bott1e at the referee. I was sad because
the Vikings lost. Tarkenton's father
died. He had a heart attack.
I helped Doug alld Ann. They moved
.................,.--
10
-.-
.
February 1971) • The Compaion
Please Read this .
• •
CHAPTER 337-H.F. NO. 67
An act relating to handicapped persons; providing an interpreter in
aU proceedings.
BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE
NESOTA:
O~
THE STATE OF MIN-
Section 1. [546;42] HANDICAPPED PERSONS: INTERPRETERS.
For the purposes of sections 1 to 3 a handicapped pel'son is one who because of a hearing, speech or other communication disorder, or because
of the inability to speak or comprehend the English language, is unable
to understand the proceedings in which he is required to participate, or
when named as a party to a legal proceeding, is unable by reason of such
deficiency to obtain due process of law.
Sec. 2. [546.43] PROCEEDING WHERE INTERPRETER AP·
POINTED. Subdivision 1. In a civil action in which a handicapped person is a litigant or witness, the presiding judicial officer shall appoint
a qualified interpreter to serve throughout the proceedings.
Subd. 2. In a proceeding before a board,. commission. agency, or licensing authority of the state, or of a political subdivision of the state,
where a witness or the principal party in interest is a handicapped person, all of the proceedings that are pertinent shall be interpreted in a
language the handicapped pel"SOn understands by a qualified interpreter
appointed by the board, commission agency, or licensing authority.
Sec. 3. [546.44] QUALIFIED INTERPRETER. Subdivision 1. No
person shall be appointed as a qualified interpreter pursuant to sections
1 to 3 unless he is readily able to communicate with the handicapped person, translate the proceedings for him, and accurately repeat and translate the statements of the handicapped person to the officials before
whom the proceeding is taking place.
Subd. 2. A qualified interpreter appointed pm'suant to the provisions
of sections 1 to 3, before entering upon his duties shall take an oath that
he will, to the best of his skill and judgmen~, make a true interpretation
to the handicapped person being examined of all the proceedings, in a
language which the person understands. and that he will repeat in the
English language the statements of the handicapped person to the court
or other official before whom the proceeding is taking place.
Subd. 3. The fees and expenses of a qualified interpreter shall be
determined by the presiding official and paid by the court, board, commission, agency or licensing authority before whom the proceeding is
taking place.
Approved June 5, 1975.
to Maplewood. I helped them carry
things. Doug gave me some money.
Then we WEnt out to eat. I ate a "Pig
in a blanket".
On Christmas day Julie and Randy
came to my house. We had ma.ny presents ,under the Christmas tree. We
opened the gifts. I got many clothes, a
model car, 'snow boots, and a Viking
Shirt.
On Friday morning, January 2, I went
sking. I was so cold, I went in the house
and wa,:ched T.V.
Eaturday morning we went up to
Appleton. It was storming in Appleton.
I saw my Grandma and Grandpa. We
slept there OVErnight.
CHRISTMAS VACATION
Julie Hanno'n - Grade 6
We
We
We
We
went ice skating.
went sledding.
tode on a snowmobile.
made a Santa Claus
NEWS
Jamie Torgerson -
Grade 3
We wat3hed Inside Out on T.Y. in
PQllard Hall ¥esterday. We went to Gym
Continued from page 11
Wisconsin ToPiS MSD Matmen
MSD Girls Bow To Mazeppa
Five 32-28
Minnesota School for the Deaf won
four Qf the fiVll~ final matches Saturday,
but bowed to visiting Wisconsin School
for the Deaf 33-30 in a non-eonference
match.
Trailing 27-15, pins by Bobby Breitbach and, Dan Smith tied the CQntest at
27-27 with just two matches remaining.
But at 180, Robin Ladd earned a second
period fall for WSD to put his team on
top 33-27.
MSD heavyweight Paul Oakes needed
a pin at heavyweight to give the Trojans
a tie, but had to settle for a 3-1 decision
Andy Bonheyo and Gary Ettel also
earned falls for the Trojans, while Gerry
Wassenaar picked up a wild 14-12 decision.
A strong second half by the Minnesota
School for '~he Deaf was not quite
enough to overcome Mazeppa in a gir13'
Centennial' Conference basketball game.
The Trojans scored the final eight points
of the game, but bowed to the Indians
32-28.
'We are getting closer," said MSD
coach Linda Gunderson. "The kids came
back really cold after vacation, but they
are starting to improve on their fundamentals and make fewer mistakes. We
had: a really poor fh1st half as the girls
just stood around like they were lost.
But they came back in the second half
and hustled and did a good job on the
boards.'
Mazeppa led 12-2 at the quarter and
22-10 at halftime. MSD outs00red the
visitQrs 18-10 after halftime.
Tri scored 12 points and Ridgeway 10
for the Indians. Margie Crowley led the
Trojans with 10 points, while teammates
Sheree Fairbanks pulled down 12 rebounds. The TrQjans, shot 25 per cent
from the floor.
The Trojans will host rival Morristown Friday at 3:45 p.m. Last time the
two teams m'et, Morristown claimed
victories in both
the A and B squad
games
MSD's B squad picked up its second
win of the season yesterday 13-12 behind 8 points from Crowley who played
only two quarters.
MSD Girls Nipped By Claremont
The Minnesota School for the Deaf
girls came within reach of a victory last
night, but fell short again as Claremont
took home a 32-29 decision.
The TrojanB held a 29-28 fourth quarter lead, but the Parrots scored the final
four points of the game.
"We're almost there, and I look for
a win in our next game," said MSD
coach Linda Gunderson. "The girls played so well again and I couldn't be happier, except that I'd like to see them win
for their own sakes."
The MSD scoring was led by Margie
Crowley with 11, and Bonita Kroll and
Diane LeFebvre with 6 each. LeFebvre
pulled down 18 rebounds and Sheree
Fairbanks followed with 13. Fairbanks
fouled out in the foudh quarter.
The Trojans will he seeking to join
the win column Monday when they play
Wat'erville.
CROSS COUNTRY RACE
By Allen Matejka
This story will be about my brother,
Paul Matejka, and his racing.
Last year he bought a 1975 John
Deere 340/S a'nd in a few weeks he
signed up for the North Dakota Governor's Trophy Race. It was 110 miles long.
It was his first race. He left at the starting line neax Minot. In about 30 miles
or so, (I can't remember) his machine
stopped and wouldn't run anymore. So
he gave up. He couldn't find anything
wrong with it. So he came home. He and
his friend fixed it and found that some
kind of wire was disco'nnected.
Before the Winnipeg to St. Paul race
Paul took his machine over to my other
'brother's farm to recheck it, by taking
it apart. They took everything off and
replaced it again. It worked the same.
As they got to Winnipeg, there were
several other racers, too. They had some
tests on many things before ~ they raced.
On January 2{), they had 33 racers in
1 grolllp on the starting line for the race.
There were many groups of starters.
Paul was in the third group. They left
Winnipeg and were heading for East
Grand Forks. Some broke down and
crashed at the starting line. One man WRESTLING MAT FUND
broke his leg at that goo'ne. All racers
Balance from the last issue $2,770.01
were off on their way to St. Paul for
$15.00
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Norling
$36,000 prize.
$5.00
Leo
Latz
As Paul was 70-80 miles south of
$10.00
Winnipeg, he was on the 'fast track at Mr. and Mrs. John Mathews
$20.00
about 55 mph. He accidentally went over .Mr. and Mrs. Fred Benedix
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Art
Petersen
a bump and fell off. As they both, (the
'$15.00
machine and Paul) came to a stop, the and Ivan Sass
$25.00
Mr. and Mil'S. Arnold' Crary
machine didn't shut off, with the tither
$20.00
Mtr. and Mrs. Orville Polzin
emergenc'Y switch. The machine was on
25.00
Int. Catholic of Deaf Ass'n
its side, running. Paul got up and ran
to it. He left again. On the same track
2,905.01
tI"
12
February 1976 • The Companion
after about 5-10 miles, he ran over a
rQCk and rolled over all the way down
the track. His John Deere was lying
dead with a jammed clutch and motor.
That was the end of his first race: Now
hI:! had to wait for his pit crewmen, my
bIlother, Loren and his friend, Jim
Adamson to come after him. The pit
crewmen couldn't lEave until after two
hours after the. racers left.
As they came and found Paul, they
loaded the machine into the trailer.
Then they came home.
Another year came and Paul traded
his 340/s into a 1976 John Deere Liquidator. He sold all of his little pigs averaging 55 pounds for one dollar or
more a pound. He l.ept the sows and he
now has only small chores to do in the
winter time.
Then he a.ttended all ntne cross coun·
try races. The first race will be on
December 19 and 20. I have a list of the
races below:
North Dakota Governor's Trophy Race
250 miles - Dec. 19 and 20 1975
Balsam Lake Classic
250 miles - Dec. 28, 1975
South Dakota Governor's Cup
250 miles - Jan. 10 and 11, 1976
Winnipeg to St. Paul 500
500 miles - Jan. 19 and 21, 1976
Dairyland 100
180 miles - Jan. 31, 1976
Regina-Minot International 250
250 miles - Feb. 6 and 7, 1976
Eagles Heartland "Grand Prix"
200 miles - Feb. 14, 1976
Mille Lacs Lake 300
300 miles - Feb. 21 and 22, 1976
Iowa Great Lakes 300
300 miles - Feb. 28 - Mar. 1 1976
This is the list of races he has to
finish. But I think he will miss 1 or 2
rai~es if he gets his machine in bad
shape after one race. Then he will have
it fixed in time for another race. If it
isn't too late, I don't know what will
happen.
GOOD LUCK, PAUL MATEJKA! !
..,.J'.
~
Easter Vacation April 15-19
Needed $50.00 to complete
This Project Will You Help?
MINNESOTA SCHOOL 1"OB THE DEAF
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE
INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA
Audio-Visual AU.
LIBRARY
Eu "E KRUGEll. L.brarian
CIIAPL \I. 's
VERA J. LIEIN5. Commissioner
BLREAl OF RESIDENTIAL SERVICES
CATHEBINE SCHULTZ.
W= EY G R "TAD A
t Co nmiSSlO1I.:T
DIVISION OF REHABILITATIVE SERYICES
JOHN S, BUZZELL, D...ect r
Gcp.o
RL:vERE -D
ADl'tIINISTRATIVE DEPARTltIENT
H. BRASEL. SuperlRtendrnt
BAJITO. "ELSON, Bus",e.. MallGg.r
MnvI
DOROTHY GRIESERT, Cl.rk-Typ~t
r.
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
""
Pr>lcipal
MAIlI;L HILDEBRA"DT, Clcrk-Stenog·.. apher
ES~l Ell Bn M~R. Clerk·Typu;t
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
LOWER SCHOOL
CARA CONK'IN,
BE'rTY GRl'S5
'P"ICE JAcons
BETTY Lons
A I
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FRECHETTE IIALL-A "RIA.' RAGE.',
Resident a Hall Supervisor
CI rk.TlI ist
OLS N, Stor ke per
EnWAHn J.
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K, C!erk-Stenograher
CI
KOLBECK
D an of 5t drnts
Cl rk <;tenogra her
D I ,'T. S cial I orker
LOCK ER, Spec "al Programs
COL N
BARB
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OFFICE STAFF
DIA
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DOR flTORY DEPARTMENT
MAlLJOIU!: SHEADY, Sr. Account Clerk
ALyCE \ R\
FATIlER FRA, 'CIS Pm;uOT
G
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Supervising Teacher
THO~1AS llEl:CLER
FRANCELLA Bos H'UIDT
GLEK:-I BOSSIL\RDT
MIKE DALY
ER, 'ST GRAF
GREG KLINKHMnlER
JAN. 'E PAQUETTE
S0 'JA RF.YA:-IT
SgARON SALMONS
AUDREY SAND
GARY HEATH
QI'ENTIN KANE
AVODELL SHEVLI:-i
EDWIN YARGER
BHl'CE I~",L\IEn
GALE YUXKERS
REUBEN QVIE, NightwatclI
PATRICIA MADAY
ELEA. 'OR MUELLER
CORRINE PETERSE:-l
POLLARD HALI~ HELEN MILLER,
Resid'''lf'al Hall Supervisor
LonsE DRIESS :-I
JOSEPHI. 'E JlIATTlII
I ARC \RET ~I TrIllES
SHARO.· MI:ILI
1 :rEI. SnAW
SHARON PETERSO:-i
EUNICE Pl:TZ
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HEALTH DEPARTME.IT
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B T D. OLSO " D ntist
DR, PAtL E. WEAVER, Phy.,cl<ln
MA.IlY KALvlV', R. 9., Head l\'lLTflI
KAREN J~HNSON, l.P N, AS8Ultant Nurse
ASSISTA '1'S
MAltIL~N Kt'NDE
PAl:.A MATHEWS
JAYNE NELSON
MARGAR~ SCHERER, L.F.N., Assistant NUT••
M DREr, \ OH , A.e sl ) t """,'se Aide
DR. HADDOW 111. KE' II, Con nUinll Pediatrician
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'llAURlCE FLA N
GENE GASNER
HEARING CLINIC
PAT RICE, AudtologiJIt
l\.EGINA KENNEDY, Clerk.TlIpiJlt
CLARENCE HOBAN
JAMES JOH"SON
ROGER KElLEN
------ --.----------~----.~
~~~i

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