THE BUFF AND BLUE VOL 10 NO 1_19011101.pdf

Document technical information

Format pdf
Size 4.0 MB
First found May 19, 2016

Document content analisys

Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts
no text concepts found

Persons

N. E. Brown
N. E. Brown

wikipedia, lookup

Thomas Sheridan (actor)
Thomas Sheridan (actor)

wikipedia, lookup

Aaron A. Brooks
Aaron A. Brooks

wikipedia, lookup

Philip J Day
Philip J Day

wikipedia, lookup

George Eliot
George Eliot

wikipedia, lookup

N. J. Rao
N. J. Rao

wikipedia, lookup

Samuel Porter Jones
Samuel Porter Jones

wikipedia, lookup

John W. King
John W. King

wikipedia, lookup

Arnaldus de Villa Nova
Arnaldus de Villa Nova

wikipedia, lookup

Organizations

Places

Transcript

T;/'.S5­*rJ'^'i?SAS!>%'j­'35i­?'^'i­tlL''^Kfi^
!E>=<E!~X:
xm>
KOTEMBER. 1901.
jl
y
■f^''&^?-
1 ^ .
X
AND
y
y
yf'M^X^
GALUUDET
COLLEGE
»o<_IX
IflftSHlNfiTORlXC.
■>^^:^ig,!
GALEAUbET GOLLEGE^
a<>RI>ORiLTlO]Sr.
^
PATBON.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT, President of the U nited States. ;
EDWARD M. GALLAUDET, Ph. D., LL. D.
BECEETAKY.
U
TEEAS BEK.
HoH. J O H N B. WIGHT.
'
LEWIS J. DAVIS, Bed.
DIEECTOES.
How. FRANCIS M. COCKRELL, Senator from Missouri.
H O N . CHARLES A . RU SSELL, M. C. from Connecticut.
H O N . SAMU EL W. T. LANHAM, M. C. from Texas.
H O N . H E N R Y L . DAWES, of Massachusetts.
H O N . JOSEPH R. HAWLEY, Senator from Connecticut.
H O N . J O H N W. FOSTER, of Washington, D. C.
LEWIS J. DAVIS, Es<i., of Washington, D. a
R. ROSS PERRY, Esq., Washington, D. C.
EDWARD M. GALLAU DET, Ph. D., LL. D.,
President, and Professor of Moisl and Folltieal Sdenee.'
E D W A R D A. FAY, M. A., P h . D.,
Yice-Presideiit, and Professor of Ziangaages.
R E V . JOHN W. CHICKERING, M. A.
Emeritus Professor of Xatoral Science and Lectorer on Fedacogr.
JOHN B. HOTCHKISS, M. A.,
Professor of History and English.
AMOS G. DRAPER, M. A.,
Professor of Mathematics and Latin.
CHARLES B. E L Y , M. A., P h . D.,
Professor of Natural Science.
PEECIVAL HALL, M. A.,
Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
HEBBERT E. DAY, M. A.
Assistant Professor of Katnral Science.
ALLAN B. FAY, M. A.,
Instmctor in English and Latin.
ELIZABETH PEET,
'
Instractor in English.
ALBERT C.GAW,M. A., ! '
Instmctor In History.
ARTHUR D. BBYANT, B. Ph.,
Instructor in Drawing.
ALBEET F. ADAMS, M. A ,
Instructor in Qjrmnastlcs.
I>i;PiLSTMi;iSrT o r
PERCIVAL HALL, M. A.,:
Professor in Charge.
ASSISTANTB.
Insbrvetor.
K A T E H. FISH,
Normal FdUncs.
CLAUDE R. McIVEE, B. Ph.,
Univ. of N . C , North Carolina.
, ■
JOSIE HELEN DOBSON,
Instructor In Gynmartiei
J L R T l < 3U I , i L T I O N .
H A R R Y F. BEST B. A.,
Centre College, Danville, Ky.
F R A N K O. HUFFMAN, B. A.
Wake Forest College, N . C.
BERTHA G. PATEBSON, R A.,
Ohio State U niversity, Ohio.
GUSSIE H. GREENER, B. A.
Ohio State U niversity, Ohio.
%WM:
TM.%
BUFF AND BLUE
Volume X—Number 1.
Xlovcmbev, \<^0\,
CONDUCTED
BY T H E UNDERGRADUATES
OF
GALLAUDET COLLEGE
WASHINGTON, D . C .
< S O N T i ; N T S r O B . lsrOYE;MBi;K,
IQOl.
W H E N AUTUMN COMES,
S,
37
FICTION AND ITS INFLUENCE,
IT,
38
'05,
40
T H E MASTER HANDS,
"A
J. H. K.,
The Victim, 43
LITTLE NONSENSE, ETC.,"
T H E BUBRO,
A DAY UPON LONG ISLAND SOUND,
K. S., '05,
45
H. F.,
49
SCRAPS
63
EDITORIAL
56
ALUMNI
60
LOCALS
71
ATHLETICS
EXCHANGES
75
;
80
THE BTTFF AND BUTE is published monthly during the college year by
the undergraduates of Gallaudet College.
Contributions from the undergraduates, and information regarding Alumni
and former students, are earnestly solicited. Articles by Alumni and former
students are also greatly desired.
All articles submitted must be accompanied by the author's full name or
initials. Should they be deemed unsuitable they will be returned.
The subscription price is $1.00 per college year, payable in advance..
Single copies, 15 cents; to subscribers, 10 cents. Sample copies mailed upon
request. Subscribers not receiving a current issue before the 28th of the
month will please notify the Business Manager.
Advertising rates made known upon application.
Advertisers desiring a change in the wording of their announcements
should notify the Business Manager before the 9th day of each month, so as to
insure the change.
Address all communications to
T H E B U F F AND BLUE,
GALLAUDET COLLEGE,
"WASHINGTON, D . C .
Entered at the Washington post-office as second-class mail matter.
^ e guff and glue.
BOARD O F E D I T O R S .
JOHN H. CLAKK, '02, Utah,
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF.
-
ELIZABETH DELOSQ, '02, Utah,
WILHELMF. ScHSEIDKE, '02, Ohio,
AssociAT?; EDITOKS.
P E T E S T . H P O H E S , '03, Missouri,
JOHN B . HOTCHKISS, '69, Connecticut,
A B T H U B O. STEIDEIIAN, '02, Missouri,
EDITH FITZQEBALD, '03, Illinois,
FBEDEBICE J. NEESAU, '04, Wisconsio,
A S T H U B L . BOBBBTS, '04, Kansas,
EzBA C. WTAKD, '02, Maryland,
H A B L E T D . DBAKE, '04, Ohio,
VOL. X.
ALmitn EDITOB.
-
LOCAL EDITOBS.
ATHLETIC EDITOB.
EXCHANGE EDITOB.
-
-
-
-
BnsiNEaa MANAGBE.
ASS'T. BHSIKESS MAKAGEB.
NOVEMBER, 1901.
( RONDEAU.)
W h e n a u t u m n comes t h e w i n d s blow chill,
F r o m lake and wood and w i n d i n g rill:
A n d w i l d birds seek t h e i r southern ways.
B u t over all a pnrple haze
Makes soft the lines of tree and h i l l ;
A n d tho' t h e woods and streams grow
still.
D a m e Nature paints e a c h leaf, until
T h e earth h e r loveliest h u e s displays
W h e n autumn comes.
A n d s o I crave n o m a g i c skill
T o w i n back youth w i t h a l l i t s fill
Of heat and noise, these d i m m e r days
Y e t richer are with love's pure w a y s ;
A n d peaceful j o y s life's h o p e fulfill
W h e n autumn comes.
No. 2.
The Bufi and Blue.
F K 3 T I O N iL2Sri> I T S
I
TN^I^TJ^T^UKS^.
T was not until within the last two hundred years that the influence of this branch of literature began to be felt in the
literary world, and to-day works of fiction are not by any means
considered trival or insignificent in prose literature. In this, as in
any other line of exertion, merit is not to be judged by the department that the person chooses, but by the degree of excellence
attained in it.
A novelist does hot always acquire his reputation by the subject he chooses, or by the abundance of his writings, but by the
amount of naturalness that he is able to infuse into his productions.
For instance, a novel, having a very excellent plot, may be written
and yet given rather scant attention all on account of the lack of
natural finish and faithfulness of detail which are essential to the
success of any work of fiction. On the other hand the delineator
of the simple and humble scenes in life, if he but pictures them
faithfully and truly, if his sentiments are lofty, his perceptions
accurate, and all the colorings natural, will be known to every one
in every land. Some of these delineators were Dickens, BulwerLytton, George Eliot, Hugo and Dumas, pere. The various phases
and scenes in life portrayed by these noted writers, the sentiments
expressed therein; all these are brought forth in the simplest and
most natural manner.
Many writers in fiction, who have not attained so high a place
in literature as Dickens, Dumas, Eliot or Lytton, have left behind
them many beautiful conceptions of beings who win their way to
every heart, of domestic pictures which we all admire, of love, of
virtue, of victories won in moral and physical strife, all these so
real that one can not contemplate them without being influenced
for the good, and feeling that an example has been set for them and
that they should not fail to follow it.
The world is fiiU of novels and romances of low tone, bad
taste, voluptuous coloring and questionable morality. These books
Fiction and its Influence.
39
have an evil and depressing effect on their readers. They appeal
to the baser nature of the individual, and the influence that they
exert is not for the good. Novels of this sort and all other cheap
fiction that excite passion and turn the mind of the young reader—
he is nearly always a youth that indulges in this cheap fiction—
should be left alone and out of reach of those that they harm. On
the other hand those of a purer nature and of a higher tendency
are, we believe, among the most effective agents of good.
Whether a study should be written with some definite aim in
view or not iS'a question in which all are not of one mind. Mrs.
Stowe, in her "Uncle Tom's Cabin" aimed to stir up sympathy among
the Northern 'people for the Negro slave in the South. Dickens in
" Nicholas Nickleby " presented to the English people the horrible
conditions existing at the boarding schools without even giving the
slightest hint about the object he had in view. The people were
not slow in realizing that something wrong was going on in their
boarding schools, and they were not slow in reforming these
abuses. There may be some moralizing and exhortations in works
of fiction, but the less of either the better. Without these being
brought to him directly the reader can see all, how suflering is
borne, how victory is won, how vice is overcome, how peace and
good are made to spring out of evil. He may meet with reflections
which cast a sudden light upon him and reveal to him the sad
secrets of his own existence, and give him a good and faithful example that he feels he ought to follow.
Works of fiction which thus operate upon the minds of their
readers are by no means always the ones that always display the
greatest genius of the author. All that is necessary for such eflfects
is fidelity to nature, the proper style and the right subject. The
author who remains faithful to these, whatever the school of novelists, to which he or she belongs, will always have a place in the
hearts of lovers of good literature.
40
The Buff and Blue.
T H i ; M i I S T 3 5 K HiLlSTBiS.
O
UTSIDE the storm was raging furiously. A cold, biting wind
roared through the forest bending the tall trees. The crashing
of branches added to the tumult of the wild war of the elements.
Across the open spaces of the low lands, the gale and hissing rain
had flattened the grass to the earth. In the seclusion of mj cozy
den I pitied any living creature caught out in this black night.
Drawing my easy chair close to a cheery fire, I sought forgetfulness
in the pages of a musty volume, picked at random from the shelves
of a well stocked library.
The house I was then occupying was an old colonial mansion.
It stood on the summit of a hill, commanding a view of the surrounding country, a wearying outlook of swamp and woodland,
stretching away for miles. Back of the house lay an unbroken
forest where it was always twilight, for the sunshine never penetrated the thick green roof.
It was a mere whim that possessed my chums. Bob Loring
and Jack Heath and myself to rent this lonely spot for a few months.
Time's hand had not rested lightly on the house or its surroundings.
The nearest village was twelve miles away, but the low price asked
for rent made us lose sight of all other inconveniences. My two
companions had gone away to town early in the morning, promising
to be back before midnight, so I settled myself to await their
arrival. |
The volume before me proved to be a treatise on chiromancy
by some obscure writer of the eighteenth century. It was mainly
interesting for its quaint language and numerous intricate diagrams
which I took pleasure in unravelling. I must have been dozing
over the book for I was suddenly startled by an unusually loud
noise. A shutter had become unfastened by the wind and swung
to with great force. I arose to fasten it and succeeded with some
difficulty, as the wind was blowing strongly and almost took my
The Master Hands.
4^
breath away. As I was about to close the sash, to my amazement
I saw two hands placed on the window-sill, a moment later cross
the room, and move a chair near the table. For a short space I
stood staring at the hands trying to collect my scattered wits.
Judging from the way the hands crossed the room and their position at the table, they must, I concluded, belong to some invisible
body. My curiosity was aroused, so I resumed my place near the
fire and watched my intruders on the table nearby.
They were small like the hands of a woman, and perfectly
formed, seemingly carved from the whitest of marble. Every
finger-nail and line was visible. Around them glimmered a phosphorescent light. The fire sank down, the room grew cold and the
darkness was intensified by the nebulous halo around the hands.
Suddenly they tapped three times on the table, each tap louder
than the first, and 1 was aware they were forming the letters of the
manual alphabet. Slowly and distinctly they made the letters,
pausing as if to emphasize each word.
" We are the Master Hands. We control the hands of all the
living and all the dead. On the living we carve the past and
future. Ours is the power that backs the hand be the deed good,
or be it evil. All return to us when relaxed in the last, long sleep.
With the body we have naught to do. Only the hands are ours."
Thrice again the hands tapped and at each tap the fire flared
higher. One finger pointed to a dark corner of the room from
whence came a rustling sound like a soft wind in summer passing
through a vast forest. I followed the direction with my eyes.
Out of the gloom came a straggling procession of hands ; white,
yellow, brown and black ; hands of men, women and children.
They were lean with the skin shrunken to the bone. They rattled
loosely as they passed before me, thousands upon thousands of
them, members of bodies I could not see. Some pointed at me
scornfully, others clinched threateningly and many stretched toward
me as if imploring aid. Transfixed with horror I sat watching the
ghastly procession pass and disappear in the light of the fire. The
Master Hands were tapping steadily on the table. The rattling
noise swelled louder. Suddenly it ceased. The fire burned low
again and I was alone in the darkness with the Master Hands.
"Famine and disease yielded all these to us," spelled the
42
The Buff" and Blue.
hands. " You shall see others " again the hands tapped and the
smouldering embers flashed into light.
They came in orderly array swinging rythmically to the silent,
measured tread of their owners, Hands of men and boys, blackened
with powder and stained with blood. Many were rough and tanned
with hard work and exposure in the open air, some were those of
gentlemen looking white and soft as in a drawing room. Regiment
after regiment passed in review before their masters. None threatened. Never did the steady swing cease. They came on silently,
and disappeared in the circle of light cast by the fire. Three slow
taps from the Master Hands, the grim review vanished, and a darkness nameless and appalling, with a silence still more vast weighed
me down, while the Master Hands spelled out in their weird glimmer.
" The harvest from the battle fields of the old world and the
new. The mighty deep rendered back to us those that were ours.
You would not see more ? "
But pitilessly they called up from their rest in the tomb, prince,
peer and peasant: soldier, statesman and citizen. Their full quota
from the uttermost ends of the earth, from the islands of the seven seas;
from Canada to Cape Horn, and those that sleep on their hide-bound
sledges in the frozen loneliness of the poles, while I sat and shivered beyond the firelight. Terror clogged my speech and numbed my brain,
binding me in a relentless grip. Unknown pulses were beating in my
throat. I tried to shriek, but could only utter a few feeble Sounds.
Then I shut my eyes and barred the awfiil, endless procession.
When I opened them the Master Hands were tapping steadily
and mockingly, for there before me were two little hands stretched
out to me pleadingly. On the third finger of the left hand gleamed
a quaintly carved golden circlet, my gift to Sibyl, my sweetheart.
Hope died out of my heart. She was gone. With a mightly effort
I gasped out the question, "You have not taken her from me?"
the last word ended in a shriek. I broke the spell and sprang forward. The Master Hands crashed loudly on the table, crossed and
covered my eyes with icy cold fingers, and then— I awoke, to find
Bob and Jack holding their cold hands over my eyes.
"What's the matter, old boy, you look as if you had seen a ghost."
" Ghost be hanged," I retorted, and stumbled sleepily to bed.
J. S. K., '05.
A Little Nonsense, Etc.
«ii j^nrz,^
I
4^
N O N S I ; N S E ; , %T<SJ
T was in the afternoon before the opening day of GkiUaudet
College. Quite a number of the students had already returned
and a small group were rehearsing their summer's experiences to
each other on the Green.^ Some of the sportsmen of the upper
classes were there, with arms primed and loaded for any member
of the feathery tribe known as "Ducks" which might chance to
to peregrinate thitherward. Although the sports were forearmed,
the Ducks must have been forewarned, for some time had passed
and not even so much as a duckling had put in an appearance.
However they had not much longer to wait. Presently the keen
and practiced eye of one of the veteran hunters descried a speck in
the distance, rising up over the B. & 0 . tracks on 7th Street, which
soon developed into the bill, neck and wings of the veritable waterfowl for which they were lying in wait.
There was no doubt of it. He was coming straight toward the
College to join the flock from which he had, perforce, been separated
for so many years. In one of his wings, he tightly clasped a heavy
valise which made his waddle even more pronounced than that of
his brethren. The sportsmen began to get agitated. They examined
their arms and duckshot to see that everything was all right, they
straightened their tiles, pulled down their vests, adjusted their ties
and faces and the Senior sportsman gave an extra twist to his
mustache. Then with fowling pieces in readiness, they awaited
their game.
As he first caught sight of the college buildings he gave a quack
to think that the dream of years was at last to be realized. To be
sure he had heard vague rumors of the mighty Nimrods at Gallaudet College who rivaled Grover in their mania for duck-hunting.
But at the sight of beautiful Kendall Green all such thoughts
vanished from his mind. All unsuspecting the "Duck" approached
nearer and nearer to the sportsmen lying on the grass. He bethought-
u
The Buff and Blue.
himself of his instructions to report to Mr. Fowler on arrivaL
Seeing the students conveniently near, he started to make inquiry
of them as to Mr. Fowler's whereabouts. The students themselves
opened fire and evinced the liveliest kind,of a social interest in the
new-comer. After some commonplaces about being a new student,
etc, he was introduced to "Professor Draper" one of the young
men who was apparently somewhat older than the rest. The new
student had often heard of Professor Draper and was pleased to
make his acquaintance. He was introduced to " Professor Hotchkiss"
another one of the young men who seemed to be slightly older than
the others, and whose gray tile gave him an added dignity. The
" Duck " was delighted to meet Professor Hotchkiss as his father
had told him about going to school with Professor Hotchkiss at Old
Hartford. While these two " Professors " were making game of the
" Duck," the lesser sportsmen who were standing around, were
nearly convulsed. At first this seemed like a singular proceeding to
the new student, who could not account for their unseemly conduct.
However the cause presently dawned upon him and as soon as he
explained to " Professor Draper " that he was one of the new Normal
Fellows and not one of the Introductory Class, they were amazed
not to say discomfited, to discover that they had bagged larger game
than they had expected. He was hurriedly directed to Mr. Fowler's
office and went on his way rejoicing.
The Victim.
The Burro,
45
THi; BURB.O.
H
IS arrival was announced by Rache, an arrival of the day before, coming to me in the kitchen where I was making pies for
the Idealist,—and, in his hurry, blurting out, " The wash-stand is
coming." I looked up in amazement. How could a washstand be
coming; and pray, what was it coming up to that mountain wilderness for! Theo it dawned upon me that he meant the burro! The
burro whose arrival had been daily expected and looked forward
to.
Leaving the pies to fare as best they could, I ran out to make
my bow to Sir Donk. There he stood, a brown little, round little,
meek little donk, with big ears, observing eyes, and feet which I
noticed, with jealousy, were smaller than my own. His previous
owner stood beside him with one arm thrown over his neck as if
loth to part with him.
On the return of the Boss, the Idealist, and the rest of the party
from their tramp, I sent them all to laughter by relating how
Rache, having heard us call it the ' bureau,' had got his words
mixed and called it the wash-stand!
The Boss and the Idealist straightway took steps to get on the
good side of his majesty by means of numerous encouraging pats,
pilfered cookies, and lumps of sugar, thinking, no doubt, that they
would put their theories in practice and rule him by love. They
only succeeded, however, in showing him that he could very easily
impose upon them. And before the end of the summer they had
learned, with the rest of us, that that switch which could be made
to hurt on occasion was far more persuasive than that which could
not.
We named him Shadrac, because, although we never tried him
with fire, we learned from sad experience that he was as staunch in
standing up for his principles, especially if those principles were
directly opposed to what he knew ours to be. He insisted upon
his rights with a vigor that could not be gainsaid; and should we
46
The Buff and Blue.
happen to be so rude as to turn our backs upon him, we would be
admonished trom behind by a poke of his head that was moving,
to say the least.
The amount of attention lavished upon him the first few days
quite put him out of conceit with his own company. Whenever
we left him alone, a most doleful bray would be heard, endeavoring
to recall us. He was a hard-hearted person, or a very hurried one,
who did not return to bestow a final pat.
Patsy, the spaniel, was very amusing in the intense jealousy
he showed when he first saw his best beloved paying attention to
the burro and actually riding it. From that day there was a
sworn enmity between them. How he did sputter a t ' that donk'
in his dog language, how his small heart swelled with rage, and
what lots of pains he was at to deprive his donkeyship of as many
dainty bread crusts as he could manage to snatch from under his
nose.
We first made use of the burro, as a freight train for the camp,
transferring our baggage and provisions from the " cog " to our
cabin, way up above. Three of us were required for each trip, one
to lead him, one to make him go and one to watch the load. Many
slow and laborious journeys were made before all was safely stowed
in our camp in the air.
Now came our attempts at riding our shaggy steed. The
Bachelor was the first to try his hand at it. All went well until
he reached the business street of the nearest village where the
passers-by were treated to a bucking exhibition,—the participants
being a full-blooded mountain burro and a newly arrived son of the
effete East. The poor Bachelor came limping into camp next day,
without the companion on which he had ridden off so gaily the day
before, and related his tale of woe; how he had been bucked and
thrown, had returned to camp on the cog. A horse was good
enough after that.
Next, the Man of Sense tried his hand at equestrian feats; but
the knowing donk let his heels fly, one of which landed in the
Man's pockets and it, part of the coat, and the burro went off together while the astonished Man sat still.
Then came the turn of the Girl of Haste. She chose to show
her prowess by riding to the Half Way House, a mile up the trail.
The Burro.
i7
The crowd saw her safely on and by uudinted shouting and urgent
pokes, got the "wash-stand" to going, but just as soon as he got beyond sight and hearing of the crowd with his helpless burden, the
contrary creature stood stock still. His rider was in a quandary.
She had neglected to supply herself with a switch and dared not
get off for one, lest the burro—as soon as her back was turned—
should turn tail and make a bee line for home. So there she sat
and kicked and clucked and whistled by turns, but all to no purpose. Wearying, at last, she just sat still and wondered if sunset
would find her Still there. Before long, her wandering attention
was recalled. Slowly, O joy! the donk began to move ! Would
he go! With absorbed interest she watched each thoughtful step,
fearing lest it be his last. However, the movement, though long
drawn out, continued until, when he did stop, she looked up to find
herself near some bushes growing beside the trail. Ah, now she
could get n switch without dismounting, and become mistress of
the situation. But no, stretch as she would, the branches were
just beyond reach. How tantalizing! The stop was shorter this
time and the alacrity with which the burro started up again looked
as if he really intended to arrive somewhere at sometime but just
as her hopes were rising, however, he stopped again! Suddenly
she heard footsteps approaching in front, she looked up to behold
the Genius coming down upon her. With a sigh of relief, she dismounted, yielded her fiery steed to his care and mentally vowed
never again to trust an imp of slowness.
The Idealist's attempt to manage the burro by love was
crowned with a failure, dismal in its completeness.
It remained for the Inventor to devise a means whereby
Shadrac was induced to anything like continual movement without
either the influence of love on the one hand, or the persuasion of a
switch on the other. It happened in this way: Eight of us had
been vainly striving, both singly and together; and by various
methods, to get the burro to cross the tumbling mountain brook.
We had finally reached the end of our resources and had given up
in despair. We were standing around laughing at the idea of our
being nonplussed by the one, determined, little creature, when
the Inventor suddenly started toward camp at a pace that boded
some scheme on foot. He returned presently, bearing a pole, a
48
The Buff and Blue.
string and a carrot! We watched, with interest, while he proceeded to tie the carrot to the string, the string to the pole and the pole,
triumphantly, to the donk iu such a manner that the carrot hung but
a few inches before his nose. Ah! but did he not go then! In his
haste to reach that delicious morsel he actually forgot that he was
doing other than we wished and we had much ado to keep our lungs
sufficiently full of the rarefied mountain air to enable us to keep
pace with him.
Thanks to the happy thought of the Inventor, the problem of
making our "bureau" go, was now solved. But few more incidents
markedour summer's acquaintance with the "wash-stand" and many
a long tramp was eased by his sturdy helplessness.
One day, when the Duchess was descending the Bottomless Pit
trail—the steepest one in the vicinity—the constant jolting loosened
the saddle. I t slipped forward, and the Duchess slid gracefully
over the burro's ears notwithstanding the formidable obstruction
they offered to such a proceeding.
Late in the afternoon of a day towards the end of the summer,
a flutter of excitement passed through the camp at sight of a bear,
a real live bear, calmly ambling over our favorite trail to the C r a p .
To mostof us this was a first experience with a bear in his native
haunts and we were very much taken up with watching him, so much
so indeed, that we forgot all about poor Shadrac tied at the Craga
to graze. The next morning when we went after him we found
him badly cut from the friction of the rope in which he must have
become tangled in his efforts at escaping a fate which he must
have instinctively felt the bear would impose upon him.
A Day upon Long Island Sound.
iL 3 > i i Y U P O N r ^ O N G X&Z,iLNJ>
49
SOUNI>.
LONG the south-eastern coast of Connecticut is a region of great
fl natural beauty; the combined attractions of land and sea making
it one of the most delightful summer resorts upon the New England
coast.
I
Nothing lovelier could be imagined than the Sound upon a
bright, sunny day. The sparkling water, brilliant skies and invigorating atmosphere fill one with the joy of living.
In summer, the waters of the Sound are alive with pleasure-craft
of all kinds; white-winged sail-boats with their gay parties, fishingboats, steam-launches, and the fine yachts from Newport.
The annual visit of the New York Yacht Club to New London
harbor is an event that is eagerly anticipated. For, the sight of the
great fleet, whitening the waters of the Sound is one well worth
seeing. People come by boat or by carriage along the lovely shore
drives, and the great harbor is crowded with the luxurious yachts
of the millionaires and the throngs of visiting sail-boats.
One day in August, I went with a party of friends for an
excursion upon the Sound. We made our start, early in the morning,
from a river which empties into the Sound. With a fresh wind we
moved rapidly down the river, passing through a large railroad
bridge which opened to let us through.
The day was perfect, the water flashed and sparkled in the sunlight and the air was full of a wonderfully exhilarating influence.
The part of the river where it meets the Sound contains several
green islands, which are favorite spots for camping parties. As we
passed, we saw the white tents among the trees and children playing on the beach. Other boats, too, were passing down the river;
some carrying gay parties who called to us in passing, others taking
fishermen to their day's work.
As the wind drove us rapidly along, we soon left the land
behind us and came out upon the broad Sound. We sailed for
some distance along the coast and passed the nest of a great fish-
50
The Buf and Blue.
hawk. The nest was built in an iron cage, which had been placed
there by fishermen for the birds. The long pole which supported
the cage was planted among the rocks near the shore. The nest
was high above the water, and we could see the huge parent-birds,
feeding their young with the fish that they had just caught.
The Connecticut shore stretched along on one side of us, its
wooded hills, farms and villages softened into beauty by the
distance. Along the water-front were the nets of fishers. At
some distance, on our sea-ward side, was a long island, gray and
weather-beaten, the' sharp, jagged rocks on its margin whitened
with flocks of sea-birds.
The wind was fresh and our boat flew fast before it. The
water became rough as we got farther away from the land, and
sometimes showers of spray were thrown aboard.
Our objective point was a light-house in the Sound, situated
upon a bluff rising from the water, and known as a " hummock."
This hummock, though small, could be seen for a long distance as
it rose high out of the water. The light-house was upon its highest
point.
We had some difliculty in making a landing on account of the
great rocks, which were scattered thickly about the little island,
but finally got safely ashore and scrambled up the steep banks to
the light-house. The building was painted a dazzling white. In
front of it a garden of old-fashioned flowers made bright patches of
color.
Upon this desolate point of land, the old light-house keeper
and his wife lived alone. Their only communication with the mainland was by boat across the Sound, and in the storms of winter
they were completely cut off from the outer world. There was no
well or spring on the island ; rain-water was their only dependence.
We went all over the building and found it an interesting place
to visit. The light-house possessed a small library, furnished by
the government. Upstairs were a large number of little bed-rooms,
kept in most exquisite order and occupied, sometimes in the summer
by city visitors who loved to spend a few days in the salt breeze.
Going up into the highest story of the building, we climbed up
a step-ladder to the light-house tower, which was entered by a trapdoor in the floor.
A Bay upon Long Island Sound.
61
Inside this chamber was the great light. The huge lamp was
kept brilliantly burnished and revolved on wheels so as to throw its
beams in every direction.
AH around the light were windows and outside the windows,
an iron balcony ran around the tower. From this balcony we
obtained one of the most magnificient views to be seen on the New
England coast. On the south could be seen Montauk Point, at the
sea end of Long Island, and on the north was the whole sweep of
the Connecticut shore, with its villages, its hills and the lovely bays
and rivers indenting its shores.
Every object stood out with wonderful distinctness and the sea
and sky were full of glorious color.
The waters of the Sound ftimished an animated spectacle, with
the saU-boats, steamers and launches and the big schooners passing
out to sea.
Growing hungry, after a while, we wished to descend from the
tower and found that we had shut ourselves in, as there was no way
to raise the trap-door in the floor from the inside and we had shut
it down hard.
For some time we made unavailing attempts to get the door up,
and the heat becoming stifling in the close chamber were nearly
sufibcated, so that we were obliged to open one of the windows upon
the balcony, to admit air.
Going outside, we shouted and waved to our friends far down
upon the beach finally succeeding in attracting the attention of
one of them, who came up and liberated us from our cramped
quarters.
Descending to the ground once more we found great preparations
for dinner going forward. A fire was built of drift-wood upon the
shore, and a kettle of fish-chowder and a pot of cofiee were swinging,
gypsy-fashion, over the blaze. When the chowder was done, the
kettle was carried to the house on a long pole, and dinner was served
in the dining-room of the light-house.
Afterwards, we went out to explore the little island, and spent
a delightful afternoon in scrambling over the great rocks and huntings
for shells and sea-weeds.
In the salt pools left by the tide, we found many curious seacreatures ; star-fish, barnacles, and jelly-fish, and the lively little
5S
The Buff and Blue.
crabs, which we tried to catch, and which sometimes nipped our
fingers.
But most of all, I liked to lie upon some warm rock, high
above the tide, and watch the wonderful panorama of land and sea.
The brilliant colors, changing, but always lovely, fascinated me
so much that I could hardly tear myself away when the time came
for us all to return to the boat.
But soon we were all on board again, and moved slowly away
from the island, the old light-house keeper and his wife standing
upon the shore and waving " good-bye."
The wind had all died down as the day declined and the boat
hardly moved through the tranquil water. Behind us the sun was
setting, and the sky and water were illuminated with the most
wonderful colors, remaining brilliant long after the sun had
dbappeared. Our progress was necessarily slow, in the light
wind. "We drifted slowly along and beguiled the way with songa
and laughter. A few stars had come out, and the shadows were
falling as we entered the river again, but on the water the light
still lingered. Reaching our landing-place we rowed ashore and
picking up our baskets and shawls climbed the hills towards home.
H. F.
Scraps.
53
SORiLPS.
" The shades of night are falUng fast."
The ^yster stew is o'er.
The midnight gas begins to bam,
And Cats begin to snore.
For while the lessons long are conned,
They take a little snooze;
And, when we're safe in slamber-Iand,
Go camping in our shoes.
J. L. S.
"THiLT Ti;B.B.iBi;i;
T
<3i;osi:-roRMiiTioisr.
HE hoary-headed oldest inhabitant of Kendall Green was asked,
after the recent Gallaudet-Georgetown game, if he had watched
the glorious contest. Yes, he said, and with thrilling interest.
That "terrible close-formation" which the boys now make so much
of reminds me of the terribly close formation used in our first
game with an outside eleven.
After the rudiments of the Rugby Game had been introduced
into Gallaudet in the earlier 'seventies and practiced for some
weeks, the boys looked around for foemen worthy of their kicks.
Football, up to that time, had not been played in Washington, and
Gallaudet bad to create a sentiment. So, as a fit subject for mis.
sionary work, they picked out their old rival in baseball, Columbian
College—^for it was a college then, with buildings and grounds on
Columbia Heights, bordering on 14th Street extended. After a little palaver, a date was fixed, and we went over to give them their
medicine.
The game was to come ofi'in the Columbian back-yard, so to
speak. The college building, with a wide and deep brick-area
5Jf
The Buf and Blue.
along its side to give light to the basement rooms, bounded the
field at one end, and a decrepit fence, at the other, and sticks stuck
in the ground marked the places where the goal posts were supposed to be; but otherwise the bounds were left to the imaginations
of the players.
When the teams had lined up on the field for play, the C!olumbian captain signaled for a parley, and wanted to know how the
game was played. Our boys loosened the screws of their keyed up
spirits and went to work patiently to explain.
The Columbian boys scratched their heads when the explanation was ended, and then said that they were not going to risk
their necks in any such muss. They proposed that we play what
they called "real football"; that no carrying be allowed; that the
ball be subjected only to the indignity of kicks and cuffs. This
seemed a lame and impotent conclusion to our vigorous practice for
a Rugby Game; but they said it must be that or nothing, and the
game began.
You will see that what those boys were starting was really an
embryo Association Game. And very intimate association it was;
in fact, the "terribly close formation" was started with that game.
The twenty-two players went whirling off after the ball in one solid
bunch, scurrying hither and thither with no regard to bounds or
goals, their only object seeming to be to kick and cuff that ball.
I n their inexperience, their feet and fists would land on shins, and
stomach, and face oftener than on the ball.
Gradually the struggling, kicking, striking mob worked over
toward the College building, and, then, with a sudden swerve, it
swept to the edge of that brick-area, which in the excitement every
one had forgotien. There it hovered a moment until the ball found
an inlet to the pit, and, then, all but a few stragglers seemed to
pitch headlong after it. The horrified spectators hastened up to
gaze down upon the heart-rending scene at which the stragglers
aforesaid now stood or sat on the edge of the pit and glared.
When we got there, we found that a reef had been taken in that
"terribly close formation" and it was now still closer. The backyard football field had shrunk to the size of the area, and the contending forces were at work as madly as ever trying to kick or hit
that ball somewhere or through something.
Scraps.
55
And there the game ended. The players went on trying to
kick down those brick walls, or the ball through them, to the end of
"time,"—the rules which they had adopted forbidding them to
carry the ball, or hold it long enough to toss it out of the area.
When time was called the heroes were ignominously hauled out
of the hole by their partisans; and not until then did they have
room and time to rub their bruises. I tell you what, boys, that
there was a rushing game, and those old-timers had your {terribly
close formations down fine.—don't you see?
36
The Buf and Blue.
ijrxiTORiiLi,.
When the new Secret Society, the
The inflmence of
Kappa Gamma was formed one of the
the Kappa Gamma.
public announcements was to the
effect that no student was elegible to membership unless he
had passed all examinations for the Freshman class. Later,
another announcement was made that all candidates would be
rigorously examined as to their special fitness. From the
time the announcements were made, there was a perceptible
stir in the mental and moral atmosphere of the student body
in general. Students, aside from charter members, were
most noticeably affected. Conditions in studies began to be
dropped off one by one, and even the " D u c k s " began to
exert themselves to a greater extent as though they too felt the
necessity for increased industry. We can say nothing of the
moral change, except merely to mention it, because that is a
matter only Society members may be acquainted with. This
change demonstrates the good the society is wielding and we
hope that all members will see to it that there is no retograde
movement in the organization's good intentions. The Society
should be a mecca for. all students, and the very fact that it
now has on its roll only those students who have made their
mark, should be a guide board to the future admission of
candidates. If the Society is to stand for the good* of the
College and avoid corruption, it musi admit on/y tried men—
men who stand for what is best and will guard assiduously
all secrets intrusted to them.
The status of
the Alumni.
Alumni declared
Some three years ago a number of the
students who considered themselves
authorities on the status of the
that our Alumni were of no use
Editorial.
57
to the College, as far as its student organizations
were concerned. They talked quite loudly on the mdependence of these organizations, and argued that smce
many of the Alumni had not shown an active interest in
certain of the societies, they were, as a body, unpatriotic and
selfish and more of an an encumbrance than a help to the
advancement of the organizations. The very childishness of
this should have kept the Alumni from giving it any consideration Then, too, it was the view of only a small number of
the " K i c k e r " element. The students themselves paid no
attention to it since they did not regard it as serious. But
some of the Alumni raised a cry at the injustice of the thmg
and the harm was done. The prominent Alumm cut all
connections with the students, so to speak, and as an
immediate result the Athletic Association and the BUFF and
BLUE suffered considerably. Last year a letter was sent to
the Alumni asking for contributions to fill the depleted
treasury of the Association, but an unfortunate wordmg of the
letter alienated what friends the Association still had. Just
here we wish to have it understood that all this trouble was
started by a few men who opposed the general sentiment
among the students, which is to the effect that the Alumni are
members of the organizations they founded and helped to
maintain and have certain rights that are to be respected and
that they must be treated with a deference due their long
membership. Now, when the Athletic Association is in dire
necessity, we find only antagonism among those who should
be strongest in its support. W e deplore the necessity which
brings us to talk of such a state of affairs and hope that the
trouble will be seen in its true light and that this little piece
of experience will serve to keep up a better understandmg
between the Alumnus and the Under-grad.
W e have often seen it stated by the
A Word
undergraduates that the absence of exin seasor.
celleut articles in the College magazine is
the fault of the editors. Some even go so far as to say that
58
The Buff and Blue.
the occasional tardiness of the magazine is due to their carelessness and neglect of duty. W e are unable to see any
reasons why some students should lay the blame on the
editors' shoulders. " O n whom, then, does it rest?" they
will naturally ask. Most certainly on the undergraduates
themselves; for, they own the magazine and conduct it. It
is from them that articles are expected, while it remains with
the editors to judge which shall go into the magazine and
which shall be rejected and returned for further improvement,
as the case may be. Their time is too much occupied with
this matter to enable them to always write something for the
magazine. Remember, they have other duties besides. The
duty of filling the B U F F AND BLUE with excellent reading
matter each month devolves almost wholly upon the undergraduates themselves. Alumni and other friends have
occasionally contributed, but they are under no obligations
to do so.
Now, since it is clear that it is the duty of the undergraduates to contribute the majority of articles for the BUFF
and B L U E , what have they done? As far as personal experience goes, they have handed them in reluctanty, half
apologetically—and, too, after much persuasion. It is on
account of this that the B U F F AND BLUE is often late in coming
out. Besides, not enough come in each month to enable
the editors to choose the best — to get cream, so to speak
and the editors are consequently obliged to content them
selves with what is on hand. If this does not come up to
the expectations of the students, why should they kick
at and abuse the editors? The editors are just as much
dissatisfied with the work as the pessimists or critic, yet they
are compelled to offer it to a public which really expects
more.
Students, we hope you have read attentively what
we have to say. You are now at liberty to salt it according to
your tastes, before swallowing it. W e guarantee it will
not produce indigestion. Then let all who can write go to
work with vim and deluge our sanctum with copy. But re-
Editorial.
59
member, do not dash off your articles. Such will surely be
returned for polishing. Write carefully, and let there be a
fair proportion of stories, essays, poems, and sketches. The
new .department of Scraps is intended for all short effusions
whether in prose or verse. You are earnestly requested to
hand in anything that is orginal, be it only a line or two.
The success of the magazine depends upon the co-operation
of the students with the Board they have elected to carry on
the work.—S.
In the Alumni department will be found
Resolutions by
resolutions on the death of Professor
the Aioinni.
Porter. It was our intention to place
them in the October number but lack of space and the late
arrival of the resolutions prevented our doing so. These
resolutions are only a small evidence of the great respect and
love the Alumni have for Professor Porter, and we print them,
even at this late hour, that all may see that the Alumni intend
to keep him in memory as one of their best and most loved
friends.
60
The Buff and Blue.
T H i : iLI^UMISri.
R E S O L U T I O N S ADOPTED B Y T H E BOARD O F DIRECTORS O F
T H E G A L L A U D E T C O L L E G E A L U M N I ASSOCIATION.
SAMTJEL P O K T E E .
W H E R E A S , Dr. Samuel Porter, the venerable teacher and friend of the
deaf, beloved and reverenced by them all, has gone to his long rest and
WHEREAS, his beautiful and noble life, his long and faithful services as a
guide and friend, his great learning and fine sholarship so modestly displayed
have endeared him to successive generations of students at Gallandet, therefore, be it
^
ijegoiijcd by t h e Alumni Association of Gallaudet College,
I h a t it is the sentiment of the Association that by the death of Dr. Porter
a most valuable life has ended, and affectionate remembrance and admiration
for their dear old friend will endure among the deaf who knew him throughout their lifetime;
That the Association unites with the surviving relatives of Dr. Porter
t h e Faculty and undergraduates of Gallandet College, and his many friends'
in their grief;
That a copy of these resolutions be conveyed to the relatives and to the
Faculty, and published in the B u r r AND BLXTE.
f F . R. Gray, President,
Philip J . Hasenstab, 1st. Vice-President,
Signed -j Agatha Tiegel Hanson, 2nd. Vice-President,
Oscar Henry Regensberg, Treasurer,
. James H . Cloud, Secretary.
T H E BUFFALO MEETING.
THE
To
THE
PRESIDENT'S REPORT.
M E M B E R S O F T H E GAXLATJDET COLLEGE A L U M N I ASSOCIA-
TION:—-The only task left to the present Board when it assnmed control was the
publishing of the proceedings of the previous meetings. The preceding
Board had found funds too low and prices too high for them to venture, but
fortunately, the present officers found that the work could be accomplished at
even less expense than had been previously figured. The contract was let to
Mr. E . S. Waring, of Grinnell, Iowa, at 172.50 for 250 copies.
Early in the present year, the subject of a special meeting to so amend
the Constitution as to admit Normal Fellows to full membership, was bronght
before the Board, and, alter a full discussion, it was decided to hold the meeting
and have the matter settled if possible. Objection has been made as to t h e
1 ity of such proceeding, but the Constitution is absolutely silent on the
2%e
Alumnt.
61
subject of amendments, hence, if we go contrary to custom and amend it at a
special meeting, we will not violate any article of our fundamental law.
Wishing to have as general and fall an expression of opinion on this subject as possible, the Board sent out circulars requesting members unable to be
present to send sealed votes, which it was the intention of the Board to ofier
to the assembly for consideration. If, in its judgment, the course was right,
the votes would be opened and counted; but if the contrary, they would be
withheld and only members present allowed to vote. Jn doing this the Board
has been influenced only by a desire to give every' member a chance to be
heard on a question of some importance to alL
In connection with the above, I would beg leave to ofier some suggestions
in regard to the need of by-laws, to define and limit the meaning of the articles
of the Constitution. A constitution should, according to Koberts, be broad
and general in its terms, to the end that it will be hard to amend, and this we
have in our present one. But by-laws are needed to give more precise limits
to certain parts, to the end that there be less room for difierences of opinion
as to their interpretation. Three or four points appear to me to be deserving
of immediate action, all having come up for consideration during the past few
months, and the Board is not unanimous in construing them.
1. First and foremost: When and how amendments may be made to the
Constitution. You can all see the importance of this point.
2. What method shall be used in admitting chapters ? The President
has heretofore admitted them on his own authority, without consulting the
Board. This mode of action has been called in question, it being argued that
Art. rV., Sec. 3 requires a formal vote of the entire Board to admit a chapter.
3. A third point on which we might have a by-law is that of voting by
midl. Our Association is spread over so great a territory that a full attendance is seldom or never possible, and, when a measure of general importance
comes up, it might be decided by one-third or one-fourth of the qualified members. It seems that in all fairness those members who are unable to attend
should have a chance to express their opinions through the ballot when subjects of more than passing importance are before the Association.
4. A point of minor importance, yet which might sometimes have embarrassment, is that of reporting election of officers of chapters. It might be
well to have a rule that, at every election, the names of the new offlcers of
the chapter holding the election be at once sent to the President of the Association in order that official correspondence when necessary might be prompt.
The above suggestions are offered to the Association for consideration
after the special business of the meeting shall have been disposed of.
F. E. GKAY, President.
REPORT OF THE SECBETAET.
T o THE M E M B E E S O F THE AlTJMNI ASSOCIATION OF GAIiATJBET COL-
MGE:—Of the 250 copies of the proceedings of Association meetings printed,
91 copies have been sent to members, 15 complimentary copies sent out, 100
copies sent to the Volta Bureau for foreign and domestic distribution, 2 copies
sold, while 42 copies remain on hand. Since the meeting at St. Paul, in 1899,
notice of the organization of five chapters have been received for record in
the order given below:
N o . 1. Minnesota, at Faribault, Jan. 18,1901, Hanson, '86, President.
2. Ohio, at Columbus, May 9,1901, Patterson, '70, President
3. Iowa, at Council Blufis, June 7,1901, HoUoway, '75. President.
4. Illinois, at Jacksonsville, June 9,1901, George, '76, President.
5. Pittsburg, at PitUburg, June 27,1901, Teegarden, '76, President.
6S
The Buf and Blue.
The Chicago Chapter, which, up to the present time, has not requested
official recognition of the Board, claims seniority over Minnesota, protests
t^ainst Minnesota being designated as Chapter No. 1, and objects to the
Secretary's use of chapter numbers. The qnestion of chapter-seniority and
the propriety of designating a chapter by number as well as by name is respectfully referred to the Association.
Eespectfnlly submitted,
J. H. CLOUD, '86, Secretary.
TaEASTJBEB'S R E P O B T .
From Sept. 1,1899, to July 5,1901.
BECETPTS.
Sept. 1,1999. By cash retfd from Mrs. A. T. Hanson, Treas., 190
„ dues of members,
101
„ initiation fees (28)
28
„ interest on deposit,
3
„ sales of proceedings,
1
EXPENDITCBES.
Sept. 1,1899. To express chaises from Faribault, Minn.,
Oct. 21,
„ Setfy expenses,
23,
„ Treas.
„
24,
„ printing,
March 22,1900. „ Sec'y expenses mailing proceedings, etc.,
,, E. S. Waring printing proceedings,
April 2,
„ printing,
„ mailing expenses,
7,
„ exchange charges on check rec'd.
May 7,
„ Treas. expenses,
Aug. 7,
„ express charge 6 . T. Dougherty, old claim,
Oct. 5,
„ Seo'y expenses and express charges,
Jan. 28, 1901, ., roll-book,
Aprils,
„ Treas. expenses,
„ printing,
June 23,
„ Seo'y expenses, printing and postage,
July 5,
„- cash on hand,
50
65
1 08
2 25
20 91
72 50
4 50
4 30
10
00
49
55
36
2 35
4 50
6 65
197 52
324 20 324 20
THE CHICAGO CHAPTER FIRST IN THE FIELD.
1. Who first conceived and proposed the idea of " chapters" in the
Alumni Association ?
Ans. The Chicago Chapter, through its then-president, Rev. Mr. Hasenstab, who got inserted in the revised Constitution {at St. Paul, July, 1899 )
the clause allowing of the formation of chapters wherever practicable.
2 Who first took on the name of " chapter " ?
Ana. The Chicago Chapter ?
3. When did the Chicago Chapter first organize under such a name ?
Ans. In March, 1899.
4, Was it before the revised Constitution went into effect, allowing the
privilege of organizing chapters ?
.4ns. Yes.
The Alumni.
6S
5. Was not the Chicago Chapter legalized at the time the revised Constitution went into effect, seeing that it had previously, and has all along since
done exactly what the Constitation directs or allows as to membership, and
name of organization, and working organization ?
^Jia.
Yes.
6. Which organization, or chapter, was thefirstto meet after the passage
of the revised Constitation ?
Anx. Again the Chicago Chapter, which met in April, 1900, elected new
o£Scers, and banqaetted. No other "chapter" had met or banqnetted before
then.
7. What other chapter was the next to meet, and when ?
Ang. The Minnesota Chapter, in January, 1901. It had theretofore existed as an independent " Association," bat had not met for three years previously, and did not meet after the passage of the revised Constitation until
Janusiy, 1901, when it changed itself to a "chapter"; which action puts it
in line next to the Chicago Chapter.
8. How many times had the Chicago Chapter met, elected officers and
sat down to a banquet after the date of the revised Constitution ?
Ans. Twice; in April, 1900, and in April, 1901—annually, as near
April 8 as possible in order to commemorate the signing by President Lincoln of the Act of Congress establishing the National Deaf-Mute (now Gallandet) College.
9. How many times has the Minnesota Chapter held a meeting during
that time ?
Ans. Once, which was in January, 1901, as above stated.
10. What has the revised Constitution to say in regard to " chapters " ?
Ans. "Art. VII. Chapters. Whenever there is a sufficient number of
alumni residing in any locality to form a working organization, such may b«
organized and known as a chapter of this Association, designated by the name
of locality in which it exists."
11. Did the President or the Board of Officers of the Association ever
take an official stand on the position of the Chicago Chapter prior to the Buffelo meeting 7
Ans. Yes. The President, Mr. Gray, after considerable investigation,
wrote to the Secretary of the Chicago Chapter in June, 1901, that he rendered
a decision that the Chicago Chapter was the first one to organize, though not
the first to notify him. The Board, through its President, requested the
Minnesota Chapter to " courteously vacate the title of No. 1 in favor of the
Chicago Chapter " in view of the prior organization of the latter; which request the Minnesota Chapter refnsed to comply with. The Board never reconsidered their action; but the President afterwards overruled, or rather refused to entertain a motion from another member of the Board to revoke the
title of No .1 which the President, or Secretary, had over-hastily bestowed without sanction by the Board, and to recognize all chaptets only by the names of
their respective localities. This individual act,of the President, or Secretary,
was in the face of the Constitution which says in regard to the power and functions of the Board:
" The officers shall constitute a Board of Directors, to consult for, and
have general charge of, the acts and property of the Association."
12. Should Eev. Mr. Hasenstab, the actual author of the chapter clause
in the revised Constitution, or the Secretary of the Association, or any other
individual member for that matter, be considered a better oracle on the real
meaning or import of such a clause ?
Am. As is customary in legal jurisprudence, it is considered correct
form to defer to the views of the author.
64
The Buff and Blue.
13. Does the Chicago Chapter insist on " ^ o . 1 or nothing" 7
Arte. Its Secretary wrote to the President of the Association in Jane,
1901, requesting that the whole business of giving numbers to chapters be revoked and discontinued, and the provisions of the Constitution be strictly followed by calling chapters simply by the names of their respective localities.
The Chicago Chapter offered in such case to waive all its claims on No. 1 as a
step to the peaceful solution of the dispute. Mr. Gray readily i^reed to this
proposal, but, as usual, could not get the co-operation of the Secretary of the
Association; and they afterward succeeded, by bringing up the matter before
the Association at Buffalo ( without giving due notice to the Chicago Chapter,
and after the question was settled, as the Chicago I hapter thought, satisfactorily
by the President), in leaving it in a worse plight than- ever before for the
good name and harmony of the Association.
1 4 Are all the officers and members of the Chicago Chapter also members of the main body ?
.4718. Yes.
15. Are all the officers and members of the Minnesota Chapter also
members of the main body ?
Ans. No. Two of its four officers and quite a number of its members
are not.
16. Did the Minnesota Chapter reorganize when it decided to become a
chapter ?
Ans. No. It elected its present officers before it voted to become a
chapter. It neglected to reorganize afterward, or to reoi^nize by election of
new officers fully eligible by membership in the main body. It still retains
its officers and members who are not members of the main body. This is one
of the big-sized flaws in the title of the so-called Minnesota < hapter to Number One. It is manifestly absurd and illegal to call one a chapter of the main
body when all or part of its oflBcers and members are not members of the main
body.
17. What is the official name of the Chicago Chapter ?
Ans. " Chicago Chapter of Gallaudet College Alumni Association."
18. What was the Chicago Chapter's central idea when it first oj^anized?
Ana. According to the minutes of the first meeting of the chapter, the
meeting was called "to discuss the advisability of a local branch of the Gallaudet College Alumni Association," with the result that the Chicago Chapter
was formed, and with such an idea.
19. Was there any public record or recognition given the Chicago
Chapter immediately after its organization ?
Ans. Yes, in the B U F F AND BLUE and the Deaf-Mut^s Journal. Also we
had a letter of greeting from President Gallaudet, who thus wrote under date
of March, 17,1899 :
" I am interested to know of the establishment of the Chicago Chapter
of the Alumni Association, and wish it all success."
In conclusion: The Chicago Chapter desires to state that it feels perfectly justified in deciding to continue business at the old stand, and to
hold the Association's absolutely • unjust and absurd action at the Buffalo
meeting as unconstitutional in it that it (the Association) has no right to
override the Constitution, nor has a constitutional right to refuse recognition
to any chapter which has always lived up to the provisions of the ( onstitution. We have had a sort of apologetic letter from the President of the Association since the Buffalo meeting, who wrote, amongother things:
"They (the Association) were, to say the least, going too far. * * *
but the impatience of the assembly, distracted by desire to get away to other
The Alumni.
65
places, prevented their tising cool jadgment and according Chicago ezac
joBtice."
Even one or two members of the Minnesota Chapter admitted to one of
ns afterward that Chicago did not receive justice at Bnfialo. The other
members present at Buiialo, and whom we have since met, assured us that the
Association did not understand the real status of the case.
Ours was the original chapter, and, for quite a while, was the only one in
the field. We blazed the way for other chapters by OTganizing as a chapter
first, and then inserting the clause in the constitution expressly allowing
chapters. It may be added that the first banqnet of local alumni of Gallandet
in any place in the United States was given at the Grand Pacific Hotel in
Chicago in the snmmer of 1892, when President Gallandet and Dr. E. A. Fay
were present as gnests of the occasion, and it proved to be a memorable affair
in more than one respect.
CHICAGO CHAPTER OP GAMJLUBET COLLEGE ALTTMNI ASSOCIATION,
per GEO. T . DOTTGHEBTT, Secretary.
'78. J. E . Crane has another birdling to fish for. Her
name is Grace Carolina.
Hi, there, you Chicago Chapter! git on the fence and
jest-tickle-eight and holler; every body knows that air
Sec'tary wuz allers distressin'ly hard o' hearin'.
'89. The mother of W . H . Lipsett, ex-'89 died recently
at an advanced age. While sorrowing for his loss he rejoices
that she was with him for so many years of his manhood.
'81. C. Q. Mann, ex-'8i, is now a lay-reader in the
Episcopal Church, and, as in the old days on the cinder-path,
heels-and-toes it squarely along the path of righteousness.
M. T. Haines, formerly of the class of 1902, is now
employed in Keen's tailor shop on F St. in Washington, D . C.
W e are glad to see Milton considers it "'never too late to
mend."
'72. R. P . McGregor has moved into the surburbs of
Columbus, where he has seven acres of land upon which to
raise "garden sass" and hunt for the fruit of the hen. It is
the next best thing to having his foot upon his native heath,
'01, A. L. Norris was recently married to Miss Eva
Grove, a deaf lady of Indianapolis. Their home is to be in
Portland, Oregon, where Mr. Norris has secured work.
Thus he is joined to his old chum, H . C. Merrill, '96, who is
forecaster in the weather bureau of Portland.
66
The Buff and Blue.
'JJ. Gorham D . Aboot, ex-'77, is now working in
Nashua, N . H . , alongside of W . E. White, ex-'84. The
deaf of Nashua are rejoicing in the prospect of enjoying some
of the dramatic readings on account of which Mr. Abbot is so
popular in Lowell, Mass., and other cities.
'99. Miss C. L. Waters, ex-'99, has been appointed a
teacher in the Missouri School. —A. A. Stutsman is no longer connected with the Illinois School. Some say the
"College B a b y " succumbed under the weight of an Old Man
of the Sea; others say that Asa dabbled in politics.
'92. Paul Lange has relinquished the office of principal
of the School at Evansville, Ind., and stepped into the place
made vacant in the Wisconsin School by the transfer of J. S.
Long, '8g, to the Iowa School.—A daughter was bom to
Mrs. John Kavanaugh (Miss Lowman) of Baltimore in June
last.
'98. Miss Clara Runck has severed her connection with
the Oral School in New York City, She prefers Ohio as a
home, even if it offers a humbler sphere of labor
Robert
Zahn has declined the ofier of a position as supervisor in the
Louisiana School. My, how high and mighty our friend is
getting!
The Alumni had their usual " b a n q u e t " at the Buffalo
meeting, of which about seventy Alumni and guests partook.
Mr. J. S. Long, '89, presided as toastmaster, and, backed
u p by an excellent bill of fare, the speakers succeded in
making every one nearly as happy as were Mr. Seaton, '93,.
and his bride.
'95. R. W . Williams, who some months back resigned
his position in the Louisiana School, is now a member of a
firm of L a Crosse, Wis., engravers and printers. On account
of great increase of business, .the firm recently took out
articles of incorporation with a capital of $12000, our friend
being made Vice-President of the company. The dimples in
the cheeks of Dick are now deeper and more mirth-compelling
than ever.
The Alumni.
67
'83. Harry Reed has secured a position in the Government Printing Ofl&ce in Washington, D . C — ] . L. Smith has
bought a foot-ball for his boys, and now in day-dreams
pictures himself passing down the autumn lane of life, the
cynosure of all eyes and the focus of all fingers as the father
of famous kickers.
'79. John W , Michaels, ex-'yg, is now head-teacher, or
principal, of the Arkansas School, where he has long taught
with signal ability and faithfulness. Believing that it is
never too late to learn, he recently paid a visit to the Ohio
School to study the methods which, under the supervision of
Robert Patterson, '70, have placed that school in the front
rank.
'85. Lars M. Larson still finds the Jordan road down
in New Mexico a hard one to travel. The Legislature got to
fighting and neglected to provide funds for the support of the
School, and it is likely to remain closed for two years. But
Lars, with his true Norse grit, remain right on the spot ready
to carry on the work without pay if support of the pupils can
be provided.
'73. Those two school and college chums and congenial
spirits, Willard E . Martin and Geoge W. Wakefield, ex-'73,
have been enjoying each other in work and pleasure for weeks
past in Brownfield, Maine, the home of the latter. When
the time for parting came, so hard it was for friends to sever,
that Wakefield accompanied Martin as far as Manchester, N .
H . , on the way to Randolph, Vt.
They had a foot-ball game in Minnesota recently in
which we notice several old college boys took part. L . A.
Roth, '97, was right half-back and J. B. Bumgardener, '99,,
quarter- of the victorious team while Bruns, ex-'04, besides
having to tackle these tough old players, found his path to.
victory blocked by such insurmountable names as Droskowski
and Wojciechowski. No wonder he went down to ignominious defeat, gently shown the way by Thomas Sheridan> 'g4»
referee, and J. S. S. Bowen, ex-'g8, umpire.
68
The Buf and Blue.
'80. H . C. White has a book on " E t i q u e t t e " in the
hands of a publisher—F. W . Bigelow, ex-'8o, the college
"Bull-Dog," is now a " B u U ' s - E y e " fiend, and tramped the
country last summer petrifying people and things on dry plates
with his gaze. H e spent sometime in St. Johnsbury, Vt.,
with our friend, Albert S. Heyer, ex-'00. The automobile of
the latter gave the " B u l l ' s - E y e " greater range.
'90. Stephen Shuey and Miss Hannah Schankweiler, '94,
were married sometime last year. — C. L. Washburn is in
Berlin, Germany, with face turned to Minnesota. Hist,
Caddie, think thrice, and clear your throat before you
deploy your German; you manoeuvre near the lese-majeste
ambush. — H . L . Tracy has gone back on the old hen, his
stand-by for, lo, these many years, and now broods over an
incubator while it broods over his eggs. His first hatch is
out.
'86. Architect Hanson is said to have disported himself
in Lake Tetonka during the summer "like a porpoise out for
a holiday," and to have tried to teach his better-half, '93,
how to swim. — Lah, a porpoise teaching his wife how to
swim! What a sputtering there must have been!—Albert
Berg recently gave a reading of Shakespear's " C y m b e l i n e "
before an ansembly of Ohio deaf people in Colimibus. It was
for the benefit of the Ohio Home for Aged Deaf People, and
netted about ^ 15; so Albert's signs are worth about ten cents
apiece.
'97. A child was bom to R. E . L. Nicholson on the
13th of September last. Mrs. Nicholson is pleasantly remembered as the beautiful Miss Williams, ex-'oi. — Mrs. Jay
C. Howard, ex-'97, has been spending several months at her
native place, Patterson, N. J., visiting her mother. — Miss
Josephine Daly, ex-'97, is about to make her home in California, going there from Brooklyn, N. Y. Hereafter in our
mind California will be still more salubrious. — Miss Helen C.
Price spent the summer with her classmate, Mrs. J, C,
Howard, ex-'97, in Duluth, which seems, from the frequent
The Alumni.
^
calls for this item, to be the zenith city of delight as well as
of unsalted seas.
'96. Miss Bertha Block is now residing in New York
City, and conducts a Bible-Class in St. Ann's Church for
Deaf-Mutes. She has fifteen fortunate young people in her
class.
A. H . Sessoms is now book-keeper of a wholesale
grocery firm of Wilmington, N . C. H e is also one of the
stock-holders, and reports it doing a good business. If old
friends wish to communicate with a happy man, they should
write to P . O. Box, ^S^.—On
O c t 20, A. J. Sullivan
delivered his first Sunday lecture before the pupils of the
Louisiana School, and very appropriately chose the text,
" Suffer little children to come unto me." The little children
will not longer quake at the sight of the Quaker.
'93. W . I. Tilton, having suffered for a long time from
appendicitis, spent two weeks of his vacation in getting rid of
the supposed worse-than-useless appendix. The celerity with
which he recovered from the two hours carving to which he
was subjected astonished the surgeons, but he attributes it to
gym-work and foot-ball while in College. And now the
caution of "declining years" alone prevents him from jumping into the game again and "bucking the line." — P . H .
Brown, who dropped suddenly through a trap-door into
oblivion down in that hot place, Louisiana, has as suddenly
bobbed up again in Devils Lake, where he is now in charge
of the carpenter shop of the North Dakota School.
'79. John Schwirtz, ex-'89, and his wife spent a portion
of their summer in getting better acquainted with their native
land. A trip on the Lakes, to Toronto, to Buffalo and the
Exposition and the Convention, to New York, to Boston, to
Washington, where they spent a week with M. O. Roberts,
ex-'83, visited Kendall Green and renewed College memories,
then up the Hudson River, to Montreal and home—an ideal
trip for western «' hayseeds " — for our friend is a great farmer.
And, yet, for all his " h a y s e e d " lore, Johnny did not know
poison-ivy from woodbine, and let it twine lovingly and
70
The Buff and Blue.
poetically about his porch until frequent poisonings had wellnight put him in the Helen Keller-Tommy Stringer Class, as
The Companion has it.
'oo. O. G. Carrel, now teaching in the Texas School,
met with a serious mishap last summer. H e with his
college friends and present co-laborers, W . H . Davis, and G;
A. Brooks, '99, had started on a hunting trip behind a
mule of erratic temper and flighty heels. While they were
jogging along, Mr. Carrel inadvertently ofiended the mule
by grasping the top of the dash-board so that the fingers of
his left hand rested on the mule's side of the board. Thereupon that temper flared up and those heels took a flight, one
hitting Carrel's hand, the iron shoe cutting off the index finger
between the secondand third joint, and breaking some bones
in the hand. A effort was made to save the finger, but the
rough surgery did not succeed in re-establishing circulation
in the severed part and it was lost.
NORMALS-
)g, Alvin E . Pope, spent his vacation traveling for an
lows publishing firm in the thinly settled territories of the
Northwest. While many miles away from railroads, he
received word that his presence at the Nebraska School,
where he is teaching, was necessary on a date so much earlier
than he had expected, that he would have to make great exertions to be there on time. Hiring a boat, therefore, he
launched forth on the Missouri River by night in a furious
storm, and, after hard work and several hair-breadth escapes,
he reached a place thirty miles from his starting point, where,
after walking five or six miles, he could hire a team to take
him across country to the railway. The storm continued, and
the team was swept away in crossing a swollen creek. One
horse was nearly drowned, and was unable to proceed, but
Alvin mounted the other, and pressed on, reaching the railway just in time to catch the train that landed him in Omaha
on time.
Locals.
71
3vO<3iiI/S.
"Rev. 1 3 3 " !
Have some peanuts?
Flick, '03, has been elected official photographer.
Ask Long, '05, how much for " admission of tickets."
The father of Lawrence, '02, visited him sometime ago.
Dr. Gallaudet was an honored guest at the Yale Bicentennial.
Miss P . (to Mr. S.) :—" What are Mr. Tammany's political
views anyway?"
Some of the Seniors seem bent on having their rooms outdo
the dens of Nabobs.
Have you seen any of the new breed otchickena-the felines f
One of the Ducks has.
Ask one ofthe Normal Fellows how he enjoyed being introduced into polite (?) society.
Students with loud shirts and neckties are much in evidence
since the "radiator" weather opened.
Leitch, '04, is mourning the loss of a genuine black-thorn
vrhich he brought over from the ' old sod.'
We are informed by a wise Sophomore that milk causes consumption. That's why he gets three glasses.
Dr. Gallaudet entertained the members of the "Lit." with a
lecture on "The Paris Congress" on the 18th ult.
I t appears that there is a regular cafe in No 5 (Willard H d l )
Every afternoon odorous hall-breezes bring from it the smeU of
coffee and toast.
The Civil Engineering class has finished its outdoor work of
making a railroad switch across the coUege grounds, and is now
engaged in drawing up a map of it.
72
The Buff and Blue.
The cousin of Phelps, '05, was at the Villa Nova game and
had the pleasure of seeing him play as quarter-back.
The guesses a certain Senior makes in reciting in German,
while rather startling, still qualify him as a sure winner in guessing
contests.
One of the students. Miller, I. C, from Virginia, has already
left College. Inability to study, on account of poor eyesight, is
the cause. Allen, '03, has also left.
Strong, '02, resigned the captaincy of the Eeserves on account
of an injured knee which will prevent his further participation in
gridiron battles. Friend, '05, takes his place creditably.
Fourteen dollars for the Athletic Association has been netted
by the sale of peanuts and chocolate within the College and at football games. This is a surprise even to the most sanguine.
Three Seniors, disdaining the plebian pen and ink, now dedicate their letters on a rented typewriter. Another Senior, not wishing to be outdone, went them one better by buying a second-hand
one.
The Vesper Lawn Tennis Club reorganized for the year with
the following officers: President, Northern, '02; Vice-President,
Flick, '03; Secretary, MDler, '03 ; Treasurer, Phelps, '05; Captain,
Hendricks, '04.
Our Villa Nova visitors must have found their stay very pleasant, judging by the frequency and heartiness with which they
cheered for Gallaudet from the moment of finishing the game till
they left for home.
The Bicycle Club has reorganized for the year with the following officers: President, Flick, ' 0 3 ; Vice-President, Cameron, '04;
Secretary-Treasurer, Friedman, '04; Captain, Marshall, '04; SubCaptain, Phelps, '05.
The Dramatic Club intends to ^ v e a pantomime entitled, " The
"White Statue" on the evening of Nov. 30th. The entire proceeds
are to be given to the Athletic Association to-buy new togs for our
"knights of the diamond" whose present armor is in a sad state of
dilapidation.
With the pleasant springlike weather there has been a revival
LoeaU.
75
of interest in lawn tennis and the court marked out is always occupied on afternoons. Two of the golf cranks have also hunted up
their clubs and spend three fourths of their time hunting for lost
balls on the campus.
The Co-eds of the Freshman Qass recently had a social gathering among themselves as a sort of celebration of their real entrance
to College, and to initiate the three new members: Misses Schwartz,
Fish and Fisch. They do not seem to regret in the least their exit
from "Duckdom," and all report a jolly time.
"Ducks" and green Freshmen are still caught in various embarrassing positions. A party of them recently entered the Senate
Chamber and seated themselves. After an hour's wait a guard
came along and when asked what time the Senate convened for the
afternoon's work, said, "First Monday in December."
Much to the regret of all, Miss Morriss, '04, of Arkansas, was,
on account of ill health, obliged to return home the last of October It is sincerely hoped that home-care will soon restore her
strength, so that she may resume her studies. A few days before
her departure, a farewell party was tendered by a number of friends.
The pin of our Kappa Gamma Fraternity has been decided
upon It is diamond-shaped having a gold scimitar and skull m
the center and the Greek letters K. G. in the corners. Kappa above
and Gamma below. The whole, having a background of true blue,
surrounded by a broad gold border, forms a very pleasing and
attractive pin.
Saturdav morning, the nineteenth, a crowd of Co-eds, chaperoned by Mis^ Feet, took a car for Brookland to^visit Mount bt.
Sepulchre, the seat of the Commissariat of the Holy Land. The
tour of the underground corridors and chapels was intensely interesting and made us think of the days, centuries ago, when Chnstians
vrere obliged to worship in secret.
During the progress of the celebration around the bonfire on
the evening of the Johns Hopkins-Gallaudet game, some co-eds on
the fourth story balcony dropped a « dummy" among the revelers.
Men with co-ed sweethearts experienced that " empty feeling in
the breast when they saw it come tumbling down. In revenge
they dissected it and consigned the remnants to the flames.
74
The Buf and Blue.
Saturday evening, October nineteenth, the first literary meeting of the O. W. L. S. took place, and the following program was
carried out:
Address of Welcome,
Response,
Story: "Experiences of the Ducks,"
Declamation, "America"
Miss ZeU, '02.
Miss Fritz, L C.
Miss Morse, '05.
Miss Hagler, '05.
Friday evening, the 25th, the members of the Jollity Club
celebrated Hallowe'en in advance by giving a Farmers' Ball. As
may be imagined, the costumes were not all Paris gowns, the styles
of Uncle Josiah and Aunt Samantha reigning instead. In the
ball-room cornstalks, cabbages, and so forth, together with jack-o'lantems, took the place of palms, flowers and incandescent lights.
The refreshments, consisting of sandwiches and coffee, pickles,
cheese, pie, cake, and apples, were in agreement with the occasion,
and with the characters present. Misses DeLong and Snyder as
Mr. and Mrs. John Abraham Greencorn took the prize for the
most appropriate costumes, and Misses Hayden and Hall were
punished for appearing too much like "city folks," by being awarded the booby prize. It was a most amusing and enjoyable affair
all around.
Athletieg,
75
iLTHI^^TlOS.
FOOT-BALL.
RESERVES, 11.
COLLEGE ]*AEK, MD., OCT. 16.
M. A. C. 10.
The Reserves met and dfefeated the much heavier Maryland
Agriculture College team bV a score of 11 to 10. The result was a
suprise to everyone. The scrubs showed great improvement in offensive work, but were rather weak on the defensive. Their end
runs worked well, Escherich gaining much ground in this way,
Mayer never failed to gain when he bucked the line.
***
KENDALL GREEN, OCT. 18.
RESERVES, 12.
W. H. S,0.
The Reserves won another victory in a well played game with
the Western High School eleven. Twice in the first half the Reserves rushed the ball down the field until it was within a few feet
of their opponent's goal line, only to lose it on downs. Throughout the second half, however, they retained possession of the ball
and by some fast snappy plays scored two touchdowns.
***
WESTMINISTEE, MD., OCT, 19,
GALLAUDET, 11.
W, M.C.,0.
In an interesting game of twenty minute halves Gallaudet won
from the Western Maryland College team 11 to 0. In weight the
two teams were nearly equal, the advantage being slightly in favor
of Maryland. From the kick-ofl" Gallaudet rushed the ball to
Maryland's twenty-five yard line where it was lost on a fumble.
After gaining about ten yards Maryland lost the ball on downs.
After a series ofshort rushes Gallaudet pushed Erickson over for
a touchdown. Geilfiiss kicked goal. Score: 6 to 0.
In the second half Worley kicked off, Maryland brought the
76
The Buff and Blue.
ball back into Gallaudet's territory where they were held for downs.
Grallaudet worked the ball slowly to Maryland's goal line, Andree
going over for the touchdown. Gallaudet showed up strong in
defence. Eoberts the big guard of the Maryland team being the
only man able to gain through their line. The Maryland ends
played a good game, effectually stopping plays that came their
way.
On account of being reftised the names of the Maryland players
we are unable to give the line-up.
***
KENDALL G E E E X , OCT. 23.
GALLAUDET, 12.
VILLA NOVA, 0.
The 'Varsity played its first home game with the strong Villa
Nova team and won handily. Villa Nova was plainly outplayed,
as only once was Gallaudet's goal in danger.
Gallaudet began the game by kicking off. On the second line-up
Powers of Villa Nova fumbled and Waters fell on the ball. Gallaudet then went to work and by line bucking and tackle plays
finally secured a touchdown. Villa Nova kicked off and Gallaudet, after losing it once, brought it back to Villa Nova's twenty
two yard line where Andree, breaking through center and dodging
several players, made a beautiful run for a touchdown.
In the second half, after the ball had changed hands a few times.
Villa Nova was forced to kick. Powers punted forty yards to
Phelps, who dropped the ball when tackled, allowing a Villa Nova
player to fall on it at Gallaudet's twenty-five yard line. Gallaudet held them for downs, however, and worked the ball back to
Villa Nova's fifteen yard line, where Worley tried a drop-kick
that failed by inches only.
Andree caught the kick out from the twenty yard line and made
a great run of forty yards. At this juncture time was called.
Liine up:
VILLA NOVA
GAlIAtTDET.
Geilfnss
McDonough
Hewetson
Worley
Lawrence
Neesam
left end
left tackle
left guard
center
right gnard
right tackle
Herr
Nolan
Donahne
Gevenda
Sullivan
Egan
77
Athletics.
Escherich
right
end
CEonke
Phelps
qnarter-back
Weir
Andree
right
half back
Doolin
Erickson
left half back
McBride
Waters
fullback
Powers
Touchdowns:- Erickson, Andree. Goals:- Geilfuss [2] Umpire:- Mr
Bagley of Villa Nova. Keferee:-Mr Watson of Swathmore. Time-keepera:
luison '02 and Kiley of Villa Nova.
***
RESERVES. 6.
'
KENDAIIL GEEEN, OCT. 25.
J
C H. S., 0.
The Eeserves played their second game with the strong
Central High School team.! The C. H. 8. boys had beaten the local y . M. C. A. eleven the Saturday before and, therefore, felt confident of victory. But the Eeserves proved too much for them this
time.
In the first half the two teams sea-sawed up and down the center
of the field, but in the second half the Eeserves blocked a punt on
Central's thirty yard line, and then rushed the ball over the goal
line for the only touchdown of the game.
***
KENDALL GEEEN, OCT., 26.
GALLAUDET,12.
J. H. U.,0.
The Johns Hopkins University team was a rather easy proposition for GaUaudet and it was only their fine kicking and the poor
return of punts by GaUaudet that prevented a much larger score
being rolled up against them. The visitors were never able to gain
the requisite five yards for first down, but were forced to kick or
surrender possession of the ball. GaUaudet was downed after the
kick-oflf on her own ten yard line. Andree broke through the line
and made a run of forty yards. Then, by some fine end runs, a
touch down was soon made. Throughout the half GaUaudet continued to tear holes in Hopkin's line, but were unfortunate enough
to lose the baU several times. Hopkins punting out of danger each
time.
In the second half, after taking the baU to Hopkins eight yard
line GaUaudet was penaUzed for ofi'side play and Worley attempted a drop kick that failed. After the kick out, GaUaudet by rushes
averaging ten yards at a stretch, finally pushed Waters over for the
78
The Buff and Blue.
second touchdown. Fine punting by Plaggemeyer kept Hopkin's
goal line out of danger during the remainder of the half. Gallaudet's line up was the same as in the Villa Nova game.
***
RESERVES, 0.
KENDALL G E E E N , OCT. 29.
U. S-MARINE&6.
The Eeserves were defeated by the much heavier U. S. Marine
team from the Navy Yard. The Marines made use of their weight
in line bucking and were thus able by small steady gains to score
a touchdown.
Poor generalship prevented the reserves from scoring in the sec-'
ond half when they were two feet from the goal line.
*^*
*
GALLAUDET.e.
ANNAPOLIS, N O V . 2.
ST. JOHNS, 6-
Gallaudet met her old rival, St. Johns on the gridiron and split
even in one of the most stubbornly contested games of the season.
The advantage lay with St. Johns during the first half, but in the
second Gallaudet braced up and played the better game.
Gallaudet kicked ofi" and St. Johns, after bringing the ball back
to the center of the field, lost it on a fumble. Then GraUaudet by line
bucking and a pretty end run for twenty-five yards by Escherich
took the ball to St. John's ten-yard line where it was lost on downs.
By gains of about three yards at a time St. Johns worked her way to
Gallaudet's ten-yard line where a fumble lost the ball for them.
Gallaudet also fumbled immediately afterwards, but saved the ball
GeiUuss punted thirty-five yards and then St. Johns slowly hammered her way down the field for a touchdown. Goal succeeded.
Afl«r the kick-oflT St Johns worked the ball to Gallaudet's five-yard
line, where Gallaudet, by a great stand, secured the ball on downs.
Geilfuss punted out of danger and then time was called.
In the second half St. Johns kicked ofi" and Gallaudet rushed the
ball to the center of the field where Andree broke through the line
and ran fifty two yards for a touchdown. Geilfuss kicked goalAfter the next kick ofi" Gallaudet took the ball to St. Johns' twenty-five yard line where it was lost on downs. St. Johns was forced
to kick but Phelps muffed the ball and a St. Johns man fell on it,
spoiling Gallaudet's chances of another tonch-down. The rest of
the game was a see-saw in the center of the field.
Athletic.
Line u p :
GALLAUDET.
Geilfnss
McDonongh
Hewetson
Worley
Lawrence
Neesami
Mather J ■
Escherich
Phelps
79
ST. JOl
Seth.
Cooper
Hntchins
Brown
Spates
Baker
1. e.
1. t.
Lg.
c.
1­g.
r. t.
r. e.
q.b.
Andree
r.|h. b.
Erickson 1
Meunierj'
1. h. b.
Howard
Farhnttor
/Gary
\Halbert
Beatty
fGordy
fi b.
Waters
1 Bnrwell
Touchdowns: Andree, Halbert. Goals: Geilfnss, Howard. E eferee; Riley
of St Johns Umpire: E ev. Smilean '97. Halves; 25 and 20 minutes.
***
V A N NE SS PAE K. NOV. 2.
RESERVES, 5.
Y­ M­ C. A.. 17.
The Reserves greatly weakened by the absence of of several
their best players who accompanied the 'Varsity to Annapolis were
defeated by the Y. M. C. A. team.
According to reports brought home, they were greatly handicap­
ped by the greater weight of their opponents and unjuat decisions
of the umpire, tho' they found no trouble in going through the line
Bo
The Buff and Blue.
^xoHiiisrai^s.
The Nagsaa Litawrg Magazine has s strong t»ble of contents for October.
"Glimpses of Genoa and Pisa" in the October Wadtington Colkgian is
interesting.
We are pleased to place the Ottawa Oampus upon our exchange list. The
high aim of its editors is to be commended.
The October Penn Chronicle pleases us much. "American Student Life
in Paris" and "College Luxuries" are very fine articles.
The October Mount Holyoke has an excellent article on " The American
School of Classical Studies at Athens.', It breathes of the delightful conditions of study and research there, and of " the glory that was Greece."
Says the Ex-man of the Oeorgetown College Journal, in his salutatory:
"We do not intend to rage and rant up and down the field of College letters
waving our dripping blue pencil." We suppose, after some reflection, that
our friend, in his commendable enthusiasm, dips his blue pencil into the inkstand, or perchance into his mouth.
,
/
Among the many pleasant features of some of our exchanges we note an
increased tendency to publish articles on European student life. The October JTormo/CbHe^e ^ems contains an excellent account of "Some impressions
of German University Life," by Dr. jyooge. Articles of this nature add
much to the pages of a college magazine.
The Momingside is limited in the quantity of its reading matter, but the
quality is all that could be desired. "The First Number" is interesting.
We see that Columbia is to have a professorship of Chinese. We hope that
the craze for the Celestial language will not creep into the pages of the
Mcyminggide to mar its otherwise delightfulness.
We have'nothing but good words for the October Oeorgetown College Journal. Its table of contents is worthy of the magazine. Among the prose,
Exchanges.
Sz
"When the Boss Gave In," "The King's Qnair," "My Friend the Dentist,"
and "A Capital Offence" are clever articles. "To an Old Pipe" has much of
the quality that we may call poetic, and "Eben's Promenade" has a twang of
the Old South.
The September Boies Student contains two articles of interest, "The Col­
lege Ideal," and "The Professor's Protege." The former is an admirable
essay on the educated man, the man who is broad and libera! in his ideas, not
shallow nor of much natural ability spread over large space, but deep and
sound on subjects that interest him most The latter is a serial stoiy, and
although we are not quite in favor of serials in college papers, we must say
that it is well written and shows much ability on the part of its author to
hold the attention of his reader. | We look forward for Part II with expecta­
tion.
1
The West Virginia University Ath enaeum has been metamorphosed into
a weekly. And we are afraid it will become a fossil. A weekly college pa­
per, ninety­nine cases out of a hundred, ic of of little permanent interest to its
exchanges. It is merely a localizer of the college which publishes it, of
much interest, no donbt to the students thereof. But there its entertainment
generally ceases. The average man or woman knows that the weekly college
papers which are able to present a fairly good table of contents, are as scarce
as hen's teeth. A college magazine, to be worthy of the name, must contain
more than the local and personal items of its own small college world. We
■woulA thiA OUT fTieods of the Anlhenaeum had forebome from their present
exploit But doubtless they have reasons, which are to themselves pertinent
DHEAMING.
Lonely I sit
On a throne in state;
Tho' my friends seem many.
Sad is my fate;
For tho' riches and dignity
Are laid at my feet.
There's no one to love me—
None half so sweet
As the mother who guarded
My waking and sleep.
For her smile was my comfort
And solace in tears.
And her love is as lasting
As eternity's years.
—Mary, in the MomUaineer.
*2
The Buff and Blue.
TO klS out
PEPE.
The hearth-fire flick'iing in the gloom
Boms low,
And ghostly shadows slowly loom
And grow.
Without, the wind goes howling by
Like hunting hounds when in full cry:
We're left alone, just yon and I,
Old pipe.
We're comrades been these many years
We two,
And you've stood firm, come smiley come tears.
E'er true.
Though other friends have dropped away
Since fickle Fortune turned one day,
You've stood by me when the world looked gray,
Old pipe.
And as I watch the blue smoke curl,
On high.
And see the rings thai spin and swirl.
Then die,
I love to dream, my fancy free,
Of things that were or yet may be,
And muse and think alone, with thee,
Old pipe.
I seem to pierce the smoke's dim haze.
At last,
And see the scenes of other days.
Long past.
When life's cup brimmed with sweetest joy
Untinged by care, without alloy.
And I was but a laughing boy.
Old pipe.
But ah I the smoke cloud fades away.
In air,
The pictures vanish, and To-day
Is there.
Yet cherished memories will last,
We'll nail Hope's ensign to the mast,
And link the Present to the Past,
Old pipe.
—Q. C JJ., '05, in Oeorgelown (Mege Journal.
Exchanges.
soiro
Break talk with kissing, heart's delight.
For what are idle words to me
When in the splendid starlit night
I fondly gaze on thee?
Ah, what are words when red lips lore
And heart to heart beats high ?
Oh, kiss again—my lore is poor
Till sigh caresses sigh.
—O. K ! D , tn the Momingside.
|i
S3
Adveiiiiements.
PLUMBING.
TINNING.
S. S. Shedd & Bro.
Lamps, and Gas Portables,
Gas, and Oil
Heating and Cooking Stoves.
433 9tli Sreet.
GAS AND ELECTRIC
FURNACES
FIXTURES.
REPAIRING.
PLACK FOR CLOSE BUYING - ^ ^ '
^ ^ SWETT & CO., Stationers-sj^
6 0 3 7tlx S t r e e t , N.'W., V i T a s h i n g t o t i , D . C .
TABLETS.
Swettfs No. 1 Fountain Pen, a Perfect Pen, Folly Guaranteed, Price $1.00
Sirett'i! Stenographer's Pencils, S for 10c. S5c per d<a.
10 per cent discount to Students
"Phone Main 197-3.'>
Fountain Pens Repaired.
FRANKLIN S^ CO.
ESTABLISHED 1861.
Opticians,
KODAKS,
PHOTOGRAPHIC
PBrNTING AND DEVELOPING. SUPPLIES.
1203 F STEEBT,
WASHINGTON, D. C.
ii
Advertisements.
BURKE BROS,
KodctkSj Camerasj
and Ftjoto Supplies
DEVELOPING.
PRINTING, AND
MOUNTING
FOR AMATEURS712 9th St., N. W., near G.
Hall orders promptly filled.
Phone S4S8-2.
William H. Dyer,
Manufacturer and Dealer In'
Doors, Sash, Blinds & Mill Work,
Thirteenth and C Streets and Ohio Avenne.
BRISON NORRIS,
501 H St., K E.
G R O C E R I E S a n d PROVISIONS.
Fiist-CIass Groods.
Home Dressed.
Lowest Prices.
Meats Exclusively.
The Finest Butter.
Fresh Eggs.
W. H. BUKCH,
DRY GOODS,
Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings, Hosiery, Notions, Etc.
Corsets a Specialty.
814 H Street, Xortb-East.
James F. Oyster,
DEAI.EEm
FINE BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC.
Marble B'l'd'g.—Telephone 271.
Cor. Penna. Ave. and gth St.
Advertisementg.
WOODWARD
■
iii
& LoTHROP,
IMPORTED AND DOME STIC DRY AND FANCY
GOODS, ME N'S, WOME N'S, AND CHIL­
DREN'S FINE FURNISHINGS,
SCHOOL SUPPLIES,
ETC., E TC.
Washington,
New York,
ji
Paris.
L u t e &y Co.,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Saddlery, Earness, Trunks, Ba^s,
Fine Leath er Goods, etc.
FINE CARRIAGE HARNESS.
Sole Agents for the
"COHCORD HiRBE SS" AHD COLLARS.
497 Penn Ave., ­
­
­
­
­ Washingtion, D. C.
STEPHEN LANE
FOLGE R,
200
BRO ADWAY,
WATCHES-DIAMOND-JEWELRY.
CLUB AND COLL GE PINS AND RINGS
N E W YO RK
GOLD AND SILVER MEDALS.
Ecduiive Original Desiffns ujxm Ap^votMia.
ESTABLISHED 1867.
Q. TAYLOR WADE ,
<3eneral O o m m i s s i o n M e r c h a n t
FOR T H E SALE OF ALL
Early Fruits a n d
01 i j > i <» n STREET N . W . ,
Vegetables,
WASHINGTON, D . C .
BFECIALT^-norll^o'i^gl:Tomatoes.Potatoe., Cucumber.,Cabbage. BeC. Pe.
^*^*'
StraTTberrie.. Grape., Pear., Plumi, Apple., *«.
iv
Advertisements.
LITTLE & PAGE,
"Good Things to Fat/'
1210 F St, K W.
FINE GROCERIES
Florence Oil Stoves.
J^OBERT W. BLAIE,
0 3 3 H Street, N . E .
S C O T C H BAKERY-
Pies, Cakes, etc., to order.
ADOLPH. V^. 5SIEVKRLING,
T h e N o r t l ^ e a s t tle-sareler.
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, Plain and S e t Rings.
FINE REPAIRING AND ENGRAVING A SPECIALTY.
All work guaranteed.
710 H St., N". E.
GEO. F. MUTH&CO.,
Saccessors to Geo, Ryneal, Jr.j
418 7tti Street, N . W .
Artist's and Draughtsmen's Supplies, Drawing Materials,
Paints, Varnishes, and Stains, Drawing-Room,.
Parlor and Siudy Lamps.
SHEETZ& BISHOP,
Plxoto^fapl^ic Stocli Mouse
~
614 Twelfth Street, N. W.
Kodaks, Cameras and all Accessories.
Fine Printing and Developing for Amatean;. Free Developing Booms.
Advertisements.
''
Wheels Sold o n Installments.
Repairing
E. P. HAZELTON & SON,
Cor.7thandHSt3.,N.E.
BICYCLE SUNDRIES.
Washington, D. C.
STIII^KEL'S
707HSt..N.E.
F i n e Stationary, Magazines and Periodicals, Daily and
Sunday Papers. Orders delivered promptly.
FINE CONFECTIONS AND FRUITS.
B®'Please give us a call.
Toys and School Supplies,
J i L S . iL. N i a H O I ^ S O N & S o n ,
Awftingsj Tents and Fictge.
DBOOBATIONS, EECErnoN A W I N G S AND TENTS FOB HIBE.
1312 F Street, Korthwest,
Washington, D. C.
MACKALL BROTHERS,
WHOLESAI.E AND RETAIL DBUGGISTS
AND
MAinjFACTUBrNG PHAEMACISTS.
Large Stock and Low Prices.
.
^TTcv^twT?
9tli and H Streets, Is. ii.
Washington, D.c
The family Supply Co.,
Importers and
Retailers.
i^ine groceries.
Washington Stores:
1816 14th. St., N . W., and
701 H St., N . E .
^
Advertisements.
S h i r t m a k e r a n d Hal>erdasher
FOR MEN AND WOMEN.
PH.T. MALL,
F, Corner Thirteenth, JV. W.
.
Full line of Fall wear ready for your inspection.
—Goods—The Newest—The Best—The Cheapest.
A. FABRITZ,
Fine Merchant Tailor,
Scouring, Dyeing, and Repairing Neatly Done on Short Notice.
? 0 8 H St.. N . g .
W a s h i n g t o n . D. C
,t634PA.AVE-r
BYRON S . ADAMS
BOOK AND JOB PRINTER
512 n t h St.
"We print everything and do it well."
V. A. CLEMENTS,
Dealer i n
GE0CEEIE8, MEATS AND PEOViSION&
Fine Creamery Batter a Specialty.
601 M Street, North-Ewt, Cor. 5th
Advertisements.
TU
C L . A K H N O P T I C A L CO.
BEFRACTINO AND JtANUPACTD KIIfG OPTICIANS.
PRACTICAL
-
Masonic Temple,
-
-
SCIENTIFIC
907 P St., Wa^hingrtoii, » . C
Johnson & Morris,
STEAM AND WATER
Meatir(!g Apparatus
09 Eleventh St, N. W.
j|
'V?Vas]riirigtori, D . C
Thomas Eagan, Manager
"D T r^ TLJ ' O
­■­^AV­^XX
If they are RICH'S SHOES
V J
they're proper.
M I O H ­ G R A D E ;
S H O E S .
Entire New Building.
Phone 150.
Ten One F St. Cor. loth.
W
A
Qlnrlan
-3.
Mercnant Tailor,
. A. OldQen, ¥• ^29 JE, Capitol St.
J
■■^(^
Suits made to Order.
Dying, Cleaning, and Repairing.
ESTABLISHED, 1815.
Hayenner BaMng Co.
460 to 476 C St.
<3rackers, <3akes, a n d S^amily B r e a d
Oor Institntion is supplied mth Havenner's Bread.
J[sh Your Grocer for it.
yiii
AdverHsemenU.
Thos. T. Keane,
Wholesale and Betail Dealer.
"yyASHINGTON
DRESSED
SS to 51 Centre
B E E F .
Market.
TELEPHONE 158.
9 WHOLESALE ROW.
C C H M E D T I E BROS.,
ESTABLISHED, 1864.
John Mmsen, Propridor,
Diamot\d.s,
B'irx^e ^Je-ssreliry, ^ c .
704 Seventh Street, North-Weat.
For Pracioal and Good Shoe
CALL OK
Repairing,
M. B. ELBERT,
715 H Street, N. E.
R - o s e n f e l d ' s Cor^fectior^eary,
8 1 3 H S t . , N . K.
Ice Cream and Ices for Parties a Spedalty.
Fine Line Chocolates.
Bon-Bons and Taffies.
Oysters and Lunches.
Seaiqwxiiera for the Students of College.
Telephone East306-A.
J . Vsl. ViToodL,
826 10 th St., N. E.,
BOOT AND SHOEMAKER,
Repuring Neatly Done.
Advertigements.
IX
S u c c e s s o r t o W. A. MCCARTHY,
—DEALER I N —
CSf;ars, Tobacco, Newspapers, Periodicals, Stationery, etc
719 H Street, Northeast.
Washington, D . C.
THE
HOFFMAK HOUSE,
FRIED OYSTERS, CLAMS, GRABS AND FISH.
Ice Cream, Pies, Cakes and Confectionery of all kinds.
Mineral Waters,^ Cider, Ginger Ale, etc.
Groceries and Provisions, I and general varieties of all kinds from a shoe
string all around up to a, hat pin.
tl. F . H o f f m a r i .
1120 7th St, N ; E .
CHAS. I. GRIFFITH,
P h a r m a c i s t , Cor. 7th. and H Sts. F.E.
PURE DRUGS Am) CHEMICAI^.
Frescriptloiis a Specialty.
A fine line of stationery and note-books.
Branch Postal Telegraph and U. S. Express Money Order Office.
THE GEM Shaving Parlor,
~~
48i7 H . S T . , N . E.
Hair Singed; Hair Cutting a Specialty.
Clean Towel to Every Customer.
Imported Bay Bum Free.
CARL E. GUNDLACH,
^1 tH^
927 E St., K W.,
\
ao ^Attr^5^5S^
Washington, D. C.
Q U D E & BRO.
Florists and Floral Decorators.
1224-
F S t r e e t , N. W.
' P h o n e Main S 6 9 ,
X
AdevrtisemenU.
Isn't tlie experience of 20 years 'worth something to you ?
BRANCH BALTIMORE SHIRT FACTORY,
929 and 931 Ninth Street, N. W . ,
J. A. Ireland, Manag-er.
Washington, D. C,
Shirts t o Measure a Specialty.
Bicycles and Sundries,
Our Motto:
" T h e best-HTOrU
f o r tlx^ l e a e t m o n e y , "
Try me once and see.
HIGH GRADE W O R K .
/<>v ENAMELING, BRAZINA
'J^^S'
VULCANIZING, REMODELLING.
"Hx
All work guaranteed.
F l a . i l Y e . & H , N . BSJ.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
THE BURTON STEAM LAUNDRY,
3 1 0 C STRET, N. W.
C. B U R T O N , Prop.
Telephone East 33-D.
Medals, Trophies,
Class Pins and Rings,
Prize Cups, Etc.
Our special productions bear the impress of
individuality, appropriateness and artistic merit.
Prices as low as is consistent with highest
quality and workmanship.
Correspondence invited.
J. E. CaWvveU & Co.
902 CHESTNUT STREET
Diamond Blercbants, Jewelers, SilTersmitlu, Importers of Art Objects.
AdvertuemenU.
zi
The Best Shaveis on Earth—every one Gnaranteed and kept in shaving condition free. Our
line of Cutlery is the largest in town. Sporting and Athletic Goods of every description.
^'Jflbilee Razors." I u
GEKEKAL EEPAIEING.
Walford,
909 and 4-77 Penna Ave.
See the new 1900 Victor Bicycle—^$35.
L E A D E R S S I N C E 1867.
• If you want C L O T H I N G ready-to-wear that
is just as good in every respect as can be
made to order—^you'll find it in the
SQks-Clothlng.
Ready-to-Wear Prices.
All the latest novelties.
Everything else Men and Boys wear, too,—
and the only complete Sporting and Athletic
Goods Stock south of New York.
Saks & Company,
Pennsylvania Ave. and Seventh St.
TSTM. BiLI^I^iLNO^YNi) ^
SONS,
BookSellersj Stcttionersj dnd Engrdvers.
^28 7 Street, KoHhwesb.
A Full and Complete Stock of Everything in our Line.
zii
Advertisementt.
The Regerxt Shoes
$2.50
For ME N,
THE REGENT,
943PENNAAyE.
Elphonzo Youngs Co.
« Nuff Sed."
FRED. B. NICHOLS.
HARRY W . NICHO LS.
i^RaEjI). B . N I O H O I y S & <30.,
Paper, Blank Books and Stationeiy,
913
E; S T R K S T ,
N .
vy.
£1 Kid Finish Note Paper, $. 15.
EASTERN DEPARTMENT STORE,
M R S . A , W I L S O N , Prop.,
Up-to*'Date Retailer.
Fifty D epartments equal t o 5 0 Complete Specialty Stores.
Agents for Standard Patterns and Publications.
1119
& 1123
H
STREET, N . E .
' T ' - r p - p ' T ' T T (^ r^ OFTEN in a very short time. D on'tlet
*■*-'■*-'■*■ -"^ VJ V ^ then, do this by neglect till they are
hopelessly lost Come and consnk our competent Dentists without cost, and
have good work at small prices.
Painless Extracting, SOcts.
BV-A-NS' D E N T A L P A R L O R S ,
1309 F street, N. W.
Advertisements.
• ••
xui
MERMOD & JACCARD
1 I Jewelry Co.,
Broadway corner Locastj
The poid and Silversmiths of the City of St. Louis,
Designers and Manufacturers of all Kinds of
Class Pins, Badges, Medals Silver, Gold,
Enamelled and Jeweled.
Also design and make Prize Caps and Trophies for all events
in Solid Silver, Silver Plate and Pewted Designs and
estimates promptly famished on request.
Onr work which has gone to all parts of the United States
has elidted mnch praise and commendation for eriginality
of design, elegance of execution and reasnoable prices.
THK
BE;ST
of everyhing in Sporting goods—and only
T H E BEST.
Gymnasium Apparatus, Dumb bells, Indian Clubs, etc.
Football and Golf Accessories.
Bods, Heels, and Fisbing Tackle of all kinds.
Ice and Boiler Skates from 25c. up.
Oldest established Sporting Goods house in Washington
—always a favorite shopping place for
Gallaudet College.
M . i t . l^iLI^PiLN & <20.,
I 3 3 S F St., Ni W.
C. C. P U R S K L L ,
BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER,
4 1 S Ninth S t . N. TST., "Washington, I>. C
BLANK BOOKS AND STATIONERY OF EVERY SORT.
BOOKS'ABE SOLD HEBE AT A GREAT BEDUCnOK I 3 0 1 I FBXHTED PBICES.
Advertiaemenls.
xiT
The Typewriter Exchange
5 N. Calvert St.
Baltimore. Md.
I>ealers in second hand typewriters
of all maKe.
Old machines exchanged.
Machines shipped for examination free.
WRITE FOR PRICES.
RETAILS AND SUPPLIES.
To the
Sou^A ^n^ FLORIDA^
THE SEABOARD AIR LINE
•
^
is the
S H O R T E S T and Q U I C K E S T
operating
D O U B L E DAILY S C H E D U L E S
'
with most improved
TRAIN and PULLMAN CAR SERVICES.
For all information applj to
GEO.
Z . PHILLIPS,
W . H . DOLE,
Pass. Agt.,
Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept,
1434 New York Ave., Washington, D . C.
R. E. L. BttNCH, Gren. Pass. Agt., Portsmouth, Va.
f/^
n^
.i^
-a
mie^^Man's
re,'i
01
SSf^?!: (^
ff^
IS%:|
ft^-^vf
Ji^
The " swagger''^2-buttont
:?]?^
double-breasted sack suit- ;
: /^
a stalfcart, i athletic modelj ; ^
'^^'^"'^i:'--"^sij^
^5'^-^f.--^
feV ^1 ^.:-"^'■ij '-.■^■'■■. -■
^^i^;'i"'£';'
>^-Jii'i'-'-.~>':l
'■■ i?ir»--*;.;-::,-..'S^,V-*^
i5^
\ ^
calculated to bring > out J S;
J^
every good point of ;»
man's physique—illustrat- ;'
0
ing an elegance and finish -.
^f s
in high-class tailoring never ^-^
before attained in ready-to^
wear clothing. Shown in ;;
m
the stylish black unfinish-"
ed worsteds and blue and
i
bronze overplaids. Prices, ?
m
m
m
M
m
m
m
$16.50 to $ 2 0 - : j u s t a;?^saving of from $3.50 to $5. f.
0^'MM
D. JKAUFMAli
t/^d^^' ■
%' %.-i:y-:': '■•'.!
-7
M&i^
■„ ;■'•*■'t;i;■%lfi^j|%'>
'^-S^S%MJ^^^^i
×

Report this document