Psychology Graduate Handbook 2015-2016

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GRADUATE PROGRAM
IN
PSYCHOLOGY
2015/2016
HANDBOOK
Behavioural Sciences Building, Room 297
4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario
M3J 1P3, Canada
416-736-5290
http://psychology.gradstudies.yorku.ca/
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TABLE OF CONTENTS – 2015/2016
Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………….5
General Information, Organization and Administration………………………………………………………5
The Graduate Program Director
The Graduate Program Executive Committee
The Graduate Program Faculty Members
Areas of Specialization
Graduate Student Organizations………………………………………………………………………………..6
The Psychological Students’ Association
The York University Graduate Students’ Association
The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
Facilities…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..7
Centre for Vision Research
Counselling Disability Services (CDS)
FGS Graduate Professional Skills (GPS)
Institute for Social Research (ISR)
LaMarsh Centre for Child and Youth Research
Psychology Resource Centre /Donald O. Hebb Computer Lab
Sherman Health Sciences Research Centre
Teaching Commons
York University Psychology Clinic
Safety Contracts for Students
When Problems Arise……………………………………………………………………………………………12
Privacy: Information on the Collection, Use, and Sharing of Students’ Personal Information……..………13
Financial Information…………………………………………………………………………………………….14
Teaching Assistantships (TA)
Graduate Assistantships (GA)
Research Assistantships (RA)
Bursaries and Funds
National Scholarship Competitions
Provincial Scholarship Competitions
York Donor-Funded Scholarships
Mitacs Awards
Financial Allowances for M.A. theses and Ph.D. dissertations under the CUPE contract
Academic Matters………………………………………………………………………………………………17
Faculty Supervisors
Forming the Supervisory Committee
Guidelines for the Supervisory Committees, Supervisors and Students
Annual Evaluation of the Student
Prohibition of Unsupervised Psychological Services
Guidelines for Thesis/Dissertation Proposals…………………………………………………………………20
Ethical Considerations
When to Secure Copyright Permission
Sequence of Events in Finalizing the Defense of a Thesis or Dissertation
Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission
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The M.A. Degree………………………………………………………………………………………………..23
Program Requirements
Time Limits
Advancement in Status from M.A. to Ph.D. Candidacy
Provisional Ph.D. Status
The Ph.D. Degree……………………………………………………………………………………………….26
Program requirements
Ph.D. Minor area paper requirement
Time Limits
Clinical Competency Examination
Additional Information for Students in the Clinical and Clinical-Developmental Area
Additional Information for Students in the Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Area
Specialty Stream and Graduate Diplomas…………………………………………………………………….33
Clinical Neuropsychology Stream requirements
Health Psychology Graduate Diploma requirements
Neuroscience Graduate Diploma requirements
Quantitative Methods Diploma in Psychology Requirements
Course Evaluation and Evaluation of Student’s Coursework………………………………………………..35
Grades……………………………………………………………………………………………………………35
Incomplete Grades
Course Syllabi……………………………………………………………………………………………………36
Guidelines for Directed Reading Courses (6710)……………………………………………………………...36
Fall, Winter and Summer Registration..……..…………………………….…………………………………..36
Faculty and Program Regulations……………………………………………………………………………...36
Petitions
Withdrawal from the Program
Reinstatement vs. Re-Admission
Adding and Dropping Courses
Courses in Other Programs and Other Institutions
Leave of Absence/Maternity Leave
Intellectual Property and the Graduate Student
Academic Honesty
Library Policy Regarding Extended Loan Privileges…………………………………………………………40
Course Schedule ……………..………………………………………………………………………………….41
Building List……………………………………………………………………………………………………..45
York University Campus Map……………………………………………………………………………..…..46
Course Descriptions……………………………………………………………………………………………..47
Sessional/Important Dates...................................................................................................................................79
Useful Contact Information……………………………………………………………………………………..80
IMPORTANT NOTE: Please keep all annual handbooks for future reference. Should you register with
the College of Psychologists, you will be asked to supply detailed descriptions of all the courses you have
taken. It will be your responsibility to provide course descriptions. It is also a good idea to keep all course
syllabi for courses you have taken for future reference.
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INTRODUCTION
Psychology was the first graduate program to be established at York University and currently is one of the university's largest
programs. Our 95 faculty members include several who are also members of other graduate programs such as Biology,
Computer Science, Kinesiology and Health Science, Philosophy and Gender, Feminist & Women's Studies. Faculty members
are also associated with the following research units at York University: the Centre for Vision Research, the Institute for Social
Research, the LaMarsh Centre for Child and Youth Research, the Centre for Refugee Studies, and the Centre for Feminist
Research. In addition to its regular faculty members, presently 50 adjunct faculty members are affiliated with the Program.
The Graduate Program in Psychology at York offers courses, opportunities for research, and professional training leading to
M.A. and PhD degrees in seven areas of specialization. The program provides a broad foundation in the basic principles and
methods of behavioural science and, in addition, considerable field experience. Graduates are expected to be familiar with a
wide range of problems confronting both academic and professional psychologists and to be knowledgeable in sufficient depth
in specialized areas to contribute to solutions of both theoretical and applied problems.
GENERAL INFORMATION, ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
The Graduate Program Director (GPD)
The Graduate Program Director (GPD) is responsible for the administration of the Graduate Program in Psychology and reports
to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies (FGS). Graduate Program Directors at York are appointed by the Board of
Governors on the successive recommendations of the Program Executive Committee, the Dean of Graduate Studies, and the
President of the University. Graduate Program Directors normally serve for a period of 3 years.
Students are advised that the GPD has two major roles: (i) To protect and enhance the quality of the Graduate Program in
Psychology, and (ii) to ensure that graduate students in psychology are treated fairly and served well by the Program and its
members. Graduate students are encouraged to approach the GPD when encountering difficulties within the Program, or need
counsel that they cannot obtain from their supervisor or Area Head (i.e., either the Director of Clinical Training of either of the
two clinical Areas or the Coordinator of each of the other five Areas (see below).
The Graduate Program Executive Committee
The Faculty of Graduate Studies (FGS) requires each Graduate Program to have an executive committee chaired by the GPD.
The Graduate Program Executive Committee recommends policy to the Program as a whole and seeks to co-ordinate the work
of the Program’s seven speciality Areas in relation to the overall Program. The Committee includes two members elected from
the graduate faculty membership at large, the Departmental Chairs, the seven Area Heads, four graduate students elected from
the graduate student body at large (with one being a student representative on Council of FGS), and one faculty member exofficio with voting privileges, representative on Council of FGS.
The Graduate Program Faculty Members
At York, there are two undergraduate departments of psychology. The larger department, in terms of number of both faculty
members and students, is the Faculty of Health. The other (Glendon College) is part of a bilingual liberal arts faculty and offers
courses in both French and English. It is important for students to understand, however, that the Graduate Program in
Psychology operates under the direction of the FGS, not the undergraduate faculties such as Health and Glendon College.
For faculty, membership in the Graduate Program in Psychology requires satisfying the criteria of FGS, and then being
nominated by the Program Director, approved by the Dean of FGS, and appointed by the Board of Governors. Regular
members of the Program are employees of the University. Adjunct members are employed outside it. The criteria for regular
and adjunct members are the same with respect to research background. Nevertheless, only regular members are allowed to
assume sole responsibility for supervising M.A. theses and PhD. dissertations and to conduct the business of the Program.
However, adjunct members may co-supervise theses and dissertations and sit on students’ thesis and dissertation committees.
The graduate program faculty members meet a number of times each year to consider policy changes recommended by the
Graduate Program Executive Committee. Clinical practicum supervisors may or may not be employees of the University but
are not members of graduate faculty. Their role is restricted to this clinical supervisory activity.
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Areas of Specialization
The Graduate Program comprises seven Areas or fields:
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences (BBCS)
Clinical (C)
Clinical-Developmental (CD)
Developmental Science (DS)
History and Theory (HT)
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Social and Personality (SP)
Prof. Joseph DeSouza, Area Coordinator
Prof. Jill Rich, Director of Clinical Training
Prof. Mary Desrocher, Director of Clinical Training
Prof. Scott Adler, Area Coordinator
Prof. Michael Pettit, Area Coordinator
Prof. David Flora, Area Coordinator
Prof. Raymond Mar, Area Coordinator
Each incoming student joins a particular Area in keeping with their interests indicated at the time of applying to the Program.
More details about the specific requirements for each Area can be found later in this Handbook.
The responsibilities of the Areas include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Determining the slate of members of the Area who are in a position to take on new students in any given year.
Evaluating and recommending applicants for admission to the Area.
Creating, evaluating and recommending curricula relevant to the Area.
Evaluating students’ progress; evaluating and recommending the continuation or termination of students, and the
granting of Ph.D. candidacy to students upon completion of the M.A. degree requirements.
Evaluation of practice for students in the Area and recommendations of additions, deletions or modifications to the
student’s program of study.
Contributing to service activities required to run the Graduate Program such as scholarship ratings, thesis prize
adjudication, etc.
Participation in the development of Area’s colloquia/workshops/etc.
Recommendations on recruitment of faculty.
Decisions made by the Areas are subject to the approval of the Graduate Program Director. It is a responsibility of the Director
to monitor the activities of the Areas and to ensure that they operate within the policy guidelines for the entire Program.
GRADUATE STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
The Psychology Graduate Students' Association (PGSA) – http://pgsa.student-org.yorku.ca/
The Psychology Graduate Students' Association (PGSA) represents all graduate students in psychology at York. The main
functions of the PGSA are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Administering of funds for full-time students. NOTE: Funds are available to cover conference costs related to
registration and creating presentation materials (e.g. poster printing), and only if the student presented at the
conference.
Organizing student orientation and social gatherings.
Organizing meetings of either a political or informative nature relating to the quality of graduate experience within the
Program.
Representing psychology graduate students’ interests to the Program’s administration, FGS and the York University
GSA.
Disseminating relevant information to students.
Encouraging greater interaction among students and between faculty and students.
Organizing workshops for graduate students and other events from time to time.
An Executive Committee, elected annually by psychology graduate students, administers the PGSA. All psychology graduate
students, part-time and full-time, are automatically members of the PGSA. All members are entitled to run for executive office
each September and are welcome to attend PGSA meetings whether they are executive members or not.
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The York University Graduate Students' Association (YUGSA) – www.yugsa.ca
The York University Graduate Students' Association (YUGSA) is a council of graduate student representatives from each
Graduate Program at York. The council's major roles are the disbursement of funds from graduate students' activity fees and to
represent all graduate students to the university administration. The YUGSA offers a number of services to graduate students.
Please refer to the GSA Handbook for more information.
Further inquiries may be directed to the departmental representatives (PGSA) or to the YUGSA office, Room 325 Student
Centre, phone number: (416) 736-5865, email: [email protected]
The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) - http://3903.cupe.ca/
The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) is the body that represents all graduate employees (teaching assistants,
demonstrators, tutors, markers and graduate assistants) and part-time members of the faculties of the University (sessional
lecturers). The Union is divided into three units, Unit I being comprised of graduate student Teaching Assistants, Unit II of
part-time members of the faculty, and Unit III of Graduate Assistants. Students who are research assistants are not represented
by the union. For further information, please refer to the YUGSA Handbook.
FACILITIES
Centre for Vision Research (CVR) – http://cvr.yorku.ca
Thirty faculty members at York University, of whom many are members of the Graduate Program in Psychology, conduct
research in sensory processes, perception and computer vision. These visual scientists, together with post-doctoral fellows and
graduate students working in the labs of these faculty members in Psychology, Biology, Computer Science and Engineering,
Kinesiology and Health Sciences, and Physics constitute the Organized Research Unit known as the Centre for Vision Research
(CVR). The members of the CVR come from a variety of scientific backgrounds, but their research interests converge on
overlapping problems related to sensory processing. Members pool their research expertise, engage in collaborative research
projects, and form a close-knit, interdisciplinary academic community. The CVR is thus an ideal environment for training
graduate students. Many past graduates have gone on to obtain academic and research-related positions. Students must
complete the course requirements of the graduate program in which they are registered, but the most important things are
learned by working in the well-equipped CVR laboratories and by interacting with others with similar and often complementary
interests. Therefore, from the moment they arrive at York, students in the CVR become involved in research, at first with the
help and guidance of their supervisor but as time goes on they become more independent until, at the doctoral level, they are
planning and conducting their own research. Students are encouraged to attend regular colloquia and international scientific
meetings and become identified with the local and wider scientific community. By the time students receive a Ph.D. they will
typically have published several papers, and will have presented posters or papers at international scientific meetings. In other
words, they will have become independent, creative scientists ready to take their place in the scientific community.
For information, contact the Director, Dr. Laurence Harris or the Administrative Assistant, Teresa Manini, telephone: (416)
736-5659, fax: (416) 736-5857 at 0009 Lassonde Building.
Counselling and Disability Services (CDS) – http://cds.info.yorku.ca/
Counselling and Disability Services (CDS) helps students of the University to realize, develop and fulfill their personal and
academic potential through an assortment of diverse programs.
Personal Counselling Services (PCS) - Students are invited to discuss their personal concerns with a counselor. Appointments
can be made at the PCS reception in N110 Bennett Centre for Student Services. The office is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday; and from 9:00 a.m. to 7 pm on Tuesday. They can be reached at (416) 7365297. All interviews are confidential.
Groups and Workshops - PCS offers groups and workshops for a variety of concerns, including academic performance
enhancement, assertiveness training, avoiding procrastination, effective presentation skills and public speaking, performance
anxiety in the fine arts, relaxation training, and stress management, among others. Most groups are offered during both the fall
and winter terms, depending on enrollments.
Learning Skills Services - Through individual consultations, small-group seminars, and workshop series, students can work at
improving reading, listening, note taking, memory, time management, exam preparation, and essay writing.
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Learning Disability Services - The Learning Disability Services provides a range of specialized services to students with
learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and Autism Spectrum Disorders including advice on courses and
academic programs; orientation to campus facilities and services; diagnostic assessment of psychological and educational
profiles; learning strategies; assistive technology training; career counselling; advocacy, strategies for self-advocacy and
meditative services between student and faculty regarding academic accommodations in instruction and evaluation.
Mental Health Disability Services - Educational support service is geared to students with on-going mental health needs.
Services include: orientation to campus resources and facilities, consultation regarding academic studies, peer mentorship,
advocacy, strategies for self-advocacy and meditative services between student and faculty regarding academic
accommodations in instruction and evaluation, and linkages to community resources.
Physical, Sensory & Medical Disability Services - Educational support service for students living with a physical, sensory or/
medical disabilities. Services include: orientation to campus resources and facilities, consultation regarding academic studies,
advocacy, strategies for self-advocacy and meditative services between student and faculty regarding academic
accommodations in instruction and evaluation, and linkages to community resources.
FGS Graduate Professional Skills (GPS) Workshops –
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/enhancing-your-experience/graduate-professional-skills/
Career Development
The GPS Career Development workshops offer graduate students and postdoctoral fellows assistance in exploring their career
options, discovering and communicating their skills and expertise, and planning for the future. We offer training and support
tailored to a variety of career paths: the professoriate, academic administration and staff, business, entrepreneurship, nonprofits, and government.
Knowledge Development and Transfer
The GPS Knowledge Development and Transfer workshops help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows develop the skills
and knowledge they need to perform effective research and analysis and to ensure that their research secures funding and has an
impact, whether that’s through teaching, community engagement, scholarly or popular publication, or online. We offer training
in performing and managing research, applying for scholarships and fellowships, completing your major graduate degree
requirements with the most success and the minimum level of stress, and translating your research to students, academic
audiences, and the wider world.
Oral and Interpersonal Communication
The GPS Oral and Interpersonal Communication workshops help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows develop the skills
and knowledge they need to effectively communicate and work with others. We offer training in presentations, public speaking
networking, and professional etiquette.
Management and Leadership Skills
The GPS Management and Leadership Skills workshops help graduate students learn the foundations of overseeing projects
and working in teams to facilitate success. Principles of management, as well as tools and techniques to increase overall
effectiveness, are explored.
Personal Wellbeing and Social Responsibility
The GPS Personal Wellbeing and Social Responsibility workshops address a variety of areas including community
engagement, mental health, ethical research and personal development. Graduate students will learn how to cope with
challenges and to effectively tackle multiple responsibilities in both their professional and personal lives.
Institute for Social Research (ISR) – www.isr.yorku.ca
Location:
5075 Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Building
Tel.:
416-736-5061
Email:
[email protected]
The Institute for Social Research (ISR) provides consultative and support services, many of which are offered without charge,
to York University researchers primarily in the social sciences (including psychology), but also in the biological and physical
sciences.
ISR's Statistical Consulting Service (SCS) provides assistance in research design, sampling, questionnaire design, statistical
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computing, and statistical analysis; this service is offered without charge to all York University students. SCS also sponsors
short courses on data analysis and the use of statistical software (including R, SAS, and SPSS). These courses are offered in the
fall, winter, and spring each year.
ISR's Spring Seminar Series on Social Research Methods presents short courses in questionnaire and sample design, how to use
focus groups for social research, analyzing qualitative data, conducting Web-based surveys, and survey data analysis.
ISR houses the largest university-based survey research organization in Canada and the staff of ISR’s Survey Research Centre
carries out all phases of survey research, from questionnaire and sample design, through data collection, to the preparation of
machine-readable data files, statistical analyses, and report writing.
ISR’s Data Archive provides access to results of studies conducted by the Institute and other major Canadian surveys.
ISR manages the York University-Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (York RDC) which provides social science, health,
and policy researchers access to Statistics Canada’s master data sets. In the RDC’s secure environment, researchers can access
surveys in full detail, without the removal of geographic and other information required to protect respondent confidentiality in
the public use data files.
York students may contact ISR to arrange for consultation in any of these areas or to enquire about upcoming courses.
LaMarsh Centre for Child and Youth Research –
http://lamarsh.info.yorku.ca/, Facebook: [email protected], twitter: @lamarsh
The LaMarsh Centre for Child and Youth Research in the Faculty of Health at York University is a collaborative group of
faculty and students that supports community-engaged interdisciplinary research in health, education, relationships and
development of infants, children, adolescents, emerging adults and families everywhere.
The following topics are a select sample, representative of areas currently under investigation by members of the LaMarsh
Centre:
● Health and mental health interventions with Aboriginal youth
● Bullying; Violence prevention programs in schools
● Culture and parenting
● Girls’ aggression
● Dating violence
● Healthy peer and romantic relationships
● Preventing maltreatment in high-risk parent-infant dyads
● Risky sexual behaviour
● HIV/AIDS education and risk
● Epidemiology of childhood injury
● Youth sport and psychosocial influences
● Anxiety prevention among youth from high-risk communities
● Perfectionism
● Developmental trajectories of mood disorders from childhood to emerging adulthood in aboriginal youth
● Psychosocial adjustment of youth with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
● Resiliency in teenage mothers
● Risk in vulnerable infants of immigrant & transnational families
● Healthy workplace relationships
LaMarsh prides itself in diversity of research conducted by its members. Faculty engage in collaborative scientific,
educational, and community projects that promote the well-being of children and youth. The Centre supports international
exchanges, conferences and workshops on cutting edge topics, and transfers scientific findings to the community through
partnerships with agencies and non-governmental organizations. These partnerships bridge research, intervention and program
evaluation to enhance youth programs with the most current scientific knowledge.
The centre also promotes student engagement in the LaMarsh community through partnerships, leadership and mentorship. It
supports graduate student studies through Child/Youth Research and Leadership Awards.
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LaMarsh activities and events include a bi-monthly speaker series, an annual Graduate Student Symposium, workshops as well
as research supervision and mentoring. The centre welcomes many Canadian and International scholars and engages in
international collaborations.
Psychology Resource Centre (PRC)/Hebb Computer Labs – http://psycentre.apps01.yorku.ca/drpl/
The Hebb labs and Psychology Resource Centre (PRC) play a critical role in the research and teaching missions of the
department and to the YUPC.
The PRC provides access to a variety of academic supports apart from the library resources - bookable space for research;
computers with standard and statistical software suites; statistical advising; writing and learning assistance. The configuration
provides flexible space that allows us to provide individual and collaborative space for groups to formally and/or spontaneously
engage with their learning after leaving the classroom. Faculty and groups of students or the graduate students themselves use
the bookable space to meet and work together, review findings; prepare for presentations; conduct, video and critique one
another's practice assessments; conduct research with participants; run make-up exams; hold TA office hours; review and use
PRC tools and resources (tests, test aids, multimedia, reference tools, internship, practica holdings, funding, writing guides,
laptop and test scoring software, etc.)
The Department's two Computer Laboratories and the PRC on the ground floor of BSB house a total of 50 workstations and 2
printers (1 B/W & 1 colour). The Graduate Computer Lab has twelve computers which are reserved for the exclusive use of
graduate students 24 hours / 7 days a week. Each workstation is equipped with a standard suite of software such as SAS, SPSS,
R, R-Studio, AMOS, SAMPLE POWER, MSOffice, etc. A number of computers also have specialized software: E-Prime,
MATLAB, M-Plus, NVIVO, PRISM, etc.
The PRC and computer labs provide support to and for our graduate students, the student experience, and ultimately their and
our success.
Sherman Health Sciences Research Centre –
http://www.yorku.ca/research/excellence/ShermanHealthScienceResearchCentre.htm
The Sherman Health Sciences Research Centre has transformed a former York University hockey arena into a state-of-the-art
research facility that is a leader in its field in Canada.
The $11.5 million retrofit project, made possible through a $5 million investment by York University Foundation board
member Honey Sherman and her husband Barry Sherman, president and chief executive officer of Apotex Inc., brings scientists
studying the brain, vision, biomechanics, virtual reality and robotics together under one roof.
Beyond its role in enabling York to recruit and retain top calibre neuroscientists and health science researchers, the Sherman
Health Sciences Research Centre increases the intensity of York’s research that will lead to new discoveries, health diagnoses
and treatments.
The Sherman Health Science Research Centre’s centerpiece is the York MRI Facility featuring leading-edge, high field
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology.
This facility gives York’s researchers in-house access to this technology, which has many applications to human health. York
researchers are using it to study such disorders as dyslexia, migraine, aging, monocular blindness, movement disorders,
schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, as well as the healthy brain.
Teaching Commons – http://teachingcommons.yorku.ca/
Location:
Tel:
Email:
Office Hours:
1050 Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Building
416-736-5754
[email protected]
Monday - Friday: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
The Teaching Commons will become your primary source for support, networking and professional development as you
venture into this new chapter of your academic teaching experience at York University. The Teaching Commons endeavours to
support the teaching work of Graduate Students at all levels. Whether you are new to York University and new to teaching or if
you are a Graduate Student preparing to teach your very own course, the Teaching Commons offers an array of workshops,
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programs and resources for you. Aside from extensive programming options including TA and International TA Orientation
Sessions, Professional Development Workshops, Accredited Courses and on-line resources, the Teaching Commons brings
together like-minded individuals who are interested in exploring and sharing teaching and learning innovation across York
University.
York University Psychology Clinic - www.yorku.ca/yupc
The York University Psychology Clinic (YUPC) provides progressive, state-of-the art and evidence-based training to graduate
students in Clinical and Clinical-Developmental Areas while at the same time providing needed psychological services to the
community on a fee-for-service basis. These services include a range of assessments (e.g., learning disability, ADHD, ASD,
memory impairment) and psychotherapy for clients of all ages. Referrals are not needed and there is no specific catchment
area. To learn more about the clinic go to the clinic's web-site www.yorku.ca/yupc or call the clinic at 416-650-8488.
Safety Contacts for Students
In case of crisis situations or safety concerns, there are many resources on campus and nearby.
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When Problems Arise
The Grad Program recognizes that students may encounter difficulties occasionally during their time in the program. We want
students to have a positive experience in the program and thus we hope that any difficulties which do arise can be dealt with
early on and constructively. This section of the Handbook includes some suggested ways to help resolve difficulties if they do
arise and to make you aware of the official procedures available, should you ever need them. Graduate students have the right
to be treated with respect and to be free of any kind of harassment, as do all members of the University community.
General Process
In general, when difficulties arise, it is often best to try to deal directly with them and seek a resolution (e.g., perceived
unfairness regarding a course grade, differences in expectations between a student and a supervisor regarding RA
responsibilities). Sometimes, just clarifying expectations and assumptions will help sort things out. This may not be easy but is
often effective and may be a good learning experience. However, as a student, you are clearly in a hierarchical relationship in
which you have less power than faculty and we recognize this may be awkward for you.
So, if your attempt to deal with the situation is unsuccessful or you find it impossible to address, your next recourse is usually
your Area Head or Director of Clinical Training (DCT). He or she will listen respectfully and help you generate and evaluate
various solutions or options to address the situation. These might include taking actions such as speaking with the other faculty
member, having a joint meeting, consulting the Area as a whole, etc. depending on the situation and your wishes. Or you may
choose to speak to some other trusted faculty member.
If the Area Head/DCT is unable or unwilling to help you address the situation (or is part of the difficult situation), you may
speak to the Graduate Program Director (GPD), especially if it is a graduate program or FGS matter. He or she will listen
respectfully and help you generate and evaluate your options and advise you regarding possible next steps including petitions
and appeals beyond the Psychology Department.
One of the most difficult situations that can arise for a graduate student is when the relationship with the supervisor is seriously
problematic. Although this is not a common problem, it can be very challenging to navigate through. Students may wish to
refer to the FGS guidelines about Responsibilities of Supervisors and Students later in the Handbook to see what the program
expects the role of the supervisor to be. If there are serious concerns about these responsibilities not being fulfilled or you are
experiencing harassment of any kind, you should speak up. Students should discuss the situation with the Area Head/DCT or
GPD. It may be possible to find a mutually agreeable resolution or the student may need to change supervisors. Although not
common, it is possible to change supervisors and students should not fear negative consequences when this needs to happen.
Changing supervisors should be done in consultation with the Area Head/DCT, so that the student is supported by their Area in
finding a new supervisor. This may result in a delay in program completion, however. There is a form that needs to be
submitted to the Grad office once the new supervisor is determined.
Personal Problems
Graduate students, like anyone else, may experience personal problems from time to time, difficulties such as anxiety,
depression, and relationship problems. There are excellent resources on campus for personal counselling, support groups, and
so on, that may be very helpful. These are free and are confidential (they will not tell the Graduate program that you are
receiving services). Please see the website of the Counselling and Disability Services for details: http://cds.info.yorku.ca/ or call
(416) 736-5297. Remember, it is a sign of strength to seek help when you need it.
For further information:
University Code of Conduct: www.yorku.ca/oscr/pdfs/StudentCodeOfConduct.pdf
University Policies: http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/. See especially,
http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/workplace-harassment-policy/
http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/sexual-harassment/
FGS Policies and Regulations as well as Petition Forms at http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/.
Office of the Ombudsperson & Centre for Human Rights, York University S327 Ross http://ombuds.info.yorku.ca/ or email
[email protected]
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Privacy: Information on the Collection, Use, and Sharing of Students' Personal
Information
In accordance with the University Privacy Policy (http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/access-to-information-andprotection-of-privacy-policy-on/), and in keeping with the spirit of privacy legislation in other sectors, we want students to
understand fully what information is collected, stored, disclosed, and shared about them, and for what reasons, in the
Psychology Graduate Program. Please note: This is not official University policy, but is simply intended to help students be
fully informed.
What documentation about you is collected?
The Graduate Program maintains your official student file (a paper file). These files are kept securely in the Graduate Office
while you are a student and for at least 7 years following graduation or withdrawal from the graduate program. The files include
academic, financial, and professional training materials including: application materials including undergraduate transcripts,
GREs and letters of recommendation; all course grade sheets submitted by course instructors; practicum and internship
evaluations; all annual progress evaluation materials; documentation regarding MA, MAP, and PhD (committee
formation/changes, proposal approval, submission to FGS/Ethics, schedule oral, revisions complete, etc.); petitions for any
reason (extensions, exemptions to any FGS regulation, etc.) and associated documentation (letters of support, explanation, etc.);
any disciplinary documentation, letters or emails documenting any concern regarding the student's personal/professional
competence; scholarship information; and CUPE hiring documents (which include personal and banking information).
In addition, the following electronic files are maintained by the Graduate Office or by FGS: a cumulative record of course
registrations and grades; a spreadsheet of all scholarships and awards; a spreadsheet summarizing all students’ progress.
Do you have access to your file?
Yes, you can have access to your file, with certain specific exceptions (e.g., letters of reference, items including another
student’s name, etc.), by making a request to the GPD or Graduate program staff. Any concerns about the collection, storage
and use of students’ private information may be directed to the Graduate Program Director. All concerns will be discussed and
investigated thoroughly.
Who else has access and for what purposes?
Student files, both hard copy and electronic versions, are accessible to the Graduate Program staff, Area Heads/DCTs (for
students in their Area), and the student's supervisor. They need access to this information to administer the program, ensure
your progress in the program, summarize your accomplishments for year-end evaluations, scholarship ratings, prize
nominations, letters of reference for scholarships, job applications, applications to other programs, internship applications,
registration with the College of Psychologists, and so on.
From time to time, student files are reviewed in order to complete reports to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and the Ontario
Council of Graduate Studies. Information from student files is sometimes shared with the Faculty of Graduate Studies or the
Faculty of Health for purposes such as monitoring student funding levels, time to completion, faculty workloads, etc. In
addition, site visitors for the Cyclical Program Review may review student files for the purposes of reviewing the quality of the
training program. Similarly, the Accreditation Panel of the Canadian Psychological Association may review student files for
the purposes of reviewing the quality of the clinical training programs and adherence to the CPA accreditation standards.
What information is shared and for what purpose?
Within the Graduate program, written and oral information regarding students may be shared among faculty within your Area;
between program faculty and external practicum supervisors or committee members; or between faculty and the Graduate
Office staff, as needed to monitor and oversee students' progress and administer the program.
In particular, during the annual Progress Evaluation, faculty in the Area may meet to review the progress of every student (the
procedure varies somewhat across Areas). The discussion is based on information submitted by the student and by the
supervisor summarizing the student's progress, accomplishments, plans, and any concerns or extenuating circumstances. Other
faculty who know the student via coursework, practica, TA, RA, etc. share their observations as well, so as to obtain a more
well-rounded picture of the student. This is especially important, and in the student's best interest, when the student is
struggling or if there is some tension between student and supervisor. The purpose of this exercise is to give constructive and
regular feedback to students about their progress, provide official notification of any academic or professional concerns and
suggested remedial actions, as well as to ensure the integrity of the program.
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FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Graduate Student funding will be provided from one or more of the following sources: teaching assistantship, graduate
assistantship, research assistantship, awards or fellowships. All funding is contingent on your continuous registration as a fulltime student, continued satisfactory performance in the program and fulfillment of your funding related obligations.
Teaching Assistantships (TA) (CUPE 3903 - Unit 1)
Most full time students will hold Teaching Assistantships. Most MA 1 students will have a half-course TA; most MA 2
students will have a full year TA (or two half courses). Most full-time PhD 1-6 students can reasonably expect continuing
support from Teaching Assistantships. Teaching Assistantships are provided by the undergraduate psychology departments,
and generally serve to assist course directors in undergraduate courses. Applications for TAs are generally made in January
each year, both for Summer TAs and for fall/winter TAs of the ensuing academic year. The two undergraduate programs in
psychology at York (Health and Glendon) require separate applications. Students may also apply for TAs in other programs
(e.g., the Department of Humanities, the Department of Social Science, and Department of Sociology).
Graduate Assistantship (GA) (CUPE 3903 - Unit 3)
A stipend may be paid to a full–time degree candidate for various types of activity. The duties of a graduate assistant may
include participation as an apprentice in a laboratory or applied setting, library work for the department or for a research group,
administrative, clerical and research work (non-thesis/dissertation work). Formal arrangements for work in this category are
made with the program director after admission. The student must complete a Graduate Assistantship Workload form and
submit it to the Graduate Program Office.
Research Assistantships (RA)
A Research Assistant is defined as a full-time graduate student receiving financial assistance in support of research or academic
activities related to that student’s field(s) of study within the academic program, and where it is generally the case that this field
of study overlaps substantially with that of his or her supervisor. (The term “field(s) of study” is specified in the Faculty of
Graduate Studies Calendar). Thus, it is to be expected that the research assistant’s work will be divided between his or her
thesis/dissertation work and the work of the supervisor. Specific duties are negotiated between the faculty member and the
student, and are subject to the approval of the Graduate Program Director. These research assistantships most often are paid out
of a research grant held by a faculty member, normally the student’s supervisor.
It should be noted that neither a Master’s nor a Doctoral candidate is permitted, while registered as a full–time student,
to accept more than 10 hours of paid work per week.
Bursaries and Funds
Fee Bursaries - A fund is available to graduate students for the fall/winter and summer terms, to assist those who may face
additional difficulty meeting fee payments. Students will be notified when applications are available. Please go to
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/student-finances/funding-awards/bursaries/ for more information.
Fieldwork Costs Fund – This is a fund for M.A. and Ph.D. students to defray the cost of thesis/dissertation research conducted
“in the field,” that is, away from the University. Applicants must meet certain criteria to apply, including having an approved
thesis or dissertation proposal on file in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (The application deadline is about mid/late-February.
Please check with the graduate office for details.)
Research Costs Fund - The Research Cost Fund comes from CUPE 3903 (which represents Teaching Assistants), and is
administered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The fund helps to defray students’ own research expenses that are above and
beyond those costs that are typically associated with graduate work, such as travel to sources of research, payment of research
participants, supplies, services, photocopying, etc. All full-time registered graduate students who either have been or are
members of CUPE 3903 are eligible for this grant. Priority is given to doctoral students. Applicants must have an approved
thesis or dissertation proposal on file in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (The application deadline is about mid/late-February.
Please check with the graduate office for details.)
Graduate Development Fund – This fund, administered by the Scholarships and Grants Committee, Faculty of Graduate
Studies, contributes to students’ costs for travel to academic conferences in order to present papers and posters. (The
application deadline is about mid/late-February. Please check with the graduate office for details.)
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National Scholarship Competitions
The Government of Canada’s research agencies and funded partners—the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
(SSHRC), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research
(CIHR)—promote innovation in research and reward academic excellence by offering a number of valuable and prestigious
scholarships. National foundations, created to honour the legacy of great Canadians, also offer major scholarship and
fellowship programs which aim to support and enhance the research, innovation, and leadership of top emerging scholars from
around the world who have chosen to pursue their graduate studies in Canada.
Canada Graduate Scholarships – Master’s (CGS-M)
The CGS-M Program provides financial support to high calibre scholars who are engaged in eligible Master’s programs in
Canada. The CGS-M Program supports 2,500 students annually in all disciplines and is administered jointly by Canada’s three
federal granting agencies: CIHR, NSERC, and SSHRC. The selection process and post-award administration are carried out at
the university level, under the guidance of the three agencies. Students submit their application to the university at which they
propose to hold their award via the Research Portal.
SSHRC Fellowships and CGS Doctoral Awards (CGS-D)
The SSHRC Doctoral Fellowships and Joseph–Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarships Doctoral (CGS-D)
Scholarships aim to develop research skills and assist in the training of highly qualified personnel by supporting students who
demonstrate a high standard of scholarly achievement in undergraduate and graduate studies in the social sciences and
humanities.
CIHR and CGS Doctoral Awards (CGS-D)
The CIHR and Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships Doctoral (CGS-D) Awards program
provides support to students who are pursuing a doctoral degree in a health-related field. All candidates are expected to have an
exceptionally high potential for future research achievement and productivity.
NSERC Postgraduate Scholarships and CGS Doctoral Awards (PGSD/CGSD)
Alexander Graham Bell Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS) and NSERC Postgraduate Scholarships (PGS) provide financial
support to high calibre scholars who are engaged in doctoral programs in the natural sciences or engineering. The CGS will be
offered to the top–ranked applicants at each level and the next tier of meritorious applicants will be offered an NSERC PGS.
This support allows these scholars to fully concentrate on their studies and seek out the best research mentors in their chosen
fields.
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships (Vanier CGS)
The Vanier CGS program aims to attract and retain world-class doctoral students by supporting students who demonstrate both
leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement in graduate studies in the social sciences, humanities, natural
sciences, engineering, and health. In an effort to support students in broadening their research horizons and seeking new
challenges, the Vanier CGS program strongly encourages candidates to pursue their studies beyond the university that granted
their undergraduate and graduate degrees.
Trudeau Doctoral Scholarship
Trudeau Scholarships are awarded to support doctoral candidates pursuing research of compelling present-day concern,
touching upon one or more of the four themes of the Foundation: (1) human rights and dignity; (2) responsible citizenship; (3)
Canada in the world; and (4) people and their natural environment. Trudeau Scholars are highly gifted individuals who are
actively engaged in their fields and expected to become leading national and international figures.
Provincial Scholarship Competitions
The Province of Ontario generously supports the research, leadership, and academic achievement of students from Canada and
abroad pursuing graduate education in Ontario. It does so through a number of competitive and prestigious scholarship
programs that are administered by Ontario universities and by the Council of Ontario Universities (COU).
Ontario Graduate Scholarships (OGS)
Since 1975, Ontario, in partnership with Ontario’s publicly–assisted universities, has encouraged excellence in graduate studies
at the masters and doctoral levels through the awarding of Ontario Graduate Scholarships (OGS). OGS awards are merit–based
scholarships available to students in all disciplines of academic study. The OGS program is jointly funded by the Province of
Ontario and Ontario universities. The Province of Ontario contributes two-thirds of the value of the award and the university
provides one-third. The OGS deadline is set internally within the program.
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Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarships in Science and Technology (QEII - GSST)
Since 1998, the Ontario government, in partnership with Ontario universities through private sector matching funds, has
rewarded excellence in graduate studies in science and technology through the QEII-GSST program. Funding for the QEIIGSST program is in addition to funding for the OGS Program. The QEII - GSST deadline is set internally within the program.
Autism Scholars Awards
With the support of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, a Scholar Awards Program in Autism has been
established to ensure that Ontario attracts and retains pre-eminent scholars. The community of autism scholars fostered by this
Awards Program will excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new
knowledge concerning child autism, and its translation into improved health for children, more effective services and products
for children with autism, and increase the province’s capacity in diagnosis and assessment of autism and a strengthened
treatment system.
Ontario Women’s Health Scholars Awards
Funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, a Scholar Awards Program in Women’s Health has been
established to ensure that Ontario attracts and retains pre-eminent women’s health scholars. The community of women’s health
scholars fostered by this Awards Program will excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in
the creation of new knowledge about women’s health and its translation into improved health for women, more effective health
services and products for women, and a strengthened health care system.
York Donor-Funded Scholarships
Provost Dissertation Scholarship – This scholarship is awarded by the Faculty of Graduate Studies to encourage and assist
outstanding students in the final year of doctoral study to concentrate exclusively on their dissertations. In 2015, the
scholarship was valued at just over $28, 000 (including a tuition fee waiver). Candidates must be nominated by their Graduate
Program. Nominees must have completed all required course work and all program requirements but the dissertation (the
dissertation proposal must also have been approved). Students are expected to apply in the winter term of PhD 4, but must
have completed no more than one term as a PhD 5 Candidate by the end of the Winter Term during which they are being
nominated. This award is designed to assist students financially and with a faculty facilitated, peer-reviewed dissertation
completion writing workshop. It substitutes the research-funding component of other dissertation awards with a writing
workshop focused on dissertation chapter completion.
Susan Mann’s Dissertation Scholarship – This scholarship is awarded by the Faculty of Graduate Studies to encourage and
assist outstanding students in the final year of doctoral study to concentrate exclusively on their dissertations. In 2015, the
scholarship was valued at just over $28, 000 (including a tuition fee waiver). Candidates must be nominated by their Graduate
Program. Nominees must have completed all required course work and all program requirements but the dissertation (the
dissertation proposal must also have been approved). Students are expected to apply in the winter term of PhD 4, but must
have completed no more than one term as a PhD 5 Candidate by the end of the Winter Term during which they are being
nominated. You are encouraged to plan early so that you can apply for this prestigious award!
For more York donor-funded scholarships, please go to:
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/student-finances/funding-awards/donor-awards/
Mitacs Awards
Mitacs-Accelerate connects companies with over 50 research-based universities through graduate students and postdoctoral
fellows, who apply their specialized expertise to business research challenges. Interns transfer their skills from theory to realworld application, while the companies gain a competitive advantage by accessing high-quality research expertise.
 The internship project is 4 months in length and receives $15,000 in direct funding, with the partner organization and
Mitacs each providing $7,500. (Longer projects are possible as multiples of 4-month internships.)
 Interns spend approximately half of the time on-site with the industry partner; the remainder is spent at the university
advancing the research under the guidance of a faculty supervisor.
 Open to all disciplines and all industry sectors, projects can span a wide range of areas, including: manufacturing,
technical innovation, business processes, IT, social sciences, design, and more.
 Application/proposals are due anytime throughout the year.
 For more information, please go to: http://www.mitacs.ca/en/programs/accelerate/program-details
Mitacs Elevate supports postdoctoral fellows at Canadian universities to collaborate on cutting-edge research projects in order
to build capacity for the next generation of R&D management leaders. This two-year program valued at $115,000 (plus
$15,000 non-cash value in training) develops fellows’ professional and R&D management skills as they lead a long-term
research project with their private-sector partner.
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In addition to their research project, fellows spend one to two days per month participating in training activities. Throughout
this time, fellows have multiple opportunities to connect with fellow PhD graduates in their cohort, as well as industry
representatives, potential employers and workshop facilitators. At the end of the fellowship, fellows receive a Mitacs certificate
of completion. For information, please go to: https://www.mitacs.ca/en/programs/elevate/program-details
Financial Allowances for MA Thesis and PhD Dissertations under the CUPE Contract
As indicated in the CUPE 3093 Collective Agreement, “Upon request by any full or part-time York graduate student who is a
member of the bargaining unit or who has been a member of the bargaining unit and who submits a Master’s thesis/PhD.
dissertation for defence... the employer shall grant such an individual up to $300 towards the cost of production of the final
form of the Master’s thesis, and, where applicable, up to $400 towards the cost of production of the final form of the Doctoral
dissertation, on receipt of an invoice substantiating costs incurred.” Applications forms for MA/PhD thesis/dissertation
reimbursements are available from the Thesis Coordinator, Faculty of Graduate Studies, Room 230, York Lanes.
ACADEMIC MATTERS
Faculty Supervisors
Each graduate student must have an officially assigned supervisor, normally prior to admission to the program, who provides
help in the selection of courses, signs the student's advising worksheet, provides evaluative feedback, supervises the student's
research, and serves on the student's thesis or dissertation supervisory committee. Further details of the supervisor’s role are
provided in the next section.
Forming the Supervisory Committee
In forming a supervisory committee, the student must pay attention to the Faculty of Graduate Studies regulations on committee
membership. Specifically, the principal supervisor must be from the Graduate Program in Psychology. The M.A. thesis
supervisory committees must consist of two members and the Ph.D. dissertation supervisory committee must consist of three
members (including the supervisor). All must be members of Graduate Faculty as per FGS, and at least two must be in the
Graduate Program in Psychology, whether as regular or adjunct faculty members. It may also be allowed that a fourth member
may serve as a co-supervisor, but in this case that member must hold Adjunct status in the Graduate Program in Psychology. In
exceptional circumstances, one additional member, who does not have an appointment to FGS, may be included. These
exceptions require approval by both the Graduate Program Director and the Dean of FGS. Students and supervisors should
discuss possible members for thesis/dissertation committees and those faculty members should normally be approached by the
supervisor to serve on the student’s committee. The committee must meet the GPD’s approval, which is then recommended to
the appropriate Associate Dean of FGS.
Guidelines for Supervisory Committees, Supervisors and Students
FGS has created guidelines on writing thesis/dissertation proposals and preparing for oral examinations. The full guidelines are
found at http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/thesis-dissertation/.
The document also contains the responsibilities of supervisory committees, supervisors and students. The main points of these
guidelines bearing on the Graduate Program in Psychology are as follows:
The Supervisory Committee –
1)
The Master’s Thesis supervisory committee must be recommended to the Dean no later than the end of the
second term of Master’s course of study (Spring MA 1).
2)
The Ph.D. dissertation supervisory committee must be recommended to the Dean no later than the end of the
8th term of study (Winter PhD 3).
3)
It is required that once a supervisory committee is formed, at least two members of it must meet with the student
at least once a year, normally in the spring.
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The Supervisor – It is the responsibility of the supervisor to:
1)
Be reasonably accessible to the student for consultation and discussion of the student’s academic progress and
research problems. Meetings should normally occur once a month and never less than once a term.
2)
Ensure that the turn-around time for comments on draft chapters or parts of chapters should not normally exceed 2
to 3 weeks (although the FGS applies this guideline only to supervisors, it is in the spirit of the guideline, which is
to promote student’s progress, that it be applied to the other supervisory committee members as well).
3)
Make satisfactory arrangement with the approval of the Program Director for the supervision of the student when
the supervisor is on leave or sabbatical, or an extended absence from the University.
4)
Convene an annual meeting of the supervisory committee to evaluate the student’s progress and report the
evaluation to the Area Head and Director (there are different practices in different Areas).
5)
Ensure that the student is aware of University, Faculty and Program requirements and standards to which the
thesis or dissertation is expected to conform.
6)
Assist the student with attempts to get external funding, including meeting appropriate deadlines (e.g., for
reference letters), and to engage in scholarly development (e.g., conference presentations and publications).
7)
Offer supervision and advice appropriate to the stage of the student’s work, helping the student to establish and
modify a suitable timetable for completion of various stages of a thesis or dissertation project during its stages.
Specifically, the supervisor should,




at the proposal stage, assist the student with selection of a suitable and manageable topic and approach;
at the research stage, assist the student with initial research design and subsequent modification, with
alleviating current and anticipated problems, with interpretation and analysis of findings, and with bringing
the project to completion;
at the writing stage, assist the student with appropriate and timely feedback on individual draft chapters, and
with revision to the draft thesis or dissertation as an integrated whole; and
at the oral defence stage, advise the student on preparation for the examination, and assist the student to
interpret and comply with any changes recommended by the examining committee, in conjunction with the
Dean’s Representative as required.
8)
When the final draft of the thesis or dissertation is complete, the supervisor should ensure that all examiners have
read it and that it is ready to go to oral examination, and ensure that a thesis is sent to examiners at least 4 weeks
prior to the oral.
9)
Appropriately acknowledge in published material the contributions of the student, including consideration of joint
authorship in publications (more details given in the original document).
10)
Conform to the basic principles of academic integrity and professionalism in the development of a mature and
objective relationship with the student. It must be recognized that there is a power imbalance in the relationship
between student and supervisor, and that in particular sexual and gender harassment is unacceptable.
11)
Conform to Program and Faculty grievance and appeal procedures in the event that the relationship with the
supervisor is unsatisfactory for any reason.
12)
Even though “each student has final responsibility for her or his academic honesty” (Senate Policy on Academic
Honesty), it is up to the supervisor to ensure, to the extent that it is practicable in the circumstances, the academic
integrity of primary research data, and the consistency with academic integrity and practice of interpretations
relating to such data.
The Student – It is the responsibility of the student to:
1)
Conform to University, Faculty and Program requirements and procedures for completion of the master or
doctoral degree with regards to such matters as research ethics, registration and graduation requirements, thesis
and dissertation style and quality standards, etc.
- 18 -
2)
Work out with the supervisor and other members of the supervisory committee a timetable for all stages of
completion of a thesis or dissertation, and attempt to meet appropriate deadlines.
3)
Meet regularly with the supervisor to review progress, normally at least once a month and not less than once a
term.
4)
Keep the supervisor and graduate program office informed of where the student may be contacted, and respond
promptly and appropriately to all communications received.
5)
Prepare an annual progress report (as per requirements of the particular Area).
6)
Give serious consideration to and respond to advice and feedback received from the supervisor and other
members of the supervisory committee.
7)
Recognize that the supervisor and committee members may have other teaching, research and service obligations
which may preclude immediate responses.
8)
Recognize that where the student’s research comprises a component of the supervisor’s research program, and
joint publication is envisaged, the responsibility for use of data and for publication is held jointly by the
supervisor and student. In such cases, the thesis or dissertation, or draft papers, together with a copy of the raw
data, shall be made available to the supervisor prior to submission for publication.
9)
Conform to basic principles of academic integrity and professionalism in relations with the supervisory
committee, and with other scholars. The entire program of graduate studies, including the research and writing of
a thesis and dissertation, shall be conducted under the strictest rules of ethics and academic honesty.
10)
As “each student has final responsibility for her or his academic honesty” (Senate Policy on Academic Honesty,
http://secretariat-policies.info.yorku.ca/policies/academic-honesty-senate-policy-on/), it is up to him or her to
ensure the academic integrity of his or her primary research, and of the interpretations relating to such research.
Complementary Procedures to be Followed:
Below are procedures, complementary to the above guidelines, to be followed by students and supervisory committees.
1)
The student is responsible for ensuring that the Graduate Program Office has accurate information about his or her
current address, phone number and email address, the courses currently being taken, and the supervisory
committee membership.
2)
The student and the supervisory committee are jointly responsible for designing a program of course work and
research that will enable the student to meet degree requirements, and for ensuring that all formal correspondence
between the student and the committee about academic matters is placed in the student’s file in the Program
Office.
3)
The supervisor and/or the other members of the supervisory committee should be the student’s referees of
applications to SSHRC, OGS, NSERC, CIHR, CGS and other grant or scholarship programs. As well, the
supervisor is required to sign the student’s applications for special York funds such as Research Cost Fund,
Graduate Development Fund, Fee Bursary, etc.
4)
The supervisory committee is responsible for evaluating the student’s thesis or dissertation proposal and for
recommending it to the Area Head and GPD to determine whether or not the student has met Program
requirements.
5)
The student, supervisory committee and Area are responsible for completing the student’s Annual Program
Evaluation.
6)
The supervisory committee is responsible for confirming to the Graduate Director that the student’s thesis or
dissertation is examinable before the copies are sent to the external examiner and the Dean.
7)
M.A. candidates who wish to be considered for advancement into the Ph.D. program must have the
recommendation of their supervisory committee and their Area in support of their advancement. (For further
information, see Advancement in Status from M.A. to Ph.D. Candidacy on page 25).
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Annual Evaluation of the Student
The year-end evaluation is an important exercise in the Graduate Program in Psychology. It provides the Program with an
opportunity to acknowledge good progress and performance by the student and, where appropriate, to point out places where
better progress and performance needs to be made.
The following information must be submitted to the relevant Area Coordinator or Director each year in May. (Areas may have
particular deadlines.) At the end of each winter term, students must provide an updated CV, a completed Progress Report Form.
How these materials are used varies across Areas and will not be spelled out here. Students and their supervisors are sent a
memorandum, each year at the appropriate time, specifying the details of what is to be done for the Area in which they are
members. By the end of the evaluation exercise, each year, the Graduate Program Office secures a copy of the letter of
evaluation of the student, produced by the Area. This information is placed in the student’s file and the letter is sent to the
student and the supervisor. Any concerns noted may require follow-up action by the student, supervisor, Area or Graduate
Program.
Prohibition of Unsupervised Psychological Services
Students in the Graduate Program in Psychology are not permitted to provide psychological services (including such activities
as counselling, psychotherapy, testing/assessment) unless supervised by a registered psychologist. Students should also be
aware that such activities expose them to legal liabilities, and York University and the Graduate Program in Psychology will
not assume any responsibility should any legal action be taken against the student.
GUIDELINES FOR THESIS/DISSERTATION PROPOSALS
By the end of the first year of the MA, the MA thesis committee should be formed and the proposal submitted, following the
procedures described below.
By the end of the second year of the PhD, the PhD Dissertation committee should be formed (and relevant FGS form
completed) and the Dissertation Proposal should follow shortly, once all committee members are satisfied with it.
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/thesis-dissertation/
1)
The maximum length of a thesis or dissertation proposal is 3500 words. Thus, the student must of necessity
briefly review only the literature absolutely germane to the proposed study. The student is expected to have read
more widely, so that she/he can interact knowledgeably with the supervisory committee at the proposal stage.
2)
The design, method and procedure should be complete so that the supervisory committee can make informed
recommendations.
3)
Proposals may present specific hypotheses to be tested. Alternatively, descriptive theses and dissertations may
present research questions or expectations. In all cases, there should be a rationale given for the research and a
description of how the data will be analysed at the end of the Methods section.
4)
M.A. thesis and dissertation proposals must be approved prior to the collection of new data from human research
participants. [The same applies to minor area paper proposals entailing the use of human participants.]
5)
Proposals of studies entailing the use of secondary, i.e., “archival” data need to be supported by appropriate
indications that the use of such data meets ethical requirements (see below).
6)
All students must provide the Grad Office with a Tri-council Policy Statement (TCPS) tutorial certificate dated
with in the past 2 years. You can find the TCPS tutorial at http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca/.
7)
M.A. thesis proposals must be approved by Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies not less
than 3 months prior to the date set for the oral examination; Ph.D. dissertation proposals must be approved
not less than 6 months prior to the date set for the oral examination.
- 20 -
Ethical Considerations
Once the thesis/dissertation proposal is approved by the supervisor and other committee member(s), it should be submitted to
the Graduate Program office along with relevant forms, for approval by the GPD and then FGS. All proposals require these
approvals, regardless of whether or not ethics approval is required.
Many (but not all) proposals also require ethics approval. If the study involves human participants (or animals), it will require
Ethics approval before data collection may proceed. The Tri-Council policy to which York must adhere is available at:
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/thesis-dissertation/research-ethics/. It can be complex figuring out which forms
you need to complete and which type of Ethics approval is required. It depends upon the nature of your study, whether there
are human participants or not, whether it is minimal risk or not, whether the data are being collected specifically for this project
or you are using previously collected data. Please see the chart entitled “MA Thesis/PhD Dissertation Approval Flowchart” to
help you figure out which forms you need and which boxes to check.
When to Secure Copyright Permission
The following sections provide guidance and suggestions with respect to when and how to secure copyright permission. A
student is allowed to use copyrighted material in his or her thesis/dissertation provided it falls under the Canadian Copyright
Act’s definition of “fair dealing”. Information on York University’s Fair Dealing Guidelines can be reviewed at York
University – Copyright (http://copyright.info.yorku.ca/). It is, however, the responsibility of the student to confirm that if there
is copyrighted material in his or her thesis/dissertation, it either complies with the “fair dealing” provisions of the Canadian
Copyright Act (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-42/index.html) or documented permission has been obtained to use the
copyrighted material.
- 21 -
If a thesis/dissertation includes any of the following elements, the student should seek copyright permission. (Please note that
this is not an exhaustive list. If you require additional information on York’s Copyright Policy or Fair Dealing Guidelines
contact the Copyright Office.
 Copyrighted test instruments, questionnaires, etc.
 Material or parts of material written by the thesis/dissertation author which have been previously published in a
journal and to which the author has assigned copyright
 Material co-authored with another author(s) who share copyright
 Tables, figures, and all forms of images including photos, maps, graphs, drawings, logos etc. that have been obtained
from a copyrighted source, including websites, newspapers, journals, books, brochures, professors’ lecture notes, etc.
Sequence of Events in Finalizing the Defence of a Thesis or Dissertation


In preparation for the oral examination, an examining committee must be constituted. The student's supervisor is
responsible for this.
For an MA oral, this committee usually consists of four people: the supervisor and other committee member, both of
whom sign off to say the thesis is ready to go to oral defence, plus two additional members: the Chair/Dean's Rep (who
may be from psychology or another department but who has not been involved in the thesis), and one York graduate
faculty member from outside Psychology (sometimes called the Outside reader or internal-external). In keeping with FGS
requirements, students are not allowed to select or contact (i.e., in order to ask for their participation) members of the
examining committee, including the Dean’s representative. This responsibility lies solely with the student’s supervisor.
For a PhD oral, this committee usually consists of six people: the supervisor and two other committee members, all of
whom sign off to say the thesis is ready to go to oral defence, plus three additional members: the Chair/Dean's Rep (who
may be from psychology or another department but who has not been involved in the thesis), one York graduate faculty
member from outside Psychology (sometimes called the Outside reader or internal-external), and the External examiner (an
expert in the field from a different University). The External examiner must be approved by the GPD prior to the
scheduling of the oral defence. In keeping with FGS requirements, students are not allowed to select or contact (i.e., in
order to ask for their participation) members of the examining committee, including the Dean’s representative. This
responsibility lies solely with the student’s supervisor.

The following forms must be obtained from the graduate program office (in one package):

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Recommendation for Oral Examination form
National Library of Canada form
ProQuest Subject Code form
York University Copyright License form
Name of Diploma form

It is necessary to fill out and submit the forms to the Program office no later than 4 weeks prior to the date set for the oral
for both MA and PhD oral examinations.

A copy of the thesis/dissertation must be provided to each member of the Examining Committee at least 4 weeks prior to
the date of the oral examination, typically in hard copy but may be electronically if committee member wishes (to be sent
by supervisor or graduate office, not student)

Confirmation of the oral examination will be sent from the Office of the Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies to the
interested parties.
Committee members are canvassed by the Graduate Program office to ensure they believe the thesis/dissertation is
examinable
External Examiners (for PhD dissertations) are to submit their written evaluation to FGS at least one week before the oral.
This is shared with the examining committee but is not to be shared with the student prior to the oral defence.


Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission
After the oral examination and the completion of revisions (if needed), students need to email the Thesis Coordinator at
[email protected] to get instructions for submitting your thesis/dissertation prior to a date specified by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
Students submit the final approved copies of their thesis or dissertation electronically using the Electronic Thesis and
Dissertation (ETD) platform. The ETD draws on the capacity of YorkSpace (http://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/), York
University’s institutional repository of research, to accept, store and disseminate scholarly output.
- 22 -
The ETD platform will allow students to submit their thesis or dissertation from any computer with an internet connection.
Depositing York’s theses and dissertations in YorkSpace instantly makes our research outputs discoverable to scholars and
researchers worldwide.
Once your electronic submission is approved by the Thesis Coordinator and all required forms received and fees paid, your
thesis/dissertation will be deposited in YorkSpace at the time of conferral of your degree, according to the publication date
listed on your ETD record (normally either November 1 or July 1).
THE M.A. DEGREE
Program Requirements
Students should become thoroughly familiar with the requirements for the M.A. degree in their Area of specialisation. Please
refer to the table below. Some Areas have specific course sequences within their requirements. For further information, you
can discuss with your Supervisor and/or your Area Coordinator.
AREA
COURSES

Brain, Behaviour
and Cognitive
Sciences






Clinical




ClinicalDevelopmental
(students who entered the
program Sept 2013 and
beyond)





PRACTICA
THESIS & ORAL
EXAMINATION
One applied or
research
practicum
(6820A 6.0 or
6810A 6.0); 330
hours
Required
6131 3.0 – Univariate Analysis I
6132 3.0 - Univariate Analysis II
6420 6.0 - Foundations of Clinical Psychology
6430 6.0 - Assessment in Psychology
6436 3.0 –Evidence-Based Principles of
Psychotherapy
6437 3.0 – Approaches to Psychotherapy:
Advanced Study (Required only for general
Clinical students, not those in Clinical
Neuropsychology stream.)
One research
(6820A 6.0) and
one clinical
practicum (6430
6.0P); 330 hours
each
Required
6131 3.0 – Univariate Analysis I
6132 3.0 - Univariate Analysis II
6020 3.0 - Historical and
Theoretical Foundations of Contemporary
Psychology A OR 6030 3.0
Historical and Theoretical Foundations of
Contemporary Psychology B
6610 3.0 - Social and Emotional Bases of
Development
6900 3.0- Issues in CD
Psychology: A Proseminar in Ethics,
Practice, and Research
6905 3.0 - Biological and Cognitive Bases of
Development
6910 3.0 - Psychoeducational Assessment of
Children and Adolescents
6920 3.0 - Clinical and Diagnostic Assessment
of Children and Adolescents
One research
Required
practicum
(6820A 6.0); 330
hours
Two half courses (or equivalent) in quantitative
methods from the statistics courses offered in
graduate psychology
Three additional half-courses, or equivalent,
chosen from those offered at the 6000 level by
the Graduate Program in Psychology.
- 23 -






Developmental
Science





History and Theory
of Psychology





Quantitative
Methods





Social and
Personality


6955 3.0 - Developmental Psychopathology
6965 1.5 - Diversity Issues in Children, Youth
and Adults in Clinical Practice
Note: Other Area Requirements
Professionalism and Ethical Conduct
Program-Sanctioned YUPC Hours
Two half courses (or equivalent) in quantitative
methods from the statistics courses offered in
graduate psychology
6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical Foundations
Of Contemporary Psychology A OR 6030 3.0 Historical & Theoretical Foundations Of
Contemporary Psychology B
One half-course selected from the DS course
list.
One half-course or equivalent from those offered
at the 6000 level by the Graduate Program in
Psychology.
One research
Required
practicum
(6820A 6.0); 330
hours
6131 3.0 – Univariate Analysis I
6132 3.0 - Univariate Analysis II
6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical Foundations
Of Contemporary Psychology A
6030 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical Foundations
Of Contemporary Psychology B
Two half courses (or equivalent) chosen from
those offered at the 6000 level by the Graduate
Program in Psychology or, with permission, by
another program relevant to the study of the
history and theory of psychology.
One applied or
research
practicum
(6820A 6.0 or
6810A 6.0); 330
hours
Required
6131 3.0 – Univariate Analysis I
6132 3.0 - Univariate Analysis II
Two half courses (or equivalent) in quantitative
methods
Two half courses in any other graduate
psychology courses (Note that research methods
courses can count to either the required
quantitative methods or elective courses).
One applied or
research
practicum
(6820A 6.0 or
6810A 6.0); 330
hours
Required
6131 3.0 – Univariate Analysis I
6132 3.0 - Univariate Analysis II
6400 3.0 - Contemporary Issues in Personality
and Social Psychology
6410 3.0 - either Social Psychology OR
6510 3.0 - Personality
One half course in research methods, chosen
from a list of courses approved by the area
(6150E 3.0 – Research Methods in the Study of
Personality OR 6150B 3.0 – Social Methods)
A minimum of one half-course elective, chosen
in consultation with the supervisor, from those
offered at the 6000 level.
One applied or
research
practicum
(6820A 6.0 or
6810A 6.0); 330
hours
Required
Although students occasionally change supervisors, the student’s Area is normally responsible for the student. Students are
strongly discouraged from making requests for a change in Area of specialization. However, in very exceptional cases, it is
possible for students to move from one Area to another, which would likely involve a change of supervisors. Students would
need to make up any degree requirements of the new Area. Application to change from one Area to another must be approved
- 24 -
by the student’s potential new supervisor, the Coordinator or Director of the alternative Area, and the Program Director, as
indicated on a required Area Change Form.
Time Limits
The Department of Psychology is a minimum 6-term (2-year) M.A. program. If a student has not completed their degree
requirements in this two-year period, the M.A. student must adopt part-time status (MA3 part-time), and in doing so becomes
ineligible for registration in courses, including practica, beyond those minimally required for completion of the degree, and is
ineligible for TA or GA support, until all requirements for the degree are met. All requirements for the M.A. degree must be
fulfilled within 4 years (12 terms).
When unusual circumstances have prevented timely completion of the degree, M.A. candidates approaching the end of year 4
may petition for an extension of the time allotted to complete the requirements for the degree. All required documents should
be in the Graduate Program Office on or before the end of May, so that a decision can be made prior to fall registration.
Students will be expected to provide, in writing, grounds for requesting an extension and a realistic timetable for completion
along with written agreement from his/her supervisor. Students granted an extension would be required to enrol as part-time
students.
Advancement in Status from M.A. to Ph.D. Candidacy
Students advancing to PhD must apply formally through admissions. Although usual, PhD advancement is not automatic.
Applications are first considered by the student’s Area. Criteria such as quality of the MA Thesis, successfully completing all
MA degree requirements, GPA, progressing efficiently through the program, participation in the area, year-end evaluations,
having a supervisor, etc. are considered in the promotion decision.
After all the Area Heads have forward their lists of students advancing to PhD, the Graduate Program Office will send the
students steps in how to apply formally through admissions. The Admission Office will charge each student a fee to process
their application but students do not need to supply transcripts, letters of reference, etc. again.
Provisional Ph.D. Status
In certain situations, the GPD may advance MA students who have not yet defended by the end of their second year to
provisional PhD status for one term only. In order to be considered for Provisional PhD status:
1) Your MA thesis proposal must have been approved, and
2) You must have supporting letters or emails from your supervisor and supervisory committee stating that they are confident
that you will be able to defend your thesis and complete the requirements for the MA degree by the end of October
3) You must have approval for the request from your area coordinator indicating that the Area approves you to continue to the
PhD
However, very little of the fall term should be taken up in completing the MA requirements. Again, this option is not meant to
give students another term to work on their MA requirements while holding PhD status. Only if strong and sufficient
justification is provided will the request be granted. Should you not defend your thesis by the end of October, your status may
revert to MA 3 P/T. This will have serious implications for Teaching Assistantships and doctoral funding.
- 25 -
THE PhD DEGREE
Program Requirements
Students should become thoroughly familiar with the requirements for the PhD degree in their Area of specialisation. Please
refer to the table below. For further information, you can discuss with your Supervisor and/or your Area Coordinator.
AREA

Brain, Behaviour and
Cognitive Sciences




Clinical






Clinical-Developmental
(students who entered the
program Sept 2013 and beyond)
PRACTICA AND
INTERNSHIP
COURSES



OTHER
REQUIREMENTS
One applied or research
Two half courses (or equivalent) in
practicum (6820 6.0 or
quantitative methods from the statistics
6810 6.0); 330 hours
courses offered in graduate psychology
6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology
A OR 6030 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology B
Three half courses, or equivalent from those
offered at the 6000 level by the Graduate
Program in Psychology.
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Two half courses (or equivalent) in
quantitative methods from the statistics
courses offered in graduate psychology
6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology
A OR 6030 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology B
6440 6.0 - Psychodiagnostics
6445P 6.0 - Advanced Intervention
6490B 3.0 - Ethical Issues in Professional
Practice
A minimum of two half courses, or
equivalent, at the 6000 level.
Practicum (6440P 6.0)
of 660 hours; a one-year
full-time clinical
internship (6840 6.0) of
1800 hours (or 900
hours per year over two
years – 6840 3.0).
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Two half courses (or equivalent) in
quantitative methods from the statistics
courses offered in graduate psychology
6930 3.0 - Intervention Strategies with
Children
6490B 3.0 - Ethical Issues in Professional
Practice
6480 3.0 - Brief Psychotherapy and ShortTerm Treatment
Minimum of two half elective courses, or
equivalent, at the 6000 level
Two clinical practica –
6910P 6.0 (assessment)
and 6930P 6.0
(intervention) – of 330
hours each; a one-year
full-time clinical
internship (6840 6.0) of
1800 hours (or 900
hours per year over two
years – 6840 3.0)
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Two clinical practica –
6910P 6.0 (assessment)
and 6930P 6.0
(intervention) – of 330
hours each; a one year
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Additional practicum
(6460P) strongly
encouraged.
Dissertation
Oral Defence
Clinical Competency
examination in
assessment and
intervention
Dissertation
Oral Defence
Dissertation
Oral Defence
Note: Other Area Requirements
1. Professionalism and Ethical Conduct
2. PhD Program-Sanctioned YUPC Hours (30 hours)

Clinical-Developmental
(students who entered the
program prior to Sept 2013)


6130 6.0 - Univariate Analysis OR
6140 6.0 - Multivariate Analysis
6930 3.0 - Intervention Strategies with
Children
6490B 3.0 - Ethical Issues in Professional
- 26 -
Dissertation



Developmental Science
Practice
A minimum of 3 half courses, or equivalent,
at the 6000 level of which two must be
Clinical-Developmental Courses.
full-time clinical
internship of 1800 hours Oral Defence
(or 900 hours per year
over two years).
Two half courses (or equivalent) in
quantitative methods from the statistics
courses offered in graduate psychology
A minimum of two half-courses at the 6000
level including at least one half-course from
the DS course list.
At least two applied or
research practica, (6820
6.0 or 6810 6.0);
including one in
developmental research
(330 hours each).
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Dissertation
Oral Defence
Note: Other Area Requirements
Students are also required to attend the
Developmental Science colloquium series.


6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology
A
6030 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology B
Students are encouraged
to take the practica in
different labs.
At least two practica,
either applied or
research, 330 hours
each.
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Dissertation
Students are encouraged
Oral Defence
If the above courses have been taken to meet the MA to take one practica
outside
the
History
and
requirements, another two half courses (or equivalent)
Theory Area.
must be taken from the Graduate Program in
Psychology or another relevant program in
consultation with the supervisor and with permission
of the Area Coordinator.
History and Theory of
Psychology
One half-course in psychological methods from the
following list:
 6150 3.0 - Social Methods series
 6180 3.0 - Research Methods in the Study of
Social Interaction
 6650 3.0 - Research Methodology in
Developmental Psychology
Courses on methodology or method from other
relevant programs may be taken in consultation with
the supervisor and with permission of the Area
Coordinator.



Quantitative Methods
Two half courses (or equivalent) in the
advanced study of historical or theoretical
subjects, chosen in consultation with the
supervisor. Normally this entails registration
in two sections of the 6060 series (Advanced
History of Psychology)
Four half 6000-level courses (or equivalent)
in psychology or other relevant programs,
chosen in consultation with the supervisor.
At least two of applied
6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology A or research practica
(6820 6.0 or 6810 6.0);
OR 6030 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology B* 330 hours each
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Dissertation
- 27 -


Five half courses (or equivalent) in courses
specializing in quantitative methods.
Oral Defence
A half course in any other graduate
psychology courses.
*Note:
If PSYC 6020 or PSYC 6030 were taken at the MA
level, this requirement can be met by taking three
elective credits in any other graduate psychology
courses.

Social and Personality
Two half courses (or equivalent) in
quantitative methods from the statistics
courses offered in graduate psychology
 6020 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology
A OR 6030 3.0 - Historical & Theoretical
Foundations Of Contemporary Psychology B
 6410 3.0 - Social Psychology OR
6510 3.0 - Personality
 One half course in research methods, chosen
from a list of courses approved by the area
(6150E 3.0 – Research Methods in the Study
of Personality OR 6150B 3.0 – Social
Methods)
 Two half courses, chosen in consultation
with his or her supervisor, from those
offered at the 6000 level.
*Note:
Each candidate should complete the statistics and
research methods requirement by the end of PhD 1
year. The Research method requirement can also be
fulfilled by completing an alternative course in
research methods chosen from a list of courses
approved by the area. Please contact the Area
Coordinator for more information.
At least two of applied
or research practica
(6820 6.0 or 6810 6.0);
330 hours each
Minor Area Paper to
satisfy breadth
requirement
Dissertation
Oral Defence
The number of reading courses that a student may
take for a credit in fulfilment of minimum
requirements is limited to two half courses (or
equivalent).
PhD Minor Area Paper (MAP) Requirement
Each PhD candidate is required to write a minor area paper, intended to foster breadth in psychological knowledge, and
therefore must be in an area not directly related to the candidate’s dissertation research. With permission, the topic may be
chosen from a field outside psychology.
Note that the term “minor” refers to the topic of interest of the student, and not to the quality or scope of the effort. It should
also be noted that the term "area" in this context does not refer directly to the Areas of Specialisation in the Graduate Program
in Psychology. The minor area paper may be identifiably "clinical", or "experimental", or "social" and so on.
The student's supervisor should provide assistance in choosing and defining a topic suitable for the Ph.D. minor area paper, and
in identifying appropriate faculty members to serve on the paper’s committee, who are recommended to the Dean by the
Graduate Program Director. The committee consists of two faculty members, of whom one (but not both) may also be on the
students’ dissertation committee. At least one member should be a full member of faculty; one may be adjunct or (with
permission from the GPD) from outside the department (e.g. at a hospital).
- 28 -
The minor area paper requirement may be fulfilled by either of the following:


A comprehensive and critical review of the literature on the chosen topic, with an emphasis on theory; or
A report of original empirical research that is suitable for submission to an appropriate peer-reviewed journal.
This work must not overlap with the dissertation topic, course assignments, or the MA thesis.
After discussing the proposed topic for the minor area paper with the committee members, but before working on the paper,
students prepare a brief written proposal for the committee's approval, together with appropriate ethics forms (if needed) as per
the chart below and submit those to the Graduate Program office.
When the minor area paper has been completed and accepted by the committee, the student obtains from the Program Office
one copy of the appropriate face sheet form, which must be completed and signed by each of the committee members and
returned to the Program Office along with one copy of the completed paper suitable for binding so that it may be placed in the
Resource Centre.
The MAP proposal should be submitted to the Graduate Program Office by the end of third term of PhD 2. The MAP should
normally be completed and approved by the end of the summer term (15 September) of the PhD 3.
** It is expected that the MAP will normally be completed before work begins on the Ph.D. dissertation.
For Developmental Science students, minor area paper must be completed and approved before starting your dissertation
research and the dissertation supervisor may not serve on the student’s minor area paper committee. For Clinical students,
who are required to do the clinical competency examination as well as the minor area paper and the dissertation, one of the
minor area paper committee members may sit on either the clinical competency examination committee or on the dissertation
supervisory committee, but not on both.
- 29 -
Time Limits
The Ph.D. program requires a minimum of 2 years (6 terms of registration). All requirements for a Ph.D. degree must be
fulfilled within 18 terms (6 years) of registration as a full-time or part-time doctoral student. Leaves of absence, maternity
leave or parental leave are not included in these time limits.
When unusual circumstances have prevented timely completion of the degree, Ph.D. candidates nearing the end of year 6 may
petition for an extension of the time allotted to complete the requirements of the program. All required documents should be in
the office of the Program Director on or before the end of May, so that a decision can be made prior to fall registration.
Students will be expected to provide, in writing, grounds for requesting an extension and a realistic timetable for completion
along with written agreement from his/her supervisor. A student granted an extension would be required to enrol as a part-time
student and would not be eligible for TA or scholarship support.
Clinical Competency Examination (Clinical Area Only)
Each PhD candidate in the Clinical Area of specialization is required to demonstrate a reasonable standard of competence in
both psychological assessment and intervention. These skills are evaluated by means of a written submission and an oral
examination of the student’s performance of these activities.
A student is eligible for the clinical competency examination upon completion of Clinical Practicum II, and should complete
the exam by the end of PhD-3. The student is required to submit two sets of materials in advance to the examining committee.
The assessment component requires (a) a brief case history, which may be subsumed in the psychological report in a
background section or may be submitted separately; (b) a full psychological report (i.e., the kind that is normally sent to another
mental health professional); and (c) copies of the test data upon which the report is based. The intervention component requires
(a) a statement describing the student’s approach or orientation to psychotherapy; (b) a case summary that includes the history
and formulation of the problem; (c) a summary report of the particular therapy session presented, in which the issues covered
are contextualized in regard to the therapy with that client (such as which session it was with the client and how the student’s
behaviour in the transaction accords with the demands of his or her theoretical orientation); and (d) a digital recording and
printed transcript of a psychotherapy session with a client. In anticipation of this examination, students need to be sure that
they have acquired written informed consent from one or more clients to have their case material used for purposes such as
this examination.
The student is called on to give an oral defence of the assessment and intervention case summaries, performance in the
assessment and intervention roles, and its consistency with the theory from which the summaries were derived.
Composition of the Committee
The Examining Committee consists of two full-time faculty members of York's Graduate Program in Psychology and a
practicum supervisor who is familiar with the student's work but who has not supervised the student with respect to the case(s)
presented for the Competency Examination. The student is responsible for nominating the practicum supervisor (or other
external registered psychologist) and one of the two faculty members. The Clinical Area nominates the second faculty member,
governed as much as possible by a principle of rotation. All full-time faculty members whose primary affiliation is with the
Clinical and Clinical-Developmental Areas are eligible for nomination.
Evaluation
Competence in assessment and intervention procedures is evaluated separately. The committee either (a) judges the student to
have met reasonable standards of assessment and intervention practice or (b) makes specific recommendations for remedial
tutelage in either or both areas to be undertaken prior to re-examination.
Each student will have a maximum of three opportunities to demonstrate clinical competency in assessment and intervention.
Re-examinations, if necessary, must be scheduled within one year of each other.
Guidelines for Arranging the Examination
1.
Consult with supervisor and Chair of the Clinical Area Student Program Committee prior to making the decision to
take the examination.
2.
Select and contact two examiners (one outside York and one Clinical York faculty member) who are willing to serve
on the examining committee.
- 30 -
3.
Notify the Chair of the Area Student Program Committee at least 4 weeks in advance of the desired examination date
to give the Committee time to arrange for the third examiner. Also be sure to let the Chair know if any faculty are
ineligible to be on the committee (i.e., someone who is on both the dissertation and minor area paper committees).
4.
Once the chair of the Student Program Committee recruits the third examiner, arrange a date and time that are
agreeable to all three examiners.
5.
Fill out the Clinical Competency Examination Application Form indicating the names, affiliations, and e-mail
addresses of the three examiners. Submit the form to the Chair of the Student Program Committee with all the
information.
6.
The Student Program chair will sign off on the form and submit it to the graduate office. One of the secretaries in the
Psychology graduate office will reserve a room and will contact the student and examiners to let them know where the
exam will be held.
7.
Provide the three examiners with an examination package at least 3 weeks before the examination date.
8.
The Chair of the Examining Committee is chosen at the examination itself. That person ensures that the Clinical
Competency Examination Evaluation Form is completed at the end of the examination, and submits it to the Graduate
Program Office.
See Clinical Area Handbook or contact Clinical Area Student Program Committee Chair for additional details about the
Clinical Competency Examination.
Additional Information for Students in the Clinical and Clinical-Developmental Areas
Practicum Hours
Clinical students must take 6430P 6.0 and 6440P 6.0 and Clinical-Developmental students must take 6910P 6.0 and 6930P 6.0
prior to applying to pre-doctoral internship. Clinical Practicum III as an option is provided for students who seek to add to the
quality of their training given that they are progressing through the Program in a timely manner. This third practicum has
become more normative than optional in recent years for Clinical Area students. It is an expectation that students will keep
precise track of their hours of practicum training (clinical contacts and supervision) using the time2track recording system.
CHOOSING A PRACTICUM LOCATION
a)
Each student is asked to meet with the Director of Clinical Training or a faculty member from the Practicum
Committee to discuss the choice of a practicum location. To assist their peers in this matter, students in the two
clinical areas have provided an up-to-date listing of practicum locations which can be found on the website:
http://psychology.gradstudies.yorku.ca/practicum. It is also expected that students will attend the annual Greater
Toronto Area Practicum Day, which is typically held in November and which provides an opportunity to meet with
practicum coordinators and supervisors from most of the approved sites in the area.
b) The York University Psychology Clinic (YUPC) provides a range of opportunities from general psychological to
neuropsychological assessments. In addition to psychological assessments, there are opportunities for family, couples
and individual psychotherapy for adults, adolescents and children and to be involved in the YUPC support services for
health issues (e.g. Couples Coping with Cancer).
c)
For clinical practica in the Greater Toronto Area, there is a common application deadline, typically February 1.
Students need to submit their applications to the settings by that date, along with ensuring other required materials
(such as transcripts and references) are provided. Students will be notified regarding interviews and will have an
opportunity to meet with the prospective external supervisor. Students will discuss their practicum training options
with the Practicum Committee Coordinator/Chair and rank their choices based on training needs. For clinical practica
in the Greater Toronto Area, there is a common notification day, typically the third Monday in March, in which
practicum offers will be sent to students. The Director of Clinical Training is notified regarding the successful match
with the name of the setting and practicum supervisor.
d) The student obtains a Practicum Agreement Form either from the Program Office or downloaded from the clinical
practicum website. This form is completed by the practicum supervisor and agreed to by the student. The details
entered on this form need to be clear and specific so that the student (and Director of Clinical Training) knows in
advance what kind of training will be provided (e.g. the skills to be learned), the clientele, kinds of assessment
- 31 -
instruments, kind and frequency of supervision, obligations and privileges, potential back-up training/experience from
other professional personnel on site, etc. A completed copy of this form must be submitted to the Graduate Program
Office.
e)
The practicum supervisor may receive a stipend for her/his services. The Chair of the Psychology department sends a
contract letter to the practicum supervisor, who in turn completes, signs and returns the letter to the office of the
Department Chair. This letter is not sent until after the practicum agreement form has been received. It is the
student’s responsibility to see that the practicum agreement form is properly completed and submitted to the
Graduate Program Office so that the contract can be sent from the Chair’s office.
Third Practicum - The Director of Clinical Training may recommend a student to take a third clinical applied practicum (6460P
6.0) provided that the student has completed all course work, and either the minor area paper or an approved dissertation
proposal. This option is available to students who have been progressing in a timely manner, and where it is agreed that the
third practicum is necessary to meet the student’s training requirements. For example, a student may wish additional training
in assessment or intervention skills. It is crucial that by taking the third practicum the student is not delaying her/his progress
towards completion of Ph.D. requirements. In the CD area, program sanctioned hours may be sufficient to add hours in areas
where a student deems they need more training; please consult with the DCT when making decisions about additional training
hours.
Internship
All coursework and the minor area paper and an approved dissertation proposal must be completed prior to applying for an
internship. Clinical students must take and successfully pass the clinical competency exam prior to the internship, ideally six
months prior to applying for internship. Clinical-Developmental students either have their data collection completed or at least
well under way by November prior to an internship when applications are submitted. Internship settings require that the
Director of Clinical Training “sign off” that the applicant has completed the program requirements prior to applying for the
internship. A student who has not met the requirements will not be permitted to apply for the internship.
Students may complete the PhD dissertation and oral defense prior to beginning the pre-doctoral internship. Students are
allowed to register as a part-time graduate student when taking the pre-doctoral internship (unless they are holding an external
scholarship). Furthermore, students should begin planning several years ahead as to where they would like to take their predoctoral internship. Some internship locations would prefer/require that student have already completed their Ph.D.
dissertation.
Accreditations
Both Clinical programs are intended to lead to registration with the College of Psychologists of Ontario or other regulatory
bodies. The Clinical and Clinical-Development Programs are accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA).
The CPA follows the scientist-practitioner model that is the predominant model in North American clinical psychology, which
emphasizes both the development of research skills/independent scholarship and clinical skills. The programs are designed for
students who wish to combine psychological theory, research and practice in preparation for university teaching and research
and/or for clinical practice and research in settings such as clinics, hospitals and social service agencies. In order to meet
accreditation requirements, each student must take a one-year (1800 hours) internship at an accredited internship setting as part
of the Ph.D. requirements. This often requires the student to complete the internship in a location other than Toronto.
The address for the CPA Committee on Accreditation is:
Dr. Melissa Tiessen
Registrar, Accreditation Panel
Canadian Psychological Association, Accreditation Office
141 Laurier Ave. W., Suite 702
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5J3
Tel: 1-888-472-0657 (Ms. Plante, ext. 328) Email: [email protected]
Web site: http://www.cpa.ca
Internship information may be found at:
Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) www.appic.org
Canadian Council of Professional Psychology Programs (CCPPP) www.ccppp.ca
- 32 -
Additional Information for Students in the Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science Area
Annual Meetings
The Area enforces the Departmental rules concerning advisory committee meetings. In addition, at a yearly ‘BBCS Day’ event
each student provides a 10-minute oral presentation to the supervisory committee and the faculty members of the Area. The
supervisor and committee members are expected to attend. The student receives feedback concerning his/her progress from the
committee and this information is included in the student’s file.
PhD Proposal
A dissertation proposal is to be submitted in the first 18 months of the Ph.D. program and must obtain final approval of
the supervisory committee by the end of the second year at the latest. The committee meeting can be scheduled at any time
during the year and can be combined with the yearly progress meeting.
Specialty Stream and Graduate Diplomas
Clinical Neuropsychology Stream Requirements (Clinical & Clinical-Developmental Areas Only)
The clinical neuropsychology specialty stream provides courses and training opportunities for graduate students planning to
seek registration in Clinical Neuropsychology as well as Clinical Psychology with The College of Psychologists of Ontario and
wishing to provide clinical neuropsychological services. Students in this stream receive a strong foundation in Clinical or
Clinical Developmental Psychology, depending upon the area in which they are registered. In addition, students are required to
take courses in neuropsychology and obtain practicum training at sites providing neuropsychological services.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Completion of Clinical Psychology or Clinical-Developmental Psychology Program requirements
Psyc6325 3.0 Clinical Neuroanatomy (or equivalent)
Psyc6320 3.0 Clinical Neuropsychology: History and Syndromes
Psyc6330 3.0 Cognitive Neurorehabilitation (Required for Clinical Students Only)
Psyc6450 3.0 Principles of Neuropsychological Assessment or Psyc6945 3.0 Applied Pediatric Neuropsychology
Confirmed attendance at Clinical Neuropsychology Rounds seminar series
One external practicum with supervised experience in neuropsychological assessment
Clinical competency examination (Adult Area only) neuropsychological assessment case
Internship placement with major rotation/experience in clinical neuropsychology
Dissertation topic relevant to clinical neuropsychology
For more information regarding the Clinical Neuropsychology stream, please contact Dr. Shayna Rosenbaum at
[email protected]
Health Psychology Diploma Program Requirements
The study of psychological factors in health and illness is a growing field of research both at York University and
worldwide. Health psychology research at York University covers a broad range of topics across the human lifespan, including
cancer care, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, eating disorders, HIV/AIDS, pain, SARS, and stress and coping. Health
psychology researchers at York University are also active in the promotion of health psychology at Canadian and international
professional associations. Note that while the Diploma is awarded at the Doctoral level, entering MA students can complete
coursework and attend the weekly seminar both of which can be applied to the Diploma’s requirements.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Completion of a PhD dissertation in a health psychology topic.
Two major health psychology research projects outside of the PhD dissertation.
Coursework:
(a) At least two graduate level health psychology half courses or one full year course
(b) At least one biomedical half course relevant to the student's research (e.g., anatomy, physiology, neuroscience)
Health Psychology Seminar – attend a weekly seminar in which invited speakers address a variety of topics in the area
of health psychology. There is no evaluation in this seminar. The Health Psychology Seminar must be attended for any
two years over the course of one’s graduate student career.
For students in the Clinical or Clinical-Developmental Areas of the Psychology Graduate Program only, accrual of
clinical training in health psychology must be conducted during the student’s internship year.
For more information regarding the Health Psychology Graduate Diploma, please contact Dr. Joel Katz at [email protected]
- 33 -
Neuroscience Diploma Program Requirements
Neuroscience is the multidisciplinary study of the nervous system. It ranges from research on molecular and cellular
mechanisms in nerve cells and the relationship between the elements of neural systems, to the study of behavior of whole
organisms. In the past decade, neuroscience has been one of the most rapidly expanding fields of science.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Concurrent completion of a Master’s thesis or PhD dissertation in the field of neuroscience under the supervision of a
core faculty member.
Minimum two-year consecutive participation in the Neuroscience Diploma Program
Successful completion of two-half credit graduate courses in Neuroscience: KAHS 6155 3.0 (BIO 5146 / PSYC 6257)
Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Structures, Neurons and Synapses and PSYC 6253 3.0 (BIO 5147 / KAHS
6156) Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Circuits, Systems and Behaviour.
Please note that these two courses may also be counted towards the degree requirement of students’ departmental
program.
Regular attendance at a monthly Neuroscience seminar series
Successful completion of a neuroscience review paper in 2nd year of program
Research Day. Research presentation
For more information regarding the Neuroscience Graduate Diploma, please contact Dr. Lauren Sergio at [email protected]
Quantitative Methods Diploma in Psychology Requirements
The Quantitative Methods (QM) Area in the Department of Psychology offers a formal diploma program in quantitative
methods for graduate students within the Graduate Program in Psychology, Kinesiology, Nursing and other areas. This diploma
program is developed to promote competency in the application and communication of advanced quantitative methods to
psychological and social science data, and is intended to be complementary to students’ course of study in Psychology or other
related graduate programs.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Students must complete 18.0 credits of coursework specializing in Quantitative Methods at the graduate level (there
are no specific courses required). The courses could include graduate quantitative methods classes offered by the
Departments of Psychology, Kinesiology or Nursing as well as graduate classes offered by the Department of Mathematics
and Statistics. However, other York or non-York courses might also be applied to the requirements of the diploma. All
courses that the student would like to apply towards the requirements of the diplomas must first be approved by the
student’s Diploma Program Advisor. Courses counting toward the diploma program may also count towards the student’s
graduate degree requirements, but some part of the graduate diploma program course requirements shall be additional to
degree requirements. Additionally, every course counting toward the diploma must have a minimum grade of A-.
Presenting at least once in the Quantitative Methods Forum. The presentation could either focus on a specific
quantitative method, or could highlight the student’s application of an advanced quantitative method in an ongoing
research project.
Attend at least a minimum of eight Quantitative Methods Forums. The eight QM forums need not be in the same year,
and although a minimum number is specified, it is recommended that students attend as many forums as possible.
Completion of a Minor Area Paper, Review Paper or Research Practicum with a focus on quantitative methods. The
minor area paper or review paper should be at least 4,000 words (excluding tables, figures and references) on a topic
related to the analysis of data in the behavioural sciences. The review paper should be written in a format acceptable for
submission to a peer-reviewed journal, and to count towards the diploma it must be approved by the Quantitative Methods
area. Alternatively the research practicum will be worth six credits and should be related to the analysis of data in the
behavioural sciences. A letter from the practicum supervisor outlining the nature of the practicum and indicating successful
completion of the practicum will be required in order for the practicum to count towards the diploma.
For more information regarding the Quantitative Methods Graduate Diploma, please contact Dr. David Flora at
[email protected]
- 34 -
Course Evaluation and Evaluation of Student’s Coursework
Routinely, at the end of each graduate course the course director will be sent notifications that the course evaluations are
available online. Students access the course evaluations after logging on through Passport York. The instructor never sees any
course evaluation results or comments until after they submit final grades and they never see who said what.
Research and Applied Practicum supervisors submit to the Graduate Program Office grades and written comments on the work
of their students in January and May each year. These reports are placed in the student's file. Course directors submit grades
and comments at the end of each course. Clinical Practicum supervisors submit evaluation forms specific to the Clinical or
Clinical-Developmental areas to the Graduate Program Office and faculty members associated with these courses or the DCT
assign a pass/fail grade.
It is the policy of the Program to encourage faculty members to review their evaluations of student performance in their
courses, including practica, with the student before they are submitted to the Program Office. Course and practicum evaluation
reports are available in the office for inspection by the student at any time.
The Program Office submits official grades to the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the end of each half or full course. The office
is not responsible for issuing grades to students; they may obtain them from their course directors or via the online student
systems.
GRADES
The Program Director must report grades to the Registrar's Office by the following dates:
Full Fall/Winter Courses
Half Fall Courses
Half Winter Courses
Full Summer Courses
Half Summer Courses
NOTE
Grades Due
15 May
15 January
15 May
15 September
15 September
Removal of Incomplete Grades
15 September
15 March
15 July
15 January
15 November
- That the grades need to be submitted by faculty to the Program Office one week prior to the above-indicated
dates.
Half term courses are designated as 3.0 and full term courses are designated as 6.0 and a letter following the course number.
(F) following 3.0 or 6.0 indicates that the course begins in the fall, (W) following 3.0 indicates a winter course and (Y)
indicates a year course, which is fall and winter.
Incomplete Grades
It is expected that the student will complete all work for a course before the end of the term (half course) or year (full course) in
which the course is given. Courses are to be designed by course directors so that all requirements can be normally met within
these time periods, with all assignments being made early enough in the term or year to allow for timely completion. The grade
of I (Incomplete) may be awarded only under unusual circumstances, such as ill health, which must be documented on the
grade reporting sheet handed in by the course director. The grade of I (Incomplete) may be approved for up to 2 months for a
half course or 4 months for a full course. It needs to be remembered that these deadlines for removal of incomplete grades are
already time extensions beyond the date when grades must be reported, and it is the GRADE rather than the submission of the
work, that is due by the deadline. Students must hand in their work in sufficient time for the course director to determine a
grade and for the Graduate Program to submit the grade to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
In extenuating circumstances, if the I cannot be removed before the deadline, the student may petition for an extension and
provide a rationale and a timeline. In that case, the course director must agree to the revised plan; the student's supervisor and
Area Coordinator will be notified and consulted; and the petition must be approved by the Graduate Director before being sent
to FGS for final approval.
Unless a grade for the course has been received or a petition for an additional extension has been received by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies and has been approved, it will be deemed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies that the Graduate Program has
assigned an F grade, and all I grades will become F grades on the due date. Students who receive any combinations of C
grades or combination of C and F grades will not be allowed to continue in the program.
- 35 -
COURSE SYLLABI
Course directors must specify in writing on each course syllabus within the first two weeks of classes the nature and weighting
of course assignments and their due dates. Each course syllabus must stipulate the requirements of the course, deadlines, and a
marking scheme. It is the responsibility of the student to keep copies of all his/her syllabi.
Guidelines for Directed Reading Courses
Psychology 6710 3.0/6.0 DIRECTED READING (Half or Full Course)
Students can apply to take a Directed Reading Course with a faculty member provided that it does not overlap significantly
with an available course or with a course taken previously. In order to obtain permission to enrol, the student needs to fill out a
Directed Reading Course form (available from the Program office), with the following information:
1.
Title of the course must be stated and indicate whether it is a half or full course 3.0 or 6.0. (In order for the full
title to appear on the transcript, the title must be limited to 30 characters, including spaces and punctuation).
2.
Rationale and course description – Explain how the material forms a coherent focus of study, and outline the
objectives of your study. In cases in which the material resembles that of a graduate program course, you should
explain how your reading program will differ from the course. When appropriate, the rationale should explain
the critical context in which the material will be studied.
3.
Evaluation Methods – List the assignments as agreed upon with the Course Director, e.g. the number of
written assignments and the length of each. The relative weighting of each component of the grade should also
be given.
4.
Signature of your Course Director and yourself must be on the outline. Make sure your Area Co-ordinator
has also approved it before submitting it to the Program Office.
FALL, WINTER & SUMMER REGISTRATION
Please refer to http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/regulations/ for detailed information about Registration and details
on payment of fees. The main points are as follows:
1.
Students must register for all three terms during the academic year even if you are not enrolling into courses.
Beginning in June for the fall and winter terms and March for the summer term. To enrol into courses, you need
to use a catalogue number. Please refer to this website for Registration Procedures://gradstudies.yorku.ca/currentstudents/student-status/enrollment/. Please refer to the FGS website (http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/currentstudents/student-status/important-dates/) for the last day to register without paying the $200 late fee.
2.
Students should discuss their course options with their supervisors have their supervisors sign the Advising Worksheet
and return it to the Graduate Psychology Program Office. Some Areas may require the Area Coordinator or GPD to
approve course selections as well. When the advisor is not available for an extended period, the Area Coordinator or
Graduate Program Director may substitute.
3.
Students must petition to change their status (from full to part-time or vice versa), by completing a form available in
the Graduate Program Office or on the Faculty of Graduate Studies website http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/currentstudents/student-status/forms/.
FACULTY AND PROGRAM REGULATIONS
Petitions
Students may petition for exemption from any regulation of the Graduate Program in Psychology or of the FGS. There are a
number of different petition forms on the FGS website (http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/student-status/forms/) and
these forms for petitions require Faculty approval (e.g., extension of time to remove an incomplete grade). There is also a form
for petitions requiring Area approval (e.g., exemption from an Area requirement) that is available from the Program office. The
form is returned to the Director for approval, after the approval has been given by the Supervisor, Area Coordinator/Director
and any other pertinent faculty member with signatures on the form. Should the petition be denied, the student may request that
- 36 -
the matter be taken to the Program Executive Committee. In any case, if a FGS regulation is involved, the Program approved
petition is next sent to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for consideration and disposition.
Withdrawal from the Program
If the student has not completed all program requirements within the 7-year time limit, it may become necessary for a student to
withdraw "in good standing" from the Program. Students considering this action should obtain the support of their supervisor,
and then discuss it with the Graduate Program Director.
Students deregistered from the Graduate Program in Psychology will have to re-register at least part-time for a term in order to
submit a thesis, minor area paper or dissertation research proposal. Under this condition proposals recommended by the
student’s supervisory committee and by the Program Director may be forwarded to the FGS for its consideration.
Reinstatement vs Re-admission
Following are the conditions under which persons can be reinstated as students in the same graduate program in which they
were previously registered.
REINSTATEMENT
Students previously registered in a graduate program at York who did not complete their requirements and who wish to return
to the same program may petition for reinstatement if:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
They have not undertaken further studies during their absence from the Program; and
They were in "good standing" at the time of withdrawal from the Program; and
They would require one term only to complete requirements (this usually means that they are returning solely to
defend a thesis or dissertation); and
They have their supervisor’s support; and
They obtain the approval of the Graduate Program in Psychology.
RE-ADMISSION
Students previously registered in a graduate program at York who did not complete their requirements and who wish to return
to the same program will be required to reapply through the usual admission process if:
1.
2.
They had completed less than 75%* of the Program requirements prior to leaving it and they will require more than
one term to complete; or
They were not in "good standing" at the time of withdrawal from the Program.
Note * In cases where it is not readily obvious what percentage of the program has been completed, the Graduate Program
Director shall be consulted.
Note 2: Students who reapply for re-admission are not guaranteed admission and the particular Area will consider the
application using their usual criteria, including the requirement that there is a supervisor who wishes to take the student.
Adding and Dropping Courses
Students may add and drop courses using Passport York. When the deadline has passed to add or drop courses online, the
student needs to fill out a Course Transaction Form found here: http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/studentstatus/forms/.
Important – In every instance when a student drops or adds a course, the Graduate Program Office must be informed and where
necessary, appropriate forms must be completed.
Courses in Other Programs and Other Institutions
Students may obtain permission to take courses in other graduate programs at York and at other institutions. The student
should first discuss the matter with his/her supervisor. The Graduate Program Office has the forms, which must be filled out if
courses outside the Program or at other institutions are to be taken. Courses taken at another Ontario University must be at the
graduate level, not available at York, and required for the degree program. The student’s supervisor must provide a statement
indicating why the course is necessary.
- 37 -
Students who wish to know what courses are available in other programs at York University should consult the Faculty of
Graduate Studies Calendar.
Leave of Absence/Maternity Leave
Graduate Psychology students are entitled to several types of leaves. Students are requested to complete a petition form and
forward it along with a supportive statement from the student's supervisor to the Program Director who will send the request to
the Dean of Graduate Studies or his/her designate. Please contact the Graduate Program Office for the different types of leaves.
Please note that a leave of absence (LOA) cannot exceed 1 year and that students on a leave of absence must maintain
continuous registration and pay the appropriate student fees.
Normally a LOA is not granted to students with an “I “(Incomplete) grade. Students carrying an incomplete grade over the
period of time they wish to be on LOA must provide a rationale for carrying the Incomplete during this time period and a date
by which the incomplete grade will be removed.
Each graduate student is entitled to one, Elective Leave of Absence (for one term) at any time during his/her program. No
reason or documentation is required for this type of leave. The following conditions apply:
(a) The student must have been enrolled for at least two consecutive terms prior to elective leave,
(b) The student must NOT have incomplete grades,
(c) Students nearing the completion of their degree requirements must be registered and pay appropriate fees as an
active student in the term prior to, and the term of, completion. Such students are therefore not eligible for the
elective leave of absence.
If a student is on a leave of absence, he/she is registered as “inactive” and therefore MAY NOT:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
Hold an external or internal scholarship,
Receive an FGS bursary,
Hold an RA/GA/TA,
Be eligible for the minimum guarantee or a CUPE 3903 rebate,
Receive a session validation card,
Receive any of the provisions normally associated with an actively registered student.
Intellectual Property and the Graduate Student
There is a document entitled Intellectual Property and the Graduate Student at York University that uses a question and answer
format to cover a number of topics dealing with the ownership of intellectual property. The document is here:
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/current-students/thesis-dissertation/intellectual-property/. Primary clauses are given below:
Authorship
1.
Authorship can only be credited to those who make substantial intellectual contributions to a piece of work.
Accepting the addition of an author who has not made a significant intellectual contribution to the piece of work
is not ethical for authors.
2.
Authors accept not only credit but also responsibility for their work and, in particular, for ensuring that the work
conforms to appropriate standards of Academic Honesty.
3.
Generally, the order of authors' names in a publication should reflect the substance of their relative
contributions to the work, with priority going to those who made the greatest or most significant contribution.
Supervisors should discuss the issue of authorship, and what factors may determine the final order of
authorship, normally before commencing the work.
4.
Where the major substance or data of a co-authored publication is based on a portion of a graduate student's
work, the student will normally be the first author. The supervisor or joint authors should be prepared to offer a
rationale in cases where the student is not listed as the first author. Where the work has been written up in a
dissertation or thesis or paper before the research is published, the publication will normally cite the
dissertation, thesis, or paper on which it is based.
- 38 -
5.
Anyone otherwise entitled to be acknowledged as a co-author may forfeit that right if they leave the project
before substantially completing it. In such cases their contribution to the work shall nonetheless be
acknowledged in an appropriate manner by the author(s), for example in the acknowledgements section of the
publication.
6.
Providing financial support for a student's dissertation, thesis, or research paper is not, in itself, sufficient to
warrant authorship. Only where intellectual input is provided beyond financial support, should co-authorship be
considered.
7.
Supplying minor editorial work for a student's dissertation, thesis, or research paper is not, in itself, sufficient to
warrant co-authorship.
8.
If a student is employed as a Research Assistant in circumstances where the work done in the course of that
employment is not intended to and does not in fact become part of work done for the degree requirements, then
the student may not normally claim co-authorship and does not own the data, except through a prior agreement
that is consistent with the general principles above.
9.
If a student is employed as a Research Assistant in circumstances where the work done in the course of that
employment becomes part of the thesis/dissertation/research paper, the student may, at a minimum, claim coownership of the data but as the author of the thesis/ dissertation/research paper owns the overall copyright.
Publication
10. The university has an important duty, grounded in the public interest, to seek, preserve and disseminate
knowledge. Therefore, authors should attempt to publish their work in a timely fashion. In cases where work
must be kept confidential and unpublished for a time, the period of delay should normally be no more than one
year from the date of acceptance of a thesis or dissertation, and should in no circumstances extend beyond two
years from that date.
11. Publications by graduate students and faculty must give full and proper acknowledgment to the contribution of
other students or faculty, or others to their work, notwithstanding that such contribution may not warrant
authorship. Such contributions should be substantial, in accordance with the particular discipline, and may
include items such as original ideas that led directly to the research work, or requested commentary that resulted
in significant changes to the research.
12. Normally, all co-authors or co-owners of the data need to concur in publishing or presenting the work. Coauthors should agree to the time or place of presentation or publication of their jointly authored work prior to
the presentation or publication, but such agreement should not be unreasonably withheld. The inability of the
author(s) to contact another co-author prior to presentation at a meeting or seminar should not prevent work
from being publicly disseminated, provided they make reasonable efforts to contact all contributors to obtain
prior agreement.
13. To verify research materials or data, there must be provisions for access. Supervisors and sponsors may, with
agreement of the student, retain the original materials provided. Under such circumstances students shall
normally be presented on request with complete and usable copies of those materials.
14. Where there has been significant substantive and intellectual contribution by the supervisor to the research, the
intellectual property emanating thereof shall normally be the joint property of graduate students and their
supervisor or sponsor for the masters or doctoral project in which the materials were created. When the physical
research materials embody intellectual property, the student should have reasonable access to this material.
Agreements concerning research materials and data should be made, where possible, before the commencement
of research.
15. Students shall not use in their dissertations, theses or papers data or results generated by someone else without
first obtaining permission from those who own the materials.
Academic Honesty
Students should be aware that the offences against the standard of academic honesty have been broadened to include activities
that are related to the research enterprise. Although most students would not be surprised to find that behaviours such as
fabricating results and falsifying results constitute academic dishonesty, some might not know that actions such as
- 39 -
misrepresenting research results or the methods used, failing to give credit to collaborators as joint authors or the listing as
authors of others who have not contributed to the work, and submitting data collected with other students or faculty members
for publication without their permission all constitute examples of academic dishonesty.
All graduate students should read the section on academic honesty in the Faculty of Graduate Studies Calendar:
http://www.yorku.ca/grads/calendar/fgs-calendar2007-09.pdf so that they are familiar with the Faculty's policy on this topic.
The Graduate Program in Psychology will take a strong stand on academic honesty cases.
Library Policy Regarding Extended Loan Privileges
Graduate students may apply for extended loan privileges at the circulation desk, Scott Library, by submitting a signed letter
from their Program that they are currently working on their Masters or Doctoral thesis. With extended loan privileges, the
normal 2-week loan period at Scott, Steacie, Law and Frost Libraries is extended to 100 days. Students writing major papers
are not eligible to apply for extended loan privileges. Extended loan privileges automatically carry over year to year. Students
are not required to submit subsequent letters.
- 40 -
2015 – 2016 COURSE SCHEDULE
Course
Title
Instructor
Email
Day
Time
Room
Cat. #
6020 3.0 (F)
Historical and
Theoretical
Foundations of
Psychology A
C. Green
[email protected]
Thurs
11:30
-2:30
204
BSB
X72B01
6030 3.0 (W)
Historical and
Theoretical
Foundations of
Psychology B
A. Rutherford
[email protected]
Wed
8:30 11:30
207
BSB
C19K01
6062 3.0 (W)
Subjectivity and
Society
Thurs
11:30
- 2 :30
207
BSB
A15F01
6131 A 3.0
(F)
Univariate Analysis I
: ANOVA
Tues
11:30
- 2:30
207
BSB
D64Q01
6131 B 3.0
(F)
Univariate Analysis I
: ANOVA
Thurs
8:30 11:30
328A
BSB
U11B01
6132 M 3.0
(W)
Univariate Analysis
II: Regression
R. Cribbie
[email protected]
Thurs
11:30
- 2:30
204
BSB
N58K01
6132 N 3.0
(W)
Univariate Analysis
II: Regression
D. Flora
[email protected]
Tues
2:30 5:30
328A
BSB
H05T01
6140 6.0 (Y)
Multivariate analysis
M. Friendly
[email protected]
Tues
2:30 5:30
207
BSB
D57A01
6150E 3.0
(W)
Research Methods In
Study Of Personality
R. Mar
[email protected]
Thurs
2:305:30
328A
BSB
U04X01
6170 3.0 (W)
Cultural Psychology
J. Sasaki
[email protected]
Wed
2:305:30
328A
BSB
C77R01
6176 3.0 (F)
Structural Equation
Modeling
D. Flora
[email protected]
Tues
2:30 5:30
328A
BSB
D06J01
6190 3.0 (F)
Longitudinal Data
Analysis
R. Cribbie
[email protected]
Wed
8:30 11:30
204
BSB
T82J01
Introduction to
Functional Magnetic
Resonance Imaging
K. Schneider
[email protected]
Thurs
1:00 4:00
1015
Sherman
K11CO1
Applications in
Vision Science
J. Steeves
[email protected]
Wed
2:305:30
1015
Sherman
Z16R01
6229 3.0 (W)
Statistical Modeling
R. Murray
[email protected]
Tues/
Thurs
11:301:00
204
ACW
K46W01
6245 3.0 (F)
Complex Systems
Approach to
Interpersonal change
D. Reid
[email protected]
Wed
11:302:30
328A
BSB
S66S01
6253 3.0 (W)
Fundamentals of
Neuroscience II:
Circuit
J. DeSouza
[email protected]
Wed
11:302:30
204
BSB
W94U01
Fundamentals
Neuroscience I:
Structures
Dorota Crawford
L. Sergio
[email protected],
[email protected]
Wed
11:30
- 2:30
335 CC
B88F01
Visuospatial Memory
and Goal-Directed
Action
Doug Crawford
[email protected]
Wed
2:305:30
204
BSB
A23N01
6227 3.0 (F)
xl BIOL 5148
/KAHS 6148
HOST BIOL
6228 3.0 (F)
xl BIOL
5149/ KAHS
6149 HOST
BIOL
6257 3.0 (F)
xl KAHS
6155/ BIOL
5146 HOST
KAHS
6260 3.0 (W)
/4360 3.0 xl
BIOL 5135
KAHS 6260
T. Teo
C. Green
J. Pek
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
- 41 -
Course
Title
Instructor
Email
Day
Time
Room
Cat. #
6265 3.0 (W)
xl KAHS
6161
BIOL5136
Perception and
Action
L. Harris
[email protected]
Wed
2:305:30
1015
Sherman
T24C01
6273 3.0 (F)
Computer
programming for
experimental
psychology
R. Murray
[email protected]
Tues &
Thurs
11:301:00
204
ACW
N00D01
6278 3.0 (W)
xl KAHS
6153/ BIOL
5141 HOST
KAHS
Brain and Behaviour:
Cognitive Systems
M. Fallah
[email protected]
Mon
11:30
- 2:30
214 BC
F00Q01
6320 3.0 (W)
Human
Neuropsychology:
History and
Syndromes
J. Rich
R. Mar
[email protected]
Tues
11:302:30
203
BSB
S95K01
6400 3.0 (F)
Contemporary Issues
in Social and
Personality
Psychology
[email protected]
Fri
6410 3.0 (W)
Social Psychology
TBA
TBA
Wed
11:302:30
11:302:30
328A
BSB
328A
BSB
6420 6.0 (Y)
Foundations of
Clinical Psychology
J. Mills - Fall
J. Goldberg - Winter
[email protected],
[email protected]
Tues
2:305:30
203
BSB
N51R01
6430 6.0 (Y)
Assessment in
Psychology
N. Park - Fall
J. Mills - Winter
[email protected],
[email protected]
Tues
11:302:30
204
BSB
G98D01
6430P 6.0 (Y)
Clinical Practicum l
D. Reid
K. Fergus
[email protected],
[email protected]
Fri
8:3011:30
203
BSB
S08Y05
Tutorial
Tues
9:0012:00
S08Y01
Tutorial
Tues
1:004:00
S08Y02
Tutorial
Thurs
1:004:00
S08Y03
Tutorial
Thurs
3:006:00
S08Y04
V78G01
Z88G01
6436 3.0 (F)
Evidence Based
Principles of
Psychotherapy
A. Pos
[email protected]
Wed
11:302:30
207
BSB
A52F01
6437 3.0 (W)
Approaches to
Psychotherapy:
Advanced Study
H. Westra
[email protected]
Wed
11:302:30
207
BSB
Q99N01
6440 6.0 (Y)
Psychodiagnostics
E. Glassman
J. Goldberg
[email protected],
[email protected]
Tues
8:3011:30
203
BSB
Y55U01
6440P 6.0 (Y)
Clinical Practicum II
6445P 6.0 (Y)
Advanced
Psychological
Intervention
6455 3.0 (W)
xl KIN
6460 6.0 (W)
6460 6.0 (Y)
6460 3.0 (F)
F31V01
Thurs
11:302:30
Tutorial
Tues
1:305:00
J30X02
Tutorial
Thurs
8:3011:30
J30X03
Wed
2:305:30
Current Issues in
Health Psychology
Clinical Practicum III
(Optional)
Clinical Practicum III
(Optional)
Clinical Practicum III
(Optional)
H. Westra
A. Pos
J. Katz
[email protected],
[email protected]
[email protected]
203
BSB
J30X01
203
BSB
M13E01
F60N01
M42T01
- 42 -
Course
Title
6460 3.0 (W)
Clinical Practicum III
(Optional)
6474 3.0 (W)
Qualitative Research
Methods
K. Fergus
[email protected]
Thurs
8:3011:30
207
BSB
G76E01
6477 3.0 (W)
Interprofessional
Psychosocial
Oncology:
Introduction to
Theory and Practice
L.
[email protected]
Online
Online
n/a
Q70V01
6480 3.0 (F)
Brief Psychotherapy
and Short-Term
Treatment
Y. Bohr
[email protected]
Thurs
2:30 5:30
328A
BSB
W36N01
6490B 3.0 (F)
Ethical Issues in
Professional Practice
R. Morris
[email protected]
Thurs
2:305:30
203
BSB
Q92U01
6610 3.0 (F)
Social and Emotional
Bases of
Development
M. Wintre
[email protected]
Thurs
2:30 5:30
S156
ROSS
M71Y01
6650A 3.0 (F)
Research
Methodology in
Developmental
Psychology
M. Wiseheart
[email protected]
Wed
2:30 5:30
203
BSB
G47M01
6710 3.0 (F)
Readings
K39G01
6710 3.0 (W)
Readings
D86P01
6710 6.0 (F)
Readings
U33A01
6710 6.0 (W)
Readings
N80J01
6710 6.0 (Y)
6805 3.0 (W)
Integrated
with PSYC
4380 3.0
Readings
H27S01
6810 3.0 (F)
Applied Practicum I
F02G01
6810 3.0 (W)
Applied Practicum I
V49Z01
6810 6.0 (Y)
Applied Practicum I
A74E01
6810 3.0 (F)
Applied Practicum II
R21M01
6810 3.0 (W)
Applied Practicum II
K68V01
6810 6.0 (Y)
Applied Practicum II
E15H01
6810 3.0 (F)
Applied Practicum III
U62P01
6810 3.0 (W)
Applied Practicum III
Z09B01
6810 6.0 (Y)
H56K01
6810 3.0 (W)
Applied Practicum III
Applied Practicum
IV
Applied Practicum
IV
Applied Practicum
IV
6820 3.0 (F)
Research Practicum I
E44W01
6820 3.0 (W)
Research Practicum I
U91H01
6820 6.0 (Y)
Research Practicum I
Research Practicum
II
Research Practicum
II
Research Practicum
II
Z38Q01
6810 6.0 (Y)
6810 3.0 (F)
6820 6.0 (Y)
6820 3.0 (F)
6820 3.0 (W)
Brain Rhythms
Instructor
Email
Day
Time
Room
Cat. #
F89F01
K. Hoffman
[email protected]
Tues
11:302:30
207
BSB
M55E01
K97N01
B03T01
R50E01
R79T01
H85C01
B32Y01
- 43 -
Course
Title
6820 3.0 (F)
Research Practicum
III
Y26F01
6820 3.0 (W)
Research Practicum
III
E73Z01
6820 6.0 (Y)
Research Practicum
III
V20W01
6820 3.0 (F)
Research Practicum
IV
W07V01
6820 3.0 (W)
Research Practicum
IV
P54H01
6820 6.0 (Y)
Research Practicum
IV
Z67X01
6840 6.0 (Y)
Clinical Internship
Z96A01
6840 3.0 (F)
Clinical Internship I
X43J01
6840 3.0 (W)
Clinical Internship I
B90S01
6840 3.0 (F)
Clinical Internship II
S37D01
6840 3.0 (W)
Clinical Internship II
Y84M01
6900 3.0 (F)
Issues in CD
Psychology: A
Proseminar in Ethics,
Practice and
Research
M. Desrocher
[email protected]
Tues
11:302:30
203
BSB
P83W01
6905 3.0 (W)
Biological and
Cognitive Bases of
Development
M. Desrocher
[email protected]
Thurs
2:30 5:30
203
BSB
G18U01
6910M 3.0
(W)
Psychoeducational
Assessment of
Children and
Adolescents
R. Pillai Riddel
[email protected]
Tues
9:3012:30
1015
Sherman
W65F01
6910P 6.0 (Y)
Introduction to the
Psychological
Assessment of
Children Practicum
J. Bebko
[email protected]
Mon
2:305:30
328A
BSB
Z68T01
C. Till
[email protected]
Wed
11:30
-2:30
203
BSB
T53R01
A. Perry
[email protected]
Thurs
8:3011:30
203
BSB
C48C01
6930 3.0 (F)
Intervention
Strategies with
Children
J. Weiss
[email protected]
Fri
11:302:30
207
BSB
X14R01
6930P 6.0 A
(Y)
Intervention
Strategies with
Children Practicum
R. Muller
[email protected]
Fri
10:302:30
204
BSB
J59A01
6940 3.0 (W)
Adolescent
Disorders: ClinicalDevelopmental
Assessment
&Treatment
J. Rawana
[email protected]
Mon
8:30 11:30
328A
BSB
B61D01
6955 3.0 A
(F)
Psychopathology
( MA students)
M. Toplak
[email protected]
Fri
11:302:30
203
BSB
Q41G01
6955 3.0 B
(F)
Psychopathology
(PhD students)
M. Toplak
[email protected]
Mon
8:30 11:30
328A
BSB
J88P01
6920 3.0 (F)
6925 3.0 (W)
Clinical and
Diagnostic
Assessment of
Children and
Adolescents
Supervision and
Consultation
Instructor
Email
- 44 -
Day
Time
Room
Cat. #
Course
Title
Instructor
Email
Day
Time
Room
Cat. #
SUMMER 2016
6330 3.0 (S1)
Cognitive
Neurorehabilitation
G. Turner
[email protected]
Tues &
Thurs
11:30
– 2:30
1015
Sherman
Y31F01
6945 3.0 (S1)
Applied Pediatric
Neuropsychology
C. Till
[email protected]
Thurs
2:30 –
5:30
204
BSB
V11N01
6965 1.5 (S1)
Diversity in Children
Youth and Adults
Clinical Practice
J. Connolly
[email protected]
Wed
11:30
– 2:30
204
BSB
X48J01
BUILDING LIST
AC
ATK
BSB
BCSS
BC
BU
CC
CS
CFA
CFT
CB
CLH
FRQ
FC
HNES
IKB
K
Accolade (East or West)
Atkinson
Behavioural Sciences Building
Bennett Centre for Student Services
Bethune College
Burton Auditorium
Calumet College
Central Square
Centre of Fine Arts
Centre for Film and Theatre
Chemistry Building
Curtis Lecture Halls
Farquharson Life Sciences Building
Founders College
Health, Nursing & Environmental Studies Building
Ignat Kaneff Building (Osgoode Hall Law School)
Kinsmen Building
LAS
LS
LUM
MC
PSE
PR
R
SSB
SHR
SSL
SLH
SC
TEL
VC
VH
WC
YL
- 45 -
Lassonde Building (formerly CSE)
Life Sciences Building
Lumbers Building
McLaughlin College
Petrie Science & Engineering Building
Physical Resources Building
Ross Building
Schulich School of Business
Sherman Health Science Research Centre
Steacie Science Library
Stedman Lecture Halls
Stong College
Technology Enhanced Learning Building
Vanier College
Vari Hall
Winters College
York Lanes
York Universy Campus Map (Keele)
- 46 -
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Psychology A
Psychology 6020 3.0 (F)
Christopher Green
Thursday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 20
Purpose:
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history and theory of psychology as a science, a
profession, and a social force. We are concerned with investigating how the practices, scope, and
experimental objects of psychology have changed over time. We will examine the various schools
and systems that have flourished and declined since the eighteenth-century including sensationalism,
phrenology, ‘brass instruments’ psychology, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, and
cognitive science. Particular attention will be paid to the social place of psychology as the science
moved from being the provenance of a few to a mass profession that shaped the daily lives of many.
During this period, greater attention was placed upon the inner lives of ordinary people than ever
before and large organizations sought to come to terms with the individual through standardized
measures and tests. We study how this situation came about and what its legacy is for the twentyfirst century. Students will engage with scholarly articles assessing psychology’s heritage as well as
grappling with influential documents from the discipline’s past.
Student Background:
This course is intended for students from all area.
Course Format:
Seminar discussion, with instructor and student presentations
Evaluation:
Assessment will consist of weekly participation, leading one or more seminars in class, and a formal
conference-like oral presentation at the end of term.
Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Psychology B
Psychology 6030 3.0 (W)
Alexandra Rutherford
Wednesday 8:30 – 11:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 25
Purpose:
In this course we focus on foundational issues of psychology as a science, profession, and social
institution from theoretical and historical points of view. Particular attention will be paid to a critical
assessment of psychological worldviews, theories, concepts, methods, and ideas as they have
developed in specific cultural, historical, and geopolitical contexts. A key question driving our
inquiry will be: What is the relationship between psychology and society? The relevance of
theoretical and historical psychology for research, knowledge, and application will be elaborated.
Emphasis will be placed on developing students’ capacities for critical reflexivity.
Pre-requisites:
This course is suitable for students from all areas and all levels of psychology. Graduate standing.
Course Format:
Lectures, student presentations, and class discussions
Evaluation:
In-class presentations, written reflections, final project TBD; regular attendance and participation.
Readings:
Articles and book chapters selected by the instructor.
- 47 -
Subjectivity and Society
Psychology 6062 3.0 (W)
Thomas Teo
Thursday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 18
Purpose:
Subjectivity (the first-person standpoint) has become an interdisciplinary research topic in the social
sciences, humanities, and psychology. In this course we discuss histories and theories of subjectivity
that include the notion that individual subjectivity is embedded in social, cultural, and historical
contexts and that economy, politics, and society are interwoven with the very fabric of subjectivity.
We analyze critical theories of subjectivity that reflect on Western biases as well as the processes of
subjectification through which we consider ourselves subjects. Finally, this course focuses on
opportunities of resistance in the context of subjectivity. The course provides an overview of the
debates that exist on the topic while advancing knowledge on subjectivity in a collaborative process.
Pre-requisites:
Course Format:
Graduate standing. This course is suitable for students from all areas of psychology, the humanities,
and the social sciences.
Lectures, student presentations, and class discussions.
Evaluation:
Presentation of reading in class; written elaboration of presentation; comments; regular attendance.
Readings:
TBA. Works on (a) Histories and theories of subjectivity: Human nature, societal nature, and
subjectivity; social characteristics and subjectivity; subjectivity, the world, and the conduct of
everyday life; intersubjectivity and the body. (b) Subjectification and power: psychologization and
the psydisciplines; subjectification, bodies, and technology; privilege and subjectivity. (c) Resistance
and subjectivity: Participatory action research; theoretical counter-concepts; aesthetics; postcolonial
politics.
Univariate Analysis I: Variance
Psychology 6131 A 3.0 (F)
Christopher Green
Tuesday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 18
Purpose:
The primary aim of this course is to provide the student with the basic tools for analyzing data from
univariate designs with categorical predictors. The course material focuses on simple and complex
analysis of variance (ANOVA) models, with an emphasis on the general linear model. The course
begins with a review of the basic concepts of data analysis typically covered in undergraduate
statistics courses, including descriptive statistics and graphics followed by principles of statistical
inference. Next, the main components of the course involve theory and application of ANOVA
models for between-subjects and repeated measures designs. Throughout, there is a strong emphasis
on associated methods for checking assumptions and visualizing data. Lab sessions familiarize the
student with SPSS software for carrying out these analyses.
Course Format:
Instructor presentation, lab sessions, student presentation
Student Requirements: class attendance, lab attendance, lab work outside class hours
Text /Readings:
TBA
Evaluation:
Two exams, assignments/homework and possibly a brief presentation
- 48 -
Univariate Analysis I: Variance
Psychology 6131 B 3.0 (F)
Jolynn Pek
Thursday 8:30 – 11:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 18
Purpose:
The primary aim of this course is to provide the student with the basic tools for analyzing data from
univariate designs with categorical predictors. The course material focuses on simple and complex
analysis of variance (ANOVA) models, with an emphasis on the general linear model. The course
begins with a review of the basic concepts of data analysis typically covered in undergraduate
statistics courses, including descriptive statistics and graphics followed by principles of statistical
inference. Next, the main components of the course involve theory and application of ANOVA
models for between-subjects and repeated measures designs. Throughout, there is a strong emphasis
on associated methods for checking assumptions and visualizing data. Lab sessions familiarize the
student with SPSS software for carrying out these analyses.
Course Format:
Instructor presentation, lab sessions, student presentation
Student Requirements: class attendance, lab attendance, lab work outside class hours
Text /Readings:
TBA
Evaluation:
Two exams, assignments/homework and possibly a brief presentation
Univariate Analysis I: Regression
Psychology 6132 N 3.0 (W)
Robert Cribbie
Thursday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 18
Purpose:
This course is designed to provide the student with foundational skills in analyzing data for a single
outcome variable (univariate analysis) using linear models, with an emphasis on continuous
predictors. Topics include correlation, simple linear regression, multiple linear regression,
mediation/moderation effects, generalized linear models, as well as evaluating model assumptions
and diagnostics.
Pre-requisites:
Psychology 6131, or permission from the instructor.
Student Background:
MA1 students in Psychology.
Course Format:
Lectures and computer-based lab sessions.
Text /Readings:
Cohen, J., Cohen, P., West, S. G. & Aiken, L. S. (2002). Applied multiple regression/ correlation
analysis for the behavioral sciences (3rd Ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Evaluation:
Assignments, mid-term exam and final exam.
- 49 -
Univariate Analysis I: Regression
Psychology 6132 M 3.0 (W)
David Flora
Tuesday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 18
Purpose:
To learn the basic statistical principles of the general linear model and how it is commonly applied
to psychological research. Topics include correlation, simple linear regression, multiple linear
regression, regression diagnostics, and potentially logistic regression.
Co- or pre-requisites:
Prerequisite, Psychology 6131, or permission from the instructor.
Student Background:
This course is meant for MA1 students in psychology.
Course Format:
The course will consist of lectures as well as guided computer lab exercises.
Text /Readings:
Fox, J., & Weisberg, S. (2011). An R companion to applied regression (2nd ed.). Los Angeles:
SAGE.
Evaluation:
There will be a series of assignments in which students carry out data analysis and interpret results,
as well as a mid-term and a final exam.
Multivariate Analysis
Psychology 6140 6.0 (Y)
Michael Friendly
Tuesday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 16
Purpose:
Psychology 6140 is designed to provide an integrated, in depth, but applied approach to multivariate
data analysis and linear statistical models in behavioural science research. There is a strong emphasis
throughout the course on graphical methods for visualizing data and the results of statistical models.
The statistical topics covered will include:






Regression analysis
Univariate and multivariate ANOVA and ANCOVA
Discriminant analysis
Canonical correlation analysis
Principal components and factor analysis
Cluster analysis, Multidimensional Scaling and/or Logistic regression (as time permits)
Most of these methods are actually special cases of the General Linear Model. By developing these
techniques within this framework, the student is led (hopefully) to appreciate the conceptual unity
underlying all forms of regression and all analysis of variance designs, both univariate and
multivariate.
This unification of these seemingly different forms of analysis is achieved through the use of matrix
algebra to formulate the various models. Therefore, the first part of the course (about 5-6 weeks) is
devoted to the necessary mathematical skills.
Although all of the matrix algebra required for the course will be covered in the readings and
lectures, time constraints dictate that this treatment will be somewhat brisk, and either a modicum of
initial familiarity or a willingness to work hard will be assumed. In order to facilitate exercises and
homework problems which involve matrix operations, students will be given instruction in using a
computer package for matrix algebra.
Software Notes: In the lectures and lab sessions, I will mainly use SAS for examples and tutorials.
Most of the practical assignments and graded work can be done with any software you are
comfortable with; however excercises using matrix algebra will probably be most convenient in
SAS/IML (or JMP, R or Matlab).
- 50 -
SAS/IML provide students with the equivalent of a "matrix desk calculator" which makes
exploration and learning quite efficient; the facilites of SAS provide the power and data management
facilities needed for larger projects.
Evaluation:
Grades in the course will be based on one take-home exam, two mid-year projects (one research
critique, one data analysis project), and one end-year data analysis project: four units, each worth
25%.
The two data-analysis projects will involve research reports involving analysis of either existing data
or your own. The first will focus largely on regression techniques. The final project should be based
on methods of the second half of the course using either existing data or your own.
Text and Readings:
There are two principal texts for the course, and one text on matrix algebra (Green etal.). For most
topics in the course, parallel readings are assigned in Johnson & Wichern and Tabachnick & Fidell.
1. Green, P.E., Carroll, J.D & Chaturvedi, A. Mathematical tools for applied multivariate analysis,
Academic Press, (Revised Edition), 1997. [ISBN 0-12-160955-3] {there are copies of the old
edition in the Psychology Resource Center}
2. Johnson, R.A. & Wichern, D.W. Applied multivariate statistical analysis [Pub. web site],
Prentice Hall, 2007, 6th Ed. [ISBN-13: 9780131877153; (copies of 6th Ed. in Scott/Steacie, QA
278 J63 2007)]
3. Tabachnick, B. G. & Fidell, L. S. Using Multivariate Statistics [Pub. web site] Allyn & Bacon,
2007, 5th Ed. [ISBN-13: 9780205459384; QA 278 T3 2007 (copies in Scott of 5th Ed)]
In addition, you may want to use one or more of the following for reference or supplementary
reading. The first two provide alternative readings for some sections of the course, and are available
in the Psychology Resource Center. The others relate to computing resources.
4. Morrison, D. F. Multivariate Statistical Methods (3rd ed.), 1990. New York: McGraw-Hill.
5. Stevens, J. Applied Multivariate Statistics for the Social Sciences, 4th ed., L. Erlbaum
Associates 2002. [ISBN 0-8058-3777-9]
6. The Little SAS® Book: A Primer, 3rd ed., Lora D. Delwiche and Susan J. Slaughter, 1995 (SAS
Institute, ISBN 1-59047-333-7, $CA 34.00). [A brief introduction to SAS that will serve well
for the whole course.]
7. Friendly, M. SAS System for Statistical Graphics, First Edition., SAS Institute, 1991. [ISBN 155544-441-5; everything you wanted to know about statistical graphics.]
8. Friendly, M. Visualizing Categorical Data., SAS Institute, 2000. [ISBN 1-58025-660-0]
Research Methods In Study Of Personality
Psychology 6150E 3.0 (W)
Raymond Mar
Thursday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12
Purpose:
To introduce students to the practice of personality psychology by emphasizing a skills-based
approach. The goal of this course will be for each student to produce a research proposal pertaining
to individual differences. Along with familiarizing themselves with the current practice of
personality research, students will learn how to conduct p-curve analyses and use similar techniques
to evaluate research evidence, present and discuss ideas related to research ethics, and take a critical
though constructive stance toward research in general. Other major topics will include considering
culture/context/situation when studying individual differences, measurement issues, data-analysis
practices, and biological approaches (e.g., neuroscience, genetics, psychophysiology).
Student Background:
Admission to either the Master’s or Doctoral program in Psychology at York.
Course Format:
The details of the course format will be the product of negotiations between the students and
instructor, and may include (but are not limited to): (1) engaging in structured debates regarding
assigned readings, (2) reviewing manuscripts prepared by peers, (3) producing short position papers
on debates within personality psychology, (4) conducting a quantitative review of a particular
literature, (5) presenting a research proposal.
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Requirements:
Each student will submit a major written work in the area of personality. Short papers, presentations,
and participation in general will also be evaluated.
Evaluation:
The total grade will be based on weekly responses (15%), class participation (15%), the major paper
(50%), and a short presentation (20%).
Text and Readings:
To be announced at a later date.
Cultural Psychology
Psychology 6170 3.0 (W)
Joni Sasaki
Wednesday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15
Purpose:
This course will cover advanced topics in cultural psychology. By discussing both classic and
current research in cultural psychology, we will explore the ways in which culture shapes the self,
cognition, motivation, emotion, and social interactions, among other topics. By the end of the
session, I hope that you will: (1) understand how culture and the mind inevitably make each other
up, (2) be familiar with theoretical and empirical evidence demonstrating the importance of culture
in psychology, and (3) be able to apply cultural psychological perspectives to your own research.
Student Background:
Graduate students in any area of psychology.
Course Format:
Instructor and student-led discussions.
Text /Readings:
Journal articles.
Evaluation:
Weekly reaction papers, class discussion, research proposal.
Structural Equation Modeling
Psychology 6176 3.0 (F)
David Flora
Tuesday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 16
Purpose:
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the statistical theory of Structural Equation
Modeling (SEM) and how it is commonly applied to psychological research. SEM is a very general
multivariate modeling framework for simultaneously estimating equations that can include both
observed and latent variables. Special cases of SEM include multiple regression, path analysis,
confirmatory factor analysis, and growth curve/trajectory analysis, among others.
Pre-requisites:
Psychology 6130, Univariate Analysis or Psychology 6132, Univariate Analysis: Regression
Student Background: Students should be very comfortable with multiple linear regression. Students
in any area of psychology can benefit from the course, given that SEM is a general approach that can
be applied to many types of data.
Course Format:
The course will consist primarily of lectures and regular computer lab exercises.
Text /Readings:
T.B.D.
Evaluation:
There will be a series of data analysis assignments requiring the use of R software, using data
provided by the instructor.
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Longitudinal Data Analysis
Psychology 6190 3.0 (F)
Robert Cribbie
Wednesday 8:30 – 11:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 16
Purpose:
Introduce strategies for analyzing data from longitudinal studies in psychology. The course will
cover traditional approaches to measuring change, the multilevel model for change, latent growth
curve modeling and (time permitting) survival analysis.
Pre-requisites:
PSYC 6130, PSYC 6131/6132 or equivalent
Student Background:
Students should be familiar with the basic principles of the general linear model (i.e., ANOVA,
Regression)
Course Format:
Lectures, lab exercises
Text /Readings:
Singer, J. D., & Willett, J. B. (2003). Applied longitudinal data analysis: Modeling change and event
occurrence. New York: Oxford University Press.
Evaluation:
Assignments, papers, presentations
Introduction to Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Psychology 6227 3.0 (F)
(host BIOL xl with BIOL 5148/KAHS 6148)
Keith Schneider
Thursday 1:00–4:00
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 20
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of magnetic
resonance imaging (MRI) and its application to brain imaging. Students will learn about the physical
origins of the MRI signal and how MRI scanners manipulate this signal to construct images. We will
discuss the structure of the brain and the origins of the hemodynamic signals that permit functional
MRI (fMRI). Students will learn how to design and analyze fMRI experiments, and we will discuss
contemporary issues in MRI research. Each class meeting will consist of a lecture, discussion of
assigned reading(s), and a computer laboratory. During the labs, students will learn to use FSL and
other software to analyze MRI data. For the final project, groups of students will design, implement
and analyze their own fMRI experiment using the York University MRI Facility.
Pre-requisites:
Students should have knowledge of basic statistics and neuroscience
Text /Readings:
(optional but recommended)
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Third Edition by Scott A. Huettel, Allen W. Song and
Gregory McCarthy Sinauer Associates Inc. Published August 31, 2014. ISBN 978-0-87893-627-4.
Evaluation:
Lab assignments (7) 5% each
Presentation 5%
Take-home quiz 10%
Midterm project 15%
Final project proposal 5%
Final project write-up 30%
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Applications in Vision Science
Psychology 6228 3.0 (F)
(host BIOL xl with BIOL 5149/KAHS 6149)
Jennifer Steeves
Tuesday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15
Purpose:
To introduce graduate students to a wide range of applications of vision science, including basic
visual function, vision and aging, environmental lighting and vision, 3D media, computer vision and
object recognition, brain imaging, multi-sensory integration, and visual applications to the aerospace
industry.
Student Background:
Background in vision research, biopsychology, visual neuroscience, or computer vision
Course Format:
Course will involve presentations by faculty members of the CREATE team on applications of
vision research along with discussions of relevant contemporary papers.
Text /Readings:
Readings will be determined for each topic in advance. These will generally involve journal articles.
Evaluation:
Students will be required to give a presentation and critique of a contemporary research paper in
class. Students will also work in teams to develop a proposal for some future application of vision
science.
Other Information:
This course will be offered every year and is required of all CREATE trainees during their first year
in the program.
Statistical Modeling of Perception and Cognition
Psychology 6229 3.0 (W)
Richard Murrary
Tuesday 11:30 – 1 :00
Thursday 11:30 – 1 :00
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15
Purpose:
This course covers fundamental statistical concepts and their application to statistical modelling in
psychology. Topics in statistical foundations include probability, random variables, common
statistical distributions, and Bayes’ theorem. To illustrate these concepts we cover classic statistical
models of behaviour and physiology, such as signal detection theory, optimal cue combination,
diffusion models of reaction times, probability summation, and ideal observers. We also discuss
model fitting and testing, e.g., parameter estimation, bootstrapping, goodness of fit, and model
selection. The course uses a statistical programming language such as MATLAB or R for
illustrations and problems.
Co- or pre-requisites:
Basic programming skills, such as obtained in PSYC 6273, Computer programming for
experimental psychology.
Student Background:
The course is suitable for students from all areas. It does not assume any graduate statistics courses
as prerequisites.
Course Format:
Classes are held in a computer laboratory, and each week's class consists of a lecture followed by
programming practice on assigned problems.
Text /Readings:
To be determined.
Evaluation:
Three problem sets (50%), term project (50%)
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Complex Systems Approach to Interpersonal Change
Psychology 6245 3.0 (F)
David Reid
Wednesday 11 30 – 2 :30
ENROLLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
Each student learns how to assess and respond to the inevitably complex issues humans have to deal
with. To do this each student will learn to develop her/his own Complex Systems Approach. A
Complex Systems Approach is a way of thinking and doing psychology so that one can effectively
address the inevitable complexity in human behavior. This approach is highly pragmatic meaning
dealing with things sensibly, realistically, and being intelligently integrative so that the intervention
can be calibrated to better address the complexities of the presenting problem rather than be
restricted to fitting the problem to a prescribed conventional intervention model. The sciences have
advanced in the 21st century so that there is much evidence that systemic factors such as epigenetic
inheritance, brain networks (patterns), metacognitive experiences (intuition), situated cognition
(mentalizing), emotional systems, culture and social determinism all play major roles in influencing
human behavior. Once a student has begun developing her/his complex systems approach s/he has
the scientist-practitioner level of intelligence to create with the client(s) adept ways of creating
change that is highly meaningful and relevant. These include integrating such scientific advances
into the intervention(s). A Complex Systems Approach is a sophisticated skill requiring a deeper
understanding of psychological change processes than those in current psychotherapy.
Goals/Objectives:
Each student will learn skills to use in: (a) Consulting (b) Clinical Interview Skills, (c) Mental
Status Assessment, (d) integrating personality and social psychology into their clinical work,
(d) cultural competence, (f) a variety of skills directed to handling (i) Anger (ii) Suicide risk (iii)
(e) principles of crisis management (iv) prescribing behaviors for psychological change (v) how to
draw a person out from their current mental state (other clinical techniques). Each student
borrows copies of two books to read on their own as these books convey how to apply
Constructivist Therapy and Systems notions.
Course Format and Evaluation:
The course follows a special pedagogy developed in this course since 1995. It is premised on the
saying “education is what you have left after you forgot everything you learned”. Evaluation is
completing an extensive multiday take home exam where the students answer a series of integrated
open-ended questions. Inevitably the students are astounded and excited about how much they have
learned when answering the questions as the answers role out from their “education” (see definition
above). It is like a clinical shift. Each student and the course director read materials for each class
and the director reserves the option to change content to suit the interests of the students. What is
learned is the Complex Systems Thinking and Doing while reading and intensely discussing the
readings/DVD’s/CD’s and U-Tube recordings.
Clinical in-depth Interviewing Skills:
For the final 5 weeks the course director meets weekly with individual members to go over/supervise
their audio recorded interviews (deliberately not a therapy client) where they apply what is taught in
the course to use interpersonal processes to effect intrapersonal changes. Weekly seminars
continue; interviewing supervision are extra hours usually done on the same day as the 3-hour
seminar. These skills are evaluated as well.
Fundamentals of Neuroscience II: Circuit, Systems, and Behaviours
PSYC 6253 3.0 (W)
(xl with KAHS 6156/BIOL 5147)
Joseph DeSouza
Wednesday 11:30-2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course will focus on a systems approach to specialized circuits within the central nervous
system that determine sensory, motor and cognitive functions.
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The course will provide graduate students with an in depth analysis of the circuits within the nervous
system that underlying the structure and function of the developing and mature nervous system. This
is an advanced course that will focus on current research topics in selected areas of neuroscience,
which is the study of the biology of the nervous system and its relationship to behaviour and disease.
The course includes two modules that cover a range of topics within systems neuroscience. It is
designed to complement Fundamentals of Neuroscience I and in total will introduce students to the
breadth of research within the field of neuroscience.
Prerequisite:
PSYC 6256 3.0, BIO 5147 3.0 or KAHS 6156 3.0 [i.e. Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Structures,
Neurons and Synapses.], or by permission of the course directors.
Readings:
Selected readings from peer-reviewed journal articles will be assigned for each class.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on two exams, facilitating a journal article discussion and class
participation.
Final mark will be based on:
Class Exam
Class Exam
Paper presentations
Class discussions and attendance
Text:
35%
35%
25%
5%
Eric R. Kandel, James Schwartz, and Thomas Jessell. “Principles of Neural Science” 4th Edition
(Elsevier)
Fundamentals of Neuroscience I: Structures, Synapses
Psychology 6257 3.0 (F)
(host KAHS xl with KAHS 6155/BIOL 5146)
Dorota Crawford
Lauren Sergio
Wednesdays 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The course will provide graduate students with an in depth analysis of the molecular and cellular
mechanisms underlying the structure and function of the developing and mature nervous system.
This is an advanced course that will focus on current research topics in selected areas of
Neuroscience, which is the study of the biology of the nervous system and its relationship to
behavior and disease. The course includes three modules, (1) molecular and cellular neuroscience,
(2) functional neuroanatomy and (3) muscle and spinal cord neurophysiology, which will introduce
students to the breadth of research in Neuroscience. The molecular and cellular neuroscience module
course covers topics ranging from neuronal structure and function, communication at the synapse,
membrane receptors and intra- and intercellular signaling systems within the sensory, motor,
memory, and speech systems. It will also cover the cellular and molecular processes underlying
neuronal development, including differentiation of nerve cells, migration of neurons, mechanisms of
axonal growth and guidance, target recognition and synapse formation, and the basis of synaptic
specificity. The functional neuroanatomy module will cover the structures and functions of the brain,
including the meninges, cranial nerves, spinal cord, brainstem, subcortical structures, ventricular
system, and cortex. Muscle and spinal cord neurophysiology will cover neuromuscular and motor
unit function in health and disease, spinal cord function, and reflex modulation during movement.
Pre/Co- requisites:
Undergraduate course in neuroscience or equivalent or by permission of course director. First
Priority given to Neuroscience Diploma students, other students can enroll with permission of course
directors.
Course Format:
The course will consist of lectures conducted by the instructor. Students will be evaluated based on
three exams.
Evaluation:
Final mark will be based on:
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Class Exams
Final Exams
Text:
Eric R. Kandel, James Schwartz, and Thomas Jessell. “Principles of Neural Science”4th Edition
(Elsevier)
Further reading will be assigned by individual instructors.
Visuospatial Memory and Goal-Directed Action
Psychology 6260 3.0 (W)
(integrated with 4360 3.0/, xl BIOL 5149, KAHS 6149/CSE)
Doug Crawford
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The course examines how the brain supports spatial perception and memory, updates memory as we
move through space, and uses these spatial representtaions to guide goal-direct actions of the eyes
and hands. This will include discussion of both the behavior and brain mechanisms, from early
sensory cortex through ‘association’ cortex, to motor areas of the brain. Classes will consider
theories based on behavioral experiments in healthy and brain-damaged people, neurophysiological,
and brain imaging experiments. Students will be taught to evaulate, present, and synthesize this
literature, and apply their knowledge to real-life situations.
Co- or Pre-requisites:
Students must have at least one introductory neuroscience or animal physiology course such as
PSYC 2240 Biological Bases of Behaviour, BIOL 3060, Animal Physiology, KINE 3650
Functional Neuroanatomy, or equivalent.
Reccomended Pre/Corequisites: one or more of PSY 250 (Neural Basis of Behaviour), PSYC 3260
(Cognition), PSYC 3270 (Sensation and Perception II), BIOL 4370 (Neurobiology), KINE 4500
(Neural Control of Movement), KINE 4505
(Neurophysiology of Movement in Health and
Disease) or equivalent.
The combination of KAHS 6155 Fundamentals of Neuroscience with PSYC 6253 Fundamentals of
Neuroscience II is also satisfactory as a pre/co-requisite.
Student Background:
This course is primarily intended for students who have a special interest in this topic. It is
recommended that students have a background in neuroscience, vision, spatial cognition, and/or
motor control. Students doing thesis research (or equivalent) in these areas are especially encouraged
to take the course.
Course Format:
Classes normally consist of a short lecture followed by seminar / journal club presentations by
students, and general discussion. Students will receive constructive feedback about their
presentations and advice about writing their final essay. In the final essay, students will choose a
simple real-world situation and speculate on the neural events and behavior of the human(s)
involved in terms of what they have learned in the course.
Student Requirements: To attend and participate in classes, present at least two journal articles, and write the final essay.
Readings:
Assigned weekly from journals such as
Annual Review of Neuroscience
Trends in Cognitive Science
Trends in Neuroscience
Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Nature Neuroscience Reviews
Science
Nature
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Nature Neuroscience
Neuron
Journal of Neuroscience
Journal of Neurophsyiology
Cerebral Cortex
Journal of Vision
Vision Research
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Frontiers in Neuroscience
Evaluation:
(Graduate Student evaluation)
20% for presentating articles and participation in the class discussion about the selected articles.
20% for formal seminar presentations topical to the lecture at two different times.
60% for final essay, due the last day of the term.
In the final essay (5000-6000 words), graduate students will be required to properly cite at least 30
journal articles. At least 20 of these must be original research papers (not reviews), including at least
10 papers that were not covered in the class. Graduate students will require approval of their essay
topic, but will not have to submit a formal proposal. The content of the essay will be evaluated on
creative ability to apply knowledge from the course to a simple real-world behavior chosen by the
student.
Other:
Offerred each year, integrated with Psych 4360, cross listed with BIOL 5149, KAHS 6149/CSE
Perception and Action
Psychology 6265 3.0 (W)
(xl KAHS 6161/BIOL 5136)
Laurence Harris
Wednesday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course looks at sensory and motor processes related to the representation of and interaction with
the spatial layout of the world. How is sensory information coded for perception and to guide action?
Is it the case that sensory information is processed differently depending what it is going to be used
for? No prior biological or mathematical knowledge is assumed.
Course Format:
The course will take the form of a weekly interactive seminar meeting. In the second half of the
course students will give presentations. Some written assignments (max 2) may be set during the
course and a long essay (on the topic of each student’s presentation) will be required.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be by up to three items of course work submitted throughout the
course and a long essay and an accompanying presentation at the end of the course and on
participation in class. There will be no timed exam.
Course work:
Long essay and accompanying presentation:
Participation in class:
Readings:
30%
55%
15%
Will be from original sources and review chapters & articles. A more detailed reading list will be
constructed from relevant new literature from Journals available in the York Library system. The list
will include (York call numbers included):



Harris LR (1994) Visual motion caused by movements of the eye, head and body. in Visual
Detection of Motion. Smith AT, Snowden R (Eds). Academic Press, London pp 397-436 (BF 245
V57 1994)
“The Visual Brain in Action” (2006) by David Milner and Melvyn Goodale (OUP) (QP 383.15
M55 2006)
“Sight unseen: an exploration of conscious and unconscious vision” (2004) by Melvyn Goodale and
David Milner OUP (BF 241 G65 2004)
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


“Spatial cognition, spatial perception: mapping the self and space” (2010) Francine Dolins, Robert
Mitchell, CUP (BF 469 S63 2010)
“Embodiment, ego-space and action” (2008) Roberta Klatzky, Brian MacWhinney and Marlene
Behrmann, Psychology Press (BF 697 C278 2006)
Selected chapters from “Principles of Neural Science” (2013) by Eric Kandel, James Schwatrz and
Thomas Jessell (QP 355.2 P76 2013)
Computer Programming for Experimental Psychology
Psychology 6273 3.0 (F)
Richard Murray
Tuesday 11:30-1:00
Thursday 11:30-1:00
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This graduate course covers computer programming methods that are useful in experimental
psychology. Topics include the MATLAB programming language, data files, curve fitting, Monte
Carlo simulations, statistical tests, journal-quality data plots, 2D and 3D graphics (OpenGL), and
interfacing to external devices.
Prerequisite:
The course assumes no previous programming experience, and brings students to the point where
they are able to write useful programs to advance their own research.
Course Format:
Classes are held in a computer laboratory, and each week's class consists of a lecture followed by
programming practice on assigned problems.
Evaluation:
Three problem sets (50%), term project (50%)
Guidelines on Plagiarism: An important part of learning how to program is discussing problems with other people, and
reading other peoples’ code. Sometimes this blurs the lines on what constitutes plagiarism. Here are
some guidelines. You can discuss assigned problems with others as much as you want, and read each
others’ code, but in the end you must do your own work. If you cut and paste someone else’s code,
you are plagiarizing. If you find yourself looking at someone else’s code while writing your own,
you are probably plagiarizing. If you memorize someone else’s code and type it in without
understanding how it works, you are plagiarizing. You should think of computer programming as
problem solving, and it is important that you provide your own solutions to assigned problems. That
said, discussions are an important part of solving difficult problems, and it is inevitable and
acceptable that different peoples’ solutions will end up being similar in some ways.
Course Website:
www.yorku.ca/rfm/psyc6273
Brain and Behaviour: Cognitive Systems
Psychology 6278 3.0 (W)
(host KAHS - xl with KAHS 6153/BIOL 5141)
Mazyar Fallah
Monday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course provides an in depth examination of the cognitive systems that guide our awareness,
behaviour and mental capacity. This is done through classic and recent research papers. The two
areas of major emphasis are attentional systems and the study of consciousness. Topics in attentional
systems include psychophysical studies, neurological disorders, and neurophysiological studies, for
spatial attention, feature-based attention, and object-based attention. Topics in the study of
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consciousness include what is conscious awareness, blindsight, false memories/reality monitoring,
and possible neural mechanisms.
Student Background:
Background in cognition or neuroscience.
Course Format:
Student presentations on primary research articles, group discussion, instructor lectures.
Requirements:
To present research, attend class, participate in discussions
Readings:
Primary research articles
Basis of Evaluation:
In-class quizzes, oral presentation, participation, term paper
Other:
This course is offered every other year.
Human Neuropsychology: History and Syndromes
Psychology 6320 3.0 (W)
Jill Rich
Tuesday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course will provide a foundation in the basic topics and theoretical underpinnings of
neuropsychology. There will be an emphasis on the history and development of the formal study of
brain-behaviour relationships, following the clinical-pathological approach (i.e., the study of
cerebral function via examination of behavioural changes resulting from brain damage). Major
topics will include historical foundations, phrenology, and the localizationist approach; aphasia;
agnosia; apraxia; alexia; agraphia; amnesia; dementia; and executive functions. The material
covered in class readings and discussions is considered essential for students interested in clinical
neuropsychology (i.e., assessment and interpretation).
Methodological issues relevant to
experimental (research) neuropsychology will also be discussed.
Student Background:
Graduate students at any level from Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences, Adult Clinical,
Clinical Developmental, Developmental and Cognitive Processes, or History and Theory. A
background in physiological psychology and neuroanatomy would be helpful, but is not required.
Course Format:
Required and optional readings will be assigned each week. (warning: heavy reading load) The
course director will give presentations based on the required readings (approx 2 ½ hours), and
students will present the optional readings in the remaining time.
Evaluation:
Two midterms (30% each)
Final exam (40%)
Texts and Readings:
Several chapters will be assigned from Heilman, K. M., & Valenstein, E. (Eds.). (2012). Clinical
Neuropsychology (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press, which some students may wish to
purchase. However, the readings for each week will be available electronically via a closed list for
the class.
Contemporary Issues in Social and Personality Psychology
Psychology 6400 3.0 (F)
Raymond Mar
Friday 11:30-2 :30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course has been designed to introduce students to current research being conducted in the field
of social and personality psychology. Students will participate in a series of seminars led by our
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core faculty members who specialize in a diverse array of areas within social and personality
psychology including health, culture, intergroup relations and prejudice, decision making,
forgiveness, empathy and social understanding, zeal, and perfectionism. By the end of this course it
is anticipated that students will have an increased familiarity with the research and methodologies
used in the social/personality area as well as current findings in our field. In addition, throughout
this course students will be exposed to professional issues including (a) strategies to increase the
likelihood of success in graduate school, (b) research ethics, and (c) how and where to publish.
Evaluation:
Grades will be based on a series of short papers and class participation.
Text /Readings:
Students should anticipate being assigned two to four empirical journal articles each week. The
exact content will be set by the faculty member leading the discussion for the week.
Social Psychology
Psychology 6410 3.0 (W)
TBA
Wednesday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
To provide research-oriented graduate students a historical overview of the theory and methods in
mainstream social psychology, and how these theories are currently being applied.
Student Background:
An undergraduate course in social psychology.
Text:
TBA
Course Format:
TBA
Evaluation:
TBA
Foundations of Clinical Psychology
Psychology 6420 6.0 (Y)
Jennifer Mills (F)
Joel Goldberg (W)
Tuesday 2:30 - 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course is an introduction to the knowledge base underlying the science and practice of clinical
psychology. It comprises an integrative and critical review of theory and research on social,
psychological and biological aspects of psychopathology and behaviour disorders.
Student Background:
Psych 6420 6.0 is designed and intended for students in the Doctoral Program in Clinical
Psychology at York University. Depending on enrolment other students may enrol in the course with
permission of the course instructors up to a class size maximum of 15.
Course Format:
The course will be in seminar format, comprising lectures and debates, less formal presentations and
case studies. Instructors and students will participate actively in teaching the course. Dr. Joel
Goldberg will direct the Fall term classes and Dr. Myriam Mongrain will assume direction in
January.
Evaluation:
Over the year students will write scholarly papers on a topic chosen in consultation with the
instructors, present orally to the class, and contribute to class discussion. Specific requirements and
weightings related to final grades will be provided by instructors at the beginning of the course.
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Text:
American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,
Fifth Edition (DSM-V). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association. Note: A reading list
will also be provided at the beginning of each term for each section separately.
Assessment in Psychology
Psychology 6430 6.0 (Y)
Norm Park (F)
Jennifer Mills (W)
Tuesday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The course is designed to provide students with the theoretical and practical foundation of
psychological assessment. It will focus on (a) developing clinical interviewing and test
administration skills, (b) understanding concepts in measurement theory and their importance in the
development, evaluation, and use of psychological tests in applied settings, (c) cross-cultural,
ethical, and social issues involved in assessment. There will be a significant practical component to
the course, as students will gain experience in the administration and interpretation of commonly
used assessment instruments. The Fall term will focus on personality assessment and the Winter
term will focus on cognitive assessment.
Course Format:
One three-hour session per week during the Fall and Winter terms. Instructor and student led
seminar presentations on measurement theory concepts and on issues related to specific areas of
assessment (intelligence, personality, aptitudes, interests, etc.). Role play and assessment instrument
administration exercises. Students will also demonstrate, teach, and learn how to administer, score,
and write reports based on scores on selected psychological tests.
Evaluation:
TBA by the instructor at the start of each term.
Required Reading:
TBA by the instructor at the start of each term.
Enrolment:
This course is typically reserved for students in the MA-1 year of the Adult Clinical
program in Psychology. Instructor permission is required for other students wishing to enrol.
Clinical Practicum l
Psychology 6430P 6.0 (Y)
David Reid
Karen Fergus
Friday 8:30-11:30
Note 1: No more than 8 students in a given section of the course. Open only to MA II students.
Note 2: No Clinical Practicum Agreement Form required for this course.
Course Schedule:
Seminar: Friday 8:30 am - 11:30 am
Live clinical practice and observation (3 hour time block per student): Tuesdays 9-12;
Tuesdays 1-4; Thursdays 1-4; OR Thursdays 3-6
Purpose:
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the integration of theory, research and
practice in psychological intervention, focusing mainly on adults. Students will learn about case
formulation and mechanisms of change as these may apply to the clients they are working with.
Pre-requisites:
Psychology 6420 6.0
Psychology 6130 6.0 or 6140 6.0
Psychology 6810A 6.0
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Co-requisites:
Psychology 6430 6.0 and Psychology 6435 6.0
Course Format:
The emphasis will be on practical skill development. This is meant to serve as a beginning
exposure to the application of assessment/intervention skills acquired from other courses
you have/are taking. While there will be a didactic portion to each class, the main thrust
will be on experiential exercises and actual application of principal concepts in
psychotherapeutic intervention. In-class time will consist of role-plays and other
experiential exercises, discussion of key concepts, DVD and videotape examples of
psychotherapy with a view to skill acquisition.
We will stress a 'common factors' approach in this course with a focus on empirically
supported core elements of effective psychotherapy. While technical expertise is one
component of successful practice, this course will place greater emphasis on core and
common elements of effective practice. In terms of content, we will focus on the following
topics: empathy & the therapeutic alliance, diagnostic assessment, case conceptualization,
client factors (including hope & expectancy, motivation, resistance, client as common
factor), self-awareness of the clinician and reflective practice. The practical and legal
aspects of conducting a clinical practice such as the informed consent process,
confidentiality, file maintenance, and record keeping will also be addressed in this course.
Special Topics may be used to supplement these (e.g., management of suicidal ideation,
boundary issues).
The course will also provide students with skill training in case formulation. The case
formulation permits an integration of conceptualizations and approaches to intervention
from various models of psychotherapy. Toward the end of the first term, each student will
begin undertaking therapy with a client, and this course of psychotherapy will generally
coincide with the Fall-Winter term. Live supervision of each student therapist is provided
by the course instructors with additional supervision sessions carried out in both group and
individual formats. It is expected that each student will devote 10 hours per week to the
practicum. In addition to conducting psychotherapy, the time will be spent on reading,
skill training, corresponding with/about clients where necessary, progress notes, analysis of
therapy process notes and audio recorded therapy sessions, individual and group
supervision, and report writing.
Evaluation:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Participation (20%) reflects amount and quality of class participation.
Clinical skill development (45%)
Process notes (5%)
Reading & Journaling (10%) reflecting self development conveyed in weekly typed report of
interpretation and reflection on assigned readings.
5) Case presentations (15%)
6) File Maintenance, Administration, Weekly Progress Notes (5%).
Texts:
Martin, D.G. (2010). Counseling and Therapy Skills (3rd Ed.). Illinois: Waveland Press Inc.
Evidence Based Principles of Psychotherapy
Psychology 6436 3.0 (F)
Alberta Pos
Wednesday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course provides students with a grounding in empirically supported principles of
psychotherapy. It draws from the latest research in the study of psychotherapy that identifies
common core processes of effective therapy, regardless of particular school of therapy or approach.
As such, students are provided with a grounding in common factors of effective care including the
therapeutic alliance and alliance ruptures, empathy, awareness & experiencing, emotion and emotion
regulation, and client & therapist factors known to influence psychotherapy process and outcomes.
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Students will be exposed to the latest research in each of these domains. In addition, students will
also be exposed to the three major models of psychotherapy: psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral
and person-centered/experiential. The course is intended to provide a solid foundation for students
intending to engage in psychotherapy as a part of their future practice as clinical psychologists.
Students will engage with a variety of learning modes in order to facilitate these objectives including
lecture, discussion, and review of videotape. Students will also learn by leading a discussion on a
selected topic, engaging in a self-reflection exercise designed to enhance their awareness and
development as therapists, participating with class discussions, and completing an exercise designed
to hone therapy observational skills.
Text /Readings:
Prochaska, J. & Norcross, J. (2014). Systems of psychotherapy: A transtheoretical
(Eighth edition). Brooks/Cole.
Evaluation:
Participation 20%
Seminar Discussion Leader 20%
Self-Reflection Exercise 20%
Video Analysis 40%
analysis.
Approaches to Psychotherapy: Advanced Study
Psychology 6437 3.0 (W)
Henny Westra
Wednesday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course provides students for whom psychotherapy will be a primary activity of their future
work as clinical psychologists. The course allows for more intensive exploration of classic and
contemporary models of psychotherapy. Students will explore each model in detail and learn the
essential components and theory underlying each approach. By including classic as well as
contemporary models, students will gain exposure to the major approaches commonly used in
practice today. Many of these approaches they are likely to encounter in future external practica and
beyond their tenure in the program. As such, the course allows them to gain some familiarity with
each model. Moreover, the common modalities of therapy (individual, couples, group) will also be
discussed and explored to provide students with a firm grounding in modalities likely to be
encountered in their practice. Consistent with growing trends in the field and the latest scientific
evidence, emphasis will also be placed on integration of various models; seeing the wisdom in each
model and it’s unique and potential contribution. Moreover, in addition to the evidence for each
model, students will also be encouraged to consider goodness of fit of each model with their own
beliefs and developing counselling style. Students will engage with a variety of learning modes to
facilitate these objectives including lecture, discussion, and review of videotape. There will also be a
number of guest speakers specializing in the various approaches under consideration, which will
greatly benefit student learning. Students will also learn by leading a discussion on a selected topic,
participating with class discussions, completing a case formulation paper, and completing personal
reflections on each presented model/modality.
Text /Readings:
TBA
Evaluation:
Participation: 20%
Seminar Discussion Leader 20%
Case Formulation Paper 40%
Reflections on each model 20%
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Psychodiagnostics
Psychology 6440 6.0 (Y)
Ed Glassman
Joel Goldberg
Tuesday 8:30 - 11:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 20 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course covers the psychometric information required to conduct competent psychodiagnosis.
Projective, neuropsychological and other tests will be examined theoretically and practically, with
special emphasis on their integration with DSM-IV categorisation. There will be some instruction in
test administration, as needed. The fall term will concentrate on cognitive assessment, and the
second term will be devoted to personality assessment.
Prerequisites:
Psychology 6420 6.0, Psychology 6430 6.0, and Psychology 6430P 6.0
Student Background:
This is a core course in the Clinical curriculum and is required for first-year Ph.D. students in the
Clinical programme.
Course Format:
The course consists of discussion of DSM IV, various tests, their properties and interpretation.
There will be instruction on report-writing. Emphasis will be on case-based formulations in class
discussion.
Evaluation:
Written assignments which are psychological reports based on data provided by the instructors
%) and seminar participation (20%).
Text & Readings:
A list of readings will be circulated. Students should purchase the following:
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Washington,
DC, American Psychiatric Association, 2000.
(80
Strauss E, Sherman EMS, Spreen O (2006) A compendium of Neuropsychological Tests:
Administration, Norms and Commentary (3rd Edition) Oxford University Press.
Advanced Psychological Intervention
Psychology 6445P 6.0 (Y)
Alberta Pos
Henny Westra
Thursday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 9 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course provides advanced training in psychotherapy intervention. The purpose is to develop
practical skills and knowledge of theory and research on effective therapeutic practices and post
session evaluation strategies. Specific evidence-based methods of active psychotherapeutic
intervention and research evidence on their impact will be covered. Skill training, evaluation and
supervision of practice with selected clients will be emphasised.
Prerequisites:
Psychology 6420 6.0, Psychology 6435 6.0 and Psychology 6430P 6.0.
Evaluation:
First term
Case Formulation; Analysis of a session transcript
Active participation in supervision sessions
Second term
Case Presentation
Active Participation in supervision sessions
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Current Issues in Health Psychology
Psychology 6455 3.0 (W)
(xl with KAHS 6143)
Joel Katz
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
To present an overview of selected topics in health psychology. The course is intended to expose
graduate students to some of the current theoretical and practical issues in the field of health
psychology. The objectives of the course are to review, and explore in depth, specific theories in
health psychology which provide a conceptual framework for understanding health-compromising
and health-enhancing behaviour (e.g., Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of
Planned Behavior, Reactance Theory, Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior Change).
Emphasis will be on addressing these behaviours from a biopsychosocial perspective. To present,
evaluate, and discuss current evidence and theory in health psychology related to preventive and
therapeutic interventions for a variety of chronic diseases and conditions as well as addictive
behaviours in which health-compromising and health-enhancing behaviours play a role. The main
focus will be on the individual, but will also include material on couples, families, and communities.
Specific topics to be covered include mechanisms and management of chronic pain; transition of
acute pain to chronic pain; fear of pain, anxiety sensitivity, and pain disability; social support in
relation to health and illness; stress, immune function, and health; biobehavioural factors and
coronary artery disease; and biopsychosocial factors in the development, maintenance and
prevention of eating disorders.
Evaluation:
Grades will be determined on the basis of two assignments plus attendance and participation. The
first assignment involves leading a seminar on a topic chosen from a pre-selected list. The student
will be responsible for (i) presenting an overview of the topic of choice including a review of
theoretical developments and recent empirical literature and (ii) leading the class in a discussion.
The presentation should be prepared using PowerPoint. Students responsible for the seminar may
choose their own readings in consultation with the instructor. Students are strongly encouraged to (i)
select a topic and a date to lead the seminar as soon as possible, (ii) meet with the instructor at least
one week before the presentation date and (iii) prepare a handout describing the aims and objectives
of their session, summarizing briefly the content of the presentation and listing discussion points.
The presentation/discussion and handout will comprise 30% of the total grade. The second
assignment is a term paper on a topic of the students’ choice related to material covered in the
course. The paper is to be on a topic unrelated to the student’s presentation and is due on the last day
of classes for the winter term. The paper should be 15 typed, double-spaced pages excluding
references and should follow the guidelines for formatting and referencing outlined in the
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5 th edition). Students are
encouraged to meet with the instructor to discuss the topic of their paper and to submit an outline of
the paper for feedback. The outline and term paper will comprise 60% of the total grade. The final
10% of the grade will be determined by attendance and class participation.
Readings:
To be assigned.
Qualitative Research Methods
Psychology 6474 3.0 (W)
Karen Fergus
Thursday 8:30 - 11:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course will provide an introduction to the use of qualitative methods in Psychology. A range of
approaches to conducting qualitative research will be covered. In addition to practical applications
and procedures (e.g., interview techniques, management and analysis of qualitative data), the
philosophical underpinnings of qualitative approaches to research will be examined.
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Student Background:
Enrollment in a graduate program.
Course Format:
Seminar
Readings:
Course Kit
Evaluation:
Presentation of a qualitative research proposal (40%)
Write-up of the presentation in APA style (50%)
Class participation (10%)
Interprofessional Psychosocial Oncology: Introduction to Theory and Practice
Karen Fergus – Professor of Record
Psychology 6477 3.0 (W) ONLINE Course
For more information go to: http://www.ipode.ca/
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 3 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This online course provides graduate students from varying disciplines (e.g., psychology, nursing,
social work) with an introduction to the field of psychosocial oncology. Case-based learning in small
interprofessional groups allows students a rich understanding of the cancer experience and
development of competency in psychosocial oncology practice and interprofessional collaboration.
Student Background:
Enrollment in a graduate program (Masters or Doctoral level)
Course Format:
Students meet weekly as a group online in small, interprofessional groups facilitated by one of the
IPODE faculty; asynchronous discussion board participation
Text /Readings:
Course Kit
Evaluation:
Reflection papers, term paper, group project, participation
Brief Psychotherapy and Short-Term Treatment:
Cognitive Behavioural Treatment with Adults and Children
Psychology 6480 3.0 (F)
Yvonne Bohr
Thursday 2:30-5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
Cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) is one of clinical psychology's most effective tools, and, as
such, one of the most validated and accepted alternatives to medical intervention. The effectiveness
of CBT is particularly pertinent at a time when there is growing scepticism about the use of
antidepressants and anxiolytics in the treatment of children. This course will offer an overview of
assessment and intervention with adults, families and children. It will provide students with basic
skills in formulation and treatment planning within a CBT model. Special issues pertaining to the
use of CBT with children will be highlighted, as will its applicability to diverse cultural groups. This
is a case-based, clinical skills oriented seminar course: theory and practice will be equally
emphasized.
Course Format:
There will be twelve in-class sessions, each consisting of a combination of lecture, demonstration &
practice activities, case study and discussion. In addition, students will participate (as co-therapists
and/or observers) in assessment and treatment activities in the York University Psychology Clinic
(YUPC) if appropriate ; they will be expected to design a comprehensive assessment and treatment
plan for a client in the YUPC, or alternative practicum, internship or volunteer setting. Moreover,
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students will be asked to contribute to the seminar through: a presentation and written critical review
on a specific aspect of CBT; discussion; personal reflection. Students should be available to spend 1
to 2 hours per week (if possible immediately following the class) in Clinic related activities in
addition to time spent in class.
Pre-requisites:
Students should have taken a course in Abnormal Psychology and/or Atypical Development, and at
least one graduate level Intervention course.
Evaluation:
Participation in class and in YUPC Clinic cases
Case studies and analyses; CBT treatment plan
Critical Paper & presentation
Personal reflection
Text and Readings:
Readings will be provided (placed on reserve) by the instructor
Ethical Issues in Professional Practice
Psychology 6490B 3.0 (F)
Rick Morris
Thursday 2:30 - 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 20 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course is an introduction to legal, ethical, and professional issues in the practice of psychology.
The course is intended to familiarize students with ethical guidelines and standards for practice in a
variety of settings, legislation impacting on psychological practice, and the relationship between
ethical and legal issues. In addition to knowledge building, an important purpose of the course is to
facilitate the development of skills that will allow students to anticipate and prevent ethical
dilemmas, and to legally and ethically resolve difficulties that may arise in the course of professional
work.
Student Background:
The course is primarily intended (and is a requirement) for doctoral students in Clinical and
Clinical/Developmental Psychology. Other students may enrol by permission of the instructor.
Course Format:
The format will be lectures and seminar discussion with an emphasis on group-work and active
participation.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on regular, active, and constructive seminar participation,
presentation/facilitation of a discussion topic, and a paper on a selected subject.
Readings:
Readings will be assigned.
Social and Emotional Bases of Development
Psychology 6610 3.0 (F)
Maxine Wintre
Thursday 2:30 - 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 14 STUDENTS (CD STUDENTS HAVE PRIORITY)
Purpose:
The course is designed to serve as an introduction to current issues in social and emotional
development. The seminars will begin with a discussion of: (a) the historical and philosophical roots
of developmental psychology, (b) the methodologies and theories in developmental psychology that
have grown from these roots, and (c) alternative ways of viewing developmental data. The material
discussed in the beginning sessions will serve as a foundation for reviewing students' current
research interests.
Student Background:
Graduate students in first or second year with a good background in general psychology, knowledge
of basic research methodology, and some knowledge of developmental psychology.
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Course Format:
The beginning seminars will be led by the course director. The remaining seminars will be led by
students and will be on topics related to the course material described above.
Requirements:
1. To participate actively in class discussions. Students are expected to come prepared, having read
the appropriate material.
2. To present a class seminar on their research interest within the parameters of the course readings
and discussion and lead class discussions.
3. To write a paper for the end of the course on the topic they presented in point 2.
Evaluation:
Class participation --- 20%
Class presentation --- 30%
Critical and integrative paper (see above) --- 50%
Texts and Readings:
To be assigned.
Research Methodology in Developmental Psychology
Psychology 6650A 3.0 (F)
Melody Wiseheart
Wednesday 2:30-5 :30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course examines techniques for investigating developmental change. It includes research
strategies relevant to cognitive, neural, social, and clinical research.
Course Format:
Student presentation; class discussion
Text /Readings:
TBA
Evaluation:
Papers, presentations, discussions
Brain Rhythms
Psychology 6805 3.0 (W)
(integrated with 4380 3.0)
Kari Hoffman
Tuesday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
Explores the temporal dynamics of brain activity, focusing on neural oscillations. Emphasis is placed
on the behavioural consequences of oscillatory activity, including rhythmic movement,
stimulus discrimination, attention, and memory. Although not the primary emphasis, some
mechanistic descriptions are also included. This course provides a more thorough treatment of some
of the basic concepts of neural circuits introduced in PSYC 6253: FUNDAMENTALS OF
NEUROSCIENCE, including activity from simple circuits, hippocampus and neocortex.
Implications for conditions such as sleep disorders, epilepsy, and attentional disorders are discussed.
Student Background:
Students should have completed or be enrolled in PSYC 6256, Fundamentals of Neuroscience I.
Exceptions with permission of instructor.
Readings:
Rhythms of the Brain Gyorgy Buzsaki
Additional required reading materials will be provided to the student.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on three exams, participation and a presentation of a topic from the
primary literature. Exams will be essay responses, testing the understanding and synthesis of
materials covered in class.
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Final marks will be based on:
Test (Series 1)
20%
Test (Series 2)
20%
Test (Series 3)
20%
Presentation
30%
Participation
10%
Issues in CD Psychology: A Proseminar in Ethics, Practice and Research
Psychology 6900 3.0 (F)
Mary Desrocher
Tuesday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 8 STUDENTS
Course Description:
In this course, we will introduce students to CD theory, ethical and professional issues
related to clinical child practice, monitor the progress of their thesis projects, and introduce them to
the YUPC. Normative patterns of biological, social, cognitive and emotional development will be
reviewed to provide a developmental context for understanding deviations in child development.
Throughout, the implications of gender, ethno-cultural and individual diversity will be considered.
This course is designed with a seminar/discussion format to provide an overview of the main
theories that guide our scientist-practitioner model, and a focus on ethical and professional issues to
prepare for practicum placements.
Objectives:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Recommended Text:
Acquire knowledge of contemporary theories of child psychopathology
Acquire knowledge of the system of diagnosis for major childhood disorders.
Acquire knowledge of ethical and professional issues in clinical-developmental psychology
Acquire an appreciation of ethnicity, gender and individual diversity in assessment and treatment of
childhood disorders.
Learn about the York University Psychology Clinic (YUPC)
Rey, J. M. (Ed.). (2012). IACAPAP e-Textbook of Child and Adolescent Mental
Health. Geneva: International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied
Professions. http://iacapap.org/iacapap-textbook-of-child-and-adolescent-mental-health
Canadian Psychological Association Code of Ethics for Psychologists (2000).
http://www.cpa.ca/publications.
Course Requirements:
Assignment
Role Plays – each person will take the role of an
interviewer and interviewee. I will only be
grading your role as interviewer.
Written Assignment
Participation
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Proportion of
Grade
30%
60%
10%
Biological and Cognitive Bases of Development
Psychology 6905 3.0 (W)
Mary Desrocher
Thursday 2:30 - 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The goal of this course is to increase understanding of normal and abnormal cognitive and
behavioural development in early and middle childhood and adolescence and relate it to the
development of the nervous system. We will also examine conceptual and clinical issues related to
human development, such as critical periods and neural plasticity, and describe how functional
disabilities can be associated with the changes to the developing nervous system. This course will
stress the constant interaction of the developing individual with the environment. Topics will be
explored by examining the neuropsychological and cognitive science literature.
Course Format:
The course will take the form of a weekly interactive seminar and will include lectures, media
presentations, and class discussion. In the second half of the course, students will give presentations.
Evaluation:
Will be based on:
 Short position papers to gauge understanding of critical concepts (30%)
 A grant assignment, with a presentation (20%) and paper (40%) – this assignment will assess
your ability to assess cognitive and biological variables in a population of interest
 Participation in class discussions and attendance (10%)
Required Text:
TBD (in addition to supplemental readings assigned for each class)
Psychoeducational Assessment of Children and Adolescents
Psychology 6910 3.0 (W)
Rebecca Pillai Riddell
Tuesday 9:30 – 12:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 8 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice of the psychological assessment of
children. The focus will largely be on the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to the
assessment of cognitive and academic skills. However, we will also address the importance of
behavioural, emotional, and environmental factors in comprehensive evaluations. Particular attention
will be paid to the need to study the child in its ecological context, and of providing culturally
sensitive assessments.
Students will learn to administer several of the most commonly used tests of cognitive and academic
development, to score and interpret results, and to provide oral and written feedback. They will gain
an understanding of the challenges of test task demands, and of the meaningful observation of test
behaviour. There will be ongoing discussion on the ethical responsibilities of assessors. This should
support students in developing their ability to critically assess both possibility and limitation in child
assessment.
Course Format:
This course will be offered every year. There will be twelve three-hour periods of lecture,
demonstration and laboratory practice. In addition students should be prepared to spend 10-15 hours
weekly on the administration, analysis and write-up of assessment measures.
Pre-requisites:
Psychology 6610 3.0 and Psychology 6905 3.0 or permission of the Clinical-Developmental Area.
Basis of Evaluation:
The final mark in this course will be based mainly on three assessments (which will include
administration, scoring and a write up component). Students will also be required to perform a
review on relevant ethical standards, write an ethics quiz, and lead a classroom discussion on a test.
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Required: Sattler, J.M. (2008). Assessment of Children: Cognitive Applications (5th ed.). Order
from www.sattlerpublisher.com (allow 6 weeks for delivery) or www.amazon.ca.
Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists (www.cpa.ca).
Additional readings will be assigned in class: reading list can be obtained from the instructor.
Text & Readings:
Introduction to the Psychological Assessment of Children Practicum
Psychology 6910P 6.0 (Y)
James Bebko
Monday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 8 STUDENTS IN THE CD AREA
Purpose:
The purpose of this course is to accompany and form part of the 330 hour Assessment Practicum.
Placement in an applied setting is to be arranged by the student and approved by the C-D program
the previous spring. The course portion of the practicum provides in-house supervision as well as
liaison with the practicum sites. Class meetings will be held throughout the year (but not every
week) and will include discussion of issues arising from the practicum experience as well as relevant
ethics and jurisprudence material pertinent to practice with children, adolescents, and families, based
on course readings. CD Faculty or guest lecturers will present cases to help develop students’ skills
at formulation based on assessment results. Students will be expected to present a case and hand in a
written psychological assessment report (with identifying information removed) from their
practicum placement.
Pre-requisites:
Psychology 6910 3.0 and Psychology 6920 3.0
Evaluation:
The course is listed as a Pass/Fail evaluation. This evaluation will be derived from reports from
Practicum Supervisors and from course participation.
Clinical and Diagnostic Assessment of Children and Adolescents
Psychology 6920 3.0 (F)
Christine Till
Wednesday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 8 STUDENTS
Objectives:
This course functions as a compliment to PSY 6910 in providing the foundational skills and knowledge for
the clinical assessment of children and adolescents. The course will focus on case formulation and, more
specifically, will apply diagnostic knowledge of the DSM-5 as well as an appreciation of how biological,
environmental, developmental, and sociocultural influences affect psychological and behavioural
functioning in children. Students will put into practice their “clinical judgment” skills with respect to
clinical decision making, communicating assessment results, and developing treatment recommendations.
Diversity issues as they pertain to assessment will be a theme throughout the course.
Prerequisite:
Successful completion of PSYC 6910.
Text and Readings:
Readings will consist of articles and book chapters. It is recommended that students acquire the
following reference text:
Sattler, J.M. (2014). Foundations of behavioural, social and clinical assessment of children (6 th ed.).
San Diego, CA: Jerome Sattler Publishing Inc. www.sattlerpublishing.com
Course Format:
This course will consist of didactic lecture, in-class demonstrations, role playing, discussion of case
presentations and readings, and student oral presentations. As part of the course, students will participate
in a clinical assessment of a child/adolescent in the York University Psychology Clinic. The instructor will
strive to create an environment for students to feel comfortable supporting, critiquing, and challenging each
others’ opinions to the highest standards of rigour. Students are expected to come to class prepared to
discuss the week’s topic.
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Evaluation:
1. Two assessment reports (40%)
i.
Report 1 (formulation for YUPC case) – 15%
ii.
Report 2 (based on simulated interviews and history and data supplied by the instructor) – 25%
2. Self-reflection (15%)
3. Recommendations assignment (10%)
4. Seminar / Fact finding case (25%)
5. Participation (10%)
Supervision and Consultation in Behavioural Intervention with Children
Psychology 6925 3.0 (W)
Adrienne Perry
Thursday 8:30– 11:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The purpose of this course is to help prepare senior doctoral students in the Clinical-Developmental
or Clinical Areas to adopt roles they are likely to be expected to fulfill as practicing clinicians in
applied settings. The course will focus on the theory and practice of supervision and consultation
primarily, within the context of a competencies-based approach. Other topics will include leadership
and training roles, working within complex systems and in multidisciplinary teams, and integrating
one’s own experience with clinical skills and theoretical knowledge.
Co- or Pre-requisite:
Students need to have completed an intervention practicum and, preferably, have considerable
clinical experience before taking this course. Participants will need to be working in a clinical
setting in some capacity under supervision concurrently with the course and be able to conduct the
mini-practicum assignments there.
Evaluation:
The grade of this course will be determined as follows. Note that there is considerable weight given
to the students’ own self-assessment (as is appropriate for those who will soon be practicing
psychologists), including the ability to articulate a personal integration of their own learning and an
expectation of discussing this with peers in class (in addition to more traditional academic forms of
evaluation).
Presentation re specific model/application of supervision/consultation
Multi-source Evaluations of 2 Practice Components
Class Participation
Readings:
30%
60%
10%
To be assigned.
Intervention Strategies with Children
Psychology 6930 3.0 (F)
Jonathan Weiss
Monday 8:30 – 11:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
Pre-requisite:
In this course the student will first become familiar with basic clinical principles of child and
family intervention. This course is an overview of evidence-based methods in the treatment of
children and families for a variety of disorders and presenting problems. A number of empiricallyvalidated approaches will be discussed. Non-specific or non-model factors in intervention will also
be addressed. Classes will consist of theory, case-based and video-based learning, as well as
discussion.
Psychology 6610 3.0, Psychology 6905 3.0 and Psychology 6910 3.0 or permission of
the Clinical-Developmental Area and the professor.
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Course Format:
The course will be run as a seminar.
Requirements:
Student evaluation will based on: 1) A case study paper (35%), 2) preparation of a summary and
workshop on an evidence-based approach (35%), 3) class participation (30%).
Text and Readings:
Readings will consist of book chapters that will be made available to students at the beginning of the
course. Articles should be retrieved by the student. We have many readings from the following texts,
and students are recommended to purchase the books as reference texts. The readings in the boxes
that follow are the required readings. The two main texts are available as e-books or paperback too:
Gurman, A. S. & Messer, S. B. (Eds) (2011). Essential Psychotherapies, 3nd Edition:
Theory and Practice. New York: The Guilford Press.
John Weisz & Alan Kazind (Eds.) (2010). Evidence-Based Psychotherapies for Children and
Adolescents, Second Edition. New York: Guilford Press.
Axline, V.M. (1969). Play Therapy. New York: Ballantine Books.
Intervention Strategies with Children Practicum
Psychology 6930P 6.0 (Y)
Robert Muller
Friday 10:30-2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 6 STUDENTS
NOTE: STUDENTS NEED PERMISSION FROM COURSE INSTRUCTOR IN ORDER TO ENROL
Purpose:
The class-based portion of the practicum will fill several needs. It will be run in the form of group
supervision. Students will be expected to bring process notes of treatment sessions, or audiotaped
sessions, along with case histories. The group will discuss cases together. The practicum will also
serve as a forum in which to discuss general issues, which transcend particular practicum settings, as
well as issues that arise out of students’ specific experiences. It will also provide a mechanism
through which the programme can receive feedback about student experiences in their respective
settings, and as a way to maintain an active liaison between the settings and the university.
Pre-requisite:
Psychology 6610 3.0 and Psychology 6905 3.0
Co-requisite:
Psychology 6930 3.0
Class Format:
The class will meet regularly throughout the academic year, although at times these may be partially
replaced by more informal site visits and consultations.
Adolescent Disorders: Clinical-Developmental Assessment &Treatment
Psychology 6940 3.0 (W)
Jennine Rawana
Monday 8:30 – 11:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS
Purpose:
This course is intended to provide advanced knowledge related to clinical developmental psychology
practice relevant to adolescence and the transition to adulthood. In this course, we will examine the
prevalence, etiology, comorbidity, assessment, and treatment of common mental health issues in
adolescence, including internalizing (such as anxiety, depression) and externalizing disorders (such
as ADHD, substance use). Clinical issues unique to this age group will be covered including youth
transitioning out-of-care. A developmental-contextual framework will be emphasized that highlights
risk and vulnerability, diversity, as well as the changing patterns of mental health and issues from
early-adolescence to emerging adulthood. This course will highlight the importance of emphasizing
mental health promotion and prevention, as well as positive psychology frameworks.
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Co- or pre-requisites:
Successful completion of Psychology 6910 and Psychology 6920
Student Background:
Clinical Developmental
Course Format:
Lecture, demonstrations and role-plays, discussion of clinical cases and research studies, and
presentations.
Text /Readings:
A textbook may be used. Primary source readings will be assigned for each class.
Evaluation:
Research Paper (35%). Topic to be chosen in consultation with the course instructor.
Research Presentation (30%). Topic similar to Research Paper.
Clinical Presentation (25%). To include assessment tools (interviews, measures of socio-emotional
functioning, personality) and intervention strategies appropriate for adolescents.
Participation (10%)
Other Information:
This course will be offered every 3-4 academic years.
Psychopathology
Psychology 6955 3.0 A (F)
Maggie Toplak
Friday 11:30 – 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 MA STUDENTS
Purpose:
Developmental psychopathology is broad-based, integrative framework for understanding the emergence of
maladaptation in childhood and pathways of continuity or discontinuity across the lifespan. The study of
developmental psychopathology provides the underlying framework for our taxonomies that are used to
diagnose mental health disorders in children and youth. In this course we will examine taxonomies of mental
health conditions in children and adolescents in conjunction with contemporary theories and key concepts in
the study of developmental psychopathology. The characteristics of the individual in combination with
environmental contexts will be considered. Characteristics of the individual will include
cognitive/neuropsychological and emotional factors. Environmental contexts will include the contributions of
family, peers, and the socio-cultural setting. Throughout, the implications of gender and individual diversity
will be included.
Evaluation:
TBA
Readings:
TBA
Psychopathology
Psychology 6955 3.0 B (F)
Maggie Toplak
Monday 8:30 – 11:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 PHD STUDENTS
Purpose:
Developmental psychopathology is broad-based, integrative framework for understanding the emergence of
maladaptation in childhood and pathways of continuity or discontinuity across the lifespan. The study of
developmental psychopathology provides the underlying framework for our taxonomies that are used to
diagnose mental health disorders in children and youth. In this course we will examine taxonomies of mental
health conditions in children and adolescents in conjunction with contemporary theories and key concepts in
the study of developmental psychopathology. The characteristics of the individual in combination with
environmental contexts will be considered. Characteristics of the individual will include
cognitive/neuropsychological and emotional factors. Environmental contexts will include the contributions of
family, peers, and the socio-cultural setting. Throughout, the implications of gender and individual diversity
will be included.
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Evaluation:
TBA
Readings:
TBA
Cognitive Neurorehabilitation
Psychology 6330 3.0 (S1)
Gary Turner
Tuesday 11:30 - 2:30
Thursday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS
Purpose:
There are three primary course objectives: (i) To increase understanding of basic theoretical
constructs in each cognitive domain, their neural basis and how they are altered in aging, injury and
brain disease. (ii) To improve student understanding of how dynamic brain changes influence the
trajectory of cognitive decline and recovery and how these set the neurocognitive context for
intervention design and treatment planning. (iii) To critically review ‘state of the science’ cognitive
neurorehabilitation research. These reviews will specifically emphasize translational challenges
including intervention delivery in a multi-cultural context, remote delivery options, treatment
adherence, motivation and maintenance of training gains. At the end of the course students should be
able to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation interventions in multiple
cognitive domains and apply this knowledge to critically appraise and/or propose novel interventions
to remediate cognitive decline within their own clinical research areas or populations.
Student Background:
The course is designed for graduate students in the Clinical and Clinical
Developmental areas. Permission to register for students from other areas will be considered at the
discretion of the course instructor. Some background in neuroanatomy (e.g. Clinical Neuroanatomy,
6325) is strongly recommended.
Course Format:
Instructor presentation, student seminars
Student Requirement:
The seminar will be conducted in a combined lecture and student seminar format. The material will
be organized into four modules, each comprised of three class meetings. The first two classes in
each module will be in lecture format, presented by the instructor. The third class will be student-led
with an emphasis on the translation from neuroscience to rehabilitation research. Students will be
divided into small groups and each group will do an in class presentation in one of the four course
modules.
Text /Readings:
TBD
Evaluation:
Exams, papers, presentations
Other information:
Depending upon interest and enrolment, it is expected that this course will be offered every year or
every other year.
Applied Pediatric Neuropsychology
Psychology 6945 3.0 (S1)
Christine Till
Thursday 2:30 – 5:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 6 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The major focus of this course is on developing a conceptual grasp of how neuropsychological
assessments are conducted and how assessment results are evaluated and integrated into case
formulation. Students will also learn to administer common tests used in neuropsychological
assessment. The pathological, neurocognitive and behavioural features of major brain disorders (e.g.
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acquired brain injury, epilepsy, FASD), neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. ADHD, Fragile X), and
brain-based syndromes (e.g. aphasia, apraxia) will be examined in case presentations.
Student Background:
This course is offered to clinical developmental (CD) or clinical graduate students seeking training
in clinical neuropsychology. The course is intended for graduate students who have completed 6910
(or a comparable assessment course) and have an adequate foundation in brain-behavioural
relationships. Priority will be given to students who are currently enrolled in the Clinical
Neuropsychology stream.
Course Format:
The format of this course will be seminar/discussion and case-focused in nature, aimed at developing
assessment formulation skills.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on:
1. Short presentations on neuropsychological assessment measures (10%)
2. Administration and scoring of select measures (15%)
3. Neuropsychological assessment report #1 (35%)
4. Clinical case presentation (30%)
5. Participation and contribution to class discussion (10%)
Required Readings:
A textbook will be used and supplemental readings will be provided by the instructor.
Course Timing:
This course will be offered every 2 academic years.
Diversity in Children Youth and Adults Clinical Practice
Psychology 6965 1.5 (S1)
Jennifer Connolly
Wednesday 11:30 - 2:30
ENROLMENT IS LIMITED TO 10 STUDENTS
Purpose:
The goal of the course is to explore how socio-cultural and individual diversity development and
adjustment across the lifespan and to consider how delivery of clinical services can effectively
respond to these differences. Diversity based on culture, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual
orientation, disability, and economic disadvantage will be considered.
Co- or pre-requisites:
Student in Clinical-Developmental or Clinical Psychology programs
Student Background:
M.A. II or higher
Course Format:
Instructor and student presentations
Student Requirements: Class presentations, participation, socio-cultural brief
Text /Readings:
TBA
Evaluation:
Class presentations 50%
Participation 25%
Written Brief 25%
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Practica Courses
Please Note: Student must obtain a “Practicum Agreement Form” from the Program Office. This form is completed by the
Practicum Supervisor and returned no later than September 30, 2014 in order to enrol in the practicum.
APPLIED PRACTICA:
PSYC 6810 I or 6810A
PSYC 6810 II or 6810B
PSYC 6810 III or 6810C
PSYC 6810 IV or 6810D
PSYC 6430P 6.0
PSYC 6440P 6.0
PSYC 6460P 6.0/3.0
PSYC 6910P 6.0
PSYC 6930P 6.0
Applied Practicum I
Applied Practicum II
Applied Practicum III
Applied Practicum IV
Clinical Practicum I (MA Students)
Clinical Practicum II (PhD Students)
Clinical Practicum III (PhD Students)
Introduction to the Psychological Assessment of Children Practicum (PhD Students)
Intervention Strategies with Children Practicum (PhD Students)
RESEARCH PRACTICA:
Psychology 6820 I or 6820A
Psychology 6820 II or 6820B
Psychology 6820 III or 6820C
Research Practicum I
Research Practicum II
Research Practicum III
INTERNSHIPS:
Psychology 6840 6.0
Psychology 6840A 3.0
Psychology 6840B 3.0
Clinical Internship
Clinical Internship I
Clinical Internship II
THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH
Thesis Research
Dissertation Research
(Includes: Minor paper, Clinical Competency and Dissertation proposal)
Please note this on your advising worksheet
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SESSIONAL DATES
FALL REGISTRATION & ENROLMENT BEGINS
Tuesday, June 2, 2015
CANADA DAY – University Closed
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
CIVIC HOLIDAY – University Closed
Monday, August 3, 2015
FINAL DATE FOR REGISTRATION – Fall Term; Late Fees added afterwards
Tuesday, September 1, 2015
LABOUR DAY - University Closed
Monday, September 7, 2015
RESEARCH & APPLIED PRACTICA BEGIN
Thursday, September 10, 2015
TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP AND UNDERGRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN
Thursday, September 10, 2015
GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - Fall Term
Thursday, September 10, 2015
DEADLINE FOR PRACTICUM AGREEMENTS
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
THANKSGIVING - University Closed
Monday, October 12, 2015
FALL CO-CURRICULAR WEEK/DAYS - No Classes
October 29 – November 1, 2015
**LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW – Fall Half-Course
Monday, October 26, 2015
GRADUATE CLASSES END - Fall Term
Monday, December 7, 2015
FALL EXAM PERIOD
December 9 – 22, 2015
CHRISTMAS BREAK – University Closed
December 24, 2015 - January 2, 2016
GRADUATE CLASSES BEGIN - Winter Term
Monday, January 4, 2016
FINAL DATE FOR REGISTRATION – Winter Term; Late Fees added afterwards
Tuesday, January 5, 2016
**LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW – Winter Half and Full Year Course
Tuesday, January 26, 2016
WINTER READING WEEK - No Classes
February 13, 2016 to February 19, 2016
FAMILY DAY – University Closed
Monday, February 15, 2016
GOOD FRIDAY – University Closed
Friday, March 25, 2016
EASTER SUNDAY – University Closed
Sunday, March 27, 2016
GRADUATE CLASSES END
Monday, April 4, 2015
WINTER EXAM PERIOD
April 6 – 20, 2016
VICTORIA DAY – University Closed
Monday, May 23, 2016
The date on which graduate courses will begin and end is set at the discretion of the course director and may be subject to
change. The dates listed are those on which graduate classes would normally begin and end next year based on practice in
recent years.
- 79 -
USEFUL CONTACT INFORMATION
YORK UNIVERSITY MAIN PHONE NUMBER: 416 736-2100
GRADUATE PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY, Room 297, Behavioural Science Building 416 736-5290
Dr. Adrienne Perry – Director, ext. 66226, psycgpd@ yorku.ca
Lori Santos - Administrative Assistant, ext. 66225, [email protected]
Susanna Talanca – Program Secretary, ext. 33983, [email protected]
Freda Soltau – Secretary, ext. 55290, [email protected]
DEPT. OF PSYCHOLOGY, FACULTY OF HEALTH, Room 296, Behavioural Science Building
Dr. Joel Goldberg - Chair, ext. 55116, [email protected]
Ann Pestano – Administrative Assistant to the Chair, ext. 33758, [email protected]
Sandra Locke – Administrative Secretary, ext. 55116, [email protected]
Terri Cawley - Psychology Information Centre, Room 101, ext. 66178, [email protected]
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, GLENDON COLLEGE, ROOM 162, YORK HALL, GLENDON
Dr. Tim Moore - Chair, ext. 88355, [email protected]
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES, Room 230, York Lanes
http://gradstudies.yorku.ca/
CUPE 3903
2050 Technology Enhanced Learning Building, (416) 736-5144
Transcripts
To order an undergraduate or graduate transcript from York, either by FAX to (416) 736-5444 (download the form from
http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/transcripts) or on-line: http://www.registrar.yorku.ca/transcripts or in person at the Bennett
Centre for Student Services. For more information call the Registrar’s Office at (416) 872-9675.
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