Levofloxacin 5 mg/mL in 5% Dextrose Injection

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PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
STERILE
Pr
LEVOFLOXACIN in 5% Dextrose, Injection
levofloxacin
5mg/mL Solution
Antibacterial Agent
Hospira Healthcare Corporation
1111 Dr. Frederik-Philips, suite 600
St-Laurent, Québec
H4M 2X6
Control # 155733
Date of Revision: November 6, 2012
Pr
LEVOFLOXACIN in 5% Dextrose, Injection
Levofloxacin
STERILE
Injection 5 mg/mL in 5% dextrose
Antibacterial Agent
PART I: HEALTH PROFESSIONAL INFORMATION
SUMMARY PRODUCT INFORMATION
Route of
Administration
Intravenous Infusion
Dosage Form /
Strength
Injection 5 mg/mL in
5% dextrose
Clinically Relevant Nonmedicinal
Ingredients
None
For a complete listing see DOSAGE
FORMS, COMPOSITION AND
PACKAGING section.
INDICATIONS AND CLINICAL USE
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection is indicated for the treatment of adults with bacterial
infections caused by susceptible strains of the designated microorganisms in the infections listed
below.
Note: Since i.v. and oral formulations are interchangeable, i.v. administration is recommended
only when it offers a route of administration advantageous to the patient (e.g., patient cannot
tolerate oral dosage form).
Upper Respiratory Tract
Acute sinusitis (mild to moderate) due to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, or
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis.
Lower Respiratory Tract
Acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (mild to moderate) due to Staphylococcus
aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, or
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis.
Community-acquired pneumonia (mild, moderate and severe infections) due to Staphylococcus
aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including penicillin-resistant strains), Haemophilus
influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Moraxella (Branhamella)
catarrhalis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (see
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).
Nosocomial pneumonia due to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas
aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 2 of 29
influenzae or Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adjunctive therapy should be used as clinically
indicated. Where Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a documented or presumptive pathogen,
combination therapy with an anti-pseudomonal β-lactam is recommended.
Skin and Skin Structure
Uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections (mild to moderate) due to Staphylococcus
aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes.
Complicated skin and skin structure infections (mild to moderate), excluding burns, due to
Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes,
Proteus mirabilis, or Streptococcus agalactiae.
Urinary Tract
Complicated urinary tract infections (mild to moderate) due to Enterococcus (Streptococcus)
faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, or
Pseudomonas aeruginosa (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).
Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (mild to moderate) due to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella
pneumoniae or Staphylococcus saprophyticus.
Acute pyelonephritis (mild to moderate) caused by Escherichia coli (see DOSAGE AND
ADMINISTRATION).
Chronic bacterial prostatitis due to Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, or Staphylococcus
epidermidis.
Appropriate culture and susceptibility tests should be performed before treatment in order to
isolate and identify the organisms causing the infection, and to determine their susceptibility to
levofloxacin. Therapy with levofloxacin may be initiated before the results of these tests are
known; once results become available, appropriate therapy should be continued.
As with other drugs in this class, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa may develop
resistance fairly rapidly during treatment with levofloxacin. Culture and susceptibility testing
performed periodically during therapy, will reveal not only the therapeutic effect of the
antimicrobial agent, but also the possible emergence of bacterial resistance.
Geriatrics (≥ 65 years of age):
Drug absorption appears to be unaffected by age. Dose adjustment based on age alone is not
necessary (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Special Populations and ACTION AND
CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Special Populations and Conditions).
Pediatrics (<18 years of age):
Safety and effectiveness in children under 18 years of age have not been established (see
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Special Populations).
CONTRAINDICATIONS
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Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection is contraindicated in persons with a history of
hypersensitivity to levofloxacin, quinolone antimicrobial agents, or any other components of this
product. For a complete listing, see the DOSAGE FORMS, COMPOSITION AND
PACKAGING section of the Product Monograph.
Levofloxacin is also contraindicated in persons with a history of tendinitis or tendon rupture
associated with the use of any member of the quinolone group of antimicrobial agents.
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Serious Warnings and Precautions
•
•
•
•
•
Levofloxacin has been shown to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in some patients
(see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Cardiovascular).
Serious hypersensitivity and/or anaphylactic reactions have been reported in patients receiving
quinolone therapy, including levofloxacin (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Immune).
Seizures may occur with quinolone therapy. Levofloxacin should be used with caution in patients with
known or suspected CNS disorders which may predispose to seizures or lower the seizure threshold
(see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Neurologic).
Fluoroquinolones, including Levofloxacin, may exacerbate muscle weakness in persons with
myasthenia gravis. Avoid levofloxacin in patients with a known history of myasthenia gravis (see
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Musculoskeletal).
Fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, are associated with an increased risk of tendinitis and
tendon rupture in all ages. This risk is further increased in older patients usually over 60 years of age,
in patients taking corticosteroid drugs, and in patients with kidney, heart or lung transplants (see
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Musculoskeletal).
General
The intravenous administration of levofloxacin increased the incidence and severity of
osteochondrosis in immature rats and dogs. Other quinolones also produce similar erosions in the
weight-bearing joints and other signs of arthropathy in immature animals of various species.
Consequently, levofloxacin should not be used in pre-pubertal patients.
Although levofloxacin is soluble, adequate hydration of patients receiving levofloxacin should be
maintained to prevent the formation of a highly concentrated urine. Crystalluria has been
observed rarely in patients receiving other quinolones, when associated with high doses and an
alkaline urine. Although crystalluria was not observed in clinical trials with levofloxacin,
patients are encouraged to remain adequately hydrated.
As with any antimicrobial drug, periodic assessment of organ system functions, including renal,
hepatic, and hematopoietic, is advisable during prolonged therapy (see ADVERSE
REACTIONS).
I.V. Administration
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Because rapid or bolus intravenous injection may result in hypotension, LEVOFLOXACIN
INJECTION SHOULD ONLY BE ADMINISTERED BY SLOW INTRAVENOUS INFUSION
OVER A PERIOD OF 60 MINUTES FOR A 250 MG OR A 500 MG DOSE, AND 90
MINUTES FOR A 750 MG DOSE (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Levofloxacin is not indicated for the treatment of syphilis or gonorrhea. Levofloxacin is not
effective in the treatment of syphilis. Antimicrobial agents used in high doses for short periods of
time to treat gonorrhea may mask or delay the symptoms of incubating syphilis. All patients with
gonorrhea should have a serologic test for syphilis at the time of diagnosis. Patients treated with
antimicrobial agents with limited or no activity against Treponema pallidum should have a
follow-up serologic test for syphilis after 3 months.
Cardiovascular
QT Prolongation
Some quinolones, including levofloxacin, have been associated with prolongation of the QT
interval on the electrocardiogram and infrequent cases of arrhythmia. During post-marketing
surveillance, very rare cases of torsades de pointes have been reported in patients taking
levofloxacin. These reports generally involved patients with concurrent medical conditions or
concomitant medications that may have been contributory. The risk of arrhythmias may be
reduced by avoiding concurrent use with other drugs that prolong the QT interval including
macrolide antibiotics, antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, Class IA (e.g., quinidine,
procainamide) or Class III (e.g., amiodarone, sotalol) antiarrhythmic agents, and cisapride. In
addition, use of levofloxacin in the presence of risk factors for torsades de pointes such as
hypokalemia, significant bradycardia, cardiomyopathy, patients with myocardial ischemia, and
patients with congenital prolongation of the QT interval should be avoided.
Endocrine and Metabolism
Disturbances of Blood Glucose
Disturbances of blood glucose, including symptomatic hyper- and hypoglycemia, have been
reported with the use of quinolones, including levofloxacin. In patients treated with
levofloxacin, some of these cases were serious. Blood glucose disturbances were usually in
diabetic patients receiving concomitant treatment with an oral hypoglycemic agent (e.g.
glyburide/glibenclamide) or with insulin. In these patients, careful monitoring of blood glucose is
recommended. If a hypoglycemic reaction occurs in a patient being treated with levofloxacin,
discontinue levofloxacin immediately and initiate appropriate therapy (see DRUG
INTERACTIONS, and ADVERSE REACTIONS). Serious hypoglycaemia and
hyperglycemia have also occurred in patients without a history of diabetes.
Gastrointestinal
Clostridium difficile-associated disease
Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) has been reported with use of many
antibacterial agents, including levofloxacin. CDAD may range in severity from mild diarrhea to
fatal colitis. It is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhea or
symptoms of colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, or perforation of the colon
subsequent to the administration of any antibacterial agent. CDAD has been reported to occur
over 2 months after the administration of antibacterial agents.
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Treatment with antibacterial agents may alter the normal flora of the colon and may permit
overgrowth of Clostridium difficile. C. difficile produces toxins A and B, which contribute to the
development of CDAD. CDAD may cause significant morbidity and mortality. CDAD can be
refractory to antimicrobial therapy.
If the diagnosis of CDAD is suspected or confirmed, appropriate therapeutic measures should be
initiated. Mild cases of CDAD usually respond to discontinuation of antibacterial agents not
directed against Clostridium difficile. In moderate to severe cases, consideration should be given
to management with fluids and electrolytes, protein supplementation, and treatment with an
antibacterial agent clinically effective against Clostridium difficile. Surgical evaluation should be
instituted as clinically indicated since surgical intervention may be required in certain severe
cases (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Hepatic
Very rare post-marketing reports of severe hepatotoxicity (including acute hepatitis and fatal
events) have been received for patients treated with levofloxacin. No evidence of serious drugassociated hepatotoxicity was detected in clinical trials of over 7,000 patients. Severe
hepatotoxicity generally occurred within 14 days of initiation of therapy and most cases occurred
within 6 days. Most cases of severe hepatotoxicity were not associated with hypersensitivity. The
majority of fatal hepatotoxicity reports occurred in patients 65 years of age or older and most
were not associated with hypersensitivity. Levofloxacin should be discontinued immediately if
the patient develops signs and symptoms of hepatitis (see ADVERSE REACTIONS, PostMarket Adverse Drug Reactions.)
Immune
Hypersensitivity
Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity and/or anaphylactic reactions have been reported
in patients receiving therapy with quinolones, including levofloxacin. These reactions often
occur following the first dose. Some reactions have been accompanied by cardiovascular
collapse, hypotension/shock, seizure, loss of consciousness, tingling, angioedema (including
tongue, laryngeal, throat or facial edema/swelling), airway obstruction (including bronchospasm,
shortness of breath, and acute respiratory distress), dyspnea, urticaria, itching, and other serious
skin reactions. Levofloxacin should be discontinued immediately at the first appearance of a skin
rash or any other sign of hypersensitivity. Serious acute hypersensitivity reactions may require
treatment with epinephrine and other resuscitative measures, including oxygen, intravenous
fluids, antihistamines, corticosteroids, pressor, amines and airway management, as clinically
indicated (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Serious and sometimes fatal events, some due to hypersensitivity and some due to uncertain
etiology, have rarely been reported in patients receiving therapy with quinolones, including
levofloxacin. These events may be severe, and generally occur following the administration of
multiple doses. Clinical manifestations may include one or more of the following: fever; rash or
severe dermatologic reactions (e.g., toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome);
vasculitis; arthralgia; myalgia; serum sickness; allergic pneumonitis; interstitial nephritis; acute
renal insufficiency or failure; hepatitis, including acute hepatitis; jaundice; acute hepatic necrosis
or failure; anemia, including hemolytic and aplastic; thrombocytopenia, including thrombotic
thrombocytopenic purpura; leukopenia; agranulocytosis; pancytopenia; and/or other hematologic
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
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abnormalities. The administration of levofloxacin should be discontinued immediately, at the
first appearance of a skin rash or any other sign of hypersensitivity, and supportive measures
instituted (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Musculoskeletal
Tendinitis
Rupture of the shoulder, hand and Achilles tendons that required surgical repair or
resulted in prolonged disability have been reported in patients receiving quinolones,
including Levofloxacin. Levofloxacin should be discontinued if the patient experiences pain,
inflammation or rupture of a tendon. Patients should rest and refrain from exercise until the
diagnosis of tendinitis or tendon rupture has been confidently excluded. The risk of developing
fluoroquinolone-associated tendinitis and tendon rupture is further increased in older patients
usually over 60 years of age, in patients taking corticosteroid drugs, and in patients with kidney,
heart or lung transplants. Factors, in addition to age and corticosteroid use, that may
independently increase the risk of tendon rupture include strenuous physical activity, renal
failure, and previous tendon disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. Tendinitis and tendon rupture
have also occurred in patients taking fluoroquinolones who do not have the above risk factors.
Tendon rupture can occur during or after completion of therapy; cases occurring up to several
months after completion of therapy have been reported. Levofloxacin should be discontinued if
the patient experiences pain, swelling, inflammation or rupture of a tendon. Patients should be
advised to rest at the first sign of tendinitis or tendon rupture, and to contact their healthcare
provider regarding changing to a non-quinolone antimicrobial drug (see ADVERSE
REACTIONS).
Levofloxacin should not be used in patients with a history of tendon disease/disorder related to
previous quinolone treatment (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).
Myasthenia Gravis
Fluoroquinolones have neuromuscular blocking activity and may exacerbate muscle weakness in
persons with myasthenia gravis. Postmarketing serious adverse events, including deaths and
requirement for ventilatory support, have been associated with fluoroquinolone use (including
Levofloxacin) in persons with myasthenia gravis. Avoid Levofloxacin in patients with a known
history of myasthenia gravis (see ADVERSE REACTIONS, Post-Market Adverse Drug
Reactions).
Neurologic
CNS and Psychiatric Effects
Convulsions, toxic psychoses and increased intracranial pressure (including pseudotumor
cerebri) have been reported in patients receiving quinolones, including levofloxacin. Quinolones
including levofloxacin, may also cause central nervous system stimulation which may lead to
tremors, restlessness, anxiety, lightheadedness, dizziness, confusion and hallucinations, paranoia,
depression, nightmares, insomnia and, rarely, suicidal thoughts or acts. These reactions may
occur following the first dose. If these reactions occur in patients receiving levofloxacin, the drug
should be discontinued and appropriate measures instituted. As with all quinolones, levofloxacin
should be used with caution in patients with a known or suspected CNS disorder that may
predispose to seizures or lower the seizure threshold (e.g., severe cerebral arteriosclerosis,
epilepsy), or in the presence of other risk factors that may predispose to seizures or lower the
seizure threshold (e.g., alcohol abuse, certain drug therapies such as NSAIDs and theophylline,
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renal dysfunction). Levofloxacin should be used with caution in patients with unstable
psychiatric illness (see DRUG INTERACTIONS, and ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Peripheral Neuropathy
Rare cases of sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy affecting small and/or large axons
resulting in paresthesias, hypoesthesias, dysesthesias and weakness have been reported in
patients receiving quinolones, including levofloxacin. Levofloxacin should be discontinued if
the patient experiences symptoms of neuropathy including pain, burning, tingling, numbness,
and/or weakness or other alterations of sensation including light touch, pain, temperature,
position sense, and vibratory sensation in order to prevent the development of an irreversible
condition.
Renal
Safety and efficacy of levofloxacin in patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance
≤ 80 mL/min) have not been studied. Since levofloxacin is known to be substantially excreted by
the kidney, the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal
function. The potential effects of levofloxacin associated with possible increased serum/tissue
levels in renal impaired patients, such as effect on QTc interval, have not been studied.
Adjustment of the dosage regimen may be necessary to avoid the accumulation of levofloxacin
due to decreased clearance. Careful clinical observation and appropriate laboratory studies should
be performed prior to and during therapy, since elimination of levofloxacin may be reduced.
Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken
in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function. Administer levofloxacin with
caution in the presence of renal insufficiency (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION,
Recommended Dose and Dosage Adjustment, Patients with Impaired Renal Function).
Skin
Phototoxicity
Moderate to severe phototoxicity reactions have been observed in patients exposed to direct
sunlight or ultraviolet (UV) light while receiving drugs in this class. Excessive exposure to
sunlight or UV light should be avoided. However, in clinical trials with levofloxacin,
phototoxicity has been observed in less than 0.1% of patients. Therapy should be discontinued if
phototoxicity (e.g., skin eruption) occurs.
Special Populations
The safety and efficacy of Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection in children, adolescents
(under the age of 18 years), pregnant women, and nursing mothers have not been
established.
Pregnant Women: There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.
Levofloxacin should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential
risk to the fetus.
Nursing Women: Levofloxacin has not been measured in human milk. Based upon data from
ofloxacin, it can be presumed that levofloxacin can be excreted in human milk. Because of the
potential for serious adverse reactions from levofloxacin in nursing infants, a decision should be
made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the
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importance of the drug to the mother.
Pediatrics (<18 years of age): Levofloxacin is not indicated for the treatment of patients
younger than 18 years of age. Quinolones, including levofloxacin, cause arthropathy in juvenile
animals of several species. The incidence of protocol-defined musculoskeletal disorders in a
prospective long-term surveillance study was higher in children treated for approximately 10
days with levofloxacin than in children treated with non-fluoroquinolone antibiotics for
approximately 10 days (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Geriatrics (≥ 65 years of age): The pharmacokinetic properties of levofloxacin in younger
adults and elderly adults do not differ significantly when creatinine clearance is taken into
consideration. However, since the drug is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, the
risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function.
Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in
dose selection. It may also be useful to monitor renal function.
Elderly patients may be more susceptible to drug-associated effects on the QT interval (See
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Cardiovascular).
Geriatric patients are at increased risk for developing severe tendon disorders including tendon
rupture when being treated with a fluoroquinolone such as Levofloxacin. This risk is further
increased in patients receiving concomitant corticosteroid therapy (see WARNINGS AND
PRECAUTIONS, Musculoskeletal).
Severe and sometimes fatal cases of hepatotoxicity have been reported post-marketing in
association with Levofloxacin. The majority of fatal hepatotoxicity reports occurred in patients
65 years of age or older and most were not associated with hypersensitivity (see WARNINGS
AND PRECAUTIONS, Hepatic).
ADVERSE REACTIONS
Adverse Drug Reaction Overview
In North American Phase III clinical trials involving 7537 subjects, the incidence of treatmentemergent adverse events in patients treated with levofloxacin was comparable to comparators.
The majority of adverse events were considered to be mild to moderate, with 5.6% of patients
considered to have severe adverse events. Among patients receiving multiple-dose therapy,
4.2% discontinued therapy with levofloxacin due to adverse experiences. The incidence of drugrelated adverse reactions was 6.7%.
In clinical trials, the most frequently reported adverse drug reaction occurring in > 3% of the
study population were nausea, headache, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness and constipation.
Serious and otherwise important adverse drug reactions are discussed in greater detail in other
sections (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS).
Clinical Trial Adverse Drug Reactions
Because clinical trials are conducted under very specific conditions the adverse reaction
rates observed in the clinical trials may not reflect the rates observed in practice and
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should not be compared to the rates in the clinical trials of another drug. Adverse drug
reaction information from clinical trials is useful for identifying drug-related adverse
events and for approximating rates.
The data described below reflect exposure to levofloxacin in 7537 patients in 29 pooled Phase III
clinical trials. The population studied had a mean age of 49.6 years (74.2% of the population was
< 65 years), 50.1% were male, 71.0% were Caucasian, 18.8% were Black. Patients were treated
with levofloxacin for a wide variety of infectious diseases (See INDICATIONS AND
CLINICAL USE). Treatment duration was usually 3-14 days, the mean number of days on
therapy was 9.6 days and the mean number of doses was 10.2. Patients received levofloxacin
doses of 750 mg once daily, 250 mg once daily, or 500 mg once or twice daily. The overall
incidence, type and distribution of adverse reactions was similar in patients receiving
levofloxacin doses of 750 mg once daily, 250 mg once daily, and 500 mg once or twice daily.
Adverse reactions (characterized as likely related to drug-therapy) occurring in ≥ 1% of
levofloxacin-treated patients is shown in Table 1.1 below.
Table 1.1. Common (≥ 1%) Adverse Reactions Reported in Clinical Trials with levofloxacin
System/Organ Class
Infections and Infestations
moniliasis
%
(N=7537)
1
Psychiatric Disorders
Nervous System Disorders
insomnia
headache
dizziness
dyspnea
4a
6
3
1
nausea
diarrhea
constipation
abdominal pain
vomiting
dyspepsia
rash
pruritus
vaginitis
7
5
3
2
2
2
2
1
1b
edema
injection site reaction
chest pain
1
1
1
Respiratory, Thoracic and
Mediastinal Disorders
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue
Disorders
Reproductive System and Breast
Disorders
General Disorders and
Administration Site Conditions
a
b
Adverse Reaction
N = 7274
N=3758 (women)
Less Common Clinical Trial Adverse Drug Reactions (<1%)
Less common adverse reactions occurring in 0.1 to <1% of levofloxacin-treated patients is shown
in Table 1.2 below.
Table 1.2. Less Common (0.1 to 1%) Adverse Reactions Reported in Clinical Trials with levofloxacin
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System/Organ Class
Infections and Infestations
Blood and Lymphatic System
Disorders
Immune System Disorders
Metabolism and Nutrition
Disorders
Psychiatric Disorders
Nervous System Disorders
Respiratory, Thoracic and
Mediastinal Disorders
Cardiac Disorders
Vascular Disorders
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Adverse Reaction
genital moniliasis
anemia, thrombocytopenia, granulocytopenia
allergic reaction
hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, hyperkalemia
anxiety, agitation, confusion, depression, hallucination,
nightmarea, sleep disordera, anorexia, abnormal dreaminga
tremor, convulsions, parasthesia, vertigo, hypertonia,
hyperkinesias, abnormal gait, somnolencea, syncope
epistaxis
cardiac arrest, palpitation, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular
arrhythmia
phlebitis
gastritis, stomatitis, pancreatitis, oesophagitis, gastroenteritis,
glossitis, pseudomembraneous/ C.difficile colitis
Hepatobiliary Disorders
abnormal hepatic function, increased hepatic enzymes,
increased alkaline phosphatase
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue
Disorders
urticaria
Musculoskeletal and Connective
Tissue Disorders
Tendinitis, arthralgia, myalgia, skeletal pain
Renal and Urinary Disorders
abnormal renal function, acute renal failure
a
N = 7274
Rare (<0.1%) adverse reactions from Phase III studies include dyspnea and rash maculopapular.
In clinical trials using multiple-dose therapy, ophthalmologic abnormalities, including cataracts
and multiple punctate lenticular opacities, have been noted in patients undergoing treatment with
other quinolones. The relationship of the drugs to these events is not presently established.
Crystalluria and cylindruria have been reported with other quinolones.
Abnormal Hematologic and Clinical Chemistry Findings
Laboratory abnormalities seen in > 2% of patients receiving multiple doses of levofloxacin:
decreased glucose 2.1%
It is not known whether this abnormality was caused by the drug or the underlying condition
being treated.
Pediatric Data
In a group of 1534 pediatric patients (6 months to 16 years of age) treated with levofloxacin for
respiratory infections, children 6 months to 5 years of age received 10 mg/kg of levofloxacin
twice a day for approximately 10 days and children greater than 5 years of age received
10 mg/kg to a maximum of 500 mg of levofloxacin once a day for approximately 10 days. The
adverse reaction profile was similar to that reported in adult patients. Vomiting and diarrhea were
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reported more frequently in children than reported in adults. However, the frequency of vomiting
and diarrhea was similar in levofloxacin-treated and non-fluoroquinolone antibiotic comparatortreated children.
A subset of 1340 of these children treated with levofloxacin for approximately 10 days was
enrolled in a prospective, long-term, surveillance study to assess the incidence of protocoldefined musculoskeletal disorders (arthralgia, arthritis, tendonopathy, gait abnormality) during 60
days and 1 year following the first dose of levofloxacin.
During the 60-day period following the first dose, the incidence of protocol-defined
musculoskeletal disorders was greater in levofloxacin-treated children than in nonfluoroquinolone antibiotic comparator-treated children (2.1% vs. 0.9%, respectively [p=0.038]).
In 22/28 (78%) of these children, reported disorders were characterized as arthralgia. A similar
observation was made during the one-year period, with a greater incidence of protocol-defined
musculoskeletal disorders in levofloxacin-treated children than in non-fluoroquinolone antibiotic
comparator-treated children (3.4% vs. 1.8%, respectively [p=0.025]). The majority of these
disorders occurring in children treated with levofloxacin were mild and resolved within 7 days.
Disorders were moderate in 8 children and mild in 35 (76%) children.
Post-Market Adverse Drug Reactions
Table 1.3 lists adverse reactions that have been identified during post-approval use of
levofloxacin. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain
size, reliably estimating their frequency or establishing a causal relationship to drug exposure is
not always possible.
Table 1.3: Post-marketing Reports of Adverse Drug Reactions
System Organ Class
Blood and Lymphatic System
Disorders
Immune System Disorders
Psychiatric Disorders
Nervous System Disorders
Eye Disorders
Ear and Labyrinth Disorders
Cardiac Disorders
Vascular Disorders
Adverse Reaction
pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, leucopenia, hemolytic anemia,
eosinophilia, thrombocytopenia including thrombotic thrombocytopenic
purpura, agranulocytosis
hypersensitivity reactions, sometimes fatal including:
anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions, anaphylactic shock, angioneurotic
edema, serum sickness
psychosis, paranoia, isolated reports of suicide attempt and suicidal
ideation
anosmia, ageusia, parosmia, dysgeusia, peripheral neuropathy, isolated
reports of encephalopathy, abnormal EEG, dysphonia, exacerbation of
myasthenia gravis, amnesia, pseudotumor cerebri
vision disturbance (including diplopia), visual acuity reduced, vision
blurred, scotoma
hypoacusis, tinnitus
isolated reports of torsade de pointes, electrocardiogram QT prolonged,
tachycardia
vasodilation, vasculitis, DIC
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System Organ Class
Respiratory, Thoracic and
Mediastinal Disorders
Hepatobiliary Disorders
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue
Disorders
Musculoskeletal and Connective
Tissue Disorders
Renal and Urinary Disorders
General Disorders and
Administration Site Conditions
Investigations
Adverse Reaction
isolated reports of allergic pneumonitis, interstitial pneumonia, laryngeal
edema, apnea
hepatic failure (including fatal cases), hepatitis, jaundice, hepatic necrosis
bullous eruptions to include: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal
necrolysis, erythema multiforme, photosensitivity/phototoxicity reaction,
leukocytoclastic vasculitis
tendon rupture, muscle injury (including rupture), rhabdomyolysis,
myositis, myalgia
interstitial nephritis, nephrosis, glomerulonephritis
multi-organ failure, pyrexia, rash
prothrombin time prolonged, international normalized ratio (INR)
prolonged, muscle enzymes increased (CPK)
DRUG INTERACTIONS
Overview
Levofloxacin undergoes limited metabolism in humans and is primarily excreted as
unchanged drug in the urine. The P450 system is not involved in the levofloxacin
metabolism, and is not affected by levofloxacin. Levofloxacin is unlikely to alter the
pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized by these enzymes. Disturbances of blood glucose
have been reported in patients treated concomitantly with levofloxacin and an antidiabetic
agent. Therefore, careful monitoring of blood glucose is recommended when these agents,
including levofloxacin, are co-administered. As with all other quinolones, iron and antacids
significantly reduced bioavailability of levofloxacin.
Drug-Drug Interactions
Table 1.4- Established or Potential Drug-Drug Interactions
Proper name
Antacids, Sucralfate, Metal
Cations, Multi-Vitamins
Ref
T
Effect
There are no data concerning an
interaction of intravenous quinolones
with oral antacids, sucralfate, multivitamins, or metal cations.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Clinical comment
Levofloxacin should not be coadministered with any solution
containing multivalent cations (e.g.,
magnesium) through the same
intravenous line (see DOSAGE AND
ADMINISTRATION;
Administration).
Page 13 of 29
Proper name
Theophylline
Warfarin
Ref
CT/T
T
Effect
No significant effect of levofloxacin
on the plasma concentrations, AUC,
and other disposition parameters for
theophylline was detected in a clinical
study involving 14 healthy volunteers.
Similarly, no apparent effect of
theophylline on levofloxacin
absorption and disposition was
observed. However, concomitant
administration of other quinolones
with theophylline has resulted in
prolonged elimination, elevated serum
theophylline levels, and a subsequent
increase in the risk of theophyllinerelated adverse reactions in the patient
population.
Clinical comment
Theophylline levels should be closely
monitored, and theophylline dosage
adjustments made if appropriate, when
levofloxacin is co-administered.
Adverse reactions, including seizures,
may occur with or without an elevation
in serum theophylline level (see
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS).
Certain quinolones, including
levofloxacin, may enhance the effects
of oral anticoagulant warfarin or its
derivatives.
When these products are administered
concomitantly, prothrombin time,
International Normalized Ratio (INR),
or other suitable coagulation tests
should be monitored closely,
especially in the elderly patients.
Cyclosporine
CT
No significant effect of levofloxacin
No dosage adjustment is required for
on the peak plasma concentrations,
levofloxacin or cyclosporine when
AUC, and other disposition parameters administered concomitantly.
for cyclosporine was detected in a
clinical study involving healthy
volunteers. However, elevated serum
levels of cyclosporine have been
reported in the patient population
when co-administered with some other
quinolones. Levofloxacin Cmax and ke
were slightly lower, while Tmax and t½
were slightly longer in the presence of
cyclosporine, than those observed in
other studies without concomitant
medication. The differences, however,
are not considered to be clinically
significant.
Digoxin
CT
No significant effect of levofloxacin
No dosage adjustment for
on the peak plasma concentrations,
levofloxacin or digoxin is required
AUC, and, other disposition
when administered concomitantly.
parameters for digoxin was detected in
a clinical study involving healthy
volunteers. Levofloxacin absorption
and disposition kinetics were similar
in the presence or absence of digoxin.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 14 of 29
Proper name
Probenecid and
Cimetidine
Ref
CT
Effect
No significant effect of probenecid or
cimetidine on the rate and extent of
levofloxacin absorption was observed
in a clinical study involving healthy
volunteers. The AUC and t½ of
levofloxacin were 27-38% and 30%
higher, respectively, while CL/F and Clr
were 21-35% lower during
concomitant treatment with probenecid
or cimetidine compared to levofloxacin
alone.
Clinical comment
Although the differences were
statistically significant, the changes
were not high enough to warrant dosage
adjustment for levofloxacin when
probenecid or cimetidine is coadministered.
Non-Steroidal AntiInflammatory Drugs
(NSAIDs)
T
Although not observed with
levofloxacin in clinical trials, some
quinolones have been reported to have
proconvulsant activity that is
exacerbated with concominant use of
NSAIDs.
The concomitant administration of a
non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug
with a quinolone, including
levofloxacin, may increase the risk of
CNS stimulation and convulsive seizures
(see WARNINGS AND
PRECAUTIONS).
Antidiabetic Agents
C
Disturbances of blood glucose,
including hyperglycemia and
hypoglycemia, have been reported in
patients treated concomitantly with
levofloxacin and an antidiabetic agent.
Some of these cases were serious.
Careful monitoring of blood glucose is
recommended when these agents,
including levofloxacin, are coadministered.
Zidovudine
CT
Levofloxacin absorption and
disposition in HIV-infected subjects,
with or without concomitant
zidovudine treatment, were similar.
The effect of levofloxacin on
zidovudine pharmacokinetics has not
been studied.
Legend: C = Case Study; CT = Clinical Trial; T = Theoretical
No dosage adjustment for
levofloxacin appears to be required
when co-administered with
zidovudine.
Drug-Food Interactions
Levofloxacin may be taken with or without food.
Drug-Herb Interactions
Interactions with herbal products have not been established.
Drug-Laboratory Interactions
Some quinolones, including levofloxacin, may produce false-positive urine screening results
for opiates using commercially available immunoassay kits. Confirmation of positive opiate
screens by more specific methods may be necessary.
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 15 of 29
Dosing Considerations
The dosage of Levoflocacin in 5% Dextrose Injection for patients with normal renal
function (i.e., ClCr > 80 mL/min) is described in the following dosing chart. For patients
with altered renal function (i.e., ClCr < 80 mL/min), see the Patients with Impaired
Renal Function subsection. The 250 mg and 500 mg doses of Levoflocacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection should be administered by slow infusion over 60 minutes every 24
hours while the 750 mg dose is administered by slow infusion over 90 minutes every 24
hours.
Recommended Dose and Dosage Adjustment
Patients with Normal Renal Function
Infection*
Dose
Freq.
Duration**
Acute Bacterial Exacerbation
of Chronic Bronchitis
500 mg
q24h
7 days
750 mg
q24h
5 days
500 mg
q24h
750 mg***
q24h
7-14 days (10-14 days for
severe infections)
5 days
500 mg
q24h
10-14 days
750 mg****
q24h
5 days
Nosocomial Pneumonia
Uncomplicated SSSI
750 mg
500 mg
q24h
q24h
7-14 days
7-10 days
Complicated SSSI
750 mg
q24h
7-14 days
Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis
500 mg
q24h
28 days
Complicated UTI
250 mg
q24h
10 days
750 mg
q24h
5 days
250 mg
q24h
10 days
750 mg
q24h
5 days
250 mg
q24h
3 days
Comm.- Acquired Pneumonia
Sinusitis
1
Acute Pyelonephritis
Uncomplicated UTI
* DUE TO THE DESIGNATED PATHOGENS (see INDICATIONS AND CLINICAL USE).
** TOTAL THERAPY DURATION. When appropriate, patients may be converted from levofloxacin
injection to an equivalent dose of levofloxacin tablets.
*** Efficacy of this alternative regimen has only been documented for infections caused by penicillinsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae,
Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila.
**** The efficacy of a regimen of 750 mg daily for 5 days has been demonstrated to be non-inferior to a
regimen of 500 mg daily for 10 days. The 750 mg daily 5-day regimen has not been compared to a
regimen of 500 mg daily for 11-14 days.
1
The efficacy of this alternative regimen has been documented for infections caused by
Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis. Efficacy against infections
caused by Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa has not
been demonstrated with this regimen.
Patients with Impaired Renal Function
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 16 of 29
On the basis of the altered levofloxacin disposition pharmacokinetics in subjects with impaired
renal function, dose adjustment is recommended for patients with impaired renal function as
given below (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Renal; ACTION AND CLINICAL
PHARMACOLOGY, Special Populations and Conditions, Renal Insufficiency).
Dosing recommendations for renally impaired patients are based on data collected from a clinical
safety and pharmacokinetic study in renally impaired patients treated with a single 500 mg oral
dose of levofloxacin. There is no clinical experience available in this patient population for the
250 mg dose or 750 mg dose. Pharmacokinetic modelling was used to determine a recommended
dosing regimen which would provide equivalent drug exposures for which clinical efficacy has
been demonstrated. The potential effects of levofloxacin associated with possible increased
serum/tissue levels in renal-impaired patients, such as effect on QTc interval, have not been
studied.
Renal Status
Initial Dose
Subsequent Dose
Acute Sinusitis/Acute Bacterial Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis/Community Acquired
Pneumonia/Uncomplicated SSSI/Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis
ClCr from 50 to 80 mL/min
No dosage adjustment required
ClCr from 20 to 49 mL/min
500 mg
250 mg q24h
ClCr from 10 to 19 mL/min
500 mg
250 mg q48h
Hemodialysis
500 mg
250 mg q48h
CAPD
500 mg
250 mg q48h
Complicated UTI/Acute Pyelonephritis
ClCr ≥ 20 mL/min
No dosage adjustment required
ClCr from 10 to 19 mL/min
250 mg
250 mg q48h
Complicated SSSI/Nosocomial Pneumonia/Community Acquired Pneumonia/Acute Bacterial
Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis/Acute Sinusitis/Complicated UTI/Acute Pyelonephritis
ClCr from 50 to 80 mL/min
No dosage adjustment required
ClCr from 20 to 49 mL/min
750 mg
750 mg q48h
ClCr from 10 to 19 mL/min
750 mg
500 mg q48h
Hemodialysis
750 mg
500 mg q48h
CAPD
750 mg
500 mg q48h
Uncomplicated UTI
ClCr = creatinine clearances
CAPD = chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis
No dosage adjustment required
When only the serum creatinine is known, the following formula may be used to estimate
creatinine clearance.
Men:
Creatinine Clearance (mL/min)
= Weight (kg) x (140 - age) × 1.2 serum
creatinine (µmol/L)
Women: 0.85 × the value calculated for men.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 17 of 29
The serum creatinine should represent a steady state of renal function.
Missed Dose
More than the prescribed dose of Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection should not be taken,
even if a dose is missed.
Administration
Injection
CAUTION: RAPID OR BOLUS INTRAVENOUS INFUSION MUST BE AVOIDED.
Levofloxacin injection should be infused intravenously, slowly over a period of not less than 60
minutes for a 250 mg or a 500 mg dose, and not less than 90 minutes for a 750 mg dose.
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection Injection should only be administered by intravenous
infusion. It is not for intramuscular, intrathecal, intraperitoneal, or subcutaneous administration
(see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS).
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection Premix in single-use flexible containers does not
require further dilution. Consequently, each 50 mL, 100 mL and 150 mL of PREMIXED
solution contains the equivalent of 250 mg, 500 mg and 750 mg of levofloxacin (5 mg/mL),
respectively in 5% dextrose (D5W).
This parenteral drug product should be inspected visually for clarity, discoloration, particulate
matter, precipitate, and leakage prior to administration. Samples containing visible particles
should be discarded.
Since the premix flexible containers are for single use only, any unused portion should be
discarded.
Since only limited data are available on the compatibility of levofloxacin intravenous injection
with other intravenous substances, additives or other medications should not be added to
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection or infused simultaneously through the same
intravenous line. If the same intravenous line is used for sequential infusion of several different
drugs, the line should be flushed before and after infusion of Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose
Injection with an infusion solution compatible with Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection and
with any other drug(s) administered via this common line.
Instructions for the Use of Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection PREMIX in flexible containers
To open
1.
Tear outer wrap at the notch and remove solution container.
2.
Check the container for minute leaks by squeezing the inner bag firmly. If leaks are
found, or if the seal is not intact, discard the solution, as the sterility may be
compromised.
3.
Do not use if the solution is cloudy or a precipitate is present.
4.
Use sterile equipment.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 18 of 29
5.
WARNING: Do not use flexible containers in series connections. Such use could
result in air embolism, due to residual air being drawn from the primary container,
before administration of the fluid from the secondary container is complete.
Preparation for administration
1.
Close flow control clamp of administration set.
2.
Remove cover from port at bottom of container.
3.
Insert piercing pin of administration set into port with a twisting motion until the pin is
firmly seated.
NOTE: See full directions on administration set carton.
4.
Suspend container from hanger.
5.
Squeeze and release drip chamber to establish proper fluid level in chamber during
infusion of Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection in PREMIX flexible containers.
6.
Open flow control clamp to expel air from set. Close clamp.
7.
Regulate rate of administration with flow control clamp.
OVERDOSAGE
In the event of an acute overdosage, activated charcoal may be administered to aid in the
removal of unabsorbed drug. General supportive measures are recommended. The patient
should be observed, including ECG monitoring (see ACTION AND CLINICAL
PHARMACOLOGY, Pharmacodynamics, Studies Measuring Effects on QT and Corrected
QT (QTc) Intervals), and appropriate hydration maintained. Treatment should be supportive.
Levofloxacin is not efficiently removed by hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.
Levofloxacin exhibits a low potential for acute toxicity. Mice, rats, dogs and monkeys exhibited
the following clinical signs after receiving a single high dose of levofloxacin: ataxia, ptosis,
decreased locomotor activity, dyspnea, prostration, tremors, and convulsions. Doses in excess of
1500 mg/kg orally and 250 mg/kg IV produced significant mortality in rodents.
For management of a suspected drug overdose, contact your regional Poison Control Centre
immediately.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 19 of 29
ACTION AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
Mechanism of Action
Levofloxacin is a synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for intravenous administration.
Levofloxacin is the L-isomer of the racemate, ofloxacin, a quinolone antibacterial agent. The
antibacterial activity of ofloxacin resides primarily in the L-isomer. The mechanism of action of
levofloxacin and other quinolone antibacterials involves inhibition of bacterial topoisomerase II
(DNA gyrase) and topoisomerase IV. Topoisomerases are essential in controlling the
topological state of DNA, and are vital for DNA replication, transcription, repair and
recombination.
Fluoroquinolones, including levofloxacin, differ in chemical structure and mode of action from
other classes of antimicrobial agents, such as β-lactam antibiotics, aminoglycosides, and
macrolides. Therefore, microorganisms resistant to these latter classes of antimicrobial agents
may be susceptible to fluoroquinolones. For example, β-lactamase production and alterations in
penicillin-binding proteins have no effect on levofloxacin activity. Conversely, microorganisms
resistant to fluoroquinolones may be susceptible to other classes of antimicrobial agents.
Pharmacodynamics
Studies Measuring Effects on QT and Corrected QT (QTc) Intervals
Two studies have been conducted to assess specifically the effect of levofloxacin on QT and
corrected QT (QTc) intervals in healthy adult volunteers. In a dose escalation study (n=48)
where the effect on average QTc, after single doses of 500, 1000, and 1500 mg of levofloxacin,
was measured between the baseline QTc (calculated as the average QTc measured 24, 20, 16
hours and immediately before treatment) and the average post-dose QTc interval (calculated
from measurements taken every half hour for two hours and at 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after
treatment), an effect on the average QTc (Bazett) was -1.84, 1.55 and 6.40 msec, respectively. In
a study which compared the effect of 3 antimicrobials (n=48) where the difference was measured
between the baseline QTc (calculated as the average QTc measured 24, 20, 16 hours and
immediately before treatment) and the average post-dose QTc interval (calculated from
measurements taken every half hour for four hours and at 8, 12 and 24 hours after treatment), an
effect on the average QTc was an increase of 3.58 msec after the 1000 mg dose of levofloxacin.
The mean increase compared to baseline of QTc at Cmax in these two trials was 7.82 msec and 5.32
msec after a single 1000 mg dose. In these trials, no effect on QT intervals compared to placebo
was evident at any of the doses studied. The clinical relevance of the results of these studies is
not known.
Pharmacokinetics
The mean (± SD) pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin determined under single and
steady-state conditions following oral (p.o.) or intravenous (i.v.) doses of levofloxacin are
summarized in Table 1.5.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 20 of 29
Regimen
Table 1.5: Summary of Pharmacokinetic Parameters (mean ± SD)
Cmax
Tmax
AUCj
CL/F
N
(µg/mL)
(h)
(µg*h/mL)
(mL/min)
Single dose
250 mg p.o.a
15
2.8 ± 0.4
500 mg p.o.a*
23
5.1 ± 0.8
500 mg i.v.a
23
6.2 ± 1.0
750 mg p.o.cc
10
7.1 ± 1.4
750 mg i.v.c
4
7.99 ± 1.2b
Multiple dose
500 mg q24h p.o.a
10
5.7 ± 1.4
500 mg q24h i.v.a
10
6.4 ± 0.8
500 mg or 250 mg q24h i.v. patients
272
8.7 ± 4.0i
with bacterial infectionsd
750 mg q24h p.o.cc
8.6 ± 1.9
10
750 mg q24h i.v.c
4
7.92 ± 0.91b
500 mg p.o. single dose, effects of gender and age:
malee
12
5.5 ± 1.1
femalef
12
7.0 ± 1.6
youngg
12
5.5 ± 1.0
elderlyh
12
7.0 ± 1.6
500 mg p.o. single dose, patients with renal
3
7.5 ± 1.8
insufficiency:
ClCr 50-80 mL/min
8
7.1 ± 3.1
ClCr 20-49 mL/min
6
8.2 ± 2.6
ClCr < 20 mL/min
4
5.7 ± 1.0
hemodialysis
4
6.9 ± 2.3
CAPD
750 mg i.v. single dose and multiple dose, patients with renal insufficiency:
Single dose - ClCr 50-80 mL/mink
8
13.3 ± 3.6
Multiple q24h dose - ClCr 50-80 mL/mink
8
14.3 ± 3.2
t1/2
(h)
Clr
(mL/min)
1.6 ± 1.0
1.3 ± 0.6
1.0 ± 0.1
1.9 ± 0.7
ND
27.2 ± 3.9
47.9 ± 6.8
48.3 ± 5.4
82.2 ± 14.3
74.4 ± 8.0
156 ± 20
178 ± 28
175 ± 20
157 ± 28
170 ± 19
ND
ND
90 ± 11
90 ± 14
97.0 ± 14.8
7.3 ± 0.9
6.3 ± 0.6
6.4 ± 0.7
7.7 ± 1.3
7.5 ± 1.9
142 ± 21
103 ± 30
112 ± 25
118 ± 28
ND
1.1 ± 0.4
ND
ND
47.5 ± 6.7x
54.6 ± 11.1x
72.5 ±51.2ix
175 ± 25
158 ± 29
154 ± 72
102 ± 22
91 ± 12
111 ± 58
7.6 ± 1.6
7.0 ± 0.8
ND
116 ± 31
99 ± 28
ND
1.4 ± 0.5
ND
90.7 ± 17.6
72.5 ± 0.8x
143 ± 29
172 ± 2
100 ± 16
111 ± 12
8.8 ± 1.5
8.1 ± 2.1
116 ± 28
ND
1.2 ± 0.4
1.7 ± 0.5
1.5 ± 0.6
1.4 ± 0.5
54.4 ± 18.9
67.7 ± 24.2
47.5 ± 9.8
74.7 ± 23.3
166 ± 44
136 ± 44
182 ± 35
121 ± 33
89 ± 13
62 ± 16
83 ± 18
67 ± 19
7.5 ± 2.1
6.1 ± 0.8
6.0 ± 0.9
7.6 ± 2.0
126 ± 38
106 ± 40
140 ± 33
91 ± 29
1.5 ± 0.5
2.1 ± 1.3
1.1 ± 1.0
2.8 ± 2.2
1.4 ± 1.1
95.6 ± 11.8
182.1 ± 62.6
263.5 ± 72.5
ND
ND
88 ± 10
51 ± 19
33 ± 8
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
9.1 ± 0.9
27 ± 10
35 ± 5
76 ± 42
51 ± 24
57 ± 8
26 ± 13
13 ± 3
ND
ND
ND
ND
128 ± 37
145 ± 36
104 ± 25
103 ± 20
62.7 ± 15.1
64.2 ± 16.9
7.5 ± 1.5
7.8 ± 2.0
ND
ND
a
healthy males 18-53 years of age;
60min infusion for 250 mg and 500 mg doses, 90 min infusion for 750 mg dose;
c
healthy males 32-46 years of age;
cc
healthy males 19-51 years of age;
d
including 500 mg q48h for 8 patients with moderate renal impairment (ClCr20-25 mL/min) and infections of the respiratory tract or skin;
e
healthy males 22-75 years of age;
f
healthy females 18-80 years of age;
g
young healthy male and female subjects 18-36 years of age;
h
healthy elderly male and female subjects 66-80 years of age;
i
dose-normalized values (to 500 mg dose), estimated by population pharmacokinetic modelling;
j
AUC for 0-∞ reported, unless otherwise specified;
k
male and female subjects 35-54 years of age;
x
AUC0-24h;
*Absolute bioavailability; F = 0.99 ± 0.08 from a 500 mg tablet and F = 0.99 ± 0.06 from a 750 mg tablet.
ND = Not Determined
b
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Vd/F
(L)
Page 21 of 29
Absorption:
Oral
Levofloxacin is rapidly and essentially completely absorbed after oral administration. Peak
plasma concentrations are usually attained 1 to 2 hours after oral dosing. The absolute
bioavailability of a 500 mg tablet and a 750 mg tablet of levofloxacin is approximately 99% in
both cases, demonstrating complete oral absorption of levofloxacin. Levofloxacin
pharmacokinetics are linear and predictable after single and multiple oral dosing regimens.
Steady-state conditions are reached within 48 hours following a 500 mg or 750 mg once-daily
dosage regimen. The peak and trough plasma concentrations attained following multiple oncedaily oral dosage regimens were approximately 5.7 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL after the 500 mg
doses, and 8.6 µg/mL and 1.1 µg/mL after the 750 mg doses, respectively.
There was no clinically significant effect of food on the extent of absorption of levofloxacin.
Oral administration with food slightly prolongs the time to peak concentration by approximately 1
hour, and slightly decreases the peak concentration by approximately 14%. Therefore,
levofloxacin can be administered without regard to food.
I.V.
Following a single intravenous dose of levofloxacin to healthy volunteers, the mean peak plasma
concentration attained was 6.2 µg/mL after a 500 mg dose infused over 60 minutes, and
7.99 µg/mL after a 750 mg dose infused over 90 minutes. Levofloxacin pharmacokinetics are
linear and predictable after single and multiple i.v. dosing regimens. Steady-state conditions are
reached within 48 hours following a 500 mg or 750 mg once-daily dosing regimen. The peak
and trough plasma concentrations attained following multiple once-daily i.v. regimens were
approximately 6.4 µg/mL and 0.6 µg/mL after the 500 mg doses, and 7.92 µg/mL and
0.85 µg/mL after the 750 mg doses, respectively.
The plasma concentration profile of levofloxacin after i.v. administration is similar and
comparable in extent of exposure (AUC) to that observed for levofloxacin tablets when equal
doses (mg/mg) are administered. Therefore, the oral and i.v. routes of administration can be
considered interchangeable (see following figure).
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 22 of 29
Distribution:
The mean volume of distribution of levofloxacin generally ranges from 74 to 112 L after single
and multiple 500 mg or 750 mg doses, indicating widespread distribution into body tissues.
Levofloxacin reaches its peak levels in skin tissues (11.7 µg/g for a 750 mg dose) and in blister
fluid (4.33 µg/g for a 500 mg dose) at approximately 3-4 hours after dosing. The skin tissue
biopsy to plasma AUC ratio is approximately 2. The blister fluid to plasma AUC ratio is
approximately 1, following multiple once-daily oral administration of 750 mg and 500 mg
levofloxacin to healthy subjects, respectively. Levofloxacin also penetrates into lung tissues.
Lung tissue concentrations were generally 2- to 5-fold higher than plasma concentrations, and
ranged from approximately 2.4 to 11.3 µg/g over a 24-hour period after a single 500 mg oral
dose.
Levofloxacin is 24 to 38% bound to serum proteins across all species studied. Levofloxacin
binding to serum proteins is independent of the drug concentration.
Metabolism:
Levofloxacin is stereochemically stable in plasma and urine, and does not invert metabolically to
its enantiomer, D-ofloxacin. Levofloxacin undergoes limited metabolism in humans, and is
primarily excreted as unchanged drug (87%) in the urine within 48 hours.
Excretion:
The major route of elimination of levofloxacin in humans is as unchanged drug in the urine. The
mean terminal plasma elimination half-life of levofloxacin ranges from approximately 6 to 8
hours following single or multiple doses of levofloxacin given intravenously.
Special Populations and Conditions
Pediatrics: The pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in pediatric patients have not been studied.
Geriatrics: There are no significant differences in levofloxacin pharmacokinetics between
young and elderly subjects when the subjects’ differences in creatinine clearance are taken into
consideration. Drug absorption appears to be unaffected by age. Levofloxacin dose adjustment
based on age alone is not necessary.
Gender: There are no significant differences in levofloxacin pharmacokinetics between male and
female subjects when the differences in creatinine clearance are taken into consideration. Dose
adjustment based on gender alone is not necessary.
Race: The apparent total body clearance and apparent volume of distribution were not affected
by race in a covariate analysis performed on data from 72 subjects.
Hepatic Insufficiency: Pharmacokinetic studies in hepatically impaired patients have not been
conducted. Due to the limited extent of levofloxacin metabolism, the pharmacokinetics of
levofloxacin are not expected to be affected by hepatic impairment.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 23 of 29
Renal Insufficiency: Pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin following oral or intravenous
doses of levofloxacin in patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance
≤ 80 mL/min) are presented in Table 1.5. Clearance of levofloxacin is reduced and plasma
elimination half-life is prolonged in this patient population. Dosage adjustment may be required
in such patients to avoid accumulation.
A dosage reduction is being recommended depending on the levels of renal insufficiency. Dosing
recommendations are based on pharmacokinetic modelling of data collected from a clinical
safety and pharmacokinetic study in renally impaired patients treated with a single 500 mg oral
dose of levofloxacin (see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS, Renal, and DOSAGE AND
ADMINISTRATION, Recommended Dose and Dosage Adjustment, Patients with Impaired
Renal Function).
Neither hemodialysis nor continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is effective in
removal of levofloxacin from the body, indicating supplemental doses of levofloxacin are not
required following hemodialysis or CAPD.
Bacterial Infection: The pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in patients with community-acquired
bacterial infections are comparable to those observed in healthy subjects.
STORAGE AND STABILITY
Injection
When stored under recommended conditions, Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection, as supplied
in flexible containers, is stable through the expiration date printed on the label.
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection PREMIX in flexible containers should be stored at 225°C; however, brief exposure up to 40°C does not adversely affect the product. Avoid
excessive heat and protect from freezing and light. Store with protective overwrap and use
immediately once removed from the overwrap.
DOSAGE FORMS, COMPOSITION AND PACKAGING
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection in Premix flexible containers is a sterile, preservative-free,
non-pyrogenic premixed solution that contains levofloxacin, at 5 mg/mL in 5% dextrose (D5W).
The solution has a pH ranging from 3.8 to 5.8. Solutions of hydrochloric acid and/or sodium
hydroxide may have been added to adjust the pH.
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection is supplied in single-use flexible containers containing a
premixed, ready-to-use levofloxacin solution in D5W in the following formats:
•
containers of 100 mL capacity containing 50 or 100 mL of PREMIXED solution
•
containers of 250 mL capacity containing 150 mL of PREMIXED solution
NO FURTHER DILUTION OF THESE PREPARATIONS IS NECESSARY.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 24 of 29
Consequently, each 50 mL, 100 mL and 150 mL of premixed solution contains the
equivalent of 250 mg, 500 mg and 750 mg of levofloxacin (5 mg/mL), respectively in 5%
dextrose (D5W).
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 25 of 29
IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ
PART III: CONSUMER INFORMATION
Pr
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
This leaflet is Part III of a three-part "Product Monograph" published
when Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection was approved for sale
in Canada and is designed specifically for Consumers.This leaflet is a
summary and will not tell you everything about Levofloxacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection. Contact your doctor or pharmacist if you have
any questions about the drug.
Before you start to take your medicine, please read this leaflet
carefully, all the way through, as it contains important information.
dextrose, water for injection
Solutions of hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide may have
been added to adjust the pH.
What dosage forms it comes in:
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection is supplied in single-use
flexible containers containing a premixed, ready-to-use
levofloxacin solution in D5W in the following formats:
• Containers of 100 mL capacity containing 50 or 100 mL of
premixed solution.
• Containers of 250 mL capacity containing 150 mL of
premixed solution.
Retain this leaflet for the duration of your treatment.
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Remember to consult your doctor if you feel that Levofloxacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection is not helping you get better, or if you feel worse.
ABOUT THIS MEDICATION
What the medication is used for:
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection is from a group of antibiotics
known as quinolones. Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection is used
to treat adults with certain lung, sinus, skin and urinary tract
infections caused by certain germs called bacteria.
What it does:
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection has been shown, in a large
number of clinical trials, to be effective for the treatment of bacterial
infections. Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection interferes with
bacterial enzymes to prevent bacterial growth, thereby killing many
types of bacteria that can infect the lungs, sinus, skin, and urinary
tract.
Serious Warnings and Precautions
•
•
•
•
•
Sometimes, viruses rather than bacteria may infect the lungs and
sinuses (for example, the common cold). Levofloxacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection, like other antibiotics, does not kill viruses.
When it should not be used:
You should not take Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection if you
have had an allergic reaction to any of the group of antibiotics known
as quinolones, or to any of the nonmedicinal ingredients (see What
the nonmedicianal ingredients are). This includes antibiotics such
as ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin hydrochloride, gatifloxacin
and norfloxacin. If you have had any reaction to quinolones, you
should discuss this with your doctor.
You should not take Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection if you
have had tendinitis or tendon rupture while taking quinolone
antibiotics.
What the medicinal ingredient is:
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection contains the active
(medicinal) ingredient levofloxacin.
Levofloxacin has been shown to lengthen the heartbeat
on an electrocardiogram test (QT interval
prolongation).
Serious hypersensitivity (allergic) reactions, sometimes
fatal, have been reported in some patients receiving
quinolone therapy, including levofloxacin.
Seizures may occur with quinolone therapy. Tell your
doctor if you have any central nervous system
problems (i.e., epilepsy). Your doctor will determine
whether you should use this medication.
Fluoroquinolones, including Levofloxacin, may
worsen muscle weakness in persons with myasthenia
gravis. Do not use Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose
Injection if you have or have had myasthenia gravis.
Fluoroquinolones, including Levofloxacin, are
associated with an increased risk of tendinitis and
tendon rupture in all ages. This risk is further
increased in older patients usually over 60 years of
age, in patients taking corticosteroid drugs, and in
patients with kidney, heart or lung transplants.
See also SIDE EFFECTS AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT
THEM.
BEFORE you use Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection talk to
your doctor or pharmacist if:
• you have decreased kidney function.
• you have epilepsy or have a history of seizures (convulsions).
• you have had any problems with your heart rhythm, heart
rate, or problems with low potassium.
• you are taking anti-diabetic medications as Levofloxacin in
5% Dextrose Injection may interfere with blood sugar levels.
• you have a disease that causes muscle weakness (myasthenia
gravis).
• you experience any symptoms of muscle weakness, including
breathingdifficulties (e.g., shortness of breath).
What the important nonmedicinal ingredients are:
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 26 of 29
IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ
INTERACTIONS WITH THIS MEDICATION
Before taking Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection, make
sure you tell your doctor and pharmacist all the medications
you are taking. Do not start a new medicine without first
consulting a doctor or pharmacist.
It is important to let your doctor know all of the medicines you are
using including some medications for arthritis (non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs), blood sugar medicines, drugs for any heart
condition, and non-prescription drugs, because Levofloxacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection may react with certain medications.
Taking warfarin and Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
together can further predispose you to the development of bleeding
problems. If you take warfarin, be sure to tell your doctor.
Many multivitamin/mineral combinations and antacids, containing
calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, zinc and sucralfate may
interfere with the absorption of Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose
Injection and may prevent it from working properly. You should
take Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection either two hours
before or two hours after taking these products.
Some medicines such as erythromycin, clarithromycin, quinidine,
procainamide, amiodarone, sotalol, cisapride¶, antipsychotics,
tricyclic antidepressants, and other medications may produce an
effect on the electrocardiogram test. The risk of developing
abnormal heartbeat may be increased when Levofloxacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection is taken with any of these medications. Do not
take any of these medications with Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose
Injection unless your doctor tells you that it is alright.
¶
No longer marketed in Canada
PROPER USE OF THIS MEDICATION
Usual adult dose:
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection injection is to be
administered intravenously.
You may begin to feel better quickly; however, in order to make
sure that you are getting the full, sustained benefits from your
medication so that your infection does not return, you should
complete the full course of medication.
Overdose:
In case of drug overdose, contact a healthcare practitioner (e.g.,
doctor), hospital emergency department, or regional poison
control center, even if there are no symptoms.
Missed dose:
Do not take more than the prescribed dose of Levofloxacin in 5%
Dextrose Injection even if you missed a dose by mistake. You
should not take a double dose.
SIDE EFFECTS AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM
Levofloxacin is generally well tolerated. The most common side
effects caused by levofloxacin which are usually mild, include
nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, constipation,
dizziness, flatulence, rash, headache, difficulty in sleeping, and
vaginitis in women. However, allergic reactions have been
reported in patients receiving quinolones, even after just one dose.
If you develop hives, itching, skin rash, difficulty breathing or
swallowing, swelling in the face, tongue or throat, or other
symptoms of an allergic reaction, you should stop taking this
medication and call your doctor.
Levofloxacin may be associated with dizziness. You should know
how you react to this drug before you operate an automobile, or
machinery, or perform other activities requiring mental alertness
or co-ordination.
Pain, swelling and tears of shoulder, hand, or Achilles tendons
have been reported in patients receiving quinolones, including
levofloxacin. The risk of tendon effects is higher if you are over
65 years old, and especially of you are taking corticosteroids. If
you develop pain, swelling, or rupture of a tendon you should stop
taking levofloxacin, rest, avoid exercise and strenuous use of the
affected area and contact your doctor.
Convulsions have been reported in patients receiving quinolone
antibiotics including levofloxacin. If you have experienced
convulsions in the past, be sure to let your physician know that
you have a history of convulsions.
Quinolones, including levofloxacin, may also cause central
nervous system stimulation which may lead to tremors,
restlessness, anxiety, lightheadedness, confusion, hallucinations,
paranoia, depression, nightmares, insomnia and, rarely, suicidal
thoughts or acts. If you have suicidal thoughts, contact your
doctor.
Neuropathy (problems in the nerves) has been reported in patients
receiving quinolones, including levofloxacin. If neuropathy
symptoms occur such as pain, burning, tingling, numbness,
weakness, or other alterations of sensation (including feelings of
vibration, temperature or touch sensitivity), you should stop taking
levofloxacin and contact your doctor immediately.
Sun sensitivity (photosensitivity), which can appear as skin
eruption or severe sunburn, can occur in some patients taking
quinolone antibiotics after exposure to sunlight or artificial
ultraviolet (UV) light (e.g., tanning beds). Levofloxacin has been
infrequently associated with phototoxicity. You should avoid
excessive exposure to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light while
you are taking levofloxacin. Use sunscreen and wear protective
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 27 of 29
IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ
clothing if out in the sun. If photosensitivity develops, contact
your doctor.
If you have diabetes and you develop a hypoglycemic reaction
(low blood sugar) while taking Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose
Injection, you should stop taking Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose
Injection and call your doctor. Hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic
(high low blood sugar respectively) reactions have also been
reported in patients without diabetes. Common symptoms of
hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) include excessive thirst or
excessive urination. Common symptoms of hypoglycemia (low
blood sugar) include dizziness, excessive hunger, lack of
coordination, headache, fatigue, or fainting. You should call your
doctor if you experience any of these symptoms.
Problems with the liver, including fatal cases, have been reported
in patients taking levofloxacin. The symptoms of hepatic
impairment are non-specific and include nausea, vomiting,
stomach pain, fever, weakness, abdominal pain or tenderness, loss
of appetite, itching, unusual or unexplained tiredness, light
coloured bowel movements and dark coloured urine. In more
severe cases, these symptoms are followed by jaundice (yellowing
of the skin) and/or icterus (yellowing of the eyes). Call your doctor
if you experience these symptoms.
Some quinolones have been associated with lengthening of the
heartbeat on an electrocardiogram test, and with abnormal heart
rhythm. Very rare cases of abnormal heart beat have been reported
in patients while on levofloxacin, but these reports generally
involved patients who had conditions that predisposed them to
abnormal heart beat, or who have been taking other medicines that
increase the risk of developing abnormal heartbeat. If you develop
heart palpitations (fast beating) or have fainting spells, you should
stop taking levofloxacin and call your doctor.
Eye abnormalities and abnormal vision have been reported in
patients being treated with quinolones. The relationship of the
drugs to these events has not been established.
Diarrhea that usually ends after treatment is a common problem
caused by antibiotics. A more serious form of diarrhea can occur
during or up to 2 months after the use of antibiotics. This has been
reported with all antibiotics, including with levofloxacin. If you
develop a watery and bloody stool with or without stomach cramps
and fever, contact your doctor as soon as possible.
Fluoroquinolones like Levofloxacin may cause worsening of
myasthenia gravis symptoms, including muscle weakness and
breathing problems. If you have or have had myasthenia gravis, do
not use Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection.
These are not all the side effects that have been reported with
levofloxacin. If you notice any side effects not mentioned in this
leaflet, or you have concerns about the side effects you are
experiencing, please inform your doctor.
SERIOUS SIDE EFFECTS, HOW OFTEN THEY
HAPPEN AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM
Symptom / effect
Talk to
your
doctor or
pharmacist
Stop taking
drug and seek
immediate
emergency
medical
attention
Rare
Heart palpitations (fast
√
beating) or fainting spells
Tendon pain, swelling or
√
rupture
Worsening muscle weakness
√
or breathing problems
Symptoms of allergic reaction
√
• skin rash
• hives
• itching
• difficulty breathing or
swallowing
• swelling of face, tongue
or throat
Symptoms of neuropathy
√
• pain
• burning
• tingling
• numbness
• weakness
If you have diabetes and you
√
develop a hypoglycemic
reaction.
Symptoms of hypoglycemia
√
• dizziness
• excessive hunger
• lack of coordination
• headache
• fatigue
• fainting
Symptoms of hyperglycemia
√
• excessive thirst
• excessive urination
Symptoms of liver problems
√
• yellowing of the skin
and/or eyes
• nausea
• vomiting
• loss of appetite
• itching
This is not a complete list of side effects. For any unexpected
effects while taking levofloxacin, contact your doctor or
pharmacist.
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 28 of 29
IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ
HOW TO STORE IT
Levofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection should be stored at 20-25°C
and may also be stored in a refrigerator, 2-8°C.
Brief exposure up to 40°C does not adversely affect the product.
Avoid excessive heat and protect from freezing and light. Store
with protective overwrap and use immediately once removed
from the overwrap.
REPORTING SUSPECTED SIDE EFFECTS
You can report any suspected adverse reactions associated with
the use of health products to the Canada Vigilance Program by
one of the following 3 ways:
$
$
$
Report online at www.healthcanada.gc.ca/medeffect
Call toll-free at 1-866-234-2345
Complete a Canada Vigilance Reporting Form and:
- Fax toll-free to 1-866-678-6789, or
- Mail to: Canada Vigilance Program
Health Canada
Postal Locator 0701E
Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
Postage paid labels, Canada Vigilance Reporting Form
and the adverse reaction reporting guidelines are available
on the MedEffect™ Canada Web site at
www.healthcanada.gc.ca/medeffect.
NOTE: Should you require information related to the
management of side effects, contact your health professional.
The Canada Vigilance Program does not provide medical
advice.
MORE INFORMATION
This document plus the full Product Monograph, prepared for
health professionals can be found by contacting the sponsor,
Hospira Healthcare Corporation, at:
1-866-488-6088
This leaflet was prepared by
Hospira Healthcare Corporation.
Saint-Laurent, QC, H4M 2X6
Last revised: November 6, 2012
PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: PrLevofloxacin in 5% Dextrose Injection
Page 29 of 29

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