High School Language Arts - Weld County School District 6

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2012-2013
Curriculum Guides
High School
Language Arts
Weld County School District 6
Learning Services
1025 9th Avenue
Greeley, CO 80631
970/348-6000
th
9 Grade
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 1-Narrative
Inquiry Questions:
Ninth Grade
Unit Motif: Loss
English Curriculum Guide
Timeline: August 16- October 12
Days: 32
Vocabulary: Annotation, Plot Structure (review), Theme, Author’s Purpose, Motif, Conflict,
Irony (Situational, Dramatic, Verbal), Topic Sentence, Genre, Personification,
Understatement, Metaphor, Simile, Protagonist/Antagonist (review), Characterization,
Dialogue, Foreshadowing, Figurative Language (concept overall), mood
Bold= Necessary for assessments, (Review) = Taught in previous grades*
Standard(s): 2. Reading for All Purposes, 3. Writing and Composition
Grade Level Expectations (GLE):
2.1 Increasingly complex literary elements in traditional and contemporary works of literature require scrutiny and comparison
3.1 Literary and Narrative texts develop a controlling idea or theme with descriptive and expressive language
3.3 Writing for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity requires ongoing refinements and revisions
Assessments
District Writing PreAssessmentEnter scores by August 24
Galileo Benchmark
AssessmentReading #1, Writing #1 =
September 10-14
Common Unit AssessmentReading and Writing (2 tests) =
October 12
* The writing assessment for this
unit is a multi-paragraph
narrative writing task.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
2.1.a. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a
text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a
comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well
as its aesthetic impact.
b. Describe and contrast characteristics of specific literary movements and perspectives
c. Evaluate the influence of historical context on the form, style, and point of view of a
written work
d. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of
literature from outside the united states, drawing on a wide reading of world
literature.
e. Evaluate how literary components impact meaning(such as tone, symbolism, irony,
extended metaphor, satire, hyperbole)
3.1.a Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
i. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation,
establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or
characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
ii. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another
to create a coherent whole.
b. Write literary and narrative texts using a range of poetic techniques, figurative
language, and graphic elements to engage or entertain the intended audience
c. Refine the expression of voice and tone in a text by selecting and using appropriate
vocabulary, sentence structure, and sentence organization
d. Review and revise ideas and development in substantive ways to improve the depth
of ideas and vividness of supporting details
e. Explain strengths and weaknesses of own writing and the writing of others using
criteria (e.g., checklists, scoring guides)
3.3.a. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
Page 1 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Instruction
• To prepare for Common Unit
Assessment, students should
write a variety of SCRs
analyzing an author’s use of
the vocabulary words above in
a reading selection.
• Review (not reteach)
elements of plot
• Think, Write, Pair, Share use
DWA Paragraph as both a
paragraph diagnostic and a
thematic hook for the unit.
Discuss student responses in
small group/class
• Write a series of journals in
which students personally
reflect on themes found within
literature selections.
• Developing higher level
questions about conflict,
symbolism, characterization,
revenge, tone and mood.
• Cornell Note
• Costas Level questions
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
i. Identify comma splices and fused sentences in writing and revise to eliminate
them
ii. Distinguish between phrases and clauses and use this knowledge to write varied,
strong, correct, complete sentences
iii. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
iv. Spell correctly.
b. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and
style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations
for writing types are defined in expectations 1 and 2 above.)
c. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific
purpose and audience.
d. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or
shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other
information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
Resources: Reading- See suggested selections included below, AVID Annotation strategies
Writing- Narrative Structure (Blue Write Source) page 89
Personal Narrative Exemplar (Orange Text) 168
Grammar- (suggested lessons) Punctuation in Write Source pages 605-648, Review parts of speech (pages 533-548)
Suggested Reading Selections:
The Rights to the Streets of Memphis
Fish Cheeks
I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
The Sniper
Two Kinds
Grape Sherbet
I Ask my Mother to Sing
The Necklace
Pyramus and Thisbe
The Gift of the Magi
The Raven
The Pearl- John Steinbeck
The Lord of the Flies- William Golding
The Scarlett Ibis
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page in Orange Textbook
page 110
176 (part of a test)
246
405
472
681
680
page 206
1064
94
138
Not in book
Not in book
426
Page 2 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Genre
Memoir
Memoir
Autobiography
Short Story
Short Story
Poem
Poem
Short Story
Epic Poem
Short Story
Narrative Poem
Novella
Novel
Short Story
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 2-Expository
Inquiry Questions:
Ninth Grade
Unit Motif: Change
English Curriculum Guide
Timeline: October 15- November 9
Days: 15
Vocabulary: Main idea, Author’s Purpose (inform/explain, persuade, entertain,
describe), Genres of Writing, Essay writing form (thesis statement, main points,
body paragraphs, topic sentence, evidence, citation, internal transitions, external
transitions), Point of View (1st, 2nd, 3rd), Cause and Effect (review), Chronological
Order (review), Classification (review), Compare/Contrast (review), Glossary,
Index, Footnote, Endnote, Bibliography/Works Cited, Dictionary Entry Format,
caption, tone Bold= Necessary for assessments
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes, 3. Writing and Composition
Grade Level Expectations (GLE):
2.2 Increasingly complex informational texts require mature interpretation and study
3.2 Informational and persuasive texts develop a topic and establish a controlling idea or thesis with relevant support
3.3 Writing for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity requires ongoing refinements and revisions
Assessments
Galileo Benchmark AssessmentReading #2= October 15-19
Common Unit AssessmentReading and Writing (2 tests) = November
9
* The writing assessment for this unit is a
multi-paragraph, expository literary
analysis essay. It will take multiple class
periods to complete. See assessment
instructions and documents.
Evidence Outcomes
2.2.a Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development
over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped
and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.
b. Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and
refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a
text (e.g., a section or chapter). (CCSS: RI.9-10.5)
d. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events,
including the order in which the points are made, how they are
introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn
between them. (CCSS: RI.9-10.3)
e. Use flexible reading and note-taking strategies (outlining, mapping
systems, skimming, scanning, key word search) to organize
information and make connections within and across informational
texts
f. Critique author's choice of expository, narrative, persuasive, or
descriptive modes to convey a message
3.2.a. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive
topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient
evidence.
i. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
ii. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for
each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page 3 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Instruction
Review the concept of “Text
Features” by having students identify
selected elements within novels,
textbooks, articles, and other misc.
non-fiction. This works well in the
“Who Killed the Iceman” reading.
Review how to accurately read
dictionary entries to pick apart the
different components and their
meanings. Possibly take one class
period to accomplish this.
manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and
concerns.
iii. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the
text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s)
and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s)
and counterclaims.
viii. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while
attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which
they are writing.
ix. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and
supports the argument presented.
3.3.a. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
i. Identify comma splices and fused sentences in writing and revise to
eliminate them
ii. Distinguish between phrases and clauses and use this knowledge to
write varied, strong, correct, complete sentences
iii. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
iv. Spell correctly.
Resources: Reading- See suggested selections included below, AVID strategies
Writing- Literary Analysis (Orange Text) Page 490- 497, Write Source Page255-311
Grammar- (suggested lessons) Mechanics and Idioms 648-677 in Write Source
Suggested Reading Selections
Who Killed the Iceman and Skeletal Sculptures
The Things They Carried
“For Poets”
The Future in My Arms
From Here to There: The Physics of Time Travel
Sowing Change
The Lost Boys
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page in Orange Textbook
Page 534- 544
Tim O’Brien (not in book)
704
460
51
422
546
Page 4 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Genre
Article
Novel
Poem
Short Story/ Autobiography
Article
Article
Article
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 3-Research
Inquiry Questions:
Ninth Grade
English Curriculum Guide
Unit Motif: Capturing Controversy in Multiple Mediums
Timeline: November 12- December 20
Days: 19
Vocabulary: Works cited, citations, writing process (review), quote integration, fact versus
opinion (review), evaluate, credibility, database, primary source, secondary source, thesis
statement (review), valid, controversy, synthesize, Bold= Necessary for assessments
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition , 4. Research and Reasoning
Grade Level Expectations (GLE):
3.2 Informational and persuasive texts develop a topic and establish a controlling idea or thesis with relevant support
3.3 Writing for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity requires ongoing refinements and revisions
4.1 Informational materials, including electronic sources, need to be collected, evaluated, and analyzed for accuracy, relevance, and
effectiveness for answering research questions
4.2 Effective problem-solving strategies require high-quality reasoning
Assessments
Galileo Benchmark AssessmentReading #3: December 3- 7
Common Unit AssessmentReading and Writing (2 tasks)=
Due December 20
* The writing assessment for this
unit is a multi-paragraph,
expository research paper.
Completion of this task will take
the entire unit. The final product
will be assessed on the provided
rubric.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
2.2.c. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information through close text study and
investigation via other sources
2.2.f. Critique author'’ choice of expository, narrative, persuasive, or descriptive
modes to convey a message
3.2.a. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
i. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
iii. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and
reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
vi. Revise ideas and structure to improve depth of information and logic of
organization
viii. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
ix. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the argument presented.
3.3.a. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
i. Identify comma splices and fused sentences in writing and revise to
eliminate them
ii. Distinguish between phrases and clauses and use this knowledge to write
varied, strong, correct, complete sentences
iii. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
iv. Spell correctly.
b. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and
Page 5 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Instruction
Suggested Timeline for Research
Paper Instruction and Completion:
This timeline accounts for teaching
of skills and student independent
practice.
November 12- 20 = Read, annotate,
summarize, cite, and pull quotes
from researched materials.
(Remember, materials have been
provided, but you may use your own
as well)
November 26- 30 = Outline and draft
papers in class. Format works cited
page.
December 3- 7 = Revise and Edit
drafts
December 10- 14 = Prepare and
finalize complete research paper for
submission.
style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific
expectations for writing types are defined in expectations 1 and 2 above.)
c. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.
4.1.c. Judge the usefulness of information based on relevance to purpose, source,
objectivity, copyright date, cultural and world perspective (such as editorials),
and support the decision
4.1.d. Examine materials to determine appropriate primary and secondary sources
to use for investigating a question, topic, or issue (e.g., library databases,
print and electronic encyclopedia and other reference materials, pamphlets,
book excerpts, online and print newspaper and magazine articles, letters to an
editor, digital forums, oral records, research summaries, scientific and trade
journals)
4.2.b. Assess strengths and weaknesses of their thinking and thinking of others by
using criteria including relevance, clarity, accuracy, fairness, significance,
depth, breadth, logic and precision
Resources: Reading- See provided researched articles, essays, etc., Research Strategies- (orange text) 1189-2010. (Write Source) 343-354
Writing- (Orange Text) 1211-1233, (Write Source) 355-392
Grammar- Using the Right Word 678-699 (write source)
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page 6 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 4-Persuasion
Inquiry Questions:
Ninth Grade
English Curriculum Guide
Unit Motif: Freedom vs. Control
Timeline: January 7-March 1
Days: 30
Vocabulary: Logos, Ethos, Pathos (Emotional appeals to fear, pity, vanity), Speaker, Audience, Occasion, Purpose,
Alliteration, Connotation and Denotation, Diction and Word Choice, Analogy, Hyperbole, Imagery, Rhetorical Device,
Repetition, Parallelism, Rhetorical Question, Understatement, Voice, Argument, Claim, Counterargument, Refute,
Evidence, Bias, Assumption, Cliché, Credibility, Evaluate, Fallacy (circular reasoning, either/or, oversimplification,
overgeneralization, faulty reasoning) Bold= Necessary for assessments
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes, 3. Writing and Composition
Grade Level Expectations (GLE):
2.2 Increasingly complex informational texts require mature interpretation and study
3.2 Informational and persuasive texts develop a topic and establish a controlling idea or thesis with relevant support
3.3 Writing for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity requires ongoing refinements and revisions
Assessments
Galileo Benchmark
AssessmentWriting #2: January 14th - 18th
Common Unit AssessmentReading & Writing (2 tasks) =
Due March 1
* The writing assessment for this
unit is a multi-paragraph,
persuasive essay.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
1.2.a. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10
topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively.
i. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making
(e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of
alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
g. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats
(e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of
each source.
2.2.a. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by
specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
b. Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by
particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or
chapter).
d. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including
the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and
developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
e. Use flexible reading and note-taking strategies (outlining, mapping systems,
skimming, scanning, key word search) to organize information and make
connections within and across informational texts
f. Critique author's choice of expository, narrative, persuasive, or descriptive modes
to convey a message
g. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient;
identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
3.2.a. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
Page 7 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Instruction
Socratic Seminar or Philosophical
Chairs- to make sure you reach
evidence outcomes, it is important
you have some sort of collaborative
discussion. Ideas could include
picking a hot-topic article and then
discussing both sides, or possibly
assigning sides to a debatable issue.
Analyze the Message of Persuasive
arguments in multiple formatsAudio, visual, and written. Example
lesson: find an advertisement and
have students identify the persuasive
message (what does this ad want you
to do or think after you view it? How
do you know?)
Fiction as Persuasion This is an
opportunity to connect the term
“theme” to persuasion. A movie,
story, book, etc has a theme that is
intended to persuade an audience.
Have students create a list of
persuasive themes and connect them
to short stories.
texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
i. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
ii. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while
pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that
anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
iii. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons,
between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
iv. Use appropriate rhetorical appeals and genre to engage and guide the
intended audience
v. Anticipate and address readers' biases and expectations
vii. Explain and imitate emotional, logical, and ethical appeals used by writers
who are trying to persuade an audience
ix. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the
argument presented.
3.3.a. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
i. Identify comma splices and fused sentences in writing and revise to eliminate
them
ii. Distinguish between phrases and clauses and use this knowledge to write
varied, strong, correct, complete sentences
iii. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
iv. Spell correctly.
4.2.c. Implement a purposeful and articulated process to solve a problem
4.2.d. Monitor and reflect on the rationale for, and effectiveness of, choices made
throughout the problem-solving process
Resources: Reading- See suggested selections included below, AVID strategies
Writing- Persuasion (Orange Text) Page 908-914, Write Source Page 201-253
Grammar- (suggested lessons) Review Parts of Speech 700-737, Sentence Structure/Variation 738-763 in Write Source
Title of Reading Selection
Primal Screen
How Private is your Private Life
The Privacy Debate
I Have a Dream
The Pedestrian
Parkinson’s Disease Research and Treatment Persuasive Speech
The Future in My Arms
The Road Not Taken
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page In Orange Textbook
640
620
628
600
642
612
460
724
Page 8 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Genre
Article
Article
Article
Speech
Short Story
Speech
Short Story
Poem
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 5-Speech
Inquiry Questions:
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Unit Motif: Obligation to Family Timeline: March 4-May 22
Days: 36
Public Speaking Vocabulary: Adaptation, Analogy, Imagery, Delivery Skills (Eye Contact, Projection,
Gesture, Posture/Stance, Verbal Fillers) Attention Grabber, Audience, Purpose, Occasion,
Verbal/Nonverbal Communication, Active Listening, Critique, Constructive Feedback,
Dramatic Speaking Vocabulary: Act, Scene, Prologue, Stage Directions, Characterization, Aside,
Dialogue, Soliloquy and/or Monologue, Tragic hero, Blank Verse, Iambic Pentameter, Figurative Language,
Conflict, Foil, Pun, Irony, Script
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening
Grade Level Expectations (GLE):
1.1 Oral presentations require effective preparation strategies
1.2 Listen critically to comprehend a speaker’s message requires mental and physical strategies to direct and maintain attention
Assessments
Galileo Benchmark AssessmentReading #4, Writing #3: May 6-10
Common Unit AssessmentSpeech and Critique (2 tasks)= Due March 28
(suggested)
* The unit assessment is an oral speech
presentation and peer critique. It will take
multiple class periods to complete. See
assessment instructions and documents.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
1.1.a. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating
command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
b. Use verbal and nonverbal techniques to communicate information
c. Define a position and select evidence to support that position
d. Develop a well-organized presentation to defend a position
e. Use effective audience and oral delivery skills to persuade an
audience
f. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio,
visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance
understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add
interest.
1.2.b. Follow the speaker’s arguments as they develop; take notes
when appropriate
c. Give verbal and nonverbal feedback to the speaker
d. Ask clarifying questions
e. Evaluate arguments and evidence
f. Explain how variables such as background knowledge, experiences,
values, and beliefs can affect communication.
g. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse
media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally)
evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
2.1.f. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature,
including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text
complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the
high end of the range.
2.2.h. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently,
with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Page 9 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Instruction
Suggested Timeline for Speech Unit
Completion:
This timeline accounts for teaching of
skills and student independent
practice.
March 4- 28- Adapt, practice, and
present speeches as per provided
guidelines
• Be sure to allow in-class time for
students to rehearse their
speeches!
• Consider a computer-lab day (or 2)
to create multi-media
presentations
April 8- May 17 – Focus on dramatic
speech element of this unit.
• Consider incorporating a smallscale
performance/interpretation
activity.
Resources: Reading- See suggested selections included below, AVID strategies,
Writing- Speech (Orange Text) Page 650-657, R76-R83 , Write Source Page 393-403 (reworking a draft into a speech/making oral presentations)
Grammar- (suggested lessons) Review grammar skills as necessary, such as commas, commonly confused words, phrases and clauses, run on
sentences and sentence fragments, etc. Utilize resources in Write Source and McDougall Littell (orange book) supplements.
Title of Reading Selection
Fences
Romeo and Juliet
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
American Rhetoric Website (Misc Speeches-audio, video, and text)
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page In Orange Textbook
Not in book
Not in book
Not in book (http://americanrhetoric.com/)
Page 10 of 10
English 9 Curriculum Guide
Genre
Play
Play
Play
Speech
th
10 Grade
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Tenth Grade
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 1: Narrative and Poetry
Enduring Concept:
Timeline: Aug. 18 – Oct. 19 (1st 9-weeks)
The Power of Choice - Freedom and Individuality versus Tyranny and Conformity
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.2 Effectively operating in small and large groups to accomplish a goal requires active listening.
2.1 Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
3.1 Literary and narrative genres feature a variety of stylistic devices to engage or entertain an audience.
3.3 Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking: (From the standards document)
Vocabulary:
1. Why is being able to effectively function in a collaborative group a necessary skill?
•conflict •inferences and conclusions •mood
2. How can individuals monitor their own group's progress and effectiveness?
•foreshadowing •imagery •irony •metaphor • simile
3. What makes the final draft of a document look professional and polished?
•symbolism •theme •points of view •flashback
4. How does paragraph structure and formatting increase the clarity of the writer's message?
•juxtaposition • oxymoron • hyperbole •personification
5. What is the difference between personality and the impact a culture has on writing style?
6. Are there really a limited number of themes in the world, despite the historical story differences?
Assessments
Performance Tasks
Unit 1 Common Pretest
Prompt:
Prompt: The plot in “Harrison
Bergeron” suggests that by
making everyone equal,
society will be improved.
Using examples from the text,
identify and analyze how
Vonnegut develops this idea. A
good answer might consider
literary elements such as
conflict, hyperbole, satire and
theme.
August 22-26
Common Reading Assessment
#1:
See assessment. Completed by
October 12
Common Writing Assessment
#1 Prompt: A new law in the
near future is passed that,
much like smoking, bans cellphone usage (including text,
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
These Focus Standards have been selected for the unit from the Common Core State Standards.
1.2a. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts ,and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
1.2a.i.Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange
of ideas.
1.2a.ii. Support others in discussions, activities, and presentations through active listening
1.2a.iii. Listen actively in groups to accomplish a goal
1.2a.iv. Contribute effectively in both small and large groups to collaboratively accomplish a goal
1.2a.v. Choose specific words for intended effect on particular audiences
1.2a.vi. Facilitate (or lead) a group by developing an agenda designed to accomplish a specified goal
1.2a.vii. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or
larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
1.2a.viii. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence
and reasoning presented.
1.2.b. Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning
or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
2.1.a. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
drawn from the text.
2.1.b. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative
meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language
evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
2.1.c. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
smart-phone functions, etc.) in
all public places. Create a
fictional experience that might
address consequences (bad or
good), human nature including
rebellion or acceptance, and
ways the laws are enforced
and/or controlled.
Completed by October 12
Other Suggested Assessments:
Collaborative Reflecting and
Note-Taking:
Reflect on seminar questions,
take notes on your responses,
and note the page numbers of
the textual evidence you will
refer to in your seminar and/or
essay answers. Share your notes
with a partner for feedback and
guidance. Have you interpreted
the text correctly? Is your
evidence convincing?
Galileo Reading and Writing
Benchmarks:
Sept. 10-14
Galileo Reading Benchmarks
#2:
Oct. 15 – Oct. 18
or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden's "Musée des Beaux Arts" and Breughel's Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).
2.1.d. Analyze how literary components affect meaning
2.1.e. Explain the relationship between author's style and literary effect.
2.1.f. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of
the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
2.3.b. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
2.3.b.i. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
2.3.b.ii. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
2.3.c. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing,
speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary
knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
3.1.a. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details,
and well-structured event sequences.
3.1.a.i. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.
3.1.a.ii. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences,
events, setting, and/or characters.
3.1.a.iii. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of
the narrative.
3.2.a. Write literary and narrative texts using a range of stylistic devices (poetic techniques, figurative language, imagery,
graphic elements) to support the presentation of implicit or explicit theme
3.2.b. Use a variety of strategies to evaluate whether the writing is presented in a creative and reflective manner (e.g.,
reading the draft aloud, seeking feedback from a reviewer, scoring guides)
3.2.c. Revise texts using feedback to enhance the effect on the reader and clarify the presentation of implicit or explicit
theme.
3.4.a. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
3.4.a.i Use parallel structure.
3.4.a.ii Distinguish between the active and passive voice, and write in the active voice.
3.4.a.iii Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses
(independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or
presentations.
3.4.b. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
3.4.b.i. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
3.4.b.ii. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Introduction
• Consider a Gallery Walk Response – Post a variety of futuristic quotes related to predictions and/or changes students will see in their lifetime. Students walk
around and post comments/beliefs/ideas.
• Identify fads and/or trends popular within the school (i.e. tattoos, body piercings, smoking, clothing styles, electronic devices, cars). In groups or
think/pair/share, students discuss one fad and answer the following questions:
1. Why do you or don’t you conform to the fad?
2. Do you believe popular culture emphasizes individuality or does it force you to conform?
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
3. Does popular culture lead trends or follow them? Does art imitate reality or does reality imitate art?
• Introduce the students to the different types of poems
• Using The Piano, by D.H. Lawrence- and Fifteen by William Stafford
• Use Cornell notes to identify the poetic devices, i.e. simile, metaphor, imagery
Writing
District Writing Assessment Prompt: Students writing about mistakes.
SCR responses to individual work and/or group seminar discussions.
• What do you take for granted? (“Searching for Summer”)
• What makes something valuable? (“Harrison Bergeron,” “Everyday Use,” “By the Waters of Babylon”)
• What if everyone were the equal? (“Harrison Bergeron”)
Inquiry
Classroom Activity
What is your motto (a piggy-back off the novel Anthem)? Moving students to “What is it I believe? Suggested Activity: Students create their own motto in three
words or less, write it on their own hand(s), and the teacher takes a snap shot of it and either (1.) post pictures on bulletin board or load into a PowerPoint
presentation.
Suggested Instructional Strategy: Consider Venn Diagram while reading and discussing multiple short stories.
Collaboration
Reflect on seminar questions, take notes on your responses, and note the page numbers of the textual evidence you will refer to in your seminar and/or essay
answers. Share your notes with a partner for feedback and guidance: Have you interpreted the text correctly? Is your evidence convincing?
Reading
Seminar. Select passages from multiple texts that treat similar themes. How are the themes revealed in the different stories? What different techniques/literary
devices do the authors use to convey theme? Present evidence in a class discussion in which you use at least three pieces of textual evidence to support an
original thesis statement.
Read various poems and Think-Write-Pair-Share.
Post various poems along the classroom walls or hall and students work in pairs as they gallery walk to identify poetry elements and stylistic devices as guided by
the instructor.
Reader’s Theatre. Poetry Out Loud
Classroom Activity: Consider: In small groups read the poem The Love Song of J.Alfred Prufrock, by T.S. Elliot, Birches, by Robert Frost, or an appropriate but
challenging poem of your choice- have them analyze for knowledge, poetic devices, and purpose.
Suggested Instructional Strategy
Consider Numbered Heads. Ask each group to brainstorm the theme or main ideas from their discussions. Have students collaborate to agree on a thesis
statement. Then allow students to identify passages that support that thesis. Call on students (numbered heads) to share the evidence that supports that theme.
Students should be prepared to write an SCR about theme by the end of the activity.
Vocabulary
Use Cornell Notes to record definitions and examples of key literary terms. Use a student’s personal storehouse sheet to record vocabulary from the selections.
Closing Reflect in class discussion or in writing on the evidence outcomes:
• Identify emerging themes related to conformity and/or individuality.
• Explain their own belief and/or motto in SCR.
• Identify and explain elements of short story literature.
• Compare and contrast different techniques and themes from multiple selections.
Resources: See Resource Manager Attachment
Bolded Evidence Outcomes = Potential assessment items for 2012
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Tenth Grade
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 2: A World Of Ideas through Exposition and Persuasion
Enduring Concept: Ideas shape our world using rhetorical devices to persuade and inform an
Timeline: Oct. 24 – Dec. 21 (2nd 9 weeks)
audience.
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.1 Content that is gathered carefully and organized well successfully influences the audience
2.1 Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
2.2 The development of new ideas and concepts within information and persuasive manuscripts
3.2 Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
3.3c-d Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process
4.2.b Evaluate the accuracy of the information in a text, citing text-based evidence, author’s use of expert authority, and author’s credibility to defend the
evaluation.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking: (From the standards document)
Vocabulary: •persuasive appeals
1. Why is it important for communicators to organize their thinking when trying to support a position?
(ethos, pathos, logos) • credibility •fact
2. How can strong preparation be a useful tool in defending a position or trying to persuade others?
versus opinion •inductive reasoning
3. Why is it important that language match the audience being addressed?
•deductive reasoning •metaphor •simile
4. What are the implications of using language that may not match an audience?
•tone •diction •author’s purpose
5. How does voice make writing more interesting?
•author’s perspective • generalization
6. Why is correct grammar important to the reader?
7. After reading about the cultural (or historical) perspectives that were held by people during a specific time
period, what can be generalized about these individuals, and how has this event affected life today?
8. What is the difference between personality and the impact a culture has on writing style?
Assessments
Performance Tasks
Common Reading Assessment Unit 2:
December 13 and 14. See
assessment.
Common Writing Assessment Unit 2:
December 13 and 14
Prompt: What insight(s) have
you developed from the
essay, “Is Junk Food Really
Cheaper?” to further your
understanding of American
culture. Use examples from
the text to support ideas.
The essay “Is Junk Food
Really Cheaper?” is part of
the Common Reading
Assessment #2.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
1.1.b. Select organizational patterns and structures and choose precise vocabulary and rhetorical devices.
1.1.c. Make decisions about how to establish credibility and enhance appeal to the audience.
2.1 (See Standards addressed in Unit 1)
2.2.a. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
2.2.b. Provide a response to text that expresses an insight (such as an author's perspective or the nature of
conflict) or use text-based information to solve a problem not identified in the text (for example, use
information from a variety of sources to provide a response to text that expresses an insight).
2.2.c. Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and
multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
2.2.d. Compare the development of an idea or concept in multiple texts supported by text-based evidence.
2.2.e. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative,
and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g.,
how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
2.2.f. Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (e.g., Washington's Farewell Address, the
Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt's Four Freedoms speech, King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail"), including how they
address related themes and concepts.
2.2.g. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9-10 text
complexity band independently and proficiently.
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Galileo Reading and Writing
Benchmarks:
Dec. 12 – Dec. 21 (two-week testing
window)
3.2.a. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly
and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
3.2.a.i. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and
distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to
aiding comprehension.
3.2.a.ii. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details,
quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
3.2.a.iii. Choose and develop an effective appeal.
3.2.a.iv. Collect, organize, and evaluate materials to support ideas.
3.2.a.v. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify
the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
3.2.a.vi. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
3.2.a.vii. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of
the discipline in which they are writing.
3.2.a.viii. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation
presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
3.2.a.ix. Revise writing by evaluating relationship of central idea, evidence, and organizational pattern.
3.2.a.x. Explain how writers use organization and details to communicate their purposes.
3.2.a.xi. Present writing to an authentic audience and gauge effect on audience for intended purpose.
3.3.c. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective
choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
3.3.c.i. Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian's
Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
3.3.d. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in expectations 1-2
above.)
3.3.e. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
4.2 An author’s reasoning is the essence of legitimate writing and requires evaluating text for validity and accuracy.
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Introduction
Journaling Ideas:
• What would you rather have: wealth, brains or looks? Explain your rationale.
• If you could become wealthy through illegal means and not get caught would you do it?
• Why keep what is no longer useful? (“Abolishing the Penny Makes Good Sense”)
• What would make the world safer? (“On Nuclear Disarmament”)
• Do animals have rights? (“I Acknowledge Mine”)
• Do the Ends justify the means? (“Use of Animals in Biomedical Research”)
Writing
Persuasive Essay mimicking rhetorical techniques from reading.
Model persuasive writing, revising and editing with graphic organizers, outlines, supporting ideas, word choice, etc.
Provide Anchor Papers to analyze and score
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Inquiry
Classroom Activity
Consider: In groups create an advertising campaign that utilizes a persuasive appeal and uses rhetorical techniques. The campaign might be around a common
object (a rock, a coat hanger, a sponge) and why it is most important.
Viewing Guide for Political Ads (page 668-672 anthology) or use YouTube advertisements clips and discuss rhetoric and persuasive appeals.
Reading
Seminar
Reciprocal Reading
Reciprocal Teaching
Select passages from multiple texts highlighting rhetorical techniques. How are the techniques revealed in the different stories? What different
techniques/literary devices do the authors use to convey purpose?
Vocabulary: Consider TERMS: argument including claim, support, reasons, evidence, and counterargument; analogy, parallelism, repetition, and rhetorical
questions; speaker, audience, message, ethos, pathos, logos.
Use Cornell Notes to record definitions and examples of key rhetorical terms.
Use a student’s personal storehouse sheet to record vocabulary from the selections.
Closing
Prompt: In a multiple paragraph essay, that models persuasive and rhetorical techniques discussed in our reading, agree or disagree with one of the following
statements:
A) Given a choice, teenagers will waste time rather than spend it constructively.
B) Parents should impose more boundaries and restrictions on teenagers.
C) Teenagers are unable to function without technology.
Resources:
See Resource Manager Attachment
Bolded Evidence Outcomes = Potential assessment items for 2013
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Tenth Grade
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 3: The Author’s Craft through Persuasion and Research
Enduring Concept: What is style? - Elements That Reveal Style and Voice in
Timeline: Jan. 9 – Mar. 9 (3rd 9 weeks)
Reading/Writing
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
2.3 Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice all influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts.
3.2 Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
3.3 Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process.
4.1 Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share finding and conclusions
4.2 AN author’s reasoning is the essence of legitimate writing and requires evaluating text for validity and accuracy.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking: (From the standards document)
Vocabulary – Reading & Writing
1. How can multiple events in someone's life carry a particular theme?
•persuasive devices •thesis •sources
2. Why does an author choose to use this type of writing to make a point?
•plagiarism •documentation •work
3. How do readers organize thoughts as they read? Articulate how these thoughts are stored for future use (for
cited and parenthetical citations
example, connecting clues from Lincoln's early life to his leadership and honesty during his presidency).
•summarize •paraphrase •direct and
4. How does media influence the questions you ask about an issue?
indirect quotation • credibility •
5. What is "strong" evidence?
analogy • expert testimony • statistics
6. When does missing evidence possibly invent a new legitimate argument?
7. If an author claims to be defenseless in a text, what authority does this give the reader?
Assessments
Reading Common Assessment
See test
February 28
Common Writing Assessment
Entire Research Essay Project assessed
with the Research Rubric and CDE
Analytic Rubric.
February 28
Other Assessments:
TCAP March 11 – 22
Galileo Writing Benchmarks:
January 14 – 18
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Students will be able to…
Evidence Outcomes
2.3.a. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on
grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
2.3.a.i. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or
function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
2.3.a.ii. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech
(e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).
2.3.a.iii. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both
print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of
speech, or its etymology.
2.3.a.iv. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the
inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
2.3.b.ii. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
2.3.c. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for
reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate
independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to
comprehension or expression.
3.2.a. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information
clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
3.2.a.i. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and
distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful
to aiding comprehension.
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
3.2.a.ii. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
3.2.a.iii. Choose and develop an effective appeal.
3.2.a.iv. Collect, organize, and evaluate materials to support ideas.
3.2.a.v. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify
the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
3.2.a.vi. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
3.2.a.vii. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions
of the discipline in which they are writing.
3.2.a.viii. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or
explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
3.2.a.ix. Revise writing by evaluating relationship of central idea, evidence, and organizational pattern.
3.2.a.x. Explain how writers use organization and details to communicate their purposes.
3.2.a.xi. Present writing to an authentic audience and gauge effect on audience for intended purpose.
3.3.d. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in expectations 1-2
above.)
3.3.e. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
3.3.e.i. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing
products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information
flexibly and dynamically.
4.1.a. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated
question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources
on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
4.1.b. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches
effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information
into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format
for citation.
4.1.c. Formulate research questions that are clear and precise.
4.1.d. Identify and evaluate potential sources of information for accuracy, reliability, validity, and timeliness.
4.1.e. Distinguish between types of evidence (e.g., expert testimony, analogies, anecdotes, statistics) and use a
variety of types to support a particular research purpose.
4.1.f. Use in-text parenthetical citations to document sources of quotations, paraphrases and information.
4.1.g. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
4.1.g.i. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms
source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or
how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]").
4.1.g.ii. Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument
and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and
sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning").
4.2.b. Evaluate the accuracy of the information in a text, citing text-based evidence, author’s use of authority,
and author’s credibility to defend the evaluation.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Instruction: (Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills)
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction – Invention
Writing:
Review model papers of research
Create Writer’s Workshop and teach students roles and protocols from Write Source.
Spend time creating writing communities so students have skills to revise and edit research papers.
Inquiry
Classroom Activity
Students create a class generated checklist for effective questions to assess research papers for 6-Traits and valid sources.
Reading
Read expository, argumentative essays, speeches, articles (i.e. McDougall Littell Literature text)
Vocabulary
Direct instruction of critical concepts with Frayer Model Graphic Organizers jigsawed working in pairs and sharing to the entire class.
Story Impressions: See page 18 in AVID LA Write Path. Create a list of 6-8 words and give student friendly definitions to create a common framework, then
students create a 3-5 minute writing of the vocabulary words that needed to access a specific piece. The teacher can guide students to the genre of writing
that fits best.
Closing
Focus on writing this 9 weeks is research:
The students will produce a 2-4 page documented research paper.
Students will brainstorm and develop a working thesis.
Students will use library resources and technology to research supporting evidence.
Students will develop a working outline, and a rough draft.
Students will revise and peer- edit their rough draft.
Students will submit a typed, polished draft of their research paper to include a works cited page using the MLA format.
3rd quarter assessment is the completion of the research paper which will be evaluated by the extended response rubric, and the MLA format rules.
Resources
See Resource Manager Guide
Bolded Evidence Outcomes = Potential assessment items for 2013
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Tenth Grade
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 4: Drama and Speech (Novel optional)
Enduring Concept: Investigating themes of honor and loyalty and rhetoric using history of literary
Timeline: Mar. 12 – May 21 (4th 9 weeks)
genres and current events.
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.1 Content that is gathered carefully and organized well successfully influences the audience
2.1Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
2.3 Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice all influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts.
3.1 Literary or narrative genres feature a variety of stylistic devices to engage or entertain an audience
3.3 Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking: (From the standards document)
Vocabulary—Drama:
1. What are some messages that may be conveyed using only nonverbal techniques?
•cultural context •historical context •tragic flaw
2. Why is it important for communicators to organize their thinking when trying to support a position?
•tragic hero •connotation •soliloquy •aside
3. What makes the final draft of a document look professional and polished?
•dramatic irony •tragedy •blank verse •pun
4. How does paragraph structure and formatting increase the clarity of the writer's message?
Vocabulary—Speaking:
• projection • inflection • structure •
5. How does a writer determine the purpose of his/her writing?
organization • appeals (ethos, logos, pathos) •
6. In the English Language, why is important to be able to distinguish between multiple word meanings?
7. How does text context assist in figuring out the meaning of unknown words when reading difficult text?
poise • fallacies
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment #4:
Susan B. Anthony speech:
multiple choice and short answer.
May 13 – 17
Common Writing and Speech
Assessment #4:
Speech + Outline
May 13 – 17
Galileo Reading and Writing
Benchmarks:
May 20-22
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
1.1.a. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can
follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose,
audience, and task.
1.1.b. Select organizational patterns and structures and choose precise vocabulary and rhetorical devices.
1.1.c. Make decisions about how to establish credibility and enhance appeal to the audience
1.1.d. Rehearse the presentation to gain fluency, to adjust tone and modulate volume for emphasis, and to develop poise.
1.1.e. Use feedback to evaluate and revise the presentation.
1.2.a.i Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that
preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, wellreasoned exchange of ideas. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1a)
1.2.a.ii Support others in discussions, activities, and presentations through active listening
1.2.a.iii Listen actively in groups to accomplish a goal
1.2.a.iv Contribute effectively in both small and large groups to collaboratively accomplish a goal
1.2.a.v. Choose specific words for intended effect on particular audience.
1.2.a.vii Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes
or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
(CCSS: SL.9-10.1b)
1.2.a.viii Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when
warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and
reasoning presented. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1c)
1.2.b. Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning
or exaggerated or distorted evidence. (CCSS: SL.9-10.3)
2.1. See previous mentions of 2.1, with the addition of…
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
2.1.a. Evaluate the contribution to society made by traditional, classic, and contemporary works of literature that
deal with similar topics and problems.
2.3.c. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10
reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
2.3.c.i. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a
sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
2.3.c.ii. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g.,
analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).
2.3.c.iii. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and
digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its
etymology.
2.3.c.iv. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred
meaning in context or in a dictionary).
2.3.d. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
2.3.d.i. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
2.3.d.ii. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
2.3.e. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading,
writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering
vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
3.1.a. Use a variety of strategies to evaluate whether the writing is presented in a creative and reflective manner
(e.g., reading the draft aloud, seeking feedback from a reviewer, scoring guides).
3.1.b. Revise texts using feedback to enhance the effect on the reader and clarify the presentation of implicit or explicit
theme.
3.3.e. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
3.3.f. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking
advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
Instruction: (Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills)
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction – Invention
Introduction: Have the students read about Shakespeare’s World, use a supplementary video or YouTube on Shakespeare, the Globe theatre, the costumes, the
language etc.
Inquiry: Classroom Activity: Teachers need to address Standards 1.2.a.i,ii,iii,iv,v,vi,vii—Active listening, preparedness, facilitating in small and large groups.
For examples, Socratic Seminars, small group speeches and debates. The Tragedy of Julius Caesar issues would work well to facilitate these tasks.
Jigsaw: Assign students into scene groups. Each group is responsible for a summary, literary devices, mood, author’s manipulation of writing to build shift in
plot, character development and tone, etc.
Collaborative Group Presentations: After jigsaw activity, students can build a multimedia presentation, reenactment or speech communicating the essence of
the scene. AVID LA page 210-212
Reading: Reciprocal Reading/Teaching AVID LA page 48
Readers Theatre: Students are assigned roles ahead of class and using the characteristics of their assign role then deliver a vivid, oral performance. For
examples to model for students visit Youtube.com are search reader’s theatre.
Closing: see common assessment
Resources See Resource Manager Attachment
Bolded Evidence Outcomes = Potential assessment items for 2013
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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10th Grade Language Arts Curriculum Guide
American
Literature
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 1: Narrative
Timeline: Aug. 16 – Nov. 1
Eleventh Grade (American Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Essential Questions
1. What makes American literature American?
2. What is the relationship between literature and its place?
3. How does literature shape or reflect society?
Enduring Concept:
• A Gathering of Voices
• A Growing Nation
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.1 Verbal and nonverbal cues impact the intent of communication.
2.1 Complex literary texts require critical reading approaches to effectively interpret and evaluate meaning.
2.2 Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose.
3.1 Stylistic and thematic elements of literary or narrative texts can be refined to engage or entertain an audience.
3.2 Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience.
3.3 Writing demands ongoing revisions and refinements for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity.
4.1 Self-designed research provides insightful information, conclusions, and possible solutions.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. In what ways can speakers effectively engage audiences throughout a presentation?
2. How are speaking, listening, and responding skills used during an effective presentation?
3. What can speakers learn about their own presentation skills from listening to and critiquing the presentations of others?
4. Which character from the current text do you most identify with and why?
5. Why did the author choose this particular setting for this story?
6. How might this story have been different with another setting?
7. What are the implications if the revision process is not done?
8. Why do writers want to appeal to the readers' senses?
9. Why use sensory tools to influence the reader?
Academic Vocabulary:
Standard 1: communication (verbal and nonverbal cues)
Standard 2: critical reading, interpretation, evaluation, synthesis, inference, reasoning, objective, textual evidence, etymology, definition, pronunciation,
part of speech.
Standard 3: style, setting, theme, narration, description, exposition, persuasion, structure, syntax, engagement, slave narrative, prediction, theme,
Transcendentalism, Romanticism, Age of Reason, Enlightenment.
Additional Literary Terms:
Literal, figurative, connotation, denotation, oral literature, memoir, autobiography, letter, satire, sarcasm, irony, understatement, simile, metaphor,
extended metaphor, allusion, hyperbole, dialogue, plot, sequence, characterization, point of view, personification, irony, chronological, geographical,
symbol, analogy, rhyme scheme, exact and slant rhyme, epic poem.
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment #1
November 1
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
These Focus Standards have been selected for the unit from the Common Core State Standards.
1.1.a Give informal talks using an appropriate level of formality of verbal language and nonverbal interaction with
audience.
Page 1 of 11
11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
Common Writing Assessment
#1 November 1
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
2.1.a.i Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
2.1.a.iii Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
(e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
2.1.b.i Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and
technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a
text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
2.1.b.ii Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from
what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
2.2.b.iii Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument,
including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
3.1.a Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details,
and well-structured event sequences.
3.1.a.ii Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.
3.1.a.iii Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole
and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
3.1.a.iv Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the
experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
3.1.a.v Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the
course of the narrative.
3.1.a.vi Use a range of strategies to evaluate whether the writing is presented in a clear and engaging manner (such as
reading the text from the perspective of the intended audience, seeking feedback from a reviewer)
3.1.a.vii Evaluate and revise text to eliminate unnecessary details, ineffective stylistic devices, and vague or confusing
language
3.3.b Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
writing.
3.3.b.i Observe hyphenation conventions.
3.3.b.ii Spell correctly.
3.3.c Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.
4.1.f.i Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenthand early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the
same period treat similar themes or topics").
4.1.f.ii Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in
seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S.
Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public
advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Page 2 of 11
11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
Unit One: Narrative
Resources: Textbook Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience Common Core Edition 2012
Unit 1: A Gathering of Voices
Literature of Early America (beginnings to 1750)
Unit 2: A Growing Nation
Literature of the American Renaissance (1800-1870)
Suggested Texts:
•Creation Myths: Explaining our Surroundings: “Earth on the Turtle’s Back”: pg. 27
•From “A Journey through Texas” and “From of Plymouth Plantation”: Inference of Perspectives: 1st Encounters and perception of Native Americans.
•“To My Dear and Loving Husband”: Literary Devices: Tone, Poetry representative of the time.
•“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”: Imagery
•“Speech at the Virginia Convention”: Rhetorical Devices, persuasion
•“Devil and Tom Walker”: Narrative structure
•From “Self-Reliance” and “Civil Disobedience”: Nonfiction model texts
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page 3 of 11
11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 2: Exposition
Timeline: Nov. 2 – Dec. 19
Eleventh Grade (American Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Essential Questions
1. What makes American literature American?
2. What is the relationship between literature and its place?
3. How does literature shape or reflect society?
Enduring Concepts:
• Division, Reconciliation, and Expansion
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
2.2 Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose.
2.3 Knowledge of language, including syntax and grammar, influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts.
3.2 Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience.
3.3 Writing demands ongoing revisions and refinements for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. When people's ideas are challenged, does their ego or instinct respond first?
2. What is the greatest authoritative position from which to write for a specific purpose?
3. Describe an author's belief that you can cite from the text. Why do you suppose the author holds that belief? Do you share that same belief? Why or why not?
4. What is the significance of being able to correctly use patterns of word changes to bring meaning to text?
5. Why is audience determination important to the writer?
6. Why do authors want to appeal to the readers' senses?
7. How is this beneficial to the reader?
8. How does an author use sensory tools to influence readers as they read?
9. How does word choice affect the message a writer conveys?
10.How does a writer plan his/her work for a specific audience?
11.What are both a benefit and a caution to using grammar and spell-checker tools?
12.How does reviewing previous drafts and revisions improve a writer's work?
Academic Vocabulary
syntax, grammar, parallel structure (parallelism), diary, journal, Naturalism, Realism, Regionalism, local color realism, spiritual, Biblical Allusion, allegory,
diction, irony, narrative poem, characterization.
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment
Unit 2:
December 18
Common Writing Assessment
Unit 2:
December 18
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
2.2.a.i Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
2.2.a.ii & 2.1.a.ii Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,
including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the
text.
2.2.a.iv Designate a purpose for reading expository texts and use new learning to complete a specific task (such as convince
an audience, shape a personal opinion or decision, or perform an activity).
2.2.a.v Predict the impact an informational text will have on an audience and justify the prediction.
2.2.b.i Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and
technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text
(e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
2.2.c.i Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and
Page 4 of 11
11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and
arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).
2.2.c.ii Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary
significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and
Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.
2.3.b Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading
and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
2.3.b.i Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence)
as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
2.3.b.ii Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g.,
conceive, conception, conceivable).
2.3.b.iii Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and
digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology,
or its standard usage.
2.3.b.iv Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in
context or in a dictionary).
3.2.b.i Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which
precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and
multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
3.2.b.iv Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage
the complexity of the topic.
3.2.b.vi Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented
(e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
3.3.a Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
3.3.a.i Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.
3.3.a.ii Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English
Usage, Garner's Modern American Usage) as needed.
3.3.a.iii Use a variety of phrases (absolute, appositive) accurately and purposefully to improve writing
3.3.a.iv Use idioms correctly, particularly prepositions that follow verbs
3.3.d Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing
on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Unit Two: Exposition
Resources: Textbook Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience Common Core Edition 2012
Unit 3: Division, Reconciliation, and Expansion
Literature of the Civil War and the Frontier (1850-1914)
Suggested Texts:
• “An Occurance at Owl Creek Bridge”: Pg. 480- Elements of Realism (a contrast to romanticism)
• “Gettysburg Address”: parallelism, repetition,
• From “Life on the Mississippi”
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page 5 of 11
11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Unit 3: Persuasive
Timeline: Jan. 7 – Feb. 28
Eleventh Grade (American Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Essential Questions
1. What makes American literature American?
2. What is the relationship between literature and its place?
3. How does literature shape or reflect society?
Enduring Concepts:
• Disillusion, Defiance, and Discontent
• Prosperity and Protest
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
2.3 Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice all influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts.
3.2 Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
3.3 Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process.
4.1 Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share finding and conclusions
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. How can multiple events in someone's life carry a particular theme?
2. Why does an author choose to use this type of writing to make a point?
3. How do readers organize thoughts as they read? Articulate how these thoughts are stored for future use (for example, connecting clues from Lincoln's
early life to his leadership and honesty during his presidency).
4. How do media influence the questions you ask about an issue?
5. What is "strong" evidence?
6. When does missing evidence possibly invent a new legitimate argument?
7. If an author claims to be defenseless in a text, what authority does this give the reader?
Academic Vocabulary –
Dramatic Monologue, allusion, imagism, satire, tone, author’s style, poetic devices, resolution, dénouement, stream of consciousness, archetype,
apostrophe, blank verse, editorial, onomatopoeia, repetition, diction, rhetorical devices, eulogy, tragedy, Modernism.
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment Unit 3:
February 28
Common Writing Assessment Unit 3:
February 28
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
1.1.b Deliver formal oral presentations for intended purpose and audience, using effective verbal and nonverbal
communication
1.1.c Deliver oral talks with clear enunciation, vocabulary, and appropriate organization; nonverbal gestures; and
tone
1.1.d Analyze audience responses to evaluate how effectively the talk or presentation met the purpose.
1.1.e Identify, explain, and use content-specific vocabulary, terminology, dialect, or jargon unique to particular
groups, perspectives, or contexts (such as social, professional, political, cultural, historical or geographical)
1.2.a Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing
their own clearly and persuasively.
1.2.a.i Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that
preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a
thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
1.2.a.ii Critique the accuracy, relevance, and organization of evidence of a presentation.
1.2.a.iii Evaluate effectiveness of oral delivery techniques.
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11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
1.2.a.iv Listen critically to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the presentation.
1.2.a.v Analyze the resources cited for validity.
1.2.a.vi Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides
of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is
required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
1.2.c Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance,
premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
2.1.b.ii Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from
what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
2.1.b.iii Explain the influence of historical context on the form, style, and point of view of a written work
2.1.c.i Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or
recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by
Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
2.1.c.ii Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of
American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
2.2.b.ii Use text features and graphical representations to complement comprehension and enhance critical analysis
of a text.
2.2.b.iii Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument,
including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
2.3.a Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective
choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
2.3.a.i Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte's Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply
an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.
2.3.c Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
2.3.c.1 Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
2.3.c.2 Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
3.1.a.i Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance,
establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth
progression of experiences or events.
3.2.a Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and
relevant and sufficient evidence.
3.2.a.i Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s)
from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims,
reasons, and evidence.
3.2.a.ii Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each
while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge
level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
3.2.a.iii Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and
between claim(s) and counterclaims.
3.2.a.iv Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of
the discipline in which they are writing.
3.2.a.v Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
3.2.b Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
3.2.b.ii Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions,
concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the
topic.
3.2.b.iii Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion,
and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
3.3.a.v Ensure that a verb agrees with its subject in complex constructions (such as inverted subject/verb order,
indefinite pronoun as subject, intervening phrases or clauses).
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Unit Three: Persuasion
Resources: Textbook Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience Common Core Edition 2012
Unit 4: Disillusion, Defiance, and Discontent
Literature of the Modern Age (1914-1945)
Unit 5: Prosperity and Protest
Literature of the Postwar Era (1945-1970)
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page 8 of 11
11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Eleventh Grade (American Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 4: Research
Enduring Concept:
Timeline: Mar. 1 – May 22
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.1 Verbal and nonverbal cues impact the intent of communication
1.2 Validity of a message is determined by its accuracy and relevance
2.1 Complex literary texts require critical reading approaches to effectively interpret and evaluate meaning
2.2 Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose
2.3 Knowledge of language, including syntax and grammar, influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts
3.2 Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience
3.3 Writing demands ongoing revisions and refinements for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity
4.1 Self-designed research provides insightful information, conclusions, and possible solutions
4.2 Complex situations require critical thinking across multiple disciplines
4.2 Evaluating quality reasoning includes the value of intellectual character such as humility, empathy, and confidence
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. In what ways can speakers effectively engage audiences throughout a presentation?
2. How are speaking, listening, and responding skills used during an effective presentation?
3. What can speakers learn about their own presentation skills from listening to and critiquing the presentations of others?
4. How do people benefit from listening to the perspectives of others?
5. Why is it important to cite valid and reliable sources?
6. Does a periodical's headline affect an argument differently?
7. Describe an author's belief that you can cite from the text. Why do you suppose the author holds that belief? Do you share that same belief? Why or why not?
8. Why is audience determination important to the writer?
9. How does word choice affect the message a writer conveys?
10. How do you know if an online source is credible?
11. How can subjective viewpoints be used in research?
12. How do readers determine if the author(s) they are using are credible, biased on a topic or have a neutral, unbiased approach?
Academic Vocabulary:
In Medias Res, lyric poem, voice, free verse, imagery, parody, satire, post-modernism.
Terminology related to the research process. Unit One: Narrative
Resources: Textbook Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience Common Core Edition 2012
Unit 1: A Gathering of Voices
Literature of Early America (beginnings to 1750)
Unit 2: A Growing Nation
Literature of the American Renaissance (1800-1870)
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment Unit 4:
May 17
Common Writing Assessment Unit 4:
May 17
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
1.1.a Give informal talks using an appropriate level of formality of verbal language and nonverbal interaction with
audience
1.2.b Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively,
orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each
source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
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11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
2.1.d.i By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
2.2.a.iii Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events
interact and develop over the course of the text.
2.2.c.i Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles
and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes,
and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).
2.2.d.i By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band
proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
2.3.d Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading,
writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering
vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
3.2.b.v Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the
discipline in which they are writing.
3.3.a.vi Use a style guide to follow the conventions of Modern Language Association (MLA) or American Psychological
Association (APA) format
3.3.a.vii Use resources (print and electronic) and feedback to edit and enhance writing for purpose and audience
3.3.c Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.
3.3.d Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
3.3.e Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in
response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
4.1.a Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated
question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the
subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
4.1.b Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches
effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience;
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on
any one source and following a standard format for citation.
4.1.c Evaluate and revise research questions for precision and clarity
4.1.d Evaluate quality, accuracy, and completeness of information and the bias, credibility and reliability of the sources
4.1.e Document sources of quotations, paraphrases, and other information, using a style sheet, such as that of the
Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA)
4.1.f Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
4.2.a Analyze the logic of complex situations by questioning the purpose, question at issue, information, points of view,
implications and consequences inferences, assumptions and concepts
4.2.b Evaluate strengths and weaknesses of their logic and logic of others by using criteria including relevance, clarity,
accuracy, fairness, significance, depth, breadth, logic and precision
4.2.c Determine the extent to which they entered empathetically into competing points of view, exercised confidence
in reason, recognized the limits of their knowledge on the topic (intellectual humility), explored alternative
approaches to solving or addressing complex problems (intellectual flexibility), and were open to constructive
critique (intellectual open-mindedness)
4.2.d Analyze and assess the logic of the interdisciplinary domains inherent in reasoning through complex situations
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
4.2.e Monitor and assess the extent to which their own beliefs and biases influenced their reactions to the viewpoints
and logic of others
4.3.a Analyze the purpose, question at issue, information, points of view, implications and consequences, inferences,
assumptions, and concepts inherent in thinking
4.3.b Assess strengths and weaknesses of thinking and thinking of others by using criteria including relevance, clarity,
accuracy, fairness, significance, depth, breadth, logic, and precision
4.3.c Determine the extent to which they entered empathetically into competing points of view, exercised confidence
in reason, recognized the limits of their knowledge on the topic (intellectual humility), explored alternative
approaches to solving or addressing complex problems (intellectual flexibility), were open to constructive critique
(intellectual open-mindedness)
4.3.d Evaluate the reasoning of self and others for quality, strong-sense thinking
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Unit Four: Research
Resources: Textbook Prentice Hall Literature: The American Experience Common Core Edition 2012
Unit 6: New Voices, New Frontiers
Literature of the Contemporary Period (1970-Present)
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (American Literature) Curriculum Guide
Minorities
in
Literature
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Eleventh Grade (Minorities in Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 1: Narrative
Enduring Concept:
Timeline: Aug. 16 – Nov. 1
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.1 Verbal and nonverbal cues impact the intent of communication.
2.1 Complex literary texts require critical reading approaches to effectively interpret and evaluate meaning.
2.2 Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose.
3.1 Stylistic and thematic elements of literary or narrative texts can be refined to engage or entertain an audience.
3.2 Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience.
3.3 Writing demands ongoing revisions and refinements for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity.
4.1 Self-designed research provides insightful information, conclusions, and possible solutions.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. In what ways can speakers effectively engage audiences throughout a presentation?
2. How are speaking, listening, and responding skills used during an effective presentation?
3. What can speakers learn about their own presentation skills from listening to and critiquing the presentations of others?
4. Which character from the current text do you most identify with and why?
5. Why did the author choose this particular setting for this story?
6. How might this story have been different with another setting?
7. What are the implications if the revision process is not done?
8. Why do writers want to appeal to the readers' senses?
9. Why use sensory tools to influence the reader?
Vocabulary:
• Realism/Magical Realism
• Literary elements (theme, point of view, allusion, simile, metaphor, imagery, sarcasm, irony, understatement, etc.)
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment #1
November 1
Common Writing Assessment #1
November 1
Students will write their own
short story incorporating
elements of magical realism.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
These Focus Standards have been selected for the unit from the Common Core State Standards.
1.1.a Give informal talks using an appropriate level of formality of verbal language and nonverbal interaction with
audience.
2.1.a.i Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
2.1.a.iii Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
(e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
2.1.b.i Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and
technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a
text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
2.1.b.ii Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from
what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
2.2.b.iii Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument,
including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
3.1.a Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details,
and well-structured event sequences.
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
3.1.a.ii Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.
3.1.a.iii Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole
and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
3.1.a.iv Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the
experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
3.1.a.v Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the
course of the narrative.
3.1.a.vi Use a range of strategies to evaluate whether the writing is presented in a clear and engaging manner (such as
reading the text from the perspective of the intended audience, seeking feedback from a reviewer).
3.1.a.vii Evaluate and revise text to eliminate unnecessary details, ineffective stylistic devices, and vague or confusing
language.
3.3.b Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
writing.
3.3.b.i Observe hyphenation conventions.
3.3.b.ii Spell correctly.
3.3.c Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.
4.1.f.i Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenthand early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the
same period treat similar themes or topics").
4.1.f.ii Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in
seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S.
Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public
advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Resources:
• Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez
• Before We Were Free Background Resource (http://www.lindakreft.com/pdf/before.pdf)
• And the Earth Did Not Devour Him by Tomas Rivera
• And the Earth Did Not Devour Him Background Resource (http://www.glencoe.com/sec/literature/litlibrary/pdf/earth_did_not_devour.pdf)
• “An Hour With Abuelo” by Judith Ortiz Cofer (Latino Literature: Voices in a Tradition)
• Magical realism resource (http://www.english.emory.edu/Bahri/MagicalRealism.html)
• “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Latino Literature: Voices in a Tradition)
• “A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
(http://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~cinichol/CreativeWriting/323/MarquezManwithWings.htm)
• “The Third Resignation” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
• “The Other Side of Death” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
• “Someone Has Been Disarranging These Roses” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Eleventh Grade (Minorities in Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 2: Exposition
Enduring Concept:
Timeline: Nov. 2 – Dec. 19
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
2.2 Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose.
2.3 Knowledge of language, including syntax and grammar, influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts.
3.2 Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience.
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. When people's ideas are challenged, does their ego or instinct respond first?
2. What is the greatest authoritative position from which to write for a specific purpose?
3. Describe an author's belief that you can cite from the text. Why do you suppose the author holds that belief? Do you share that same belief? Why or why
not?
4. What is the significance of being able to correctly use patterns of word changes to bring meaning to text?
5. Why is audience determination important to the writer?
6. Why do authors want to appeal to the readers' senses?
7. How is this beneficial to the reader?
8. How does an author use sensory tools to influence readers as they read?
9. How does word choice affect the message a writer conveys?
10. How does a writer plan his/her work for a specific audience?
11. What are both a benefit and a caution to using grammar and spell-checker tools?
12. How does reviewing previous drafts and revisions improve a writer's work?
Vocabulary:
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment Unit 2:
December 18
Common Writing Assessment Unit 2:
December 18
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
2.2.a.i Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
2.2.a.ii & 2.1.a.ii Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of
the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an
objective summary of the text.
2.2.a.iv Designate a purpose for reading expository texts and use new learning to complete a specific task (such as
convince an audience, shape a personal opinion or decision, or perform an activity).
2.2.a.v Predict the impact an informational text will have on an audience and justify the prediction.
2.2.b.i Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative,
and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the
course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
2.2.c.i Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional
principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the
premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).
2.2.c.ii Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and
literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of
Rights, and Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
2.3.b Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12
reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
2.3.b.i Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a
sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
2.3.b.ii Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech
(e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
2.3.b.iii Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print
and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech,
its etymology, or its standard usage.
2.3.b.iv Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred
meaning in context or in a dictionary).
3.2.b.i Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on
that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures,
tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
3.2.b.iv Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to
manage the complexity of the topic.
3.2.b.vi Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation
presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
3.3.a Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
3.3.a.i Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes
contested.
3.3.a.ii Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster's Dictionary
of English Usage, Garner's Modern American Usage) as needed.
3.3.a.iii Use a variety of phrases (absolute, appositive) accurately and purposefully to improve writing.
3.3.a.iv Use idioms correctly, particularly prepositions that follow verbs.
3.3.d Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Resources
• Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas
• From “The Way It Was and Other Writings” by Jesus Colon (Norton Anthology of Latino Literature)
• Excerpts from The Mexicans: A Personal Portrait of People by Patrick Oster
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Eleventh Grade (Minorities in Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 3: Persuasive
Enduring Concept:
Timeline: Jan. 7 – Feb. 28
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
2.3 Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice all influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts.
3.2 Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
3.3 Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and revisions within the writing process.
4.1 Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share finding and conclusions
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. How can multiple events in someone's life carry a particular theme?
2. Why does an author choose to use this type of writing to make a point?
3. How do readers organize thoughts as they read? Articulate how these thoughts are stored for future use (for example, connecting clues from Lincoln's
early life to his leadership and honesty during his presidency).
4. How does media influence the questions you ask about an issue?
5. What is "strong" evidence?
6. When does missing evidence possibly invent a new legitimate argument?
7. If an author claims to be defenseless in a text, what authority does this give the reader?
Vocabulary:
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment Unit 3:
February 28
Common Writing Assessment Unit 3:
February 28
Persuasive Speech Assessment:
Students will write and present the
closing argument in the trial of
Ricardo Falcon’s death.
OR
Students will write and present a
speech on a civil rights issue.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
1.1.b Deliver formal oral presentations for intended purpose and audience, using effective verbal and nonverbal
communication
1.1.c Deliver oral talks with clear enunciation, vocabulary, and appropriate organization; nonverbal gestures; and
tone
1.1.d Analyze audience responses to evaluate how effectively the talk or presentation met the purpose.
1.1.e Identify, explain, and use content-specific vocabulary, terminology, dialect, or jargon unique to particular
groups, perspectives, or contexts (such as social, professional, political, cultural, historical or geographical)
1.2.a Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their
own clearly and persuasively.
1.2.a.i Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that
preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a
thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
1.2.a.ii Critique the accuracy, relevance, and organization of evidence of a presentation.
1.2.a.iii Evaluate effectiveness of oral delivery techniques.
1.2.a.iv Listen critically to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the presentation.
1.2.a.v Analyze the resources cited for validity.
1.2.a.vi Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides
of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is
required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
1.2.c Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance,
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
2.1.b.ii Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from
what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
2.1.b.iii Explain the influence of historical context on the form, style, and point of view of a written work
2.1.c.i Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or
recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by
Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
2.1.c.ii Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of
American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
2.2.b.ii Use text features and graphical representations to complement comprehension and enhance critical analysis
of a text.
2.2.b.iii Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument,
including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
2.3.a Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective
choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
2.3.a.i Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte's Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply
an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.
2.3.c Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
2.3.c.1 Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
2.3.c.2 Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
3.1.a.i Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance,
establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth
progression of experiences or events.
3.2.a Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and
relevant and sufficient evidence.
3.2.a.i Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s)
from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims,
reasons, and evidence.
3.2.a.ii Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each
while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge
level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
3.2.a.iii Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and
between claim(s) and counterclaims.
3.2.a.iv Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of
the discipline in which they are writing.
3.2.a.v Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
3.2.b Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly
and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
3.2.b.ii Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions,
concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the
topic.
3.2.b.iii Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion,
and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
3.3.a.v Ensure that a verb agrees with its subject in complex constructions (such as inverted subject/verb order,
indefinite pronoun as subject, intervening phrases or clauses).
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Resources
• Coyotes by Ted Conover
• Bracero Agreement (http://www.farmworkers.org/bpaccord.html)
• “I am Joaquin” by Rodolfo Corky Gonzales (http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/latinos/joaquin.htm)
• Los Vendidos by Luis Valdez
• “Public and Private Language” by Richard Rodriguez (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97799225)
• El Norte (movie)
• Cesar Chavez’s Speech “Lessons of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.”
(http://www.ufw.org/_board.php?mode=view&b_code=cc_his_research&b_no=3654&page=2&field=&key=&n=9)
• “Letter From a Birmingham Jail” by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html)
• “Weld’s Untold Story” (http://www.greeleytribune.com/article/20010404/worldsapart/112310252)
• Transcript discussing Ricardo Falcon's death
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
Greeley-Evans School District 6
Eleventh Grade (Minorities in Literature)
Language Arts Curriculum Guide
Unit 4: Research
Enduring Concept:
Timeline: Mar. 1 – May 22
Grade Level Expectations (GLE)
1.1 Verbal and nonverbal cues impact the intent of communication
1.2 Validity of a message is determined by its accuracy and relevance
2.1 Complex literary texts require critical reading approaches to effectively interpret and evaluate meaning
2.2 Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose
2.3 Knowledge of language, including syntax and grammar, influence the understanding of literary, persuasive, and informational texts
3.2 Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience
3.3 Writing demands ongoing revisions and refinements for grammar, usage, mechanics, and clarity
4.1 Self-designed research provides insightful information, conclusions, and possible solutions
4.2 Complex situations require critical thinking across multiple disciplines
4.2 Evaluating quality reasoning includes the value of intellectual character such as humility, empathy, and confidence
Student Inquiry/Higher Level Thinking (From the standards document)
1. In what ways can speakers effectively engage audiences throughout a presentation?
2. How are speaking, listening, and responding skills used during an effective presentation?
3. What can speakers learn about their own presentation skills from listening to and critiquing the presentations of others?
4. How do people benefit from listening to the perspectives of others?
5. Why is it important to cite valid and reliable sources?
6. Does a periodical's headline affect an argument differently?
7. Describe an author's belief that you can cite from the text. Why do you suppose the author holds that belief? Do you share that same belief? Why or
why not?
8. Why is audience determination important to the writer?
9. How does word choice affect the message a writer conveys?
10. How do you know if an online source is credible?
11. How can subjective viewpoints be used in research?
12. How do readers determine if the author(s) they are using are credible, biased on a topic or have a neutral, unbiased approach?
Vocabulary:
Assessments
Common Reading Assessment Unit 4:
May 17
Common Writing Assessment Unit 4:
May 17
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Evidence Outcomes
Students will be able to…
1.1.a Give informal talks using an appropriate level of formality of verbal language and nonverbal interaction
with audience.
1.2.b Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually,
quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and
accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
2.1.d.i By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the
grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
2.2.a.iii Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or
events interact and develop over the course of the text.
2.2.d.i By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity
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band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
2.3.d Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for
reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate
independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to
comprehension or expression.
3.2.b.v Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of
the discipline in which they are writing.
3.3.a.vi Use a style guide to follow the conventions of Modern Language Association (MLA) or American
Psychological Association (APA) format.
3.3.a.vii Use resources (print and electronic) and feedback to edit and enhance writing for purpose and audience
3.3.c Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience.
3.3.d Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
3.3.e Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing
products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
4.1.a Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated
question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources
on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
4.1.b Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches
effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience;
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and
overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.
4.1.c Evaluate and revise research questions for precision and clarity.
4.1.d Evaluate quality, accuracy, and completeness of information and the bias, credibility and reliability of the
sources.
4.1.e Document sources of quotations, paraphrases, and other information, using a style sheet, such as that of
the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
4.1.f Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
4.2.a Analyze the logic of complex situations by questioning the purpose, question at issue, information, points
of view, implications and consequences inferences, assumptions and concepts.
4.2.b Evaluate strengths and weaknesses of their logic and logic of others by using criteria including relevance,
clarity, accuracy, fairness, significance, depth, breadth, logic and precision.
4.2.c Determine the extent to which they entered empathetically into competing points of view, exercised
confidence in reason, recognized the limits of their knowledge on the topic (intellectual humility), explored
alternative approaches to solving or addressing complex problems (intellectual flexibility), and were open to
constructive critique (intellectual open-mindedness).
4.2.d Analyze and assess the logic of the interdisciplinary domains inherent in reasoning through complex
situations.
4.2.e Monitor and assess the extent to which their own beliefs and biases influenced their reactions to the
viewpoints and logic of others.
4.3.a Analyze the purpose, question at issue, information, points of view, implications and consequences,
inferences, assumptions, and concepts inherent in thinking.
4.3.b Assess strengths and weaknesses of thinking and thinking of others by using criteria including relevance,
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
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11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide
clarity, accuracy, fairness, significance, depth, breadth, logic, and precision.
4.3.c Determine the extent to which they entered empathetically into competing points of view, exercised
confidence in reason, recognized the limits of their knowledge on the topic (intellectual humility), explored
alternative approaches to solving or addressing complex problems (intellectual flexibility), were open to
constructive critique (intellectual open-mindedness).
4.3.d Evaluate the reasoning of self and others for quality, strong-sense thinking.
Instruction: Key teaching and Learning Experiences that embed 21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking and Reasoning – Information Literacy – Collaboration – Self-Direction - Invention
Resources
Greeley-Evans School District 6
2012-2013
Page 10 of 10
11th Grade Language Arts (Minorities in Literature) Curriculum Guide

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