OJT Program of La Consolacion College Tanauan

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OJT PROGRAMS OF LA CONSOLACION COLLEGE TANAUAN:
BASIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF AN OJT MANUAL
ALONA BALAHADIA-CABRERA
Master in Business Administration (Thesis Program)
2012
INTRODUCTION
Education has been regarded as a means toward economic stability and
progress. The increase productivity of the workforce is due mainly to the increase
in the education and training of the people. The success and development of the
country would greatly depend in the productivity of its human resources – which
is considered as one of the vital asset of the nation. And to have a good and
competent manpower resource; quality education and intensive training are
necessary for the students to become skilled and productive workers when they
become part of the labour force.
As per requirement by the CHED, graduating students of different
courses need to undergo on-the-job training with required number of hours.
Perhaps this would be a stepping stone for the practicumers to develop
themselves to become professionals in their own field of specialization and
acquire new learning through gained experiences during trainings. It is an
essential component of the learning process, geared towards preparing students’
for their future career.
From the Higher Education point of view, an internship may be defined as
a short-term educational experience with a company or organization that
provides students with work experience in an area where they are interested in
enhancing a career decision. Internships which can also spell valuable work
experiences and further increase students’ confidence.
Thus, the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) prepared guidelines
for Student Internship Abroad Program (SIAP) for all programs with practicum
subject under CHED Memorandum Order (CMO) no. 24 series of 2009, Student
Internship Program in the Philippines (SIPP) for all programs with practicum
subject under CHED Memorandum Order (CMO) no. 23 series of 2009, CMO
No. 39 series of 2006 for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, CMO
No. 3 Series of 2007 for Bachelor of Science in Accountancy, CMO No. 30 and
31 series of 2007 for BS Tourism and BS Hotel and Restaurant Management,
CMO No. 53 Series of 2006 for Information technology Education, and CMO No.
30 series of 2004 for Undergraduate Teacher Education to develop a
standardization in education.
63
On the other hand, the SIPP program aims to provide tertiary students
enrolled in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in the Philippines the opportunity
to acquire practical knowledge, skills, and desirable attitudes and values in
reputable establishments/industries in our country; enhance the students’ work
competencies and discipline as they relate to people in the workplace; promote
competitiveness of students through their training; strengthen and enrich the
degree programs in HEIs; provide opportunities to learn from and network with
experienced professionals; handle new challenges and complex tasks or
problems; and identify future career directions and become candidates of future
job opening.
CHED prepared implementing guidelines that covers the requirements for
parties involved such as higher education institution (HEI), host training
establishments (HTE) and student trainee/intern; obligations and responsibilities
of parties involved; monitoring and evaluation; duration of the internship training;
fee; offenses; sanctions; and investigation of complaints.
Confucius once said “If all I do is hearing, I will forget. If I hear and see, I
will remember. If I hear, see and do, I will understand”. Part of the college
curriculum is to train and orient students about the work and their future career. It
is very important not only to teach the students about their chosen career but to
show them the reality about working. In OJT, students are able to have hands-on
industry experiences and should be able to have a network of colleagues that
can easily help them in job hunting after graduation. An experience in OJT is
important in applying for a job. Oftentimes, employers will ask the applicant the
relevance of their training to their course and to the position they are applying for.
Some companies are giving food allowances, transportation allowances, shuttle
service and gift certificate. While learning, the students should be able to earn
money.
Moreover, La Consolacion College Tanauan (LCCT) which is duly
accredited by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) offers courses in line
with Education, Business, Accountancy, Hotel and Restaurant Management,
Tourism and Information Technology all offering the practicum subject.
Practicum coordinators encounter minimal problems in handling OJT in
terms of the behavior of students during their adjustment period in the new
environment. However, they encounter difficulty in scheduling the ocular visits in
the host establishment due to different practicum sites.
Also, as one of the practicum coordinators, the researcher experienced
difficulty in handling OJT due to lack of standard guidelines, policies, rules and
regulations of the College. It is within these concepts and reasons that the
researcher would like to propose an OJT Manual for La Consolacion College
Tanauan.
64
Findings
1.3
required
number
of
hours;
The
following
significant
findings were revealed in this study:
The Experiential Learning
Courses
(ELC)
for
Education
students consists of Field Study
course and Practice Teaching with
300 hours while the BSIT curriculum
has internship/OJT/Practicum with
540 hours. On the other hand,
practicum/work integrated learning
has a requirement of a total of 500
hours both for BS TM and BS HRM –
250 hours for the first practicum
during second year and another 250
hours for the practicum during fourth
year. Internship for BSA program is
equivalent to 300 hours while BSBA
practicum or work integrated learning
is equivalent to 600 hours.
1.
Description of the OJT
Program of La Consolacion
College Tanauan in terms of:
1.1
qualifications
of
students;
For BSBA, the student who
will undergo practicum should be one
with fourth year standing while for
BSA, the student must have a third
year standing.
The BSHRM and BSTM
programs have two practica. For the
first practicum, the students must
have taken all the major subjects
from first year up to second semester
of second year. The second
practicum is on the second semester
of fourth year where the students
must have a fourth year standing.
1.4 OJT requirements; and
The students must pass the
qualification for practicum so that
they can enrol the subject. They are
required to attend the pre-orientation
seminar to be conducted by the
Practicum Coordinator where OJT
requirements are discussed.
For BEED, BSED and BSIT,
the students must have fourth year
standing.
1.2 industry linkages;
Documents to be submitted
by the students on the pre-practicum
stage include 1.) application letter, 2.)
certification of grades, 3.) photocopy
of enrolment form, 4.) resume with
picture, 5.) medical certificate issued
by LCCT clinic, and 6.) for irregular
students, class schedule. Two sets of
these documents are placed inside a
long size brown envelope to be
submitted
to
the
Practicum
Coordinator. Once cleared, the
Practicum Coordinator will issue InSchool Interview Notice. After the
La
Consolacion
College
Tanauan has Memorandum of
Agreement with different companies
like Toyota Motor Philippines, Isuzu
Philippines, Toshiba at Sta. Rosa
Laguna, H2O Hotel at Quirino
Grandstand, Bangko Sentral ng
Pilipinas at Malate Manila, Tagaytay
Highlands, Club Balai Isabel, South
Central Elementary School and
Tanauan City High School
65
interview, the students are required to
attend seminar session and secure
certificate of attendance. Then they
will be given a logbook for their daily
activities. Included in the logbook are
the computation of grades, guidelines
in preparing a practicum report, some
tips in basic good grooming, and
copy of evaluation form and interview
guide.
1.5
evaluation
monitoring
Tourism has 10; BSA has 4
respondents; BEED has 2 and there
is no BSED and BSIT respondent.
2.2
type
of
industry
where
the
practicumer
is
deployed;
Thirty-one (31) or 71% of the
respondents were with the service
industry. Eleven or 25% were in
manufacturing while 2 or 4% were in
the education industry.
and
2.3
department/areas of
the assignment; and
The
respondents
were
assigned at Housekeeping, General
Administration Department, Kitchen,
Booking/Reservation, Project Control
Department, Food and Beverage,
High School, Financial Accounting
Department,
Admin/Finance
Department,
Crewing,
Provident
Fund, Cost Accounting, Human
Resource,
Comptrollership,
Marketing
and
Recruitment
Departments.
Every two weeks, practicumers
are required to report to their
Practicum Coordinator to update on
the tasks assigned to them and
problems encountered during OJT.
Moreover, the coordinator will check
the students’ logbooks to monitor
their activities with the host
establishments. Once a month, the
coordinator will conduct ocular visits
with the host establishments to check
the working condition of the
practicumer and to give certificate of
partnership and token of appreciation
to the company. Before completion of
the required number of hours, the
coordinator will hand carry the
evaluation form and ask the
supervisor/immediate
head
to
evaluate the practicumer and put it in
a sealed envelope. After the duration
of practicum, the students are
required to submit a practicum report.
2.4
Clerical works, room attendants,
kitchen staff, accounting staff, Front
Office,
Assistant
Recruitment
Specialists, teachers, marketing staff,
Aircraft Flight Log and Cabin Crew
Data Encoder are the nature of
work/task of the practicumers.
2.
Profile of the respondents
undergoing OJT in terms of:
2.1
nature of work/task
3.
Problems
OJT by the:
encountered
course;
3.1
Both
HRM
and
BSBA
programs have 14 respondents;
practicumers:
3.1.1 training;
66
in
Findings showed that the
practicumers disagreed that the
company does not pay extra service
rendered by the practicumers, does
not provide free snack and meal,
does not provide the school with
feedback on practicumers’ somewhat
negative attitude/behaviour, does not
provide extensive training to meet
their objectives and expectations, is
not seen as a future employer
capable of providing excellent career
opportunities, and does not provide
challenging training tasks. However,
they moderately agreed that the
company does not provide allowance.
3.1.2
work
relationship with the practicumers;
and 12.) The practicumer is not free
to ask questions to any superior
whenever it is necessary.
3.1.3 school support
Based on the findings, the
practicumers disagreed that the
department does not coordinate with
parents on the implementation of
training program policies, does not
provide regular monitoring of OJT
progress in the company, does not
have work structure for monitoring
the student’s progress, does not
provide opportunities for the students
to assess the fitness of the OJT
coordinator to the tasks given to
them, does not have standard
policies that govern placement,
monitoring
and
evaluation
of
students, does not orient the
practicumers to the cooperating firm,
does not conduct assessment of OJT
program upon completion, does not
coordinate with the company in the
design and supervision of the OJT,
the academic preparation (i.e., prerequisite courses) is not adequate to
undertake company assignment and
its challenges, and does not provide
the results of the company and the
department’s assessment of the OJT.
environment;
and
Data revealed that the
practicumers disagreed that the
following
are
problems
they
encountered during their OJT: 1.) The
distance of the company is too far
from school or practicumer’s home;
2.) The company does not offer part
time job to deserving practicumers;
3.)Time conflicts between classes
and on-the-job training schedule; 4.)
Inadequate knowledge regarding the
task assigned to the practicumer; 5.)
There is a risk of accident in the
place; 6.) The facilities and
equipment used in the place of OJT
is not modernized; 7.) The company
gives task/s not related to the course;
8.) The company does not allow the
practicumer to render overtime; 9.)
Superiors are not willing to listen to
whatever
suggestions
or
recommendations are made; 10.) A
superior does not set a positive
example to follow; 11.) The superior
does not have a good working
3.2 Practicum Coordinators
For Education students, three
problems were identified by their
practicum
coordinator. First
is
habitual absenteeism of pre-service
teachers. Second, the pre-service
teacher could not easily adjust with
their cooperating teacher or mentor.
Last, the class schedule given to
67
in terms of:
them is either too early or too late
because the laboratory school where
they are undergoing OJT have
shifting classes for the students.
4.1
competencies;
Findings revealed that the
practicumers
are
excellent
in
complying with company rules, in
coordinating well with other people, in
following directions, in applying
knowledge to new situations and
completes
relevant
tasks,
in
accomplishing given task/s within
designated time/period, and in
managing time and work distribution
effectively. Meanwhile, they are very
satisfactory
in
identifying
and
analyzing a routine problem, in
recommending solutions and in
evaluating
the
solution’s
effectiveness.
For HRM/Tourism students,
the
Practicum
Coordinator
encountered four problems. First in
the list is the misbehaviour of the
students. Second, it is difficult to
monitor the practicumers because the
host establishments is far from the
school and are located in different
areas. The third problem identified
was the work schedule for irregular
students because they need to come
to school from time to time to attend
other subjects. Last identified was
difficulty in explaining to the Assistant
Dean for Academic Management
(ADAM) that placement of OJT is not
that easy for everyone is waiting for
the available slot and not all agencies
are willing to accept practicumers.
On the part of the Practicum
Coordinator of BSA/BSBA students,
there
were
three
problems
encountered. First is completing the
required number of hours because
most of the host establishments did
not allow the practicumers to extend
their stay with them. Second,
irregular students were not able to
have their OJT in-line with their
course because they cannot go to
work every day due to their classes in
school. Last one identified was
difficulty in asking for appointment
from the host establishment due to
inadequate budget for ocular visits to
the company.
4.2
skills;
On
work
skills,
the
practicumers were assessed to be
excellent when they show flexibility
(whenever the need arises) in the
process of going through his/her
tasks, manifest thoroughness and
precise attention to details, handle
the details of the work assigned to
him/her and demonstrate the ability to
operate machine/s needed on the
job. They were very satisfactory in
showing leadership skills.
On
social
skills,
the
practicumers were assessed to be
excellent when they willingly help
others (whenever necessary) in
performance of their tasks, show
appreciation and gratitude for any
form of assistance granted to him/her
by others, show respect and courtesy
in dealing with peers and superiors,
4.
Assessment of the host
establishments
on
the
performance of the practicumers
68
and show tact in dealing with different
people they come in contact with.
4.3
establishments on the practicumers
were all excellent. There can never
be any difference because they were
all assessed as excellent.
attitude; and
6.
Proposed
On-the-Job
Training Manual to enhance the
students’ performance
The
host
establishments
assessed the practicumers to be
excellent in demonstrating dedication
and commitment to the tasks
assigned to him/her, in recognizing
and
respecting
authority,
in
demonstrating
cooperation,
in
showing interest and enthusiasm, in
practicing self-discipline in work, in
using mature judgment, in showing
constructive and positive behaviour,
in observing punctuality, and in
performing tasks without much
supervision.
The Proposed On-the-Job
Training Manual for the Practicumers
and Practicum Coordinators was
designed to maintain and enhance
the OJT performance of the students
of LCCT.
Conclusions
Based on the findings, the
following conclusions were drawn:
4.4
personality
development
1. The OJT Program of La
Consolacion College Tanauan is well
described and meets CHED minimum
standards in terms of qualifications of
students, industry linkages, number
of hours, monitoring and evaluation
and OJT requirements.
Findings revealed that the
host establishments assessed the
practicumers to be excellent in
showing
positive
attitude
and
enthusiasm, for having good personal
habits, in showing emotional maturity,
in
dressing
and
grooming
appropriately, in manifesting traits of
being responsible, dependable and
reliable, in showing high expectations
for themselves and for others and in
showing poise and self-confidence.
2. Majority of the respondents
are BSHRM and BSBA students.
Most of them are with the service
industry and manufacturing industry,
in Housekeeping and General
Administration Department doing
housekeeping and clerical works
respectively.
5.
Significant differences on
the performance of practicumers
when grouped according to their
profile variables
The significant differences on the
performance of practicumers when
grouped according to their profile
variables
were
not
computed
because the assessment of the host
3. The
host
establishments
assessed the performance of the
practicumers
in
terms
of
competencies, skills, attitude and
personality development as excellent.
4. The practicumers did not
encounter any problem in their OJT in
69
terms of training, work environment
and school support. On the other
hand,
Practicum
Coordinators
encountered
minimal
problems
concerning
the
training
of
practicumers.
5. There are no significant
differences on the performance of
practicumers
when
grouped
according to their profile variables
because the practicumers were
assessed as excellent in all variables.
6. An on-the-job training manual
for LCCT is proposed.
Recommendations
From
the
findings
and
conclusions generated in this study,
the researcher humbly recommends
the following:
1.
The OJT Program of the
institution
should
be
regularly
monitored to assure that it maintains
its quality and relevance.
2.
Future practicumers should
be well guided to work at their best
during their on-the-job training.
3.
Regular
monitoring
and
evaluation of the practicumers should
be done religiously by the Practicum
Coordinators to prevent or minimize
problems encountered.
4.
The Proposed On-the-Job
Training Manual for the practicumers
and practicum coordinators should be
used to maintain and enhance the
OJT performance of the students of
LCCT.
70
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73
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CHED Memorandum Order No.53, s. 2006. “Policies and Standards
Information Technology Education (ITE)”
CHED Memorandum Order No.39, s. 2009. “Policies, Standards and
Guidelines for Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA)”
CHED Memorandum Order No.3, s. 2007. “Revised policies and
Standards for Bachelor of Science in Accountancy (BSA), As Amended”
CHED Memorandum Order No.30, s. 2004. “Revised Policies and
Standards for Undergraduate Teacher Education Curriculum”
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Model for Design Education. 2008
74
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