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Professor Amy B. Werbel
Saint Ed’s 133
Office: 802-654-2271
e-mail: [email protected]
office hours: M, W 1-3, and by appt.
Syllabus
Art 252 AB Survey of the History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern
Spring, 2011
Section A: Tuesday, Thursday 10-11:40 a.m.
Section B (Honors): Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-4:10 p.m.
SE 104
Students in Art 252 learn to analyze art, and to see, think, write and speak critically about
painting, sculpture, and empowered objects from the fifteenth through twentieth centuries
in Europe, America, and West Africa. Throughout the course, we analyze art through
changing thematic lenses. Stylistic elements, the role of art in society, and the judgment
of what is good, are persistent themes.
Required text for this course is Art History vol. II, third edition, by Marilyn Stokstad.
Other required readings are posted in “doc sharing” on eCollege.
Jan. 18
Introduction: Art and History
Unit 1: Subject Matter and Iconography: Artists as Storytellers
Daily Response Papers for this unit should reflect on the ways artists tell stories with
images. What types of stories do the artists in this unit tell, why, and what means do they
use to enhance meaning?
Jan. 20
Early Renaissance Painting in Burgundy and Flanders
Reading: Stokstad, 583-593, 596-605; excerpt from: Linda Seidel, Jan van
Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait (Cambridge University Press, 1993): 19-58 (on
eCollege).
Jan. 25
Early Renaissance Painting and Sculpture in Italy
Reading: Stokstad, 618-623, 628-640, 646-656; Andrew Butterfield, “Art
and Innovation in Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise, in The Gates of Paradise
(Yale University Press, 2007), 16-41 (on eCollege).
Unit 2: Educational Purposes: Images as Teachers
Daily Response Papers for this unit should reflect on art’s instructional role in society.
How, and what, do images teach individuals in these societies?
Jan. 27
High Renaissance Painting and Sculpture in Italy
Reading: Stokstad, 659-677, 682-691, 696-7; excerpt from Rona Goffen,
“Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love and Marriage,” in The Expanding
Discourse (HarperCollins, 1992): 111-121 (on eCollege).
Feb. 1
Renaissance Art in Germany, the Netherlands, and England
Reading: Stokstad 706-719, 728-736; Mitchell B. Merback, ”Torture and
Teaching: The Reception of Lucas Cranach the Elder’s Martyrdom of the
Twelve Apostles in the Protestant Era,” Art Journal (Spring, 1998): 14-23.
Unit 3: Gender and Sexuality
Daily Response Papers in this unit should reflect on the ways that art reflects attitudes
towards gender and sexuality operative in their cultural context.
Feb. 3
Baroque Painting and Sculpture in Italy and Spain
Reading: Stokstad, 742-770.
February 8
Worldcat, JStor, and Refworks Instruction – Library
February 10
Artstor, Scanning, Photoshop, and PowerPoint instruction - Library
Feb. 15
Baroque Painting in Flanders and Holland
Reading: Stokstad, 772-793.
Feb. 17
Susanna for Girls and Guys
Reading: Mary Garrard, “Susanna” in Artemisia Gentileschi Princeton
University Press, 1989): 182-209 (on eCollege); Eric Jan Sluijter, “Susanna
and the Elders,” in Rembrandt and the Female Nude (Amsterdam
University Press, 2006): 113-139 (on eCollege).
Feb. 22 – No class.
February 24
Section A: Exam #1 (Paper Writers – No class)
Section B: Research Presentations (Group A)
Unit 4: Art and Political Order
Daily Response Papers in this unit should address the role art plays in creating and
preserving political power and social order.
March 1
Neoclassicism and Eighteenth Century Art of the Americas
Reading: Stokstad, 941-943, 950-952, 963-982
March 3
Romanticism
Reading: Stokstad, 981-1000; Todd Porterfield and Susan L. Siegfried,
excerpt from: “Staging Empire: Napoleon, Ingres, and David”
(Pennsylvania State University Press), 3-22 (on eCollege).
Unit 5: Artist’s Biographies: The Intersections of Life and Art
Daily Response Papers in this unit should reflect on the ways that artist’s personal life
stories and points-of-view contribute to artistic innovation.
March 8
Realism and Early Photography
Reading: Stokstad, 1009-1023.
March 10
Impressionism / Mary Cassatt
Reading: Stokstad, 1026-1038; Griselda Pollock, “Mary Cassatt: Painter
of Women and Children,” 280-301 (on eCollege).
March 15 and 17 – No class. Break.
March 22
Post-Impressionism and Symbolism / van Gogh and Gaugin
Reading: Stokstad, 1038-1050; Debora Silverman, excerpt from: Van
Gogh and Gaugin: The Search for Sacred Art (Farar, Straus, and Giroux,
2000) on eCollege.
Unit 6: Art for Personal and Social Empowerment: The West-African Tradition
Daily Response Papers for this unit should discuss the ways that creating and consuming
art can help individuals and societies gain empowerment.
March 24
West African Art Overview
Reading: Stokstad, 916-939. Babatunde Lawal, “African Art and the
Social Order,” excerpt from The Gèlèdé Spectacle: Art, Gender, and Social
Harmony in an African Culture (University of Washington Press, 1996): 318 (on eCollege).
March 29
African Art in the Diaspora
Reading: Suzanne Preston-Blier, “Vodun Art, Social History and the
Slave Trade,” 23-54 (on eCollege).
March 31
The Harlem Renaissance
Reading: Stokstad, 1111-1117; Richard J. Powell, “The Aaron Douglas
Effect,” in Aaron Douglas, Modernist (Yale University Press): 53-73.
April 5
Section A: Exam #2/ (Paper Writers – no class)
Assignment: Paper writers come to my office hours this week with ideas
for research paper topics
Section B: Research Presentations (Group B)
Unit 7: Art for the Modern Age
Daily Response Papers for this unit should discuss the elements of “modernity” in art of
the early 20th century.
April 7
Cubism and Dada
Reading: Stokstad, 1055, 1064-1081, 1088-1103, 1112
Assignment: Section A paper writers and all Section B students submit
topic and bibliography for your final presentations.
April 12
No Class. Conference.
April 14
Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism
Reading: Stokstad, 1119-1137; Stephen Polcari, Abstract Expressionism
and the Modern Experience, (on eCollege).
April 19
Assemblage and Pop Art
Reading: Stokstad, 1145-1154;
April 21
Post-1970 / Post-Modernism
Reading: Stokstad, 1160-1168, 1171-90
Unit 8: Conclusion. The Future of Art?
There is no assigned reading for this unit. You may choose to write a review of a
contemporary art exhibition at the Burlington City Arts Firehouse Gallery as a Daily
Response Paper.
April 26
Section A: Exam #3 (Paper writers no class -- meet with me this week)
Section B: Regular class, Art in the 21st Century
April 28
Art in the 21st Century II
May 3 and 5 Final Research Presentations
Final Exam t.b.a.
Section A. Grading Percentages:
Exam Takers:
Paper Writers and Presenters:
Exam I: 20 pts.
Exam II: 20 pts.
Exam III: 20 pts.
Final Exam: 30 pts.
Class Participation: 10 points
(15) 2-page daily response papers: 60 points
(1) 15-minute research presentation: 30 points
Class Participation: 10 points
Section B. Grading Percentages:
(10) pop quizzes (highest 8 scores): 8 points
(12) 2-page response papers: 48 points
(1) 10-minute research presentation: 10
(1) 20-minute research presentation: 20 points
Class Participation: 14 points
Attendance and Class Participation:
You are permitted two unexcused absences from class. Further absences will be penalized
by a two-point reduction in your final grade per extra absence. If you know you need to
be absent, please call or e-mail me in advance, so that we can confer about missed work.
Pop Quizzes
In Section B, there will be 10 pop quizzes given at unannounced times and dates. Pop
quizzes will consist of 4-5 simple multiple choice or true/false questions that demonstrate
whether you have done the reading. Each pop quiz is worth one point. Your top eight
scores will count.
Daily Response Papers
Daily Response papers give you the opportunity to synthesize course information in
short, thematic essays. You should use quotes from the readings, and discuss examples of
art we have talked about, to provide “evidence” for your answer to the question for the
unit paper. These are due in the correct eCollege dropbox before class on the day
listed. Late daily response papers are not accepted for credit. These papers should be
approximately 600 words. You should use in-text citations to course materials, e.g.
(Stokstad, 754). No bibliography is necessary. Titles of Works of Art should be italicized
or underlined. Use the following grading rubric to guide your preparation for this
assignment:
DRP Component
CONTENT & CRITICAL THINKING
• Is the unit question and daily material
addressed fully?
• Are art historical terminology and concepts
understood and discussed correctly?
• Does the paper use quotes from the reading,
and discussion of appropriate works of art
that demonstrate comprehension of assigned
course materials?
ORGANIZATION & STRUCTURE
• Is the essay focused?
• Is the flow of information logical?
• Paragraphs: Are they organized in a
deliberate and helpful way?
• Paragraphs: Are they fully developed and
appropriate in length?
• Transitions: Do they help the reader move
from thought to thought?
LANGUAGE CONTROL
• Style: Is it controlled and easy to read?
• Style: Is it appropriate to the assignment and
a general academic audience?
• Language: Are Standard Written English
guidelines followed for:
o sentence structure
o grammar
Comments
o
o
o
o
word choice/usage
punctuation
quotations/citations
spelling
GRADE:
10-minute Presentations:
These are 10-minute presentations of a book chapter or article that adds dimension and
depth to one of the artists or themes we study during the first three units. Reference
librarians will teach students use of tools to assist in learning how to find appropriate
sources and present images to the class. PLEASE clear your choice with me before
proceeding . . . J
15- or 20-minute Research Presentation
The final research presentation is an opportunity for students to apply extended research,
analysis, and interpretation to one work of art on the important works list. Students are
expected to formulate an original thesis about the meaning and significance of this work,
and to support it well with trustworthy sources. A minimum of seven academic peerreviewed, modern sources should be used in preparing your presentation.
Students must bring their presentations to class on a flash drive.
Use the following grading rubric to guide your preparation for this assignment:
PRESENTATION COMPONENT
ORGANIZATION:
• Provides overview at outset
• Provides necessary context for material in
introduction – acknowledges prior
audience understanding and/or need for
background information
• presents information in a logical order
• sums up important points in a conclusion
CONTENT:
• Student articulates a critical argument
about the work discussed
• General information is provided as
necessary, but the presentation also “goes
deep” on important points and artwork
• Student demonstrates mastery of content
through clear discussion of
trustworthy scholarly sources and artwork
that is appropriate to the topic
• Each work of art shown has a caption
underneath, listing artist, title, and date
• The student makes clear reference to
sources used, and presents a bibliography
in MLA style as the final slide of the
presentation.
COMMENTS
PRESENTATION:
• The presentation is fully-prepared and well
rehearsed, with smooth transitions
• Speech is audible and clear, with moderate
pace and good volume
• The student looks out at the audience
frequently, and directs attention to
important elements of art work displayed
• PowerPoint frames are clear and helpful,
with little text, no typos, and appropriate
stylistic choices
• Time is well used and appropriate to the
assignment
GRADE:
Exams
Each of the three 90-minute exams requires that test-takers demonstrate their
understanding of themes and “important” works of art presented in class and readings.
Each exam will include a variety of types of questions, including multiple choice and short
essays. The 120-minute final exam is comprehensive, and includes these types of
questions, plus analysis of “unknown works” for which you are asked to identify the style
and approximate date of works based on general principles.
Each exam has its own important works list, which you may bring to class, covered with
as many notes as you can fit. Although you may look at the important works list during
exams (no other materials are allowed), please be aware that these tests will contain many
questions. If you aren’t already VERY familiar with course materials, you will not have
time to complete the exam.
Art 252 – Spring, 2011 - Important Works List - Exam #1
Note - * indicates that the work is in a reading on eCollege, not in the Stokstad textbook.
Early Renaissance Painting in Burgundy and Flanders
Detail of page with Thamyris, from Bocaccio’s De Claris Mulieribus, 1402
Paul, Herman and Jean Limbourg, January, The Duke of Berry at Table, from the Tres
Riches Heures, 1411-16
Robert Campin, The Mérode Altarpiece, c. 1425-28
Jan van Eyck, Double Portrait; Traditionally Known as Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife,
Giovanna Cenami (?), 1434
Jan and Hubert van Eyck, Ghent Altarpiece (closed and open), 1432
Rogier van der Weyden, Deposition, c. 143-1438
Rogier van der Weyden, Portrait of a Lady, c. 1455
Rogier van der Weyden, Last Judgment Altarpiece (open), after 1443
Early Renaissance Painting and Sculpture in Italy
Perugino, The Delivery of the Keys to St. Peter, 1481
Anonymous, Ideal City with a Fountain and Statues of the Virtues, c. 1500
* Lorenzo Ghiberti, Gates of Paradise, full view, “Jacob and Esau” and “Adam and
Eve”panels 1425-1452
Donatello, David, c. 1446-1460(?)
Donatello, Equestrian Monument of Erasmo de Narni, 1443-53
Masaccio, Trinity with the Virgin, Saint John the Evangelist, and Donors, c. 1425-27/8
Andrea Mantegna, Frescoes in the Camera Picta, Ducal Palace, Mantua, 1465-74
Fra Angelico, Annunciation, c. 1438-1445
Andrea del Castagno, Last Supper, Resurrection, Crucifixion, and Entombment, 1447
Sandro Boticelli, The Birth of Venus, c. 1484-86
Giovanni Bellini, St. Francis in Ecstasy, c. 1470s
High Renaissance Painting and Sculpture in Italy
Leonardo, The Last Supper, 1495-98
Leonardo, Mona Lisa, c. 1503
Leonardo, Vitruvian Man, c. 1490
Michelangelo, Pietá, c. 1500
Michelangelo, David, 1501-4
Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel Ceiling, interior, ceiling top to bottom, Creation of Adam
(all 1508-12), and Last Judgment, 1536-1541
Raphael, School of Athens, 1510-11
Raphael, Leo X with Cardinals, c. 1517
Titian, Venus of Urbino, c. 1538
Titian, The Pastoral Concert, c. 1510
Titian, The Pesaro Madonna, 1519-1526
Titian, Isabella d’Este, 1534-1536
Sofonisba Anguissola, Self-Portrait, c. 1552
* Titian, Sacred and Profane Love, 1514
High Renaissance Art in Germany, the Netherlands, and England
Matthias Grünewald, Isenheim Altarpiece, closed and open, c. 1510-15
Albrecht Dürer, Self-Portrait, 1500
Albrecht Dürer, Adam and Eve, 1504
Lucas Cranach the Elder, Nymph of the Spring, c. 1537
Albecht Altdorfer, Danube Landscape, c. 1525
Caterina van Hemessen, Self-Portrait, 1548
Pieter Breughel the Elder, Return of the Hunters, 1565
Hans Holbein the Younger, Henry VIII, 1540
Attributed to Levina Bening Teerling or William Scrots, Elizabeth I when Princess, c.
1559
* Lucas Cranach the Elder, Martyrdom of Saint James the Lesser, c. 1512 (woodcut)
Baroque Painting and Sculpture in Italy and Spain
Gianlorenzo Bernini, David, 1623
Gianlorenzo Bernini, Saint Teresa of Ávila in Ecstasy, 1645-52
Caravaggio, Bacchus, 1595-1596
Caravaggio, Entombment, c. 1603-4
Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes, 1625
Artemisia Gentileschi, Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting, 1630
Giovanni Battista Gaulli, The Triumph of the Name of Jesus and the Fall of the Damned,
1672-1685
Francisco de Zurbarán, Saint Serapion, 1628
Diego Velasquez, Las Meninas, 1656
* Artemisia Gentileschi, Susanna and the Elders, 1610
Baroque Painting in Flanders and Holland
Jan Breughel and Peter Paul Rubens, Henry IV Receiving the Portrait of Marie deMedici,
c. 1621-25
Frans Hals, Catherina Hooft and Her Nurse, c. 1620
Frans Hals, Officers of the Harlem Militia Company of St. Adrian, c. 1627
Judith Leyster, Self-Portrait, 1635
Rembrandt, Captain Frans Banning Cocq Mustering His Company, 1642
Rembrandt, The Jewish Bride, c. 1665
Rembrandt, Three Crosses (fourth state), 1663
Jan Vermeer, View of Delft, c. 1662
Jan Vermeer, Woman Holding a Balance, 1664
Gerard Ter Borch, The Suitor’s Visit, c. 1658
Rachel Ruysch, Flower Still Life, after 1700
*Rembrandt, Susanna and The Elders, 1636
--------------------------------------------------------------
Art 252 – Spring, 2010 - Important Works List - Exam #2
Note - * indicates that the work is in reading on eCollege, not in Stokstad textbook.
Neoclassicism and Eighteenth Century Art of the Americas
John Singleton Copley, Samuel Adams, c. 1770-2
Jean-Honoré Fragonard, The Meeting, 1771-1773
Joshua Reynolds, Lady Sarah Bunbury Sacrificing to the Graces, 1765
Angelica Kauffmann, Cornelia Pointing to her Children as Her Treasures, 1785
Benjamin West, The Death of General Wolfe, 1770
John Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781
Marie-Louise Élisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Portrait of Marie Antoinette with Her
Children, 1787
Adéläide Labille-Guiard, Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, 1785
Jaques Louis-David, Oath of the Horatii, 1784-1785
Jaques-Louis David, The Death of Marat, 1793
Anne-Louis Girodet-Trioson, Portrait of Jean-Baptiste Belley, 1797
Romanticism
John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778
Antoine-Jean Gros, Napoleon in the Plague House at Jaffa, 1804
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres, Large Odalisque, 1814
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres, Portrait of Madame Desiré Raoul-Rochette,
1830
Théodore Géricault, Raft of the “Medusa,” 1818-1819
Eugéne Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People: July 28, 1830, 1830
Francisco Goya, The Sleep of Reasons Produces Monsters, 1796-8
Francisco Goya, Third of May. 1808, 1814-5
*Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres, Napoleon I on his Throne, 1806
*Jacques-Louis David, Le Sacre, 1808
Realism and Early Photography
Louis-Jaques-Mandé Daguerre, The Artist’s Studio, 1837, daguerrotype
Oscar Rejlander, The Two Paths of Life, 1857
Julia Margaret Cameron, Portrait of Thomas Carlyle, 1867
Gustave Courbet, The Stone Breakers, 1849
Gustave Courbet, A Burial at Ornans, 1849
Rosa Bonheur, Plowing in the Ninervais: The Dressing of the Vines, 1849
Honoré Daumier, The Third-Class Carriage, c. 1862
Thomas Eakins, The Gross Clinic, 1875
Impressionism
Édouard Manet, The Luncheon on the Grass, 1863
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863
Claude Monet, On the Banks of the Seine, Bennecourt, 1868
Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral, 1894
Pierre-August Renoir, Moulin de la Galette, 1876
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal on Stage, c. 1874
Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street, Rainy Day, 1877
Pierre-August Renoir, Bathers, 1887
Mary Cassatt, Woman in a Loge, 1879
Mary Cassatt, Maternal Caress, 1891
*Mary Cassatt, Reading “Le Figaro”, c. 1878
Post-Impressionism and Symbolism
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1885-7
Paul Cézanne, Still Life with Basket of Apples, 1890-1894
Paul Cezanne, The Large Bathers, 1906
Georges Seurat, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grand Jatte, 1884-86
Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889
Vincent van Gogh, Japonaiserie: Flowering Plum Tree, 1887
Paul Gaugin, Mahana no atua (Day of the God), c. 1894
Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1893
* Vincent van Gogh, Self-Portrait Dedicated to Paul Gaugin, 1888
* Paul Gaugin, Self-Portrait: Les Misérables, 1888
West-African and African Diaspora Art
Kojo Bonsu, Finial of a Spokesperson’s Staff, Ghana, 1960s-1970s
Nankani compound, Sirigu, Ghana, 1972
Doll (Biiga), Burkina Fasso, mid-20th Century
Twin Figures (Ere Ibeji), Yoruba, 20th Century
Temne Nowo Masquerade with Attendants, Mende Culture 1980
Power Figure (nkisi nkonde), Kongo culture, 19th century
Spirit Spouse Blolo Bla, Democratic Republic of Congo, 19th century
Ifa Divination Session, Yoruba culture, Nigeria
Mbap Mabbinc Mambeky, photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1947
Kente cloth, Ashanti culture, Ghana, 20th century
Initiation Wall Panels, Nkanu Peoples, Democratic Republic of Congo, Early 20th century
El Anatsui, Flag for a New World Power, 2004
*Basinjom Anti-Witchcraft Mask
*Togo, Ouatchi Sculptures
Harlem Renaissance
Diego Rivera, Man, Controller of the Universe, 1934
Aaron Douglas, Aspects of Negro Life: From Slavery through Reconstruction, 1934
Augusta Savage, La Citadelle: Freedom, 1930
Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936
Jacob Lawrence, During the World War there was a Great Migration North by Southern
Negroes, 1940-1
James VanDerZee, Couple Wearing Raccoon Coats with a Cadillac, 1932
*Aaron Douglas, Cover for The American Negro, 1928
--------------------------------------------------------------
Art 252 – Spring, 2010 - Important Works List - Exam #3
Cubism and Dada
Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937
Henri Matisse, The Woman with the Hat, 1905
Henri Matisse, The Joy of Life, 1905-6
Karl Schmidt-Rotluff, Three Nudes, 1913
Paula Modersohn-Becker, Self-Portrait with an Amber Necklace, 1906
Egon Schiele, Self-Portrait Nude, 1911
Vasily Kandinsky, Improvisation 28, 1912
Paul Klee, Hammamet with its Mosque, 1914
Pablo Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905
Pablo Picasso, Les Damoiselles D’Avignon, 1907
Pablo Picasso, Ma Jolie, 1911-1912
Pablo Picasso, Glass and Bottle of Suze, 1912
Gustave Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-8
Hugo Ball Reciting the Sound Poem “Karawane,” 1916
Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917
Marcel Duchamp, L.H.O.O.Q., 1919
Hannah Höch, Dada Dance, 1922
Alfred Stieglitz, The Flatiron Building, 1903
Georgia O’Keefe, City Night, 1926
Frida Kahlo, The Two Fridas, 1939
Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism
Salvador Dali, Birth of Liquid Desires, 1931-2
Meret Oppenheim, Object (Luncheon in Fur, 1936
Jackson Pollock, Male and Female, 1942
Hans Namuth, Photograph of Jackson Pollock Painting, 1950
Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950
Lee Krasner, The Seasons, 1957
Willem de Kooning, Woman I, 1950-1952
Assemblage and Pop Art
Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959
Jasper Johns, Target with Four Faces, 1955
Yves Klein, Anthropométries of the Blue Period, 1960
Richard Hamilton, Just What is it that Makes Today’s Homes so Different, so Appealing?,
1955
Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962
Andy Warhol, Birmingham Race Riot, 1964
Roy Lichtenstein, Oh Jeff. . .I Love You Too, But , 1964
Claes Oldenberg, Lipstick Ascending on Caterpillar Tracks, 1969-1974
Art 252 – Spring, 2010 - Important Works List – FINAL EXAM
Note - * indicates that the work is in reading on eCollege, not in Stokstad textbook.
Early Renaissance Painting in Burgundy and Flanders
Paul, Herman and Jean Limbourg, January, The Duke of Berry at Table, from the Tres
Riches Heures, 1411-16
Robert Campin, The Mérode Altarpiece, c. 1425-28
Jan van Eyck, Double Portrait; Traditionally Known as Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife,
Giovanna Cenami (?), 1434
Early Renaissance Painting and Sculpture in Italy
* Lorenzo Ghiberti, Gates of Paradise, “Jacob and Esau” and “Adam and Eve”panels
1425-1452
Donatello, David, c. 1446-1460(?)
Masaccio, Trinity with the Virgin, Saint John the Evangelist, and Donors, c. 1425-27/8
Andrea del Castagno, Last Supper, Resurrection, Crucifixion, and Entombment, 1447
Sandro Boticelli, The Birth of Venus, c. 1484-86
High Renaissance Painting and Sculpture in Italy
Leonardo, Vitruvian Man, c. 1490
Michelangelo, David, 1501-4
Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel Ceiling, Creation of Adam, 1508-12
Raphael, School of Athens, 1510-11
Titian, Venus of Urbino, c. 1538
Sofonisba Anguissola, Self-Portrait, c. 1552
* Titian, Sacred and Profane Love, 1514
High Renaissance Art in Germany, the Netherlands, and England
Albrecht Dürer, Self-Portrait, 1500
Lucas Cranach the Elder, Nymph of the Spring, c. 1537
Caterina van Hemessen, Self-Portrait, 1548
Pieter Breughel the Elder, Return of the Hunters, 1565
Hans Holbein the Younger, Henry VIII, 1540
Baroque Painting and Sculpture in Italy and Spain
Gianlorenzo Bernini, David, 1623
Gianlorenzo Bernini, Saint Teresa of Ávila in Ecstasy, 1645-52
Caravaggio, Entombment, c. 1603-4
Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes, 1625
Diego Velasquez, Las Meninas, 1656
* Artemisia Gentileschi, Susanna and the Elders, 1610
Baroque Painting in Flanders and Holland
Frans Hals, Catherina Hooft and Her Nurse, c. 1620
Judith Leyster, Self-Portrait, 1635
Rembrandt, Captain Frans Banning Cocq Mustering His Company, 1642
Jan Vermeer, Woman Holding a Balance, 1664
*Rembrandt, Susanna and The Elders, 1636
Neoclassicism and Eighteenth Century Art of the Americas
Angelica Kauffmann, Cornelia Pointing to her Children as Her Treasures, 1785
John Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781
Marie-Louise Élisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Portrait of Marie Antoinette with Her
Children, 1787
Adéläide Labille-Guiard, Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, 1785
Jaques Louis-David, Oath of the Horatii, 1784-1785
Anne-Louis Girodet-Trioson, Portrait of Jean-Baptiste Belley, 1797
Romanticism
John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778
Antoine-Jean Gros, Napoleon in the Plague House at Jaffa, 1804
Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres, Large Odalisque, 1814
Théodore Géricault, Raft of the “Medusa,” 1818-1819
Francisco Goya, Third of May. 1808, 1814-5
*Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres, Napoleon I on his Throne, 1806
*Jacques-Louis David, Le Sacre, 1808
Realism and Early Photography
Louis-Jaques-Mandé Daguerre, The Artist’s Studio, 1837, daguerrotype
Gustave Courbet, A Burial at Ornans, 1849
Rosa Bonheur, Plowing in the Ninervais: The Dressing of the Vines, 1849
Honoré Daumier, The Third-Class Carriage, c. 1862
Thomas Eakins, The Gross Clinic, 1875
Impressionism
Édouard Manet, Olympia, 1863
Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral, 1894
Pierre-August Renoir, Moulin de la Galette, 1876
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal on Stage, c. 1874
Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street, Rainy Day, 1877
Pierre-August Renoir, Bathers, 1887
Mary Cassatt, Woman in a Loge, 1879
Post-Impressionism and Symbolism
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1885-7
Georges Seurat, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grand Jatte, 1884-86
Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889
Paul Gaugin, Mahana no atua (Day of the God), c. 1894
* Vincent van Gogh, Self-Portrait Dedicated to Paul Gaugin, 1888
* Paul Gaugin, Self-Portrait: Les Misérables, 1888
West-African and African Diaspora Art
Kojo Bonsu, Finial of a Spokesperson’s Staff, Ghana, 1960s-1970s
Twin Figures (Ere Ibeji), Yoruba, 20th Century
Power Figure (nkisi nkonde), Kongo culture, 19th century
Mbap Mabbinc Mambeky, photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 1947
Kente cloth, Ashanti culture, Ghana, 20th century
*Togo, Ouatchi Sculptures
Harlem Renaissance
Aaron Douglas, Aspects of Negro Life: From Slavery through Reconstruction, 1934
Augusta Savage, La Citadelle: Freedom, 1930
Jacob Lawrence, During the World War there was a Great Migration North by Southern
Negroes, 1940-1
*Aaron Douglas, Cover for The American Negro, 1928
Cubism and Dada
Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937
Henri Matisse, The Joy of Life, 1905-6
Paula Modersohn-Becker, Self-Portrait with an Amber Necklace, 1906
Egon Schiele, Self-Portrait Nude, 1911
Pablo Picasso, Les Damoiselles D’Avignon, 1907
Pablo Picasso, Ma Jolie, 1911-1912
Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917
Alfred Stieglitz, The Flatiron Building, 1903
Georgia O’Keefe, City Night, 1926
Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism
Salvador Dali, Birth of Liquid Desires, 1931-2
Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950
Assemblage and Pop Art
Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959
Jasper Johns, Target with Four Faces, 1955
Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962
Roy Lichtenstein, Oh Jeff. . .I Love You Too, But , 1964
Claes Oldenberg, Lipstick Ascending on Caterpillar Tracks, 1969-1974

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