Curriculum 2014–2017 - Høgskolen i Buskerud og Vestfold

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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Page 1/33
Curriculum
2014–2017
PhD in Person-Centred Healthcare
HBV – Faculty of
Health Sciences
Buskerud and Vestfold
University College, HBV,
Campus Drammen
Postboks 7053
3007 Drammen
tel. 32 20 64 00
[email protected]
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
1
HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Page 2/33
Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 3 Duration ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Target group ......................................................................................................................................... 3 Entry requirements ............................................................................................................................... 3 Qualifications ....................................................................................................................................... 4 Learning outcomes ............................................................................................................................... 4 Internationalization .............................................................................................................................. 5 Teaching and learning strategies.......................................................................................................... 5 Overview, organization and course content ............................................................................................. 7 The Science and Practice of Person-Centred Research ....................................................................... 9 Quantitative Methods ......................................................................................................................... 15 Qualitative Methods ........................................................................................................................... 17 Clinical Health Promotion ................................................................................................................. 20 Evidence and Value Based Change Processes in Healthcare ............................................................ 23 Experiential and Expert Knowledge in Mentalhealth care – Understandings and Practices ............. 25 Person-Centred Healthcare for Elders and Persons living with a Dementia ..................................... 29 Dissertation ........................................................................................................................................ 32 Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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2
HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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Introduction
Healthcare services are faced with a series of challenges due to changes in population demographics,
complexity of health issues, medical and technological advances, organizational change processes, and
other factors. Person-centredness is central to the healthcare practices as well as healthcare policies
and research initiatives.
Person-centred healthcare research is aiming at promoting the individual person’s health and wellbeing and for developing new models of healthcare services and new ways of working in order to
realize health policy aims on national and international levels. The home and primary healthcare
environments will play increasingly important roles as arenas for public care and treatment. New
outreach and ambulatory models of care that facilitate access to expertise are being developed, both in
specialist and primary healthcare services. In addition, the demand for collaboration between specialist
and primary healthcare services is increasing. High-quality professional practice in healthcare and
research are of vital importance if society is to meet these challenges.
The PhD program in person-centred healthcare at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and
Vestfold University College (Høgskolen i Buskerud og Vestfold – HBV) will provide the candidates
with knowledge in the forefront of theories, methods and research designs, and give opportunity to
develop advanced methodological skills in a stimulating cross-disciplinary research environment with
specialists within a broad spectre of person-centred healthcare research.
Duration
The course is 3 years full-time or 4 years part-time, with 75% consisting of the PhD candidate’s
research work. To extend the project period to four years, the Faculty of Health Sciences wants to
offer PhD students a 25% temporary teaching position, linked to the BA and MA study programs.
Target group
The primary focus of the PhD program is person-centred health care. Candidates wanting to do
research with this focus may apply, and in particular, those with projects in the fields of long term
health care and/or complex health conditions, particularly elders and persons with mental health needs,
problems with substance abuse, dementia, vision, stroke, diabetes and chronic pain. However,
candidates who have an interest in other aspects of healthcare and who want to undertake personcentred projects in these areas may also apply.
The candidates will normally be healthcare professionals, with a relevant 5-year master’s degree (3+2
years) or an equivalent qualification. However, the programme is interdisciplinary and candidates with
other academic backgrounds may apply. The final admission criteria are the PhD project’s focus (on
person-centred healthcare), the quality of the project, and the qualifications of the candidate.
Entry requirements
To be accepted onto the PhD programme, the applicant must have a 5-year master’s degree or
equivalent qualification that is approved by Faculty for entry in the PhD programme. The entry
requirements are in accordance with the Regulations for the philosophiae doctor (PhD) at HBV,
Section 2. HBV processes applications and determines admission based on a comprehensive
assessment of the following factors:
• The academic courses of the PhD candidate’s previous studies at bachelor’s and master’s
levels.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
•
•
•
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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The candidate’s grades (preferably with an average of “B” or better).
An academically acceptable description of the project.
A plan for undertaking the PhD programme.
The application for admission will contain the following information:
• Description of the research project.
• Time line for completion of the project.
• Budget for the project.
• Description of the required infrastructure.
• Description of supervision needs and identification of potential supervisors.
• Plan for periods at other (including overseas) research institutions or organizations.
• Plan for dissemination of the research.
• Documentation of the education undertaken that forms the basis for the application.
• Details of any intellectual property restrictions in order to protect the rights of others.
A project plan that includes a description of the research proposal will be prepared in collaboration
with the primary supervisor. The plan must specify the topic, research questions, proposed theoretical
perspective and methods, as well as suggested publication form (articles or monograph). The applicant
may submit a preliminary proposal, but a complete project description must be prepared within 6
months of admission, §2-2 Regulations for the Degree philosophiae doctor (PhD) at HBV.
The interdisciplinary perspectives in this programme will be promoted by recruiting students from
different academic fields.
Qualifications
Successful completion of the PhD programme leads to the award philosophiae doctor (PhD) in personcentred healthcare.
Learning outcomes
The aim of the PhD programme is to produce graduates who can carry out high-level research,
professional development and evaluation of person-centred healthcare service provision within the
area of health sciences.
The National Qualification Framework for Higher Education (2009) has adapted the overarching
European qualification framework for higher education mapped out in the Bologna Process and the
European Qualification Framework for lifelong learning (EQF). The prescribed categories contained
in the qualifications framework are knowledge, skills and general competence. The learning outcome
descriptors for the PhD in person-centred healthcare have been developed in accordance with these
categories.
After completing the programme the candidate will have achieved the following competences:
Knowledge
• knowledge in the forefront of theories, methods and research designs, and of the current
debates, positions and arguments concerning different approaches to person-centred healthcare
research
• knowledge in the forefront of the on-going person-centred research in one’s own area of
specialization, including theory developments in the field
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
•
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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knowledge in the forefront of philosophy of science, research ethics and special ethical issues
relating to cross-disciplinary, person-centred healthcare research
Skills
• ability to contribute to new scientific knowledge and critical discussions of theories and
methods within the field of person-centred healthcare research
• ability to develop research questions and designs aiming at producing new knowledge to
support person-centredness in healthcare practice, and to carry out such research at a high
academic level
• ability to critically evaluate the applicability of various research designs, and the quality of
others’ research in the field of person-centredness
• ability to handle cross-disciplinary challenges in person-centred healthcare research, and to
contribute the development, performance and evaluation of cross-disciplinary research
projects
General competence
• ability to contribute to innovation and healthcare improvements through person-centred
research and dissemination of research results
• ability to communicate research findings in the field of person-centred health-care through
recognized national and international academic channels and to participate in crossdisciplinary academic discussions
• ability to identify and handle relevant research ethical issues, and to carry out research projects
with moral consideration and professional integrity
• ability to transfer skills and manage complex, cross-disciplinary projects designed for
assignments both in research and the practice field of person-centred healthcare
Internationalization
The Department will encourage and facilitate PhD candidates to have a period of study abroad as a
part of their educational plan. A period in which research is undertaken abroad will contribute to
establishing new international research collaborations and also provide further impetus for work on the
dissertation. It is therefore important that both the institution to be visited and the actual research
environment are chosen carefully in consultation with the supervisor. To increase the likelihood that
the period abroad will be professionally relevant and worthwhile, preference will be given to this
taking place at an institution where the student, supervisor and research activities at the Faculty
already have established collaborative contacts.
Teaching and learning strategies
The teaching and learning strategies are characterized by a fundamental view of student-centred
education. The teaching and learning in the coursework undertaken by the students will be undertaken
via the learning platform of HBV.
The PhD programme consists mostly of active research. This includes the completion of an
independent research project in active collaboration with supervisors, peers, partners from the clinical
area and other researchers. Therefore, participation in active research settings – nationally and
internationally – as well as professional dissemination of the candidate’s continuing research work
will be central to the learning environment. Participation in seminars and use of peer feedback
provides the foundation for establishing a good learning environment among the candidates. The
coursework content will be provided through (but not limited to) lectures, workshops, seminars, group
work, plenary sessions, supervision and presentation of the student’s own work. The courses will have
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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one or two course leaders as responsible for the actual course, but several of the faculty members will
participate in the different courses with their expert knowledge in relevant topics.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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Overview, organization and course content
The PhD programme consists of two parts: (1) coursework and (2) dissertation (Table 1).
1. Coursework
The coursework component consists of a total of 30 ECTS. The mandatory coursework comprises 20
credits and consists of a theoretical component that leads to extended competence in philosophy of
science, theoretical perspectives and central concepts of person-centred healthcare including
methodological implications and research ethics (15 ECTS). In addition, the candidates will be
required to choose an in-depth course either in qualitative or quantitative methods (5 ECTS each).
The other elective parts of the coursework provide the candidate with the opportunity to immerse
him/herself in a topic that is relevant to his/her own research project and the dissertation’s primary
focus. The candidates will choose two of the elective courses listed in the table on page 6. It will also
be possible to take courses from other institutions, both national and international; this will be decided
by discussion between the candidate and supervisors during the first semester and included in the
contract for the PhD programme of the individual candidate.
The coursework must be completed and passed before the dissertation can be submitted.
The assessment described in the individual education plan can include the candidate’s participation in
and presentations at conferences and any study period abroad.
2. Dissertation
The dissertation is described on page 29 of this curriculum.
Table 1. Overview of content of mandatory and elective subjects
Subject code
Name
Credits
Mandatory/
Elective
PHDPCR500
The Science and
Practice of Personcentred Research
Quantitative Methods
Or
Qualitative Methods
Clinical Health
Promotion
Evidence- and Valuebased Change
Processes in
Healthcare
Experiential and
Expert Knowledge in
Mental-healthcare –
Understanding and
Practices
Person-centred
Healthcare for Elders
and Persons living
with a Dementia
Dissertation
15
Mandatory
5
Mandatory
5
5
Mandatory
Elective
5
Elective
5
Elective
5
Elective
150
Mandatory
PHDQUAN500
PHDQUAL500
PHDPROM500
PHDEVVA500
PHDEXKNO500
PHDPCP500
PHDDISS500
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Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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The implementation of the seven subject areas of the coursework and the dissertation are organized
such that all courses are offered on the following 3-year cycle:
Year 1
Sem. 1
PHDPCR
500
Sem. 2
PHDPCR
500
Year 2
Sem. 3
Year 3
Sem. 5
Sem. 4
PHDPRM
500
PHDEVVA
500
PHDPCP
500
PHDEXKO
500
PHDDISS500 Dissertation (150 ECTS) →
→
PHDQUAL
500
→
→
Year 4
Sem. 7
Sem. 6
Sem. 8
PHDQUA
N500
→
→
→
→
The specific subjects are specified in the following sections. The course content and reading lists will
be updated prior to the start of each course.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
PHDPCR500
Mandatory
The Science and Practice of
Person-Centred Research
Course leaders:
Professor Brendan McCormack
Professor Hilde Eide
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
Page 9/33
15 credits
Autumn
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge in the forefront of theories of person-centeredness
• knowledge in the forefront of strategies for undertaking person-centred research
• knowledge in the forefront of how theories of person-centeredness and undertaking personcentred research is related to the philosophy of science
• knowledge in the forefront of research ethics, its core principles, guidelines and procedures,
including an understanding of the most prevalent moral challenges arising when undertaking
cross-disciplinary person-centred research
Skills:
• ability to situate and ground the PhD project in theories of person-centeredness
• ability to choose the most appropriate research methods for person-centred practice research in
the candidate’s own field
• ability to apply theories of person- centeredness in discussing research results and implications
• ability to identify the moral challenges in the research project and find ethically sound
solutions to these challenges, including the mindful identification and discussion of moral
challenges in other person-centred research projects.
General competences:
• can critically and constructively evaluate and discuss health care research and research
projects
• can apply the principles of person- centeredness in the design of research projects
• can explore ethical issues in the design of research projects and implications for undertaking
research in person-centred healthcare
• can identify and discuss theoretical, methodological and ethical problems relevant to the
research process
• has a broad overview of the field of the philosophy of science, insight into key philosophical,
methodological and ethical issues, including an understanding of their relevance to healthcare
research in general and person-centred research in particular
2. CONTENT
Person-centred practice has been defined as an approach to practice that is established through the
formation and fostering of therapeutic relationships between all care providers, patients /clients /
families and significant others.
It is underpinned by values of respect for persons, individual right to self-determination and mutual
respect and understanding. Person-centred practice is about developing, coordinating and providing
healthcare services that respect the uniqueness of individuals by focusing on their beliefs, values,
desires and wishes, independent of age, gender, social status, economy, faith, ethnicity and cultural
background and in a context that includes collaborative and inclusive practices. In addition, personcentred practice aims to plan and deliver care that takes account of the person’s context including their
social context, community networks, cultural norms and material supports.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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The course will cover different approaches to and aspects of person-centred practice in the context of
undertaking research with persons living with long-term health needs, with a particular focus on
research aimed at supporting and developing high-quality care to elders and persons with mentalhealth needs.
The course will explore approaches to person-centred healthcare in the context of the philosophy of
science, including the philosophy of personhood from different traditions and analyses of ontological
and epistemological perspectives that guide the conduct of person-centred ethical research. Central
topics covered will be the exploration and critique of different theories and different qualitative and
quantitative approaches to person-centred healthcare research, including process and outcome
evaluation. Other central topics will be research ethics, including consideration of the conduct of
research, the researcher role and the moral responsibilities involved in person-centred research and
collaborative practices.
The theoretical foundation for three different, partly overlapping approaches to person-centred
healthcare research will be explored in-depth:
a) a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach (Lindseth & Nordberg 2004), as applied in
qualitative nursing science research, including collaborative, participative and inclusive
methodologies
b) a communication theory approach, as applied in quantitative and mixed method studies of
user-provider communication (Eide et al 2011), including e-health and web-based, selfmanagement stimulating methodologies
c) an organization theory approach, as applied in quantitative and quantitative social science
research (Weick 2009), including interventions to stimulate person-centred change processes,
ethical leadership and implementation of new technologies to support user-participation.
The different, partly overlapping, partly competing traditions of philosophy of personhood and person
in context which lay the foundation for the three above mentioned approaches to person-centred
healthcare research, will also be explored in-depth, briefly sketched as:
a) the tradition of patient-centeredness, running from Hippocrates to Kierkegaard and Ricoeur to
recent theories of person-centred nursing, as represented by McCormack & McCance (2011)
b) the tradition of person-centred therapy, running from Carl Rogers’ humanistic psychology to
today’s acceptance and commitment therapy, as represented by Hayes et al (2011)
c) the tradition of human motivation theory, running from Aristotle’s teleology to recent theories
of mindfulness (Langer 1989) and self determination (Deci & Ryan 2008)
The primary philosophy-of-science focus will be on questions of rationalism, empiricism,
hermeneutics and contextualism as well as postmodern and actual contributions to and criticisms of
these perspectives using the lenses of personhood and person-in-context. The course will further
explore feminist perspectives and the role of language in science. The primary ethical focus will be on
questions of the ethics of science, medical ethics and research ethics in the social sciences. The course
will also provide thorough knowledge of the national and international systems of ethical guidelines,
committees and procedures and how to deal with ethical issues in practice. The course will combine
historical and systematic approaches, with the historical perspective providing the background to
concepts, conflicts and models for understanding current debates and actual challenges.
The primary methodological focus will be on person-centred research designs, including qualitative
and quantitative methods, process and outcome evaluations, as well as participatory methodologies
that enable active participation of all persons in research activities. A significant focus will be placed
on ethical and practical challenges of being a person-centred researcher.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
The course will be taught over two semesters. The teaching and learning methods will consist of a
combination of lectures, tutorials, group work, discussions and student presentations of course topics
in relation to the students’ own on-going PhD work.
The course essay
During the course, the PhD students will present a full draft for the essay upon which the final
assessment of participation in this course is based. The topic of the essay is self-selected within the
framework of the course, focussing on one question related to the scientific and theoretical grounding
for, or the ethical challenges of the student’s PhD thesis work. The student will present a draft of the
essay to the group, will receive prepared comments from fellow students and teachers and will rewrite
the essay before submitting it for final evaluation. The final essay will comprise 3000 words (±10%).
It must conform with the requirements of an academic essay in the field and be submitted within two
weeks after the course.
4. ATTENDANCE
Attendance is mandatory and the PhD candidate is required to present and discuss a) his/her own PhD
project, (b) one topic from the course literature, (c) a complete draft for her/his essay (8-10 p.) and (d)
commentary on the essay draft of fellow students.
5. ASSESSMENT
When all requirements are met, the final version of the essay will be graded according to the following
scale: “failed” / “passed”.
Learning support
All available support is allowed.
6. LITERATURE
The required reading for this subject area consists of 1200 pages, of which 800 pages are compulsory
and 400 pages are self-chosen.
Compulsory reading
Beauchamp, T. L. 1982. Ethical issues in social science research. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press,
pp. 40-98 (58 p.).
Bodenheimer, T., Wagner EH, Grumbach K. Improving primary care for patients with chronic illness: the
chronic care model, Part 2. JAMA. 2002;288(15):1909–14. (5 p.)
Boomer C and McCormack B (2008) ‘Where are we now?’ A process for evaluating the context of care in
practice development. Practice Development in Healthcare, 7(3), 123-133.Rosemond CA, 10pp
Borg, M. & Kristiansen, K. (2004). Recovery-oriented professionals: Helping relations in mental health services.
Journal of Mental Health, 13 (5), 493–505. (12 p.)
Borg, M., Karlsson, B., Kim, H.S. & McCormack, B. (2012). Opening Up For Many Voices in Knowledge
Construction. Forum: Qualitative Social Research. FQS, 13(1). 1-16. (15p.)
Bourdieu, P. 1984. Distinction : a social critique of the judgement of taste. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, pp
466-484 (18 p.).
Brown, D. and McCormack, B. (2011) Developing the practice context to enable more effective pain
management with older people: An action research approach. Implementation Science, 6(9): 1-14,
(14p.)
Craig P, Dieppe P, Macintyre S, Michie S, Nazareth I, Petticrew M; Medical Research Council Guidance.
Developing and evaluating complex interventions: the new Medical Research Council guidance. BMJ.
2008 Sep 29;337:a1655. doi: 10.1136/bmj.a1655. (15 p.)
Dewing J (2008) Personhood and dementia: revisiting Tom Kitwood’s ideas, International Journal of Older
People Nursing, 3: 3-13 (9 p.)
Davidson, L., Kirk,T., Rockholz, P., Tondora J., O’Connell M J., & Evans AC. (2007). Creating a recoveryoriented system of behavioral Healthcare: Moving from concept to reality. Psychiatr Rehabil J 31, 2331 (8 p.)
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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Study year 2014 – 2017
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Deegan, P.E. (2005). The importance of personal medicine: A qualitative study of resilience in people with
psychiatric disabilities. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 33, 29–35. (6p.)
Drake, R.E., Deegan, P.E., & Rapp, C. (2010). The promise of shared decision making in mental health.
Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 34(1):7–13. (6 p.)
EC. 2005. The European Charter for Researchers. The Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers.
Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation. Brussels: European Commission: Directorate-General for
Research (30 p.).
Edvardsson D, Innes A. Measuring Person-centered Care: A Critical Comparative Review of Published Tools
(2000). Gerontologist, 50: 834-846. (12 p.)
Eide, H., Eide, T., Rustøen, T., Finset, A. Patient’s validation of Cues and Concerns identified according to
Verona-CoDES. A Video – and Interview Based Approach. Patient education and counselling, 2011,
82,156–162. (6 p.)
Eilertsen, G., Kirkevold, M., Bjørk, I. T. (2010): Recovering from a stroke: a longitudinal, qualitative study of
older Norwegian women. J Clin Nurs. 19 (13-14):2004-2013. (10 p.)
Ekman, I., Ehnfors, M., et al. (2000). "The meaning of living with severe chronic heart failure as narrated by
elderly people." Scand J Caring Sci 14(2): 130-136. (7 p.)
Entwistle, V. A. & Watt, I. S. 2013. 'Treating patients as persons: a capabilites approach to support delivery of
person-centred care.' Amercian Journal of Bioethics, 13:8, 29-39
Fagerström, L., Eriksson, K. & Bergbom Engberg, I. 1999. The patient’s perceived caring needs: Measuring the
unmeasurable. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 5, 199-208. (9 p.)
Foucault, M. 1972. The archaeology of knowledge. New York: Pantheon Books, pp. 3-39 (36 p.).
Hanson, L. C., Ennett, S.T., Schenck, A.P., Weiner, B.J. Implementing person-centered care in nursing homes.
Healthcare Manage Rev 2012; 37: 257-266. (9 p.)
Frankfurt, H.G. (1989), ‘Freedom Of The Will And The Concept Of A Person’ in J. Christman (ed.), The Inner
Citadel: Essays on Individual Autonomy, Oxford University Press, Oxford. (13 p.)
Giere, R. N. 1999. The feminism question in the philosophy of science. In Science without laws. Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, pp. 200-216 (16 p.).
Haraway, D. 2000. Situated knowledges: The science question in feminism and the priviliege of partial
perspective. In The gender and science reader, ed. by M. Lederman and I. Bartsch. New York:
Routledge, pp. 169-88 (exerpt) (9 p.).
Harding, S. 1999. After the neutrality ideal: Science, politics and ´strong objectivity´. In Perspectives on
philosophy of science in nursing : an historical and contemporary anthology, ed. by E. C. Polifroni and
M. Welch. Philadelphia: Lippincott, pp 451-461 (10 p.).
Hoge, M.A., Tondora, J., Marrelli, A. (2005). The fundamentals of workforce competency: Implications for
behavioral health. Administration and Policy in Mental Health, 32, (5), 509-531. (22 p.)
Howell D, Liu G. Can routine collection of patient reported outcome data actually improve person-centered
health? Healthc Pap 2011; 11: 42-47. (5 p.)
ICMJE. 2010. Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (The Vancouver
Protocol). http://www.icmje.org/urm_main.html. (17 p.)
Kitson, A. L., Rycroft-Malone, J., Harvey, G., McCormack, B., Seers, K. and Titchen, A. (2008) Evaluating the
successful implementation of evidence into practice using the PARIHS framework: theoretical and
practical challenges, Implementation Science, 3:1 (07 Jan 2008)
http://www.implementationscience.com/content/3/1/1. (12 p.)
Lindseth, A. & Norberg, A. (2004). A phenomenological hermeneutical method for researching lived experience.
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences. 18:145-153.
Matthias, M. S., Salyers, M. P., Rollins, A.L., Frankel, R.M. Decision making in recovery-oriented mental
Healthcare. Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2012 Spring; 35 (4): 305-14. (9 p.)
Mead, N., & Bower, P. (2000). Patient-centredness: a conceptual framework and review of the empirical
literature. Social Science and Medicine, 5 1(7), 1087-1110. (23 p.)
McCormack, B., Karlsson, B., Dewing, J. and Lerdal, A. (2010) Exploring person-centredness: a qualitative
meta-synthesis of four studies and their contribution to advancing our understanding of person-centred
nursing, Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24; 620–634. (14.)
McCormack, B. & McCance, T. (2010). Person-centred nursing : theory and practice. Chichester, West Sussex:
Blackwell. (200 p.)
Morgan, D. L. (2007). Paradigms Lost and Pragmatism Regained. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1 (1),
pp. 48-76 (36 p.).
Morgan, S., Yoder, L. H. A concept analysis of person-centered care. J Holist Nurs 2012; 30: 6-15. 9pp
O’Connell, M.J., Tondora, J., Evans, A.C., Croog, G. & Davidson, L. (2005). From rhetoric to routine:
Assessing recovery-oriented practices in a state mental health and addiction system. Psychiatric
Rehabilitation Journal, 28 (4), 378-386. (8 p.)
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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Merton, R. K. 1973. The normative structure of science. In: The sociology of science : theoretical and empirical
investigations. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 167-178 (11 p.).
NESH. 2006. Forskningsetiske retningslinjer for samfunnsvitenskap, humaniora, jus og teologi (Guidelines for
research ethics in the social sciences, law and the humanities). Oslo: De nasjonale forskningsetiske
komiteer (35 p.).
Ricoeur, P. 1981. The model of the text: Meaningful action considered as a text. In Hermeneutics and the human
sciences, ed. P. Ricoeur and J. B. Thompson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 197-221 (24
p.).
Rolland, J. S. (1994): Families, illness & disability. An integrative Treatment Model. Part I, Kapittel 2, s.19-43.
Basic Books. ISBN: 0-465-02915-9. (24 p.)
Sjögren, K., Lindkvist, M., Sandman, P. O., Zingmark, K., Edvardsson, D. Psychometric evaluation of the
Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Int Psychogeriatr 2012; 24:
406-415. (9 p.)
Strong, T. (2000). Six orientering ideas for collaborative counsellors. European Journal of Psychotherapy &
Counselling, 3: 1, 25-42. (17 p.)
Strong, T., Sutherland, O., & Ness, O (2011). Considerations for a discourse of collaboration in counseling. Asia
Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2(1), 25-40. (15 p.)
Öresland, S. Määttä, S. Norberg, A. Lutzen, K. (2011) Home-based Nursing Care as an Endless Journey: An
exploration of metaphors used by nurses working in home-based nursing care. Nursing Ethics, May,
18(3):408-417. (10 p.)
van Dulmen, S., Sluijs, E., van Dijk, L., de Ridder, D., Heerdink, R., Bensing, J. Patient adherence to medical
treatment: a review of reviews. BMC Health Serv Res. 2007 Apr 17;7:55. Review. (13 p.)
van Dulmen, S. The value of tailored communication for person-centred outcomes. J Eval Clin Pract. 2011
Apr;17(2):381-3. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01586.x. Epub 2010 Nov 18. (3 p.)
van Dulmen, S., Humphris, G., Eide, H. Towards a guideline for person-centred research in clinical
communication; lessons learned from three countries. International Journal of Person Centered
Medicine, 2012, 1, 58-63. (5 p.)
Wagner, E. H. The role of patient care teams in chronic disease management. BMJ 2000;320:569-72. (4 p.)
Supplementary reading
Alvesson, M., & Sköldberg, K. (2009). Reflexive methodology: new vistas for qualitative research. London:
Sage Pubications (293 p)
Bechtel, Christine, and Debra L. Ness (2011). If You Build It, Will They Come? Designing Truly PatientCentered Health Care. Health Affairs, 29(5): 914-920.
Bensing, Jozien (2000). Bridging the gap: The separate worlds of evidence-based medicine and patient-centered
medicine. Patient Education and Counseling, 39(1):17-25.
Buber, Martin (1923/1984) I and Thou. Edinburgh: T&T Clark, (112 p.).
Deci, E. L., Ryan, L. M. (2008). Self-determination theory: A macrotheory of human motivation, development
and health. Canadian Psychology 49 (3):182-185. (4 p.)
Eide, H., Quera, V., Graugaard, P., Finset, A. (2004): Sequential patterns of physician-patient dialogue
surrounding cancer patient’s expression of concern and worry. Applying sequence analysis to RIAS.
Social Science & Medicine, 59 (1):145-155. (10 p.)
Entwistle, V. A. & Cribb, A. 2013. Enabling people to live well: fresh thinking about collaborative approaches
to care for people with long term conditions. London: The Health Foundation.
Entwistle, V. A. & Watt, I. S. 2013. 'A capabilities approach to person-centered care: response to open peer
commentaries.' American Journal of Bioethics, 13:8, W1-W4
Finlay, L. (2011). Phenomenology for Therapists. Researching the Lived World. Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell (273
p).
Hayes,, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., Wilson, K. G. (2011). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Process and
Practice of Mindful Change (2nd ed). Guilford Press.
ICPCM (2012). 'Geneva Declaration on Person-centered Care for Chronic Diseases.' (Emerging from the Fifth
Geneva Conference on Person-centered Medicine and finalized by the Board of the International
College of Person-centered Medicine on 19 May 2012).
Langer, Ellen J. (1989). Mindfulness. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co.
McMillan, Michael (2004). The person-centred approach to therapeutic change London ; Thousand Oaks: SAGE
Publications.
Pelzang, R. (2010). Time to learn: understanding patient-centred care. British Journal of Nursing, 19:14, 912-17.
Popper, K. (1989). Science: Conjectures and refutations. I Conjectures and refutations : the growth of scientific
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knowledge. 5th ed. London ; New York: Routledge.
Prelli, L. J. 1989. The rhetorical construction of scientific ethos. In Rhetoric in the human sciences (Inquiries in
social construction series), edited by H. W. Simons. London: Sage, pp 48-68. (20 p.)
Rogers, C. R. (1961). On becoming a person: A therapist's view of psychotherapy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Sanderson, Helen & Jaimee Lewis (2011). A practical guide to delivering personalisation : person-centred
practice in health and social care. London & Philadelphia: J. Kingsley Publishers.
Schön, D. A. (1983). The reflective practitioner: how professionals think in action. New York: Basic Books (374
p.)
Slater, L. (2006). Person-centredness: a concept analysis. Contemp Nurse., 23:1, 135-44.
Steiger, N. J. & Balog, A. (2010). Realizing patient-centered care: putting patients in the center, not the middle.
Frontiers of Health Services Management, 26:4, 15-25.
Thorsen, K. (1998). Kjønn, livsløp og alderdom. En studie av livshistorier, selvbilder og modernitet (Gender, life
course and old age. A study of life histories, self images and modernity). Bergen: Fagbokforlaget.
Weick, Karl E. (2009). Making sense of the organization Volume Two: The impermanent organization.
Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
PHDQUAN500
Mandatory
Course leaders:
Quantitative Methods
Norwegian and
English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
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5 credits
Professor Jan Richard Bruenech
Professor Rigmor C. Baraas
Autumn
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge at high international level about statistical analysis of problems that can be
examined by quantitative data, which are organized around the general linear model
• knowledge in the forefront about multiple regression analysis
• advanced knowledge about factor analysis
• advanced knowledge about analysis of variance including repeated measures
Skills:
• demonstrate a systematic understanding of the analysis of absolute, contingent and mediated
effects using linear models
• analyse moderated effects (interactions) and non-linear relationships between variables using
linear models
• analyse the results of designs that involve repeated measurements and exploratory factor
analysis
General competences:
• understand and explain variations in the observed variables
• apply analytical tools and critically evaluate research of self and others using similar analyses
• justify the selection of appropriate methods on an individual basis
• develop the skills required to perform further studies on related topics
2. CONTENT
This course unit covers (1) multiple linear regressions, (2) binomial probability model and multiple
logistic regression, (3) proportional hazards analysis, (4) factor analysis and (5) repeated measures
analysis.
3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
This course unit consists of topic-oriented lectures and exercise sessions including the use of software
such as Excel and SPSS, as well as written assessments. The student is responsible for completing the
given assessments in the unit and will have to exercise self-allocation of activities within the
framework of the unit.
4. PREREQUISITES
The recommended prerequisites for this course are essential skills and knowledge in methods such as
common descriptive analysis of the distributions, central tendency and variation estimation, bivariate
regression and correlation, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, sampling, statistical inference,
parametric statistics including ANOVA and non-parametric statistics.
5. ATTENDANCE
The group work and seminars are obligatory. Attendance at the scheduled classes is expected.
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6. ASSESSMENT
Final assessment
Take-home final exam, due three weeks after the end of organised activities. The student will only be
able to take this examination if he/she has completed compulsory laboratory work involving the use of
various statistical methods during the term.
Evaluations
All examinations are graded as “failed” / “passed”.
Learning support
All available support is allowed.
7. LITERATURE
The required reading for this subject consists of 500 pages.
Compulsory reading
Plichta, S. B, Kelvin, E. (2012). Munro's Statistical Methods for Health Care Research. 6th revised reprint.
Lippincott Willians & Wilkins. Philadelphia. ISBN 978-1451187946. Chapter 2-6, 10-15. (220 pp.)
Pett, M., Lackey, NR. & Sullivan, J.J. (2003). Making Sense of Factor Analysis, Sage Publications, ISBN 07619-1950-3. Chapter 1-4. (130 p..)
Katz, M. H. (2006). Multivariable analysis: a practical guide for clinicians. Cambridge University Press. ISBN:
978-0521549851. Chapter 1-10. (150 p.)
Supplementary reading
Altman, D. G. (1999). Practical Statistics for medical research. London: Chapman & Hall/CRC. ISBN
0412276305.
Armitage, P., Berry, G. & Matthews, J.N.S. (2005). Statistical Methods in Medical Research 4th ed., Blackwell
Science. ISBN: 0632052570
Pallant, J. (2010) SPSS Survival Manual: A step by step guide to data analysis using SPSS 4th ed. Open
University Press. ISBN 978-0335242399
Anthony, D. (1999). Understanding advanced statistics: a guide for nurses and Healthcare researchers.
Churchill Livingstone. ISBN: 0443059330
Bloom, H. (2005). Learning More from Social Experiments. Evolving Analytic Approaches. Russel Sage
Foundation: New York.
Dawson-Saunders, B. & Trapp, R. G. (2004). Basic & Clinical Biostatistics. Appleton and Lange. ISBN:
0071410171
Laake, P., Hjartåker, A., Thelle, D. (2007). Epidemiologiske og kliniske forskningsmetoder. Gyldendal
Akademisk.
Skog, O. J. (2004). Å forklare sosiale fenomener. En regresjonsbasert tilnærming. Oslo: Gyldendal Akademisk.
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
PHDQUAL500
Mandatory
Course leaders:
Qualitative Methods
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
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5 credits
Professor Stian Biong
Associate Professor Grethe Eilertsen
Autumn/spring
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge in the forefront to critically evaluate the expediency of different research designs
of qualitative methods in general and in relation to their own area of specialization
• knowledge in the forefront to understand the epistemological assumptions associated with
qualitative methods
• knowledge in the forefront to understand the traditions of qualitative methods and their
theoretical basis
Skills:
• ability to formulate relevant and topical research questions and justify the selection of
appropriate research methods that can be investigated / solved by using qualitative methods
• ability to individually design and undertake research projects within person-centred
healthcare and can evaluate different analytical approaches
• ability to critically evaluate the quality of qualitative research and address specific
methodological challenges in qualitative research studies in the field of person-centred
healthcare
• ability to assess the appropriateness of different qualitative methods related to his/her problem
and research questions
• ability to contribute with new knowledge in the form of developed
descriptions/interpretations, concepts or theory using appropriate qualitative methods
General competences:
• ability to identify, critically discuss and handle relevant ethical issues in qualitative research
studies in the context of healthcare in general and specifically related to persons with long
term health needs
• ability to identify, critically discuss and handle issues related to the validity, credibility and
transferability of qualitative research
2. CONTENT
Participation in this course will contribute to the development of skills in the use of qualitative
methodological approaches to a PhD thesis. The course unit will provide insight into fundamental
epistemological and methodological assumptions and selected traditions in qualitative research. There
will be special emphasis on the phenomenological and hermeneutic phenomenological approach.
Content analyses and methodological challenges in studies of vulnerable populations will be given
special attention. The unit will give students practice in evaluating qualitative research from a
methodological perspective. Methods for evaluating qualitative research will be explained.
3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
The learning activities will consist of lectures and group work. Group work should be related to the
PhD student’s project and oral presentation on a given topic. Students are offered 1 hour of individual
counselling related to the particular theme of the oral presentation.
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4. ATTENDANCE
The group work and seminars are obligatory. Attendance at the scheduled classes is expected.
5. ASSESSMENT
Each candidate of the group will give an oral presentation and two other candidates shall act as
opponents to the presenter. At the end of the presentation, the opponents will lead a discussion of
methodological issues related to a given topic in qualitative research. To obtain approval for the
subject the student must have attended the lectures and participated in the group and the presentation
must receive a “pass” grade. A participant may receive 1 credit if he/she has participated in the
lectures and in the group work, but has not given an oral presentation.
Learning support
All available support is allowed.
6. LITERATURE
The required reading for this subject area consists of 500 pages, of which 250 pages are compulsory
reading and 250 pages are supplementary
Compulsory reading
Corbin, J. & Morse, J.M. (2003). The Unstructured Interview: Issues of Reciprocity and Risks When Dealing
with Sensitive Topics. Qualitative Inquiry, 9(3), 335-354. (19 p.)
Creswell, J.W. (2007). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design. Choosing Among Five Traditions.London:
Sage publications. Chap. 1, 2, 3, 4 (s.57-62), 6, 7, 8 (pp. 147-154, pp..159-161), 10 (pp. 201-212, 215217) (116 p.)
Dickson-Swift, V., James, E.L., Kippen, S. & Liamputtong, P. (2007). Doing sensitive research: what challenges
do face Qualitative Research? Qualitative Research, 7(3), 327-353. (26 p.)
Elo, S. & Kyngäs H. (2008). The qualitative analyses process. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 62(1), 107-115.
Guillemin, M. & Heggen, K. (2008). Report and respect: Negotiating Ethical Relations Between researcher and
participant. Medicine, Health & Philosophy, 12(3), 291-9. (8 p.)
Harris, R. & Dyson, E. (2001). Recruitment of Frail Older People to research: lessons learnt through experience.
Journal of Advanced Nursing, 36(5), 643-651). (8 p.)
Karnieli-Miller, O., Copiously, R. & Pessach, L. (2009). Power Relations in Qualitative Research. Qualitative
Health Research. 19 (2), 279-289. (10 p.)
Krippendorff, K. (2004). Content analysis. An introduction to its methodology. 2nd Ed. Thousand Oaks: Sage
Publications. Chap. 9 (21 p.)
Kvale, S. (1995). The Social Construction of Validity. Qualitative Inquiry, 1,19-40. (21 p.)
Kvale, S. (2006). Dominance through interviews and Dialogue. Qualitative Inquiry, 12(3), 480-500. (21 p.)
Sandelowski, M. (1993). Rigor or rigor mortis: The problem of rigor in Qualitative research revisited. Advances
in Nursing Science, 16(2), 1-8. (7 p.)
Smith, J. L. (2008). How Ethical is Ethical research? Recruiting marginalized, vulnerable groups into health
services research. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 62, 248-25. (10 p.)
Supplementary reading
Alvesson, M. & Skjöldberg, K. (2009). Reflexive methodology. New vistas for Qualitative Research. (2nd
edition). London: Sage Publications.
Barbosa da Silva, A. (2002). An Analysis of the Unique Wellness and Theoretical Foundations of Qualitative
Methods. In: LR-M.Hallberg (ed.). Qualitative Methods in Public Health Research Theoretical
Foundations and Practical Examples, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 39-70.
Corbin, J. & Strauss, A. (2008). Basics of Qualitative Research - Techniques and Procedures for Developing
Grounded Theory. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.
Denzin, N.K. & Lincoln, Y.S. (Ed.) (2003). Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials. London: Sage
Publications.
Denzin, N. K. & Lincoln, Y. S. (2011). Handbook of Qualitative Research. (4th Ed). London: Sage publications.
Horowitz, J. A., Ladder, M.D. & Moriarty.H.J. (2002). Methodological Challenges in Research with Vulnerable
Families. Journal of Family Nursing, 8 (4), pp. 315-333.
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Kvale, Steinar & Svend Brinkmann (2009). InterViews: learning the craft of qualitative research interviewing
(2nd ed.). Los Angeles: Sage Publications (Norw. transl. Det kvalitative forskningsintervju, Oslo:
Gyldendal, 2009).
Merrick, E. (1999). An exploration of quality in Qualitative Research: Are "Reliability" and "Validity" relevant?
In: M. Koppola & LA Suzuki (Eds.) Qualitative methods in psychology. Thousand Oaks / London /
New Dehli: Sage.
Ruyter, K. W. (ed.) (2003). Forskningsetikk (Research ethics). Oslo: Gyldendal aakademisk, s. 61-91, 93-107,
109-129, 215-239.
Silverman, David (ed.) (2004). Qualitative Research. Theory, Method and Practice. London: Sage.
Silverman, D. (2005). Doing Qualitative Research. London: Sage.
Svenaeus, F. (2003). Sjukdomens mening: det medicinska mötets fenomenologi och hermeneutik (The meaning
of illness: phenomenology, hermeneutics and the medical meeting; Norw. transl. Sykdommens mening og møtet med det syke mennesket. Oslo: Gyldendal Akademisk, 2005). Stockholm: Natur och Kultur.
.
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Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
PHDPROM500
Elective
Course leader:
Clinical Health Promotion
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
Page 20/33
5 credits
Professor Stian Biong
Spring
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge in the forefront of own area in person-centred healthcare related to promoting
health and preventing ill health
• knowledge in the forefront of understanding of fundamental theoretical, scientific assumptions
in the field of clinical health promotion, especially in relation to persons with long term health
needs
• knowledge in the forefront of understanding of the ideological principles for different
perspectives (promotive, preventive, protective and curative)
• knowledge in the forefront of understanding of important concepts, theories and models in the
field
• knowledge in the forefront of understanding of evaluation of the effect of promoting health
Skills:
• ability to formulate problems and plan and carry out research on promoting health or
preventing ill health
• ability to assess and give the reasons for relevant perspectives, theories and models in his/her
research project
• ability to assess and deal with challenges related to research ethics in the field
• ability to assess the factors of importance for implementation of high-quality research within
his/her field of research
• ability to handle complex scientific issues in the research area and initiate critical inquiry
within his/her own area of research
General competences:
• ability to assess political and structural factors important to the health of persons with long
term and complex health needs
• ability to critically reflect on his/her own position and practice as a participant in the
interaction between individuals, groups and society
• ability to identify relevant ethical research issues within the field
• ability to transfer skills to manage complex, cross-disciplinary projects designed for
assignments both in research and the practice fields of person-centred healthcare
2. CONTENT
In particular, the topic covers promoting health and preventing ill health in clinical health care, both as
historical and contemporary phenomena, using the strategies and measures of the World Health
Organization to illustrate these. The connection to ethics, policy and person-centredness will be
illustrated as prerequisites for meeting people with long-term conditions in health care. The
importance of promoting health, including secondary and tertiary prevention will be analysed,
especially on the basis of research on mental health crisis management and home-based treatment,
preventive home visits and web-based counselling for long term conditions as methods in the field. In
addition, promotive and preventive actions in ophthalmic public health will be addressed. An
understanding of the health resources and practice of people is a topic that will be dealt with. The
interaction between ideological foundation, development of theory and practice will also be in focus.
Rootman’s (2001) seven basic principles (Empowerment, Participatory, Holistic, Intersectorial,
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Equality/Equity, Sustainable, Multistrategy,) form the basis for initiating, planning and implementing
preventive and health promotive research and work.
3. LEARNING ACTIVITIES
The subject is dealt with over one term, with three teaching sessions, two of them lasting two days and
one lasting one day. Five hours teaching is given on each day, mainly as lectures. Between the
teaching sessions, the students will carry out a search of the literature.
4. ATTENDANCE
The group work and seminars are obligatory. Attendance at the scheduled classes is expected.
5. ASSESSMENT
The examination consists of an oral presentation with opponent. The presentation shall deal with a
relevant self-chosen topic in promoting and/or preventing health for people with long-term complex
health problems, based on WHO’s Ottawa Charter and Rootman’s basic principles. Two other
candidates shall be opponents to the presentation.
Assessment
The presentation is assessed as “failed” / “passed”.
Examination support
All available support is allowed.
6. LITERATURE
The required reading for this subject area consists of about 500 pages, of which 300 pages are
compulsory and 200 pages are supplementary.
Compulsory reading
Andrews, T. (2003). ”Nytt” ideologisk grunnlag for forebyggende helsearbeid. En diskusjon av syn på makt og
endring. Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning, 6(1), 30-42. (12 p.)
Antonovsky, A. (1996). The salutogenic model as a theory to guide health promotion. Health Promotion
International, 11 (1), 11-18. (7 p.)
CSDH (2008). Closing the gap in a generation: health equity through action on the social determinants of
health. Final Report of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Geneva: World Health
Organization. Chapter 8,10,14 & 16. (42 p.)
Jensen, B.B. (2005). Sundhedsfremme og forebyggelse- to forskjellige paradigmer. Tidskrift for forskning i
sundhedsfremme og forebyggelse, 67-87. ( 20 p.)
McQueen, C., & Kickbusch, I. (2007). Health and Modernity: The Role of Theory in Health Promotion.New
York: Springer. Pages 12-20, 74-102. (28 p.)
Rootman, I., Goodstadt, M., Hyndman, B., McQueen, D.V., Potvin, L., Springett, J. & Ziglio, E. (2001).
Evaluation in health promotion. Principles and perspectives. København: WHO Regional Publications
European Series No 92. Pages 3-40, 83-105, 341-363. (81 p.)
Tones, K., & Tilford, S. (2001). Health promotion, effectiveness, efficiency and equity. Third edition. Leeds:
Nelson Thornes Ltd.
(xx p.)
WHO (1986). The Ottawa Charter for health promotion. World Health Organisation
(http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/conferences/previous/ottawa/en/) ( 5 p.)
WHO (2002). Prevention and promotion in mental health. Geneva: World Health Organization.
http://www.who.int/mental_health/media/en/545.pdf
(20 p.)
Supplementary reading
Biong, S., & Svensson, T. (2009). Bridging the gaps: Experiencing and preventing life-threatening heroin
overdoses in men in Oslo. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 4(2),
94-105.
Borg, M. , Karlsson, B.& Kim, H.S. (2010). Double helix of research and practice – Developing a practice model
for crisis resolution and home treatment through participatory action research. Qualitative Studies on
Health and Well-being. 5: 4647 - DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v5i1.4647
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Chakravarthy, U., Wong, T.Y., & Fletcher, A. et al. (2010). Clinical risk factors for age-related macular
degeneration: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Ophthalmol.,10, 31.
Cheung, N., & Wong, T.Y. (2007). Obesity and eye diseases. Survey of ophthalmology, 52(2), 180-195.
Coleman, A.L., Stone, K.L., & Kodjebacheva, G. et al. (2008). Glaucoma risk and the consumption of fruits and
vegetables among older women in the study of osteoporotic fractures. American journal of
ophthalmology, 145(6), 1081-1089.
Eriksson, A. (2011). Health-Promoting Leadership: A Study of the Concept and Critical Conditions for
Implementation and Evaluation (Doctoral thesis). Gothenburg: Nordic School of Public Health.
Eriksson, M. & Lindström, B. (2007). Antonovsky`s Sense of Coherence Scale and It`s Relation with Quality of
Life- A systematic review. Journal Epidemilogical Community Health, 61, 938-944.
Eriksson, M., & Lindström, B. (2008). Promoting mental health- Evidence of the salutogenic framework for a
positive health development. European Psychiatry and Health, 23(Suppl. 2), 83.
Evans, J.R., Fletcher, A.E., & Wormald, R.P. (2004). Causes of visual impairment in people aged 75 years and
older in Britain: an add-on study to the MRC Trial of Assessment and Management of Older People in
the Community. The British journal of ophthalmology, 88(3), 365-370.
Fagerström, L., Wikblad, A., & Nilsson, J. (2009). An integrative research review of preventive home visits
among older people – is an individual health resource perspective a vision or a reality? Scandinavian
Journal of caring Sciences, 23, 558-568.
Frieden, T.R. (2010). A framework for public health action: the health impact pyramid. American journal of
public health, 100, 590-595.
Horgen, G., Eilertsen, G., Falkenberg, H. K. (2012). Lighting Old Age-how lighting impacts the ability to grow
old in own housing, part one. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, 41, 33853387.
HSE (2011). The Health Promotion Strategic Framework - Main Report. Health Service Executive - National
Health Promotion Office.
Lindström, B., & Eriksson, M. (2005). The salutogenic perspective and mental health. In: Herrman, H., Saxena,
S., & Moodie, R. (Eds.) Promoting mental health. Concepts, emerging evidence, practice. Geneva:
World Helath Organisation. Sidene 50-51.
Lindström, B.,& Eriksson, M. (2010). A salutogenic approach to tackling health inequalities. In: Morgan, A.,
Davies, M., & Ziglio, E. (Eds.) Health assets in a global context: Theory, methods, action. New York:
Springer.
Mezzina, R., Borg, M., Marin, I., Sells, D., Topor, A., & Davidson, L. (2006). From participation to citizenship:
How to regain a role, a status, and a life in the process of recovery. American Journal of Psychiatric
Rehabilitation, 9 (1), 39-61.
Nes, A. A. G., Eide, H., Kristjansdottir, O. B. & van Dulmen, S. (2013). Web-based, self-management enhancing
interventions with e-diaries and personalized feedback for persons with chronic illness; a tale of three
studies. Patient Education and Counseling, 93 (3), 451-58.
Simpson, A. (1999). Creating alliances: the view of users and carers on the education and training needs of
community mental health nurses. Journal of psychiatric and mental health Nursing, 6(5), 347-356.
Wadensten B. & Carlsson M. (2003). Theory-driven guidelines for practical care of older people, based on the
theory of gerotranscendence. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 41(5): 462 – 470.
Wahl A. K. & Hanestad B. R. (2004). Måling av livskvalitet i klinisk praksis: en innføring. Bergen:
Fagbokforlaget.
Whitlock, E.P., Orleans, C.T., Pender, N., Allan, J. (2002). Evaluating primary care behavioral counseling
interventions: an evidence-based approach. American journal of preventive medicine, 22: 267-284.
WHO (2009). Milestones in Health Promotion (incl. The Ottawa Charter). Geneva: World Health Organization
(http://www.who.int/healthpromotion/milestones/en/).
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
22
HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Subject 5
Elective
Evidence and Value Based
Change Processes in Healthcare
Course leaders:
Professor Lisbeth Fagerstrøm
Professor Tom Eide
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
Page 23/33
5 Credits
Spring
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge in the forefront of the changing demands facing healthcare services (nationally and
internationally) and how these changes affect the users and healthcare professionals at
interdisciplinary and organizational levels
• knowledge in the forefront of researching leadership functions, organizational culture and
managing change processes from a person-centred perspective, i.e. in relation to patients’
security and rights, user participation and person-centred healthcare services in practice
• understanding at a high international level of research methods aimed at developing
knowledge organizations and competence of healthcare personnel, such as mixed-methods
approaches and web-based experiential learning interventions
• knowledge at a high international level of processes connected to evidence-based human
resource allocation and leadership, including the evaluation of such processes
• understanding at a high international level of interdisciplinary research into ethical leadership
and values-based change processes in healthcare organizations
Skills:
• ability to develop research questions, plan and undertake research on change processes,
including competence development of healthcare personnel, ethical leadership and evidence
based human resource allocation
• use research based knowledge to contribute to innovations for better health provision, based on
an in-depth understanding of person-centred healthcare, at interdisciplinary, organizational and
systems levels
• ability to contribute to the development of new knowledge on evidence- and value-based change
processes and how the leadership of relationships, processes and culture influence the quality,
effectiveness and outcomes for consumers and personnel, as well as the organizational level
• can manage a mixed-methods approach to research and assess the appropriateness and
application of different methods of evaluation research in evidence- and values-based change
processes and resource allocation
• ability to critically examine and evaluate contemporary healthcare research from a personcentred, interdisciplinary and ethical point of view
General competences:
• can identify relevant ethical issues in the area of research on change processes in healthcare
services from the different perspectives of users, healthcare professionals and organizations
• can assess the need for and initiate innovative change processes in healthcare services
2. CONTENT
The main focus in this course is research into developing person-centred healthcare services based on
evidence- and values-based changes process. The content of the course is based on the threedimensional model of leading change in healthcare, which emphasise the importance of leading
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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relationships, processes and culture. Person-centred principles will be woven throughout the content in
order to illustrate how to investigate and reinforce connections between ethical and values-based
leadership, organizational culture and the delivery of person-centred services. Healthcare professionals
are the crucial human resource and scientific methods of assessing and developing their competence
level and of evidence-based human resource management will be presented, critically analysed and
evaluated. The impact of team collaboration and contextual factors in the environment of the
organization will be investigated, as well as the impact of various methods for improving ethical
leadership and making values live in organizations. This course unit will critically examine and
describe action research and mixed methods approaches to investigate organizational change processes
aimed at stimulating person-centred practice.
3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
The course unit will consist of lectures, student presentations and group discussions. The content is
largely based on the student’s own reading and PhD projects.
Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the ongoing debates in the study area by, for
example, reading journals, reports and other relevant documents.
4. ATTENDANCE
The group work and seminars are obligatory. Attendance at the scheduled classes is expected.
5. ASSESSMENT
The candidate will write an academic essay on a topic relevant to his/her PhD thesis within the scope
of the course.
Evaluation
The course including the essay is graded as “failed” / “passed”.
Learning support
All available support is allowed.
6. REFERENCES
The required reading for this subject area consists of about 500 pages, of which 300 pages are
compulsory and 200 pages are supplementary.
Compulsory reading
Axelsson, R. & Bihari Axelsson, S. (2006). Integration and Collaboration in Public Health: A Conceptual
Framework. International Journal of Health Planning and Management, 21: 1-14. (14 pp.)
Bond, L., P. Craig, M. Egan, K. Skivington, and H. Thomson (2010). Evaluating complex interventions. Health
improvement programmes: really too complex to evaluate? BMJ 340:c1332.
Brown, J S & Duguid, P (2001). Knowledge and Organization: A Social-Practice Perspective. Organization
Science (12) 2: 198-213. (16 pp.)
Brown, M. E. & Trevino, L. K (2003). Is values-based leadership ethical leadership? In Emerging perspectives
on values in organizations, ed. by S. W. Gilliand, D. D. Steiner & D. P. Skarlicki. Greenwich:
Information Age Publishing, pp. 151-173. (22 pp.)
Chenoweth, L., & Kilstoff, K. (2002). Organizational and structural reform in aged care organizations:
Empowerment towards a change process. Journal of Nursing Management, 10, 235-244.
doi:10.1046/j.1365-2834.2002.00301.x (10 pp.)
Fagerström L. (2009). Evidence-based human resource management: a study of nurse leaders' resource
allocation. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, 415–425. (11 pp.)
Fagerström, L. & Salmela, S. (2010). Leading change: a challenge for leaders in Nordic Healthcare. Journal of
Nursing Management, 18, 613-617. (5 pp.)
Fagerström, L. & Rauhala, A. (2007). Benchmarking in nursing care by the RAFAELA patient classification
system. Journal of Nursing Management, 15, 683-692. (10 pp.)
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Page 25/33
Henriksson, L., Wrede, S. & Bureau, V. (2006). Understanding professional projects in welfare service work:
Revival of old professionalism? Gender, Work and Organization, 13, 2, 174-192. (20 pp.)
Institute of Medicine (2001). Crossing the Quality Chasm. A New Health System for the 21st Century. National
Academy Press, Washington. (3, p 61-88, 5, p. 111-144. (33 pp.)
Kotter J.P. (1996) Leading change. Harward Business School Press, Boston. (Specific chapters).
Morgan, P.I. & E. Ogbonna (2008). Subcultural dynamics in transformation: A multi perspective study of
healthcare professionals. Human relations, 61, 39-65. (22 pp.)
Olsvold, N. (2003). Profesjonsetikk i helsereformenes tid. Sosiologi i dag, 33, 2, 5 - 30. (25 s.)
Long A. Evaluations on practice. Shaw IF, Greene JC, Mark MM (red) (2006). The Sage Handbook of
evaluation. London, Sage Publications LTD. (p. 461- 485) (25 pp.)
Salmela S, Eriksson K & Fagerström L. 2011. Leading change: A three dimensional model of nurse leaders main
tasks and roles during a change process. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 68(2):423-433. (11 pp.)
Schwandt TA, Burgon H. Evaluation and the study of lived experiences. I Shaw IF, Greene JC, Mark MM (red)
(2006). The Sage Handbook of evaluation. London , Sage Publications LTD. (p. 98 – 119) (20 pp.)
Weick, Karl E., David Obstfeld, and Kathleen M. Sutcliffe (1999). Organizing for high reliability: Processes of
collective mindfulness. Research in Organizational Behavior 21:81-123. (42 pp.)
Young, M. (2009). A meta model of change. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 22(5), 524-548.
doi:1108/09534810983488 (25 pp.)
Aadland, E. (2010). Values in professional practice - toward a critical reflective methodology. Journal of
Business Ethics (97): 461–472. (12 pp.)
Øvretveit, J. (2003). Action Evaluation of Health Programmes and Changes : A Handbook for a User-Focused
Approach. Berkshire. Open University Press (chapter 1,2, 11-12) (75 pp.)
Supplementary reading
Ahrenfelt, B. (2001). Förändring som tillstånd. Att leda förändrings- och utvecklingsarbete i företag och
organisationer. 2 upplagan; Lund: Studentlitteratur; 2001. Kap 1 s. 19-37, kap 12 s. 273-292.
Cambridge, Paul & Steven Carnaby (eds.) (2005). Person Centred Planning and Care Management with People
with Learning Disabilities. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley
Eide, H., Kristjánsdoóttir, Ó.B., Nes, A.(2011). Kommunikasjonsteknologisk helseveiledning - kognisjon,
emosjonalitet og betydningen av situasjonsfeedback. I Lerdal A og Fagermoen MS (red). Læring og
mestring - et helsefremmende perspektiv i praksis og forskning. Oslo: Gyldendal Akademisk
Feldman, Martha C. (2000). Organizational routines as a source of continuous change. Organization Science 11,
611–29.
Feldman, Martha C. & B. T. Pentland (2003). Reconceptualizing organizational routines as a source of flexibility
and change. Administrative Science Quarterly.94-118.
Fleuren, M., Wiefferink, K., & Paulussen, T. (2004). Determinants of innovation within health care
organizations Literature review and Delphi study. International journal for quality in health care, 16
(2), 107-123.
Kristjansdottir,. Ó.B., Fors, E. A., Eide, E., Finset, A., van Dulmen, S., Stensrud, T. L., Wigers, S. H. Eide, H. A
smartphone-based intervention with diaries and therapist-feedback to reduce catastrophizing and
increase functioning in women with chronic widespread pain: randomized controlled trial. Journal of
Medical Internet Research. 2013 Jan 7;15(1):e5. doi: 10.2196/jmir.2249.
Kristjansdottir,. Ó.B., Fors, E. A., Eide, E., Finset, A., van Dulmen, S., Stensrud, T. L., Wigers, S. H. Eide, H. A
smartphone-based intervention with diaries and therapist-feedback to reduce catastrophizing and
increase functioning in women with chronic widespread pain. Part 2. 11-month results of a randomized
controlled trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research Res 2013 | vol. 15 | iss. 3 | e72 |
McCormack, B, Manlye. K., Titchen, A. (eds) (2013). Practice Development in nursing and health care. 2nd
edition. Chichester, Jon Wiley et sons.
Poksinska, B. 2010. 'The current state of Lean implementation in health care: literature review.' Quality
Management in Health Care, 19:4, 319-29.
Reynolds, M. & Vince, R. (eds. 2004). Organizing reflection. Aldershot & Burlington: Ashgate.
Shaw, I.F., Greene, J.C. & Mark, M.M. (red) (2006). The Sage Handbook of evaluation. London: Sage
Publications LTD.
Tjora A, Sandaunet A-G. (red). (2010). Digitale pasienter. Oslo: Gyldedal Akademisk.
Walshe, K. & Boaden, R. (ed.) (2005). Patient Safety – research into practice. GBR: Mc Graw-Hill Education.
http://site.ebrary.com/lib/hibu/docDetail.action?docID=10175171
PHDEXKNO500
Experiential and Expert
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
5 credits
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
25
HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Elective
Knowledge in Mental Health care
– Understandings and Practices
Course leaders:
Professor Marit Borg
Professor Bengt Karlsson
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
Page 26/33
Autumn/spring
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge in the forefront in the area of experience-based knowledge development in personcentred mental health care
• understanding at a high international level of the complexity of knowledge development
pertaining to the concepts of knowledge- and practice-based evidence in person-centred
mental health care
• knowledge in the forefront and understanding of collaborative practices in mental health care
• understanding at a high international level of collaborative research methodologies
Skills:
• ability to formulate research questions and plan research in the area of experiential knowledge
and collaborative practices in person-centred mental health care
• ability to assess and justify perspectives and theories relevant to his/her research project
• ability to challenge established knowledge and practice in person-centred mental health
research and services
• ability to critically analyse and evaluate the experiential knowledge of service users, patients,
carers and healthcare professionals as a basis for research and service transformation in
person-centred mental health care
• ability to contribute to the development of new knowledge, theories and methods and offer
advice about policies and services in a person-centred mental health field
General competences:
• can critically reflect on collaborative practices at both micro (face to face) and macro
(community) levels
• can assess the need for practice innovation
2. CONTENT
This course unit is particularly concerned with the emergence of new understanding and paradigms of
person-centred care and support and their implications for mainstream policies, services, practices and
professions. What distinguishes these new approaches is that they come from people with direct
experience of care and support, including mental health professionals working in this field. These new
approaches also consider an awareness of contexts as being central to knowledge development.
The primary focus will be on different perspectives of experiential knowledge in person-centred
mentalhealth care, the development of collaborative practices in clinical work and the methodical and
scientific contribution of the candidate to systematizing and developing different areas of experiential
learning in person-centred mental health care. Relationships between differing views of knowledge
and organizational frameworks will also be explored. The content described above will be
disseminated via the following contexts and topics:
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Page 27/33
Recovery as a social and individual process.
Crisis resolution and home treatment.
Person-centred and hopeful practices.
Client-directed outcome-informed practices.
Collaborative practices in person-centred mental health care.
Methods for the systematization of experiential knowledge.
3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
The teaching and learning methods will consist of a combination of lectures, group work and
presentations based on the lecture topics and the candidates’ own on-going research work.
4. ATTENDANCE
The group work and seminars are obligatory. Attendance at the scheduled classes is expected.
5. ASSESSMENT
The final assignment is a 3000-word (±10%) essay based on the literature review that the candidate
has performed during the semester. The essay will focus on a self-chosen topic related to the
experiential knowledge of service users, patients, carers and health personnel in mental health care.
The selected topic must also reflect the candidates’ own experiential learning in person-centred mental
health care. The assignment will be presented orally on the final teaching day.
The assignment will be graded as “failed” / “passed”.
Learning support
All available support is allowed.
6. LITERATURE
The required reading for this subject area consists of 500 pages, of which 300 pages are compulsory
and 200 pages are supplementary.
Compulsory reading
Anderson, H. (2007). The heart and spirit of collaborative therapy: The philosophical stance – “A way of being”
in relationship and conversation. In H. Anderson & D. Gerhart (eds.), Collaborative therapy –
Relationsships and conversations that make a difference (pp. 43-59). New York: Routledge. (16 p.)
Beresford, P. (2007). The role of service user research in generating knowledge-based health and social care:
From conflict to contribution, Evidence & Policy. A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice, 3(3):
329- 341. (12 p.)
Bronstein, L. (2003). A model for interdisciplinary collaboration. Social Work, 48(3), 297-306. 9 p.
Borg, M. & Davidson, L. (2008). Recovery as lived in everyday experience, Journal of Mental Health. 17(2),
129-141. (12p.)
Borg, M., Karlsson, B. & Kim, H.S. (2009). User involvement in community mental health services –principles
and practices. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 16 (3), 285–292. (7 p.)
Borg, M., Karlsson, B. & Kim, H.S. (2010). Double helix of research and practice – Developing a practice model
for crisis resolution and home treatment through participatory action research. Qualitative Studies on
Health and Well-being. 5: 4647 - DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v5i1.4647.(8 p.)
Borg, M., Karlsson, B., Kim, H.S. & McCormack, B. (2012). Opening Up For Many Voices in Knowledge
Construction. Forum: Qualitative Social Research. FQS, 13(1). 1-16. (15 p.)
Borg, M., Lofthus, A.M., Karlsson, B. & Davidson, L. (2011). Hitting the wall”: Lived experiences of mental
health crises. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 6(4), 7197. (8 p.).
Borg, M. & Askeheim, O.P. ( 2010). Deltagerbasert forskning i psykisk helsearbeid – et bidrag til mer ’brukbar’
kunnskap? Tidsskrift for psykisk helsearbeid, 7(2), 100-110. (10 p.)
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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Biong, S., Karlsson, B. & Svensson, T. (2008). Metaphors of a shifting sense of self in men recovering from
substance abuse and suicidal behaviour. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services,
46(4), 35-41. (6 p.).
Biong, S. & Ravndal, E. (2009). Living in a maze: Health, well-being and coping in young non-western men in
Scandinavia experiencing substance abuse and suicidal behaviour. International Journal on Qualitative
Studies on Health and Well-being, 4(1), 4-16. (12 p.).
Bryant, W., Vacher, G., Beresford, P. and McKay, E. (2010). The modernisation of mental health day services:
participatory action research exploring social networking, Mental Health Review Journal, 15(3), 11- 21.
(10 p.).
Crocker, A., Trede, F., & Higgs, J. (2012). Collaboration: what is it like? – Phenomenological interpretation of
the experience of collaborating within rehabilitation teams. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 26(1),
13-20. (7 p.)
D'Amour, D., Ferrada-Videla, M., Rodrijuez, L. S., & Beaulieu, M. (2005). The conceptual basis for
interprofessional collaboration: Core concepts and theoretical frameworks. Journal of Interprofessional
Care, Supplement 1: 116-131. (15 p.)
Finay, L. (2010). Phenomenology for therapists. Wiley-Blackwell. Part I and II. p.3- 157. (154 pp).
Herrestad, H. & Biong, S. (2010). Relational hopes: A study of the lived experience of hope in some patients
hospitalized for intentional self harm. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Wellbeing. 5: 4651 - DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v5i1.4651. (10 p.).
Karlsson, B., Borg, M. & Kim, S.H. ( 2008). From good intentions to real life: introducing crisis resolution
teams in Norway. Nursing Inquriry. 15(3), 206-215. (9 pp).
Rose, D., Thornicroft, G. & Slade, M. (2006) Who decides what evidence is? Developing a multiple perspectives
paradigm in mental health. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavia, 113 (Suppl 429), 109-114. (5 p.).
Sundet, R. (2009). Collaboration: Family and therapists’ perspectives of helpful therapy. Journal of Marital and
Family Therapy, doi:10.1111/j.1752-0606.2009.00157.x. (11 p.).
Sundet, R. (2010). Therapeutic collaboration and formalized feedback: Using perspectives from Vygotsky and
Bakhtin to shed light on practices in a family therapy. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 15(1),
81-95. (14 p.).
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
PHDPCP500
Elective
Person-Centred Healthcare for
Elders and Persons living with a
Dementia
Course leaders:
Professor Kirsti Skovdahl
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
Page 29/33
5 credits
Autumn/spring
1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
The candidate will have acquired the following competences upon completing this course unit:
Knowledge:
• knowledge in the forefront about how person-centred healthcare is manifested and applied
with individuals as well as in different contexts providing healthcare to elders and persons
living with a dementia
Skills:
• ability to critically evaluate research about person-centeredness and formulate its´ application
to healthcare for older people and especially to persons living with a dementia
• ability to formulate appropriate design and critically assess / or discuss the principles of
person-centred healthcare in relation to own research
• can critically value and reflect upon perspectives and approaches related to person-centred
healthcare within research and guidelines relevant for healthcare to elders and/or persons
living with a dementia
General competence:
• can critically evaluate and participate in collaborative person-centred practice developments
within healthcare for elders in different life conditions and persons living with a dementia
• can identify and evaluate relevant and current research questions pertaining to his/her research
focus
• can critically evaluate own methodological approaches to answering research questions in
relation to ethical considerations and person-centred healthcare to elders and/or persons living
with a dementia
2. CONTENT
This course aims to provide specialized knowledge of person-centred healthcare with a particular
focus on
• The philosophy underpinning person-centred healthcare and how this can be manifested in
different healthcare contexts for elders and persons living with a dementia
• Opportunities and obstacles for the development of person-centred healthcare for elders and
persons living with a dementia from the perspectives of society, healthcare, industry and
different cultures
• Experiences of healthcare among elders and persons living with a dementia and outcomes for
person-centred healthcare in relation to evidence, organization and environment
• Interventions for promoting health, well-being and participation for a good quality of life (for
example communication skills) for elders experiencing disability or disturbances such as
stroke, fatigue, pain, or sleep disturbances
• How person-centred healthcare can be studied or assessed among elders and persons living
with a dementia and with particular focus on those who have difficulties promoting own
wishes and needs
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
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HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
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Study year 2014 – 2017
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3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
The course consists of 3 days of classroom-based seminars and lectures, with active participation and
discussion among the candidates. Another part of this course consists of literature studies on an
elective topic with relevance for person-centered healthcare for older persons and/or persons living
with a dementia, which are undertaken outside the formal timetable. During the course there will be
opportunities for the students to discuss the course topics in relation to their own ongoing studies.
4. ATTENDANCE
The group work and seminars are obligatory. Attendance at the scheduled classes is expected.
5. ASSESSMENT
The course will end with an examination that consist of two obligatory parts: 1) An individual written
paper of about 4000 words focusing on theories of person-centered healthcare consistent with and
applied to the candidate’s ongoing research. 2) The paper will be discussed at a seminar where the
presenter will have an appointed opponent, who together with active researchers within the field of
healthcare for elders and/or dementia care will debate the topic.
Learning support
All available supports are allowed
6. LITERATURE
Compulsory reading
Alnes, R. E., Kirkevold, M., & Skovdahl K. (2011) Marte Meo Counselling: a promising tool to support positive
interactions between residents with dementia and nurses in nursing homes Journal of Research in
Nursing, Sept., 16 415-43. http://jrn.sagepub.com/content/16/5/415.full.pdf+html
Brooker, D. (2007). Personcentered dementia care – making services better. London: Jessica Kingsley
Publishers.
Edvardsson, D., Sandman, P.-O. & Rasmussen, B. (2008). Swedish language Person-centred Climate
Questionnaire – patient version: construction and psychometric evaluation. Journal of Advanced
Nursing, 63:3, 302–09.
Harré, R. (1998). The singular self. An introduction of the psychology of personhood. London: Sage
Kitwood, T. (1997). Dementia reconsidered – the person comes first. England: Bell & Bain ltd.
McCance, T., McCormack, B. & Dewing, J. (2011). 'An Exploration of Person-Centredness in Practice.' The
online journal of issues in nursing, 16: 2, Manuscript 1.
McCormack, B. (2001). Negotiating partnerships with older people : a person centred approach. Aldershot,
Hampshire, England ; Burlington, VT, USA: Ashgate.
McCormack, B., Dewing, J., Breslin, L., Coyne-Nevin, A., Kennedy, K., Manning, M., Peelo-Kilroe, L., Tobin,
C. & Slater, P. (2010). Developing person-centred practice: nursing outcomes arising from changes to
the care environment in residential settings for older people. International Journal of Older People
Nursing, 5, 93-107.
Nolan, M.R., Davis, S., Brown, J., Keady, J. & Nolan, J. (2004). Beyond “personcentered” care: a new vision for
gerontological nursing. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13(3a),45-53. (8 p.)
Sjögren, K., Lindkvist, M., Sandman, P. O., Zingmark, K. & Edvardsson, D. (2013). Person-centredness and its
association with resident well-being in dementia care units. J Adv Nurs. [Jan 21. Epub ahead of print].
Skovdahl, K., Sörlie, V. & Kihlgren, M. (2007). Tactile stimulation associated with nursing care to individuals
with dementia showing aggressive or restless tendencies. An intervention in the dementia care. Journal
of Older People Nursing, 2, 162-170. (8 p.)
Von Humboldt S & Leak I (2012). Building bridges: Person-centered therapy with older adults. European
Journal of Business and Social Sciences. 1 (8) pp 23-32.
Supplementary reading
Brooker, Dawn (2007). Person-centred dementia care making services better. Bradford Dementia Group good
practice guides. London & Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Edvardsson, D., Sjögren, K., Lindkvist, M., Taylor, M., Edvardsson, K. & Sandman, P. O. 2013 'Person-centred
climate questionnaire (PCQ-S): establishing reliability and cut-off scores in residential aged care.' J
Nurs Manag. [Epub ahead of print].
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Study year 2014 – 2017
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Edvardsson, D., Winblad, B. & Sandman, P. O. 2008. 'Person-centred care of people with severe Alzheimer's
disease: current status and ways forward.' Lancet Neurol., 7:4, 362-7.
Jeffrey, David (2006). Patient-centred ethics and communication at the end of life. Oxford & Seattle: Radcliffe.
Taylor, Helen J. (2005). Assessing the Nursing and Care Needs of Older Adults: A Patient-centred Approach.
Oxon, UK: Radcliffe Publishing.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
31
HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
PHDDISS500
Mandatory
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
Page 32/33
150 credits
Dissertation
Supervisors
Norwegian and English
PhD programme in person-centred healthcare
Autumn/spring
Dissertation
The dissertation consists of an independent, scientific work of high academic standards with regard to
problem statements, definition of concepts, methodological, theoretical and empirical bases,
documentation and form of presentation. The dissertation shall contribute to the development of new
academic knowledge and be at an academic standard justifying its publication as part of the scientific
literature of the relevant field.
The dissertation can be either a monograph or a collection of 3-5 publishable articles, where at least
two must have been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.
If the dissertation consists of a collection of articles, their content shall constitute a whole research
programme, bounded within a dissertation framework. In addition to the individual articles, an
introduction and a summary describing the whole of the dissertation must be provided. The
introduction to the dissertation shall present the research agenda; positioning the research in relation to
existing knowledge and the theoretical propositions addressed in the dissertation. The articles must be
at a high level of quality required for publishing in acknowledged scientific journals with peer review.
The summary shall not only recapitulate, but also put together the questions raised in the individual
articles and their conclusions in an overall perspective. It is also required that the summary explains
the contributions to new knowledge in the field. In case of multiple authors in one or more of the
articles, the candidate must document an independent contribution.
The dissertation can be written in Norwegian, another Nordic language or English.
Knowledge
• knowledge in the forefront of theories, methods and research designs and of the current
debates, positions and arguments concerning different approaches to person-centred healthcare
research
• knowledge in the forefront of the on-going person-centred research in his/her own area of
specialization, including theory developments in the field
•
•
knowledge in the forefront of philosophy of science, research ethics and special ethical issues
relating to cross-disciplinary, person-centred healthcare research
Skills
• ability to contribute to new scientific knowledge and critical discussions of theories and
methods within the field of person-centred healthcare research
• ability to develop research questions and designs aiming at producing new knowledge to
support person-centredness in healthcare practice and to undertake such research at a high
academic level
• ability to critically evaluate the applicability of various research designs and the quality of
others’ research in the field of person-centredness
• ability to handle cross-disciplinary challenges in person-centred healthcare research and to
contribute the development, performance and evaluation of cross-disciplinary research
projects
General competence
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
32
HBV – Faculty of Health Sciences
•
•
•
•
PhD in person-centred healthcare
Study year 2014 – 2017
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ability to contribute to innovation and healthcare improvements through person-centred
research and dissemination of research results
ability to communicate research findings in the field of person-centred health-care through
recognized national and international academic channels and to participate in crossdisciplinary academic discussions
ability to identify and handle relevant research ethical issues and to carry out research projects
with moral consideration and professional integrity
ability to transfer skills and manage complex, cross-disciplinary projects designed for
assignments both in research and the practice field of person-centred healthcare
3. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
During the work with the thesis the PhD candidates are offered regular individual supervision. It is
expected that the candidates will prepare an application for the national research ethical board. In
addition the candidates will participate in different seminars to discuss and present their work in
different part of their progress.
PhD seminars are held every month, 2-4 candidates present their work and receive prepared feedback
from other candidates and senior researchers.
Research seminars in research groups are mandatory for the candidates. These seminars will create an
advanced seminar for the candidates, where they can discuss specific topics relevant for their
dissertation.
Mid- term evaluation will be mandatory for all candidates. Here a presentation of the final draft for the
dissertation will be evaluated from a committee consisting of one external and one internal member of
the faculty staff. The candidates must “pass” this evaluation before handing in the final dissertation.
4. FINAL ASSESSMENT
The dissertation will be an independent scientific work that meets the international standards of the
field. The dissertation will contribute to the development of new knowledge and be at a level that
allows it to be published in the academic literature.
The dissertation can be either a collection of published journal articles or a monograph. In the former
case the dissertation will also include a summary of the articles in the form of an abstract and an
integrated framework presenting the scientific contribution of the thesis. Contributions to collaborative
work in the collected articles will be accepted for assessment provided that the candidate’s
independent own work can be identified and assessed. In such circumstances, declarations of
authorship will normally be obtained from the other authors and any others who have contributed to
the work so as to facilitate accurate identification of the candidate’s work § 4-1 Regulations for the
Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) at HBV.
The articles included in the dissertation must be of sufficiently high academic standard to be accepted
for publication in peer-reviewed journals.
The number of articles to be included in the dissertation will be assessed on the basis of their quality,
depth and breadth, but normally three to five articles are required, of which at least two have been
accepted for publication in peer-reviewed journals and at least two have the candidate as the first or
sole author. This requirement may be waived under special circumstances.
The following requirements apply with respect to the dissertation:
• At least two articles have been published
• There is evidence of the results being disseminated.
• A period of study abroad has been undertaken.
• Annual progress reports have been provided.
Name of file:
Curriculum, PhD in person-centred healthcare
Date: 27.08.14
Sign: LF/VNN/TE/HE
33
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