Upgrading to SQL Server 2008

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Overview: Upgrading from SQL Server 2000 to
SQL Server 2008
SQL Server Technical Article
Published: February 2009
Applies to: SQL Server 2008
Summary: Upgrading to Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 provides organizations with improved
scalability, security, and manageability for their databases built on the trusted fundamentals of
the Microsoft® SQL Server® platform. This white paper discusses the factors that companies
should take into consideration as they plan to upgrade to SQL Server 2008 as well as the tools
that Microsoft and Microsoft partners provide to help make upgrading easier and more
successful.
Copyright
The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation
on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to
changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of
Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the
date of publication.
This white paper is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES,
EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT.
Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the
rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in, or introduced into
a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written
permission of Microsoft Corporation.
Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual
property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any
written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any
license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property.
© 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Microsoft, Access, Active Directory, ActiveX, Excel, Forefront, Internet Explorer, MSDN,
SharePoint, SQL Server, Visual Studio, Windows, Windows PowerShell, Windows Server, and
Windows Vista are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies.
All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
Contents
Introduction: Why Upgrade to SQL Server 2008? ........................................................................................ 1
Return on Investment ............................................................................................................................... 2
Microsoft Data Platform Vision ................................................................................................................ 2
Trusted Database Platform ....................................................................................................................... 3
Increased Productivity for Database Workloads ...................................................................................... 3
Intelligent Data Platform .......................................................................................................................... 4
Feature Changes in SQL Server 2008 ........................................................................................................ 5
Support ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
Key Considerations in Upgrading from SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2008 ............................................. 6
Upgrade Options ....................................................................................................................................... 6
Side-by-Side Upgrade vs. In-Place Upgrade .............................................................................................. 7
In-Place Upgrade ................................................................................................................................... 7
Side-by-Side Upgrade ............................................................................................................................ 8
Comparing In-Place and Side-by-side Upgrade Methods ......................................................................... 9
Upgrade Strategy Overview ................................................................................................................ 10
Functionality Considerations .................................................................................................................. 14
Minimizing Downtime ......................................................................................................................... 14
Application Backward Compatibility ................................................................................................... 14
Discontinued Features ........................................................................................................................ 15
Deprecated Features........................................................................................................................... 15
Breaking Changes ................................................................................................................................ 15
Behavior Changes................................................................................................................................ 16
Other SQL Server Services Affected by Upgrade ................................................................................ 16
SQL Server Upgrade Tools........................................................................................................................... 16
Primary Tools .......................................................................................................................................... 16
SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Advisor ...................................................................................................... 16
DTS xChange........................................................................................................................................ 17
Secondary Tools ...................................................................................................................................... 18
Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit 3.2 ................................................................................. 18
SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Assistant .................................................................................................... 19
Best Practices Analyzer for SQL Server 2000 ...................................................................................... 19
System Configuration Checker (SQL Server 2008 Setup During In-Place Upgrade) ........................... 19
SQL Server Profiler .............................................................................................................................. 20
SQL Server: Deprecated Features Object Counter in System Monitor ............................................... 21
SQL Server Data Backup ...................................................................................................................... 21
Other Tools.......................................................................................................................................... 21
Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................... 22
Appendix A: Discontinued Features in SQL Server 2008 ............................................................................ 23
Appendix B: Deprecated Features in SQL Server 2008 ............................................................................... 26
See Also – Breaking Changes: ................................................................................................................. 35
See Also – Behavior Changes .................................................................................................................. 35
Related Links ............................................................................................................................................... 37
Introduction: Why Upgrade to SQL Server 2008?
Upgrading to Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 provides organizations with next-generation database
capabilities built on the trusted fundamentals of SQL Server. Upgrading to SQL Server 2008 provides
these benefits through a return on your upgrade investment that can pay for itself in as little as six
months.
More than ever, organizations rely on data storage and analysis for critical business operations.
Moreover, to take advantage of new opportunities in today's fast-moving business world, companies
need the ability to create and deploy data-driven solutions quickly for end users throughout the
enterprise. SQL Server 2008 provides a trusted, productive, and intelligent data platform that enables
you to run your most demanding mission-critical applications, reduce time and cost of development and
management of applications, and deliver actionable insight to your entire organization. While
conceptually an upgrade to Microsoft SQL Server 2008 may seem trivial, one may run into unexpected
issues or barriers if an appropriate level of planning is skipped. This white paper will explore some of the
reasons to upgrade from Microsoft® SQL Server®2000 to SQL Server 2008 as well as common upgrade
strategies, considerations, and tools provided by Microsoft and Microsoft partners to make upgrading
easier and more successful.
At the most fundamental level, a database must protect the data stored within it. SQL Server 2008
equips organizations with a highly secure, reliable, and scalable platform on which to run their missioncritical applications. New security tools like transparent data encryption, read-based auditing, and
policy-based management allow organizations to control and protect data. Transparent data encryption
permits organizations to maintain regulatory compliance and store confidential information with greater
peace of mind, and policy-based permissions allow much more modular control over access to data.
Microsoft has taken significant care to make the database more productive and reduce the cost of
managing your data infrastructure while streamlining development of database applications. Policybased permissions management reduces the cost and effort of administering your data infrastructure.
Organizations will be able to benefit from more sophisticated data types and programming models
within the entity framework that streamline development to realize new business opportunities.
Features like Resource Governor allow complete control over database load by allowing prioritization of
all database activity. This allows organizations to fine-tune and scale the database with much more
control than in the past.
SQL Server 2008 enjoys a number of intelligent performance enhancements made throughout the
technology stack, including enhancements within Analysis Services, Reporting Services, and Integration
Services. SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services provides a comprehensive and scalable analysis platform for
analyzing performance indicators and business metrics through the intuitive interface of Microsoft®
Office Excel® 2007. SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services empowers users to produce reports and
visualizations in Microsoft® Office Word 2007 and Excel 2007 without involving IT staff. SQL Server 2008
1
Integration Services can provide record-setting extract, transform, and load (ETL) performance and can
integrate growing volumes of data from disparate systems.
Return on Investment
In an increasingly competitive business environment, every IT investment decision needs to support
itself through reduced costs and increased productivity. Upgrading to SQL Server 2008 is no different
and can provide surprising returns for your business.
In a September 2008 Forrester® Total Economic Impact™ study commissioned by Microsoft, Forrester
interviewed a business that had upgraded to SQL Server 2008. Focusing only on readily quantifiable
benefits such as avoiding additional SQL Server licenses and related hardware, removing third-party
software, and employee savings and productivity, Forrester discovered that the business interviewed
had realized a three-year return on investment between 162 and 181 percent. For this company, that
equaled a payback period on their upgrade between four and six months. Considering the additional
benefits provided by upgrading to SQL Server 2008 not covered in this study, the benefits to this
company were even greater. Download the full report to get a better sense of the economic returns of
upgrading to SQL Server 2008 for your company:
http://download.microsoft.com/download/d/1/1/d11349b8-af33-45c4-a89cf0dc64bbd431/TEI%20of%20SQL%20Server%202008%20Upgrade.pdf.
Microsoft Data Platform Vision
The amount and variety of information that organizations need to work with continues to explode.
Myriad new forms of information are becoming integral to business operations, from digitized images
and video to sensor information from radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. At the same time,
growing regulatory compliance in a globalized business world requires that organizations store more
information securely and keep it available at all times. In parallel with these driving needs, the cost of
disk storage has dramatically decreased, enabling businesses to store more data per dollar invested. And
fundamentally, users and decision makers must be able to sift quickly through mountains of data to find
relevant information to gain business insight.
Microsoft created its Data Platform Vision to frame these needs faced by businesses and to provide a
solution for organizations to meet these needs. The driving goal of the Data Platform Vision is to provide
businesses with tools so they can store and manage disparate types of data—including XML, e-mail,
time/calendar, file, document, and geospatial—while providing a rich set of services to interact with the
data: search, query, data analysis, reporting, data integration, and robust synchronization.
SQL Server 2008 delivers on the Microsoft Data Platform Vision. It is more than simply a database
solution. SQL Server 2008 extends users’ reach so that they can access information from creation to
archiving on virtually any device, from the desktop to a mobile device. It also deepens the usability of
data, affording users rich analytical and reporting capabilities through applications they are already
familiar with like Word 2007 and Excel 2007. SQL Server 2008 delivers a trusted, productive, intelligent
data platform to help businesses meet the requirements and seize the opportunities caused by the
evolution in business data needs.
2
Trusted Database Platform
Trust SQL Server 2008 to run your most mission-critical applications on a highly secure, reliable, and
scalable platform. Encrypting information on your database is
“With SQL Server 2008 we have
essential to maintaining the security of your data. Building on the data
transparent encryption, so we can
encryption capabilities introduced in Microsoft® SQL Server® 2005,
easily enforce the encryption of the
transparent data encryption in SQL Server 2008 saves time for both
information in the database itself
database administrators and developers. In comparison to SQL Server
without making any changes on
2000, SQL Server 2008 offers much more robust encryption and
the application side”.
requires far fewer administrative resources. Moreover, SQL Server
Ayad Shammout, CareGroup
2008 audits all access to private database information, further
HealthCare System
securing data and simplifying compliance.
Database availability and data continuity have been improved in SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2008.
SQL Server 2005 added support for database mirroring and made 99.999 percent uptime possible. SQL
Server 2008 has built on this foundation by adding enhancements to clustering and support for
virtualization. In addition, SQL Server 2008 also supports hot-add processor support (on server hardware
that supports it) and automatic data corruption recovery on mirrored databases.
Resource Governor is a new utility in SQL Server 2008 that allows complete control over database load
by allowing prioritization of all database activity. Database administrators identify and set priorities for
workloads and groups then allocate shared CPU and memory resources as they are requested, based on
specified limits. This allows organizations to fine-tune and scale the database with much more control
and stability than what was available in the past.
Increased Productivity for Database Workloads
SQL Server 2008 offers many performance enhancements throughout the technology stack to reduce
the cost of managing your data infrastructure while streamlining development of data applications.
These include improvements within the core Database Engine, SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS), SQL
Server Reporting Services (SSRS), and SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS).
SQL Server 2005 introduced support for access permission management. Database administrators can
manage their enterprise data infrastructure easily with SQL Server 2008 Policy-Based Management. This
reduces the time they spend on daily maintenance operations by defining a common set of policies for
most database operations like query optimizations, naming conventions, backup and restore operations,
and index management. Administrators can also apply policies to many servers for consistent
management across the enterprise. SQL Server 2008 also enables Performance System Analysis by
collecting performance data from your system and storing it in a centralized data repository.
Administrators can view reports to benchmark and analyze system performance and health.
With SQL Server 2008, database administrators can also use Management Studio to troubleshoot, tune,
and monitor instances across the enterprise; define configuration policies for the enterprise; and use
built-in facets and policies to manage surface area configuration and apply best practices—all of which
reduces the time and costs of managing enterprise information infrastructure.
3
SQL Server 2008 has new, built-in compression for database files
and transaction log files, row-level and page-level compression,
and compression at the backup level. These new compression
types free up space for live data. Not only do the SQL Server 2008
data compression features reduce hardware, space, and cooling
costs, they can also reduce the operating footprint and enhance
processing speeds as a result of smaller amounts of data being
retrieved and saved to the database.
“We’ve seen tables reduced in size
by 80 percent using SQL Server
2008 Backup Compression. With
100 terabytes of data, we’re very
happy to be able to reduce our
backup footprint”.
Thomas Grohser Senior Database
Engineer, bwin
As you extend your applications, you get additional development enhancements such as a more
sophisticated set of data types that will streamline the development process. Integration with
Microsoft® Visual Studio® 2008 and the Microsoft® .NET Framework can speed up development and
dramatically reduce the lines of code for new applications. More specifically, programmers are able to
access data by defining business entities instead of tables and columns with the ADO.NET Entity
Framework. Additionally, they are able to query and retrieve these entities natively within any .NET
language with Language Integrated Query (LINQ). These features enable developers to work with the
logical entity model while administrators are still able to define the physical implementation of the
model as tables and columns. Plus, by upgrading from SQL Server 2000, developers can access types and
sources of data that were previously impossible to store, providing additional analysis opportunities to
users. The new FILESTREAM data type has been introduced to facilitate easier manipulation of
unstructured data such as documents and images residing outside the database. XML data is stored
efficiently and is readily accessible with XQuery. Additionally SQL Server 2008 supports geometry and
geography data types for storing spatial data. These types support methods and properties that allow
for the creation, comparison, analysis, and retrieval of spatial data.
Lastly, SQL Server 2008 now supports multiple options for virtual server consolidation, providing
organizations with the flexibility to choose the consolidation approach that best meets their
requirements. Capabilities such as centralized management, auditing, and monitoring make it easy to
manage multiple databases and data services on virtual appliances, significantly reducing administrative
overhead in large enterprises.
Intelligent Data Platform
SQL Server 2008 drives business intelligence throughout your organization, manages reports and
analysis of any size or complexity, and empowers users by providing powerful visualization and
integration with the Microsoft® Office system.
SQL Server 2008 enables organizations to import, store, and deliver almost any data as well as manage
reports and analyze huge amounts of data. Administrators are able to scale and manage large numbers
of users and data with improved query performance on large tables. For example, Unisys and Microsoft
recently set a new ETL performance record by loading one terabyte of data in less than 30 minutes using
SQL Server 2008 Integration Services
(http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2008/en/us/benchmarks.aspx).
4
Obtaining information from the database is improved over SQL Server 2000 as well. Business users can
create complex reports and share them internally and externally with colleagues, customers, and
partners. SQL Server Analysis Services provides a consistent set of key performance indicators and
business metrics to all users with its comprehensive and scalable analysis platform. SQL Server 2008
Analysis Services provides the capability to perform complex data analysis and reporting on real-time
data: Users can receive immediate feedback about key metrics by creating dashboards and scorecards
and tracking key performance indicators that provide current information about business operations.
In SQL Server 2008, these analysis and additional reporting capabilities have been integrated with
familiar Microsoft Office applications like Word 2007 and Excel 2007, as well as Microsoft® Office
SharePoint® Server 2007. In contrast to SQL Server 2000, SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services enables
business users to create their own ad hoc reports when they want them. The IT department no longer
needs to be involved when new reports are needed, freeing them to work on other high-priority tasks.
In addition to self-service reporting, the new report designer application in SQL Server 2008 allows users
to create enterprise-class reports without the need for Developer Studio.
Integrated Data Mining enables predictive analysis so you can investigate common issues like
forecasting and identifying key influencers for decisions. Enhanced designers assist in developing
scalable analysis models that incorporate best practices into the design experience. The scale and
performance of analysis models have been increased by optimizations made to analytical capabilities as
well as optimizations to complex computations and aggregations.
SQL Server 2008 introduces sparse columns, which allow NULL values to be stored without taking up any
physical space on the disk. SQL Server 2008 also includes a new mechanism called Change Data Capture
that captures updated, deleted, and inserted data in an easily consumed storage schema and allows for
incremental loading of data warehouses from those tables.
Feature Changes in SQL Server 2008
SQL Server 2008 contains improvements and additional features in nearly every area of the product. In
fact, any one of these enhanced features can be a compelling case for upgrading, depending on the
need for high availability, performance, and added functionality. Additionally, upgrading to the latest
release of the product extends the Microsoft support life cycle to the maximum degree possible, in
accordance with the software support policy.
To better understand the SQL Server 2008 features that make upgrading advantageous, see the white
paper “SQL Server 2008 Product Overview”
(http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinfo/whitepapers/sql2008Overview.mspx).
Support
With the latest version of SQL Server, companies can benefit from a long-term and current support path.
As of April 2008, SQL Server 2000 has moved off mainstream support to an extended support path. As a
result, Microsoft will not accept requests for warranty support, design changes, or new features during
the extended support phase.
5
Microsoft provides upgrade tools to help manage upgrading from prior versions. Compatibility has been
maintained with the majority of functionality, which should enable most applications to upgrade
seamlessly.
Key Considerations in Upgrading from SQL Server 2000 to
SQL Server 2008
Upgrading to SQL Server 2008 from SQL Server 2000 presents organizations that are undertaking this
change with a number of things to consider. Organizations must decide what route to take in upgrading
their SQL Server 2000 instances as well as evaluate how the upgrade will affect the functionality of their
database applications and other SQL Server services on which their database workloads rely.
Upgrade Options
Table 1 summarizes four methods for managing an upgrade to SQL Server 2008 from SQL Server 2000.
An in-place upgrade modifies the existing database, with the end result that the new version replaces
the previous version. A side-by-side upgrade creates a new instance of the database, after which all of
the data and many other database objects must be manually copied to the new version before
integration with the of the database application. In general, the automatic upgrade path is
administratively less intensive but less flexible, while a side-by-side upgrade offers more control with a
higher administrative cost.
A full list of upgrade paths may be accessed at MSDN®, the Microsoft® Developer Network
(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143393.aspx).
Table 1: Upgrade Methods and Considerations
In-Place Upgrade
SQL Server 2000 to
SQL Server 2008
(direct upgrade)
SQL Server 2000 to
SQL Server 2008
(with SQL Server 2005 as
interim step)
Advantages
Advantages


Single occurrence of
database downtime
Entire operation
automated
Disadvantages
 Existing applications may
require significant
modification to retain
6


Automated
Software release
schedules can be
coordinated with
database upgrades
 Application changes can
be addressed
incrementally
Disadvantages
 Administratively more
intensive
 Rollback strategy

Side-by-Side Upgrade
functionality
Less control over
upgrade process
Advantages



More granular control
over the upgrade
process
Original database left
unchanged; allows for
testing of new database
Single occurrence of
database downtime
Disadvantages
 Administratively more
intensive
 Requires more hardware
resources
potentially more
complex
Advantages

More granular control
over the upgrade
process
 Software release
schedules can be
coordinated with
database upgrades
 Original database left
unchanged; allows for
testing of new database
 Allows flexible
integration of the
updated database
 Potential for a single
occurrence of database
downtime
Disadvantages
 Administratively more
intensive
 Requires more hardware
resources
Side-by-Side Upgrade vs. In-Place Upgrade
There are two fundamental strategies for upgrading:
 In-place upgrade: uses the SQL Server 2008 Setup program to directly upgrade a SQL Server
2000 instance to SQL Server 2008. The older SQL Server instance is replaced.
 Side-by-side upgrade: performs operations to move all or data and other database components
from SQL Server 2000 to a separate SQL Server 2008 instance.
In-Place Upgrade
Using an in-place upgrade strategy, the SQL Server 2008 Setup program directly replaces a SQL Server
2000 instance with a new SQL Server 2008 instance on the same x86 or x64 platform; the upgraded
instance of SQL Server 2000 is replaced by the new SQL Server 2008 instance. There is no need to copy
database-related data from the older instance to SQL Server 2008 because the old data files are
automatically converted to the new format. When the process is complete, the old SQL Server 2000
instance is removed from the server, with only retained backups able to restore it to its previous state.
7
Figure 1: Direct upgrade of SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2008
Side-by-Side Upgrade
Conversely, in a side-by-side upgrade, database structure and component data are transferred from the
SQL Server 2000 instance to a new, distinct SQL Server 2008 instance; the new SQL Server 2008 instance
runs alongside the legacy SQL Server 2000 either by using two servers or a single server.
Figure 2: Side-by-side upgrade to SQL Server 2008 using two servers
You may also use the side-by-side method to upgrade to SQL Server 2008 on a single server. Figure 3
shows a side-by-side upgrade on a single server.
8
Figure 3: A side-by-side upgrade on a single server, leaving both instances running
Regardless of whether a side-by-side upgrade is performed using one or two servers, data and other
database objects must be transferred using other utilities.
Objects requiring other transfer methods include:







Data files
Database objects
SSAS cubes
Configuration settings
Security settings
SQL Server Agent jobs
SSIS packages
A side-by-side upgrade to a new server offers the most flexibility and control: organizations can take
advantage of a new and potentially more powerful server and platform, but the legacy server remains as
a fallback if they encounter compatibility issues. This method allows for rigorous testing of the new
database before transitioning it into the production environment. The downside of a side-by-side
upgrade is that increased manual interventions are required, so it might take more up-front preparation
and planning, but, in most cases, the benefits of this degree of control merits the extra effort.
Comparing In-Place and Side-by-side Upgrade Methods
Table 2 summarizes the distinction between the two upgrade strategies:
Table 2: Characteristics of an In-Place Upgrade vs. a Side-by-Side Upgrade
Process
Number of resulting
instances
Number of physical
servers involved
Data file transfer
SQL Server instance
configuration
9
In-Place Upgrade
One only
Side-by-Side Upgrade
Two
One
One or more
Automatic
Automatic
Manual
Manual
Supporting tool
SQL Server Setup
Various data transfer
methods
Note that the main distinction between an in-place upgrade and a side-by-side upgrade hinges on the
resulting instances. An in-place upgrade replaces the old instance, so that only one instance remains.
Another way to look at the distinctions between an in-place upgrade and a side-by-side upgrade is to
focus on how much of the legacy instance you want to upgrade. Table 3 shows how you can use the
component level of the upgrade, combined with the resulting number of instances, to determine what
upgrade strategies are available for your needs.
Table 3: Upgrade Strategies and Components
Component Level
Single Resulting SQL
Server 2008 Instance
Two Resulting Instances
All components
Single component
Single database
In-place
In-place
Not available
Side-by-side
Side-by-side
Side-by-side
Upgrade Strategy Overview
Expediency, disk space, new server hardware, and high availability are all factors that will determine
which upgrade strategy to use. Because of database complexity and the diversity of implementation
methods, there are no simple rules to follow.
Rolling Back an Upgrade
When evaluating which upgrade strategy to use, take into account the risk that an in-place upgrade or
side-by-side upgrade may need to be rolled back. The complexity and effort required to roll back is an
important factor in choosing which method to use.
Rolling back an in-place upgrade can be complex and time-consuming. The new data file structures for
SQL Server 2008 are not compatible with SQL Server 2000. To roll back an upgraded instance, you must
uninstall the SQL Server 2008 instance, remove the data files and other components, reinstall the legacy
SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server 2005 instance, and restore the original data. Having a backup or image of
the initial system may enable you to shorten the time required to restore the original system on the
server. One option is to copy the legacy data files from a backup location to the appropriate disk
volume, and then integrate the SQL Server 2000 database in the previous environment.
In a side-by-side upgrade, the new SQL Server 2008 instance resides alongside the legacy SQL Server
instance, either on the same server or on a different server. As a result, the legacy instance remains
available for a rollback scenario.
However, after the upgraded SQL Server 2008 instance goes into production and starts capturing new
data, there will come a point in time when enough new data has been captured that a rollback is no
longer realistic. For an in-place upgrade, if you encounter problems after the system is in production,
making adjustments or “patches” to the new application would be a better option than attempting a
rollback. For a side-by-side upgrade, you could employ SSIS to transfer new data from the SQL Server
10
2008 instance to the legacy SQL Server 2000 to bring it current. Depending on the complexity of the
data, this could be a difficult process.
Choosing an Upgrade Strategy
The upgrade method available for your specific needs depends on numerous factors, including the
components you want to upgrade and the editions you want to use.







Components: A certain upgrade strategy might not be possible because the component does
not support it. For example, there is no in-place upgrade for SSIS from SQL Server 2000;
Microsoft recommends that you upgrade most SQL Server 2000 SSAS components.
Versions and Editions: The in-place upgrade strategy does not support all paths between
versions and editions. For example, to upgrade a SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition instance to
SQL Server 2008 Standard Edition, you must perform a side-by-side upgrade because SQL Server
Setup does not support an in-place upgrade path.
Partial upgrading: To transition only a few databases on a server to SQL Server 2008 and leave
the rest on the legacy version, you must use a side-by-side upgrade.
Upgrading over time: To transition databases gradually, a few databases at a time, from a
legacy instance to SQL Server 2008, you can only use a side-by-side upgrade.
Effect on applications: If your organization requires minimal disturbance to the existing
applications and users, you may want to choose an in-place upgrade if possible.
Availability: Both an in-place upgrade and a side-by-side upgrade require that the databases be
unavailable for a certain amount of time. The amount of downtime required depends primarily
on the size of the data sets. At first, it might seem that an in-place upgrade would be faster than
a side-by-side upgrade because the data is not transferred from one server to another.
However, an in-place upgrade also requires time for the installation of SQL Server 2008. In a
side-by-side upgrade, SQL Server 2008 is already installed on another instance. If the data
transfer proceeds quickly and few changes are needed on the new instance, a side-by-side
upgrade might be faster than an in-place upgrade.
Rollback: For many database systems in production, it is impossible to justify a change without a
rollback strategy in case the results are not acceptable. The side-by-side upgrade strategy
supports rollback at the time of acceptance testing because the legacy instance can still be made
available. However, after users update the databases in the new instance, rollback might no
longer be feasible.
Some of these factors alone may dictate one strategy over another. Regardless of which method is
employed, a successful upgrade to SQL Server 2008 should be smooth and trouble free. To achieve that
smooth transition, you must devote sufficient planning for the upgrade and match the complexity of
your database application. Otherwise, you risk costly and stressful errors and upgrade problems.
Part of the upgrade planning process should also include consideration of how new SQL Server 2008
components can be used to enhance your particular implementation. Significant improvements have
been made in the areas of relational database operations, specifically higher availability, database
engine enhancements, and security and auditing. Analysis Services, Data Mining, Integration Services,
11
and Reporting Services have all been improved. Close analysis of enhancements made in these areas in
advance of the upgrade itself will help ensure that organizations derive the greatest benefit from the
new version.
Like all IT projects, planning for every contingency and then testing your plan gives you confidence that
you will succeed. However, if you ignore the planning process, you increase the chances of running into
difficulties that can derail and delay your upgrade. The flowchart below is an example of a typical
upgrade process plan. Creating a similar plan tailored to your particular needs is highly recommended.
12
Figure 4 An example upgrade process plan
13
For more in depth coverage of this topic, you may download the SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Technical
Reference Guide (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=66d3e6f5-6902-4fddaf75-9975aea5bea7&displaylang=en).
Functionality Considerations
Regardless of your upgrade strategy, you should consider the functionality changes between SQL Server
2000 and SQL Server 2008—some SQL Server 2000 features on which your applications rely may be
discontinued in SQL Server 2008 or in future versions of SQL Server.
Application compatibility testing is a good practice to identify and resolve potential issues that may arise
after upgrading the database. A typical set of Application Compatibility Testing tasks should include the
following:





Determine how much Application Compatibility Testing is appropriate.
Ensure testing of all relational database management system (RDBMS) queries.
Test databases with the current compatibility level. In the case of SQL Server 2008, it is level 10.
Test application setup with SQL Server 2008.
Confirm that any third-party vendor software is certified on SQL Server 2008.
Minimizing Downtime
Often when working with complex systems, or applications considered to be mission critical, it is
desirable to minimize the amount of time these systems are unavailable while performing upgrade
tasks. There are several tasks that can be carried out in advance of the upgrade itself, resulting in a
shorter maintenance event. The following tasks can be performed without any negative impact or
outage to the databases that will be upgraded:







Upgrade any databases older than SQL Server 2000 to an upgradable version (at least SQL Server
2008).
Ensure installation requirements are met. Run the SQL Server Upgrade Advisor for a listing of
potential issues that will prevent the setup routine from completing. Resolve each of the issues
enumerated in the report.
Preinstall the Microsoft® .NET Framework 3.5 Service Pack 1 (SP1).
Preinstall SQL Server 2008 common components (Simple Network Access Controller,
Management tools).
Select efficient media and transfer methods (Fibre Channel, Cat-5/6, network-attached storage
(NAS), storage area network (SAN), removable media) if performing a side-by-side upgrade.
Use DBCC CHECKDB to examine the continuity of data as well as check for other anomalies.
Back up data before, during, and after the upgrade procedure.
Application Backward Compatibility
When planning for an upgrade to SQL Server 2008, you need to understand which features have been
deprecated, discontinued, or changed in the new version. Being aware of these changes ahead of an
upgrade can help prevent both performance problems and compatibility issues.
14
The majority of SQL Server 2008 functionality and behavior is backward compatible with SQL Server
2000. However, you should examine feature changes during the planning process. The most serious
backward-compatibility issues that can affect planning are those that can block an in-place upgrade and
prevent an installation of SQL Server 2008.
If the SQL Server 2008 Setup program detects these issues in the process of an in-place upgrade, it will
abort the install, leaving the legacy instance unchanged. The SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Advisor is the
best tool for finding these types of blocking issues ahead of time. You can find comprehensive
information about changes in the SQL Server 2008 Books Online (BOL) topic, “SQL Server Backward
Compatibility” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc707787.aspx.
Discontinued Features
While the vast majority of backwards compatibility has been retained, it is possible that certain
components of SQL Server 2000 have been discontinued. These features functioned in earlier versions
of SQL Server but have been removed from SQL Server 2008. Although some references to these
features might not block an in-place upgrade, you should remove those references anyway—if the
references are not removed, the application might not behave correctly.
Use the Upgrade Advisor to detect whether your application is using discontinued features. For more
information about such features, see “Discontinued SQL Server Features in SQL Server 2008” at
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc707782.aspx. See Appendix A: Discontinued Features in SQL
Server 2008 for a list of features that have been discontinued.
Deprecated Features
Features that are deprecated in SQL Server 2008 still operate the same as in the legacy versions, but
they will be removed in a future version of SQL Server. Access to these features does not necessarily
need to be removed to complete an upgrade, but you should eventually address them because they
might cause problems with upgrades after SQL Server 2008. For details, see the SQL Server 2008 BOL
topic: “Deprecated SQL Server Features in SQL Server 2008” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/enus/library/cc707789.aspx.
Note: Your upgrade will not be blocked if you use deprecated features. However, it is advised
that you decide how or when you want to deal with any of these to give yourself plenty of time
to resolve the issues before they are discontinued in some future SQL Server release.
See Appendix B: Deprecated Features in SQL Server 2008 for a list of features that will not be supported
in the next version of SQL Server or future versions of SLQ Server.
Breaking Changes
Breaking changes to SQL Server 2008 are those that might require changes to the applications because
the features in question now have a different behavior. If you do not use the feature, there is no impact
on you, but if you do use the feature, your application might be affected.
15
The best tool for discovering this type of issue is Upgrade Advisor, which analyzes a legacy system and
reports on all potential breaking changes and how to resolve them. For more information about this
type of change, see “Breaking Changes to SQL Server Features in SQL Server 2008” at
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc707784.aspx.
Behavior Changes
Behavior changes may not visibly affect your database code or applications, but you need to be aware of
them. Database operations that depend on features with modified behaviors may be adversely affected.
For more information about behavior changes, see “Behavior Changes to SQL Server Features in SQL
Server 2008” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc707785.aspx.
Other SQL Server Services Affected by Upgrade
For information on backward compatibility for SQL Server 2008 components, see “Backward
Compatibility” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc280407.aspx.
SQL Server Upgrade Tools
Microsoft and Microsoft partners offer myriad tools to help automate and better ensure the success of
the upgrade process to SQL Server 2008. Each tool has its own purpose and timing, so it is best to
become familiar with all the tools and then use those most appropriate for each phase of your upgrade.
Primary Tools
The principal tools for planning and executing your SQL Server 2008 upgrade are the SQL Server 2008
Upgrade Advisor and DTS xChange from Pragmatic Works.
SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Advisor
Perhaps the most important tool of the several tools commonly used for upgrade planning is SQL Server
2008 Upgrade Advisor. Upgrade Advisor can help ease the transition to SQL Server 2008 by detecting
potential incompatibility issues in your legacy SQL Server 2000 instance. It analyzes objects and code
within legacy instances and produces reports detailing upgrade issues. The resulting reports show
detected issues and provide guidance about how to resolve the issues or work around them. The reports
are stored on disk, and you can review them by using Upgrade Advisor or export them to Microsoft®
Office Excel® for further analysis.
In addition to analyzing data and database objects, SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Advisor can analyze
Transact-SQL (T-SQL) scripts and SQL Server Profiler/SQL Trace traces. Upgrade Advisor examines SQL
code for syntax that is no longer valid in SQL Server 2008. It generates a report listing the code in
question along with links to where you can find more information to help resolve the questionable code.
Whether you choose an in-place upgrade or a side-by-side upgrade, run Upgrade Advisor on your legacy
systems. You can run Upgrade Advisor from a local or remote server, and you can execute it from the
Command Prompt window by using a configuration filename as an input parameter.
16
Requirements
The Upgrade Advisor requires the following to run:







Windows Server® 2008, Windows Server® 2003 Service Pack 2 (SP2), Windows Vista® SP1, or
Windows® XP SP3
The Microsoft® .NET Framework 2.0 (the same version of the .NET Framework included with SQL
Server 2008 and Microsoft® Visual Studio® 2005)
Windows® Installer 4.5
SQL Server 2000 Decision Support Objects (DSO) if analyzing SSAS (you can use SQL Server 2000
Setup to install DSO)
SQL Server 2000 client components if analyzing Data Transformation Services (DTS) (you can use
SQL Server 2000 Setup to install the SQL Server 2000 client components)
Pentium III-compatible processor or higher, with a processor speed of at least 500 megahertz
(MHz)
15 megabytes (MB) of available hard disk space
Availability
Upgrade Advisor is a separate download. The most recent downloadable version is available as part of
the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Feature Pack available at
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=C6C3E9EF-BA29-4A43-8D69A2BED18FE73C&displaylang=en.
You can find more information about this valuable tool in the Upgrade Advisor Guide in SQL Server 2008
BOL; also see “Using Upgrade Advisor to Prepare for Upgrades” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/enus/library/ms144256.aspx.
DTS xChange
Although SQL Server 2008 Integration Services may be considered the fourth iteration of an ETL tool in
SQL Server, it is dramatically different from SQL Server 2000 Data Transformation Services (DTS). The
architecture of SSIS has changed drastically to support an in-memory ETL method that can efficiently
support a load of millions of rows. To take advantage of this new architecture, organizations must
migrate their DTS packages into SSIS and apply new best practices to the migrated packages.
SQL Server 2008 comes with the DTS Package Migration Wizard, a built-in means of migrating simple
DTS packages to SSIS. However, this method will not meet the needs of all organizations. For
organizations in need of a more robust solution that can handle thousands of packages with little
administrator intervention, DTS xChange is an enterprise solution, offered by a Microsoft partner
Pragmatic Works, that migrates DTS packages to Integration Services while applying a series of best
practices rules to the packages.
DTS xChange is broken into three components:
1. Profile: DTS xChange Profiler helps organizations estimate their migration project in hours and
dollar cost whether they choose to use an automation tool or not.
17
2. Convert: DTS xChange migrates packages, applying rules to each DTS package as it migrates
them to enforce best practices.
3. Monitor: The SSIS Performance Warehouse is a software development kit (SDK) to help
organizations get the most out of their new Integration Services environment. It contains a
series of reports and a data warehouse to monitor administrators’ Integration Services package
execution.
Secondary Tools
There are multiple additional tools that fit specialized needs in the upgrade planning and execution
process, including:







Microsoft® Assessment and Planning Toolkit 3.2
SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Assistant
SQL Server Best Practices Analyzer
System Configuration Checker
SQL Server Profiler
SQL Server: Deprecated Features Object Counter
Other tools
Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit 3.2
For enterprise users of SQL Server, the number and versions of all SQL databases may not be readily
available. For these occurrences, the Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit 3.2 (MAP) can be used
to ascertain details about hardware and software running SQL Server databases. MAP is a scalable and
agent-less assessment platform designed to make it easier for our customers to adopt the latest
Microsoft technologies. In this version, MAP has expanded its assessment capabilities to include SQL
Server 2008, Microsoft® Forefront™/ Network Access Protection (NAP), and Microsoft® Online Services
migration.
Requirements
Supported operating systems: Windows Server® 2003, Windows Server® 2008, Windows Vista, Windows
Vista Service Pack 1, Windows XP Professional Edition
Hardware Requirements:
1.6-gigahertz (GHz) or faster processor minimum (dual-core for Windows Vista)
1.5 GB of RAM minimum (2.0 GB for Windows Vista)
1 GB of available hard-disk space required
10/100 megabits per second (Mbps) network adapter required
Software Requirements: SQL Server 2005 or Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 Express for storing inventory
and assessment data. Microsoft® Office Word 2003 SP2 or Word 2007 and Microsoft® Office Excel®
2003 SP2 or Excel 2007 for generating reports. The .NET Framework v3.5 SP1, Windows Installer v4.5
18
Availability
For more information and download instructions, see the Microsoft Assessment and Planning Toolkit on
the Microsoft Web site: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=67240b76-31484e49-943d-4d9ea7f77730&DisplayLang=en.
SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Assistant
The SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Assistant is an external tool that lets you determine in a test environment
how an application currently running on SQL Server 2000 will run on SQL Server 2008. This tool uses
Upgrade Advisor, along with baseline and trace replay in a test environment, to help identify
compatibility issues.
Requirements
Requirements for using Upgrade Assistant are:



Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Vista, or Windows XP SP2 or later
SQL Server 2000 SP4 or later
Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP1 or later
Availability
For more information and download instructions, see SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Assistant on the
Scalability Experts Web site: http://www.scalabilityexperts.com/default.asp?action=article&ID=43.
Best Practices Analyzer for SQL Server 2000
Before installing SQL Server 2008, you should also run the SQL Server Best Practices Analyzer (BPA)
against the SQL Server 2000 instance. If bad or questionable practices exist, you may address them
before the upgrade, moving the fixes through test and into production. Using best practices on the
legacy SQL Server systems first will help ensure a smoother upgrade.
You can download the SQL Server 2000 version of BPA at Best Practices Analyzer Tool for Microsoft SQL
Server 2000 1.0: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=b352eb1f-d3ca-44ee893e-9e07339c1f22&DisplayLang=en.
System Configuration Checker (SQL Server 2008 Setup During In-Place Upgrade)
An in-place upgrade uses SQL Server 2008 Setup to directly upgrade a SQL Server 2000 instance. SQL
Server 2008 installs required prerequisites such as the .NET Framework and Windows PowerShell™ 1.0.
It also scans the target computer for minimum hardware and software requirements, as well as a
compatible SQL Server edition.
To do this, the SQL Server 2008 Setup program contains a utility called the System Configuration
Checker (SCC), which performs a scan of the computer in preparation for an install. For comprehensive
information about SCC, see the SQL Server 2008 BOL topic “Check Parameters for the System
Configuration Checker” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143753.aspx.
The Setup SCC looks for conditions that can prevent a successful SQL Server installation or upgrade.
These checks occur before Setup starts the SQL Server 2008 Installation Wizard and report any issues
19
that would block an install along with advice about how to address the blocking issues. The Setup SCC
uses rules from the following categories (for more information about any of these categories, see the
related link from SQL Server 2008 BOL):




Feature Installation Rules: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc646015.aspx
Upgrade and Repair Rules Check: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc281843.aspx
Edition Upgrade Rules: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc645998.aspx
Uninstallation Rules: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc645979.aspx
The SCC will prevent an upgrade if the following conditions are not met:









The target computer must be connected to the Internet while the .NET Framework security
check validates a certificate.
The SQL Server registry keys must be consistent.
The CPU architecture of the installation program must match the CPU architecture of features
intended for upgrading.
If the computer is clustered, the cluster service must be online.
Windows PowerShell must be installed. (Setup will do this automatically when installing
prerequisites.)
SQL Server Setup must be supported on this operating system platform.
SCC checks whether a pending computer restart is required.
The existing performance counter registry hive must be consistent.
SCC checks that neither Microsoft® SQL Server® 7.0 nor SQL Server 7.0 OLAP Services is installed
on the server. SQL Server 2008 is not supported running on the same server with SQL Server 7.0.
Additional checks that the SCC performs are:






Database features that are not supported in the SQL Server version and edition to which you are
upgrading.
Restrictions on restarting of the SQL Server Service.
SQL Server service is not set to Disabled.
Analysis of whether or not the SQL Server version meets the upgrade matrix requirements.
SASS upgrade validity.
Evaluation of whether the edition of the selected instance of SQL Server is supported in a given
scenario.
SQL Server Profiler
SQL Server Profiler can record a running workload and then replay that same activity from a given SQL
Server instance, making it a valuable tool for preparing an upgrade.
Profiler is useful for simulating an upgrade to determine performance and correct behavior. For
example, you can use SQL Server 2008 Profiler to trace a SQL Server 2000 database under load and save
the trace. You can then restore the SQL Server 2000 database to two instances on equivalent hardware:
20
a SQL Server 2000 instance and a SQL Server 2008 instance. Run the replay on each (but at different
times if on the same server), and while running the replay, also run a Profiler trace on each of the two
runs, capturing errors and query durations. By comparing the results, you can determine whether the
upgrade behaves correctly (without error) and performs well.
Using Profiler to test upgrade results is made much easier by using the SQL Server 2008 Upgrade
Assistant. Upgrade Assistant helps automate the process and reports for comparing performance and
behavior of an upgraded SQL Server.
For more information about using Profiler for replay, see the SQL Server 2008 BOL topic “Replaying
Traces” at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190995.aspx.
SQL Server: Deprecated Features Object Counter in System Monitor
SQL Server 2008 provides a new System Monitor (Perfmon) counter called SQL Server: Deprecated
Features Object to monitor whether your application is submitting commands to the SQL Server 2008
database engine that have been scheduled for removal from SQL Server in future releases. You should
remove such deprecated commands from SQL Server 2008 applications after they are detected. You can
use this counter to help plan modifications to your application code so that when you upgrade to the
next version of SQL Server after SQL Server 2008, the upgrade process will go more smoothly.
Choose which type of feature to monitor by using the Instance selection box for the counter. System
Monitor records the total number of times the deprecated feature was encountered since SQL Server
2008 was last started. For details about using this tool, see the SQL Server 2008 BOL topic, “SQL Server,
Deprecated Features Object” at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb510662.aspx.
SQL Server Data Backup
It will be important to assess the point at which it is sensible to perform backup operations and to assess
which data should be backed up. User databases for example should be backed up after users are not
using the system and before the upgrade process has started. Another point which may be considered
for backup might be once the upgrade has been complete but before any system parameterization has
occurred. One final backup should be made once the entire system is up and running but before users
are permitted to start using the application.
Other Tools
Analysis Services Migration Wizard
Use the Migration Wizard to migrate the metadata, and optionally the data, from an existing Microsoft
SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services database into a Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services database.
Additionally, the migration process can be saved to a script file for later migration.
DTS Package Migration Wizard
Installing SSIS 2008 also installs the DTS Package Migration Wizard, which aids in the migration of DTS
packages to SSIS.
21
Also, SQL Server 2008 provides support for running DTS packages. For details, see “Support for Data
Transformation Services (DTS) in SQL Server 2008” at http://msdn.microsoft.com/enus/library/bb500440.aspx.
For information about upgrading DTS to SSIS and support for DTS, see “SQL Server Integration Services”
at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms141026.aspx.
Conclusion
Upgrading from SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2008 can provide organizations with broad benefits to
the scalability, manageability, security, and performance of their database applications. However, there
are numerous considerations that companies must bear in mind as they plan and execute their upgrade.
Among these are not only the means and the path by which they will affect their upgrade, but also
features that have changed or will change in the future that will impact their database.
Microsoft and Microsoft partners like Pragmatic Works provide a broad array of tools to help companies
successfully upgrade to SQL Server 2008. Effective planning, testing, and proper use of tools can help
make the upgrade a smooth experience that provides new capabilities to your organization.
22
Appendix A: Discontinued Features in SQL Server 2008
The following features are not supported in SQL Server 2008; for the most up-to-date list of
discontinued features, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc280407.aspx.
Database Engine
Discontinued feature
Aliases
sp_addalias
APIs
Registered Servers API
SQL-DMO based Windows® Management Instrumentation (WMI)
provider
SQL Namespace API (SQL-NS)
Backup and restore
Named pipe backup devices
DUMP statement
LOAD statement
BACKUP LOG WITH NO_LOG
BACKUP LOG WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY
BACKUP TRANSACTION
Command prompt utilities
isql utility
Compatibility level
60, 65, and 70 compatibility levels
Configuration options
'allow updates' option of sp_configure
'open objects' option of sp_configure
'set working set size' option of sp_configure
Database creation
DISK INIT
DISK RESIZE
Database creation
FOR LOAD option of CREATE DATABASE
DBCC
DBCC CONCURRENCYVIOLATION
DBCC DBREPAIR
DBCC NEWALLOC
DBCC PINTABLE, DBCC UNPINTABLE
DBCC ROWLOCK
DBCC TEXTALL
DBCC TEXTALLOC
Extended store procedure
programming
Use of SRV_PWD field in the SRV_PFIELD structure when there has
been an impersonation context switch from the original login
Groups
sp_addgroup
sp_changegroup
sp_dropgroup
23
sp_helpgroup
Network protocols
The following protocols: NWLink IPX/SPX, AppleTalk, Banyan Vines,
Multiprotocol
Rebuild master
Rebuildm.exe
Sample databases
Northwind and pubs
Setup.exe
Remote Setup - the TARGETCOMPUTER parameter - is not supported
Tools
Surface Area Configuration Tool
Transact-SQL
*= and =* outer join operators
Virtual tables
Syslocks
Web Assistant
sp_makewebtask
sp_dropwebtask
sp_runwebtask
sp_enumcodepages
Analysis Services
Discontinued Feature
Connection string properties
Mining Execution Location
Mining Location
Log File
Execution Location
Distinct Measures by Key
Large Level Threshold
Features
Aggregated Providers
Linked Cubes
Custom Level Formulas
Cube and Database Role Commands
MDX
CreateVirtualDimension
CreatePropertySet
Ignore
With Cache
Create Cache
Other
Active Directory® Registration
Skipped levels in parent-child hierarchies
Notification Services
Reporting Services
Discontinued Feature
Rendering
HTML 3.2 Rendering Extension
HTML OWC Rendering Extension
SQL Server 2000 Report Server Web Service Endpoint
24
Report server initialization
Rsactivate.exe
Windows® Internet Explorer® 5.5 Support
Report Builder Runs in Full Trust Mode Only
Tools
Surface Area Configuration Tool
Replication
Discontinued Feature
All types of replications







Creating push subscriptions without a connection to the
Subscriber in the New Subscription Wizard
Using file transfer protocol (FTP) to initialize Subscribers running
SQL Server version 7.0
Creating subscriptions in Windows® Synchronization Manager
Subscribing to a publication by locating it in Active Directory
Snapshot ActiveX® control
Remote agent activation
Microsoft® Office Access® (Microsoft® Jet 4.0) Subscribers
Transactional replication
Message Queuing option for queued updating subscriptions
Merge replication
IVBCustomResolver interface
Other Tools and Features
Discontinued Feature
Setup command-line
parameters
ADDLOCAL
DISABLENETWORKPROTOCOLS
DISABLENETWORKPROTOCOLS
INSTALLSQLDATADIR
REINSTALL
REINSTALLMODE
REMOVE
SAMPLEDATABASE
SAVESYSDB
SKUUPGRADE
UPGRADE
USESYSDB
25
Appendix B: Deprecated Features in SQL Server 2008
The following features will not be supported in the next version of SQL Server:
Database Engine
Feature Not Supported in the Next Version of SQL Server
Backup and restore
BACKUP { DATABASE | LOG } WITH PASSWORD
BACKUP { DATABASE | LOG } WITH MEDIAPASSWORD
RESTORE { DATABASE | LOG } WITH DBO_ONLY
RESTORE { DATABASE | LOG } WITH PASSWORD
RESTORE { DATABASE | LOG } WITH MEDIAPASSWORD
Compatibility levels
80 compatibility level and upgrade from version 80
Database objects
WITH APPEND clause on triggers
Database options
sp_dboption
Instance options
Default setting of disallow results from triggers option = 0
Metadata
DATABASEPROPERTY
Query hints
FASTFIRSTROW hint
Remote servers
sp_addremotelogin
sp_addserver
sp_dropremotelogin
sp_helpremotelogin
sp_remoteoption
@@remserver
SET REMOTE_PROC_TRANSACTIONS
Security
sp_dropalias
SET options
SET DISABLE_DEF_CNST_CHK
SET ROWCOUNT for INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements
System tables
sys.database_principal_aliases
Transact-SQL syntax
Use of *= and =*
COMPUTE / COMPUTE BY
RAISERROR syntax
Tools
sqlmaint Utility
Analysis Services
Feature Not Supported in the Next Version of SQL Server
Connection string properties
Mining Execution Location, Mining Location, Log File, Execution
Location, Distinct Measures by Key, Large Level Threshold
Features
Aggregated Providers, Linked Cubes, Custom Level Formulas, Cube
and Database Role Commands
MDX
CreateVirtualDimension, CreatePropertySet, Ignore
26
Other
Active Directory Registration, Skipped levels in parent-child
hierarchies, Surface Area Configuration Tool
Replication
Feature Not Supported in the Next Version of SQL Server
All types of replications
Attachable subscriptions
Adding publications to Active Directory
Checksum validation
Schema changes usingsp_repladdcolumn andsp_repldropcolumn
SQL Distributed Management Objects (SQL-DMO)
Subscriber registration
-UseInprocLoader parameter
Transactional replication
Distribution ActiveX control
"No sync" subscriptions to transactional publications
ODBC Subscribers
Replicating to Oracle 8 subscribers and from Oracle 8 publishers
Replication Distributor Interface
Subscription expiration for transactional publications
Transformable subscriptions
Updatable subscriptions including immediate updating and queued
updating with snapshot and transactional publications
Merge replication
Alternate synchronization partners
@allow_partition_realignmentproperty in sp_addmergepublication
@delete_tracking property in sp_addmergearticle
-ExchangeType parameter
Logical Records
Merge ActiveX control
Multicolumn UPDATE option
"No sync" subscriptions to merge publications
-ParallelUploadDownloadparameter
Other Tools and Features
Feature Not Supported in the Next Version of SQL Server
Setup command-line
parameters
ADDLOCAL
DISABLENETWORKPROTOCOLS
INSTALLSQLDATADIR
REINSTALL
REINSTALLMODE
REMOVE
SAMPLEDATABASE
SKUUPGRADE
UPGRADE
USESYSDB
27
The following features will not be supported in a future version of SQL Server:
Database Engine
Feature Not Supported in a Future Version of SQL Server
Backup and restore
BACKUP { DATABASE | LOG } TO TAPE
BACKUP { DATABASE | LOG } TO device_that_is_a_tape
sp_addumpdevice 'tape'
sp_helpdevice
Collations
Azeri_Latin_90
Azeri_Cyrilllic_90
Hindi
Korean_Wansung_Unicode
Lithuanian_Classic
Macedonian
SQL_AltDiction_CP1253_CS_AS
Compatibility levels
sp_dbcmptlevel
Database compatibility level 90
Configuration




SET ANSI_NULLS OFF and ANSI_NULLS OFF database option
SET ANSI_PADDING OFF and ANSI_PADDING OFF database option
SET CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL OFF and CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL
OFF database option
SET OFFSETS
Data types
sp_addtype
sp_droptype
timestamp syntax for rowversion data type
Ability to insert null values into timestamp columns
'text in row' table option
Data types:

text

ntext

image
Database
management
sp_attach_db
sp_attach_single_file_db
Database objects
CREATE DEFAULT
DROP DEFAULT
sp_bindrule
sp_bindefault
sp_change_users_login
sp_depends
sp_renamedb
sp_renamedb
28
sp_getbindtoken
sp_unbindrule
sp_unbindefault
Database options
Ability to return result sets from triggers
sp_bindsession
sp_bindsession
sp_resetstatus
sp_resetstatus
TORN_PAGE_DETECTION option of ALTER DATABASE
DBCC
DBCC DBREINDEX
DBCC INDEXDEFRAG
DBCC SHOWCONTIG
DBCC PINTABLE
DBCC UNPINTABLE
Extended properties
Level0type = 'type' and Level0type = 'USER' to add extended properties to
level-1 or level-2 type objects
Extended stored
procedures
xp_grantlogin
xp_revokelogin
xp_loginConfig
Extended stored
procedure
programming
sp_addextendedproc
sp_dropextendedproc
sp_helpextendedproc
srv_alloc
srv_convert
srv_describe
srv_getbindtoken
srv_got_attention
srv_message_handler
srv_paramdata
srv_paraminfo
srv_paramlen
srv_parammaxlen
srv_paramname
srv_paramnumber
srv_paramset
srv_paramsetoutput
srv_paramstatus
srv_paramtype
srv_pfield
srv_pfieldex
29
srv_rpcdb
srv_rpcname
srv_rpcnumber
srv_rpcoptions
srv_rpcowner
srv_rpcparams
srv_senddone
srv_sendmsg
srv_sendrow
srv_setcoldata
srv_setcollen
srv_setutype
srv_willconvert
srv_wsendmsg
Functions
fn_get_sql
Index options
CREATE TABLE, ALTER TABLE, or CREATE INDEX syntax without parentheses
around the options
sp_indexoption
Instance options
sp_configure option 'allow updates'
sp_configure options:

'locks'

'open objects'

'set working set size'
sp_configure options 'user instances enabled'
sp_configure option 'priority boost'
sp_configure option 'remote proc trans'
Linked servers
A linked server uses OLEDB
Locking
sp_lock
Mail
SQL Mail
Metadata
FILE_ID
INDEXKEY_PROPERTY
Native XML Web
Services
The CREATE ENDPOINT or ALTER ENDPOINT statement with the FOR SOAP
option
EXT_endpoint_webmethods
EXT_soap_endpoints
Programmability
SQL Server Database Management Objects (SQL-DMO)
Removable
databases
sp_certify_removable
sp_create_removable
sp_dbremove
30
Security
The ALTER LOGIN WITH SET CREDENTIAL syntax
sp_addapprole
sp_dropapprole
sp_addlogin
sp_droplogin
sp_adduser
sp_dropuser
sp_grantdbaccess
sp_revokedbaccess
sp_addrole
sp_droprole
sp_approlepassword
sp_password
sp_changeobjectowner
sp_defaultdb
sp_defaultlanguage
sp_denylogin
sp_grantlogin
sp_revokelogin
sp_srvrolepermission
sp_dbfixedrolepermission
sp_srvrolepermission
sp_dbfixedrolepermission
GRANT ALL
DENY ALL
REVOKE ALL
USER_ID
SETUSER
PERMISSIONS intrinsic function
RC4 encryption algorithm
SMO classes
Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.Smo.Information class
Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.Smo.Settings class
Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.Smo.DatabaseOptions class
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.DatabaseDdlTrigger.NotForReplication
property
SQL Server Agent
net send notification
Pager notification
ActiveX subsystem
SQL Server
Management Studio
Solution Explorer integration in SQL Server Management Studio
Source Control integration in SQL Server Management Studio
31
System functions
fn_virtualservernodes
fn_servershareddrives
System tables
sysaltfiles
syscacheobjects
syscolumns
syscomments
sysconfigures
sysconstraints
syscurconfigs
sysdatabases
sysdepends
sysdevices
sysfilegroups
sysfiles
sysforeignkeys
sysfulltextcatalogs
sysindexes
sysindexkeys
syslockinfo
syslogins
sysmembers
sysmessages
sysobjects
sysoledbusers
sysopentapes
sysperfinfo
syspermissions
sysprocesses
sysprotects
sysreferences
sysremotelogins
sysservers
systypes
sysusers
sys.numbered_procedures
sys.numbered_procedure_parameters
System views
sys.sql_dependencies
Table compression
Use of the vardecimal storage format
Use of the sp_db_vardecimal_storage_format procedure
Use of the sp_estimated_rowsize_reduction_for_vardecimal procedure
32
Table hints
Specifying NOLOCK or READUNCOMMITTED in the FROM clause of an UPDATE
or DELETE statement
Specifying table hints without using the WITH keyword
Textpointers
TEXTPTR()
TEXTVALID()
READTEXT
UPDATETEXT
WRITETEXT
Transact-SQL syntax
















:: function-calling sequence
Three-part and four-part column references in SELECT list
A string enclosed in quotation marks used as a column alias for an
expression in a SELECT list: for example, 'string_alias' = expression
Numbered procedures
table_name.index_name syntax in DROP INDEX
Not ending Transact-SQL statements with a semicolon
Use of #, ## as temporary table and temporary stored procedure names
Use of @, @@, or @@ as Transact-SQL identifiers
Use of DEFAULT keyword as default value
Use of a space as a separator between table hints
The select list of an aggregate indexed view must contain COUNT_BIG (*)
in 90 compatibility mode
The indirect application of table hints to an invocation of a multistatement table-valued function (TVF) through a view
GROUP BY ALL
ROWGUIDCOL as a column name in DML statements
IDENTITYCOL as a column name in DML statements
ALTER DATABASE syntax:
o MODIFY FILEGROUP READONLY
o MODIFY FILEGROUP READWRITE
XML
Inline XDR Schema Generation
Other
DB-Library
Embedded SQL for C
Analysis Services
Feature Not Supported in a Future Version of SQL Server
Connection string
properties
InsertInto CreateCube
Features
SQL Server 2000 PMML
Multidimensional
Expressions (MDX)
Create Action
CalculationPassValue
33
CalculationCurrentPass
NON_EMPTY_BEHAVIOR query optimizer hint was turned on by default
Other
CELL_EVALUATION_LIST intrinsic cell property
Objects
COM assemblies
Replication
Feature Not Supported in a Future Version of SQL Server
Replication
Adding publications to Active Directory
Attachable subscriptions
Checksum validation
PublisherAddress, PublisherNetwork, DistributorNetwork, and
DistributorAddress parameters in Distribution and Merge Agents
Schema changes using sp_repladdcolumn and sp_repldropcolumn
SQL Distributed Management Objects (SQL-DMO)
Subscriber registration
-UseInprocLoader parameter
Transactional
Replication
"No sync" subscriptions to transactional publications
Distribution ActiveX control
ODBC Subscriber
Replicating to Oracle 8 subscribers and from Oracle 8 publishers
Replication Distributor Interface
Subscription expiration for transactional publications
Transformable subscriptions
Updatable subscriptions including immediate updating and queued updating
with snapshot and transactional publications
Merge Replication
@allow_partition_realignment property in sp_addmergepublication
@delete_tracking property in sp_addmergearticle
Alternate synchronization partners
-ExchangeType parameter
Logical Records
Merge ActiveX control
Multicolumn UPDATE option
No sync subscriptions to merge publications
-ParallelUploadDownload parameter
Other Tools and
Features
Management Tools
34
Feature Not Supported in a Future Version of SQL Server
Net send notifications (SQL Server Agent)
osql.exe
Pager notifications (SQL Server Agent)
SMO Class:
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.DatabaseDdlTrigger.NotForReplication
property
SMO Class: Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.Smo.DatabaseOptions class
SMO class: Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.Smo.Information class
SMO class: Microsoft.SQLServer.Management.Smo.Settings class
SQL Server 2005 Registered Server API
SQL-DMO
SQLMail
The ActiveX subsystem (SQL Server Agent)
The Database Project System, including source-control integration, in SSMS
See Also – Breaking Changes:
Breaking Changes to SQL Server Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc707784.aspx
Breaking Changes to Analysis Services Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143742.aspx
Breaking Changes in SQL Server Reporting Services:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143380.aspx
Breaking Changes to Integration Services Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa337086.aspx
Breaking Changes in SQL Server Replication:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143470.aspx
Breaking Changes to Management Tools Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc879338.aspx
Breaking Changes to Management Tools Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc879338.aspx
See Also – Behavior Changes
Behavior Changes to Database Engine Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143359.aspx
Behavior Changes to Analysis Services Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143682.aspx
Behavior Changes in SQL Server Reporting Services:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143200.aspx
35
Behavior Changes to Integration Services Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb500430.aspx
Behavior Changes in SQL Server Replication:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143733.aspx
Behavior Changes to Management Tools Features in SQL Server 2008:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc879340.aspx)
36
Related Links
SQL Server 2008 Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2008/en/us/default.aspx
SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Technical Reference Guide:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=3d5e96d9-0074-46c4-bd4fc3eb2abf4b66&DisplayLang=en
MSDN SQL Server Developer Center
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sqlserver/default.aspx
TechNet SQL Server Tech Center
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sqlserver/default.aspx
Upgrading to SQL Server 2008
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb677622.aspx
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