6.B.Tech.CSE R15 Regulations 3rd and 4th Year Course

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___________________________________________________________R15
JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
(Established by Govt. of A.P., Act. No. 30 of 2008)
ANANTHAPURAMU – 515 002 (A.P.) INDIA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Course Structure for B.Tech-R15 Regulations
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
B.Tech III-I Semester (CSE)
S. Course
No. Code
1. 15A05501
2. 15A05502
3. 15A05503
4. 15A05504
5. 15A05505
6.
15A05506
15A05507
15A05508
7. 15A05509
8.
9.
15A05510
15A99501
Subject
Operating Systems
Computer Networks
Object Oriented Analysis and Design
Principles of Programming Languages
Software Testing
MOOCS-I
a. Introduction to Big Data
b. R Programming
c. Introduction to Operations Management
Object Oriented Analysis and Design &
Software Testing Laboratory
Operating Systems Laboratory
Social Values & Ethics (Audit Course)
Total:
Page 1
L
T
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3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
-
3
3
3
3
3
3
-
-
4
2
2
20
06
4
2
10
2
22
___________________________________________________________R15
B.Tech III-II Semester (CSE)
S. Course
No. Code
1. 15A05601
2. 15A05602
3. 15A05603
4. 15A05604
5. 15A05605
6.
15A05606
15A05607
15A05608
15A01608
7. 15A05609
8. 15A05610
9. 15A52602
10.
15A05611
Subject
Compiler Design
Data Warehousing & Mining
Design Patterns
Design and Analysis of Algorithms
Web and Internet Technologies
CBCC-I
a. Artificial Intelligence
b. Linux Environment System
c. System Applications & Product (SAP)
d. Intellectual Property Rights
Web and Internet Technologies Laboratory
Data Warehousing & Mining Laboratory
Advanced English Language
Communication Skills(AELCS) Laboratory)
(Audit Course)
Comprehensive Online Examination-II
Total:
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3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
-
3
3
3
3
3
3
-
-
4
4
2
2
2
-
18
06
10
1
23
___________________________________________________________R15
B.Tech IV-I Semester (CSE)
S. Course
No. Code
1. 15A52601
2. 15A05701
3. 15A05702
4. 15A05703
5.
15A05704
15A05705
15A05706
6.
15A05707
15A05708
15A05709
7.
8.
15A05710
15A05711
Subject
Management Science
Grid & Cloud Computing
Information Security
Mobile Application Development
CBCC-II
a. Software Architecture
b. Computer Graphics
c. Machine Learning
CBCC-III
a. Software Project Management
b. Distributed Systems
c. Real Time Systems
Grid & Cloud Computing Laboratory
Mobile Application Development
Laboratory
Total:
L
T
P
C
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
-
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
-
3
-
-
4
4
2
2
18
06
08
22
L
T
P
C
1
-
3
1
-
3
2
4
4
24
32
2
2
12
22
B.Tech IV-II Semester (CSE)
S. Course
No. Code
1.
15A05801
15A05802
15A05803
2.
15A05804
15A05805
15A05806
3.
4.
5.
15A05807
15A05808
15A05809
Subject
MOOCS-II
3
a. Data Analytics
b. Mobile Computing
c. Innovations and IT Management
MOOCS-III
3
a. Building Large Scale Software Systems
b. Enabling Technologies for Data Science &
Analytics : IoT
c. Cyber Security
Comprehensive Viva-Voce
Technical Seminar
Project Work
Total:
6
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05501
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3
OPERATING SYSTEMS
Course Objectives:
 To make the students understand the basic operating system concepts such as
processes, threads, scheduling, synchronization, deadlocks, memory
management, file and I/O subsystems and protection.
 To get acquaintance with the class of abstractions afford by general purpose
operating systems that aid the development of user applications.
Course Outcomes:
 Able to use operating systems effectively.
 Write System and application programs to exploit operating system functionality.
 Add functionality to the exiting operating systems
 Design new operating systems
UNIT I
Operating Systems Overview: Operating system functions, Operating system
structure, operating systems Operations, protection and security, Computing
Environments, Open- Source Operating Systems
System Structures: Operating System Services, User and Operating-System
Interface, systems calls, Types of System Calls, system programs, operating system
structure, operating system debugging, System Boot.
Processes: Process concept, process Scheduling, Operations on processes, Inter
process Communication, Examples of IPC systems.
UNIT II
Threads: overview, Multicore Programming, Multithreading Models, Thread Libraries,
Implicit Threading, Threading Issues.
Process Synchronization: The critical-section problem, Peterson‗s Solution,
Synchronization Hardware, Mutex Locks, Semaphores, Classic problems of
synchronization, Monitors, Synchronization examples, Alternative approaches.
CPU Scheduling: Scheduling-Criteria, Scheduling Algorithms, Thread Scheduling,
Multiple-Processor Scheduling, Real-Time CPU Scheduling, Algorithm Evaluation.
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UNIT III
Memory Management: Swapping, contiguous memory allocation, segmentation,
paging, structure of the page table.
Virtual memory: demand paging, page-replacement, Allocation of frames, Thrashing,
Memory-Mapped Files, Allocating Kernel Memory
Deadlocks: System Model, deadlock characterization, Methods of handling Deadlocks,
Deadlock prevention, Detection and Avoidance, Recovery from deadlock.
UNIT IV
Mass-storage structure: Overview of Mass-storage structure, Disk structure, Disk
attachment, Disk scheduling, Swap-space management, RAID structure, Stable-storage
implementation.
File system Interface: The concept of a file, Access Methods, Directory and Disk
structure, File system mounting, File sharing, Protection.
File system Implementation: File-system structure, File-system Implementation,
Directory
Implementation, Allocation Methods, Free-Space management.
UNIT V
I/O systems: I/O Hardware, Application I/O interface, Kernel I/O subsystem,
Transforming I/O requests to Hardware operations.
Protection: Goals of Protection, Principles of Protection, Domain of protection, Access
Matrix, Implementation of Access Matrix, Access control, Revocation of Access Rights,
Capability- Based systems, Language – Based Protection
Security: The Security problem, Program threats, System and Network threats,
Cryptography as a security tool, User authentication, Implementing security defenses,
Firewalling to protect systems and networks, Computer–security classifications.
Text Books:
1. Operating System Concepts, Abraham Silberchatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg Gagne,
Wiley , Eight Edition, 2014.
Reference Books:
1. Operating systems by A K Sharma, Universities Press,
2. Operating Systems, S.Haldar, A.A.Aravind, Pearson Education.
3. Modern Operating Systems, Andrew S Tanenbaum, Second Edition, PHI.
4. Operating Systems, A.S.Godbole, Second Edition, TMH.
5. An Introduction to Operating Systems, P.C.P. Bhatt, PHI.
6. Operating Systems, G.Nutt, N.Chaki and S.Neogy, Third Edition, Pearson Education.
7. Operating Systems, R.Elmasri, A,G.Carrick and D.Levine, Mc Graw Hill.
8. Principles of Operating Systems, B.L.Stuart, Cengage learning, India Edition.
9. Operating System Desgin, Douglas Comer, CRC Press, 2nd Edition.
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05502
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COMPUTER NETWORKS
Course Objectives:



Study the evolution of computer networks and future directions.
Study the concepts of computer networks from layered perspective.
Study the issues open for research in computer networks.
Course Outcomes:



Ability to choose the transmission media depending on the requirements.
Ability to design new protocols for computer network.
Ability to configure a computer network logically.
Unit I
Introduction: Networks, Network Types, Internet History, Standards and
Administration, Network Models: Protocol Layering, TCP/IP Protocol Suite, The ISO
Model.
The Physical layer: Data and Signals, Transmission impairment, Data rate limits,
Performance, Transmission media: Introduction, Guided Media, Unguided Media,
Switching: Introduction, Circuit Switched Networks, Packet switching.
Unit II
The Data Link Layer: Introduction, Link layer addressing, Error detection and
Correction: Cyclic codes, Checksum, Forward error correction, Data link control: DLC
Services, Data link layer protocols, HDLC, Point to Point Protocol, Media Access
control: Random Access, Controlled Access, Channelization, Connecting devices and
virtual LANs: Connecting Devices.
Unit III
The Network Layer: Network layer design issues, Routing algorithms, Congestion
control algorithms, Quality of service, Internetworking, The network layer in the Internet:
IPV4 Addresses, IPV6, Internet Control protocol, OSPF, BGP, IP, ICMPv4, IGMP.
Unit IV
The Transport Layer: The Transport Service, Elements of Transport Protocols,
Congestion Control, The internet transport protocols: UDP, TCP, Performance
problems in computer networks, Network performance measurement.
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___________________________________________________________R15
Unit V
The Application Layer: Introduction, Client Server Programming, WWW and HTTP,
FTP, e-mail, TELNET, Secure Shell, Domain Name System, SNMP.
Text Books:
1. ―Data communications and networking‖, Behrouz A. Forouzan, Mc Graw Hill
Education, 5th edition, 2012.
2. ―Computer Networks‖, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Wetherall, Pearson, 5th edition,
2010.
References:
1. Data Communication and Networks, Bhushan Trivedi, Oxford
2. ―Internetworking with TCP/IP – Principles, protocols, and architectureVolume 1, Douglas E. Comer, 5th edition, PHI
3. ―Computer Networks‖, 5E, Peterson, Davie, Elsevier.
4. ―Introduction to Computer Networks and Cyber Security‖, Chawan- Hwa Wu,
Irwin, CRC Publications.
5. ―Computer Networks and Internets with Internet Applications‖, Comer.
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05503
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OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS & DESIGN
Course Objectives



To understand how to solve complex problems
Analyze and design solutions to problems using object oriented approach
Study the notations of Unified Modeling Language
Course Outcomes:



Ability to find solutions to the complex problems using object oriented
approach
Represent classes, responsibilities and states using UML notation
Identify classes and responsibilities of the problem domain
Unit-I
Introduction: The Structure of Complex systems, The Inherent Complexity of Software,
Attributes of Complex System, Organized and Disorganized Complexity, Bringing Order
to Chaos, Designing Complex Systems, Evolution of Object Model, Foundation of
Object Model, Elements of Object Model, Applying the Object Model.
Unit-II
Classes and Objects: Nature of object, Relationships among objects, Nature of a
Class, Relationship among Classes, Interplay of Classes and Objects, Identifying
Classes and Objects, Importance of Proper Classification, Identifying Classes and
Objects, Key abstractions and Mechanisms.
Unit-III
Introduction to UML: Why model, Conceptual model of UML, Architecture, Classes,
Relationships, Common Mechanisms, Class diagrams, Object diagrams.
Unit-IV
Structural Modeling: Package Diagram, Composite Structure Diagram, Component
Diagram, Deployment Diagram, Profile Diagram.
Unit-V
Behavioral Modeling: Use Case Diagram, Activity Diagrams, State Machine Diagrams,
Sequence Diagram, Communication Diagram, Timing Diagram, Interaction Overview
Diagram.
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___________________________________________________________R15
Text Books:
1.
2.
3.
―Object- Oriented Analysis And Design with Applications‖, Grady BOOCH,
Robert A. Maksimchuk, Michael W. ENGLE, Bobbi J. Young, Jim Conallen,
Kellia Houston, PEARSON, 3rd edition, 2013.
―The Unified Modeling Language User Guide‖, Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh,
Ivar Jacobson, PEARSON 12th Impression, 2012.
http://www.omg.org/
References:
1.
2.
3.
4.
―Object-oriented analysis and design using UML‖, Mahesh P. Matha, PHI
―Head first object-oriented analysis and design‖, Brett D. McLaughlin, Gary
Pollice, Dave West, O‘Reilly
―Object-oriented analysis and design with the Unified process‖, John W.
Satzinger, Robert B. Jackson, Stephen D. Burd, Cengage Learning
―The Unified modeling language Reference manual‖, James Rumbaugh, Ivar
Jacobson, Grady Booch, Addison-Wesley
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05504
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PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
Course Objectives:
• To study various programming paradigms.
• To provide conceptual understanding of High level language design and
implementation.
• To introduce the power of scripting languages
Course Outcomes:
• Ability to select appropriate programming language for problem solving
• Ability to design new programming language.
Unit I:
Introduction: Software Development Process, Language and Software Development
Environments, Language and Software Design Models, Language and Computer
Architecture, Programming Language Qualities, A brief Historical Perspective.
Syntax and Semantics: Language Definition, Language Processing, Variables,
Routines, Aliasing and Overloading, Run-time Structure.
Unit II:
Structuring the data: Built-in types and primitive types, Data aggregates and type
constructors, User-defined types and abstract data types, Type Systems, The type
Structure of representative languages, Implementation Models
Unit III:
Structuring the Computation: Expressions and Statements, Conditional Execution
and Iteration, Routines, Exceptions, Pattern Matching, Nondeterminism and
Backtracking, Event-driven computations, Concurrent Computations
Structuring the Program: Software Design Methods, Concepts in Support of
Modularity, Language Features for Programming in the Large, Generic Units
Unit IV:
Object-Oriented Languages: Concepts of Object-oriented Programming, Inheritances
and the type system, Object-oriented features in programming languages
Unit V:
Functional Programming Languages: Characteristics of imperative languages,
Mathematical and programming functions, Principles of Functional Programming,
Representative Functional Languages, Functional Programming in C++
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Logic and Rule-based Languages: ―What‖ versus ―how‖: Specification versus
implementation, Principles of Logic Programming, PROLOG, Functional Programming
versus Logic Programming, Rule-based Languages
Textbook:
1) ―Programming Language Concepts‖, Carlo Ghezzi, Mehdi Jazayeri, WILEY
Publications. Third Edition, 2014
Reference Textbooks:
1. Concepts of Programming Languages, Tenth Edition, Robert W. Sebesta, Pearson
Education.
2. Programming Languages Principles and Paradigms, Second Edition, Allen B. Tucker,
Robert E. Noonan, McGraw Hill Education.
3. Introduction to Programming Languages, Aravind Kumar Bansal, CRC Press.
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05505
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SOFTWARE TESTING
Course Objectives:
 Fundamentals for various testing methodologies.
 Describe the principles and procedures for designing test cases.
 Provide supports to debugging methods.
 Acts as the reference for software testing techniques and strategies.
Course Outcomes:




Understand the basic testing procedures.
Able to support in generating test cases and test suites.
Able to test the applications manually by applying different testing methods
and automation tools.
Apply tools to resolve the problems in Real time environment.
UNIT I
Introduction: Purpose of Testing, Dichotomies, Model for Testing, Consequences of
Bugs, Taxonomy of Bugs.
Flow graphs and Path testing: Basics Concepts of Path Testing, Predicates, Path
Predicates and Achievable Paths, Path Sensitizing, Path Instrumentation, Application of
Path Testing.
UNIT II
Transaction Flow Testing: Transaction Flows, Transaction Flow Testing Techniques.
Dataflow testing: Basics of Dataflow Testing, Strategies in Dataflow Testing,
Application of Dataflow Testing.
UNIT III
Domain Testing: Domains and Paths, Nice & Ugly Domains, Domain testing, Domains
and Interfaces Testing, Domain and Interface Testing, Domains and Testability.
UNIT IV
Paths, Path products and Regular expressions: Path Products & Path Expression,
Reduction Procedure, Applications, Regular Expressions & Flow Anomaly Detection.
Logic Based Testing: Overview, Decision Tables, Path Expressions, KV Charts,
Specifications.
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UNIT V:
State, State Graphs and Transition Testing: State Graphs, Good & Bad State
Graphs, State Testing, Testability Tips.
Graph Matrices and Application: Motivational Overview, Matrix of Graph, Relations,
Power of a Matrix, Node Reduction Algorithm, Building Tools.
Text Books:
1. Software testing techniques – Boris Beizer, Dreamtech, second edition.
Reference Books :
1.
The craft of software testing - Brian Marick, Pearson Education.
2.
Software Testing- Yogesh Singh, Camebridge
3.
Software Testing, 3rd edition, P.C. Jorgensen, Aurbach Publications (Dist.by
SPD).
Software Testing, N.Chauhan, Oxford University Press.
Introduction to Software Testing, P.Ammann & J.Offutt, Cambridge Univ.
Press.
Effective methods of Software Testing, Perry, John Wiley, 2nd Edition, 1999.
Software Testing Concepts and Tools, P.Nageswara Rao, dreamtech Press
Win Runner in simple steps by Hakeem Shittu,2007 Genixpress.
Foundations of Software Testing, D.Graham & Others, Cengage Learning.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05506
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INTRODUCTION TO BIG DATA
(MOOCS-I)
Course Objectives:




To understand Big Data Analytics for different systems like Hadoop.
To learn the design of Hadoop File System.
To learn how to analyze Big Data using different tools.
To understand the importance of Big Data in comparison with traditional
databases.
Course Outcomes:


To gain knowledge about working of Hadoop File System.
Ability to analyze Big Data using different tools.
Unit-1: Distributed programming using JAVA: Quick Recap and advanced Java
Programming: Generics, Threads, Sockets, Simple client server Programming using
JAVA, Difficulties in developing distributed programs for large scale clusters and
introduction to cloud computing.
Unit-2: Distributed File systems leading to Hadoop file system, introduction, Using
HDFS, Hadoop Architecture, Internals of Hadoop File Systems.
Unit-3: Map-Reduce Programming: Developing Distributed Programs and issues, why
map- reduce and conceptual understanding of Map-Reduce programming, Developing
Map-Reduce programs in Java, setting up the cluster with HDFS and understanding
how Map- Reduce works on HDFS, Running simple word count Map-Reduce program
on the cluster, Additional examples of M-R Programming.
Unit-4: Anatomy of Map-Reduce Jobs: Understanding how Map- Reduce program
works, tuning Map-Reduce jobs, Understanding different logs produced by Map-Reduce
jobs and debugging the Map- Reduce jobs.
Unit-5: Case studies of Big Data analytics using Map-Reduce programming: K-Means
clustering, using Big Data analytics libraries using Mahout.
Text Books:
1. JAVA in a Nutshell 4th Edition.
2. Hadoop: The definitive Guide by Tom White, 3rd Edition, O'reily.
References:
1. Hadoop in Action by Chuck Lam, Manning Publications.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05507
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R-PROGRAMMING
(MOOCS-I)
Course Objectives:
 Understand the fundamentals of 'R' programming
 Learn how to carry out a range of commonly used statistical methods
including analysis of variance and linear regression.
 Explore data-sets to create testable hypotheses and identify appropriate
statistical tests.
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to Work on a real life Project, implementing R Analytics to create
Business Insights.
 Ability to analyze the data and results using R, a flexible and completely
cross- platform.
 Ability to use a wide range of analytical methods and produce presentation
quality graphics.
UNIT-I
INTRODUCING R: Getting the Hand of R, Running the R Program, Finding Your Way
with R, Command Packages.
BECOMING FAMILIAR WITH R: Reading and Getting Data into R, Viewing Named
Objects, Types of Data Items, The Structure of Data Items, Examining Data Structure
Working with History Commands, Saving your Work in R.
WORKING WITH OBJECTS: Manipulating Objects, Viewing Objects within Objects,
Constructing Data Objects, Forms of Data Objects: Testing and Converting,
UNIT II
Data: Descriptive statistics and tabulation.
DISTRIBUTION: Looking at the Distribution of Data
SIMPLE HYPOTHESIS TESTING: Using the Student‘s t-test, The Wilcoxon U-Test
(Mann-Whitney), Paired t- and U-Tests, Correlation and Covariance, Tests for
Association.
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UNIT-III
INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHICAL ANALYSIS: Box-whisker Plots, Scatter Plots, Pairs
Plots(Multiple Correlation Plots) Line Charts, Pie Charts, Cleveland Dot Charts, Bar
Charts, Copy Graphics to Other Applications.
FORMULA NOTATION AND COMPLEX STATISTICS: Examples of Using Formula
Syntax for Basic tests, Formula Notation in Graphics, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA).
UNIT-IV
MANIPULATING DATA AND EXTRACTING COMPONENTS: Creating Data for
Complex Analysis, Summarizing Data.
REGRESSION (LINEAR MODELING): Simple Linear Regression, Multiple Regression,
Curvilinear Regression, Plotting Linear Models and Curve Fitting, Summarizing
Regression Models.
UNIT-V
Adding elements to existing plots, Matrix plots, multiple plots in one window, exporting
graphs
WRITING YOUR OWN SCRIPTS:
BEGINNING TO PROGRAM: Copy and Paste Scripts, Creating Simple Functions,
Making Source Code.
Text Books:
1)
―Beginning R the statistical programming language‖ Dr. Mark Gardener, Wiley
Publications, 2015.
References Books:
1) Hands-On Programming with R Paperback by Grolemund (Author), Garrett (Author),
SPD,2014.
2) The R Book, Michael J. Crawley, WILEY, 2012.
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05508
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INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
(MOOCS-I)
Course Objectives:
Study key aspects of business operations and lean management including capacity,
productivity, quality, and supply chain.
Course Outcomes:
 Identify an operations system with some known standard configurations
 Make an assessment of the complexity of an operations system
 Understand the various components of a supply chain and the need to configure
them appropriately
 Identify methods for reducing bullwhip effect in supply chains
 Understand and relate the concept of Lean Management to one‘s own business
situation
 Understand & use specific tools and techniques to analyze quality problems
UNIT I
Understanding Operations
Introduction, Operations in an Organization, Alternative Configurations in Operations,
Performance Measures in Operations.
UNIT II
Analyzing Capacity in Operations
Introduction, The Notion of Capacity in Organizations, Process Design and Capacity
Analysis, Capacity Estimation and De-bottlenecking, Other Issues in Capacity Planning.
UNIT III
Supply Chain in Operations
Introduction, Supply Chain Management: Components, Design of an Appropriate
Supply Chain, Issues in Inventory Planning, Reverse Supply Chain.
UNIT IV
Productivity Improvement in Operations
Introduction, Productivity Paradox in Organizations, Productivity Management:
Philosophy, Tools & Techniques, Tools for Sustaining Productivity Improvements,
Challenges in Lean Management.
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UNIT V
Assuring Quality in Operations
Introduction, Six Sigma Quality in Organizations, Total Quality Management:
Philosophy, Tools & Techniques, Statistical Process Control, Establishing Quality in
Service Organizations.
Text Book:
1. B. Mahadevan, ―Operations Management: Theory & Practice‖, third edition, Pearson
education-2015.
Reference Books:
1. Nigel Slack, Stuart Chambers and Robert Johnston, ―Operations Management‖,
Sixth Edition, Pearson-2010.
2. Robert Johnston, Graham Clark and Michael Shulver, ―Service Operations
Management‖, 4th Edition, Pearson.
3. S. N. Chary, ―Production And Operations Management‖, Third edition, Tata McGrawHill Education-2004
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05509
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4
C
2
OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN &
SOFTWARE TESTING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
 Practice the notation for representing various UML diagrams
 Analyze and design the problem by representing using UML diagrams
 Become familiar with all phases of OOAD
Course Outcomes:
 Find solutions to the problems using object oriented approach
 Represent using UML notation and interact with the customer to refine the
UML diagrams
Part A: OOAD Lab
UML diagrams to be developed are:
1. Use Case Diagram.
2. Class Diagram.
3. Sequence Diagram.
4. Collaboration Diagram.
5. State Diagram
6. Activity Diagram.
7. Component Diagram
8. Deployment Diagram.
9. Test Design.
Problems that may be considered are
1. College information system
2. Hostel management
3. ATM system
1
Part B : Software Testing Lab
Write programs in ‗C‘ Language to demonstrate the working of the following
constructs:
i) do...while
ii) while….do
iii) if…else
iv) switch
v)
for
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2
―A program written in ‗C‘ language for Matrix Multiplication fails‖ Introspect the
causes for its failure and write down the possible reasons for its failure.
3 Take any system (e.g. ATM system) and study its system specifications and
report the various bugs.
4 Write the test cases for any known application (e.g. Banking application)
5 Create a test plan document for any application (e.g. Library Management
System)
6 Study of Win Runner Testing Tool and its implementation
a) Win runner Testing Process and Win runner User Interface.
b) How Win Runner identifies GUI (Graphical User Interface) objects in an
application and describes the two modes for organizing GUI map files.
c) How to record a test script and explains the basics of Test Script
Language (TSL).
d) How to synchronize a test when the application responds slowly.
e) How to create a test that checks GUI objects and compare the behaviour
of GUI objects in different versions of the sample application.
f) How to create and run a test that checks bitmaps in your application and
run the test on different versions of the sample application and examine
any differences, pixel by pixel.
g) How to Create Data-Driven Tests which supports to run a single test on
several sets of data from a data table.
h) How to read and check text found in GUI objects and bitmaps.
i) How to create a batch test that automatically runs the tests.
j) How to update the GUI object descriptions which in turn supports test
scripts as the application changes.
Apply Win Runner testing tool implementation in any real time applications.
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B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
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2
OPERATING SYSTEMS LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
 To understand the design aspects of operating system
 To solve various synchronization problems
Course out comes:
 Ensure the development of applied skills in operating systems related areas.
 Able to write software routines modules or implementing various concepts of
operating system.
1. Simulate the following CPU scheduling algorithms
a) Round Robin b) SJF c) FCFS d) Priority
2. Simulate all file allocation strategies
a) Sequential b) Indexed c) Linked
3. Simulate MVT and MFT
4. Simulate all File Organization Techniques
a) Single level directory b) Two level c) Hierarchical d) DAG
5. Simulate Bankers Algorithm for Dead Lock Avoidance
6. Simulate Bankers Algorithm for Dead Lock Prevention
7. Simulate all page replacement algorithms
a) FIFO b) LRU c) LFU Etc. …
8. Simulate Paging Technique of memory management
9. Control the number of ports opened by the operating system with
a) Semaphore b) monitors
10. Simulate how parent and child processes use shared memory and
address space
11. Simulate sleeping barber problem
12. Simulate dining philosopher‘s problem
13. Simulate producer and consumer problem using threads (use java)
14. Simulate little‘s formula to predict next burst time of a process for SJF
scheduling algorithm.
15. Develop a code to detect a cycle in wait-for graph
16. Develop a code to convert virtual address to physical address
17. Simulate how operating system allocates frame to process
18. Simulate the prediction of deadlock in operating system when all the
processes announce their resource requirement in advance.
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Reference Books :
1. ―Operating System Concepts‖, Abraham Silberchatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg
Gagne, Eighth edition, John Wiley.
2. ―Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles‖, Stallings, Sixth Edition–
2009,Pearson Education
3. ―Modern Operating Systems‖, Andrew S Tanenbaum, Second Edition, PHI.
4. ―Operating Systems‖, S.Haldar, A.A.Aravind, Pearson Education.
5. ―Principles of Operating Systems‖, B.L.Stuart, Cengage learning, India
Edition.2013-2014
6. ―Operating Systems‖, A.S.Godbole, Second Edition, TMH.
7. ―An Introduction to Operating Systems‖, P.C.P. Bhatt, PHI.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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2
B. Tech III-I Sem. (CSE)
15A99501
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C
0
SOCIAL VALUES & ETHICS (AUDIT COURSE)
(Common to all Branches)
UNIT - I
Introduction and Basic Concepts of Society: Family and Society: Concept of
family, community, PRIs and other community based organizations and society,
growing up in the family – dynamics and impact, Human values, Gender Justice.
Channels of Youth Moments for National Building: NSS & NCC: History,
philosophy, aims & objectives; Emblems, flags, mottos, songs, badge etc.;
Organizational structure, roles and responsibilities of various NSS functionaries. Nehru
Yuva Kendra (NYK): Activities – Socio Cultural and Sports.
UNIT – II
Activities of NSS, NCC, NYK:
Citizenship: Basic Features Constitution of India, Fundamental Rights and
Fundamental Duties, Human Rights, Consumer awareness and the legal rights of the
consumer, RTI.
Youth and Crime: Sociological and psychological Factors influencing youth crime,
Peer Mentoring in preventing crimes, Awareness about Anti-Ragging, Cyber Crime and
its prevention, Juvenile Justice
Social Harmony and National Integration: Indian history and culture, Role of youth in
peace-building and conflict resolution, Role of youth in Nation building.
UNIT – III
Environment Issues: Environment conservation, enrichment and Sustainability,
Climate change, Waste management, Natural resource management (Rain water
harvesting, energy conservation, waste land development, soil conservations and
afforestation).
Health, Hygiene & Sanitation: Definition, needs and scope of health education, Food
and Nutrition, Safe drinking water, Sanitation, Swachh Bharat Abhiyan.
Disaster Management: Introduction to Disaster Management, classification of
disasters, Role of youth in Disaster Management. Home Nursing, First Aid.
Civil/ Self Defense: Civil defense services, aims and objectives of civil defense, Need
for self defense training – Teakwondo, Judo, karate etc.,
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UNIT – IV
Gender Sensitization: Understanding Gender – Gender inequality – Role of Family,
Society and State; Challenges – Declining Sex Ratio – Sexual Harassment – Domestic
Violence; Gender Equality – Initiatives of Government – Schemes, Law; Initiates of
NGOs – Awareness, Movements;
UNIT - V
Physical Education : Games & Sports: Health and Recreation – Biolagical basis of
Physical activity – benefiets of exercise – Physical, Psychological, Social; Physiology
of Musucular Activity, Respiration, Blood Circulation.
Yoga: Basics of Yoga – Yoga Protocol, Postures, Asanas, Pranayama: Introduction of
Kriyas, Bandhas and Mudras.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. NSS MANUAL
2. SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT: A.S.Chauha, Jain Brothers Publications,
6th Edition, 2006
3. INDIAN SOCIAL PROBLEM: G.R.Madan, Asian Publisher House
4. INDIAN SOCIAL PROBLEM: Ram Ahuja, Rawat Publications
5. HUMAN SOCIETY: Kingsley Davis, Macmillan
6. SOCIETY: Mac Iver D Page, Macmillan
7. SOCIOLOGY – THEMES AND PERSPECTIVES: Michael Honalambos,
Oxford University Press
8. CONSTITUTION OF INDIA: D.D.Basu, Lexis Nexis Butterworth Publishers
9. National Youth Policy 2014 (available on www.yas.nic.in)
10.TOWARS A WORLD OF EQUALS: A.Suneetha, Uma Bhrugudanda, Duggirala
Vasantha, Rama Melkote, Vasudha Nagraj, Asma Rasheed, Gogu Shyamala,
Deepa Streenivas and Susie Tharu
11. LIGHT ON YOGA : B.K.S.Iyengar, Penguin Random House Publishers
www.un.org
www.india.gov.in
www.yas.nic.in
http://www.who.int/countries/ind/en/
http://www.ndma.gov.in
http://ayush.gov.in/event/common-yoga-protocol-2016-0
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05601
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1
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C
3
COMPILER DESIGN
Course Objectives:
This course is a de facto capstone course in Computer Science, as it combines skills in
software design, programming, data structures and algorithms, theory of computing,
documentation, and machine architecture to produce a functional compiler.
 Realize that computing science theory can be used as the basis for real
applications
 Introduce the major concept areas of language translation and compiler
design.
 Learn how a compiler works
 Know about the powerful compiler generation tools and techniques, which are
useful to the other non-compiler applications
 Know the importance of optimization and learn how to write programs that
execute faster
Course Outcomes
 Able to design a compiler for a simple programming language
 Able to use the tools related to compiler design effectively and efficiently
 Ability to write optimized code
Unit - I
Introduction: Language processors, The Structure of a Compiler, the science of
building a complier
Lexical Analysis: The Role of the lexical analyzer, Input buffering, Specification of
tokens, Recognition of tokens, The lexical analyzer generator Lex, Design of a Lexical
Analyzer generator
Unit II
Syntax Analysis: Introduction, Context Free Grammars, Writing a grammar, TOP
Down Parsing,
Bottom Up Parsing, Introduction to LR Parsing: Simple LR, More Powerful LR Parsers,
Using ambiguous grammars, Parser Generators
UNIT III
Syntax Directed Translation: Syntax Directed Definitions, Evaluation orders for
SDD‘s, Application of SDT, SDT schemes, Implementing L-attribute SDD‘s.
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Intermediate Code Generation: Variants of syntax trees, three address code, Types
and declarations, Translations of expressions, Type checking, control flow statements,
backpatching, switch statements, intermediate code for procedure.
UNIT IV
Run Time Environment : storage organization, , Stack allocation of space, Access to
non-local data on stack , Heap management
Symbol Table: Introduction, symbol table entries, operations on the symbol table,
symbol table organizations, non block structured language, block structured language.
UNIT V
Code Generation: Issues in the design of a code generator, The Target language,
Basic blocks and flow graphs, optimization of basic blocks, a simple code generator,
register allocation and assignment, optimal code generation for expressions, dynamic
programming code generation.
Code Optimization: Introduction, where and how to optimize, principle source of
optimization, function preserving transformations, loop optimizations, global flow
analysis, machine dependent optimization
Text Books :
1. ―Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools‖, Second Edition, Alfred V. Aho,
Monica S. Lam, Ravi Sethi, Jeffrey D. Ullman., Pearson,2014.
2. ―Compiler Construction‖, K.V.N Sunitha, Pearson, 2013
Reference Books :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Compiler Design‖, K. Muneeswaran., Oxford University Press, 2012
―Engineering A Compiler‖, Second Edition, Keith D. Cooper & Linda Torczon.,
MK(Morgan Kaufmann) (ELSEVIER)
―Compilers Principles and Practice‖, Parag H. Dave, Himanshu B.
Dave.,PEARSON
―Compiler Design‖, SandeepSaxena, Rajkumar Singh Rathore., S.Chand
publications
―Compiler Design‖, SantanuChattopadhyay., PHI
―Principals of Compiler Design‖, Nadhni Prasad, Elsevier
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05602
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1
P
0
C
3
DATA WAREHOUSING & MINING
Course Objectives:
 To know the basic concepts and principles of data warehousing and data
mining
 Learn pre-processing techniques and data mining functionalities
 Learn and create multidimensional models for data warehousing
 Study and evaluate performance of Frequent Item sets and Association Rules
 Understand and Compare different types of classification and clustering
algorithms
Course Outcomes:
 Understand the basic concepts of data warehouse and data Mining
 Apply pre-processing techniques for data cleansing
 Analyze and evaluate performance of algorithms for Association Rules
 Analyze Classification and Clustering algorithms
UNIT I
Introduction: Fundamentals of data mining, Data Mining Functionalities, Classification of
Data Mining systems, Data Mining Task Primitives, Integration of a Data Mining System
with a Database or a Data Warehouse System, Major issues in Data Mining. Data
Preprocessing: Need for Preprocessing the Data, Data Cleaning, Data Integration and
Transformation, Data Reduction, Discretization and Concept Hierarchy Generation.
UNIT II
Data Warehouse and OLAP Technology for Data Mining: Data Warehouse,
Multidimensional Data Model, Data Warehouse Architecture, Data Warehouse
Implementation, Further Development of Data Cube Technology, From Data
Warehousing to Data Mining. Data Cube Computation and Data Generalization:
Efficient Methods for Data Cube Computation, Further Development of Data Cube and
OLAP Technology, Attribute-Oriented Induction.
UNIT III
Mining Frequent Patterns, Associations and Correlations: Basic Concepts, Efficient and
Scalable Frequent Itemset Mining Methods, Mining various kinds of Association Rules,
From Association Mining to Correlation Analysis, Constraint-Based Association Mining,
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Classification and Prediction: Issues Regarding Classification and Prediction,
Classification by Decision Tree Induction, Bayesian Classification, Rule-Based
Classification, Classification by Back propagation, Support Vector Machines,
Associative Classification, Lazy Learners, Other Classification Methods, Prediction,
Accuracy and Error measures, Evaluating the accuracy of a Classifier or a Predictor,
Ensemble Methods
UNIT IV
Cluster Analysis Introduction :Types of Data in Cluster Analysis, A Categorization of
Major Clustering Methods, Partitioning Methods, Hierarchical Methods, Density-Based
Methods, Grid-Based Methods, Model-Based Clustering Methods, Clustering HighDimensional Data, Constraint-Based Cluster Analysis, Outlier Analysis.
UNIT V
Mining Streams, Time Series and Sequence Data: Mining Data Streams, Mining TimeSeries Data, Mining Sequence Patterns in Transactional Databases, Mining Sequence
Patterns in Biological Data, Graph Mining, Social Network Analysis and Multi relational
Data Mining, Mining Object, Spatial, Multimedia, Text and Web Data: Multidimensional
Analysis and Descriptive Mining of Complex Data Objects, Spatial Data Mining,
Multimedia Data Mining, Text Mining, Mining the World Wide Web.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques, Jiawei Han and Micheline Kamber,
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Elsevier, Second Edition, 2006.
2. Introduction to Data Mining – Pang-Ning Tan, Michael Steinbach and Vipin Kumar,
Pearson Education.
REFERENCES:
1. Data Mining Techniques, Arun KPujari, Second Edition, Universities Press.
2. Data Warehousing in the Real World, Sam Aanhory& Dennis Murray Pearson
EdnAsia.
3. Insight into Data Mining, K.P.Soman, S.Diwakar,V.Ajay, PHI,2008.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05603
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1
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0
C
3
DESIGN PATTERNS
Course Objectives:
 To understand design patterns and their underlying object oriented concepts.
 To understand implementation of design patterns and providing solutions to
real world software design problems.
 To understand patterns with each other and understanding the consequences
of combining patterns on the overall quality of a system.
Course Outcomes:
 Know the underlying object oriented principles of design patterns.
 Understand the context in which the pattern can be applied.
 Understand how the application of a pattern affects the system quality and its
tradeoffs.
UNIT-I
Introduction to Design Patterns
Design Pattern Definition, Design Patterns in Small Talk MVC, Describing Design
Patterns, Catalog of Design Patterns, Organizing the Catalog, Solving of Design
Problems using Design Patterns, Selection of a Design Pattern, Use of Design
Patterns.
UNIT-II
Designing A Document Editor: A Case Study
Design problems, Document structure, Formatting, Embellishing the User Interface,
Supporting Multiple Look and Feel standards, Supporting Multiple Window Systems,
User Operations, Spelling Checking and Hyphenation.
Creational Patterns: Abstract Factory, Builder, Factory Method, Prototype, Singleton,
Discussion of Creational Patterns.
UNIT-III
Structural Patterns-1: Adapter, Bridge, Composite.
Structural Patterns-2: Decorator, Façade, Flyweight, Proxy, Discuss of Structural
Patterns.
UNIT-IV
Behavioral Patterns-1: Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter, Iterator.
Behavioral Patterns-2: Mediator, Memento, Observer.
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UNIT-V
Behavioral Patterns-2(cont‘d): State, Strategy, Template Method, Visitor, Discussion of
Behavioral Patterns.
What to Expect from Design Patterns, A Brief History, The Pattern Community An
Invitation, A Parting Thought.
TEXT BOOK :
1. Design Patterns By Erich Gamma, Pearson Education
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Pattern‘s in JAVA Vol-I By Mark Grand, Wiley DreamTech.
2. Pattern‘s in JAVA Vol-II By Mark Grand, Wiley DreamTech.
3. JAVA Enterprise Design Patterns Vol-III By Mark Grand, Wiley DreamTech.
4. Head First Design Patterns By Eric Freeman-Oreilly-spd
5. Design Patterns Explained By Alan Shalloway,Pearson Education.
6. Pattern Oriented Software Architecture, F.Buschmann &others, John Wiley & Sons.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05604
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1
P
0
C
3
DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS
Course Objectives:
 To know the importance of the complexity of a given algorithm.
 To study various algorithm design techniques.
 To utilize data structures and/or algorithmic design techniques in solving new
problems.
 To know and understand basic computability concepts and the complexity
classes P, NP, and NP-Complete.
 To study some techniques for solving hard problems.
Course Outcomes:
 Analyze the complexity of the algorithms
 Use techniques divide and conquer, greedy, dynamic programming,
backtracking, branch and bound to solve the problems.
 Identify and analyze criteria and specifications appropriate to new problems, and
choose the appropriate algorithmic design technique for their solution.
 Able to prove that a certain problem is NP-Complete.
UNIT I
Introduction: What is an Algorithm, Algorithm specification, Performance analysis.
Divide and Conquer: General method, Binary Search, Finding the maximum and
minimum, Merge sort, Quick Sort, Selection sort, Stressen‗s matrix multiplication.
UNIT II
Greedy Method: General method, Knapsack problem, Job Scheduling with Deadlines,
Minimum cost Spanning Trees, Optimal storage on tapes, Single-source shortest paths.
Dynamic programming: General Method, Multistage graphs, All-pairs shortest paths,
Optimal binary search trees, 0/1 knapsack, The traveling sales person problem.
UNIT III
Basic Traversal and Search Techniques: Techniques for binary trees, Techniques for
Graphs,
Connected components and Spanning trees, Bi-connected components and DFS
Back tracking: General Method, 8 – queens problem, Sum of subsets problem, Graph
coloring and Hamiltonian cycles, Knapsack Problem.
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UNIT IV
Branch and Bound: The method, Travelling salesperson, 0/1 Knapsack problem,
Efficiency
Considerations.
Lower Bound Theory: Comparison trees, Lower bounds through reductions –
Multiplying triangular matrices, inverting a lower triangular matrix, computing the
transitive closure.
UNIT V
NP – Hard and NP – Complete Problems: NP Hardness, NP Completeness,
Consequences of beingin P, Cook‗s Theorem, Reduction Source Problems,
Reductions: Reductions for some known problems
Text Books:
1. ―Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms‖, Ellis Horowitz, S. Satraj Sahani and
Rajasekhran, 2nd edition, University Press.2014,
2. ―Design and Analysis of Algorithms‖, Parag Himanshu Dave, Himanshu
Bhalchandra Dave, Pearson Education, Second Edition, 2009.
Reference Books:
1. ―Introduction to Algorithms‖, second edition, T.H.Cormen, C.E.Leiserson,
R.L.Rivest and C.Stein, PHI Pvt. Ltd./ Pearson Education.
2. ―Introduction to Design and Analysis of Algorithms A strategic approach‖,
R.C.T.Lee, S.S.Tseng, R.C.Chang and T.Tsai, Mc Graw Hill.
3. ―Data structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++‖, Allen Weiss, Second edition,
Pearson education.
4. ―Design and Analysis of algorithms‖, Aho, Ullman and Hopcroft,Pearson
education.
5. ―Algorithms‖ – Richard Johnson baugh and Marcus Schaefer, Pearson
Education
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05605
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1
P
0
C
3
WEB AND INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES
Course Objectives:
 To introduce client side scripting with Javascript and DHTML
 To introduce server side programming with Java servlets, JSP and PHP.
 To learn the basic web concepts and Internet protocols
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to create dynamic and interactive web sites
 Gain knowledge of client side scripting using java sript and DHTML.
 Demonstrate understanding of what is XML and how to parse and use XML data
 Able to do server side programming with Java Servelets, JSP and PHP.
 Able to design rich client presentation using AJAX.
UNIT I
Introduction to Web Technologies: Introduction to Web servers like Apache 1.1, IIS
XAMPP(Bundle Server), WAMP(Bundle Server),Handling HTTP Request and
Response, installations of above servers, HTML and CSS: HTML 5.0 , XHTML, CSS 3.
UNIT II
Java Script: An introduction to JavaScript–JavaScript DOM Model-Date and Objects,Regular Expressions- Exception Handling-Validation-Built-in objects-Event HandlingDHTML with JavaScript. Servlets: Java Servlet Architecture- Servlet Life Cycle- Form
GET and POST actions- Session Handling- Understanding Cookies.
Installing and Configuring Apache Tomcat Web Server;- DATABASE
CONNECTIVITY: JDBC perspectives, JDBC program example - JSP: Understanding
Java Server Pages-JSP Standard Tag Library(JSTL)-Creating HTML forms by
embedding JSP code.
UNIT III
Introduction to PHP: The problem with other Technologies (Servelets and JSP),
Downloading, installing, configuring PHP, Programming in a Web environment and The
anatomy of a PHP Page.
Overview of PHP Data types and Concepts: Variables and data types, Operators,
Expressions and Statements, Strings, Arrays and Functions.
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PHP Advanced Concepts: Using Cookies, Using HTTP Headers, Using Sessions,
Authenticating users, Using Environment and Configuration variables, Working with
Date and Time.
UNIT IV
Creating and Using Forms: Understanding Common Form Issues, GET vs. POST,
Validating form input, Working with multiple forms, and Preventing Multiple
Submissions ofa form.
XML: Basic XML- Document Type Definition XML Schema DOM and Presenting XML,
XML Parsers and Validation, XSL and XSLT Transformation, News Feed (RSS and
ATOM).
UNIT V
AJAX: Ajax Client Server Architecture-XML Http Request Object-Call Back Methods;
Web Services: Introduction- Java web services Basics – Creating, Publishing, Testing
and Describing a Web services (WSDL)-Consuming a web service, Database Driven
web service from an application – SOAP.
TEXT BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Beginning PHP and MySQL, 3rd Edition , Jason Gilmore, Apress Publications
(Dream tech.).
PHP 5 Recipes A problem Solution Approach Lee Babin, Nathan A Good, Frank
M.Kromann and Jon Stephens.
Deitel and Deitel and Nieto, ―Internet and World Wide Web - How to Program‖,
Prentice Hall, 5 th Edition, 2011.
Herbert Schildt, ―Java-The Complete Reference‖, Eighth Edition, Mc Graw Hill
Professional, 2011.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05606
T
1
P
0
C
3
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
(CBCC-I)
Course Objectives:
To learn the basics of designing intelligent agents that can solve general purpose
problems, represent and process knowledge, plan and act, reason under uncertainty
and can learn from experiences.
Course Outcomes:
 Select a search algorithm for a problem and estimate its time and space
complexities.
 Possess the skill for representing knowledge using the appropriate technique for a
given problem
 Possess the ability to apply AI techniques to solve problems of game playing,
expert systems, machine learning and natural language processing.
UNIT I
PROBLEM SOLVING
Introduction – Agents – Problem formulation – uninformed search strategies – heuristics
– informed search strategies – constraint satisfaction
UNIT II
LOGICAL REASONING
Logical agents – propositional logic – inferences – first-order logic – inferences in
firstorder logic – forward chaining – backward chaining – unification – resolution
UNIT III
PLANNING
Planning with state-space search – partial-order planning – planning graphs – planning
and acting in the real world
UNIT IV
UNCERTAIN KNOWLEDGE AND REASONING
Uncertainty – review of probability - probabilistic Reasoning – Bayesian networks –
inferences in Bayesian networks – Temporal models – Hidden Markov models.
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UNIT V
LEARNING
Learning from observation - Inductive learning – Decision trees – Explanation based
learning –Statistical Learning methods - Reinforcement Learning
TEXT BOOK:
1. S. Russel and P. Norvig, ―Artificial Intelligence – A Modern Approach‖, Second
Edition, Pearson Education, 2003.
REFERENCES:
1. David Poole, Alan Mackworth, Randy Goebel, ‖Computational Intelligence : a logical
approach‖, Oxford University Press, 2004.
2. G. Luger, ―Artificial Intelligence: Structures and Strategies for complex problem
solving‖, Fourth Edition, Pearson Education, 2002.
3. J. Nilsson, ―Artificial Intelligence: A new Synthesis‖, Elsevier Publishers, 1998.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05607
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1
P
0
C
3
LINUX ENVIRONMENT SYSTEM
(CBCC-I)
Course Objectives:
The student should be made to:
 Understand the Multiuser, Multiprocessing, Multitasking, and multiprogramming
environment.
 Learn the various flavors and installation types of Linux operating system.
 Experiences the installation and configuration status of Linux system.
 Learn the file system and various commands of Linux environment system.
Course Outcomes:
 Able to describe and use the LINUX operating system.
 Able to describe and use the fundamental LINUX system tools and utilities.
 Able to describe and write shell scripts in order to perform basic shell
programming.
 Able to describe and understand the LINUX file system.
UNIT- I
INTRODUCTION TO LINUX OPERATING SYSTEM: Introduction and Types of
Operating Systems, Linux Operating System, Features, Architecture Of Linux OS
and Shell Interface, Linux System Calls, Linux Shared Memory
Management, Device and Disk Management in Linux, Swap space and its
management. File System and Directory Structure in Linux. Multi-Processing, load
sharing and Multi-Threading in Linux, Types of Users in Linux, Capabilities of Super
Users and equivalents.
UNIT -II
INSTALLING LINUX AS A SERVER : Linux and Linux Distributions ;
Major differences between various Operating Systems (on the basis of: Single Users vs
Multiusers vs Network Users; Separation of the GUI and the Kernel; Domains; Active
Directory;).
INSTALLING LINUX IN A SERVER CONFIGUARTION : Before Installation;
Hardware; Server Design ;Dual-Booting Issues; Modes of Installation; Installing
Fedora Linux; Creating a Boot Disk; Starting the Installation; GNOME AND KDE
: The History of X Windows; The Downside; Enter GNOME; About GNOME ;
Starting X Windows and GNOME; GNOME Basics; The GNOME Configuration Tool.
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UNIT-III
INSTALLING SOFTWARE : The Fedora Package Manager; Installing a New
Package using dpkg and RPM; Querying a Package; Uninstalling a Package
using dpkg
and
RPM; Compiling Software; Getting and Unpacking the
Package; Looking for Documentation; Configuring the Package; Compiling Your
Package; Installing the Package, Driver Support for various devices in linux.
MANAGING USERS: Home Directories ;Passwords; Shells; Stratup Scripts; Mail;
User Databases; The / etc /passwd File; The / etc / shadow File; The / etc
/group File; User Management Tools; Command-Line User Management; User
LinuxConf to Manipulate Users and Groups; SetUID and SetGID Programs.
UNIT IV
THE COMMAND LINE : An Introduction to BASH, KORN, C, A Shell etc. ; BASH
commands: Job Control; Environment Variables; Pipes; Redirection; Command-Line
Shortcuts; Documentation Tools; The man Command; the text info System; File
Listings; Owner ships and permissions; Listing Files; File and Directory Types;
Change Ownership; Change Group; Change Mode ; File Management and
Manipulation; Process Manipulation; Miscellaneous Tools; Various Editors Available
like: Vi and its modes, Pico, Joe and emacs, , Su Command.
BOOTING
AND SHUTTING
DOWN:
LILO and GRUB; Configuring
LILO; Additional LILO options; Adding a New Kernel to Boot ; Running LILO; The
Steps of Booting; Enabling and disabling Services.
UNIT-V
FILE SYSTEMS: The Makeup File Systems; Managing File Systems; Adding
and Partitioning a Disk; Network File Systems; Quota Management;
CORE SYSTEM SERVICES: The init Service; The inetd and xinetd
Processess; The syslogd Daemon; The cron Program.
PRINTING
: The Basic of lpd; Installing LPRng; Configuring /etc/printcap;
The /ETC/lpd.perms File; Clients of lpd, Interfacing Printer through Operating System.
Text Books:
1. Linux Administration : A Beginner's Guide by Steve Shah , Wale Soyinka, ISBN
0072262591 (0-07-226259-1), McGraw-Hill Education.
2. Unix Shell Programming, Yashavant P. Kanetkar, BPB Publications, 2003.
3. UNIX Concepts and Applications by Sumitabha Das Tata McGraw-Hill, 2006.
th
4. Operating System Concepts 8
edition, by Galvin Wiley Global
Education, 2012.
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References:
1. Unix operating system, by Grace Todino, John Strang, Jerry D. Peek Oreily
publications 1993.
th
2. Operating System Concepts 8 edition, by Galvin Wiley Global
Education, 2012.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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3
B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05608
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3
SYSTEM APPLICATIONS & PRODUCT (SAP)
(CBCC-I)
Course Objectives:
1. Understand the role of enterprise systems in supporting business processes.
2. Identify key integration points between financial accounting and other processes.
3. Understand the role of the credit management process in fulfillment.
4. Analyze the key concepts associated with material planning.
Course Outcomes:
1. Adopt and apply an integrated perspective to business processes
2. Effectively use SAP® ERP to execute the key steps in the procurement process.
3. Ability to use SAP ERP to extract meaningful information about the production
process.
4. Extract and evaluate meaningful information about the material planning process
using the SAP ERP system.
Unit 1:
Introduction to Business Processes: The Functional Organizational Structure,
Business Processes, Global Bike Incorporated (GBI). Introduction to Enterprise
Systems: Enterprise Systems, Data in an Enterprise System, Reporting. Introduction
to Accounting: Organizational Data, Master Data, Key Concepts, Processes,
Reporting.
Unit 2:
The Procurement Process: Organizational Data, Master Data, Key Concepts,
Process, Reporting.
Unit 3:
The Fulfillment Process: Organizational Data, Master Data, Process, Credit
Management Process, Reporting.
Unit 4:
The Production Process: Master Data, Process, Reporting. Inventory and
Warehouse Management Processes: Inventory Management, Organizational Data in
warehouse Management, Master Data in Warehouse Management, Processes in
Warehouse Management, Reporting.
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Unit 5:
The Material Planning Process: Master Data, Process, Reporting, Process
Integration: Procurement, Fulfillment, and IWM Processes, Procurement, Fulfillment,
Production, and IWM Processes.
Text Book:
1. ―Integrated Business Processes with ERP systems‖ Simha R.Magal, Jeffery word,
JOHN WILEY & SON S, INC.
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B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
(CBCC-I)
Course Objectives:
This course introduces the student to the basics of Intellectual Property Rights, Copy
Right Laws Trade Marks and Issues related to Patents. The overall idea of the course is
to help and encourage the student for startups and innovations.
Course Outcomes:
On completion of this course, the student will have an understanding of the following:
a) Intellectual Property Rights and what they mean
b) Trade Marks and Patents and how to register them
c) Laws Protecting the Trade Marks and Patents
d) Copy Right and laws related to it.
UNIT – I
Introduction To Intellectual Property: Introduction, Types Of Intellectual Property,
International Organizations, Agencies And Treaties, Importance Of Intellectual Property
Rights.
UNIT – II
Trade Marks : Purpose And Function Of Trade Marks, Acquisition Of Trade Mark
Rights, Protectable Matter, Selecting And Evaluating Trade Mark, Trade Mark
Registration Processes.
UNIT – III
Law Of Copy Rights : Fundamental Of Copy Right Law, Originality Of Material, Rights
Of Reproduction, Rights To Perform The Work Publicly, Copy Right Ownership Issues,
Copy Right Registration, Notice Of Copy Right, International Copy Right Law.
Law Of Patents : Foundation Of Patent Law, Patent Searching Process, Ownership
Rights And Transfer
UNIT – IV
Trade Secrets : Trade Secrete Law, Determination Of Trade Secrete Status, Liability
For Misappropriations Of Trade Secrets, Protection For Submission, Trade Secrete
Litigation.
Unfair Competition : Misappropriation Right Of Publicity, False Advertising.
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UNIT – V
New Developments Of Intellectual Property: New Developments In Trade Mark Law ;
Copy Right Law, Patent Law, Intellectual Property Audits.
International Overview On Intellectual Property, International – Trade Mark Law, Copy
Right Law, International Patent Law, International Development In Trade Secrets Law.
TEXT BOOKS & REFERENCES:
1. Intellectual Property Rights, Deborah. E. Bouchoux, Cengage Learing.
2. Intellectual Property Rights– Unleashmy The Knowledge Economy, Prabuddha
Ganguli, Tate Mc Graw Hill Publishing Company Ltd.,
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B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
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4
WEB AND INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
 To introduce client side scripting with Javascript and DHTML
 To introduce server side programming with Java servlets, JSP and PHP.
 To learn the basic web concepts and Internet protocols
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to create dynamic and interactive web sites.
 Gain knowledge of client side scripting using java sript and DHTML.
 Demonstrate understanding of what is XML and how to parse and use XML data
 Able to do server side programming with Java Servelets, JSP and PHP.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
To create a simple student bio-data form using html5 . it should contain the
following name (text box), address (multiline text box),gender (radio button
male,female),skill sets known (check boxes – c,c++,java,C#etc), extra curricular
activities (text box), nationality (combobox) ,submit and reset button.
To create an html page with different types of frames such as floating frame,
navigation frame & mixed frame.
Design the webpage by applying the different styles using inline, external &
internal style sheets.
Write a java script program to read .XML file and display data in a neat format.
To write a Javascript program to define a user defined function for sorting the
values in an array. Use HTML5 for user interface.
To create an html page to demonstrate exception handling in javascript
Create an html page named as ―exception.html‖ and do the following.
i. within the script tag write code to handle exception
a) define a method RunTest() to get any string values(str) from the user and call
the method Areletters(str).
b) In Areletters(str) method check whether str contain only alphabets (a-z, AZ), if not throw exception.
c) Define a exception method Input Exception(str) to handle the exception
thrown by the above method.
ii. Within the body tag define a script tag to call Runtest() method define.
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7. Write a jsp servlet program to implement the single text field calculator.
8. Write a jsp servlet program to demonstrate session handling using
– url rewriting
--hidden formfield
--cookies
--sessions
9. To create a php program to demonstrate the different predefined function
in array, Math, Data & Regular Expression.
Procedure:
 Create php file named as Regularexpression.php
 for demonstrating the method for handling various strings with regular
expression Array.php
 for demonstrating the methods for handling the array values
Math_function.php
 to demonstrate the predefined in math objects. Date_time.php to demonstrate
the predefined function in date subjec
10. Write a program in PHP for a simple email processing with attachment using forms
11. Write a program for PHP for a login script ; create a login database and store
username and password
12. Write a program in PHP to add, update and delete using student database
13. Create a DTD to describe a library. Library has one or more books, members and
staffs.
 Each book has BookID(Attribute), Title, one or more Authors, Publisher Year of
Publication, ISBN and Price.
 Each Member has MemeberID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
 Each Staff has StaffID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
 Each Author has AuthorID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
 Each Publisher has PublisherID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.

Use it in a XML document.
14. Create a DTD to describe a Computer. A computer has following details,




Type of computer (this is an attribute), Which can be Desktop PC, Laptop,
Palm Top, Server, Minicomputer or mainframe)
A Monitor with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of manufacture,
Size, Type (which is either colour or monochrome)
A keyboard with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of manufacture,
No of keys, Type( which is either Standard or Enhanced or Multimedia)
A mouse with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of manufacture,
No of buttons, Scroll wheel (which is yes or no), Type (Which is Ball or Optical)
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




A Mother board with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of
manufacture, No of USB ports, No of IDE slots, No of SATA hubs, No of PCI
slots, Display Type(Which is VGA or HDMI), Number of Processor slots, Type
of Processors supported (must be a list), Type of RAM supported (Which is
either SD or DDR1 or DDR2 or RD), Maximum Capacity of RAM, Form Factor
(which is either AT or Baby AT), On Board sound card (Which is yes or no)
A Microprocessor with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of
manufacture, speed (in GHz), No of Cores (Single, Dual, Quad)
A power supply with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of
manufacture, Type (AT, ATX), Wattage
One or more hard disks, each Hard disk must have Serial Number (Attribute),
Make, Model, Year of manufacture, capacity and type (Which is IDE or SATAI
or SATAII, SCSI)
One or more RAM SIMM, with Serial Number (Attribute), Make, Model, Year of
manufacture, Type (which must be SD, DDRI, DDRII, RD), capacity, operating
frequency.
Use it in a XML document.
15. Create a Schema to describe a Computer. Use the previous question‘s details and
show an instance XML document.
16. Create a Schema to describe a library. Library has one or more - books, members
and staffs.
 Each book has BookID(Attribute), Title, one or more Authors, Publisher Year
of Publication, ISBN and Price.
 Each Member has MemeberID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
 Each Staff has StaffID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
 Each Author has AuthorID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
 Each Publisher has PublisherID(Attribute), Name, Address, Phone number.
Use the above DTD in a sample XML document.
17. Create a DTD to describe a bank that has one or more customers, accounts or
Employee.
 Each Customer has a Customer ID, Name and address.
 Each account has an account ID, BranchID, CustomerID, AccountType
and Balance.
 Each Employee has aEmpID, Name, Designation, DOJ, Salary and
Address.
Use this DTD in a XML file.
18. Create Schema describe a bank that has one or more customers, accounts or
depositors. Use the previous questions details. Also show a sample instance XML
document.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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B. Tech III-II Sem. (CSE)
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DATA WAREHOUSING & MINING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
Learn how to build a data warehouse and query it (using open source tools like Pentaho
Data Integration and Pentaho Business Analytics), Learn to perform data mining tasks
using a data mining toolkit (such as open source WEKA), Understand the data sets and
data preprocessing, Demonstrate the working of algorithms for data mining tasks such
association rule mining, classification, clustering and regression, Exercise the data
mining techniques with varied input values for different parameters.
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to build Data Warehouse and Explore WEKA
 Ability to perform data preprocessing tasks and Demonstrate performing
association rule mining on data sets
 Ability to perform classification, clustering and regression on data sets
 Ability to design data mining algorithms
Data Warehousing
Experiments:
Build Data Warehouse and Explore WEKA
A.
Build a Data Warehouse/Data Mart (using open source tools like Pentaho Data
Integration tool, Pentoaho Business Analytics; or other data warehouse tools
like Microsoft-SSIS, Informatica, Business Objects, etc.).
(i). Identify source tables and populate sample data
(ii). Design multi-dimensional data models namely Star, snowflake and Fact
constellation schemas for any one enterprise (ex. Banking, Insurance,
Finance, Healthcare, Manufacturing, Automobile, etc.).
(iii). Write ETL scripts and implement using data warehouse tools
(iv). Perform various OLAP operations such slice, dice, roll up, drill up and pivot
(v). Explore visualization features of the tool for analysis like identifying trends
etc.
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B. Explore WEKA Data Mining/Machine Learning Toolkit
(i). Downloading and/or installation of WEKA data mining toolkit,
(ii). Understand the features of WEKA toolkit such as Explorer, Knowledge Flow
interface, Experimenter, command-line interface.
(iii). Navigate the options available in the WEKA (ex. Select attributes panel,
Preprocess panel, Classify panel, Cluster panel, Associate panel and Visualize
panel)
(iv). Study the arff file format
(v). Explore the available data sets in WEKA.
(vi). Load a data set (ex. Weather dataset, Iris dataset, etc.)
(vii). Load each dataset and observe the following:
i. List the attribute names and they types
ii. Number of records in each dataset
iii. Identify the class attribute (if any)
iv. Plot Histogram
v. Determine the number of records for each class.
vi. Visualize the data in various dimensions
Perform data preprocessing tasks and Demonstrate performing association rule
mining on data sets
A.
Explore various options available in Weka for preprocessing data and apply (like
Discretization Filters, Resample filter, etc.) on each dataset
B. Load each dataset into Weka and run Aprori algorithm with different support and
confidence values. Study the rules generated.
C. Apply different discretization filters on numerical attributes and run the Apriori
association rule algorithm. Study the rules generated. Derive interesting insights
and observe the effect of discretization in the rule generation process.
Demonstrate performing classification on data sets
A.
Load each dataset into Weka and run Id3, J48 classification algorithm. Study the
classifier output. Compute entropy values, Kappa statistic.
B. Extract if-then rules from the decision tree generated by the classifier, Observe
the confusion matrix and derive Accuracy, F-measure, TPrate, FPrate, Precision
and Recall values. Apply cross-validation strategy with various fold levels and
compare the accuracy results.
C. Load each dataset into Weka and perform Naïve-bayes classification and kNearest Neighbour classification. Interpret the results obtained.
D. Plot RoC Curves
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E.
Compare classification results of ID3, J48, Naïve-Bayes and k-NN classifiers for
each dataset, and deduce which classifier is performing best and poor for each
dataset and justify.
Demonstrate performing clustering on data sets
A.
Load each dataset into Weka and run simple k-means clustering algorithm with
different values of k (number of desired clusters). Study the clusters formed.
Observe the sum of squared errors and centroids, and derive insights.
B. Explore other clustering techniques available in Weka.
C. Explore visualization features of Weka to visualize the clusters. Derive
interesting insights and explain.
Demonstrate performing Regression on data sets
A.
Load each dataset into Weka and build Linear Regression model. Study the
clusters formed. Use Training set option. Interpret the regression model and
derive patterns and conclusions from the regression results.
B. Use options cross-validation and percentage split and repeat running the Linear
Regression Model. Observe the results and derive meaningful results.
C. Explore Simple linear regression technique that only looks at one variable
Resource Sites:
1. http://www.pentaho.com/
2. http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/ml/weka/
Data Mining
Task 1: Credit Risk Assessment
Description:
The business of banks is making loans. Assessing the credit worthiness of an applicant
is of crucial importance. You have to develop a system to help a loan officer decide
whether the credit of a customer is good, or bad. A bank's business rules regarding
loans must consider two opposing factors. On the one hand, a bank wants to make as
many loans as possible. Interest on these loans is the banks profit source. On the other
hand, a bank cannot afford to make too many bad loans. Too many bad loans could
lead to the collapse of the bank. The bank's loan policy must involve a compromise: not
too strict, and not too lenient.
To do the assignment, you first and foremost need is some knowledge about the world
of credit. You can acquire such knowledge in a number of ways.
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1.
2.
3.
4.
Knowledge Engineering. Find a loan officer who is willing to talk. Interview her and
try to represent her knowledge in the form of production rules.
Books. Find some training manuals for loan officers or perhaps a suitable textbook
on finance. Translate this knowledge from text form to production rule form.
Common sense. Imagine yourself as a loan officer and make up reasonable rules
which can be used to judge the credit worthiness of a loan applicant.
Case histories. Find records of actual cases where competent loan officers
correctly judged when, and when not to, approve a loan application.
The German Credit Data:
Actual historical credit data is not always easy to come by because of confidentiality
rules. Here is one such dataset, consisting of 1000 actual cases collected in Germany.
credit dataset (original) Excel spreadsheet version of the German credit data.
In spite of the fact that the data is German, you should probably make use of it for this
assignment. (Unless you really can consult a real loan officer !)
A few notes on the German dataset




DM stands for Deutsche Mark, the unit of currency, worth about 90 cents Canadian
(but looks and acts like a quarter).
Owns_telephone. German phone rates are much higher. So fewer people own
telephones.
Foreign_worker. There are millions of these in Germany (many from Turrkey). It is
very hard to get German citizenship if you were not born of German parents.
There are 20 attributes used in judging a loan applicant. The goal is to classify the
applicant into one of two categories, good or bad.
Subtasks: (Turn in your answers to the following tasks)
1. List all the categorical (or nominal) attributes and the real-valued attributes
separately.
2. What attributes do you think might be crucial in making the credit assessment ?
Come up with some simple rules in plain English using your selected attributes.
3. One type of model that you can create is a Decision Tree - train a Decision Tree
using the complete dataset as the training data. Report the model obtained after
training.
4. Suppose you use your above model trained on the complete dataset, and classify
credit good/bad for each of the examples in the dataset. What % of examples can you
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classify correctly? (This is also called testing on the training set) Why do you think you
cannot get 100 % training accuracy?
5. Is testing on the training set as you did above a good idea? Why or Why not ?
6. One approach for solving the problem encountered in the previous question is using
cross-validation? Describe what is cross-validation briefly. Train a Decision Tree again
using cross-validation and report your results. Does your accuracy increase/decrease?
Why?
7. Check to see if the data shows a bias against "foreign workers" (attribute 20), or
"personal-status" (attribute 9). One way to do this (perhaps rather simple minded) is to
remove these attributes from the dataset and see if the decision tree created in those
cases is significantly different from the full dataset case which you have already done.
To remove an attribute you can use the preprocess tab in Weka's GUI Explorer. Did
removing these attributes have any significant effect?
8. Another question might be, do you really need to input so many attributes to get
good results? Maybe only a few would do. For example, you could try just having
attributes 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 17 (and 21, the class attribute (naturally)). Try out some
combinations. (You had removed two attributes in problem 7. Remember to reload the
arff data file to get all the attributes initially before you start selecting the ones you
want.)
9. Sometimes, the cost of rejecting an applicant who actually has a good credit (case
1) might be higher than accepting an applicant who has bad credit (case 2). Instead of
counting the misclassifcations equally in both cases, give a higher cost to the first case
(say cost 5) and lower cost to the second case. You can do this by using a cost matrix
in Weka. Train your Decision Tree again and report the Decision Tree and crossvalidation results. Are they significantly different from results obtained in problem 6
(using equal cost)?
10. Do you think it is a good idea to prefer simple decision trees instead of having long
complex decision trees? How does the complexity of a Decision Tree relate to the bias
of the model?
11. You can make your Decision Trees simpler by pruning the nodes. One approach is
to use Reduced Error Pruning. Try reduced error pruning for training your Decision
Trees using cross-validation (you can do this in Weka) and report the Decision Tree you
obtain? Also, report your accuracy using the pruned model. Does your accuracy
increase?
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12.(Extra Credit): How can you convert a Decision Trees into "if-then-else rules". Make
up your own small Decision Tree consisting of 2-3 levels and convert it into a set of
rules. There also exist different classifiers that output the model in the form of rules one such classifier in Weka is rules. PART, train this model and report the set of rules
obtained. Sometimes just one attribute can be good enough in making the decision,
yes, just one ! Can you predict what attribute that might be in this dataset ? OneR
classifier uses a single attribute to make decisions (it chooses the attribute based on
minimum error). Report the rule obtained by training a one R classifier. Rank the
performance of j48, PART and oneR.
Task Resources:
 Andrew Moore's Data Mining Tutorials (See tutorials on Decision Trees and
Cross Validation)
 Decision Trees (Source: Tan, MSU)
 Tom Mitchell's book slides (See slides on Concept Learning and Decision
Trees)
 Weka resources:
o Introduction to Weka (html version) (download ppt version)
o Download Weka
o Weka Tutorial
o ARFF format
o Using Weka from command line
Task 2: Hospital Management System
Data Warehouse consists Dimension Table and Fact Table.
REMEMBER The following
Dimension
The dimension object (Dimension):
_ Name
_ Attributes (Levels) , with one primary key
_ Hierarchies
One time dimension is must.
About Levels and Hierarchies
Dimension objects (dimension) consist of a set of levels and a set of hierarchies
defined over those levels. The levels represent levels of aggregation. Hierarchies
describe parent-child relationships among a set of levels.
For example, a typical calendar dimension could contain five levels. Two hierarchies
can be defined on these levels:
H1: YearL > QuarterL > MonthL > WeekL > DayL
H2: YearL > WeekL > DayL
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The hierarchies are described from parent to child, so that Year is the parent of Quarter,
Quarter the parent of Month, and so forth.
About Unique Key Constraints
When you create a definition for a hierarchy, Warehouse Builder creates an identifier
key for each level of the hierarchy and a unique key constraint on the lowest level (Base
Level)
Design a Hospital Management system data warehouse (TARGET) consistig of
Dimensions Patient, Medicine, Supplier, Time. Where measures are ‗ NO UNITS‘,
UNIT PRICE.
Assume the Relational database (SOURCE) table schemas as follows
TIME (day, month, year),
PATIENT (patient_name, Age, Address, etc.,)
MEDICINE ( Medicine_Brand_name, Drug_name, Supplier, no_units, Uinit_Price, etc.,)
SUPPLIER :( Supplier_name, Medicine_Brand_name, Address, etc., )
If each Dimension has 6 levels, decide the levels and hierarchies, Assume the level
names suitably.
Design the Hospital Management system data warehouse using all schemas. Give the
example 4-D cube with assumption names.
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ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMMUNICATION
SKILLS (AELCS) LAB (Audit Course)
1. Introduction
With increased globalization and rapidly changing industry expectations, employers are
looking for the wide cluster of skills to cater to the changing demand. The introduction of
the Advanced Communication Skills Lab is considered essential at 3 rd year level. At this
stage, the students need to prepare themselves for their careers which may require
them to listen to, read, speak and write in English both for their professional and
interpersonal communication in the globalised context.
The proposed course should be a laboratory course to enable students to use ‗good‘
English and perform the following:







Gathering ideas and information and to organise ideas relevantly and coherently.
Engaging in debates.
Participating in group discussions.
Facing interviews.
Writing project/research reports/technical reports.
Making oral presentations.
Taking part in social and professional communication.
2 OBJECTIVES:
This Lab focuses on using multi-media instruction for language development to meet
the following targets:
 To improve the students‘ fluency in English, through a well-developed vocabulary
and enable them to listen to English spoken at normal conversational speed by
educated English speakers and respond appropriately in different socio-cultural
and professional contexts.
 Further, they would be required to communicate their ideas relevantly and
coherently in writing.
 To prepare all the students for their placements.
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3. SYLLABUS:
The following course content to conduct the activities is prescribed for the Advanced
English Communication Skills (AECS) Lab:
UNIT-I: COMMUNICATION SKILLS
1. Reading Comprehension
2. Listening comprehension
3. Vocabulary Development
4. Common Errors
UNIT-II: WRITING SKILLS
1. Report writing
2. Resume Preparation
3. E-mail Writing
UNIT-III: PRESENTATION SKILLS
1. Oral presentation
2. Power point presentation
3. Poster presentation
UNIT-IV: GETTING READY FOR JOB
1. Debates
2. Group discussions
3. Job Interviews
UNIT-V: INTERPERSONAL SKILLS
1. Time Management
2. Problem Solving & Decision Making
3. Etiquettes
4. LEARNING OUTCOMES:
 Accomplishment of sound vocabulary and its proper use contextually
 Flair in Writing and felicity in written expression.

Enhanced job prospects.
 Effective Speaking Abilities
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5. MINIMUM REQUIREMENT:
The Advanced English Communication Skills (AECS) Laboratory shall have the
following infra-structural facilities to accommodate at least 60 students in the lab:
 Spacious room with appropriate acoustics.
 Round Tables with movable chairs
 Audio-visual aids
 LCD Projector
 Public Address system

P – IV Processor, Hard Disk – 80 GB, RAM–512 MB Minimum, Speed – 2.8 GHZ
 T. V, a digital stereo & Camcorder
 Headphones of High quality
6. SUGGESTED SOFTWARE:
The software consisting of the prescribed topics elaborated above should be procured
and G
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Walden Infotech: Advanced English Communication Skills Lab
K-VAN SOLUTIONS-Advanced English Language Communication Skills lab
DELTA’s key to the Next Generation TOEFL Test: Advanced Skills Practice.
TOEFL & GRE( KAPLAN, AARCO & BARRONS, USA, Cracking GRE by CLIFFS)
Train2success.com
7. BOOKS RECOMMENDED:
1. Objective English for Competitive Exams, Hari Mohana Prasad, 4th edition, Tata Mc
Graw Hill.
2. Technical Communication by Meenakshi Raman & Sangeeta Sharma, O U Press 3rd
Edn. 2015.
3. Essay Writing for Exams, Audrone Raskauskiene, Irena Ragaisience & Ramute
Zemaitience,OUP, 2016
4. Soft Skills for Everyone, Butterfield Jeff, Cengage Publications, 2011.
5. Management Shapers Series by Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd., Himayatnagar,
Hyderabad 2008.
6. Campus to Corporate, Gangadhar Joshi, Sage Publications, 2015
7. Communicative English,E Suresh Kumar & P.Sreehari, Orient Blackswan, 2009.
8. English for Success in Competitive Exams, Philip Sunil Solomon OUP, 2015
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3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A52601
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3
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
Course Objectives: The objective of the course is to equip the student the fundamental
knowledge of management science and its application for effective management of
human resource, materials and operation of an organization. It also aims to expose the
students about the latest and contemporary developments in the field of management.
UNIT –I: Introduction to Management: Concept-Nature and Importance of
Management, Functions-Evaluation of Scientific Management, Modern managementMotivation Theories-Leadership Styles-Decision Making Process-Designing
Organization Structure-Principles and Types of Organization.
UNIT- II: Operations Management: Plant location and Layout, Methods of production,
Work-Study-Statistical Quality Control through Control Charts, Objectives of Inventory
Management,
Need
for
Inventory
Control-EOQ&ABC
Analysis(Simple
Problems)Marketing Management:
Meaning, Nature, Functions of Marketing, Marketing Mix, Channels of distributionAdvertisement and sales promotion-Marketing strategies-Product Life Cycle.
UNIT -III: Human Resource Management (HRM): Significant and Basic functions of
HRM-Human Resource Planning(HRP), Job evaluation, Recruitment and Selection,
Placement and Induction-Wage and Salary administration. Employee Training and
development-Methods-Performance Appraisal-Employee Grievances-techniques of
handling Grievances.
UNIT –IV: Strategic Management: Vision, Mission, Goals and Strategy- Corporate
Planning Process-Environmental Scanning-SWOT analysis-Different Steps in Strateg
Formulation, Implementation and Evaluation. Project Management: Network AnalysisPERT, CPM, Identifying Critical Path-Probability-Project Cost Analysis, Project
Crashing (Simple Problems).
UNIT-V: Contemporary Management Practices: Basic concepts of MIS-Materials
Requirement
Planning(MRP),Just-In-Time(JIT)System,
Total
Quality
Management(TQM)-Six Sigma and Capability Maturity Models(CMM) evies, Supply
Chain Management, Enterprise Resource Planning(ERP),Performance Management,
Business Process Outsourcing(BPO), Business Process Re-Engineering and Bench
Marking, Balance Score Card.
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Course Outcomes: This course enables the student to know the principles and
applications of management knowledge and exposure to the latest developments in the
field. This helps to take effective and efficient management decisions on physical and
human resources of an organization. Beside the knowledge of Management Science
facilitates for his/her personal and professional development.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. A.R Aryasri: Management Science, TMH, 2013
2. Kumar /Rao/Chalill ‗Introduction to Management Science‘ Cengage, Delhi, 2012.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. A.K.Gupta ―Engineering Management‖,S.CHAND, New Delhi, 2016.
2. Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert, Management, Pearson Education,New Delhi, 2012.
3. Kotler Philip & Keller Kevin Lane: Marketing Mangement , PHI,2013.
5. Koontz & Weihrich: Essentials of Management, 6/e, TMH, 2005.
6. Kanishka Bedi, Production and Operations Management, Oxford University Press,
2004.
7. Memoria & S.V.Gauker, Personnel Management, Himalaya, 25/e, 2005
8. Parnell: Strategic Management, Biztantra, 2003.
9. L.S.Srinath: PERT/CPM,Affiliated East-West Press, 2005.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05701
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C
3
GRID AND CLOUD COMPUTING
Course Objectives:
The student should be made to:
 Understand how Grid computing helps in solving large scale scientific
problems.
 Gain knowledge on the concept of virtualization that is fundamental
to cloud computing. Learn how to program the grid and the cloud.
 Understand the security issues in the grid and the cloud environment.
Course Outcomes:
The student should be able to
 Apply the security models in the grid and the cloud environment.
 Use the grid and cloud tool kits.
 Apply the concept of virtualization.
 Apply grid computing techniques to solve large scale scientific problems
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
Evolution of Distributed computing: Scalable computing over the Internet –
Technologies for network based systems – clusters of cooperative computers - Grid
computing Infrastructures – cloud computing - service oriented architecture –
Introduction to Grid Architecture and standards – Elements of Grid – Overview of Grid
Architecture.
UNIT II
GRID SERVICES
Introduction to Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) – Motivation – Functionality
Requirements – Practical & Detailed view of OGSA/OGSI – Data intensive grid service
models – OGSA services.
UNIT III VIRTUALIZATION
Cloud deployment models: public, private, hybrid, community – Categories of cloud
computing: Everything as a service: Infrastructure, platform, software - Pros and Cons
of cloud computing – Implementation levels of virtualization – virtualization structure –
virtualization of CPU, Memory and I/O devices – virtual clusters and Resource
Management – Virtualization for data center automation.
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UNIT IV PROGRAMMING MODEL
Open source grid middleware packages – Globus Toolkit (GT4) Architecture ,
Configuration – Usage of Globus – Main components and Programming model Introduction to Hadoop Framework - Mapreduce, Input splitting, map and reduce
functions, specifying input and output parameters, configuring and running a job –
Design of Hadoop file system, HDFS concepts, command line and java interface,
dataflow of File read & File write.
UNIT V SECURITY
Trust models for Grid security environment – Authentication and Authorization methods
– Grid security infrastructure – Cloud Infrastructure security: network, host and
application level – aspects of data security, provider data and its security, Identity and
access management architecture, IAM practices in the cloud, SaaS, PaaS, IaaS
availability in the cloud, Key privacy issues in the cloud.
TEXT BOOK:
1.
Kai Hwang, Geoffery C. Fox and Jack J. Dongarra, ―Distributed and Cloud Computing:
Clusters, Grids, Clouds and the Future of Internet‖, First Edition, Morgan Kaufman
Publisher, an Imprint of Elsevier, 2012.
REFERENCES:
1. Jason Venner, ―Pro Hadoop- Build Scalable, Distributed Applications in the Cloud‖, A Press,
2009
2. Tom White, ―Hadoop The Definitive Guide‖, First Edition. O‘Reilly, 2009.
3. Bart Jacob (Editor), ―Introduction to Grid Computing‖, IBM Red Books, Vervante, 2005
4. Ian Foster, Carl Kesselman, ―The Grid: Blueprint for a New Computing Infrastructure‖, 2 nd
Edition, Morgan Kaufmann.
5. Frederic Magoules and Jie Pan, ―Introduction to Grid Computing‖ CRC Press, 2009.
6. Daniel Minoli, ―A Networking Approach to Grid Computing‖, John Wiley Publication, 2005.
7. Barry Wilkinson, ―Grid Computing: Techniques and Applications‖, Chapman and Hall, CRC,
Taylor and Francis Group, 2010.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05702
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3
INFORMATION SECURITY
Course Objectives:
 Extensive, thorough and significant understanding of the concepts, issues,
principles and theories of computer network security
 Identifying the suitable points for applying security features for network traffic
 Understanding the various cryptographic algorithms and implementation of
the same at software level
 Understanding the various attacks, security mechanisms and services
Course Outcomes:
 Protect the network from both internal and external attacks
 Design of new security approaches
 Ability to choose the appropriate security algorithm based on the
requirements.
Unit-I
Computer Security concepts, The OSI Security Architecture, Security attacks, Security
services and Security mechanisms, A model for Network Security
Classical encryption techniques- symmetric cipher model, substitution ciphers,
transposition ciphers, Steganography.
Modern Block Ciphers: Block ciphers principles, Data encryption standard (DES),
Strength of DES, linear and differential cryptanalysis, block cipher modes of operations,
AES, RC4.
Unit-II
Introduction to Number theory – Integer Arithmetic, Modular Arithmetic, Matrices,
Linear Congruence, Algebraic Structures, GF(2n) Fields, Primes, Primality Testing,
Factorization, Chinese remainder Theorem, Quadratic Congruence, Exponentiation and
Logarithm.
Public-key cryptography - Principles of public-key cryptography, RSA Algorithm, DiffieHellman Key Exchange, ELGamal cryptographic system, Elliptic Curve Arithmetic,
Elliptic curve cryptography
Unit-III
Cryptographic Hash functions: Applications of Cryptographic Hash functions,
Requirements and security, Hash functions based on Cipher Block Chaining, Secure
Hash Algorithm (SHA)
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Message Authentication Codes: Message authentication Requirements, Message
authentication functions, Requirements for Message authentication codes, security of
MACs, HMAC, MACs based on Block Ciphers, Authenticated Encryption
Digital Signatures-RSA with SHA & DSS
Unit-IV
Key Management and distribution: Symmetric key distribution using Symmetric
Encryption, Symmetric key distribution using Asymmetric, Distribution of Public keys,
X.509 Certificates, Public key Infrastructure.
User Authentication: Remote user Authentication Principles, Remote user
Authentication using Symmetric Encryption, Kerberos, Remote user Authentication
using Asymmetric Encryption, Federated Identity Management, Electronic mail security:
Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), S/MIME.
Unit-V
Security at the Transport Layer(SSL and TLS) : SSL Architecture, Four Protocols, SSL
Message Formats, Transport Layer Security, HTTPS, SSH
Security at the Network layer (IPSec): Two modes, Two Security Protocols, Security
Association, Security Policy, Internet Key Exchange.
System Security: Description of the system, users, Trust and Trusted Systems, Buffer
Overflow and Malicious Software, Malicious Programs, worms, viruses, Intrusion
Detection System(IDS), Firewalls
Text books:
1. ―Cryptography and Network Security‖, Behrouz A. Frouzan and Debdeep
Mukhopadhyay, Mc Graw Hill Education, 2nd edition, 2013.
2.―Cryptography and Network Security: Principals and Practice‖, William Stallings,
Pearson Education , Fifth Edition, 2013.
References:
1. ―Network Security and Cryptography‖, Bernard Menezes , Cengage Learning.
2. ―Cryptography and Security‖, C.K. Shymala, N. Harini and Dr. T.R. Padmanabhan,
Wiley-India.
3. ―Applied Cryptography, Bruce Schiener, 2nd edition, John Wiley & Sons.
4. ―Cryptography and Network Security‖, Atul Kahate, TMH.
5. ‗Introduction to Cryptography‖, Buchmann, Springer.
6. ‗Number Theory in the Spirit of Ramanujan‖, Bruce C.Berndt, University Press
7. ―Introduction to Analytic Number Theory‖, Tom M.Apostol, University Press
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05703
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0
C
3
MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
Course Objectives:
 To understand fundamentals of android operating systems.
 Illustrate the various components, layouts and views in creating android
applications
 To understand fundamentals of android programming.
Course Outcomes:
 Create data sharing with different applications and sending and intercepting
SMS.
 Develop applications using services and publishing android applications.
 To demonstrate their skills of using Android software development tools
Unit 1: Introduction to Android:
The Android 4.1 jelly Bean SDK, Understanding the Android Software Stack, installing
the Android SDK, Creating Android Virtual Devices, Creating the First Android Project,
Using the Text view Control, Using the Android Emulator, The Android Debug
Bridge(ADB), Launching Android Applications on a Handset.
Unit 2: Basic Widgets:
Understanding the Role of Android Application Components, Understanding the Utility
of Android API, Overview of the Android Project Files, Understanding Activities, Role of
the Android Manifest File, Creating the User Interface, Commonly Used Layouts and
Controls, Event Handling, Displaying Messages Through Toast, Creating and Starting
an Activity, Using the Edit Text Control, Choosing Options with Checkbox, Choosing
Mutually Exclusive Items Using Radio Buttons
Unit 3: Building Blocks for Android Application Design:
Introduction to Layouts, Linear Layout, Relative Layout, Absolute Layout, Using Image
View, Frame Layout, Table Layout, Grid Layout, Adapting to Screen orientation.
Utilizing Resources and Media Resources, Creating Values Resources, Using
Drawable Resources, Switching States with Toggle Buttons, Creating an Images
Switcher Application, Scrolling Through Scroll View, playing Audio, Playing Video,
Displaying Progress with Progress Bar, Using Assets.
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Unit 4: Using Selection widgets and Debugging:
Using List View, Using the Spinner control, Using the GridView Control, Creating an
Image Gallery Using the ViewPager Control, Using the Debugging Tool: Dalvik Debug
Monitor Service(DDMS), Debugging Application, Using the Debug Perspective.
Displaying And Fetching Information Using Dialogs and Fragments: What Are
Dialogs?, Selecting the Date and Time in One Application, Fragments, Creating
Fragments with java Code, Creating Special Fragments
Unit 5: Building Menus and Storing Data:
Creating Interface Menus and Action Bars, Menus and Their Types, Creating Menus
Through XML, Creating Menus Through Coding, Applying a Context Menu to a List
View, Using the Action Bar, Replacing a Menu with the Action Bar, Creating a Tabbed
Action Bar, Creating a Drop-Down List Action Bar
Using Databases:
Using the SQLiteOpenHelperclasss, Accessing Databases with the ADB, Creating a
Data Entry Form,
Communicating with SMS and Emails:
Understanding Broadcast Receivers, Using the Notification System, Sending SMS
Messages with Java Code, Receiving SMS Messages, Sending Email, Working With
Telephony Manager.
Text Books
1. Android Programming by B.M Harwani, Pearson Education, 2013.
References Text Books:
1. Android application Development for Java Programmers, James C Sheusi,
Cengage Learning
2. Android In Action by w.Frank Ableson, Robi Sen, Chris King, C. Enrique
Ortiz., Dreamtech.
3. Professional Android 4 applications development, Reto Meier, Wiley India,
2012.
4. Beginning Android 4 applications development, Wei- Meng Lee, Wiley
India,2013
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05704
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0
C
3
SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE
(CBCC-II)
Course Objectives:
 Introduction to the fundamentals of software architecture.
 Software architecture and quality requirements of a software system
 Fundamental principles and guidelines for software architecture design,
architectural styles, patterns, and frameworks.
 Methods, techniques, and tools for describing software architecture and
documenting design rationale.
 Software architecture design and evaluation processes.
Course Outcomes:
 The student will be able to:
 Design and motivate software architecture for large scale software systems
 Recognize major software architectural styles, design patterns, and frameworks
 Describe a software architecture using various documentation approaches and
architectural
 description languages
 Generate architectural alternatives for a problem and select among them
 Use well-understood paradigms for designing new systems
UNIT I: ENVISIONING ARCHITECTURE
What is software Architecture-What is Software Architecture, Other Points of View,
Architectural Patterns, Reference Models, and Reference Architectures, Importance of
Software Architecture, Architectural Structures and views.
ENVISIONING ARCHITECTURE:
Architecture Business Cycle- Architectures influences, Software Processes and the
Architecture Business Cycle, Making of ―Good‖ Architecture.
UNIT II: DESIGNING THE ARCHITECTURE WITH STYLES
Designing the Architecture: Architecture in the Life Cycle, Designing the Architecture,
Formatting the Team Structure, Creating a Skeletal System.
Architecture Styles: Architectural Styles, Pipes and Filters, Data Abstraction and ObjectOriented Organization, Event-Based, Implicit Invocation, Layered Systems,
Repositories, Interpreters.2013-2014
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UNIT III: CREATING AN ARCHITECTURE-I
Creating an Architecture: Understanding Quality Attributes – Functionality and
Architecture, Architecture and Quality Attributes, System Quality Attributes, Quality
Attribute. Scenarios in Practice, Other System Quality Attributes, Business Qualities,
Architecture Qualities.
Achieving Qualities: Introducing Tactics, Availability Tactics, Modifiability Tactics,
Performance Tactics, Security Tactics, Testability Tactics, Usability Tactics.
UNIT IV: CREATING AN ARCHITECTURE-II
Documenting Software Architectures: Use of Architectural Documentation, Views,
Choosing the Relevant Views, Documenting a view, Documentation across Views.
Reconstructing Software Architecture: Introduction, Information Extraction, Database
Construction, View Fusion, and Reconstruction.
UNIT V: ANALYZING ARCHITECTURES
The ATAM: Participants in the ATAM, Outputs of The ATAM, Phases Of the ATAM. The
CBAM: Decision-Making Context, The Basis for the CBAM, Implementing the CBAM.
The World Wide Web:A Case study in Interoperability- Relationship to the Architecture
Business Cycle, Requirements and Qualities, Architecture Solution, Achieving Quality
Goals.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Software Architectures in Practice , Len Bass, Paul Clements, Rick Kazman, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Publication.
2. Software Architecture , Mary Shaw and David Garlan, First Edition, PHI Publication,
1996.
REFERENCES BOOKS:
1. Software Design: From Programming to Architecture, Eric Braude, Wiley, 2004.
2. N. Domains of Concern in Software Architectures and Architecture Description
Languages. Medvidovic and D. S. Rosenblum. USENIX.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05705
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C
3
COMPUTER GRAPHICS
(CBCC-II)
Course Objectives:
 To provide students with an understanding of the algorithms and theories that
form the basis of computer graphics and modeling.
 To give students skills necessary in the production of 2D &3D models.
Course Outcomes:
 Acquire familiarity with the relevant mathematics of computer graphics.
 Be able to design basic graphics application programs, including animation
 Be able to design applications that display graphic images to given
specifications
UNIT I
Introduction, Application areas of Computer Graphics, overview of graphics systems,
video-display devices, raster-scan systems, random scan systems, graphics monitors
and work stations and input devices
Output primitives: Points and lines, line drawing algorithms, mid-point circle and ellipse
algorithms. Filled area primitives: Scan line polygon fill algorithm, boundary-fill and
flood-fill algorithms.
UNIT II
2-D Geometrical transforms: Translation, scaling, rotation, reflection and shear
transformations, matrix representations and homogeneous coordinates, composite
transforms, transformations between coordinate systems.
2-D Viewing :
The viewing pipeline, viewing coordinate reference frame, window
to view-port coordinate transformation, viewing functions, Cohen-Sutherland and Cyrusbeck line clipping algorithms, Sutherland –Hodgeman polygon clipping algorithm.
UNIT III
3-D Object representation: Polygon surfaces, quadric surfaces, spline representation,
Hermite curve, Bezier curve and B-spline curves, Bezier and B-spline surfaces. Basic
illumination models, polygon rendering methods.
UNIT IV
3-D Geometric transformations: Translation, rotation, scaling, reflection and shear
transformations, composite transformations, 3-D viewing: Viewing pipeline, viewing
coordinates, view volume and general projection transforms and clipping.
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UNIT V
Visible surface detection methods: Classification, back-face detection, depthbuffer, scan-line, depth sorting, BSP-tree methods, area sub-division and octree
methods Computer animation: Design of animation sequence, general computer
animation functions, raster animation, computer animation languages, key frame
systems, motion specifications
TEXT BOOKS:
1. ―Computer Graphics C version‖, Donald Hearn and M. Pauline Baker, Pearson
education.
2. ―Computer Graphics Principles & practice‖, second edition in C, Foley, VanDam,
Feiner and Hughes, Pearson Education.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. ―Computer Graphics Second edition‖, Zhigand xiang, Roy Plastock, Schaum‘s
outlines, Tata Mc Graw hill edition.
2. ―Procedural elements for Computer Graphics‖, David F Rogers, Tata Mc Graw
hill, 2nd edition.
3. ―Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics‖, Neuman and Sproul, TMH.
4. ―Principles of Computer Graphics‖, Shalini, Govil-Pai, Springer.
5. ―Computer Graphics‖, Steven Harrington, TMH.
6. Computer Graphics,F.S.Hill,S.M.Kelley,PHI.
7. Computer Graphics,P.Shirley,Steve Marschner&Others,Cengage Learning.
8. Computer Graphics & Animation,M.C.Trivedi,Jaico Publishing House.
9. An Integrated Introduction to Computer Graphics and Geometric
Modelling,R.Goldman,CRC Press,Taylor&Francis Group.
10. Computer Graphics,Rajesh K.Maurya,Wiley India.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05706
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0
C
3
MACHINE LEARNING
(CBCC-II)
Course Objectives:
 To understand the basic theory underlying machine learning.
 To be able to formulate machine learning problems corresponding to different
applications.
 To understand a range of machine learning algorithms along with their strengths
and weaknesses.
 To be able to apply machine learning algorithms to solve problems of moderate
complexity.
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to understand what is learning and why it is essential to the design of
intelligent machines.
 Ability to design and implement various machine learning algorithms in a wide
range of real-world applications.
 Acquire knowledge deep learning and be able to implement deep learning
models for language, vision, speech, decision making, and more
Unit I:
What is Machine Learning?, Examples of machine learning applications, supervised
Learning: learning a class from examples, Vapnik- Chervonenkis dimension, probably
approximately correct learning, noise, learning multiple classes, regression, model
selection and generalization, dimensions of a supervised machine learning algorithm.
Decision Tree Learning: Introduction, Decisions Tree representation, Appropriate
problems for decision tree learning, the basic decision tree learning algorithm,
Hypothesis space search in decision tree learning, Inductive bias in decision tree
learning, issues in decision tree learning, Artificial Neural Networks: Introduction, Neural
Network Representation – Problems – Perceptrons – Multilayer Networks and Back
Propagation Algorithm, Remarks on the BACKPROPGRATION Algorithm, An
illustrative Example: Face Recognition, Advanced Topics in Artificial Neural Networks.
Unit 2:
Evaluating Hypotheses: Motivation, Estimating hypothesis accuracy, basics of sampling
theory, a general approach for deriving confidence intervals, differences in error of two
hypothesis, comparing learning algorithms, Bayesian Learning: Introduction, Bayes
Theorem, Bayes Theorem and Concept Learning, Maximum Likelihood and least
squared error hypothesis, Maximum Likelihood hypothesis for predicting probabilities,
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Minimum Description Length Principle, Bayes Optimal Classifier, Gibbs Algorithm ,
Naïve Bayes Classifier , Bayesian Belief Network, EM Algorithm
Unit 3:
Dimensionality Reduction: Introduction, Subset selection, principle component
analysis, feature embedding, factor analysis, singular value decomposition and matrix
factorization, multidimensional scaling, linear discriminant analysis, canonical
correlation analysis, Isomap, Locally linear embedding, laplacian eigenmaps,
Clustering: Introduction, Mixture densities, K- Means clustering, ExpectationsMaximization algorithm, Mixture of latent variable models, supervised learning after
clustering, spectral clustering, Hierarchal clustering, Choosing the number of clusters,
Nonparametric Methods: Introduction, Non Parametric density estimation,
generalization to multivariate data, nonparametric classification, condensed nearest
neighbor, Distance based classification, outlier detection, Nonparametric regression:
smoothing models, how to choose the smoothing parameter
Unit 4:
Linear Discrimination: Introduction, Generalizing the linear model, geometry of the
linear discrimination, pair wise separation, parametric discrimination revisited, gradient
descent, logistic discrimination, discrimination by regression, learning to rank, Multilayer
Perceptrons: Introduction, the perceptron, training a perceptron, learning Boolean
functions, multilayer perceptrons, MLP as a universal approximator, Back propagation
algorithm, Training procedures, Tuning the network size, Bayesian view of learning,
dimensionality reduction, learning time, deep learning
Unit 5:
Kernel Machines: Introduction, Optimal separating hyperplane, the non separable case:
Soft Margin Hyperplane, ν-SVM, kernel Trick, Vectorial kernels, defining kernels,
multiple kernel learning, multicast kernel machines, kernel machines for regression,
kernel machines for ranking, one-class kernel machines, large margin nearest neighbor
classifier, kernel dimensionality reduction, Graphical models: Introduction, Canonical
cases for conditional independence, generative models, d separation, belief
propagation, undirected Graphs: Markov Random files, Learning the structure of a
graphical model, influence diagrams.
Text Books:
1) Machine Learning by Tom M. Mitchell, Mc Graw Hill Education, Indian Edition, 2016.
2) Introduction to Machine learning, Ethem Alpaydin, PHI, 3rd Edition, 2014
References Books:
1) Machine Learning: An Algorithmic Perspective, Stephen Marsland, Taylor & Francis,
CRC Press Book
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05707
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0
C
3
SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT
(CBCC-III)
Course Objectives:
The main goal of software development projects is to create a software system with a
predetermined functionality and quality in a given time frame and with given costs. For
achieving this goal, models are required for determining target values and for
continuously controlling these values. This course focuses on principles, techniques,
methods & tools for model-based management of software projects, assurance of
product quality and process adherence (quality assurance), as well as experiencebased creation & improvement of models (process management). The goals of the
course can be characterized as follows:




Understanding the specific roles within a software organization as related to
project and process management
Describe the principles, techniques, methods & tools for model-based
management of software projects, assurance of product quality and process
adherence (quality assurance), as well as experience-based creation &
improvement of models (process management).
Understanding the basic infrastructure competences (e.g., process modeling
and measurement)
Understanding the basic steps of project planning, project management,
quality assurance, and process management and their relationships
Course Outcomes:
 Describe and determine the purpose and importance of project management
from the perspectives of planning, tracking and completion of project.
 Compare and differentiate organization structures and project structures
 Implement a project to manage project schedule, expenses and resources
with the application of suitable project management tools
UNIT I
Conventional Software Management: The waterfall model, conventional software
Management performance. Evolution of Software Economics: Software Economics,
pragmatic software cost estimation
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UNIT II
Improving Software Economics: Reducing Software product size, improving software
processes, improving team effectiveness, improving automation, Achieving required
quality, peer inspections.
The old way and the new: The principles of conventional software engineering,
principles of modern software management, transitioning to an iterative process
UNIT III
Life cycle phases: Engineering and production stages, inception, Elaboration,
construction, transition phases.
Artifacts of the process: The artifact sets, Management artifacts, Engineering
artifacts, programmatic artifacts. Model based software architectures: A Management
perspective and technical perspective.
UNIT IV
Work Flows of the process: Software process workflows, Inter Trans workflows.
Checkpoints of the Process: Major Mile Stones, Minor Milestones, Periodic status
assessments. Iterative Process Planning: Work breakdown structures, planning
guidelines, cost and schedule estimating, Interaction planning process, Pragmatic
planning.
Project Organizations and Responsibilities: Line-of-Business Organizations, Project
Organizations, evolution of Organizations.
Process Automation: Automation Building Blocks, The Project Environment
UNIT V
Project Control and Process instrumentation: The server care Metrics, Management
indicators, quality indicators, life cycle expectations pragmatic Software Metrics, Metrics
automation. Tailoring the Process: Process discriminates, Example.
Future Software Project Management: Modern Project Profiles Next generation
Software economics, modern Process transitions.
Case Study: The Command Center Processing and Display System-Replacement
(CCPDS-R)
Text Books:
1. Software Project Management, Walker Royce, Pearson Education.
2. Software Project Management, Bob Hughes & Mike Cotterell, fourth edition,Tata McGraw Hill
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Reference Books :
1. Applied Software Project Management, Andrew Stellman & Jennifer Greene,
O‟Reilly, 2006
2. Head First PMP, Jennifer Greene & Andrew Stellman, O‟Reilly,2007
3. Software Engineering Project Managent, Richard H. Thayer & Edward Yourdon,
second edition,Wiley India, 2004.
4. Agile Project Management, Jim Highsmith, Pearson education, 2004
5. The art of Project management, Scott Berkun, O‟Reilly, 2005.
6. Software Project Management in Practice, Pankaj Jalote, Pearson Education,2002
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
15A05708
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1
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0
C
3
DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS
(CBCC-III)
Course Objectives:
The student should be made to:
 Understand the issues involved in studying process and resource
management.
 Understand in detail the system level and support required for distributed
system.
 Introduce the idea of peer to peer services and file system.
 Understand foundations of Distributed Systems.
Course Outcomes:
Student should be able to:
 Design process and resource management systems.
 Apply remote method invocation and objects.
 Apply network virtualization.
 Discuss trends in Distributed Systems.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
Examples of Distributed Systems – Trends in Distributed Systems – Focus on resource
sharing – Challenges. Case study: World Wide Web.
UNIT II
COMMUNICATION IN DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM
System Model – Inter process Communication - the API for internet protocols – External
data representation and Multicast communication. Network virtualization: Overlay
networks. Case study: MPI Remote Method Invocation And Objects: Remote Invocation
– Introduction - Request-reply protocols - Remote procedure call - Remote method
invocation. Case study: Java RMI - Group communication - Publish-subscribe systems Message queues - Shared memory approaches - Distributed objects - Case study:
Enterprise Java Beans -from objects to components.
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UNIT III
PEER TO PEER SERVICES AND FILE SYSTEM
Peer-to-peer Systems – Introduction - Napster and its legacy - Peer-to-peer –
Middleware - Routing overlays. Overlay case studies: Pastry, Tapestry- Distributed File
Systems –Introduction - File service architecture – Andrew File system. File System:
Features-File model -File accessing models - File sharing semantics Naming:
Identifiers, Addresses, Name Resolution – Name Space Implementation – Name
Caches – LDAP.
UNIT IV
SYNCHRONIZATION AND REPLICATION
Introduction - Clocks, events and process states - Synchronizing physical clocksLogical time and logical clocks - Global states – Coordination and Agreement –
Introduction - Distributed mutual exclusion – Elections – Transactions and Concurrency
Control– Transactions -Nested transactions – Locks – Optimistic concurrency control Timestamp ordering – Atomic Commit protocols -Distributed deadlocks – Replication –
Case study – Coda.
UNIT V
PROCESS & RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Process Management: Process Migration: Features, Mechanism - Threads: Models,
Issues, Implementation. Resource Management: Introduction- Features of Scheduling
Algorithms –Task Assignment Approach – Load Balancing Approach – Load Sharing
Approach.
TEXT BOOK:
1. George Coulouris, Jean Dollimore and Tim Kindberg, ―Distributed Systems Concepts
and Design‖, Fifth Edition, Pearson Education, 2012.
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REAL TIME SYSTEMS
(CBCC-III)
Course Objectives:
 Acquire skills necessary to design and develop embedded applications by
means of real-time operating systems
 Understand embedded real-time operating systems
Course Outcomes:
 Characterize real-time systems and describe their functions
 Analyze, design and implement a real-time system
 Apply formal methods to the analysis and design of real-time systems
 Apply formal methods for scheduling real-time systems
 Characterize and describe reliability and fault tolerance issues and approaches.
Unit-1
Typical Real time Applications: Digital control, High-level control, Signal processing,
other Real-time Applications.
Hard versus Soft Real-Time Systems: Jobs and processors, Release time, dead lines
and Timing constraints, Hard and soft timing constraints, Hard Real time systems, Soft
Real-time Systems.
A Reference Model of Real Time Systems: Processors and resources, Temporal
parameters of Real time workload, periodic task model, precedence constraints and
data dependency, Functional parameter, Resource Parameters of Jobs and Parameters
of Resources, Scheduling Hierarchy.
Commonly used Approaches to real time Scheduling: Clock-Driven Approach,
Weighted Round-Robin Approach, Priority driven Approach, Dynamic vs Static
Systems, Effective release time and deadlines, Optimality of the EDF and LST
algorithms, Nonoptimality of the EDF and LST algorithms, Challenges in validating
timing constraints in priority driven System, Off line vs On line scheduling, summary.
Unit-2
Clock-Driven Scheduling: Notations and Assumptions, static, Timer-Driven scheduler,
General Structure of the Cyclic Scheduler, Improving the average response time of
Aperiodic Jobs, Scheduling sporadic Jobs, Practical considerations and generalizations,
Algorithm for generating Static Schedules, Pros and cons of Clock-driven scheduling,
summary.
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Unit-3
Priority-Driven Scheduling of periodic Tasks : Static Assumption, Fixed-priority vs
Dynamic-priority Algorithms, Maximum Schedulable Utilization, Optimality of the RM
and DM Algorithms, A Schedulability test for Fixed-priority tasks with Short Response
time, A Schedulability test for Fixed-priority tasks with arbitrary Response time,
Sufficient Schedulability conditions for the RM and DM Algorithms, summary.
Unit-4
Scheduling Aperiodic and Sporadic Jobs in Priority Driven Systems: Assumptions
and approaches, Diferrable servers, Sporadic Servers, Constant utilization, total
bandwidth and weighted fair –Queueing servers, Slack stealing in Dead-line Driven
System, Stack stealing in Fixed-priority systems, Scheduling of sporadic jobs, Real-time
performance for jobs with soft timing constraints, A two-level scheme for Integrated
scheduling.
Unit-5
Resources and Resource access control: Assumptions on Resources and their
usage, Effects of Resource contention and resource access control, Non Preemptive
critical section, Basic Priority inheritance protocol, Basic Priority ceiling protocol, Stack
–based, Priority ceiling protocol, Use of priority ceiling protocol in Dynamic priority
systems, pre-emption ceiling protocol, Controlling accesses to Multiple unit Resources,
Controlling concurrent accesses to data objects.
Multiprocessor Scheduling, Resource access control, and Synchronization:
Model of Multiprocessor and Distributed Systems, Task assignment, Multiprocessor
Priority ceiling protocol, Elements of Scheduling Algorithms for End-to-End Periodic
Tasks, Schedulability of Fixed-priority End-to-End periodic Tasks, End to End tasks in
heterogeneous Systems, Predictability and validation of Dynamic Multiprocessor
Systems, Summary.
Text Book:
1. ―Real-Time Systems‖ by Jane W.S Liu, Pearson Edition, 2006.
Reference Text Book:
1. Real-Time Systems: Scheduling, Analysis, and Verification, Cheng, A. M. K.:
Wiley, 2002.
2. Z.: Scheduling in Real-Time Systems, by Cottet, F., Delacroix, J., Kaiser, C.,
Mammeri John Wiley & Sons, 2002.
3. Real-Time Systems, C. M., Shin, K. G. McGraw-Hill, Krishna 1997.
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B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
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GRID AND CLOUD COMPUTING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
 The student should be made to:
 Be familiar with developing web services/Applications in grid framework.
 Be exposed to tool kits for grid and cloud environment.
 Learn to use Hadoop
 Learn to run virtual machines of different configuration.
Course Outcomes:
The student should be able to
Design and Implement applications on the Cloud.
Design and implement applications on the Grid.
Use the grid and cloud tool kits.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
2
3
4
5
6
GRID COMPUTING PROGRAMS USING GRIDSIM
Program to creates one Grid resource with three machines
Program to to create one or more Grid users. A Grid user contains one or
more Gridlets
Program to shows how two GridSim entities interact with each other ;
main( ie example3 ) class creates Gridlets and sends them to the other
GridSim entities, i.e. Test class
Program shows how a grid user submits its Gridlets or tasks to one grid
resource entity
Program to show how a grid user submits its Gridlets or task to many grid
resource entities
Program to show how to create one or more grid users and submits its
Gridlets or task to many grid resource entities
Program to creates one Grid resource with three machines
Grid computing programs using Use Globus Toolkit or equivalent:
Develop a new Web Service for Calculator.
Develop new OGSA-compliant Web Service.
Using Apache Axis develop a Grid Service.
Develop applications using Java or C/C++ Grid APIs
Develop secured applications using basic security mechanisms available
in Globus Toolkit.
Develop a Grid portal, where user can submit a job and get the result.
Implement it with and without GRAM concept.
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1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
CLOUD COMPUTING
Programs on SaaS
Create an word document of your class time table and store locally
and on the cloud with doc,and pdf format . ( use www.zoho.com and
docs.google.com)
Create a spread sheet which contains employee salary information and
calculate gross and total sal using the formula
DA=10% OF BASIC
HRA=30% OF BASIC
PF=10% OF BASIC IF BASIC<=3000
12% OF BASIC IF BASIC>3000
TAX=10% OF BASIC IF BASIC<=1500
=11% OF BASIC IF BASIC>1500 AND BASIC<=2500
=12% OF BASIC IF BASIC>2500
( use www.zoho.com and docs.google.com)
NET_SALARY=BASIC_SALARY+DA+HRA-PF-TAX
Prepare a ppt on cloud computing –introduction , models, services ,and
architecture
Ppt should contain explanations, images and at least 20 pages
( use www.zoho.com and docs.google.com)
Create your resume in a neat format using google and zoho cloud
Programs on PaaS
Write a Google app engine program to generate n even numbers and
deploy it
to google cloud
Google app engine program multiply two matrices
Google app engine program to validate user ; create a database
login(username, password) in mysql and deploy to cloud
Write a Google app engine program to display nth largest no from the
given list
of numbers and deploy it into google cloud
Google app engine program to validate the user
Use mysql to store user info and deploy on to the cloud
Implement Prog 1-5 using Microsoft Azure
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CASE STUDY- cloud computing
Sr.
No.
Title of
Experiment
Aim of the
Experiment
Demonstration
Equipments/
Components
to be required
1
Case Study of
Amazon
2
Case Study of
Azure
3
Case Study of
Hadoop
4
Case Study of
Aneka
5
Case Study of
Google Apps
6
Google apps
business solution
for data access
and data upload
Type of
Experiment/
Demonstration
(Lab/Classroom)
To understand the
services of Amazon
elastic cloud.
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
To understand the
services of Microsoft
azure.
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
To understand the
services of hadoop.
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
To understand the
services of aneka
elastic cloud.
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
To understand the
services of google
apps engine.
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
To understand the
business solution
application of Google
apps.
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
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7
Control panel
software manager
Application of
hypervisors
To understand the
application of
hypervisors.
Page 81
Computers with
Internet
Connection
Experiment: Student
perform practical
under supervision of
faculty and Lab
technician.
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B. Tech IV-I Sem. (CSE)
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2
MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
 To understand fundamentals of android operating systems.
 Illustrate the various components, layouts and views in creating android
applications
 To understand fundamentals of android programming.
Course Outcomes:
 Create data sharing with different applications and sending and intercepting
SMS.
 Develop applications using services and publishing android applications.
 To demonstrate their skills of using Android software development tools
1. Setting Up the Development Environment
1.1 Download/Install the SDK
For in-depth instructions, visit Android Installation Documentation. Otherwise perform
the following steps.
 Go to http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html.
 Unpack to a convenient location - Remember the full path to this location,
we will refer to it as <android_sdk_dir> for the rest of the lab.
o <android_sdk_dir> would then be
/home/<username>/android_dir.
 Add the path to the <android_sdk_dir>/tools directory to your system PATH
o Windows:
1. Right-click My Computer.
2. Click Properties.
3. Click Advanced tab.
4. Click Environment Variables button.
5. Double Click Path under System Variables.
6. Add ; <android_sdk_dir>/tools;<android_sdk_dir>/platform-tools
to the end of the Variable Values text field.
 Navigate to your <android_sdk_dir>/tools directory and type android.
Add the appropriate components. See step 4
in http://developer.android.com/sdk/installing.html.
 Test your installation by running adb from the command line. If you did
everything right, you should get a long list of help instructions.
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1.2 Download/Install the Eclipse Plugin
 It is recommended that you use Eclipse 3.4 or later
o Lab
Machines Fedora
Eclipse
based
on
3.4.2
The version of Eclipse used by the lab machines is missing a vital
component and requires adding an additional Eclipse plugin in order to
use the Android plugin:
1. Click the menu Help -> Software Updates.
2. Click the tab Available Software -> Add Site button.
3. Enter http:// download.eclipse.org/releases/ganymede into
the Location field.
4. Click OK button.
5. Enter WST Common UI into the search/text box at the top of the
window (give it a second, it tries to search as you type and its kind of
slow).
6. Click the checkbox next to WST Common UI.
7. Click the Install button.
8. Click the Next button.
9. Accept the terms, click Finish.
10. Restart Eclipse.
11. Follow the steps in the next bullet 3.4 Ganymede.
o
o
Eclipse 3.4 Ganymede:
1. Click the menu Help -> Software Updates.
2. Click Available Software tab -> Add Site button.
3. Enter https://dl-ssl.google.com/andriod/eclipse into the "Location" field.
4. Click OK button.
5. Click the checkbox next to Developer Tools.
6. Click the Install button.
7. Click the Next button.
8. Accept the terms, click Finish.
9. Restart Eclipse.
Eclipse 3.5 Galileo:
1. Click Help -> Install New Software .
2. Click Add... button.
3. Enter a name for the site into the Name field.
4. Enter htpps://dl-ssl/google.com/android/eclipse/ into the Location field.
5. Click OK button.
6. Click the checkbox next to Developer Tools.
7. Click the Next button.
8. Accept the terms, click Finish.
9. Restart Eclipse.
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
Point Eclipse to <android_sdk_dir>:
1. Click the menu Window -> Preferences.
2. Click Android from the Hierarchy view on the left hand side.
3. Enter <android_sdk_dir> into the SDK Location field.
4. Click the Apply button.
5. Click the OK button.
1.3 Download/Install the SDK Platform Components
At the time of writing this lab there are are eight different versions of the Android
Platform available, ranging from 1.1 to 2.2. It is best practice to develop for the oldest
platform available that still provides the functionality you need. This way you can be
assured that your application will be supported by as many devices as possible.
However, you will still want to download newer versions of the platforms so that you can
test your applications against these as well. Due to the size of each platform component
you will only be required to download and develop on one platform for the whole class.
We will target the highest platform that the G1 phones support, Android 1.6 (API
4). Before we can begin developing we must download and install this platform:
 Select the menu Window -> "Android SDK and AVD Manager", or click on the
black phone shaped icon in the toolbar.
 Select Available Packages on the left hand side.
 Expand the Google Android site in the "Site, Packages, and Archives" Tree.
 Check the following items:
o SDK Plaform Android 1.6, API 4 Revision 3
o Google APIs by Google Inc., Android API 4, Revision 2
o NOTE: Those of you developing on Lab Machines should follow
these instructions: http://sites.google.com/site/androidhowto/how-to1/set-up-the-sdk-on-lab-machines-linux.
 Click Install Selected.
 Accept the Terms for all packages and click Install Accepted.
We're now ready to develop our application.
2. Create "Hello World" Application
2.1 Create a new Android Project
2.2 Run "Hello World" on the Emulator
2.3 On a Physical Device
2.4 Greeting the User
3. Create Application by Using Widgets
3.1 Creating the Application by using the Activity class
(i)
onCreate()
(ii)
onStart()
(iii)
onResume()
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(iv)
onPause()
(v)
onStop()
(vi)
onDestroy()
(vii) onRestart()
3.2 Creating the Application by using Text Edit control.
3.3 Creating the Application Choosing Options
(i) CheckBox
(ii) RadioButton
(iii) RadioGroup
(iv) Spinner
4. Create Application by Using Building Blocks for Android Application Design
4.1 Design the Application by using
(i) Linear Layout
(ii) Relative Layout
(iii) Absolute Layout
4.2 Create the Application to play the Audio and Video clips.
5. Create Application by Using Building Menus and Storing Data
5.1 Design the Application for Menus and Action Bar
5.2 Design the application to display the Drop-Down List Action Bar
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3
B. Tech IV-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05801
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DATA ANALYTICS
(MOOCS-II)
Course Objectives:
 To introduce the terminology, technology and its applications
 To introduce the concept of Analytics for Business
 To introduce the tools, technologies & programming languages which is used in
day to day analytics cycle
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to work with different data types.
 Ability to solve various problems related to businesses.
 Ability to effectively utilize the time and involve in collaborative tasks.
Unit I
Introduction to Analytics and R programming (NOS 2101)
Introduction to R, RStudio (GUI): R Windows Environment, introduction to various data
types, Numeric, Character, date, data frame, array, matrix etc., Reading Datasets,
Working with different file types .txt,.csv etc. Outliers, Combining Datasets, R Functions
and loops. Summary Statistics - Summarizing data with R, Probability, Expected,
Random, Bivariate Random variables, Probability distribution. Central Limit Theorem
etc.
Unit II
SQL using R & Correlation and Regression Analysis (NOS 2101)
Introduction to NoSQL, Connecting R to NoSQL databases. Excel and R integration
with R connector. Regression Analysis, Assumptions of OLS Regression, Regression
Modelling. Correlation, ANOVA, Forecasting, Heteroscedasticity, Autocorrelation,
Introduction to Multiple Regression etc.
Unit III
Understand the Verticals - Engineering, Financial and others (NOS 2101)
Understanding systems viz. Engineering Design, Manufacturing, Smart Utilities,
Production lines, Automotive, Technology etc. Understanding Business problems
related to various businesses
Unit IV
Manage your work to meet requirements (NOS 9001)
Understanding Learning objectives, Introduction to work & meeting requirements, Time
Management, Work management & prioritization, Quality & Standards Adherence,
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Unit V
Work effectively with Colleagues (NOS 9002)
Introduction to work effectively, Team Work, Professionalism, Effective Communication
skills, etc. NOS * National Occupational Standards
Text Books:
1. Student‘s Handbook for Associate Analytics.
2. Introduction to Scientific Programming and Simulation Using R, Owen Jones, Robert
Maillardet and Andrew Robinson, Second Edition, CRC Press, 2014
3. A First Course in Statistical Programming with R, Braun W. J., Murdoch D. J.. — Cambridge
University Press, 2007
4. Data Manipulation with R, Jaynal Abedin and Kishor Kumar Das, Second Edition, Packt
publishing, BIRMINGHAM – MUMBAI.
5. Beginning R The Statistical Programming language- Mark Gardener, John Wiley & Sons,
Inc, 2012
Reference Books:
1. Introduction to Probability and Statistics Using R, ISBN: 978-0-557-24979-4, is a textbook
written for an undergraduate course in probability and statistics.
2. An Introduction to R, by Venables and Smith and the R Development Core Team. This may
be downloaded for free from the R Project website (http://www.r-project.org/, see Manuals).
There are plenty of other free references available from the R Project website.
3. Time Series Analysis and Mining with R, Yanchang Zhao
4. Graphics for Statistics and Data Analysis with R – Kevin J. Keen, CRC Press, 2010
5. Data Analysis and Graphics Using R, Third Edition, John Maindonald, W. John Braun,
Cambridge University Press, 2010
6. Exploratory Data Analysis with R – Roger D. Peng, Leanpub publications, 2015
7. Introduction to Probability and Statistics Using R, G. jay Kerns, First Edition, 2011
8. The Art of Data Science- A Guide for anyone Who Works with Data – Roger D. Peng and
Elizabeth Matsui, Leanpub Publications, 2014
9. Montgomery, Douglas C., and George C. Runger, Applied statistics and probability for
engineers. John Wiley & Sons, 2010.The Basic Concepts of Time Series Analysis.
http://anson.ucdavis.edu/~azari/sta137/AuNotes.pdf
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
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B. Tech IV-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05802
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C
3
MOBILE COMPUTING
(MOOCS-II)
Course Objectives:
 Understand mobile ad hoc networks, design and implementation
issues, and available solutions.
 Acquire knowledge of sensor networks and their characteristics.
Course Outcomes:
• Students able to use mobile computing more effectively
• Students gain understanding of the current topics in MANETs and
WSNs, both from an industry and research point of views.
• Acquire skills to design and implement a basic mobile ad hoc or
wireless sensor network via simulations.
UNIT-I:
Wireless LANS and PANS: Introduction, Fundamentals of WLANS, IEEE 802.11
Standards, HIPERLAN Standard, Bluetooth, Home RF.
Wireless Internet:
Wireless Internet, Mobile IP, TCP in Wireless Domain, WAP, Optimizing Web over
Wireless.
UNIT-II:
AD HOC Wireless Networks: Introduction, Issues in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, AD
Hoc Wireless Internet.
MAC Protocols for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks: Introduction, Issues in Designing a
MAC protocol for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, Design goals of a MAC Protocol for Ad
Hoc Wireless Networks, Classifications of MAC Protocols, Contention - Based
Protocols, Contention - Based Protocols with reservation Mechanisms, Contention –
Based MAC Protocols with Scheduling Mechanisms, MAC Protocols that use
Directional Antennas, Other MAC Protocols.
UNIT -III:
Routing Protocols: Introduction, Issues in Designing a Routing Protocol for Ad Hoc
Wireless Networks, Classification of Routing Protocols, Table –Driven Routing
Protocols, On – Demand
Routing Protocols, Hybrid Routing Protocols, Routing Protocols with Efficient Flooding
Mechanisms, Hierarchical Routing Protocols, Power – Aware Routing Protocols.
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Transport Layer and Security Protocols: Introduction, Issues in Designing a
Transport Layer Protocol for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, Design Goals of a Transport
Layer Protocol for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, Classification of Transport Layer
Solutions, TCP Over Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, Other Transport Layer Protocol for Ad
Hoc Wireless Networks, Security in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, Network Security
Requirements, Issues and Challenges in Security Provisioning, Network Security
Attacks, Key Management, Secure Routing in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks.
UNIT –IV:
Quality of Service: Introduction, Issues and Challenges in Providing QoS in Ad Hoc
Wireless Networks, Classification of QoS Solutions, MAC Layer Solutions, Network
Layer Solutions, QoS Frameworks for Ad Hoc Wireless Networks.
Energy Management: Introduction, Need for Energy Management in Ad Hoc Wireless
Networks, Classification of Ad Hoc Wireless Networks, Battery Management Schemes,
Transmission Power Management Schemes, System Power Management Schemes.
UNIT –V:
Wireless Sensor Networks: Introduction, Sensor Network Architecture, Data
Dissemination, Data Gathering, MAC Protocols for Sensor Networks, Location
Discovery, Quality of a Sensor Network, Evolving Standards, Other Issues.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Ad Hoc Wireless Networks: Architectures and Protocols - C. Siva Ram Murthy and
B.S.Manoj, PHI, 2004.
2. Wireless Ad- hoc and Sensor Networks: Protocols, Performance and Control - Jagannathan
Sarangapani, CRC Press
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ad hoc Mobile Wireless Networks – Subir Kumar sarkar, T G Basvaraju, C Puttamadappa,
Auerbach Publications,2012.
2. Wireless Sensor Networks - C. S. Raghavendra, Krishna M. Sivalingam, 2004, Springer.
3. Ad- Hoc Mobile Wireless Networks: Protocols & Systems, C.K. Toh , Pearson Education.
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B. Tech IV-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05803
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3
INNOVATIONS AND IT MANAGEMENT
(MOOCS-II)
Course Objectives:
 Understand the rule of information technology in businesses, in state or
central government departments and in remote parts of India.
 Understand the future of information systems and the manner in which they
are shaping the world around us.
 Understand the Ethical and Social issues concerning information systems.
Course Outcomes:
 Ability to do Business over the Internet.
 Ability to solve Business problems by applying analytics.
 Ability to use ICT to participate in Democratic process.
Unit-1:
Organisations and Information Systems: Modern organization, Information systems
in organisations, The role of Internet, , Managing in the Internet Era, Managing
Information Systems in Organisations, Challenges for the Manager. Concepts of MIS:
Data and information, Information as a Resource, Information in Organisational
Functions, Types of Information Technology, Types of Information Systems, Decision
Making with MIS, Communication in Organisations. Information systems and
Management Strategy: The Competitive environment of Business, Using IT for
Competing, Information goods, Information systems and competitive Strategy.
Unit- 2:E-Commerce technology, HTML and E-mail, Business over the Internet, EBusiness, E-Governance. Managing Information Systems: Challenges of managing
the IT Function, Vendor Management, The role of CIO, Ethical Issues, and Social
Issues.
Unit- 3: Infrastructure of IT: What is IT Infrastructure, IT infrastructure Decisions,
Infrastructure components, networks, solutions, cloud computing, Virtualization,
Enterprise systems, IT Outsourcing, Networks in organisation and what has to be
managed. Information systems security and control: Threats to the organization,
Technologies for handling security, managing security.
Unit- 4: Analysis of Business Process, Business Process Integration, Motivation for
Enterprise systems (ES), Supply chain management systems, Customer Relationship
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Management systems, Challenges for ES implementations, International Information
systems, Decision support systems (DSS), Components of DSS, Analytical and
Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management.
Unit-5: ICT Development, Types of ICT interventions, Examples, E-Governance
concepts, E-Government, E-Participation, Social Dynamics of the internet, Services of
the Internet, Technology of the Internet, Social Issues, Social networks in the
Enterprise, concept of open source software, open source licences, open source in
business and Government, open Data Standards and the open community.
Text book:
1. ―MIS: Managing information Systems and in Business, Government and
Society‖ Rahul De, Wiley publications.
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3
B. Tech IV-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05804
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C
3
BUILDING LARGE SCALE SOFTWARE SYSTEMS
(MOOCS-III)
Course Objectives:
 To introduce the architecture of large c programs.
 To introduce the concept Case study for design of large C programs using
Linux kernel.
 To introduce the tools, technologies & programming languages.
Course Outcomes:
 Student able to understand coupling and cohesion
 Student able to design large c and c++ programs using Linux kernel
 Student able to understand how to design Linux kernel
 Ability to solve various problems related to Object Oriented Software using
patterns
Unit I: Architecture of Large C Programs : Coupling and Cohesion concepts , types of
cohesion functional, sequential, procedural, temporal, logical and coincidental; types of
coupling – data,stamp, control, common, content coupling.
Unit II: Designing Large C programs having good cohesion and coupling; C modulesnotion of separate compilation; Case study for design of large C programs using linux
kernel.
Unit III: Tools for building large programs – version control using git and building large
programs using make – bug tracking systems – bugzilla.
Unit IV: Building Large C++ programs – Architecture of Large C ++ programs –
Coupling and Cohesion of C++ programs, Metrics for measuring the quality of C++
programs, Chidamber and Krammer. Metric suite- MOOD metrics – improving the
design of C++ programs; Case study of redesigning Linux kernel into Minimalistic
Object Oriented Linux (MOOL).
Unit V: Pattern Oriented Software Architecture: Building object oriented programs using
design patterns identification of design patterns in source code- refactoring existing
programs into design pattern based programs- case studies of building software with
design patterns.
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Text Books:
1. D. Janakiram, ―Building Large Scale Software Systems‖, McGraw Hill
Education, 2013.
2. John Lakos , ―Large-Scale C++ Software Design‖, Addison Wesley, 1996.
References:
1. Scott W. Ambler, Barbara Hanscome, ―Process Patterns: Building LargeScale Systems Using Object Technology‖, 1st Edition, Camebridge University
Press, 1998.
2. Peter van der Linden, ―Expert C Programming: Deep C Secrets 1st Edition‖,
Prentice Hall.
3 . Andrei Alexandrescu, ―Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and
Design Patterns Applied‖, 1st Edition, Addison Wesley, 2011.
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JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05805
T
1
P
0
C
3
ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DATA SCIENCE
& ANALYTICS: IoT
Course objectives:
 Students will be explored to the interconnection and integration of the
physical world and the cyber space. They are also able to design & develop
IoT Devices.
Course Outcomes:
 Able to understand the application areas of IoT
 Able to realize the revolution of Internet in Mobile Devices, Cloud & Sensor
Networks
 Able to understand building blocks of Internet of Things and characteristics.
UNIT I: Introduction to Internet of Things
Introduction, Physical Design of IoT, Logical Design of IoT, IoT Enabling Technologies.
Domain Specific IoTs
Introduction, Home Automation, cities, Environment, Retail, Agriculture, Industry, Health
& Lifestyle.
UNIT II:
IoT and M2M
Introduction, M2M, Difference between IoT and M2M, SDN and NFV for IoT.
IoT System Management with NETCONF-YANG
Need for IoT Systems Management, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP),
Network Operator requirements, NETCONF, YANG, IoT System Management with
NETCONF-YANG.
UNIT III: Developing Internet of Things
Introduction, IoT Design Methodology, Case Study on IoT System for Weather
Monitoring.
Case Studies Illustrating IoT Design:
Introduction, Home Automation, Cities, Environment, Agriculture, Productivity
Applications.
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UNIT IV
Advanced Topics:
Introduction, Apache Hadoop, Using Hadoop Map Reduce for Batch Data Analysis.
IEEE 802.15.4:
The IEEE 802 committee family of protocols, The physical layer, The Media Access
control layer, Uses of 802.15.4, The Future of 802.15.4: 802.15.4e and 802.15.4g.
UNIT V:
ZigBee:
Development of the standard, ZigBee Architecture, Association, The ZigBee network
layer, The ZigBee APS Layer, The ZigBee Devices Object (ZDO) and the ZigBee
Device Profile (ZDP), Zigbee Security, The ZigBee Cluster Library (ZCL), ZigBee
Applications profiles, The ZigBee Gateway Specifications for network devices.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Internet of Things a Hands-on Approach by Arshdeep Bahga and Vijay Madisetti.
University Press.
2. The Internet of Things key applications and protocols by Oliver Hersent, David
Boswarthick and Omar elloumi, Wiley Student Edition.
REFFERENCE BOOOKS:
1. Internet of Things: Architecture, Design Principles and Applications by Raj Kamal
MCGraw Hill Edition.
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___________________________________________________________R15
JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY ANANTAPUR
L
3
B. Tech IV-II Sem. (CSE)
15A05806
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0
C
3
CYBER SECURITY
(MOOCS-III)
Course Objectives:
 Appraise the current structure of cyber security roles across the DoD
enterprise, including the roles and responsibilities of the relevant
organizations.
 Evaluate the trends and patterns that will determine the future state of cyber
security
Course Out comes:
 Analyze threats and risks within context of the cyber security architecture
 Appraise cyber security incidents to apply appropriate response
 Evaluate decision making outcomes of cyber security scenarios
Unit-I
Cyber crime: Mobile and Wireless devices-Trend mobility-authentication service
security-Attacks on mobile phones-mobile phone security Implications for organizationsOrganizational measurement for Handling mobile-Security policies and measures in
mobile computing era. Cases.
Unit-II
Tools and methods used in cyber crime-Proxy servers and AnonymizersPhishingPassword cracking-Key loggers and Spy wares-Virus and worms-Trojan Horse
and Backdoors-Steganography-SQL Injection-Buffer overflow-Attacks on wireless
network. Cases.
Unit-III
Understanding computer forensic-Historical background of cyber forensicForensic
analysis of e-mail-Digital forensic life cycle-Network forensic-Setting up a computer
forensic Laboratory-Relevance of the OSI 7 Layer model to computer ForensicComputer forensic from compliance perspectives. Cases.
Unit-IV
Forensic of Hand –Held Devices-Understanding cell phone working characteristicsHand-Held devices and digital forensic- Toolkits for Hand-Held device-Forensic of i-pod
and digital music devices-Techno legal Challenges with evidence from hand-held
Devices. Cases.
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Unit-V
Cyber Security –Organizational implications-cost of cybercrimes and IPR issues Web
threats for organizations: the evils and Perils-Social media marketing Security and
privacy Implications-Protecting people privacy in the organizations Forensic best
practices for organizations. Cases.
Text book:
1. Nina Godbole & Sunit Belapure ―Cyber Security‖, Wiley India, 2012.
REFERENCES:
1. Harish Chander, ―cyber laws & IT protection‖, PHI learning pvt.ltd, 2012.
2. Dhiren R Patel, ―Information security theory & practice‖,PHI learning pvt
ltd,2010.
3. MS.M.K.Geetha & Ms.Swapne Raman‖Cyber Crimes and Fraud
Management, ‖MACMILLAN,2012. Pankaj Agarwal : Information Security&
Cyber Laws (Acme Learning), Excel, 2013.
4. Vivek Sood, Cyber Law Simplified, TMH, 2012.
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