THE GOOD NEWS - Saint Pauls Greek Orthodox Church

Document technical information

Format pdf
Size 1,5 MB
First found фев 4, 2016

Document content analysis

Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts

Bishop wikipedia, lookup

Catholic Church wikipedia, lookup

Orthodox Church wikipedia, lookup

Christian terms wikipedia, lookup

Greek Orthodox Church wikipedia, lookup

History of the Orthodox Church wikipedia, lookup

Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople wikipedia, lookup

Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria wikipedia, lookup

Persons

Daniel John Cunningham
Daniel John Cunningham

wikipedia, lookup

Dorothy Day
Dorothy Day

wikipedia, lookup

John the Baptist
John the Baptist

wikipedia, lookup

Arturo Toscanini
Arturo Toscanini

wikipedia, lookup

Iain Duncan Smith
Iain Duncan Smith

wikipedia, lookup

Dennis Thomas Flynn
Dennis Thomas Flynn

wikipedia, lookup

Henry St John, 1st Viscount St John
Henry St John, 1st Viscount St John

wikipedia, lookup

John Chrysostom
John Chrysostom

wikipedia, lookup

Nick Davis (record producer)
Nick Davis (record producer)

wikipedia, lookup

Organizations

  • St Mary Hall, Oxford lookup, wikipedia
  • Congregation of St. Basil lookup, wikipedia
  • [email protected] lookup, wikipedia
  • St Paul's Girls' School lookup, wikipedia
  • Church's lookup, wikipedia
  • St. John's Institution lookup, wikipedia

Places

Transcript

THE GOOD NEWS
Saint Paul’s Greek Orthodox Church - Monthly Bulletin
“I am not ashamed of the Good News because it
is the power of God for the salvation of everyone
who believes.“ (Romans 1:16)
January, 2015
Volume 78| Issue 158 The Baptism of our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ
in the Jordan River by St. John the Baptist
Celebrated on Tuesday, January 6th
WORSHIP SERVICES Saint Paul’s Greek Orthodox Church Sundays Morning Prayer 9am Divine Liturgy 10am

Monday, January 5th
The Pre-Feast of Theophany
The Royal Hours 5:30pm
Vespers & Liturgy 7pm
Blessing of Waters 8:15pm

Theophany
The Baptism of Christ
Morning Prayer 9am
Divine Liturgy 10am
Blessing of Waters
11:15am

Wednesday, January 7th
St. John the Baptist
Morning Prayer 9am
Divine Liturgy 10am


Saturday, January 17th
St. Anthony the Great
Morning Prayer 9am
Divine Liturgy 10am

Friday, January 30th
The Three Hierarchs
Morning Prayer 8am
Divine Liturgy 9am
Please note the earlier times
for services
for the Three Hierarchs
in order to
accommodate the
“Pastoral Challenges in
Marriage Conference”
being put on by our
Archdiocese here in Irvine.
Deacon Daniel Cunningham, Parish Deacon ‐ Dean Langis, Pastoral Assistant Marina Kookootsedes, Office Administrator Joanne Petas, Administra ve Assistant — Denise Oller, Administra ve Assistant THE BLESSING OF HOMES & BUSINESSES
IN THE NEW YEAR OF OUR LORD 2015
Because the prayers used by
the Church to bless holy water
on the feast of Theophany—
celebrating the baptism of
Christ by John the Baptist in
the Jordan River—are the same
as those used at every baptism, this service is essentially
the “baptizing” of one’s home
or business. It is a marking off
and consecration of one’s living
space and/or working space
that declares your home and
work and all who live in it as
belonging to Christ, as places
where He is King! The annual
blessing of homes after the
celebration of the Baptism of
Christ on January 6th coincides
with the New Year and allows
us to rededicate, renew and
fortify not only ourselves with
the blessings of Theophany but also our homes and even the
places where we work.
Tuesday, January 6th
2 4949 Alton Parkway, Irvine, California 92604‐8606 Office Telephone: (949) 733‐2366 ● Fax: (949) 733‐0962 h p://www.stpaulsirvine.org Father Steven Tsichlis, Pastor — Father Theofanis J. Degaitas. Assistant Priest 



The blessing of homes by the priest with holy water maintains
the spiritual association between the ‘family church’ and the parish, as well as again providing for the sharing of God’s spiritual
blessings. This annual blessing should not be overlooked by families. If the priest comes to bless the home when the children are
present, they have the opportunity to see the priest in a more
personal situation and can lead the way through the house, or
hold a candle. For children, the house blessing shows the connection of the Church to home. If you would like to have
your home or workplace blessed during this period, please
call Marina or Joanne in the Church Office at 949-7332366 to set up a time for Fr. Steve or Fr. Theofanis to
come for a pastoral visit and blessing.
PHILOPTOCHOS MEANS “LOVE FOR THE POOR”
ST. PAUL’S VASILOPETA (ST. BASIL’S BREAD) CELEBRATION BY PHILOPTOCHOS
ON SUNDAY, JANUARY 11th!
On Sunday, January11th, we will have our annual celebration of the Vasilopeta (St. Basil’s bread) which will be
hosted by the women of our Philoptochos (“Love for the
Poor”) in the Parish Center at the conclusion of the Liturgy. This custom began in the 4th century when St. Basil the
Great, wanting to distribute money as well as bread to the poor
of his diocese, commissioned some women to bake sweetened
bread in which he arranged to place gold coins. Thus, after the
loaves were distributed, the hungry who cut the bread for nourishment also discovered the additional gift
of gold coins. This event traditionally benefits a ministry of our Archdiocese—and of Philoptochos in particular—St. Basil’s Academy for children
in need, that is located in upstate New York, overlooking the Hudson River. St. Basil’s Academy provides a refuge for children whose parents or
guardians are unable to care for their children because of illness, the
death of a parent, chemical addictions, destitution and other family problems. Established in 1944 by the late Patriarch Athenagoras (1886-1972)
during the time of his ministry as Archbishop of America, St. Basil’s
Academy has been a beacon of light for some 70 years. A special tray
benefitting St. Basil’s Academy will be passed by the women of
Philoptochos at the end of Liturgy this morning.
Who was St. Basil the Great? The impact of the vigorous personality and thought of St.
Basil the Great (329-379AD) dominated the life of the Church in the 4th century in a way that
few other figures did. An able ecclesiastical politician who was more than willing to challenge
the secular Roman authorities if necessity demanded, a clear sighted dogmatic theologian
whose book On the Holy Spirit was an important factor in leading to the 2nd Ecumenical Council in 381AD, a liturgical reformer whose Liturgy of St. Basil is still celebrated in the Orthodox
Church to the present day, an organizer of social relief on a vast
scale in an age when harshness and cruelty often seemed to reign
supreme, he was also, first and foremost, a man engaged in living
the monastic life. Black-bearded, with heavy eyebrows, glittering
eyes, small lips pressed tightly together, Basil stares out from mosaics and icons found in churches in Greece, Constantinople, Mt.
Athos, Russia and throughout the Orthodox world. Basil was born
into an old Christian family of wealth and distinction in Caesarea of
Cappadocia (modern Turkey) and educated in Constantinople and
Athens. He had a strong sympathy for the poor and downtrodden.
Becoming the bishop of Caesarea in 370AD, he established a large
monastic complex, called the Basilead, that included a hospital for
the sick, a hospice, an orphanage, a special building for the care of
lepers, a soup kitchen and so much more that it came to be called a
new town, a new Caesarea. Basil the Great – he wears the name
well: a man of profound intellect deeply in love with God.
3 PHILOPTOCHOS MEANS “LOVE FOR THE POOR”
As you can see from the announcements on the previous page,
we will celebrate our annual Vasilopita (St. Basil’s Bread) on
Sunday, January 11th and also take a pass a second tray after
Liturgy to support the St. Basil’s Academy, an Archdiocese institution that is now in its 70th year.
OUR ANNUAL VASILOPITA CELEBRATION:
One of the most beautiful and inspiring of the traditions and
customs of the Greek Orthodox Church is the observance of
Vasilopita. The word Vasilopita is a compound Greek word
which means the sweet 'bread of Basil'. This age old tradition
began in the fourth century, when Saint Basil the Great, who
was the bishop of the ancient city of Caesarea in Cappadocia
(modern Turkey), wanted to distribute money to the poor in
his Diocese. He commissioned some women to bake a sweetened bread, in which he arranged to place gold coins. Thus the families who received the
loaves, in cutting the bread to nourish themselves, were pleasantly surprised to find the gold
coins.
ST. BASIL'S ACADEMY:
In March 1944, then Archbishop Athenagoras requested Philoptochos to purchase the beautiful
250-acre estate of Jacob Ruppert in Garrison, NY, which is located on the shores of the Hudson River, directly opposite the U.S. Military Academy of West Point. With the purchase of this
estate, Philoptochos had the enormous task of completely renovating the property, which included several buildings, the main administration building, a residence for the Director, classrooms and dormitories, a reception hall and building a Chapel. Today, the Philoptochos continues to be one of the main financial supporters of the Academy through two commitments: Vasilopita and Sisterhood. The Vasilopita event is conducted during the month of January across
the United States by every Chapter in every parish. It is the main source of funding for the operating expenses of the Academy. The Sisterhood Fund is collected each year in April. This
program provides for the ongoing physical needs of the children of the Academy, such as
clothing, furniture, equipment and essentials for the dormitories, kitchen, etc. and for the
graduation celebrations and special awards for graduating students.
Stewardship is based on a calendar year. Our membership drive begins this January with the
distribution of a brochure that will include a schedule of events. ALL OF OUR FUNDS GO TO
OUR CHARITY WORK!
Consistent, compassionate and accountable services for those in need is the goal of St. Paul's
Philoptochos. An application form is included for your convenience and also available on St.
Paul's website with the PayPal payment option.
Please call or email me with comments or questions. I look forward to hearing from you!
Thank you for all your support of our many ministries!
In Christ's Love,
Nanette Bowman
Nanette Bowman, President
714-269-0612 (c)
[email protected]
4 PHILOPTOCHOS MEANS “LOVE FOR THE POOR”
5 OUTREACH-SERVING CHRIST BY SERVING OTHERS
ST.PAULS’S/ST. MARY’S ROMANIAN CHURCH IN ANAHEIM SERVING MEALS
TO THE HOMELESS IN GARDEN GROVE ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7th!
We thank all our parishioners from St. Paul’s and from St. Mary’s who have donated their
money and their time to this wonderful ministry. The average cost of the meal is $250 for
about 70-80 people—the homeless we serve are men, women and children. We kindly ask for
donations and volunteers. The actual serving of meals is from 1:30 to 2:30 pm, but you are
encouraged to come earlier from 12:00 to 1:30 pm to help to prepare the food and to set up
and/or to stay afterwards to clean up from 2:30 to 3:00 pm. We feed the homeless at St. Anselm’s Episcopal Church at 13091 Galway Street in Garden Grove, CA 92844. For directions
and for any further information please don’t hesitate to call Elvira Opran at 714-828-0650 or
Dean Langis at 949-733-2366.

ST. PAUL’S VISITS TO ELDERLY SHUT-INS AT THE CONCLUSION OF LITURGY
ON SUNDAY, JANUARY 11th!
All of our parishioners are invited to visit a few of our elderly shut-ins who cannot make it to
Church easily with Deacon Daniel Cunningham and Dean Langis. Please sign up at the activity
table in the Parish Center or you may also call Dean Langis at 949-733-2366. Many of these
elderly parishioners are very lonely and would greatly appreciate your love and concern.
Please join us as we go to bring them some cheer!

FOCUS ORANGE COUNTY: THE NEXT MEAL PROVIDED BY ST. PAUL’S
AT THE VALENCIA INN WILL BE ON SUNDAY, JANUARY 11th!
The Fellowship of Orthodox Christians United to Serve (FOCUS) serves
and provides food for the working poor and homeless families living in
the Valenica Inn at 2630 West Lincoln Avenue, Anaheim, CA 92801;
(714) 821-3690 on Sunday evenings from 5pm to 8pm.
Our next
time for St. Paul’s turn to serve will be on Sunday, January 11th.
FOCUS needs people to both prepare here in the kitchen at St. Paul’s
and serve meals at the Valencia Inn. Please contact Jacob Lee at
[email protected] if you would like to help prepare and serve the meal. More details can
be found at www.FOCUSoc.org. Thank you!

PHILOPTOCHOS (LOVE FOR THE POOR) IS SERVING MEALS TO THE HOMELESS
AT ISAIAH HOUSE ON MONDAY, JANUARY 26th!
We invite you to help serve dinner to the homeless women and children who reside at the Isaiah House. We serve on the 4th Monday of each month from about 4pm to 6:30pm—this month
on Monday, January 26th. The Isaiah House is a local ministry of the Catholic Worker movement founded by Dorothy Day (1897-1980) in 1933 to serve the poor and homeless in New
York city during the Great Depression. Today there are 185 Catholic Worker communities in
the US. Isaiah House offers formal meals for the homeless, shelter, showers, bags of food,
clothing, a listening ear and other emergency assistance in the Name of Jesus Christ. Isaiah
House offers shelter to homeless women—and often to their school age children as well. Please
call Jeri Konopisos at 949-731-4710 or Terry Maroutsos at 949-378-1719 if you would like
to participate in this ministry.
6 7 CHRISTIAN EDUCATION & SPIRITUAL FORMATION
ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY 101 RESUMES MEETING
ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7th AT 7PM!
OC101, taught by Father Steve, will resume meeting on Wednesday
evenings beginning on January 7th at 7PM! We meet in the Education
Building in the Father George Stephanides Library. The purpose of this
class is to provide a broad overview of the Church's faith and life, beginning with our worship. This class is intended for those who wish only to
explore Orthodoxy; for those who wish to become members of the
Church; and for those members of our parish family already Orthodox
but interested in broadening and deepening their faith. We are looking
at the question: What does it mean to be a disciple of Jesus Christ in the
21st century? And in January, we’re focusing specifically on questions
related to our being the Church that Christ founded and the Holy Spirit
established on the day of Pentecost: What does it mean for us personally to be members of the Church, to be part of a Christian community
that has a 2,000 year history; and where did all these other denominations/churches come from?
January classes
7th The Church: the Bride of Christ, the Body of Christ and foretaste of the Kingdom.
Read: “The one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church” and “We are the Church of the early fathers”
from Introducing the Orthodox Church pp. 4-18 and 74-93
14th The history of the early Church.
Read: “Which came first: the Church or the New Testament?” a pamphlet by Father James Bernstein
21st Where did all these churches come from? The history of the Church thru modern times.
Read: the “Teaching” section in the OC 101 Notebook about the Church and her history
28th We are the Church of the 7 Ecumenical Councils and the Nicene Creed.
Read: “What we believe about the Nicene Creed” and “What we believe about Jesus” and “What we
believe about the Holy Trinity” and “What we believe about salvation” from Introducing the Orthodox
Church pp. 19-43 and 62-73
THE NEXT MEETING OF OUR ROMAN CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN BOOK
CLUB WILL TAKE PLACE ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 13th AT 7PM
Our Roman Catholic/Orthodox Christian book club now includes members from
three Churches here in Irvine: St. Paul’s, St. Paul’s Coptic Orthodox Church and
St. John Neumann Roman Catholic Church. Our next meeting will be on Tuesday, January 13th at 7PM at St. Paul’s Coptic Orthodox Church in Tustin!
We will be discussing the book: The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer—a book by
Evangrius of Pontus, the 4th century Desert Father who was ordained a deacon
by St. Gregory the Theologian in Constantinople before he went to live as a monk
in the Egyptian desert.
Copies of The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer are available from Joanne Petas. Please give
her a call in the parish office at 949-733-2366 or e-mail her at [email protected] to
purchase your copy.
Please join us for an evening of prayer, study and ecumenical fellowship!
8 CHRISTIAN EDUCATION & SPIRITUAL FORMATION
THE WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY WILL RESUME MEETING
ON THURSDAY, JANUARY 8th AT 10AM
The Women’s Bible Study is focused on the Gospel of
John, the last of the four Gospels to be written. The Gospel of St John, following the prologue, may be divided into two main parts. The first part is the book of “signs,”
the record of a number of Jesus’ miracles with detailed
“commentary” about their significance in signifying Him
as Messiah and Lord (chapters 2-11). Because the “signs”
all have a deeply spiritual and sacramental significance
for believers in Christ, with almost all of them dealing
with water, wine, bread, light, the salvation of the nations, the separation from the synagogue, the forgiveness of sins, the healing of infirmities
and the resurrection of the dead, it is sometimes thought that the gospel of St John was expressly written as a “theological gospel” for those who were newly initiated into the life of the
Church through the sacramental mysteries of baptism, the gift of the Holy Spirit, and the Eucharist. The latter half of St John’s gospel concerns the passion and resurrection of Christ and
its meaning for the world. (chapters 11-21). Here most explicitly, in long discourses coming
from the Lord Himself, the teachings of Christ’s person and work are most deeply explained.
Here Christ relates that He is one with God, Whose Word He is and Whose words He speaks,
Whose works He accomplishes and Whose will He does. And through the Holy Spirit, Who proceeds from the Father to bear witness to Him in the world, He remains forever in the hearts of
those who are His through their faith in Him and worship of God. The class is led by Eve
Tibbs, and our discussions are informal and congenial. No previous Bible study experience is
required. Drop-ins and children are welcome. Please join us for a morning of fellowship
and discussion!

THE WOMEN’S STUDY FELLOWSHIP WILL RESUME MEETING
ON MONDAY, JANUARY 12th AT 6:30PM!
Do you wonder how you might truly live your life as God
created you to live it? Do you long for a deep, fundamental change in your life with God? Do you desire a
greater intimacy with God? Our spiritual growth develops: like an instrument, it must be played. Like a path, it
must be walked. We long to grow closer to God and we
know that prayer and silence, scripture and reflection are
ways to open ourselves up to the movement of the Holy Spirit. Yet, the busyness of life
crowds in on us and we often do not follow through on our intentions. With this study we will
explore the depths of scripture, learn to listen to God through it, and allow our lives to be
shaped by God’s word. There will be readings that we will do during the week and a time to
put what we think into words on paper (or on a computer screen!). Writing is an inward and
outward experience and it connects the world we live in with a world that is larger than our
thoughts. Written reflection can help us understand our struggles and reflect on our relationship with God! As we journey together, we will become Companions in Christ. Please join us
as we as we support one another on our spiritual journey as Orthodox Christian women. For
more information, please phone Dorothea Love at 949-481-6288.
9 New Year’s Resolutions for Orthodox Christians
by Father Andrew Damick
Around this time of year, many people start thinking about ways they can change for the better. While New Year’s resolutions are not particularly a feature of the Orthodox faith, change
certainly is, and resolving to change based on times and seasons is certainly part of our liturgical tradition. So adapting the cultural custom of New Year’s resolutions to become a better
Orthodox Christian is perfectly fine. Here are some suggestions for Orthodox Christians resolving to change for the better in the New Year, things every Orthodox Christian can do.
1. Get serious about coming to Church (more)!
While many who read this are no doubt at least every-Sunday attenders at church, it is statistically true that only 26% of Greek Orthodox Christians in America come to church
weekly (the statistic is drawn from people who are actually involved in parish life, not from
anyone who was ever baptized Orthodox; that statistic would be much worse). That’s really a
horrible percentage! If you’re not coming to church weekly, why not? There are probably
some good reasons out there, but most of those 74% who don’t attend almost certainly do
not have good reasons. If you’re not serious about coming to church weekly, it’s time
to get serious. This is eternal life we’re talking about, not a social club.
2. Come to Church on time!
It’s kind of an in-joke that Orthodox people are always late to church. But why is that? We
too often accept the excuse that we function on “Greek time” or “Syrian time” but
even Greeks and Syrians (and whoever else; insert your preferred ethnicity here) seem to be
able to adapt to show up to everything else on time. Why can we show up on time for work,
sporting events, movies, doctor’s appointments, etc. but reserve our tardiness for an encounter with the King of Kings? There are some kinds of events for which it doesn’t much matter if
you come at a later time—parties, various kinds of social gatherings, etc.—but Church services on Sunday mornings aren’t one of them. There is a definite beginning and a definite
ending. If you show up late, you are late. And if you leave early, you are skipping out. What
you show up on time for tells the world what you find important. It’s what you find indispensable. And when you show up late to church, it also tells your fellow parishioners that you
don’t consider church very important. And it also communicates it to your kids. And you
can be assured that they will imitate you. Come at least ten minutes early. That says you
are serious. You know what also says you’re serious?
3. Tithe!
Nothing says you’re serious like giving 10% of your income to something. Giving 10% to God
sounds crazy to a lot of people, but the reality is that it’s actually totally normal for many
Christians—even for generations. Orthodox people in the US aren’t used to tithing (10%) or
even giving some other percentage, mainly because many of their forebears across the sea
gave to their churches just by paying their taxes. That doesn’t work anywhere in the Englishspeaking Orthodox world. Your taxes do not go to support your church. Meanwhile, you are
probably spending a lot more just on cable TV. Or Internet access. Or your smartphone. Or
eating out. Or coffee. Or a lot of other things. But the most important thing about pledging
and tithing is not about meeting parish budgets or supporting your priest like the hardworking, educated man he is. It’s about worship. Your heart is where your treasure is (Matthew
6:21). Where’s your treasure? Follow the money, find the heart. If you’re not up for 10% yet,
then try 8%. Or 6%. Or whatever. But go on record, and get disciplined about giving.
Don’t give until it hurts, but until it actually feels good.
10 New Year’s Resolutions for Orthodox Christians
4. Pray at home!
Even if all you do is say the “Our Father” when you wake up (saying it three times a day is the
most ancient known prayer rule), you will notice a change in how you think and feel about
your faith. It will become more present for you and will define you more. Oh, and, parents? It
will have a huge impact on your kids. Watching parents pray at home and (in time) joining
them in that prayer is one of the biggest contributions that kids can receive toward their longterm spiritual viability. If you don’t bring the faith home and practice it, you can forget
about it mattering in the long run, either for you or your kids.
5. Sing along at Church!
The choir and chanters are there to lead you in prayer, not to entertain you or pray instead
of you. Yes, it is possible to pray with them silently, but there are few things more spiritually invigorating than singing your prayers. So if you’re able, you should.
6. Invite someone to Church!
Did you know that 82% of the unchurched say that they would come if invited? Did you
know that only 2% of church members invite someone to church in a given year? Do
you really believe that you’ve found the true faith, seen the true light and received the heavenly Spirit, like you sing near the end of the Liturgy? Then why are you keeping it to yourself? Think of at least one person you know who isn’t in church. Make him or her a spiritual
priority this year. Pray every day for that person. And when the time is right, give the invitation. Statistically speaking, they are probably going to say yes. And when you make the invitation, don’t say, “You should come to church with me sometime.” “Sometime” is no time. Say,
“We’re celebrating the Divine Liturgy this Sunday at 9am at my church. Can I pick you up and
bring you with me?”
7. Attend a Bible study or an adult education class regularly!
It’s unfortunate how uneducated many Orthodox people are in their own faith. I sometimes
hear the excuse that that stuff is just for seminarians and clergy, that it’s too intellectual, too
far above the heads of the average parishioner, etc. But the very same people are often lawyers, doctors and teachers and can give you detailed information about what the rules and records in the Super Bowl are, what their least favorite politician has done to wreck the country,
and what the latest gossip is on various celebrities, all in remarkable detail. But when it comes
to what will last into eternity, we are suddenly the dumbest people on the face of the earth.
Don’t sell yourself short. You are probably pretty smart about many things. Why
don’t you use that same talent to get smart about your faith in Christ?
8. Read a good spiritual book recommended by your priest!
There are few things that get us into another story, another way of looking at life, like a good
book. And a good spiritual book can help to retrain your mind to become like the mind of
Christ. Let’s face it: most of us do not have the mind of Christ. We have the mind of something
else. Our minds are filled with meaningless distractions, painful necessities and the cares of
this fallen world. But the extended meditation on what is good and true and beautiful that can
come from reading a good spiritual book can help to change all that. And you know what? That
change helps to bring us peace. And that’s something that each of us needs a whole lot more
of.
11 PARISH ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS
ST. PAUL’S AMBASSADORS GREEK LUNCHEON AT CHRISTAKIS GREEK CUISINE IN
TUSTIN ON THURSDAY, JANUARY 8th AT 11:30 AM!
We invite all our parishioners and your friends ages 50 and up on Thursday, January 8th for
our trip to the delightful Christakis Greek Cuisine Restaurant for our Greek luncheon at 11:30
am. Christakis Greek Cuisine is located at 13011 Newport Ave, Tustin, CA 92780; 714-7316600. It is located in the shopping complex at the northwest corner of Newport Ave. and Old
Irvine Blvd. You may either meet us at the restaurant at 11:30 am or carpool with us from St.
Paul’s at 11 am. Please R.S.V.P. to Dean Langis at 949-733-2366 because we need to give
the restaurant of how many will be coming. Please join us for a wonderful and authentic
Greek luncheon!

ST. PAUL’S FREE MUSIC NIGHT ON THE BIG SCREEN WITH ARTURO TOSCANINI AND
LEONARD BERNSTEIN CONDUCTING MASTEPIECES OF JEAN SIBELIUS OF FINLAND
ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 23rd AT 7:30 PM!
Please come to see this marvelous concert on the St. Paul’s big screen with the Arturo Toscanini conducting Sibelius’ exquisitely beautiful “En Saga” and Leonard Bernstein conducting Sibelius’ magnificent 5th Symphony—both of these masterpieces on the big screen! We also
hope to listen to Sibelius’ gorgeous Violin Concerto as performed by the great Greek violinist of
our time, Leonidas Kavakos. We plan to serve free Lenten dessert and refreshments. Please
bring the whole family for a beautiful evening of lovely and delightful music!

ST. PAUL’S PILGRIMAGE TO THE LIFE-GIVING SPRING WOMEN’S MONASTERY AT
ST. NICHOLAS RANCH ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14th and 15th!
Please join us on our pilgrimage to the magnificent LifeGiving Spring Women’s Monastery located near Dunlap at
St. Nicholas Ranch at 38526 Dunlap Road, Squaw Valley,
CA 93675; phone: 559-338-2103. We plan to carpool
from St. Paul’s at 8am on Saturday morning, February
14th and return on Sunday evening, February 15th. If
you would like to be one of our drivers or if we can use your van or car, please call Dean
Langis. We plan to stay overnight at St. Nicholas Ranch where the rooms are only $35 for
Saturday night. Please call Dean Langis for further information and/or to R.S.V.P. at 949-7332366 as soon as possible! Please come for a spiritually uplifting pilgrimage!
VISITING THE LIFE-GIVING SPRING WOMEN’S MONASTERY by Jennifer Hampson
As a convert to Orthodoxy, I found the idea of visiting a monastery to be both
intimidating and intriguing. I loved the idea of entering briefly into the monastic rhythm, but I had no idea about the proper etiquette or even how to
address monks and nuns. When St. Paul's offered a pilgrimage to the LifeGiving Spring Monastery a few years ago, I decided to get my feet wet. After
all, Mr. Dean was heading the trip, so I knew I could ask any questions I had
and follow his lead. My life was forever changed on that trip. I thoroughly enjoyed the services
and meeting Gerontissa Markella. I found a quiet peace in my soul that carried on a while after
our return. Visiting the monastery is a great opportunity to fellowship with other parishioners
from St. Paul's as well. I hope to go on the pilgrimage again this year, and I'm hoping the
bring my family! Please join us!
12 PARISH ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS
A VISION 21 UPDATE:
BELOW ARE PHOTOS OF SOME OF THE MOSAIC ICONOGRAPHY
THAT IS CURRENTLY IN PROGRESS IN ITALY
THE RAISING OF LAZARUS FROM THE DEAD AS RECORDED IN JOHN 11:1-44
PALM SUNDAY: THE ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM
THE CRUCIFIXION OF CHRIST
IT IS HOPED THAT INSTALLATION OF THESE ICONS WILL BEGIN IN EARLY MARCH
SO THAT THEY WILL BE COMPLETED AND IN PLACE
BEFORE HOLY WEEK AND PASCHA!
13 PARISH ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS
THE 2014 PARISH COUNCIL
What is the parish council and what is its
ministry? The parish council is the administrative body of the local parish community elected
by its stewards for the purpose of working together with the parish priest in fulfilling the mission and goals of their community.
The following people were elected to serve on the 2015-2016 parish council at our elections
this past December 7th: Mona Fahmy Almond, Jim Dargavel, George Ekizian, Alex Gorbenko, Wayne House, Jacob Lee, Dennis Thomas and Steve Tibbs. They will be joining
Greg Cladopulos, Dean Conzaman, Jim Eckstaedt, Mark Hudoff, John Leventis, Lou
Machos and Ron Tedesco. The newly constituted parish council will be prayed for and
blessed to begin their service on Sunday, January 11th at the conclusion of the Liturgy, after
which they will adjourn to the conference room in the parish center to elect their officers for
the New Year.
A special word of thanks goes to Mel Bowman and Nick Konopisos for their countless hours
of service to St. Paul’s on this past year’s parish council. Their work honored God!
14 CHURCH MUSIC-SINGING PRAISES TO THE LORD
Have you ever stopped to notice... that just about every word we hear in church during
the Divine Liturgy is sung? All of our worship and the life-giving words of our Christian Faith
are expressed in music during the Divine Liturgy! The purpose and meaning of “sacred music” in Orthodox Christianity was expressed well in this quote of St. John Chrysostom:
“Nothing uplifts the soul so much, and gives it wings, and liberates it from
the earth, and releases it from the fetters of the body, and makes it aspire
after wisdom, and deride all the cares of this life, as the melodies and
rhythms of sacred songs."
Hot off the press!
The new Divine Liturgy
hymnals have arrived, and
will be in our pews in
early January.
In the most ancient Orthodox prayer books, the services were always written as a dialogue
between “Priest” and “People.” The prayer books never said “Priest” and “Choir” since everyone in attendance is to participate in the service. This is the main reason that what is now
being called "congregational singing" is returning to the practice of many Orthodox parishes in
America. Every voice was created by God, and every voice should be thanking Him. The
worshipping congregation is to be of "one mind and one heart" before God. Having the entire
congregation sing together becomes a living icon of that unity of praise, as expressed beautifully by St. Ignatius of Antioch:
“All of you together become a choir so that being harmoniously in concord.
and receiving the keynote from God, in unity you may sing with one voice
through Jesus Christ to God the Father.”
At Saint Paul’s, our focus on congregational singing will not eliminate the "formal" choir, but
our Church Musicians will lead the congregation in singing the responses (“Lord have mercy”,
“To You O Lord”, etc.) as well as the hymns with familiar melodies. Saint Paul’s choir will
continue to grow and develop, so if you are a singer interested in formally learning one of the
four parts the choir sings (bass, tenor, alto, soprano) rather than just the melody, please
send an email to [email protected] Digital “accommodations” are available for those
who cannot regularly attend rehearsals.
15 STEWARDSHIP– OUR OFFERING TO CHRIST
Ahad, Nevine & Wajdi Abdul
Alexiou, James & Elaine
Anast, George
Anstadt, George & Mary
Aprahamian, Richard & Connie
Ayoub, Donna
Ball, Grant & Helen
Bekis, Constantinos & Sandra
Bizakis, Maria
Bowman, Mel & Nanette
Brizolis, Demetrios & Ann
Buday, Stephen
Chacopulos, Patty
Chade, Richard & Anthea
Chernyshev, Alexander & Elena
Chrisopoulos, Stelios & Elizabeth
Chryssogelos, Apostolos & Theodora
Cladopulos, Gregory & Christine
Cokas, Joann
Colby, Stephanie
Columbus, Paul & Patti
Condas, Helen
Confrey, John & Katina
Conley, Chris & Maria
Cretikos, Stella
Cunningham, James & Maria
Dalis, Don & Joanne
Dalis, John
Dames, Peter
Dargavel, James & Bea
Davis, Nicholas & Kiki
Debbaneh, George & Rama
Diamant, Georgeann
Diamant, Nick & Angeline
Diamantopoulos, Nicholas & Terri
16 Diyakonov, Oleksiy & Oksana
Domer, Paul
Drakodaidis, Christina
Duggan, Jeffrey & Christa
Eckstaedt, James & Kathryn
Economos, George
Eifert, Dave & April
Eilenberg, Sydney
Ekizian, George & Karen
Gigounas, Argie
Gorbenko, Alex & Linda
Gountanis , Nick & Kay
Halamandaris, Harry & Sandra
Hampson, Mark & Jennifer
Harrington, Gary & Freeda
Harrison, Christina
Henning, Robert & Ana
Homyak, David & Lonnie
House, Wayne & Barbara
Hudoff, Mark & Hresula
Hutchings, Pamela & Donald
Jianas, Alex & Diana
Joannides, Nickolas & Courtney
Kartsonis, Michael & Melinda
Katsiametis, Maria
Knapp, Gregory & Michele Litzie
Konopisos, Nick & Donnella
Konopisos, Stephanie
Konopisos,Theodore & Jeri
Kookootsedes, George & Marina
Korp, Cathy & Bruce
Kouracos, Steve & Carolyn
Koutures, Dr. & Mrs. Chris
Koutures, Maria
Kouzelos, A. Jack & Kristine
Krembas, Jeanette
Langis, Dean
Leara, Angelo & Denise
Lee, Jacob & Calee
Lekas, Bill & Denise
Lembesis, Peter
Les, Mark & Barbara
Leventis, John & Laura
Levine, Jeffrey
Lidis, John & Dina
Livadas, Alex & Linda
Louis, Theresa
Lovato, Leo & Carol
STEWARDSHIP– OUR OFFERING TO CHRIST
Luke, Nina
Lykos, Cosmas & Kelli-Ann
Machos, Lou & Karen
Manakides, Tommy & Ginger
Manneh, Mitri & Linda
Manos, Jim & Mary
Maras, Menelaos & Katie
Marcopulos, Stathi & Linda
Mariades, Christopher
Maroutsos, Angelo & Terry
Mastrangelo, Anthony & Georgian
Matinas, Evangeline
Matthews, Ron & Helen
McLin, Robert & Constance
Mitrovich, Asimenia
Murry, Martha
Musey, Mitchell
Mwesigwa , Adam & Nadine
Mylonas, George & Michele
Neforos, Thomas & Debbie
Ogonowski , John & Julia
Opran, Elvira
Panos, Mike & Xenia
Pappas, Dino & Catherine
Patellis, Nicholas & Lillian
Peters, George
Peterson, Pamela & John
Pirozzi, Lewis
Poulos, Mary
Powell, Demetra & Nicholas
Preketes, Nick and Jeanette
Price, Andrea
Pullos, Faye
17 Ratanjee, Georgette & Joe
Reed, Bill
Rerhko, Maya & Alex
Ritsi, Peggy
Santa Ana, Edwin & Anamaria
Sardis, George & Sherie
Schipsi, Jennifer & Robert
Scordalakes, Nicholas & Erin
Sekeris, Lambros & Carol
Simcoe, Duncan
Smith, John & MaryAnne
Smock, Louis & Jeannine
Speliopoulos, Nick & Carol
Stankovich, Peter & Kimberly
Stavropoulos, Alex
Stephanides, Presvytera Elaine
Stout, Michael & Alysha
Sun, Georgia & Chien
Sutil, Cesar & Vicky
Sysock, Marie
Taktikos, Georgia
Tedesco, Ronald & Priscilla
Thanos, Jerald
Theodor, Georgia
Theodorou, George & Georgia
Thomas, Dennis & Maria
Tibbs, Steve & Eve
Ticknor, William & Mary Kay
Tomich, Mark & Ginny
Torris, James & Evangelia
Tsichlis, Fr. Steven & Katie
Tsighis, Mrs. Joyce
Urbanski, Douglas & Christal
Warren, Ermione Koutsoudis
Washington, Jr., Benjamin & Jennifer
Werth, Tim & Barbara
Wood, Patrick & Barbara
Wysmierski, Raymond & Mary
Zambukos, Ted & Sharol
Zampas, Tom and Susie
A special word of thanks
to all those
who have made their
stewardship pledge
to St. Paul’s for 2015!
18 SCHEDULE OF TALKS AND EVENTS
Thursday, January 29th
8:00am—Typika Service
8:30—Breakfast/Registration
9:30—Opening Remarks
10:00—Keynote:
His Eminence Metropolitan Gerasimos
11:30— Workshop Session I
Fr. Timothy Pavlatos—Rebuilding a Marriage in
the Aftermath of an Affair
Allena Barbato—The Impact of Infertility and
Miscarriage on the Marriage
Fr. Tom Tsagalakis—How Addictions Infect and
Destroy Intimacy in Marriage
1:00—Lunch
2:30—Workshop Session II
George Papageorge—Boundaries: Insights into
Ourselves and our Relationships
Fr. Jim & Presvytera. Donna Pappas—Say What?!...Communication Matters
Philip Mamalakis—When Couples Get Stuck: Pastoral Care & the Journey of Oneness
Friday, January 30th
9:00am—Liturgy for Three Hierarchs (at St. Paul’s Church)
10:30—Brunch (at St. Paul’s Church)
11:00—Keynote: Rev. Dn. Stephen Muse (at St. Paul’s Church)
1:00 —Workshop Session III
Fr. Timothy Pavlatos—Rebuilding a Marriage in the Aftermath of an Affair
Allena Barbato—The Impact of Infertility and Miscarriage on the Marriage
Fr. Tom Tsagalakis—How Addictions Infect and Destroy Intimacy in Marriage
2:30—Light Lunch To Go (take to your workshop)
3:00—Workshop Session IV
George Papageorge—Boundaries: Insights into Ourselves and our Relationships
Fr. Jim & Presvytera. Donna Pappas—Say What?!...Communication Matters
Philip Mamalakis—When Couples Get Stuck: Pastoral Care & the Journey of Oneness
5:00—Paraklesis to Sts. Joachim and Anna
19 20 21 2015 MINISTRY LEADERS
2014 PARISH COUNCIL
AMBASSADORS (AGES 55 AND UP)
President: Ron Tedesco
Vice President: Jim Dargavel
Treasurer: Wayne House
Secretary: John Leventis
Mona Fahmy Almond, Greg Cladopulos,
Dean Conzaman, Jim Eckstaedt, George Ekizian,
Alex Gorbenko, Mark Hudoff, Jacob Lee, Lou Machos,
Dennis Thomas, Steve Tibbs
Coordinated by: Dean Langis
ST. PAUL’S FOUNDATION
President: Ted Konopisos
Vice President: Michael Kartsonis
Secretary: Chris Louis
Treasurer: Jim Eckstaedt
James Alexiou, Hugo Aviles, Mel Bowman,
Tykye Camaras, Dean Conzaman, Nick Davis,
Mark Hudoff, Alex Jianas, Anthony Kalomas, Jack Kouzelos,
Angelo Leara, Bill Lekas, Chris Louis, Tom Mallos,
Ron Matthews, Nick Speliopoulos, Steve Tibbs,
Father Steven Tsichlis
ST. PAUL’S STEWARDSHIP COMMITTEE
BIBLE STUDY PROGRAMS
Women’s Bible Study: Eve Tibbs
Orthodox Koinonia Bible Study: Dean Langis
Tuesday’s with Yiayia: Dorothea Love
CHURCH CATECHETICAL SCHOOL
Executive Director: Eve Tibbs
Directors: Dorothea Love,
Joanne Petas, MaryAnne Smith, Steve Tibbs
ADULT CHRISTIAN EDUCATION
Orthodox Christianity 101: Fr. Steve
Orthodox/Catholic Book Club: Fr. Steve
Women’s Study Fellowship: Dorothea Love
Grief Ministry: Presvytera Elaine Stephanides
ST. PAUL’S BOOKSTORE
Joanne Lorton
Coordinator: Mark Hudoff
Barbara House, Jeff Levine, Lou Machos, MaryAnne Smith
ST. PAUL’S LIBRARY
ST. PAUL’S PHILOPTOCHOS
YOUTH MINISTRIES
(Love for the Poor)
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President: Nanette Bowman
Advisor/Chaplain: Dorothea Love
First V.P.: Carol Sekeris
Second V.P. Ana Henning
Recording Sec.: Karen Ekizian
Corresponding Sec.: Catherine Korp
Treasurer: Diana Jianas
Kiki Anastopoulos, Kathy Gabriel, Linda Gorbenko,
Barbara House, Maria Elena Konugres, Marina Kookootsedes,
Helen Louis, Mary Manos, Jeanette Preketes
AGAPE OUTREACH
At Isaiah House: Terry Maroutsos & Jeri Konopisos
At St. Anselm’s Episcopal Church: Elvira Opran
FOCUS – Orange County
GOYA (Grades 8-12): Carolyn Kouracos & Pita Dargavel
Acolytes: John Britigan & Dean Langis
CHOIR
Director: Eve Tibbs
President: Stephen Borchert
Treasurer: John Smith
Secretary: Stacy Gentry
BREAD FOR THE LITURGY
Coordinator: Deacon Daniel Cunningham
USHER COORDINATORS
Leo Lovato
Theresa Louis
Jacob Lee, Director
ARCHONS OF THE
ECUMENICAL PATRIARCHATE
MISSIONS COMMITTEE
Tykye Camaras, Archon Lambadarios
Ron Matthews, Archon Hartophylax
(Mission is Possible)
Chairman: Alex Gorbenko
Secretary: Nadine Mwesigwa
Treasurer: Jennifer Schipsi
22 Georgia Theodor
GREEK LANGUAGE CLASSES
Adults: Nina Luke
Children: Loula Katalanos
January
In the Year of our Lord 2015
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
1
Fri
Sat
2
3
9
10
16
17
Happy
New Year!
Church Office Closed.
4
6
7
8
Eve of Theophany
Strict Fast Day Today
(no meat/poultry, dairy/
eggs, fish, wine or oil)
Royal Hours, 5:30 pm
Divine Liturgy, 7 pm
Blessing of the Water,
8:15 pm
Adult Greek School,
6:30 pm
Alcoholics Anon., 6:30 pm
Epiphany
St. John
the Baptist
Ambassadors Carpools
at 11 am from St. Paul’s
to Lunch at Christakis
Greek Cuisine in Huntington Beach at
11:30 am
Women’s Bible Study,
10 am
Irvine Study Fellowship
at Lee Home, 6:30 pm
Orthodox Koinonia,
7:30 pm
11
12
13
14
15
Regular Schedule
Blessing of 2015
Parish Council
Vasilopita (St. Basil’s
Bread) Sunday
St. Paul’s Visits to
Elderly Shut-ins 1 pm
Adult Greek School,
6:30 pm
Orthodox/Catholic
Book Club, 7 pm
at. Paul’s Coptic
Church in Tustin
Children’s Greek
School, 3:30 pm
Women’s Bible Study,
10 am
Adult Greek School,
6 pm
Irvine Study Fellowship at Lee Home,
6:30 pm
Regular Schedule
Morning Prayer,
9 am
Divine Liturgy,
10 am
FOCUS Feeding the
Homeless, 4:30 pm
5
Alcoholics Anon.,
6:30 pm
Women’s Study
Fellowship, 6:30 pm
Regular Schedule
Morning Prayer, 9 am
Divine Liturgy, 10 am
Blessing of the Water,
11:15 am
Choir, 7 pm
Steweardship
Committee, 7 pm
Ladera Ranch Study
Fellowhip, 6:30 pm
Morning Prayer, 9 am
Divine Liturgy, 10 am
St. Paul's/St. Mary’s
Feeding the Homeless in
Garden Grove, 12-3 pm
Children’s Greek School,
3:30 pm
Adult Greek School, 6 pm
Orthodox Christianity 101,
7 pm
Orthodox Christianity
101, 7 pm
St. Anthony
Morning Prayer, 9 am
Divine Liturgy, 10 am
Orthodox Koinonia,
7:30 pm
18
19
20
21
22
23
St. Athanasios
Adult Greek School,
6:30 pm
Parish Council, 6 pm
Children’s Greek
School, 3:30 pm
Women’s Bible Study,
10 am
Adult Greek School,
6 pm
Irvine Study Fellowship at Lee Home,
6:30 pm
St. Paul’s Free Music
Night on the Big Screen
with Arturo Toscanini
and Leonard Bernstein
Conducting Masterpieces by Jan Sibelius
of Finland , 7:30 pm
Regular Schedule
Alcoholics Anon.,
6:30 pm
Choir, 7 pm
Women’s Study Fellowship, 6:30 pm
25
St. Gregory the
Theologian
Regular Schedule
GOYA Appreciation
Luncheon after
Church
Philoptochos
Membership
Luncheon, 1 to 3 pm
23 26
Agape Ministry at
Isaiah House, 4 pm
Adult Greek School,
6:30 pm
Alcoholics Anon.,
6:30 pm
Women’s Study Fellowship, 6:30 pm
Ladera Ranch Study
Fellowhip at Angelos’
Home, 6:30 pm
Orthodox Christianity
101, 7 pm
27
24
Orthodox Koinonia,
7:30 pm
28
29
Children’s Greek
School, 3:30 pm
Adult Greek School,
6 pm
Orthodox Christianity
101, 7 pm
Pastoral Challenges in
Marriage ConferenceOneness: Protecting
and Growing the
Blessed Communion
Women’s Bible Study,
10 am
Irvine Study Fellowship at Lee Home,
6:30 pm
Orthodox Koinonia,
7:30 pm
Pastoral Challenges in
Marriage ConferenceOneness: Protecting
and Growing the
Blessed Communion
30
31
Three Hierarchs
Pastoral Challenges in
Marriage ConferenceOneness: Protecting
and Growing the
Blessed Communion
Morning Prayer, 8 am
Divine Liturgy with
Met. Gerasimos, 9 am
Pastoral Challenges in
Marriage ConferenceOneness: Protecting
and Growing the
Blessed Communion
NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE
Address Service Requested2
DATED MATERIAL PLEASE RUSH DELIVERY
24 PAID
IRVINE,CA
PERMIT #25
×

Report this document