22813

Document technical information

Format pdf
Size 385.0 kB
First found May 10, 2016

Document content analysis

Category Also themed
Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts
no text concepts found

Transcript

EDAD 626 - Public School Law
Course Syllabus
Spring 2013
Instructor
Stewart Mayers, Ed.D., Adjunct Professor, Educational Leadership
Office Location
eCollege
Office Hours
Mondays and Thursdays 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Home Phone
(580) 924-3576 (Please do not call my home on Wednesday evenings – I’m at choir
rehearsal at my church. Thanks!)
Email Address
[email protected]
COURSE INFORMATION
Materials – Textbooks, Readings, Supplementary Readings:
Alexander, K., & Alexander, M. D. (2011). American public school law (8th ed.).
Belmont CA: Wadsworth.
American Psychological Association. (2009). Publishing manual of the American
Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.
Kemerer, F., Walsh, J., & Maniotis, L. (2010). The educator’s guide to Texas school
law (7th ed.). Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press.
Course Description
EdAd 626 serves as an in-depth examination federal and state school law for educational
leaders addressing legal issues that impact the operation of public schools.
Student Learning Outcomes
The learning outcomes for students in EdAd 626 are listed below:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
The student will demonstrate familiarity with terminology in the field of law as it
applies to education.
The student will articulate an understanding of basic legal concepts through
examination and discussion of relevant court cases.
The student will demonstrate critical analysis by differentiating factual and
evidentiary data.
The student will comprehend and utilize basic legal tests applied by the judiciary
in their application to factual situations and cases.
The student will gain an awareness of major legal resources and demonstrate the
ability to use those resources.
The student will gain an in-depth understanding of landmark cases in various
areas of school law.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Attendance and Participation on the Discussion Board (100 points; 20% of grade)
This is a very reading and study-intensive course. Each student is expected to participate
through E-College, complete all reading and written assignments on time, and actively
engage in class by closely connecting class topics and discussions to textbook and other
readings.
Each week’s work will include two modules (running simultaneously) each consisting of
two online discussions to complete. Modules will be available from Sunday at midnight
through the following Saturday. Please DO NOT email discussion responses to me and
DO NOT post discussion responses at any place on eCollege other than the appropriate
discussion boards.
Participate online at least three different days each week by responding to prompts and
responding to the answers of others. Reflections should be approximately 150-200 words
in length and center around course readings and discussions. Participate in endeavors
with the goal of contributing meaningfully and implementing higher order thinking
skills. You cannot receive participations points if you are not contributing to the class
discussion. To earn participation points, you must discuss and apply knowledge of the
readings. Be sure to introduce yourself in the Student Lounge area of the course.
You should read, analyze, and respond to the issues of the week/questions and comments
from me and the other members of the class. In short, you are required to actively
participate in our classroom discussions and online. You must do more than complete
assignments; you must demonstrate your regular reading of others’ responses. In other
words, I am looking for evidence that you are an active participant in the learning
experience. This can be done by relating real world experiences to the discussions or
summaries, building on other’s comments with alternative solutions, and pointing out
problems or adding another dimension to the discussion. Saying, “I agree” does not fall
within the above parameters. Responses should be substantial (i.e. not one sentence).
The discussion forums are related to the chapter readings, external resources, and
activities. Upon completion or near completion of the assigned readings and activities,
you are expected to engage in an ongoing discussion/debate with your learning
community peers. Your contributions to the discussion forums will be graded for quality
and timeliness of your contributions using a Discussion Forum Grading Rubric.
Student Learning Outcome: The student will articulate an understanding of basic legal
concepts through examination and discussion of relevant court cases. The student will
gain an awareness of major legal resources and demonstrate the ability to use those
resources.
Assessment Method: Each forum will be graded using the Discussion Forum Rubric.
Legal Briefs (100 points each; 25% of grade: 10% 1st brief; 15% 2nd brief)
Each student will prepare two carefully articulated and thoroughly researched briefs on
assigned cases pertaining to the course material and assigned reading. Upload your briefs
in written format to eCollege. Failure to post the brief on eCollege by the required time
poses a hardship for your class colleagues and thus will result in an automatic deduction
of one letter grade. Make sure to select “share file with entire class” when uploading.
Class members should access the briefs through eCollege. Do not copy or otherwise
plagiarize the brief. It should be your work in your words.
Each brief should be a one-page, single-spaced paper (clear/easily readable font, 12 point
type, one-inch margins) summarizing the case using the following format with at least
one paragraph within the conclusion discussing the impact of this case and the decision of
the case to administrators. Address each of the questions or statements below. Label each
section (for example, Facts, Issues, Ruling) as labeled below.
Title: Give the name of the case
Court: Identify the court in which it was heard. For TEA Commissioner cases, state TEA
Commissioner.
Citation: List the legal citation for the case.
Fact(s): Restate the legally relevant facts of the case. Discuss in detail what happened to
get this case into the court system.
Issue(s): In one sentence, identify the question to be answered. To pick out the issue,
think about who is arguing and what they are arguing about. An issue statement should
include the sources of the law (for example, the First Amendment, the Texas Revised
Code, IDEA, etc.), the parties involved, and the issue to be decided. For example, “Was
the school district guilty of discrimination?” is not significantly detailed to meet the
criteria of a good issue statement. “Does the equal protection clause of the
14th Amendment prevent publics school districts from maintaining separate schools based
on race?” contains the necessary components of an issue statement.
Holding/Ruling: What did the courts decide? What were the results? What was
the final ruling for the case?
Rationale: Why did the court make that particular decision? What precedent or social
event brought the court to this particular decision? On what did the court base these
answers?
Conclusion: How does this court decision relate to your life as an educator or
administrator, and education in general? What does this ruling mean to our profession?
How will our lives be altered by this decision? How will the students’ lives be altered by
this decision?
Student Learning Outcome: The student will comprehend and utilize basic legal tests
applied by the judiciary in their application to factual situations and cases. The student
will demonstrate critical analysis by differentiating factual and evidentiary data.
Assessment Method: Your briefs will be graded using a Legal Brief Rubric.
Mid-Term Examination (100 points, 25% of grade)
Each student will complete a mid-term examination over course material from the first
half of the semester.
Student Learning Outcome: The student will gain an in-depth understanding of landmark
cases in various areas of school law. The student will articulate an understanding of basic
legal concepts through examination and discussion of relevant court cases.
Assessment Method: The examination will be comprised of true/false and essay questions.
Final Examination (100 points, 30% of grade)
Each student will complete an examination over the semester’s course material.
Student Learning Outcome: The student will gain an in-depth understanding of landmark
cases in various areas of school law. The student will demonstrate familiarity with
terminology in the field of law as it applies to education.
Assessment Method: The examination will be comprised of true/false and essay questions.
Grading
While the final course grade is the sole judgment of the professor, the following scale
will be used as a guide.
Participation/Discussion Boards
20%
2 Legal Briefs (1st Brief, 10; 2nd Brief 15%)
25%
Mid-Term Examination
25%
Final Examination
30%
A 90-100
B 80-89
C 70-79
D 60-69
F 0-59
Caveat: This syllabus represents a relationship between the two of us regarding the
evaluative measures and the content included in EdAd 626. I reserve the right to amend,
revise, or change the content of the syllabus as deemed necessary.
TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
This is a web-enhanced course and some obvious technological resources will be
required, including: 1) access to a computer with Internet access (high-speed preferred),
2) headset/microphone, 3) computer speakers, and 4) Word processing software
(Microsoft Word preferred)
Our campus is optimized to work in a Microsoft Windows environment. This means that
our course works best if you are using a Windows operating system (XP or newer) and a
recent version of Microsoft Internet Explorer (6.0, 7.0 or 8.0). Your online courses will
also work with Macintosh OS X along with a recent version of Safari 2.0 or better. Along
with Internet Explorer and Safari, eCollege also supports the Firefox browser (3.0) on
both Windows and Mac operating systems.
It is strongly recommended that you perform a “Browser Test” prior to the start of your
course. To launch a brower test, login in to eCollege, click on the “myCourses” tab and
then select the “Browser Test” link under Support Services.
As a student enrolled at Texas A&M University-Commerce, you have access to an email
account via MyLeo; all class emails from your instructors will be sent from eCollege (and
all other university emails) will go to this account, so please be sure to check it regularly.
Conversely, you are to email us via the eCollege email system or your MyLeo email as
our spam filters will catch yahoo, hotmail, etc. and we will not check for your email in
spam.
ACCESS AND NAVIGATION
This course will be facilitated using eCollege, the Learning Management System used by
Texas A&M University-Commerce. To get started with the course, go to https://leo.tamucommerce.edu/login.aspx. You will need your CWID and password to log in to the
course. If you do not know your CWID or have forgotten your password, contact
Technology Services at 903.468.6000 or [email protected]
Course Organization
This course is organized by units based on public school law. The course is organized for
a sub-term session. Some topics may be studied across multiple weeks. Unit opening and
closing dates are posted in eCollege. All assignments due the assigned timeframe must be
submitted by the posted due date. The calendar found in this syllabus describes the
modules found in each week of the 7-week course. Be sure to adhere to deadlines. This is
a reading intensive course. I recommend you read ahead if at all possible. I will provide
study guides to assist you in preparation for exams.
What to Do First
Download syllabus, then open and read the Introduction module.
How to Proceed with Class Activities Each Week
1. Access and follow all course instructions found in the unit content area of the
eCollege course (left navigation bar).
2. Read the assigned readings, links, and other resources provided in the syllabus
and in the eCollege units. Links to documents are provided in the course units.
3. Respond to class questions or posted discussion board questions using the
eCollege discussion tool. Links to the discussion boards are found under each unit
content of the course on the left navigation bar of eCollege.
4. Complete and submit assignments electronically using the eCollege drop box
tool/tab located in the toolbar at the top of the eCollege course window. Required
assignment instructions, due dates, and submission information will be provided
by the instructor via eCollege units.
5. View links, briefs, and PowerPoints as assigned.
6. Complete the course assignments according to the instructions provided in this
syllabus and the eCollege unit content.
eCollege Technical Concerns
Chat Support: Click on 'Live Support' on the tool bar within your course to chat with an
eCollege Representative.
Phone: 1-866-656-5511 (Toll Free) to speak with an eCollege technical support
representative.
Email: [email protected] to initiate a support request with an eCollege
technical support representative.
COMMUNICATION AND SUPPORT
Quality of Online Course Communication
We will be sharing personal experiences and individual reflections as we discuss course
concepts. You are encouraged to share your personal and professional experiences.
However, in order to assure that we can have a free and open discussion, we expect each
person to respect the confidentiality of classmates. At the same time, you are asked to
exercise good judgment in what you choose to share, avoiding non-public or
competitively sensitive information.
Our discussion goal is to be collaborative, not combative. Experience suggests that even
an innocent remark in the online environment can easily be misconstrued. We suggest
you always reread and edit your responses carefully before posting in order to make
certain that the wording in your message will not be seen as a personal attack. Personal
attacks and harsh tones will not be tolerated and will negatively affect your grade. We
expect you to be positive in your approach to others and diplomatic with your words.
Your instructors are also committed to do the same in all of our communications.
Interaction with Instructor
Email is the best way to reach me. A reply will be sent within 24 hours (and quite often
sooner), depending upon the time your message was received.
Office hours are posted at the beginning of this syllabus. Office hours refer to the times I
should be immediately available to take phone calls from students. You are welcome to
call me, at my home during the evenings, except Wednesday (I’m not home) until 10 pm.
Since I normally work at home on Monday and Friday mornings, I am usually reachable
by phone during those times as well.
This course is an online course technically supported by the Texas A&M UniversityCommerce campus-wide computer platform eCollege. We will have access to and begin
using eCollege the first day of class. If you are not familiar with the use of eCollege or
the Library Online Services, please avail yourself of the online tutorials easily accessible
through your MyLeo web page.
It is critical for you to check your MyLeo email every day, as we will be communicating
with you as we go both within the course online environment and through university
email.
COURSE AND UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES/POLICIES
Assignments
You will be able to check your grades in the grade book throughout the course. You will
be graded on assignments, participation, and assessments, so be sure to turn in
assignments on time. Points will be deducted for late assignments. Your grade will also
be affected (either positively or negatively) by the mechanics of writing (i.e. spelling,
punctuation, grammar, organization, flow, format, etc.). In order to maintain spontaneity
in discussions, you will not be graded on spelling or grammar on any material sent to the
discussion group board but this does not mean you should not proofread. Proofreading in
online classrooms is a form of courtesy to your reader. Please proofread for tone and
mechanics.
I hope to make this course a positive learning experience for all involved including
myself. I assure you that I will do everything I can to promote your success. Studying is a
lonely, difficult task, but with the support from others in this course, it can be very
rewarding.
Check your MyLeo email regularly (at least once each weekday) for information. I will
be sharing information as we go. We will be using discussions groups in this course. You
will need to participate on at least three different days each week with responses to the
discussion questions/issues.
Writing Style
All papers must be written according to the 6th Edition of the APA Manual. Papers must
include references formatted using the APA style manual. All citations and references
must be made using the APA style manual (6th edition). Please use the following format
for all your documents: any clear and readable font, double-spaced, one-inch margins,
and 12-point type.
Dropping a Course
A student may drop a course by logging into their myLEO account and clicking on the
hyperlink labeled “Drop a class” from among the choices found under the myLEO
section of the Web page.
Administrative Withdrawal
Students who miss two sections of class (virtually or in person, depending on the status of
the course) may be administratively dropped for excessive absences.
Incomplete Grades
Per university policy, you must visit with the instructor, develop, and sign “Plan for
Completing the Grade of X” before you may receive an incomplete for the course. The
reason for such requests is limited to “circumstances beyond student’s control which
prevented student from attending classes during Finals Week or the preceding three
weeks” (Policy A 122.07, 1998). You are notified that the deadline date for all plans is
not to exceed one semester. Failure to fulfill plan requirements within the specified time
will result in a course grade of F.
Academic Honesty
Texas A&M University-Commerce does not tolerate plagiarism and other forms of
academic dishonesty. Conduct that violates generally accepted standards of academic
honesty is defined as academic dishonesty. "Academic dishonesty" includes, but is not
limited to, plagiarism (the appropriation or stealing of the ideas or words of another and
passing them off as one's own), cheating on exams or other course assignments, collusion
(the unauthorized collaboration with others in preparing course assignments), and abuse
(destruction, defacing, or removal) of resource material.
Please see the TAMU-C Graduate Catalog (2001-02, pp. 17-18) and the Publication
Manual of the American Psychological Associationfor the discussion of academic
honesty. Academic honesty is especially important when it comes to citing/quoting
sources in research papers and assignments. Students are responsible for reading this
material and becoming familiar with the conventions for acknowledging sources of
information.
Recommended websites to review include:
http://www.plagiarism.org/
http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/plagiarism.html or
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml
Common Decency
All students enrolled at the University shall follow the tenets of common decency and
acceptable behavior conducive to a positive learning environment (See Student’s Guide
Handbook, Policies and Procedures, Conduct).
ADA Statement
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that
provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other
things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning
environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you have
a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact:
Office of Student Disability Resources and Services
Texas A&M University-Commerce
Gee Library 132
Phone (903) 886-5150 or (903) 886-5835
Fax (903) 468-8148
[email protected]
Student Disability Resources & Services
Student Conduct
All students enrolled at the University shall follow the tenets of common decency and
acceptable behavior conducive to a positive learning environment. (See Code of Student
Conduct from Student Guide Handbook).
University Mission and Vision Statements
The Texas A&M University-Commerce Mission: Texas A&M University-Commerce
provides a personal educational experience for a diverse community of life-long learners.
Our purpose is to discover and disseminate knowledge for leadership and service in an
interconnected and dynamic world. Our challenge is to nurture partnerships for the
intellectual, cultural, social and economic vitality of Texas and beyond.
The College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) Mission: The College of
Education and Human Services promotes and enhances the development of researchers,
professional practitioners and leaders through the discovery and dissemination of
knowledge.
The College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) Vision: The College of
Education & Human Services will be recognized nationally for our excellence in practice,
programs, research, and services.
The Department of Educational Leadership (EDL) Mission: The Department of
Educational Leadership at Texas A&M University-Commerce prepared graduated for
teaching, service and leadership roles in a variety of educational, business, government
and industry contexts.
The Department of Educational Leadership (EDL) Vision: The Department of
Educational Leadership at Texas A&M University-Commerce envisions exemplary
programs that challenge highly-qualified students to excel in their respective disciplines
and careers through engagement in a rigorous and transformative learning environment
linking theory to practice while expanding the knowledge base of the learner, the
profession and the respective academic discipline.
TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE / CALENDAR
Week
Topic
1 Introduction and Structure of Law
Chapter Readings
Alexander 1,2,3
Kemerer 1
Educational Governance & Sources of Law
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
2 Students and the Law Part I
Discipline; Student Rights
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Students and the Law Part II
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
3 Students and the Law Part III
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Teachers and the Law Part I
Teacher Rights
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
4 Teachers and the Law Part II
Certification; Employment; Contract Law
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Teachers and the Law Part III
Discrimination; Personnel
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Alexander 4,10
Kemerer 6
Alexander 8,9
Kemerer 7
Alexander 6
Kemerer 2
Alexander 16,17
Kemerer 6
Alexander 15
Kemerer 4
Alexander 18
Kemerer 5
4 Take mid-term exam
5
The Instructional Program
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Educator and School District Liability (Torts)
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
6 Special Education
Individuals with Disabilities and the Law
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
7
7
Alexander 7
Alexander 12,14
Kemerer 10
Alexander 11
Kemerer 3
Religion in Public Schools
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Alexander 5
Kemerer 7
Privacy
Module activities and readings
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Alexander 13
Kemerer 9
School Desegregation
Module activities and readings.
Submit briefs on assigned dates.
Participate in discussion board.
Alexander 20
Take final exam
**See eCollege for additional assignment information.
EDAD 626
Public School Law
Table of Cases
Week
1
Introduction and Structure of Law; Ed. Governance & Sources of Law
Plyler v. Doe 457 US 202 (1982)
Governance/Students and the Law Part 1
Pierce v. Society of Sisters 268 US 510 (1925)
Citizens for Better Education v. Goose Creek C.I.S.D. 719 SW2d 350 (1986)
Shoffner v. Goose Creek C.I.S.D. Docket Number 331-Rio-694
(Commissioner of Education 1995); & Clear Creek Educators Association
TSTA/NEA v. Clear Creek I.S.D. Docket Number 059-R8-1193 (Commissioner of
Education 1995)
Hartzell v. Connell 679 P.2d 35 (1984)
Berg v. Glen Cove City School District 853 F.Supp. 651 (1994)
Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District 393 US 503 (1969)
2
Students and the Law Part II
Bethel School District No. 403 v. Fraser 478 US 675 (1986)
Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier 484 US 260 (1988)
Bivens by Green v. Albuquerque Public Schools 131 F. 3d 151 (1995)
Morse v. Frederick 551 US 393 (2007)
Layshock v. Hermitage No. 07-4465 (2011) cert. Denied, 11-502, Jan.2012
Sherman v. Community School District 21 980 F.2d 437 (1992), cert. Denied, 508
US 950 (1993)
Palmer v. Merluzzi 868 F.2d 90 (1989)
Beeson v. Kiowa County School District RE-1 567 P.2d 801 (1977)
Goss v. Lopez 419 US 565 (1975)
Cole v. Newton Special Municipal Separate SD 853 F. 2d 924 (1988)
3
Students and the Law Part III
New Jersey v. T.L.O. 469 US 325 (1985)
Isiah B. v. Wisconsin 500 N.W. 2d 637 (1993)
BOE, District #92, Pottawatomie Co. v. Earls 536 US 822 (2002)
Rudolph v. Lowndes Co BOE 242 F. Supp 2d 1107 (2003)
Cornfield v. Consolidated High School District No. 230 991 F. 2d 1316 (1993)
Safford v. Redding 557 US ____ (2009)
Gonzales v. McEuen 435 F. Supp. 460 (1977)
Ingraham v. Wright 430 US 651 (1977)
Board of Education of Rogers Arkansas v. McCluskey 458 US 966 (1982)
Ryan G. v. Navasota I.S.D. Docket No. 113-R5-598 (Commissioner of Education,
1999)
Mendoza v. Klein I.S.D. 4:09-cv-03895 (S.D. TX 2011)
Teachers and the Law Part I
Dodge v. Board of Education 302 US 74 (1937)
Beilan v. Board of Public Education 357 US 399 (1958)
Board of Regents of State Colleges v. Roth 408 US 564 (1972)
Pickering v. Board of Education of Township High School District 205 391 US
563 (1968)
4
Teachers and the Law Part II
Mt. Healthy City School District Board of Education v. Doyle 429 US 274 (1977)
Fowler v. Board of Education of Lincoln County 819 F. 2d 657 (1987)
Boring v. Buncombe County BOE 136 F. 3d 364 (1996)
Cockrel v. Shelby County School District 270 F. 3d 1036 (2001)
Collins v. Faith School District #46-2 574 N.W.2d 889 (1998)
Milkovich v. Lorain Journal Co. 497 U.S. 1 (1990)
Skinner v. Railway Labor Executives Association 489 U.S. 602 (1989)
Teachers and the Law Part III
East Hartford Education Association v. Board of Education of Town of East
Hartford 562 F.2d 838 (1977)
Gaylord v. Tacoma School District No. 10 559 P.2d 1340 (1977), cert.
Denied, 434 US 879 (1977)
Harrah ISD v. Martin (1979) 440 U.S. 194 (1979)
Cowan v. Strafford R-VI School District 140 F.3d 1153 (1998)
Erb v. Iowa State Board of Public Instruction 216 N.W. 2d 340 (1974)
Gillett v. Unified School District 605 P.2d 105 (1980)
Barcheski v. BOE of Grand Rapids Public Schools 412 N.W. 2d 296 (1987)
Scheelhaase v. Woodbury Cent. Cmty. School District 488 F. 2d 237 (1973)
Geller v. Markham 635 F.2d 1027 (1977), cert. Denied, 451 US 945 (1981)
5
The Instructional Program
Sandlin v. Johnson 643 F.2nd 1027 (1981)
Meyer v. Nebraska 262 U.S. 390 (1923)
Andrews v. Weber 108 Ind. 31 (1886)
Steirer v. Bethlehem Area School District 987 F.2d. 989 (1993)
Board of Education, Island Tree Union Free School District No. 26 v. Pico 457
U.S. 853 (1982)
Epperson v. State of Arkansas 393 U.S. 97 (1968)
Keefe v. Geanakos 418 F.2d. 359 (1969)
Cornwell v. State Board of Education 314 F.Supp. 340 (1969)
Educator and School District Liability (Torts)
Wood v. Strickland 420 US 308 (1975)
Carey v. Piphus 435 US 247 (1978)
Franklin v. Gwinnett County Schools 503 US 60 (1992)
Peter W. v. San Francisco Unified School District 131 Cal. Rptr. 854 (Cal. St.
App. 1976)
Cannon v. University of Chicago 441 US 677 (1979)
Barr v. Bernhard 562 S.W. 2d. 844 (Tex. 1978)
Hopkins v. Spring 736 S.W. 2d. 617 (Tex. 1987)
Johnson v. School District of Millard 573 N.W. 2d 116 (1998)
Spears v. Jefferson Parish School Board 646 So.2d 1104 (1994)
Wagenblast v. Odessa School District No. 105-157-166J 110 Wash 2d 845 (1988)
6
Special Education; Individuals with Disabilities and the Law
Board of Education of the Hendrick Hudson Central School District v.
Rowley 458 US 176 (1982)
Clyde K. v. Puyallup School District 35 F.Supp. 1396 (9th Circuit Court of
Appeals)
Texas City Independent School District v. Jorstad 752 F.Supp. 376 (1987)
Thomas v. Atascadero Unified School District 662 F.Supp 376 (1987) & Grube v.
Bethlehem Area School District 550 F.Supp. 418 (1982)
Privacy
Point Isabel Independent School District v. Hinojosa 797 S.W. 2d 176 (Tex.
App. Corpus Christi 1990)
Cox Enterprises v. Board of Trustees of Austin Independent School District 704
S.W 2d 956 (1986)
Kylie H. v. Marble Falls Independent School District Dkt. No. 068-R5198 (Comm’r
Educ. 1998) & Guzman v. Harlandale Independent School District Dkt. No. 485R2-895 (Comm’r Educ. 1999)
Roberts v. Houston Independent School District 788 S.W.2d 107 (Tex. App.—
Houston [1st Dist.] 1990)
Ryans v. Gresham 6 F.Supp.2d 595 (E.D. Tex. 1998)
Smith v. Holley 827 S.W.2d 433 (Tex. App.—San Antonio 827 S.W.2d 433 (Tex.
App.—San Antonio 1992)
Merriken v. Cressman 364 F.Supp. 913 (E.D. Penn. 1973)
Fay v. South Colonie Central School District 802 F.2d 21 (1986)
7
Religion in Public Schools
Engel v. Vitale 370 US 421 (1962)
School District of Abington Township v. Schempp/Murray v. Curlett 374 US
203 (1963)
Stone v. Graham 449 US 39 (1980)
Lamb’s Chapel v. Center Moriches Union Free School District 508 U.S. 385
(1993)
Lee v. Weisman 505 US 577 (1992)
Edwards v. Aguillard 482 US 578 (1987)
Santa Fe v. Doe 530 US 290 (2000)
Doe v. Norfolk 340 F. 3d 605 (2003)
Selman v. Cobb County Schools 49 F. 3d 1320 (2006)
School Desegregation
Plessy v. Ferguson 163 US 537 (1896)
Sweatt v. Painter 339 U.S. 629 and McLaurin v. OK State Regents 339 U.S. 637
1950
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka 347 US 483 (1954) & Brown v. Board of
Education of Topeka 349 US 294 (1955)
Green v. County School Board of New Kent County 391 US 430 (1968)
Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education 402 US 1 (1971)
Columbus Board of Education v. Penick 443 US 449 (1979)
Milliken v. Bradley 418 US 717 (1974)
Missouri v. Jenkins 515 US 70 (1995)
×

Report this document