Chapter 1: Learning About Your Health

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UNIT
1
xvi
You and
Your Health
Eating right and being active are
important to good health, but health
isn’t just physical. Engaging in activities
that you enjoy and spending time with
your family and friends are also
How can flying
a kite lift your
spirits?
good for your health.
When you feel good
about yourself, you make
better choices and can bet-
ter meet the goals you set. Your friends
and relatives, your talents and activities,
and a confident, positive outlook are all
parts of the whole that makes you—you!
1
CHAPTER
1
2
Learning About
Your Health
HEALTH
Do you know what it means to be healthy? You’ll
find out by taking the Health Inventory for
Chapter 1 at health.glencoe.com.
Before You Read
Make this Foldable to record
and organize what you learn
in Lesson 1 about the three
aspects of health. Begin
with two plain sheets of
81/2 x 11 paper.
Line up one of the short edges of a sheet
of paper with one of the long edges. Cut
off the leftover rectangle.
Repeat Step 1 with the
second sheet. You will
now have two squares.
Stack the two squares and
staple along the fold.
Title your journal “Three Parts of Health.”
Label the inside page spreads Physical,
Mental/Emotional, and Social.
arts
Three P h
of Healt
As You Read
On the appropriate page of your journal,
take notes on what you learn about each
of the three aspects of health, and give
examples from your own life.
3
3
Lesson
1
What Is Health?
Quick Write
Think about some of
your habits and everyday
activities. Jot down
how you think these
behaviors contribute
to your health.
LEARN ABOUT...
• what it means to be
•
•
healthy.
how to balance
your physical,
mental/emotional,
and social health.
the relationship
between health
and wellness.
VOCABULARY
• health
• self-assessment
• wellness
Being Healthy
What makes a person healthy? Carl runs every day with the track
team. However, he often has trouble controlling his temper. As a result, his friendships don’t last very long. Ana often stays up late
studying and sometimes skips breakfast. She feels tired a lot of the
time. How healthy do you think Carl and Ana are?
Good health involves every part of your life. Health is a
combination of physical, mental/emotional, and social well-being.
Think of your health as a triangle with equal sides, as shown in
Figure 1.1 on the next page.
Physical Health
Your physical health involves the condition of your body. There
are many things you can do to keep your body strong and healthy.
• Eat a well-balanced diet.
• Participate in regular physical activity.
• Get at least nine hours of sleep every night.
• Have regular health screenings.
• Avoid tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs.
• Understand and follow school rules related to health.
• Avoid unnecessary risks.
Having good friends
is an important part
of health.
4
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
Mental/Emotional Health
Your mental/emotional health relates to your thoughts and
feelings. To keep yourself mentally and emotionally healthy,
•
•
•
•
•
•
face difficult situations with a positive and realistic outlook.
identify, express, and manage your feelings appropriately.
set priorities so that you can handle all of your responsibilities.
use your talents effectively to achieve your goals.
be patient with yourself as you learn new skills. If you make a
mistake, think about how you can do better the next time.
accept responsibility for your actions.
Social Health
Social health involves the ways in which you relate to other
people. To form strong social connections,
•
•
•
•
•
•
support and value members of your family.
have a friendly, open attitude toward other people.
pay attention to what you say and how you say it.
be a loyal, truthful, and dependable friend.
learn to disagree without arguing and
show respect for others.
don’t insult others or put them down.
Visual Arts
PICTURE OF HEALTH
Create a poster illustrating the relationships between your
physical, mental/
emotional, and social
health. You can use the
image of the health
triangle or choose
another three-part
organization. Your
poster may combine
original drawings,
photos from newspapers and magazines,
and computer clip art.
FIGURE 1.1
T HE H EALTH T RIANGLE
To achieve and maintain total
health, pay attention to all three
sides of the health triangle. If
you were in these pictures,
what activities would you
be doing?
LESSON 1: WHAT
IS
HEALTH?
5
Measuring Your Health
You can’t judge how healthy you are just by looking in a mirror.
You can get a more complete view through self-assessment, or
careful examination and judgment of your own patterns of behavior. Honest self-assessment can help you judge your current health
status. It may reveal areas you can work to improve.
On
s
d
n
Ha
h
Healt
Y O U R H E A LT H T R I A N G L E
Take this survey to recognize how your
choices and actions influence your health.
Then you can set goals to improve your health.
WHAT YOU WILL NEED
•
•
•
writing paper and a pen or pencil
a sheet of graph paper
scissors
WHAT YOU WILL DO
Part 1: On a sheet of paper, write “yes” or
“no,” depending on whether each of the
statements to the right describes you.
HOW DID YOU DO?
Part 2: You can use graph paper to make
a model of your results.
For each area of health, cut a strip of
graph paper. Include one square for each
of your “yes” answers.
Label one of your strips “physical,” one
“mental/emotional,” and one “social.”
Compare the lengths of the strips. Make
a triangle with the three strips.
•
•
•
I N CONCLUSION
1. What does your triangle look like? Does it
have equal sides, or is it a little lopsided?
2. Is there one area that you are strong in?
Is there an area you need to work on?
3. What can you do to improve your health
and balance your triangle?
6
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
What Is Wellness?
Keeping the three parts of your health triangle in balance is the
best way to achieve wellness, which is a state of well-being, or
balanced health. By making wise decisions and practicing healthful behaviors each day, you will be able to achieve a high level of
wellness throughout your life.
How are health and wellness related? Your health refers to how
you are doing physically, mentally/emotionally, and socially at a
particular moment. Your health is constantly changing. For
example, you may feel energetic one day and tired the
next. Your level of wellness, on the other hand, has to do
with how the three aspects of health interact over time.
The choices you make every day become part of your
long-term level of wellness. You want to make sure that
most of the time, you enjoy a high level of wellness—
a high level of energy and a feeling of well-being.
Eating a healthful breakfast every
day is a regular behavior that enhances wellness. Name one behavior
you do regularly that contributes to
your health and wellness.
Lesson
Lesson
1
Review
Review
Using complete sentences, answer the
following questions on a sheet of paper.
Reviewing Terms and Facts
1. Vocabulary Define the term health.
2. Recall How can self-assessment help you
improve your health?
3. Explain What is meant by the term
wellness? Use it in an original sentence.
5. Analyze Reread the descriptions of
Carl and Ana on page 4, and suggest
ways for each of them to improve their
personal health.
6. Analyze Review the health triangle
shown on page 5. Analyze the interrelationships of physical, mental/emotional,
and social health.
Applying Health Skills
Thinking Critically
4. Apply Think of two school rules that are
related to health. Briefly describe how
these rules help protect health and why it’s
important to follow them.
7. Goal Setting Choose an action that
would improve your health. Name one
barrier that might keep you from taking
this action. Describe how you could set a
goal to overcome this barrier.
LESSON 1: WHAT
IS
HEALTH?
7
Lesson
2
Quick Write
Think of three choices
you have made today
that affect your health.
Briefly describe each one.
LEARN ABOUT...
• how heredity and
•
environment affect
your health.
other factors
that influence
your health.
VOCABULARY
What Influences
Your Health?
What Affects Your Health?
Both internal (personal) and external (outside) factors affect your
health. You have control over many of these factors, but you can’t
control all of them. For example, you can’t change your height, but
you can improve your posture.
Making healthy choices means understanding and accepting what
is beyond your control. It also means making the most of the factors
you can control. Figure 1.2 illustrates all of the factors that affect
your health.
FIGURE 1.2
YOUR H EALTH F RAMEWORK
Some factors, such as heredity, are beyond your control. Think of factors like these as the framework of who you are. Inside that framework,
you can make personal choices that affect your health. Each of these
factors can have a positive or negative influence on health. Name a
health risk associated with each of these factors.
• heredity
• environment
• culture
• media
• evaluate
8
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
Heredity
Heredity (huh·RED·i·tee) is the passing on of traits from
biological parents to children. Genetic factors or traits that are
passed on through heredity include skin, eye, and hair color; body
type and size; growth patterns; and the likelihood of getting certain
diseases. Inherited traits are “built in”—you can’t choose them or
avoid them. However, recognizing the traits that you have inherited from your parents can help you make important decisions
about your health. If, for example, members of your family tend to
have many cavities, pay special attention to your dental care.
Environment
Your environment (en·VY·ruhn·ment) is all the living and
nonliving things that surround you. It includes physical and social
factors that contribute to individual and community health. Social
environmental factors include access to education and jobs and
presence of gang activity. Physical environmental factors include:
• your home, neighborhood, and school. Do you live and go to
school in a large city or in a small town? Do you live in an apartment building or in a house?
• the air you breathe and the water you drink. Do you live in an
area with heavy air pollution? Does your water come from a
well, or is it supplied by a public utility?
• the climate in which you live. Do you live in a warm or cool
climate? Do the seasons change noticeably where you live?
You may not be able to change your environment,
but you can still make choices that can help you stay
healthy. First, recognize parts of your environment
that might harm your health. Then take steps to protect yourself.
Developing
Good
Character
Citizenship
Help keep the
school environment
healthy and safe:
Pick up trash on the
school grounds and
encourage others to
do so. Understand
and follow school
rules related to
health. Participate in
school efforts to
promote health, such
as walk-a-thons. How
can you get your
peers involved?
Describe your physical
surroundings. What aspects of your environment
enhance your health?
What aspects pose risks
to your health?
LESSON 2: WHAT INFLUENCES YOUR HEALTH?
9
✔
Reading Check
Understand how text is
organized. The last sentence of the first paragraph on this page makes
a statement. How do the
first sentences of the
following paragraphs
support or expand on
that statement?
Your Health Choices
Along with heredity and environment, several other aspects of
your life influence your health. When you make a choice, many
factors influence your thinking. Your family, friends, and the media can all contribute to your decisions.
Family and Friends
Your family has traditions that influence many aspects of your
life, such as the foods you eat, the holidays you celebrate, and the
goals you set. Some of these traditions are part of your cultural
background. Culture is the beliefs, customs, and traditions of a
specific group of people. Culture is one part of your health framework. You can learn to make wise health choices that help you
honor and celebrate your culture. Sometimes, cultural factors can
increase your health risks. For example, if your cultural traditions
include eating foods that are high in sugar and fat, you may be at
increased risk for developing diabetes or heart disease.
HEALTH SKILLS ACTIVITY
ANALYZING I NFLUENCES
Class Health Survey
When you recognize the factors that influence your health,
you are able to make wise choices about your health and wellness. Such factors may include heredity; the environment; your
family, friends, and role models; and the media.
With your class, make a list of at least 15 things that have
an impact on your individual and community health. The impact can be positive or negative. Be
as specific as possible. For example,
environment might relate to the air
quality or climate where you live. It
might mean the social environment,
such as feeling safe. Your teacher will
write the list on the chalkboard. Then,
on a separate sheet of paper, write the
five factors from the list that are most
important to you. Do not write your
name on the paper. Your teacher will
collect the papers and tally the class
results. What are the top five factors
that influence the health of your class?
10
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
Your friends can also influence your decisions.
Their influence can be either positive or negative. A
friend who listens to you when you have a problem
will probably have a positive influence on your
health. A friend who urges you to drink alcohol or
smoke cigarettes could have a very negative influence
on your health.
The Influence of the Media
Another powerful influence on your individual and
community health is the media, the various methods
for communicating information. Media include TV
and radio, movies, books, newspapers, magazines,
billboards, and the Internet. Media and technology
can influence health in various ways. For example,
watching too much TV and not getting enough
physical activity have created health problems for
young people. On the other hand, media and technology can be used to promote important health
messages such as antismoking campaigns.
Media sources can be helpful when you gather the
information you need to make wise choices. To use these
sources effectively, however, you must learn to evaluate, or determine the quality of, everything you see and hear. A media message
often has a specific purpose. Commercials are designed to convince you to buy something, whether it is healthful for you or not.
Magazine articles are designed to grab a reader’s attention and
sell copies.
Lesson
Lesson
2
Media messages can
be expressed through
words, images, or a
combination of both.
Which media do you find
most helpful and why?
Review
Review
Using complete sentences, answer the
following questions on a sheet of paper.
Reviewing Terms and Facts
1. Vocabulary Define the terms heredity
and environment.
2. Restate Describe how you can use information about inherited traits to make
health decisions.
3. List Identify three factors, other than
heredity and physical environment, that
can influence a person’s health.
Thinking Critically
4. Evaluate A friend says, “I don’t need
to know about my family’s health history
because there’s nothing I can do about it
anyway.” How might you respond?
5. Explain Analyze positive and negative
relationships that influence individual and
community health, such as families, peers,
and role models.
Applying Health Skills
6. Analyzing Influences What factor has
the most influence on your health? Explain.
LESSON 2: WHAT INFLUENCES YOUR HEALTH?
11
Lesson
3
Quick Write
Describe a time when
you felt that you were in
a risk situation. What
did you do? Why? How
did it work out? What
could you have done to
prevent this situation?
LEARN ABOUT...
• what risk behavior is.
• what cumulative risk is.
• how you can avoid
health risk behaviors.
VOCABULARY
• risk behaviors
• consequences
• cumulative risks
• subjective
• objective
• prevention
• abstinence
Health Risks and
Your Behavior
Risk Behaviors
Have you ever seen a small child running toward the street with a
concerned parent close behind? The parent was trying to protect the
child from the risk of being hit by a vehicle. Risks—the possibility
that something harmful may happen to your health and wellness—
come in many forms. Since elementary school you have probably
been aware of the risks associated with smoking. Did you know,
however, that you also take health risks by eating high-fat foods and
by not getting enough physical activity or sleep? An important part
of taking responsibility for your health is identifying and avoiding
risk behaviors, actions or choices that may cause injury or harm to
you or to others.
Some risks are unavoidable. Events are unpredictable; and
certain activities, such as playing a sport, can involve some
hazards, or potential sources of danger. Risk behaviors, however,
are actions that lead you into taking unnecessary risks.
Certain risks carry with them the likelihood that you or someone
else will get hurt, now or in the future. For instance, if you pick a
fight with another kid at school or in your neighborhood, you face
the possibility that you will harm that person. You might cause
physical pain, hurt the person emotionally, or affect her or
his relationships with others.
For these reasons, it is
important to realize that
your behavior can also
affect the health
of others.
Wearing a safety helmet will greatly reduce
the risk of a serious head injury while cycling. What other types of protective equipment do you use to avoid the risk of injury?
12
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
The Consequences of Taking Risks
Risk behaviors may lead to a variety of consequences, or the
results of actions. Some consequences affect only you and may not
be especially dangerous. Other types of risk behaviors can lead to
very serious consequences. Figure 1.3 shows some of the results
of taking unnecessary risks.
FIGURE 1.3
C ONSEQUENCES
OF
H EALTH R ISK B EHAVIORS
Every risk can lead to many different kinds of consequences. Name one
risk behavior that could lead to each type of consequence shown here.
Physical Consequences
You could fall and hurt
yourself.
Mental/Emotional
Consequences
You could feel upset and
angry with yourself.
Academic Consequences
You might need to make up for
time lost from school because you
were injured.
Financial Consequences
You could be forced to pay for
damaging something.
Social Consequences
Legal Consequences
You could get in trouble
for trespassing.
You could miss out on
activities because of
injury.
LESSON 3: HEALTH RISKS
AND
YOUR BEHAVIOR
13
Types of Risks
Are teens taking risks? The answer seems to be that many
people your age are recognizing the danger of engaging in certain
risk behaviors. According to a major drug survey conducted by the
Department of Health and Human Services, the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs by youths ages 12–17 has either declined or
remained the same in recent years. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that a large percentage of 12and 13-year-olds are physically active. Finally, the National Safety
Council reported that a large percentage of children ages 5–15 are
wearing safety belts when riding in a motor vehicle. See Figure 1.4.
Cumulative Risk
Some hazards or risk factors may not seem very dangerous
to you. The more risk factors you have, however, the more likely
you will be to experience negative consequences. Some groups of
risks are referred to as cumulative (KYOO·myuh·luh·tiv) risks.
Cumulative risks are related risks that increase in effect with each
added risk. Riding a bicycle without a helmet, for example, is one
risk factor. If you are also riding on a busy street and it is raining,
your chance of serious injury increases greatly.
FIGURE 1.4
YOUTH R ISK B EHAVIOR —E NCOURAGING N EWS
These graphs show that the majority of teens are avoiding risk
behaviors. Do you belong to this majority? If not, how might you begin
to change your behavior?
Use safety belts
81%
84%
Do not currently
use illicit drugs
69%
Participate
in vigorous
physical activity
14
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
91%
Do not currently
smoke cigarettes
Have not used
alcohol in the
previous month
69%
HEALTH SKILLS ACTIVITY
REFUSAL SKILLS
Avoiding Risk Behaviors
Miguel and Jamie have been friends for
many years, but lately Jamie has been
changing. He has started hanging out with
some teens who ride their skateboards in
traffic, start fights, and smoke. Miguel has
met these guys and feels uncomfortable
about hanging out with them. Now Jamie is
trying to convince Miguel to skip school
with him so that they can spend time at the
arcade with these guys. Miguel doesn’t
want to skip school to hang out with
Jamie’s friends. How can Miguel refuse
Jamie’s request?
S AY N O I N A F I R M VO I C E .
T E LL W HY N OT.
O F F E R AN OTH E R I D EA .
P R O M PTLY LEAVE .
What Would You Do?
S.T.O.P. is an easy way to remember
how to use refusal skills when someone asks
you to do something unhealthful or unsafe.
With a classmate, role-play a scene in which
Miguel uses S.T.O.P. to say no to Jamie.
Knowing the Risks
Why do some teens take risks? Some young people take risks
because they believe that nothing bad can happen to them. Others
may question whether certain actions are really risky. They may
believe, for example, that people who have accidents are just unlucky. This idea is subjective, which means that it comes from a
person’s own views and beliefs, not necessarily from facts.
When considering risks, it is much better to use objective
information, which is information based on facts. Objective information can help you act responsibly so that you can prevent injuries
and illnesses. The following is an example of subjective versus
objective thinking:
• Subjective (involving a person’s own views): “Lots of people
smoke cigarettes, so how harmful can it be?”
• Objective (based on facts): The average smoker has a risk of
dying from cancer of the lung, throat, or mouth that is 14 times
greater than that of a nonsmoker.
LESSON 3: HEALTH RISKS
✔
Reading Check
Distinguish between
subjective and objective
statements. Write subjective and objective
statements about smoking or another risk
behavior.
AND
YOUR BEHAVIOR
15
Reducing and Avoiding Risks
One of the most effective strategies to reduce risks or even
avoid them entirely is to practice prevention. Prevention means
taking steps to make sure that something does not happen. For
example, wearing a helmet can prevent head injuries. Being on the
lookout for hazards, or potential sources of danger, is an important
part of prevention. If you’re aware of hazards, you can protect
yourself against them. For example, riding your bike in bad
weather is a hazard. You can keep yourself safer by slowing down.
A key element of prevention is abstinence, or not participating
in unsafe behaviors or activities. If you abstain from using tobacco
or alcohol or engaging in sexual activity, you can avoid the serious
consequences associated with these risk behaviors. Figure 1.5
shows several ways you can protect yourself from risk.
FIGURE 1.5
Shield Yourself from Risk
Each of these attitudes and actions can help you protect yourself
against risks that could threaten your health and even your life.
Which of these do you practice?
16
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
Keeping Yourself Healthy
You can take an active role in caring for your health. Keeping
health and safety in mind will help you enjoy life while protecting
your own health and that of others. Most injuries are not caused by
bad luck or fate but by poor decision making. If you act responsibly
and avoid risks, you can prevent most injuries. By practicing good
health habits, you can also prevent many illnesses.
I DENTIFYING RISK
BEHAVIORS
Watch a half-hour
television program.
Make a list of the
risk behaviors displayed by characters on the show.
How do you think
the characters’
behavior might
influence viewers?
How have you
been influenced
by television?
You can avoid most sports injuries by wearing the correct
protective equipment and following the rules. What else
can you do to learn how to play a sport more safely?
Lesson
Lesson
3
Review
Review
Using complete sentences, answer the
following questions on a sheet of paper.
5. Describe Suppose that you were going to
spend a day on a boat. What precautions
might you take to avoid risks?
Reviewing Terms and Facts
1. Vocabulary Define the term risk behavior.
2. Identify List six types of consequences
that may result from risk behavior.
3. Vocabulary Define the term cumulative
risks. Then give an example of a cumulative risk.
Thinking Critically
4. Analyze Explain the role of media and
technology in influencing individual and
community health.
Applying Health Skills
6. Refusal Skills On hot summer days, you
and two of your close friends like to go
swimming in a nearby lake. Lately, your
friends have been talking about climbing
onto some rocks and diving into the water.
You think that the plan sounds dangerous.
You could get hurt on the rocks or hit your
head when you enter the water. Explain
how you would use S.T.O.P. to respond to
your friends’ request.
LESSON 3: HEALTH RISKS
AND
YOUR BEHAVIOR
17
Do You Have
Sleep Smarts?
Quiz
1.
How many hours of sleep
does a teen need each night?
Take our test to see if
you need to wake up
your sleeping habits!
a. Five
b. Seven
c. Nine or more
2.
You are probably overtired
if you
a. sleep until noon on the
weekends.
b. can’t react as quickly as
you used to while playing
computer games.
c. don’t feel like socializing
as much as you have in
the past.
d. All of the above
3.
Pulling an all-nighter before a
big test will usually help you
score a better grade than
studying and then getting a
good night’s sleep.
a. True
4.
b. False
Sleeplessness in teens is
commonly caused by
a. anxiety about school or
sports.
b. poor eating habits.
c. a lack of physical activity.
d. All of the above
Answers: 1. c.; 2. d.; 3. b.; 4. d.
Check out the explanations on the next page!
18
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
SNOOZE NEWS
THESE sleep facts are interesting
enough to keep anyone awake:
HUMANS spend about a third of their
lives sleeping.
THE record for the longest period of
time without sleep is 18 days, 21 hours,
and 40 minutes, which took place
during a rocking chair marathon. The
record holder experienced hallucinations, slurred speech, blurred
vision, and lapses in memory and
concentration.
PEOPLE can sleep for a brief period of
time with their eyes open—without
even knowing they are asleep.
DURING rapid eye movement (REM)
sleep, a person’s eyes move back and
Explanations
A teen needs nine or more hours of
sleep each night to function at his or her
best. “Research shows that growth
hormones are secreted [released]
during sleep,” says sleep expert Amy Wolfson
of the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts. “The teen years are an important period of
growth, so it makes sense that [teens] would need
more rest.”
1.
If you’re overtired, it will affect
all areas of your life: how well you
concentrate in class, your ability to remember
simple facts, your health—even your social life.
“When we don’t get enough sleep it affects our
mood, making us prone to feeling depressed and
less sociable,” explains Wolfson. To combat this,
make sure you sleep for at least nine hours and
keep a regular sleep schedule by going to bed and
waking up at roughly the same time each day.
2.
Instead of pulling an all-nighter, you’d
probably do better on the exam if you studied and slept. “Memory is impaired when
you don’t get a good night’s sleep,”
explains sleep researcher Mary Carskadon.
Without sleep, it’s likely that you’ll forget some of
what you learned the night before the test.
3.
Common causes of sleeplessness in
teens are anxiety, poor diet, and lack of
exercise. Learning to deal with stress
and not overloading your schedule
are keys to a better night’s sleep.
Reducing your intake of caffeine and sweets and
getting regular physical activity can also help you
sleep at night.
4.
forth quickly. REM sleep usually
begins about 90 minutes after
falling asleep and occurs in bursts
that total about two hours a night.
This is the period when most
dreams take place.
NONHUMAN primates, such as
chimps, monkeys, and baboons,
sleep about 10 hours a day. Brown
bats sleep nearly 20 hours a day,
while giraffes sleep less than two
hours a day.
PEOPLE fall asleep more easily when
body temperature drops, which is
why it is often difficult to drop off
during hot summer nights.
Sources: Dr. Eric Chudler, University of Washington;
Australian Broadcasting Corp.; ThinkQuest; Stanford
University
About Sleep Habits
For seven consecutive nights, record the
number of hours you sleep. Compute the
average number of hours you slept each
night. Compare your average with those
of your classmates. On days you sleep
fewer hours than your average, do you
notice any difference in the way you feel
and in how you perform in school? Set a
goal to get an adequate amount of sleep
each night.
TIME HEALTH: DO YOU HAVE SLEEP SMARTS?
19
BUILDING
HEALTH
SKILLS
A CC E S S I N G I N F O RMATI O N
N
W
O
D
G
N
I THE FACTS
K
C
A
TR
Model
Some teens take health risks without realizing it because
they act on subjective, rather than objective, information.
Hey, Samuel. I
didn’t know you were
going to try out for
the wrestling
team.
Read this conversation between Eli and Samuel. The objective information is in green. The subjective information is in red.
Yep! I’ve
been working on my
technique.
Me too. What have
you been doing to get
ready for tryouts?
I’m thinking about using
some pills to lose weight. I don’t
want to wrestle in the higher weight
class. My brother says diet pills aren’t
dangerous and they help you lose
weight fast. He says all the good
wrestlers use them.
Well, I’ve been eating
lots of fruits, vegetables,
and pasta. My health book says
that athletes need complex carbohydrates. I’ve also been trying to get
enough sleep. I read in the newspaper that most teens don’t
get enough sleep.
Are you doing anything
to improve your strength
and endurance?
Yeah. I got this workout idea in a
wrestling magazine. I do aerobic exercises,
like jogging, to increase my stamina. I do weight
training to build strength. I’m also taking several
vitamins every day. I’m convinced you
can’t get too many vitamins.
20
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
Hey, maybe we could
work out one day soon.
H’S
OAC
BOX
C
Practice
Below are seven statements about health. Can you separate
the subjective from the objective information? Use your textbook to find the facts. When you find a subjective statement,
change it to an objective statement.
• Anger is a bad emotion.
• Regular shampooing prevents head lice.
• Almost half of the deaths of young people result from accidents.
• Snacking is bad for you.
• Most of your body is water.
• All stress is negative and should be avoided.
• Smokeless tobacco is a safe alternative to cigarettes.
Accessing
Information
Ask yourself these
questions about
any source of information.
• Is it scientific?
• Does it give only
one point of view?
• Is it trying to sell
something?
• Does it agree with
other sources?
Apply/Assess
Finding accurate information improves your ability to make
healthful choices. It can also help you be a source of accurate
information for your friends and family. Choose an area of
health that interests you. You may use the Table of Contents in
this book to review the different areas of health.
Use sources of objective information to find four health facts
that teens should know. Report your facts to the class in the
form of a chart. See the example below.
Self - Check
• Does my chart
•
•
Fact
Source(s)
Why I Believe This
Source Is Objective
Eating chocolate
does NOT cause
acne.
www.familydoctor.org
uses the logo of the
American Academy
of Family Physicians
www.aad.org
site of the American
Academy of Dermatology
include four
health facts?
Does my chart
show where to
find objective
information?
Does my chart
explain why each
source I found
provides objective information?
BUILDING HEALTH SKILLS: TRACKING DOWN
THE
FACTS
21
CHAPTER
ASSESSMENT
1
After You Read
Use your completed Foldable to
review the information on the
three aspects of health.
Reviewing Vocabulary
and Concepts
On a sheet of paper, write the numbers 1–5.
After each number, write the term from the list
that best completes each statement.
[
• self-assessment • mental/emotional
• physical
• social
wellness
•
]
Lesson 1
1. Your
health involves the condition of your body.
2. Being patient with yourself when learning
a new skill and taking responsibility for
your actions are both examples of
health.
3. How well you get along with others is a
key part of your
health.
4. Careful examination and judgment of your
own patterns of behavior is
.
5. One sign of a high level of
is
a consistent feeling of well-being.
On a sheet of paper, write the numbers
6–18. Write True or False for each statement
below. If the statement is false, change the
underlined word or phrase to make it true.
Lesson 2
6. Air pollution is an environmental factor
that can affect your health.
22
CHAPTER 1: LEARNING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH
7. Heredity is one part of your health framework that does not change.
8. A friend who encourages you to smoke is
an example of a positive influence.
9. The beliefs, customs, and traditions
of a specific group of people is known
as culture.
10. Media are the various methods for communicating information.
11. It is important to accept the information
you learn from television programs,
magazines, or any other media source.
Lesson 3
12. Risks are the possibility that something
harmful may happen to your health and
wellness.
13. A fallen tree in the middle of a bicycle
path and a high level of dietary fat are
both examples of abstinence.
14. Injuries and disabilities are two possible
physical consequences of taking unnecessary risks.
15. If a statement is objective, it is based on a
person’s views and beliefs, not necessarily
on facts.
16. If a statement is subjective, it is based on
facts.
17. Going canoeing without wearing a life
jacket when the current is strong and with
someone who has no experience is an
example of cumulative risks.
18. Not smoking is one example of hazards.
Thinking Critically
Using complete sentences, answer the
following questions on a sheet of paper.
19. Hypothesize If your mental/emotional
health improves, how might other aspects
of your health be affected?
20. Assess How can you contribute to the
strengthening of health-related policies at
your school?
21. Evaluate In your opinion, which factor is
a greater influence on your health: heredity or environment? Why?
22. Apply Imagine that you are getting to
know a group of new friends. Tell how
you would decide whether these friends
were going to be a positive or negative influence on your health.
23. Explain Interpret critical issues related to
solving problems: How can you resist
peer pressure to try alcohol or other
drugs?
Standardized
Career Corner
Health Teacher Do you like learning about
health? Do you think you have a talent for
helping others learn new information? If so, a
career as a health teacher might be for you.
This career requires excellent communication
skills and the ability to motivate others. You’ll
also need a four-year teaching degree with
specialized courses in health education. One
way to prepare for this career is by tutoring
others. For more information, visit Career
Corner at health.glencoe.com.
Test Practice
1. In the passage, the word “bustling” helps
the reader see that the scene is
Read the paragraphs below and
then answer the questions.
busy.
beautiful.
peaceful.
It is early morning and Mead Park Recreation Center is bustling with activity. A few
joggers are making their way around the
pond. Tennis partners are unpacking their
racquets and balls for a morning match. Players and coaches are out on the softball field
getting ready for another game.
More and more people are becoming
physically active on a regular basis. Some engage in physical activity to improve their level
of fitness or to achieve a healthful weight.
Many people are physically active because
they know how much better they feel after a
game or a run. There are many reasons to be
active, but one thing is clear: physical activity
benefits physical, mental/emotional, and social health.
TH05_C2.glencoe.com/quiz
confused.
2. Which of the following best describes the
organization of the second paragraph?
ranking reasons to be physically active in order of importance
explaining the pros and cons of physical activity
presenting events in the order in
which they occur
presenting different reasons for being
physically active
3. Write a paragraph giving the reasons why
you think more people are engaging in regular physical activity.
CHAPTER 1 ASSESSMENT
23

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