Spring 2015 Internship Abstracts - Edward J. Bloustein School of

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Internship Abstract Book
Spring 2015
Public Health/Policy & Planning
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Photo courtesy Elijah Reichlin-Melnick
Table of Contents—Public Health
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Abdallah, Juliana
“Do Something” Campaign
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Rutgers Health Services: Health Outreach Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E)
Adams, Nicholas
Public Health Standing Committee on Microplastics
Dr. Mark Robson, Professor and Chair, Department of Plant Biology, Rutgers University;
Dr. Brian Pachkowski, Toxicologist at NJDEP
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Addy, Daniel
Faith in Prevention Program (FIP)
Nashon Hornsby, JD¹, Monique Howard EdD, MPH
New Jersey Department of Health
Agbotse, Judith
Teen Health Fair
Marie Kinsella, Director of Community Programs; Misan Oroye-Lane, Supervisor of
Family Support/Assessment Workers
Partnership for Maternal and Child Health of Northern New Jersey
Ahmed, Sameer
Advocate for Tobacco Cessation on Rutgers University, New Brunswick Campus
Direct Supervisor: Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist at Rutgers
Health Services; Project Supervisor: Anne LeCluyse, Graduate Student of the School of
Social Work
Health Outreach, Promotion and Education
Ahmed, Tanweer
Sundowning in Skilled Nursing Facilities
Betty Thomas, Vice President of Operations
Tandem Management Company
Amare, Romel
Public Health Issues and the Ethical Concerns Associated with the Current Ebola Outbreak
Paula Bistak, Chief of Human Subjects Protection Program at Rutgers University
Human Subjects Protection Program
Andrews, Andrea
The Process of Effective HIV Preventions
Jermaine McCrossin, Recruitment Specialist
Project ACHIEVE
Angamarca-Rodriguez, Jennifer
La Casa de Don Pedro and McKinley Afterschool Program Evaluation
Roland V. Anglin, PhD., Director and Associate Research Professor; Michael; Simmons,
Program Manager; Kimaada Sill, Program Manager
The Joseph C. Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies
Anyaduba, Linda
Examining Models of School Nurse Leadership
Director: Laura Fenster Rothschild; Research Associate: Anne E. Ray.
Center for Alcohol Studies: Education and Training
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Arikala, Hema
Economic Empowerment Program for South Asian Women who faced violence
Hera Mir, Advocate
Manavi
Arslan, Saad
Anti-smoking Campaign: Analyzing Rutgers’ Smoke-free Policies
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist at Health Outreach,
Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Rutgers Health Services – Health, Outreach, Promotion and Education
Asare, Stephany
The Role of Lycopene, antioxidant, on Prostate Cancer Patients
Dr. Andres Gomez, PHD, MPH Head of Epidemiology, Safety Science and Analytics,
Global Pharmacovigilance and Epidemiology
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Azer, Veronica
Performance Improvement of Trauma Flow Sheets
Timothy Murphy, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC, CEN; Diana Starace, Injury Prevention Program
Coordinator; Carol Lavitt, Safety Ambassador Program Coordinator; Lisa Falcon, RN,
MSN, CCRN
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Trauma and Injury Prevention
Bachmann, Rebekah
Economic Empowerment Program for South Asian Women who faced violence
Mr. Benjamin Wilner, LNHA
South Mountain Health Care and Rehabilitation Center
Bakare Korodo, Samsondeen
Pharmaceutical Distribution for a Public Health Emergency
John Dowd
Middlesex County Office of Health Services
Barnor, Gloria
Bridging the gap between communities and individuals with disabilities
Sharline Griffiin
Arc
Barra, Andrew E.
Creating innovative cancer surveillance and management tools tailored to needs of cancer
survivors
Dr. Shawna Hudson, Medical Sociologist
Rutgers- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Family Medicine and
Community Health Research Division
Barroso ,Itzel
HomeStyles Express: Nutrition Education Program to Help Parents of Young Children
Prevent Obesity
Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.N.D
HomeStyles Project, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University
Bhasin, Sahebjit
Electrical Median Nerve Stimulation for treatment of Nausea and Vomiting
Dr. Shaul Cohen
Department of Anesthesiology at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
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Bhatia, Aimee
Maternity Care and Notification
Tyla Housman, Deputy Director
New Jersey Hospital Association
Bialek, Amanda
Bottle or Breast Lesson Plan
Susan Stephenson-Martin, Sr. Program Coordinator, Middlesex EFNEP/ SNAP-Ed
NJ SNAP-Ed (Rutgers Cooperative Extension)
Black, Ryan
Workshop Safety Training and Audit Efficacy
Marc Longo
Rutgers Environmental Health and Safety
Bryant, Tiara
Domestic Violence and the Role of the Healthcare Worker
Mariam Merced, Director; Yesenia Hernandez, Program Coordinator; Elaine Hewins,
Domestic Violence Education and Awareness Program Coordinator; Brenna Aiossa,
Domestic Violence Outreach Worker.
Community Health Promotions Program at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Califano ,Olivia
NCADD Legislative Event / Annual Policy Forum
Ezra Helfand, Acting CEO
NCADD Middlesex
Canty,Tanieya
Multiple Employer Welfare Arrangement
Stephanie Alfonso, Project Manager. Maryann Swierczek, Sr. Director of Operations
Qualcare Inc.
Caparimo, Gabrielle
Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait: Sustainability Planning
Laurie Navin, Director of Program Services; Sherenne Simon, Associate Director of Public
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Affairs & Program Services
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March of Dimes, New Jersey Chapter
Caponegro, Brittani
Improving Operational Efficiency in the Echocardiography Laboratory
Stephern Allison, Vice President of Cardiovascular Services
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick (RWJUH)
Castro, Ashley
Effectiveness of Late Night Programming at Rutgers University
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez
Rutgers Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Cedeno, Dinia V.
Family Caregiving Stress and Mindfulness
Diann Robinson, Executive Director
Adult Day Center of Somerset County
Chebli, Marwa
Relationship Between Infant Mortality Rates and the Utilization of Prenatal Care among
Adolescents aged 15-19 in Newark, New Jersey
Michelle E. Michel, Manager of Outreach and Enrollment; Sunita Mookerjee,
Strong Start Program for Centering Pregnancy
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Chen, Amelia
Healthcare Facility Evacuation Coordination Plan
Direct Supervisor: Grant Shea
Philadelphia Office Of Emergency Management (OEM)
Chen, Justin
Cost Effectiveness at the JFK Adult Medical Day Program
Dawn A. Giakas, MPH, LNHA, CALA, FABC, Administrator; Mary Buglio, CTRS,
Director
JFK Hartwyck Nursing, Convalescent and Rehabilitation Centers, Adult Medical Day
Program
Samuel, Chen
University Hospital Operating Procedure Analysis & Process Improvement
Direct Supervisor: Achalanka Dalawella, Lean Project Manager/Black Belt
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Lean Department
Chishti , Shumaila F.
Increasing Student Awareness on the Safety and Health Concerns for Child Laborers in
Less Developed Countries (LDCs)
Dr. Derek G. Shendell, D. Env, MPH
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey- School of Public Health
Claiborne, Jontae
A Home Fire Preparedness Campaign between the City of Orange and the American Red
Cross
Director of Community Services; Wali-Abdul Salaam, Public Health Officer; Vincent
Difillipo, Director of Older Adults/Emergency Management Coordinator; Pamela Taylor,
Emergency Management Coordinator; Yvone Ikner
City Hall of Orange, N.J Health Department
Cobbinah, Mercy A.
Statistics of Diagnosis of Breast Cancer within the Organization and the African American
Community: New Member Packet
Dorothy Reed, President and Co-Founder of Central New Jersey Chapter
Sisters Network of Central New Jersey A National African American Breast Cancer
Survivorship Organization
Cohen, Michelle
Patient Education and Tracking
Mr. Gilbert Baez, Manager of Outpatient Oncology Services
Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Medical Center
Cowan, Shantavia
Were you born outside of United States?
Marybeth Caruso, RN
Middlesex County Tuberculosis Clinic
Crawley, Christopher
2015 Young Adults and Children In-Transition (YAC-IT) Needs Assessment Plan
Sarah Murchison, Human Services Coordinator
Somerset County Department of Human Services (SCDHS)
Creagh, Antonio
Guiding Good Choices Program
Luann Dias, Service Area Director of Youth and Services; Raysa, Program Manager
Catholic Charities Diocese of Metuchen
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D’Agostino, Andrea
Community Outreach Program Evaluation and Analysis
Gilbert Baez, Manager Carol G. Simon Cancer Center & Amy Lewis, Coordinator of
NJCEED Program
Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Memorial Hospital and NJ Cancer Education
and Early Detection Program (NJCEED)
D’Ambrosia, Marisa
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Dedicated Observation Unit
Sara Gonzalez JD Assistant Lean PI Director, Achalanka Dalawella Black Belt Manager
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
David, Jeffrey Hipolito
Using Clinical Priority in Smoking-Alcohol Comorbidities to Evaluate Clinical Culture
Dr. Michael Steinberg, M.D., MPH, Medical Director91
Robert Wood Johnson Tobacco Dependency Program
Della Sala, Kristen
Annual OSHA Report Log for Woodbridge Township
Magdalena Frangos: Personnel Clerk/Typist
Woodbridge Township Personnel Department
Devecka, Lauren
Expanding an Aesthetics Medispa Private Practice
Boris Vernovsky, Director of Operations; Dr. Sneha Jacob, Director of HIV Clinical
Quality Health Care and Wellness Center
Dickhaus, Julia
Public Health Education and Promotion for U.S. Fund for UNICEF Campus Initiative
Leaders
Hillary Larman, Program Engagement Fellow
U.S. Fund for UNICEF
Du, Feiyang
Radiation Therapy Elapsed Time for Early Stage Breast Cancer
Sheenu Chandwani, PhD
Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
Dubey, Kritika
HIV Suppression of Viral Load in Patients
Joy Melendez, MSW Program Coordinator, Infectious Diseases; Dr. Sneha Jacob, Director
of HIV Clinical Services
Eric B. Chandler Health Center
Duncan, Nataki
The Impact of Traffic-Related Air Pollution on Childhood Asthma Exacerbation
Dr. Robert Laumbach, M.D., M.P.H., C.I.H. Associate Professor of Environmental and
Occupational Medicine
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI)
Economikos, Helena
An Intervention on Hookah Misconceptions and Use among New Jersey Youth
Michael B. Steinberg, MD, Tobacco Dependency Program
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Ekpeni, Joanne
Exploring the Relationship between media and substance abuse usage
Angela Conover
Partnership for a Drug Free New Jersey
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Eldin, Sarah M.
Patients Outcomes through Cardiac Rehabilitation
Jose Maniquis; Registered Nurses: Nancy Scalice, Ellen Weiss, Maureen Atzori
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Cardiac Rehabilitation
Elmogahzy, Amal
Medical Leadership Academy
Vincent Joseph
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Emeana, Princess Chisom
New Jersey Local Information Network and Communications System Program
Ms. Carrie Johnson
New Jersey Department of Health—Middlesex County
Evans, Shanequa
Healthy Living Program
Laura Eppinger, Program Associate
New Brunswick 4-H, Youth Development Program
Fahmy, Yumna
Community Health Promotion Programs
Christopher Chapman, Health Officer
Health Department-Borough of Ringwood
Felix, Claudia
Living Life to the Fullest
Melanie M. Ford, Director
New Brunswick Senior Citizen Resource Center
Galati, Gabrielle
Regional Elementary School Hand Washing Needs Assessment
Cleo Hendrickson, Regional Officer, Volunteer Services
American Red Cross South Jersey Region
Ganthier, Charline
The Power of Health Education and Data Management
Alyssa Schaffer, Coordinator of Community Health and Education; Jessica Walsh,
Communications and Data Manager
Susan G. Komen Philadelphia Affiliate
Garcia, Steve
Head Shop Ordinance
Donna Ivy, Director of Department of Health & Human Services
City of Paterson - Department of Health & Human Services
Gbajabiamila, Faidat
Women Empowerment & Leadership Summit Program
Dr. Yetunde Odugbesan-Omede
Young Woman’s Guide, INC
Givehchi, Yasmine
American Health Lawyers Association’s Representing Physicians Handbook Publication
Lisa Gora, Esq. and Michael Schaff, Esq.
Wilentz, Goldman & Spitzer
Goag, Joice
Increase Family Bonding
Dominque Garrett and Medji Jean, Family Partner; Priscilla Muchado, Family Success
Center Director
Prevention Links- Bayway Family Success Center, Elizabeth, NJ
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Gordon, D’Juana
Sisters Informing Healing and Empowering (SIHLE)
Deloris Dockrey
Hyacinth AIDS foundation
Grullon, Keyla
Strategizing to Promote Healthy Environments for Rutgers Students
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach, Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E.), Rutgers Health Services
Gwiszcz, Ewelina
Establishing an Online Platform for Cross-Sharing of Health Information and Resources in
Central Jersey
Direct Supervisor: Marge Drozd, Director of Community Mobile Health Services of Saint
Peter’s University Hospital, Project Supervisor: Zachary Taylor, MEd, CHES, Coordinator
of the Community Health Consortium for Central Jersey, Project Supervisor: Tara
Gunthner, BSN
Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Community Mobile Health Services
Halasan, Nicole
The Effects of Methadone Maintenance Therapy on the Health and Well-Being of Pregnant
Women Addicted to Opioid Drugs and Their Infants
Ellen Shuzman, PhD, RNC-OB, APN
Central Jersey Family Health Consortium (CJFHC)
Hanson, Kerri
R.I.S.E. (Reaching Into Self Empowerment)
Sue Wasserman, Community Services Director
National Council of Jewish Women/Essex County, Center for Women
Hao, Rahdley
Women and Heart Disease
Vicky Coll Susan Massad, M.D., Faculty Member
The American Heart Association
Hegarty, Jennifer
The Public Health Implications of Psychiatric Nosology
Melissa Meyer, International Training and Programs Coordinator; Matthew Gonzalez,
Intern Coordinator; Susan Massad, M.D., Faculty Member
The East Side Institute for Group and Short Term Psychotherapy
Huq, Shaila A.
Social Media as a Tool of Civic Engagement Amongst College-Aged Students
Jennifer Fraser, Regional Organizer for ONE Campus program
The ONE Campaign
Imtiaz, Ayesha
Healthy Eating And Physical Activity
Gina Stravic
Raritan Valley YMCA
Ip, Alison
Community Support Program for Lupus Patients and Their Loved Ones
My-Lan Tran, LCSW
LANtern (Lupus Asian Network) - Hospital for Special Surgery
Itile, Alexandrina
Hackensack Weight Loss/Wellness Challenge Evaluation
Mary Sullivan, Director of Healthy Lifestyles
YMCA of Greater Bergen County
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Jaffery, Aram
Health Impacts of Flooding for Residents of Coastal New Jersey
Karen Lowrie, Rutgers University Bloustein School
New Jersey Health Impact Collaborative and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and
Public Policy
Jarvis, Imani
An Evaluation Study: Birth Control Education at Eric B. Chandler Health Center’s Social
Service Department
Carlos Cordero, Program Director of Social Services
Eric B. Chandler Health Center
Johnson, Marquis
New Jersey’s Overdose Prevention Act
Amanda Bent, Policy Associate, New Jersey
Drug Policy Alliance
Johnson, Sherdrain
Sexual Health Outreach
Francesca Maresca, Director of H.O.P.E.
Rutgers University’s Health Outreach Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Kaur, Jaskaran
Understanding the Mixer Chiropractic Approach in Relation to Lower Back Pain
Rosa Corey
Corey Chiropractic
Kaur, Jastej
Oral Health in Children Outreach
Dr. Andrea Barrett
Belbar Dental Associates
Keita, Oumou
Diana Starace, Coordinator of Injury Prevention and Maureen Sharlow, Concussion Center
Outreach Coordinator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Khan, Naseer
Smoking-Cessation: Nicotine Replacement Therapy
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education
Kiledjian, Patille
UTI-Stat® Trial
Hourig Karalian, DON
Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center
Koyfman, Brian
Issues of Follow-up Appointments in a Dental Practice
Dr. Esfir Samoylovich DDS
Alabrami Dental Care, P.C.
Krymchanskaya, Anna
Virtual Dementia Tour Empathy Training
Joanne Prospero, Betty Lou La Rocca
Chelsea Assisted Living Facility – Manalapan
Kulakowski, Kelly
Public Health Accreditation Quality Improvement Processes and Outcomes
David Henry, Health Director
Monmouth County Regional Health Commission
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Labayen, Katrina
NJ POLST Compliance in Nursing Homes
Andrew Harris, LNHA Supervisor: David Barile, MD
Bridgeway Care and Rehabilitation Center, Hillsborough, NJ
Lee, Erica
Sleep Hygiene Workshop for Rutgers Students
Francesca Maresca, Ph.D, Director, H.O.P.E., with Rutgers Health Services
Health, Outreach, Promotion, and Education (HOPE) Rutgers Health Services
Lee, Sonia
New Jersey Hepatitis B Coalition
Dr. Carolyn Daniels, Dr. Su Wang
NJ Department of Health, Office of Minority and Multicultural Health & St. Barnabas
Medical Center, Center for Asian Health
Lesko, Mae
Redefining Virginity, Healthy Relationships, and Sex Under the Influence for Newark
Youth
Stephanie Franklin, Founder/CEO
Masakhane Center
Lewis, Derek
Evolution of Capreomycin Resistance in New York City’s Tuberculosis Outbreak
Dr. Barry Kreiswirth, Director of Public Health Research
Public Health Research Institute (PHRI)
Ley, Adrienne
Alcohol and Drug Peer Educator Project
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Librojo, Michelle
CSCCNJ Participant Records Update
Amy Sutton, Executive Director
Cancer Support Community of Central New Jersey
Louis, Germondy
BFSC Tutoring Program
Priscilla Muchado, Director; Alexandra Linunes, Senior Family Partner; Diana Lodeno,
Family Partner; Medji Jean, Family Partner; Dominque Garrett, Family Partner
Bayway Family Success Center (BFSC)
Louis, Luiphdjina
Basic Nutritional Knowledge of School-aged Children
Executive Director: Gina Stravic Agency: Bayway Family Success Center (BFSC)
Raritan Valley YMCA
Malik, Roheena
Educational Initiative: Knowledge and Awareness About Diabetes Among the Youth
Roheena Malik
Benita Rosario R.N.; Registered Nurse, Dr. Tayyaba K. Malik, Pediatric Physician
Westside Pediatrics
Manfredini, Margaret
Educational Initiative: Management & Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Among Pregnant
Women
Michelle Michel, Manager Outreach & Enrollment; Sunita Mookerjee, Program Manager,
Strong Start Program for Centering Pregnancy
New Jersey Primary Care Association
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Martinez, Ashley
American Red Cross Home Fire Preparedness Campaign
Chris Dempsey, Disaster Program Manager North-East Territory
American Red Cross Jersey Coast Chapter
Mathews, Nicole
Health Awareness Amongst Rutgers University Students
Mark Cruz, Health Education Specialist
H.O.P.E.: Rutgers Health Services
McCleery, Melissa
What Do Students Know About Advance Care
Doctor David Barile
Goals of Care, NJ
McCormick, Linard
Sling Inspection Training Session
Director of Environmental Health and Safety, Maintenance Supervisor, Lift-all
representative
US Ecology
McLean, Jamila
NJ Health Insurance Migration Project
Margaret Koller
Rutgers Center for State Health Policy
McRae, Lester Julian
Durable Medical Equipment
Michael Prasad, Director of Disaster Support Functions
The American Red Cross - North Jersey Region
Mervil, Daniel
PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) Access Program
Derrick Gibbs, Prevention Team Leader
Hyacinth AIDS Foundation
Millar, Karon
The Spring Cleaning Initiative
Direct Supervisor: Joel Torres, Senior Coordinator; Project Coordinator: Jaclyn Lagasca;
Regional Organizer: Lisa Joseph; Prevention Educator: Victoria Joseph
ADAPT: The Essex Coalition
Mogeni, Consolata
Integrating Behavioral changes for COPD patients
Administrator and Direct Supervisor: Mr. Steven Salvanto, Head Clinician: Sylvia Rose
Admission Coordinator: Renee Ricardo
Care One Assisted Living and Senior Living, Livingston NJ
Mouphouet, Tarloh L.
“Do Something” Campaign Visibility Assessment
Mr. Mark Cruz, Social Media and Evaluation
H.O.P.E. (Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education)
Narotam, Hena
Physiological and Psychological Reactions to Marijuana Cues
Jennifer Buckman, Associate Research Professor
Center of Alcohol Studies
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Nascondiglio, Anthony
Evaluating Functional Goals of Twin Boro Physical Therapy Patients (Union Clinic)
Dr. Tom Greene, Director of Physical Therapy; Joel Silverman, Physical Therapist
TwinBoro Physical Therapy, Union Clinic
Ndlovu, Thobekile
The Global Perspective of Gender Based Violence
Stephanie Perez, Senior Program Coordinator
Rutgers Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs
Nechrebecki, Priscilla
The Effectiveness of American Red Cross CPR Classes
Michelle Esposito, Regional Director of Volunteers, North Jersey Region; & Joelle Piercy,
Program Specialist Volunteers and Youth Services.
American Red Cross, Princeton Chapter
Nho, Eunice
Long-Term Affordable Housing for Survivors of Domestic Violence
Reverend Susan Kramer Mills, Executive Director of Town Clock Community
Development Corporation
Town Clock Community Development Corporation
Noel, Francia
Counseling Testing and Referral
Cecil Wilder, CTR Coordinator
Hyacinth AIDS Foundation
Ntuk, Donald
Promoting Health and Wellness in the Community
Yesenia Hernandez, Program Coordinator
Robert Wood Johnson: Community Health Promotions Program
O’Hare, Kaitlyn
Meridian Health Online Medical Records (RelayHealth)
Peggy Skudera, Supervisor of Volunteer Services. Jason Beelitz, Guest Relations Manager
Ocean Medical Center; Meridian Health
Ogbevoen, Iyanosa
Promoting Healthy Lifestyles to the Youth
Barry Smith
Youth Empowerment Services
Okesola, Babatunde
New Brunswick Youth Nutritional Education Assessment
Director Barry Smith
Youth Empowerment Services
Okoro, Chizoba
Physician’s Order for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) Compliance and Assessment
Direct Supervisor: Bob Reyes, Administrator; Project Supervisor: Felicia Lynne Santos,
Director of Social Services, Assistant: Marcia M. Bristol, Social Worker
Abingdon Care & Rehabilitation Center
Onwumelu, Chinemelum
Impact of Health Regulations on E-Cigarette Retailers in NJ
Karen Blumenfeld, Executive Director; Cara Murphy, Policy Attorney and program
Coordinator
New Jersey Global Advisors on Smoke-free Policy (NJGASP)
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Osagie, Eman
Consumable Medical Supplies for Individuals with Access and Functional Needs
Michael Prasad, Director of Disaster Support Functions
The American Red Cross - North Jersey Chapter
Palad, Camila
Blood Pressure Reading Assessment
Maria Victoria Coll, DDS, Health Equity/Multicultural Initiatives Director HeartSaver
American Heart Association
Parekh, Nikki
School to Prison Pipeline: A Public Health Approach
Eliza Straim & Professor Debbie Borie-Holtz
American Civil Liberties Union
Park, Jennifer
Do Something Initiative
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Parmar, Anisha
Improving Patient Satisfaction Using Bedside Rounding
Dolores VanPelt, Director- Organizational Effectiveness, Karen Hepworth, Patient
Improvement Specialist
Hunterdon Medical Center
Parmar, Veenat
Awareness of Cancer and Prevention in College Seniors
Sandra D’Elia, CGC; Sarah Nashed, CGC; Stephanie Pachter, CGC
The LIFE Center at the Rutgers, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Patel, Bhumi
MLTSS IPRO Audit
Akanksha Kapoor, Process Improvement Associate; Suzanne Bardenhagen, Senior
Administrative Assistant; Sabrina Gilliam, Process Improvement Associate; Jennifer
Langer, Operation Vice President.
Amerigroup RealSolutions
Patel, Molly
Improving Student Health through Active Recreation in Campus Design
Karen Lowrie
Environmental Analysis and Communications Group, The Bloustein Group
Patel, Mona
MLTSS IPRO Audit
Process Improvement Associate: Akanksha Kapoor Senior Administrative
Assistant:Suzanne Bardenhagen, Process Improvement Associate: Sabrina Gilliam,
Operation Vice President: Jennifer Langer Jacobs
Amerigroup RealSolution
Patel, Riddhi
Advancing Excellence in the Nursing Home
Direct Supervisor: Lisa Slater, Director of Professional Education; mentor: Carol Burt,
LNHA CALA Sr. administrator; Project Supervisor: Michael Yannotta, Senior Director of
Nursing; Roberto Muniz: President and CEO
Francis E. Parker Memorial Home
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Patel, Risha
Accuracy of Point of Care of CNAs
Lisa Slater, Director of Professional Education; Gloria Zayanskosky, Chief Quality
and Community Services Officer; and Roberto Muñiz, President & CEO.
Francis E. Parker Memorial Home
Patel, Shivani
Client Funding Department- Check Tracer Process
Manager of Client Funding Department: Chakira Santos, Director of Client Funding:
Kelliann Duffy
QualCare Inc
Pegler, Cecilia
Strong Start Program
Celeste Andriot Wood - Project Director
Andrea Loftus - Project Specialist
Central Jersey Family Health Consortium
Perez, Jessica
Here4Seniors Workshop Program
Angela McKnight, Founder of AngelaCARES, Inc.
AngelaCARES, Inc
Phillips, Kwame
Healthy Workspace Inventory
Robyn Ginese
Rutgers Student Life Leadership & Training
Pierce, Danielle
Space Management
Linda Tanzer, CAO & Marco DiNicolangelo, Program Support
Rutgers, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Qureshi , Humza
Pap Smear Health Indicator Performance Assessment
Direct Supervisor: Joshua Gilens, Research Coordinator, Dr. Jeffrey Apter, Medical
Director
Princeton Medical Institute
Rangroo, Rohit
Local Measures to Ban Fracking Throughout Coastal New Jersey Municipalities
Lauren Petrie, Organizer at Food & Water Watch
Food & Water Watch
Redona, Jenny
Trinkets and Trash
M. Jane Lewis, DrPH, Associate Professor at Rutgers School of Public Health; Mia
Zimmerman, MPH
Rutgers School of Public Health: Center for Tobacco Surveillance and Evaluation Research
Resian , Mishi
Tuberculosis Eradication Program
Tefera Gezmu, Timpiyian Yiare
Talaku Community Based Organization
Rizvi, Ednan
Rutgers Drug Education and Outreach Initiative
Professor Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez
Rutgers Health Services - H.O.P.E.
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Rodriguez, Sofia
The Benefits of Public Access to the Raritan River
Sara J. Malone, Senior Research Specialist
Environmental Analysis and Communications Group at Edward J. Bloustein School of
Planning and Public Policy
Romeo, Erik
Developing a Culture of Wellness in NJ DOH
Dr. Arturo Brito, Deputy Commissioner New Jersey, Lisa Asare, Executive Assistant to
Deputy Commissioner
New Jersey Department of Health
Rosario, Brenda
Warren County Chooses Healthy
Sarah Shoemaker, Public Health Practice Standards Partnership Coordinator
The Warren County Health Department
Rossi, Pia F.
Regaining Function to Everyday Life
Shaloo Choudhary, Supervisor of Outpatient OT/PT Department
Robert Wood Johnson Outpatient Physical and Occupational Therapy
Fort, Nadianie Saint
Integrated Care Team Program
Judy Chester, Volunteer Nurse and Interior Designer
American Red Cross---Somerset County
Santana, Bianca
Preventing Heart Disease and Strokes in Hispanic Populations
Maria Victoria Coll, DDS, Health Equity/Multicultural Initiatives,
The American Heart Association
Sarfraz, Shiza
Unplug and Recharge: The impact of technology usage on sleep patterns and other
behavioral traits.
Dr. Francesca Maresca, Director of Rutgers HOPE
Rutgers H.O.P.E. (Health, outreach, promotion, and education)
Sarpong, Janet
How Mocha Mom Mothers Navigate The Daily Challenges of Their Lives
Dr. Stephanie M. Curenton,
Ecology of School Readiness Lab, (ESR)
Sathian, Hima
“Coming Out, Coming Home: South Asian Family Acceptance and LGBTQ Youth”
Aruna Rao, Associate Director, NAMI - New Jersey
SAMHAJ | NAMI - New Jersey
Sattar, Illaha
SBIRT Substance Abuse Prevention Strategy Assessment
Direct Supervisor: Nancy Parello, Communications Director
Advocates for Children of New Jersey
Saturne, Rolguens
Patient satisfaction with a mobile cancer screening program.
Dr. Nancy Louis, Clinical Director
S.A.V.E. Women & Men Cancer Screening Program
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Sawhney, Baneet
A Snapshot of Substance Use and Abuse at Rutgers University
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Rutgers Health Services - Health Outreach Promotion and Education
Sayal, Taran
Customer Survey Satisfaction Assessment
Sharon Copeland, Chief Executive Officer of Enable, Inc
Enable, Inc.
Schreiber, Robyn
Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Addressing the Potential Risks of Comorbidity
Dr. Grace Lu-Yao, Cancer Epidemiologist and Team Science Leader
The Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Shabash, Olivia
Developing an Urgent Care Model for RWJUH in New Brunswick
Susan Krum, Vice President of Ambulatory Services
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital - Ambulatory Services
Shah, Anooj
Patient’s Pipeline in the Emergency Department
Jennifer Curry, Supervisor of Data Control Clerks
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Emergency Department
Shah, Roma
Suggestions for Addressing Risk Factors for Child Abuse
Jessica Nugent, Program Manager of Home Visitation
Prevent Child Abuse - New Jersey
Shalan, Gannat
Underrepresented Minorities in Science Education
Dr. Kamal Khan, Director; Taruna Chugeria, Assistant Director
Office for Diversity and Academic Success in the Sciences (ODASIS)
Sharma, Ambika
Condom Distribution Pilot Program
Stephanie Antoine, Prevention Team Leader
Hyacinth- The AIDS Foundation
Shayevich, Marina
Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Hesitancy Among University Students
Tefera Gezmu, PhD, MPH
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy – Public Health Program
Sims, Jianna
Fun N Fit Program
Serena Collado, Director of Community Health
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset
Srikakulam, Aparajita
Disaster Relief Preparedness- Consumable Medical Supplies
Michael Prasad
The American Red Cross
Sta. Ana, Francelene
Hospital Length of Stay (LOS) and Quality of Care
Dr. Bernard Toro-Echague, Internist and Physician Advisor
JFK Medical Center
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Staab, Jenn
Promotion of the Health Administration Degree in New Jersey Community Colleges
Ann Marie Hill
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Suh, Matthew
Shelter Preparedness and Readiness
Lauri Gill (Regional Mass Care Manager/Logistics Support) Michael Prasad (Director of
Disaster Support Functions)
American Red Cross (Central New Jersey Chapter)
Sultana, Tahmina
Fighting domestic violence & homelessness
Rev. Susan Kramer-Mills
Town Clock Community Development Corporation (TCCDC)
Tai, Sharjeel
Client Satisfaction in Laboratory Outreach Program
Karen Shepherd Director of Laboratory Outreach, Felecia Clark Business Liaison
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Telemaque, Laurette M.
Middlesex County Faith Health Initiative
Debbie Gash, Director of Nursing, John Dowd, Public Health Emergency Notification
Systems Coordinator
Middlesex County Office of Health Services
Thaker, Dev
Health Insurance Outreach Program
Issac Benjamin, New Jersey Organizer
Enroll America
Uddin, Imran
Harlan Genotyping Standard Operating Procedure
Samantha Garcia, Principal Laboratory Technician; John Nuara, Laboratory Researcher
RUCDR Infinite Biologics
Usman, Fatima
Overdose Prevention Act and 911- What’s Next?
Ezra Helfand, Program Director
National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence (NCADD)
Uzuegbu, Chasity N.
Exercise Core Performance & Health Assessment
Michael Onorato, General Manager; Shaun Redding, Personal Training Manager; Christian
Thomas, Group Fitness Manager
Robert Wood Johnson Fitness & Wellness Center
Valenzuela, Ana
Promoting Healthier Lives For Babies
JoAnn Bartoli, Senior Community Director
March of Dimes in Pine Brook, New Jersey
Vargas, Veronica
Enhanced Diabetes Education for High Risk Populations
Dr. Marsha Rosenthal
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research
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Veress, Jacqueline
The Implementation of a Patient Centered Medical Home
Direct Supervisor: Tara Gunthner, BSN, RN-BC; Director of CMHS: Margaret Drozd,
MSN, RN, APRN-BC
Saint Peter’s University Hospital: Community Mobile Health Services
Voter, Michelle
Bringing Community Paramedicine into Avenel, New Jersey
Lt. Michael Giardina
Avenel-Colonia First Aid Squad
Wen, Wendy
Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of HIV among Asian-Americans and Asian Immigrants
in the U.S.
Dr. Tefera Gezmu
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Williams, Kia
Examining Depression Screenings amongst Acute Stroke Patients
Florence Chukwuneke, MSN, APN
JFK Medical Center Neuroscience Institute
Woodward, Miriam
The Exercise Prescription: A Recommendation for the Clinical Care of Midlife Women
Gloria Bachmann, MD
Women’s Health Institute, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Worthen, Marcella
The Effectiveness of Electronic Medical Records on Time Efficiency
Deb Hall, LNHA, MSRD, Nursing Home Administrator
Alaris Health at St. Mary’s
Wright, Brittany
ADAPT Drug Theft Prevention Campaign
ADAPT Senior Coordinator: Joel Torres, ADAPT Regional Organizer: Lisa Joseph, and
ADAPT Prevention Educator: Victoria Joseph
Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Team (ADAPT)
Yi, Joe X.
Trends in Healthcare Coverage for New Jersey Residents
Wardell Sanders, President; Sarah Adelman, Vice President
New Jersey Association of Health Plans
Zambrzycka, Milena
Spirituality Outreach Substance Abuse and Prevention Program (SOSAPP)
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist and Professor
Rutgers Health Services-H.O.P.E (Health Outreach, Promotion, Education)
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Name:
Title:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Name:
Title:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Athanasiou, Marios
Assessing and Improving Higher Education in New Jersey
Mark Magyar, Associate Executive Director at the Senate Majority Office
New Jersey State Senate Majority Office
Cordeiro, Matthew
Improving the Bloustein Internship Program
Ann Marie Hill
Edward J. Bloustein School
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Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
Preceptors:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Agency:
Name:
Title:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Name:
Title:
Preceptors:
Agency:
DiGenno, James
After-School Program Evaluation and Crime Reduction Initiative Implementation
Michael Simmons, Program Manager; Kimaada Sills, Program Manager; Dr. Roland
Anglin, Executive Director
The Joseph C. Cornwall Centerfor Metropolitan Studies at Rutgers-Newark
Earle, Brianna
The Implementation of a Higher Gas Tax to Improve New Jersey’s Infrastructure
Project Supervisor: Senior Associate, Jonathan Scharff
M Public Affairs
Harpaz, Sarah
Framework for the Raritan State of the Bay Report
Sara Malone
The Sustainable Raritan River Initiative
Huggins, Shanice A.
Rutgers Day 2015 Event Coordination: “Shore Restoration & Resilient Communities”
Amy Cobb, Events Services and Facilities Manager; Karyn Olsen, Director of
Communications and Senior Public Relations Specialist
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Kaur, Kira
Jersey City Summer Works Assessment
Sarah Goldfarb, Aide to the Deputy Mayor; Vivian Brady-Phillips, Deputy Mayor of Jersey
City
Office of the Mayor, City of Jersey City
Lee, Victoria
Implementing new procedures to increase compliance with the Stark Law
Director of Physician Relations and Executive Health: Anamika Desai
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Mansell, Coryanne
Campaign Coordinator for “Go Solar, New Jersey”
Solar Campaign Organizer: David Beavers, Director: Doug O’Malley
Environment New Jersey
Miller, Alexis
Municipal Profile Project
Kamal Saleh
County of Union: Economic Development Department
O’Neill, Kenya
Mark Conference
Robyn Ginese, Interim Director; Ryan Bissonnette, Associate Director; Stephanie Cwynar,
Graduate Intern
The Office of Leadership & Training
Osamwonyi, Abieyuwa
Progress of the Overdose Prevention Act in NJ
Amanda Bent
Drug Policy Alliance
Patel, Shane
How the market values fossil fuel reserves, and fund exposure to fossil fuel
Tilak Lal,Director of Risk Management
Franklin Templeton Investments
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Name:
Title:
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Ramsaywack, Yuvraj
Transformation of the Brooklyn Waterfront
Kara Gilmour
Brooklyn Bridge Park Corp.
Rokerya, Nabeel
Student Loan Forgiveness Accessibility Program
Mrs. Ashley Bencan, Special Projects Manager, Office of Recruitment, Preparation and
Recognition
NJ Department of Education
Shetty, Prerna
The Self Help Group-Bank Linkage model of microcredit as an answer to the failure of
Microfinance Institutions in the State of Andhra Pradesh, India.
Professor Meredeth Turshen
Research Internship at the E.J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Tadese, Alef
Recreation and Open Space Element
Direct Supervisor: Nicholas Tufaro, Principal Planner/Landscape Architect; Project
Supervisor: Director of Comprehensive Planning, Mirah Becker
Middlesex County Planning Department
Wallace, Connor
Destination Marketing in Central New Jersey
Lina Llona, President at the Middlesex County Regional Chamber of Commerce
GoCentralJersey (Central Jersey Convention and Visitors Bureau)
Wang, Steven
Enhancing the SCUT-Bloustein 2+2 Program for Planning and/or Public Policy Major
Dona Schneider and Ann Marie Hill
Edward J Bloustein School of Policy and Planning (EJB) at Rutgers and Southern China
University of Technology (SCUT)
Winter, Christine
Business Development and Green Building Education
Matt Kaplan, CEO
ReVireo
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Public Health Students
1
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
“Do Something” Campaign
Juliana Abdallah
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Rutgers Health Services: Health Outreach Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E)
Purpose: To promote the “Do Something” initiative among the Rutgers Community.
Significance: In 2012, NJ’s Governor's Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (GCADA) established
the NJ Task Force on heroin and other opiate use. According to the 2014 government report by the
GCADA, the Task Force created a strategic action plan to address the pressing issue of heroin and other
opiate use by NJ’s youth and young adults which have increased dramatically over recent years. The
report states that more than 40% of the 8,300 NJ residents admissions to drug treatment programs for
opiate addiction in 2012, were younger than 25. In response to this report, Rutgers created the campus
wide campaign “Do Something” to address drug use and other health concerns. The campaign encourages
individuals who are aware of an at-risk student to share their concerns so the student can receive
professional assistance.
Method/Approach:
• Developed the messaging and marketing of the campaign
• Maximized the visibility of the campaign by
• Developing outreach materials such as flyers and pledges
• Asking Rutgers’ students, staff, and organizations to take pictures with the campaign
poster for HOPE’s social media sites
• Participated in interactive tabling events to educate, promote the campaign, and encourage the
Rutgers community to “do something” and be active bystanders
• Assisted in the development of a targeted approach for off-campus outreach
• Collaborated and networked with organizations on-campus and businesses off-campus
Outcomes:
• Development and launch of the “Do Something” social marketing campaign
• Conducting outreach at 5 various events on Rutgers Campus and distributing at least 150
educational materials
• Creation of campaign’s outreach plan and development of on/off-campus partnerships
• Preparing the campaign for Rutgers New Student Orientations and for the 2015-2016 academic
year
Evaluation: A survey was conducted to evaluate the campaign by analyzing the visibility of the “Do
Something” logo on and off-campus. Results showed that 46% of students have seen it while 58% have
not. Other questions asked about further improvements within the campaign. Additionally, at the end of
each semester, the number of incidents reported on the campaign's website will be counted and evaluated.
The data will be evaluated furthered by reviewing the number of Rutgers student transports to New
Brunswick hospitals due to drug related incidents and how many students are referred to the Dean of
Students; Residence Life; and (CAPS) Counseling, Alcohol and Other Drug Assistance Program &
Psychiatric Services.
2
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Public Health Standing Committee on Microplastics
Nicholas Adams
Dr. Mark Robson, Professor and Chair, Department of Plant Biology, Rutgers University;
Dr. Brian Pachkowski, Toxicologist at NJDEP
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Purpose: To research the possible health effects from the exposure to microplastics through ingestion and
report to the New Jersey Department of Health findings and suggestions on how to limit this risk for New
Jersey citizens.
Significance: This project is important to public health in New Jersey because the possible health effects
of microplastics are relatively unknown. Microplastics are constantly introduced into the marine
environment through a number of consumer products including facial washes containing micro
beads. However, studies have not been done on the possible long-term health impacts of exposing these
particles into the water system. Studies on microparticles of similar size and composition highlight the
ability of these particles to pass through the various membranes in the body and rest in organs causing
more significant damage. The committee must attempt to extrapolate information from these reports to
ensure that proper precautions are in place to prevent any serious health risks from microplastic
exposure.
Method/Approach: An exhaustive literature reviews on microplastics and nanoplastics was conducted in
order to demonstrate to the Public Health Standing Committee that there is no research on the health risks
of exposure to either microparticle. Once the committee agreed that the research explicitly linking
microplastics to health risks was inconclusive, we began to research other micro and nanoparticles which
had similar properties to microplastics. Each member selected a few scholarly articles on microparticles
to present to the committee during monthly meetings.
Outcomes: Out of a sample of 44 research articles, none turned up any significant data suggesting any
outstanding health risk associated with microplastics. Three articles outlined the toxicological effects of
microplastics in marine biota, including the sorption of pollutants into blood. Research of other topics,
such as chemical ion nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes produced data that suggested that direct
exposure to these particles can lead to significant human health risks.
Evaluation: No articles directly linked exposure to microplastics and negative human health
effects. Although assumptions can be made based on research evaluating other nanoparticles, the drastic
changes in toxicology accompanying slight changes in physical or chemical structure make any
extrapolation to micro- and nanoplastics scientifically unfounded. To give a sound response to the New
Jersey Department of Health, the committee believes that more primary research must be completed,
specifically studying the human health effects of microplastic exposure.
3
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Faith in Prevention Program (FIP)
Daniel Addy
Nashon Hornsby, JD¹, Monique Howard EdD, MPH
New Jersey Department of Health: Division of Family Health Services (NJDOH:FHS)
Purpose: To monitor three regional health collaborators as they utilize a $900,000 budget to educate faith
based organizations (FBOs), which focuses on evidence-based methods that could decrease obesity,
increase physical activity, and improve nutrition to prevent/control obesity within the faith community.
Significance: According to the 2011 New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (NJBHRFS), 23.8% of
adults aged 20 years and older were obese. The NJBHRFS also states, 26.1% of adults aged 18 years and
older consumed five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Only 53.2% of adults met the
current Federal physical activity guidelines for moderate or vigorous physical activity. Based on this data,
the FHS will work with health collaborators to link faith based organizations to the health care delivery
system. This program will provide education and training to lay leaders in order to ensure that lay leaders
implement evidence based strategies to prevent/combat obesity through increased physical activity and
improved nutrition in the faith community.
Method/Approach: To properly monitor the FIP program, Dr. Howard² and Daniel Addy are in constant
contact with collaborators. Collaborators submit financial reports in order for FHS to observe how and
what grantees are spending the money on. The financial reports are utilized to calculate and project
whether they will use the entire grant. Dr. Howard and Daniel will conduct site visits to assure that health
collaborators utilized the grant appropriately.
Outcomes: By the end of the federal fiscal year, this program should demonstrate a reduction of BMI and
blood pressure amongst congregants that participated in the program. The program will provide skills in
creating healthy meals, the importance of reading labels, and inspire congregants to eat healthier and
exercise more often. If grantees utilize the entire grant appropriately, fully demonstrate reduction in
obesity, and the CDC deems that the program was a success then FHS will be awarded more funds for the
next fiscal year. This increased funding will be used to expand towards more FBOs to ultimately reduce
obesity in New Jersey. This program should encourage faith-based communities to observe the change
and want to eat healthier and become more active.
Evaluation: To properly evaluate FIP, health collaborators are required to submit 3 month and 6 month
post-assessments, as well as, quarterly and annual progress reports in order for FHS to evaluate their
progression. After each assessment/report, FHS determines whether health collaborators are on track, how
far they are into the program, whether they will finish the program by the fiscal year, are they
appropriately using the grant, and if they will use the entire grant. The Rutgers’ Nursing School will
conduct pre/post evaluations of congregants’ blood pressure and BMI to determine if the program was
effective. This measurement will be done before the congregants take part in the program and afterwards.
4
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Teen Health Fair
Judith Agbotse
Marie Kinsella, Director of Community Programs; Misan Oroye-Lane, Supervisor of
Family Support/Assessment Workers
Partnership for Maternal and Child Health of Northern New Jersey
Purpose: To encourage students to develop healthy lifestyles and effective strategies to cope with health
issues and social concerns using community agencies.
Significance: Infants born to teenage mothers have a higher risk of poor birth outcomes such as low birth
weight, preterm birth, and infant death. Additionally, teenage mothers often have more limited
educational, social, and financial resources, creating greater risks for infant and maternal health.
According to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, using data from the CDC’s National Vital Statistics
System (NVSS), there was a dramatic regional disparity in teen pregnancy, with birth rates ranging from
4.4 per 1,000 in Hunterdon County to 40.5 per 1,000 in with Passaic County (Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation, 2012). Passaic County has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in New Jersey. Also, the
county has the third highest sexually transmitted infection rate according to a 2013 survey conducted by
the State of New Jersey Department of Health Survey.The Teen Health Fair is a way to bring a variety of
organizations in one place for high school students in order to give them an opportunity to learn about
health issues, educational opportunities, community resources, and post-graduate opportunities (i.e.
military & employment).
Method/Approach: At the health fair, students play "The Game of Life," which is designed to teach
teenagers better decision-making skills while being introduced to a wide range of community services
(resources). In the game, scenarios, which have been written by students, describe various adolescent
problems that they may encounter such as; being caught driving without insurance, living with an
alcoholic parent(s), or becoming a teen parent at age 15. Students at the fair must approach the available
community agencies for help with their particular scenario, which is provided by the health teacher. Also,
to encourage students’ full participation in the Teen Health Fair, an Art, Poetry, and Essay district-wide
contest is held with three (3) winners in each category.
Outcomes: Participants of the Health Fair have an opportunity to have fun, communicate with
responsible, knowledgeable individuals, and receive a myriad of useful information. Teens can better deal
with difficult issues and make better choices when real information if it’s at their disposal. Information is
power, and teens are empowered to draw strength from information. It is more often the lack of
knowledge and the fear that results from the lack of information that disables teens, leaving them
vulnerable.
Evaluation: Evaluations were based on pre and post tests given to students to measure how much they
gained from the fair and their level of knowledge before and after they attended the fair. Also, agencies
that attended the fair are given surveys to measure their connections with the students and any comments.
5
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Advocate for Tobacco Cessation on Rutgers University, New Brunswick Campus
Sameer Ahmed
Direct Supervisor: Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist at Rutgers
Health Services; Project Supervisor: Anne LeCluyse, Graduate Student of the School of
Social Work
Health Outreach, Promotion and Education
Purpose: To provide health-related educational services aimed at reducing or eliminating the distribution
of tobacco products on campus.
Significance: Each year, secondhand smoke kills over 42,000 individuals in the United States. With the
Surgeon General’s outreach and education combined with stricter policy implementation for tobacco
distribution, smoking mortality rates have dropped over sixty-percent. The Surgeon General found that
over 90% of individuals who begin to smoke tobacco products before the age of 26 due to the availability
of a higher quantity of products and social and educational hindrances (i.e., peer-pressure smoking,
marketing by tobacco companies, and misconception of the safety of these products). This evidence
indicates a gap in understanding the importance of tobacco and tobacco-less product distribution and
reducing the misconception of these products to college students. Evidence-based interactions will
address these gaps to possibly reduce the distribution of these products on campus.
Method/Approach:. A retrospective review was completed to assess the attitudes of college-students on
the distribution of tobacco-related products on campus. The ongoing process involved outreach with
students center on the quantity of their distribution, their costs, profits, and other alternatives that could be
substituted for tobacco products. The ongoing process also involved outreach through tabling at various
student events including Freaky Firsts, HIV Testing, and weekly basis across all student centers on
campus. The data was exported to a spreadsheet and of those, 90 were recorded in the observable field.
Based on the investigative nature of surveying, there are three types of results towards the favorability of
Rutgers University becoming a smoke-free environment on all New Brunswick campuses and addressed
three types of results: (a) unfavorable (1-2), (b) indifferent (3), and (c) favorable (4-5).
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=93), 60 students (64.5%) had a favorable attitude towards a
smoke-free environment, 21 students (23.3%) had an indifferent attitude and 12 students (12.2%) had an
unfavorable attitude towards a smoke-free environment on all New Brunswick campuses.
Evaluation: More than half, (n=60, 64.5%) of Rutgers University from the sample size cohort (n=93) had
a favorable attitude towards a smoke-free environment on all New-Brunswick campuses. Continued
outreach with collaboration of organizations such as Rutgers University Student Associations will serve
as effective strategies to (address misconceptions about “safer alternatives,”) (b) outreach to outside
student-run organizations such as Tobacco Dependence Program for policy implementation and (c) push
forward for legislation to University Senate to ban distribution of these products on campus.
6
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Sundowning in Skilled Nursing Facilities
Tanweer Ahmed
Betty Thomas, Vice President of Operations
Tandem Management Company
Purpose: To conduct informational research on condition currently impacting the nursing home industry
to provide educational material for staff and family and provide discussion on salient points of how the
state regulates the treatment of these conditions.
Significance: Numerous elderly patients, especially those with Alzheimer's disease and dementia,
experience a phenomenon called sundowning syndrome. This condition is an increased amount of
restlessness, agitation, irritability or confusion. As many as 20 percent of those diagnosed with
Alzheimer's disease experience sundowning syndrome, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.
Because this condition can contribute to the harm of the patient and those around them, it is important for
caregivers and families to be knowledgeable about how to handle certain situations.
Method/Approach: Using Google Scholar, Rutgers Libraries Databases, and the Alzheimer’s
Association, data on causes, signs, and symptoms were collected; furthermore, research was collected on
possible treatments, both pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical, as well as advice for care
giving. Information and checklists from previous state surveys were also given to me by my preceptor;
this data was also put into the presentation.
Outcomes: This project will serve to encourage nurses and administration to give more personalized
attention to those who experience Alzheimer’s and sundowning; this way individual plans can give
direction for planning any interventions. By producing a Plan of Care checklist to be used by RNs as well
as rehab personnel such as physical and occupational therapists, and by doing a presentation on state
regulations that medical personnel can follow, we can expect better outcomes such as lowered
antipsychotic medication use and better quality of care.
Evaluation: This project will be evaluated in a number of ways to test success. A survey will be given to
participants to see if they thought they benefited. Furthermore, to make certain that procedures are being
followed, monthly audits will be conducted on care plans of patients with Alzheimer’s disease to see if
necessary interventions are being provided and properly recorded.
7
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Public Health Issues and the Ethical Concerns Associated with the Current Ebola
Outbreak
Romel Amare
Paula Bistak, Chief of Human Subjects Protection Program at Rutgers University
Human Subjects Protection Program
Purpose: To explore the public health issues and ethical concerns that arose due to the effort to accelerate
the Ebola vaccine
Significance: Ebola virus disease has ignited some of the worst fears in a globalized world. The current
Ebola crisis is the largest Ebola epidemic in history, mainly affecting multiple countries in West Africa.
There have been over 25,000 cases reported since early 2014 in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone with
almost 10, 576 deaths. The Ebola epidemic has revealed the weakness of not only of the national
healthcare systems and global healthcare structures, but also of international crisis management
mechanisms as a whole.
Method/Approach:. Information was gathered from scholarly articles, science journals, as well as
government agencies including CDC, WHO, FDA. The data that was compiled was broken into several
sections based on a the chronological order of events of the epidemic. After, the findings were then
organized and constructed as the foundation of the PowerPoint presentation. In order to measure the
success of the educational session to the Institutional Review Board, a anonymous likert scale based postevaluation survey of eight questions will be administered. The last step will be to review and record the
results and outcomes of discussion and critique the effect it had on the knowledge of attendees to the
presentation.
Outcomes: Prepared and delivered an informative PowerPoint session for IRB Staff on the ethical issues
that resulted from the fast-tracked process of developing an Ebola vaccine. The analysis and comparison
of the fast-tracked approval to the standard and its ethical implications for IRB review was discussed. The
staff also was presented with discussions on ethical concerns that arose due to the decision to fast track
the Ebola vaccine. The main ethical concerns discussed included deploying an unproven vaccine to a
large audience, administrating studies during previous outbreaks, and the responsibility of the U.S. to
fight the deadly virus disease.
Evaluation: Post- Evaluation was administered and prepared upon the completion of the educational
presentation for the IRB. The Staff of the IRB was asked if the presentation provided useful information
on the vaccine fast- tracked development as wells as the public health challenges of preventing and
treating the Ebola virus disease.
8
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Process of Effective HIV Preventions
Andrea Andrews
Jermaine McCrossin, Recruitment Specialist
Project ACHIEVE
Purpose: To effectively find ways to prevent HIV infection, thru the use of education and vaccine study
trials.
Significance: Currently there are more than 35 million people who are living with HIV/AIDS worldwide.
In 2012, alone, 1.6 million people died of AIDS-related illnesses worldwide. There are nearly 6,300 new
infections occurring everyday and about 60 new infections diagnosed every week in New York City.
Koblin and Mayer, et. al. (2013) found that in the United States there is a particularly high rate of young
black men who have sex with men, having a higher rate of contracting HIV. According to the CDC, Black
and Hispanic women continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV, compared with women of other
races/ethnicities. Factors for these high rates could be not having proper health care, not having access to
free clinics, not practicing safe sex, and/or not being aware of your partner risk factors.
Method/Approach: Project ACHIEVE promotes events, education services, and online surveys about
effective ways to prevent HIV infection thru the uses of social media and flyers. By handing out flyers
every few weeks and updating the Facebook page there is a promotion of safe sex and the importance of
vaccine trials thru social media. There are also two events, Vaccine-O-Licious and Save Our Sex
(SOS). A fun and learning environment will be the theme for this years Vaccine-O-Licious event, which
spreads the word about HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. SOS is a community gathering event that
stimulates conversations about our sexual lives. Project ACHIEVE provides community education on
HIV 101, HIV Vaccines 101, PrEP 101, and integration of biomedical and behavioral interventions,
among other topics as well.
Outcomes: By effectively promoting the availability of vaccine study trials, Project ACHIEVE trials are
able to move forward. Goals were met with the enrollment of 25 people in the Eclair Study, and 11 people
in the HVTN 105 Study. However, the HVTN 104 Study, still only has 6 subjects and needs to 8 and the
HVTN 110 Study only has 1 person enrolled. Project ACHIEVE outcomes demonstrate successful
enrollment of people into their studies but not all goals were reached.
Evaluation: To reach their goals of enrollment in Project ACHIEVE, email and phone call reminders
should be sent to those who scheduled an education visit about the trials and a faster reply back should be
used when people respond to the vaccine study trial ad on Craigslist.
9
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
La Casa de Don Pedro and McKinley Afterschool Program Evaluation
Jennifer Angamarca-Rodriguez
Roland V. Anglin, PhD., Director and Associate Research Professor; Michael Simmons,
Program Manager; Kimaada Sill, Program Manager
The Joseph C. Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies
Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of La Casa de Don Pedro and McKinley’s after-school program,
by conducting quantitative and qualitative research to be condensed into a thorough report.
Significance: The Cornwall Center conducted an evaluation to assess the impact of La Casa de Don
Pedro’s after-school program at Newark’s McKinley Elementary School. La Casa serves 75 children in
grades 4, 5, and 6, as well as their families. The program is designed to provide students with the skills
needed to improve their academic performance and social-emotional development, enhance their civic
understanding and engagement, promote health and wellness, and encourage artistic expression.
Method/Approach: The program evaluation includes qualitative and quantitative analysis. The Cornwall
Center has developed and administered interviews and study survey instruments as well as conducted
direct observation of after-school activities. The evaluation procedure examined, among other things,
program delivery and quality of implementation, program personnel, and the development of schoolcommunity partnerships. Additionally, the evaluation ensured that the program staff had access to timely
data on preliminary results in order for the data to be incorporated in program design and improvement.
Outcomes: This evaluation was meant to determine if La Casa’s after-school program was operating in
accordance with the recommended fidelity to the State of New Jersey Mandated Educational Goals and
Objective. Additionally, it provides real time information about the relative strengths, weaknesses,
threats, and opportunities to improve student learning.
Evaluation: Incorporating qualitative and quantitative research to evaluate the effectiveness of La Casa’s
after-school program at McKinley school will help develop a comprehensive report that will provide
useful information on the areas in which the program can improve and the areas in which it is excelling.
10
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Examining Models of School Nurse Leadership
Linda Anyaduba
Director: Laura Fenster Rothschild; Research Associate: Anne E. Ray.
Center for Alcohol Studies: Education and Training
Purpose: To contribute to a case study analysis of the Johnson & Johnson School Health Leadership
Program by reviewing the literature on nursing leadership and documenting community demographics of
nurses selected to participate.
Significance: The Johnson & Johnson School Health Leadership Program (JJSHLP) is an 18-month
fellowship program for school nurses that aim to develop their leadership, management, and public health
skills to improve health within their schools and communities. Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies
conducts this program annually. A case study analysis of two teams from the 2014 cohort is going to be
conducted to assess the process by which participating nurses grow as leaders and use those skills to
implement successful health initiatives within their communities during the fellowship period. The goal
for the current project is to conduct a literature review on nursing and community health leadership, and
document the demographics of the teams selected to participate in the case study evaluation.
Method/Approach: The following databases were used to conduct a literature review on nursing and
public health leadership: Academic Search Premier, JSTOR, CINAHL, Nursing & Allied Health
Collection: Comprehensive, SCImago Journal & Country Rank (SJR), R2 Digital Library, Database of
Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), First Consult, MEDLINE, Joanna Briggs Institute EvidenceBased Practice Database, NIH RePORTER, The Cochrane Library, and ClinicalKEY. Some search terms
included: professional nursing, practical structural empowerment [J11], and school nurse characteristics.
Paper titles and abstracts were compiled and organized in a database and examined for relevance to the
overall goal of the literature review in consultation with the JJSHLP project leadership. To document the
demographics of nurse teams selected to participate in the case study, data the nurses provided on reports
submitted as a part of their JJSHLP participation was compiled and compared.
Outcomes: Articles were examined to better understand existing evidence based practices and models of
leadership in the nurse field. Information reported for participating nurse teams included display of
progress with respect to team goals, statistics related to teams’ geographical region, structure of the team,
and description of each team’s community. The results from the literature review and the demographic
analysis provides the foundation for the full case study, of which the ultimate goal is to gain a better
understanding of the processes by which participating teams are successful in their efforts to impact
health within their communities.
Evaluation: Findings from the literature review will be summarized, with attention paid to the areas
noted above. Consistent themes that emerge will be noted. Potential influences of existing literature on
the case study methodology will be discussed and participating nurse teams will be compared on the
characteristics described above. Through identification of existing themes and best practices in school and
community health leadership, the findings from the literature review will ultimately help to guide the
implementation of the case study.
11
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Economic Empowerment Program for South Asian Women who Faced Violence
Hema Arikala
Hera Mir, Advocate
Manavi
Purpose: To financially empower South Asian Women who have faced violence by developing proper
resources.
Significance: Financial abuse is a common approach used by abusers to gain power in a relationship and
to entrap the partner in the relationship. Research by The National Network to End Domestic Violence
indicates that 98% of the survivors experienced financial abuse and have concerns about financial safety
of themselves and their dependents. Moreover, it is one of the leading reasons listed by survivors for
staying in or returning to an abusive relationship. Some short terms effects of financial abuse would be
access to assets, which are important for the safety of the survivor, like affordable housing. Many
survivors often face long term effects like ruined credit scores, debts, and legal issues caused by the
abuser. Thus, addressing economic needs and finances as part of advocacy are imperative. However,
there is a lack of clarity and knowledge among advocates about different resources and support they can
provide regarding finances (VonDeLinde 2002). Thus, the goal of this project is to develop several
resources for both advocates and to survivors about economic needs and financial literacy.
Method/Approach: To address the economic needs of the women, several resources will be developed to
guide them towards financial success. Economic Empowerment Toolkit and a Job Bank will be provided
for the advocates detailing various resources about career development, financial literacy, education, and
daily needs. A financial literacy guide will be provided for survivors, which will contain basics of
banking and investments geared towards South Asian immigrants. To encourage savings and assets,
Individual development accounts will be established for the participants.
Outcomes: Economic Empowerment Clinics are one-on-one sessions with volunteer advocates will be
used to provide the women the resources developed. These sessions will be geared towards individual
economic needs at a specific point in time.
Evaluation: A process evaluation will be conducted by the primary advocates of the women who used
the economic empowerment clinics. Questions will be included about the resources provided to them by
the advocates and about the efficacy of the financial literacy toolkits.
12
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Anti-smoking Campaign: Analyzing Rutgers’ Smoke-free Policies
Saad Arslan
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist at Health Outreach,
Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Rutgers Health Services – Health, Outreach, Promotion and Education
Purpose: To analyze the level of reception towards implementing potential policies prohibiting tobacco
use on campus or within certain distance perimeters from buildings, and proposing appropriate guidelines
for a healthier Rutgers community.
Significance: Environmental tobacco smoke is a Class A Carcinogen with no safe level of exposure
(EPA). Currently, there are 15.7% of or 1,079,700 adults in New Jersey who smoke, of which 11,800 die
each year due to their own smoking (2015). While a small portion of these include college students, the
majority of them begin their smoking journey from college. This in turn influences the high school youth,
since there are 6,900 kids under 18 who become new daily smokers each year. Smoking is known to kill
more people than alcohol, AIDS, car crashes, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides combined — and
thousands more die from other tobacco-related causes — such as fires caused by smoking and exposure to
secondhand smoke (more than 1,000 deaths/year nationwide). As the tobacco industries make billions of
dollars each year, New Jersey is the only state in the US to allocate zero dollars to smoking cessation and
prevention. While it may be difficult to prevent such death tolls statewide, we as a state university can
prevent our Rutgers’ community members from smoking by enforcing certain policies and ultimately
make our campuses smoke-free in order to help ensure that our college doesn’t pave the way for new
lifetime chain smokers.
Method/Approach: The main method is to attain data by distributing surveys via person to person
approach, social media and tabling activities. The data is collected from the students, faculty and staff of
Rutgers - New Brunswick. The surveys ask about their thoughts regarding certain changes to Rutgers’
tobacco use policies; community members are given the smoking statistics of NJ and are told that the
ultimate goal is to make Rutgers’ completely smoke-free. They are also motivated by the fact as of April
2, 2015, there are at least 1,543 smoke-free campuses in the US. Of these, 1,043 are 100% tobacco-free,
and 633 prohibit the use of e-cigarettes anywhere on campus.
Outcomes: Data is still currently being collected, as the ideal sample size has not been met yet.
Evaluation: The results will be analyzed and calculated once sample size is complete. Also, self-selected
survey participants may create a bias to results.
13
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Role of Lycopene, antioxidant, on Prostate Cancer Patients
Stephany Asare
Dr. Andres Gomez, PHD, MPH Head of Epidemiology, Safety Science and Analytics,
Global Pharmacovigilance and Epidemiology
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Purpose: To prove if the consumption of lycopene, an antioxidant in tomato product is associated with
lower risk of developing prostate cancer.
Significance: Prostate Cancer is the most common cancer among older men and the second leading cause
cancer in American men but it can often be treated successfully. Even though, More than 2 million men
in the US count themselves as prostate cancer survivors, only this year as reported by the American
Cancer Association, about 220,800 new cases and about 27,540 death cases from prostate Cancer.
Likewise, reports from several studies have suggested the consumption of Lycopene, a tomato product
antioxidant or carotenoid is a preventive agent to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. In contrast,
epidemiologic or clinical trials evidence remains inconclusive. Evaluating all the clinical trials and other
studies done on this topic will identify why there is no evidence to prove that lycopene can help decrease
the number of risk cases of prostate cancer in older men and what other approaches to take to conclude on
this topic, either effective or ineffective
Method/Approach: A meta-analysis reviewed on eleven articles with clinically proven results on
lycopene and prostate cancer was completed to assess the outcomes of each article and to prove if having
lycopene in the diet of elderly men can assist in reducing risk of prostate cancer. Data for all 11 clinical,
cohort, case control and prospective study articles were exported to an excel spreadsheet to evaluate the
outcomes, results and conclusion of each article to sum up the final solution; if lycopene has a significant
effect on prostate cancer. Before collecting the data 7 case control study articles was select and two by
four table was made to run the data collected from these articles. The data was run on comprehensive
meta analysis document
Outcomes: Asset the benefits of therapy with lycopene with relation to prostate cancer, by looking at the
seven articles; showed these results for the odd ratios and p-values. All articles provided a p value of
0.002.
Evaluation: From the results collected, lycopene protects against prostate cancer by about 20% reduction
in risk depending on what statistical model. Lycopene was not effective from the authors hypothesis but it
actually helped prostate cancer patients who were not in their advance stage. Even though lycopene does
reduce risk 100% but there is a percentage that should be put into concentration. Looking at the results, it
is a good habit to involve tomatoes products in our daily diets and foods because it has nutrients that
protects our body in general.
14
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Performance Improvement of Trauma Flow Sheets
Veronica Azer
Timothy Murphy, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC, CEN; Diana Starace, Injury Prevention
Program Coordinator; Carol Lavitt, Safety Ambassador Program Coordinator; Lisa
Falcon, RN, MSN, CCRN
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Trauma and Injury Prevention
Purpose: To improve accuracy of trauma flow sheets in order to better trauma performance in the Robert
Wood Johnson Emergency Department.
Significance: Trauma flow sheet data is the main way to measure performance improvement on a regular
basis. In order for Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital to maintain the Level 1 Trauma status, the
hospital must have complete documentation for all trauma resuscitations. Nursing documentation patterns
have been linked to patient mortality. Serial vital sign documentation helps identify trends in the severely
injured patient’s hemodynamic status.
Method/Approach: Trauma nurses recorded data on each patient that entered the hospital from January
through March 2015, which was then sent to the trauma department to be exported onto an Excel
spreadsheet. Following entry of all data, graphs and charts were created to provide a visual representation
of the information. Upon completion, statistics were compared to documentation from previous months
(September through November 2014). Based upon these and future findings, measures will be
implemented to communicate results to the emergency department staff and improve trauma flow sheets.
Outcomes: Upon completion of this project, the anticipated outcome will be improved documentation.
Additionally, the expectation is that this will lead to a decreased length of stay and fewer complications.
Successful completion of patient information will further enhance performance improvement and research
activity. Barriers to successful documentation will also be identified.
Evaluation: Additional monitoring of trauma flow sheets will be conducted to measure improvement
over time.
15
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Economic Empowerment Program for South Asian Women who faced violence
Rebekah Bachmann
Mr. Benjamin Wilner, LNHA
South Mountain Health Care and Rehabilitation Center
Purpose: This project will review and analyze a common reoccurring diagnosis of congestive heart
failure among patients within the sub acute rehabilitation department. The goal is to pinpoint methods in
which patients can be educated to avoid re-admittance prior to the completion of thirty days post
discharge.
Significance: Nursing homes that have a high volume of readmission rate for patients that do not
complete a thirty-day “rest” period out of the hospital can undergo penalties by Medicare. Nursing homes
work in coordination with hospitals to maintain patients out of the hospital for a minimum of 30 days to
avoid penalties. The hospital shares a mutual desire to keep patients out of the hospital so that they do not
need to be readmitted into the NH. The hospital may hold the nursing home in higher regard if they
successfully help the hospital avoid readmission penalties. Not only does the Nursing Home suffer
consequences in insurance penalties, but readmission can be an indication of a patient’s health status and
ability to cope with medical instructions upon returning home. Patients who return to the nursing home
for the same condition, are proving that may be uneducated and undisciplined in self care and prevention.
Patients that are commonly readmitted for the same diagnosis may need further instruction to better take
care of their health.
Method/Approach: Incoming patient’s admission records and face sheets will be analyzed to pinpoint
patient’s who were returned to the facility after hospitalization. Common diagnoses of congestive heart
failure will be mapped and reviewed for readmission in less than thirty days. Patients who have been
readmitted more than once in the course of thirty days and seen by the same physician should further be
examined and tested on course of treatment and continuum of care prior to discharge. The nursing home
staff can better prevent readmission by giving the patients more thorough discharge paperwork that give
special follow-up instruction to contact their GP/PCPs. Social workers are trained to ask chronic heart
failure patients a series of questions as well as personally see to it that an appointment is made with their
primary health care physician post nursing home. The chronic heart failure patient should also be supplied
with pamphlets including dietary and exercise suggestions. The facility can also hold in-services and
seminars on better self-care and ways to prevent injuries that lead them to return to the nursing home.
Discharge meetings can be held with family members/close friends to decipher who will be most involved
with the patient’s care post nursing home.
Outcome: The goal of the project is to address common recurring readmission of congestive heart failure
patients in an effort to help better educate them about self care and preventative measures. Sub acute
patients discharged to home should know how to care for themselves in order to avoid readmission to
hospital and consequently the nursing home.
Evaluation: Continued tracking of discharged patients who are readmitted will be conducted on an
ongoing basis.
16
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Pharmaceutical Distribution for a Public Health Emergency
Samsondeen Bakare Korodo
John Dowd
Middlesex County Office of Health Services
Purpose: To recruit organizations into the pharmaceutical distribution program so that they may serve as
closed PODs in the event of a public health emergency.
Significance: Public health emergencies affecting U.S. civilian population requires rapid access to large
quantities of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies. The Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention
(CDC) has established the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) initiative to store large quantities of
medicine and medical supplies to serve the American public in the case of an emergency. Federal, State,
County, and local planning are required to receive, stage, store, and dispense SNS assets. Closed PODs
are an important component of pharmaceutical distribution to dispense medications to employees and
their families so that they can better serve the community. During an emergency hospitals and other
treatment centers may be overwhelmed and unable to serve the entire population. The implementation of
closed PODs is significant because they lower the burden on community PODs and help meet public
health goals.
Method/Approach: A survey was provided to local Office of Emergency Management Coordinators
during a regional meeting. The survey was provided to see if municipalities have conducted POD
exercises, if they have received training, and they would like additional training. Approximately 25
municipalities were surveyed.
Outcomes: This survey demonstrated the urgent need for more organizations to receive additional
training to become closed PODs and also showed the willingness of these organizations to join the
program and make a change. Of the 25 municipalities surveyed, 15 responded. 13 of those 15
municipalities would like to receive training about Closed POD/First Responder for their respective
communities. The results of the survey will be used to begin training of hopeful program participants.
Evaluation: The survey results provided data for process evaluation. The data will be analyzed and used
to move the project forward in support of the continuation of Closed POD training throughout the county.
The Middlesex County Office of Health Services is evaluating and monitoring the progression of the
program.
17
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Bridging the gap between communities and individuals with disabilities
Gloria Barnor
Sharline Griffiin
Arc
Purpose: Assess and update client database for accuracy and timeliness.
Significance: Over 650 million people live with disabilities worldwide and 20% of the U.S disabled
population is living in poverty. The Arc is a non-profit organization with one purpose: that is to protect
the overall health of individuals with disabilities. Many disabled people are denied educational
opportunities, work programs and even housing accommodations. The Arc through its advocacy programs
is able to reach this goal, of equal opportunity, and education for all.
Method/Approach: One major task of this internship is completing a spreadsheet of all Arc clients. The
Arc is a organization that is constantly getting new clients. In addition the current clients files
continuously need to be up dated to accurately reflect the statuses of the clients. New client information
needs to be entered into the company database and many entries are incomplete with missing information
of current clients. A majority of the files were not up to date in terms of the medical conditions of the
clients. Information such as, clients Doctor names, doctor visits, medications, new illnesses or conditions
and guardianship. To ensure that all 200 client information is complete, the database and contact clients
were reviewed for missing information and updated.
Outcomes: Of 200 client files, 143 of them had to be updated and made complete. Eighty-nine of these
files are now complete and the remaining 54 clients will be completed on schedule.
Evaluation: In order to evaluate the client information, a brief survey will be designed to assess how
complete the database is.
18
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Creating innovative cancer surveillance and management tools tailored to needs of cancer
survivors
Andrew E. Barra
Dr. Shawna Hudson, Medical Sociologist
Rutgers- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Family
Medicine and Community Health Research Division
Purpose: Conduct analyses on data collected for patient and healthcare provider survey information.
Determine cancer survivor preferences for receiving health care information.
Significance: In 2012, there were nearly 14 million cancer survivors in the United States (DeSantis et al.,
2014). The observed survival rate for cancer patients was estimated to increase by 2024 to 58%,
approximately 19 million individuals (9.3 million males and 9.6 million females) (National Cancer
Institute, 2014). Although some cancer survivors recover with a renewed sense of life and purpose after
their cancer treatment, many fail to realize there are late and long-term effects from their treatment could
have long-lasting negative effects on their health (Hewitt et al., 2006). A proactive approach for
healthcare planning relating to cancer follow up care is necessary in order to monitor for other comorbid
conditions that may occur years later after cancer treatment (Hudson et al., 2012). In order to target these
areas, patients need tools and resources to monitor their health and to manage their interactions with
different healthcare providers.
Methods: Cancer survivors and primary care providers were interviewed to understand their self-care and
self-management needs. A total of 35 cancer survivor participants (31 breast cancer survivors, 3 prostate
cancer survivors and 1 colorectal cancer survivor) were interviewed. The cancer survivor participants
were recruited through community groups, support groups, primary care and oncology settings.
Demographic data were entered into Qualtrics and exported into SPSS, and this information was used to
determine sample demographics.
Outcome: Tracking and monitoring database and segmenting the users into different audience segments
to better understand their needs and desires to receive health care education.
Evaluation: Success of the EXCELS intervention can be evaluated by conducting a study with a larger
sample of cancer survivors to examine whether the patterns found in this small sample are generalizable
to the larger sample of cancer survivors.
19
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
HomeStyles Express: Nutrition Education Program to Help Parents of Young Children
Prevent Obesity
Itzel Barroso
Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.N.D
HomeStyles Project, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University
Purpose: To create an intervention that enables and motivates parents of young children to shape their
home environment and lifestyle with a no-cost program to help prevent childhood obesity.
Significance: In the United States, 12% of preschool children are obese and 16% are at risk for being
overweight; these children have an increased risk for chronic disease, obesity in adulthood, social
stigmatization, and depression. Parents have the greatest influence on their children’s lives; they control
most of the children’s essential needs such as their diet and physical activity. Thus, counseling parents
can result in positive changes that can prevent obesity.
Methods/Approach: Parents of young children (ages of 2-7) who live outside of New Jersey and Arizona
(n=146) were recruited via electronic announcements. After completing a baseline survey, parents were
randomized to either a 10-week intervention or delayed treatment (control) condition. Intervention
materials included 8 4-page mini-magazine-formatted guides (1 per week delivered via email) and a 15minute phone consultation with Nutritionist/Registered Dietitian. Guides focus on strategies to alter the
home environment and lifestyle behaviors related to physical activity and diet. Guides encourage
increased fruit, vegetable, and breakfast consumption, family meals, physical activity, appropriate portion
sizes, and a reduction in sweetened beverages and screen time. After completing the 8 guides, parents
completed a follow-up survey that consisted of the baseline survey and also included program evaluation
questions. Primary outcomes assessed included parent and child BMI and home lifestyle environment.
This abstract will report the baseline data.
Outcomes: Mothers of preschoolers were 35.96±4.79 years old, had 1.69±0.66 children, 85% were white,
and 100% had at least some post-secondary education. Changes in fruit and vegetable servings, milk
servings, level of physical activity, frequency of shared family meals were assessed via online surveys.
Evaluation: This study can be evaluated by analyzing completed surveys.
Thank you Carol Byrd-Bredbenner and Jennifer Martin-Biggers for allowing Itzel to become part of the
HomeStyles Project Family, and for all of the support, time and knowledge provided!
20
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Electrical Median Nerve Stimulation for treatment of Nausea and Vomiting
Sahebjit Bhasin
Dr. Shaul Cohen
Department of Anesthesiology at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: To determine whether electrical stimulation at the median nerve reduces nausea and vomiting
during general anesthesia in parturients undergoing cesarean section.
Significance: Routinely, IV 8mg Ondansetron (Zofran) and 10mg Metoclopramide (Reglan) are used for
the treatment of nausea and vomiting during a c-section, but there are many side-effects along with these
medications. Application of electrical stimulation at the median nerve will help reduce the incidence of
nausea and vomiting during general anesthesia with no side-effects. In a previous study done in 2004,
titled “A randomized controlled comparison of electro-acupoint stimulation or ondansetron versus
placebo for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting,” it was concluded that application of
electrical median nerve stimulation helps reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting during general
anesthesia.
Method/Approach: 140 patients will be used who are undergoing induction of combined spinal-epidural
technique for c-section. Group I (n=73) is the control receiving no therapy. Group II (n=67) receives
median nerve stimulation from procedure onset until arrival at the PACU. An investigator will record
patients’ height, weight, ASA status, gestational age in weeks, Apfel score (1-4), hypertension (>140/90),
hypotension (<90 systolic), hypoxia (O2 Sat<85%), blood loss >700mL, efficacy of sensory block for csection, evidence of nausea and vomiting (during procedure, after administration of epidural medications,
after eversion of uterus, after replacement of uterus, upon arrival to PACU), nausea and vomiting
treatment satisfaction, and overall satisfaction. A t-test will be used for statistical analysis. A p-value of
<.05 will be considered to determine statistical significance.
Outcomes: A table indicating the final results and p-values will be displayed at the end of the project.
The p-values will determine statistical significance for each group. The results will portray whether there
is significance in the incidence of nausea and vomiting when comparing control with median nerve
stimulation. The specific data that will be compared between the control and experimental group will be
vomiting during procedure, nausea during procedure, nausea after the application of the spinal-epidural
technique, nausea after the eversion of the uterus, nausea after replacement of the uterus, nausea upon
arrival to the PACU, and whether nausea and vomiting satisfaction is above a 7 out of 10.
Evaluation: An investigator will undergo a satisfaction survey at the end of each c-section to test if the
electrical nerve stimulation worked and if it produced any side effects. Patients will be asked after the
procedure whether or not they felt nausea upon arrival to the PACU.
21
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Maternity Care and Notification
Aimee Bhatia
Tyla Housman, Deputy Director
New Jersey Hospital Association
Purpose: To research legislative bills related to the regulation of maternity care in New Jersey and
throughout the country in order to support or to help amend current legislation.
Significance: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in children from one
month to one year of age in the United States. While alarming, statistics show that rates of infant
mortality have declined by half in the United States since 1990, including deaths attributed to SIDS. New
Jersey currently ranks number six in lowest rates of infant mortality in the nation, however new
legislative proposals continue to increase notification requirements for maternity care patients in
hospitals. The impacts of these new policies on health care providers in NJ, in comparison with the
already existing policies they abide by, were examined to reveal the additional burden these policies
create for hospitals in their attempt to provide quality and resourceful healthcare to their patients as, at
this point in time, hospitals already provide paperwork that addresses over 25 areas of of concern for new
mothers and their infants.
Method/Approach: A database of current regulations and statutes governing maternity notification was
developed through research of existing state and national legislation. In addition, hospitals were contacted
in order to identify a list of documents that hospitals currently provide mothers upon delivery of their
newborn. This data was analyzed with regard to background information regarding New Jersey’s
effectiveness in providing care to maternity patients in comparison to other states.
Outcomes: It was found that the quality of maternity care in New Jersey is excellent in comparison to
other states and with regard to the statutes and regulations that are already in place for state to abide by.
These guidelines will be available for review through the database that is being prepared which includes
all statutes and regulations governing the most recent legislative proposals related to stillbirths, SIDS, and
hospital notification. Furthermore, a survey is being developed that will provide legislators with
information regarding what hospitals currently hand out to maternity patients upon delivery. This
information will be useful in informing the legislative process of the quality of care that NJ hospitals
already provide to their patients.
Evaluation: Methods of evaluation include interviewing hospital managers, healthcare professionals,
and also patients in order to determine the effectiveness of maternity care in NJ.
22
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Bottle or Breast Lesson Plan
Amanda Bialek
Susan Stephenson-Martin, Sr. Program Coordinator, Middlesex EFNEP/ SNAP-Ed
NJ SNAP-Ed (Rutgers Cooperative Extension)
Purpose: To promote behavioral changes in mothers by informing them of the advantages and
disadvantages of bottle-feeding versus breast-feeding their babies through creating and implementing a
behaviorally focused lesson (‘Bottle or Breast’).
Significance: Information regarding bottle and breastfeeding is not always readily available to the
public. Without this knowledge, mothers can significantly impair the health of their children by
practicing certain behaviors such as smoking, consuming alcohol, and taking drugs while
breastfeeding. The significance of this lesson is to ensure that all mothers are equally educated about the
advantages and disadvantages of bottle vs breast-feeding by providing a lesson geared toward women
with limited resources. By supplying mothers with the knowledge they need, they can make a more
confident and informed decision when it comes to feeding their babies.
Method/Approach: Methods include the revision of an already established lesson containing missing
and outdated information on bottle feeding and breastfeeding. By researching the benefits of bottlefeeding vs. breastfeeding, interviewing nutritionists/lactation consultants, and analyzing data, the
information on each method will be updated and revised. Interactive activities and demonstrations will be
added to the lesson to encourage mothers to engage in facilitated discussions regarding the topic, to allow
them to view the proper way to bottle or breastfeed a child, and to correct existing myths about
breastfeeding.
Outcomes: With this updated lesson, women will be able to a.) Make more informed decisions on
whether or not to bottle/ breastfeed their infants; b.) Understand that certain behaviors and lifestyles can
directly affect the health of their babies (i.e. smoking, drinking, drug use), and c.) Give mothers the ability
to discern correct and incorrect information regarding breast and bottle feeding.
Evaluation: A formative evaluation will be distributed to participants. A pre-test will be administered
before the start of the lesson, as well as a post-test upon the lesson’s completion. This will be a 1-2
minute assessment on the information covered in the lesson. It will objectively measure the lesson’s
impact and effectiveness on participants’ potential behavior.
23
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Workshop Safety Training and Audit Efficacy
Ryan Black
Marc Longo
Rutgers Environmental Health and Safety
Purpose: This project will examine the efficacy of current Workshop Safety Training and Workshop
Audits at preventing accidents and compare the program to those of other large universities.
Significance: As a major university and employer, Rutgers has a duty to protect its faculty, staff, and
students. In pursuit of this it trains the people who work in the numerous workshops around campus as
well as auditing the shops to ensure compliance with OSHA and EPA regulations. The program should
thus be as effective as possible.
Method: Examining accident data and comparing training and audit techniques with other large research
universities, will allow the effectiveness of Rutgers’ system to be evaluated. Changes can then be
suggested based on the programs of other universities.
Target Audience: This project can serve as a basis for a for changes to Rutgers’ workshop training or it’s
auditing process and thus would be of interest to Rutgers Environmental Health and Safety and it’s parent
department, Rutgers Public Safety.
Outcomes: The report will be available to Rutgers Public Safety and Environmental Health and Safety
for use in evaluating and potentially improving Rutgers’ workshop training and/or auditing techniques.
Evaluation: Evaluation of the project will be based on supervisor feedback.
24
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Domestic Violence and the Role of the Healthcare Provider
Tiara Bryant
Mariam Merced, Director; Yesenia Hernandez, Program Coordinator; Elaine Hewins,
Domestic Violence Education and Awareness Program Coordinator; Brenna Aiossa,
Domestic Violence Outreach Worker.
Community Health Promotions Program at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: To create a road map to modify RWJUH’s model training program Domestic Violence and the
Role of the Healthcare Provider, for its clinical care technicians (CCTs) on how to assess patients who are
victims of interpersonal/domestic violence and strategize an intervention best avoiding re-victimization.
Significance: According to the New Jersey State Police Uniform Crime Reporting Unit, there were 610
reported incidents of domestic violence in New Brunswick in 2012. At RWJUH, educating healthcare
professionals about the negative stigma surrounding domestic violence and being mindful of the signs
that domestic violence might be present; should become a standard throughout the hospital.
Method/Approach: A one hour seminar educating CCTs about the dynamics of abusive relationships,
signs of abuse, ways to effectively screen patients for intimate partner violence using direct, indirect, and
framing questions, and protecting the patients right to autonomy will be conducted. After the seminar is
over, CCTs will be given useful information to give to the patients who are seeking help.
Outcomes: At the end of the one hour seminars, CCTs will have a better understanding of how to screen
patients for possible domestic violence at home. CCTs will know how to acquire online resources of
different help-programs/ shelters. This seminar will also give the CCTs the courage to notify a nurse, if he
or she believe the patient is a victim of domestic violence. By educating the CCTs; this allows healthcare
professionals that interact with the patient to identify the signs of domestic violence and offer or refer the
patient to find help.
Evaluation: CCTs that attend the training will receive a pretest and posttest as a tool of evaluation. At the
beginning of the seminar, CCTs will receive a pretest to see how much knowledge they possess about
domestic violence strategies to avoid re-victimizing the patient. After the seminar is held, a posttest will
be given out that will assess the new acquired knowledge about caring for patients that have been victims
of domestic/interpersonal violence and reinforce the information that was given. Every year after the
program is implemented, individuals will have a unit based focus group during a staff meeting to discuss
how the strategies have been helping the patients and how many patients have been referred to a helpprogram. Annually, an online post-posttest through the hospitals Healthstreams program with recertify
CCT’s with an condensed online version of the seminar and an immediate posttest which each individual
have to receive 100% on the post test to complete his or her re-certification.
25
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
NCADD Legislative Event / Annual Policy Forum
Olivia Califano
Ezra Helfand, Acting CEO
NCADD Middlesex
Purpose: “Overdose Prevention and 9-1-1 Legislation – What’s Next?” is an educational event that will
focus on changes implemented in New Jersey through legislation and policy as a result of heroin and
opioid use locally.
Significance: Heroin use in New Jersey is on the rise especially amongst young adults ages 18-25. It is
important to understand the harmful effects and damages caused to the body by using heroin. The spread
of education and prevention methods is essential in the downfall of the heroin epidemic seen on a
national, state and local level in the past years. Providing people with proper advocacy techniques,
education, training, and resources will hopefully help to decrease the number of heroin users in the area.
Method: NCADD will host its annual legislative event at the Bloustein School where a panel of experts
will discuss this year’s topic of Overdose Prevention and 9-1-1 Legislation. The participating panel will
provide information, statistics, facts, stories, etc., to attendees. NCADD has recruited a group of panelists
including government officials, legislators, law enforcement and community organizers. Attendees will be
provided a clear understanding of the state’s heroin epidemic and the legislation formed to combat it. The
attendees will participate in a post-event Retrospective Questionnaire that will gauge their attitudes and
knowledge.
Outcome: The intention of the legislative event is that people will leave with new information on the
issues and solutions surrounding the epidemic regarding heroin and opioid use. It is also intended to
provide attendees with proper resource information and the motivation to get involved in new legislation
and advocacy efforts.
Evaluation: Evaluation of results will be measured based on a post forum examination. Based on
information provided at the legislative event, people’s attitudes and knowledge on the subject will be
evaluated.
26
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Multiple Employer Welfare Arrangement
Tanieya Canty
Stephanie Alfonso, Project Manager. Maryann Swierczek, Sr. Director of
Operations
Qualcare Inc.
Purpose: To band small to mid-size employers together into a self-insured environment that can
ultimately save money for employers.
Significance: Qualcare is one of the region’s leading providers of health care coverage, and it provides
the public and private marketplace with a higher-quality, lower cost alternative to commercial insurance
companies. Qualcare services over 900,000 members ranging from school boards, health systems, and
local governments to some of New Jersey’s largest corporations. With rate increases that are consistently
below industry standards and unparalleled service satisfaction, QualCare is well positioned to succeed in
the changing healthcare industry.
Method/Approach: The project will be conducted by performing weekly short-term projects to assist the
Operations team with helping prepare for the brainstorming, actions, and audit process of the Multiple
Employer Welfare Arrangement department. This will be achieved by performing tasks such as creating
spreadsheets to verify the addresses of clients, making out welcome letters to employers who are enrolled
at Qualcare, and making sure Health insurance ID cards have the correct information listed for clients.
Conference calls about America’s Health Insurance Plans, and the legislative win for the Patient
Protection and Affordable Care Act to gather information in regard to how it will affect Qualcare inc.
Outcomes: At the end of the project, assistance will be given to the day-to-day internal projects in order
to help the directors of the MEWA department run more smoothly. The directors of the Operations
department are responsible for staffing issues, employee placement, etc. Assistance is provided with those
minor tasks such as verifying addresses, or developing spreadsheets for the Senior Directors in order to
help the department maintain efficient and effective customer service. Data from these results will be
assessed by 4/1/2015.
Evaluation: For the evaluation, managers will conduct a biweekly meeting on updates to align staff on
what strategies are successful and which ones need work. A survey will be given every 6 months to
clients in order to track satisfaction. An exit survey when client chose to leave the services on their
reasons why to evaluate what the department can improve on.
27
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait: Sustainability Planning
Gabrielle Caparimo
Laurie Navin, Director of Program Services. Sherenne Simon, Associate Director of
Public Affairs & Program Services
March of Dimes, New Jersey Chapter
Purpose: To create a model action plan for the third and final year of the HBWW initiative in Newark,
New Jersey.
Significance: According to the latest March of Dimes Prematurity Report Card and data compiled by the
National Center for Health Statistics, the rate of premature births for African American women in New
Jersey has increased to 15.3% (4.6 points higher than the second leading group, Hispanics, and about 6
points higher than Whites and Asians). The March of Dimes’ Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait
Initiative (HBWW 2012-2015) strives to reduce the racial disparity in premature birth rates of African
American mothers in Newark and create awareness of the resources available to healthcare providers and
consumers. As the final year of the HBWW draws to a close, formulating an action plan of the most
important yet accomplishable tasks within the remaining time frame is necessary to ensure 2020 state
prematurity reduction goals (9.6%) are met.
Method/Approach: At the Newark HBWW Advisory Board meeting in March, activity sheets with lists
of last year’s concerns for each topic (Early Entry into Prenatal Care, Interconception, Postpartum) were
administered to groups of 5-6 members. The three groups were to each select a target issue that they
collectively thought could be solved by the group within the year, offer a 3 step solution plan, as well as,
additional thoughts on key players and budgets. The surveys were then presented and discussed before all
attendees and collected at the very end. Additional notes were recorded and forwarded to all attendees.
Outcomes: For the Early Entry into Prenatal Care topic, the most pertinent issue was creating awareness
of resources for expectant mothers. The use of social media and a marketing campaign competition were
agreed upon as the best means of informing target communities. For the Pre- and Interconception issue,
the advisory board chose patient education regarding appropriate pregnancy spacing as the target issue. A
possible solution included identifying and training specialists who understand the language
(English/Spanish/Creole) and neighborhood culture to deliver culturally competent lessons. The target
issue in the Postpartum category was addressing the large number of women who do not attend their
postpartum appointments. The board educating mothers early on (36 weeks) about the importance of postpartum care and scheduling visits as a solution.
Evaluation: The evaluation of the proposed action plans could only be measured if actually implemented.
If chosen, the efficacy of the plans could be measured by surveys of the community health workers,
healthcare providers, and mothers involved in the Newark community and observing the 2015 data
collection of premature births by NCHS.
28
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Improving Operational Efficiency in the Echocardiography Laboratory
Brittani Caponegro
Stephern Allison, Vice President of Cardiovascular Services
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick (RWJUH)
Purpose: To improve operational efficiency in the New Brunswick Echocardiography Laboratory (Echo
Lab) at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Significance: Operational efficiency in healthcare is defined as delivering products and services in the
most cost-effective and time-effective manner without sacrificing the quality of patient care. At RWJUH,
LEAN is an important operational efficiency approach, which can be defined as “the relentless pursuit of
the perfect process through waste elimination.” Currently in the Echo Lab at RWJUH, there exists a need
to improve operational efficiency. Of the overall 831 inpatient Echos completed over a one-month period,
53% were inpatients located throughout the Tower Building, causing bottlenecks and delays in patient
flow. As a result, LEAN methodology is being implemented in the Lab.
Method/Approach: An in-depth analysis of the overall operations of the Echo Lab was conducted over a
one-month period. Encompassed in this analysis are daily walk-throughs of the department, one-on-one
meetings with the technicians, walking the route of technicians traveling bedside as well as the route of
hospital transport services, monitoring the timing it takes for patients to be transported to the lab via
Premise (transport services), and shadowing the technicians while performing Echos. Over the first twoweek period, 19 Echos were observed on inpatients (patients excluded in these observations were
outpatients and the critically ill.) Of the 19, 9 were performed bedside and 10 were performed in the Lab.
Over the second two-week period, 32 ambulatory inpatients were observed from the Tower Building to
measure the time when the patient was entered into Premise to the time the patient arrived in the Lab.
Outcomes: When Echos are performed bedside versus in the Lab, an additional 25-35 minutes are added
to testing time, which is on average 30 minutes. When Echos are performed in the Lab, specifically on
Tower Building ambulatory inpatients, the average time for patients to arrive in the lab after being entered
into Premise is 33 minutes. Therefore, due to the high volume of Echos performed on Tower Building
patients, the creation of a satellite Echo Lab located in this building will be presented to Administration.
The expected time that will be saved by decreasing transport time and eliminating unnecessary steps in
bedside Echos will increase the number of Echos performed by the department.
Evaluation: In order to reduce waste and redundancy in the process, a pilot study was conducted to test
the design of a satellite Echo lab in the 4 Tower unit. Taking into consideration all steps taken in the
complete process, time frame, and elimination of non-value added steps, a satellite Echo Lab will improve
operational efficiency with the elimination of throughput.
29
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Effectiveness of Late Night Programming at Rutgers University
Ashley Castro
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez
Rutgers Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Purpose: To provide Rutgers students with the proper information about health and wellness resources
on campus through late night, interactive events that promotes alternatives to alcohol consumption.
Significance: According to data collected for the 2013-2014 academic year, more than 2700 students
attended a Freaky Firsts event. HOPE hosts a Freaky First event every first Thursday of each month on a
different campus to promote a healthy campus environment. Freaky Firsts is offered to students to
complement environmental and behavioral changes on campus as well as the surrounding community.
Throughout each academic year, organizations such as Rutgers Programming Association (RUPA),
Student Life, student-based organizations, as well as on-campus fraternities and sororities and many
others contribute to Freaky Firsts by either cosponsoring or attending the event. These organizations
encourage more students to participate in the event and educate themselves on the dangers of drug and
alcohol use and abuse.
Methods/Approach: The main objective of the Freaky Firsts program is to provide an array of activities
that will encourage students to practice safer drinking habits. It also aims to have students disengage in
alcohol consumption for an evening. Another objective of the program is to educate the Rutgers student
population on the resources available to them. For example, brochures are handed out to students that
detail all the benefits available to students through Rutgers Health Services and Rutgers Health, Outreach,
Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.). The program also serves to provide interactive activities that
inform students of the importance of proper nutrition, mental health, addressing drug and alcohol and
abuse, and how to practice safe sex.
Evaluation: During each event, evaluation forms are distributed. The evaluation forms give students the
opportunity to voice their opinion on the effectiveness of the program and offer suggestions for
improvement. These suggestions are taken into consideration and used to enhance future events.
Outcome: Statistics show that there is a strong correlation between alcohol-free events and reduced
alcohol-related incidents such as arrests, vandalism, and car accidents. These statistics imply that alcoholfree events have the ability to decrease the prevalence of alcohol consumption amongst students as well.
Freaky Firsts is an alcohol-free event that works well for the Rutgers community. Late night programs
that provide alternatives to alcohol consumption are a key component in prevention of alcohol use and
abuse. They reinforce safe healthy behaviors amongst light to moderate alcohol drinkers.
30
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Family Caregiving Stress and Mindfulness
Dinia V. Cedeno
Diann Robinson, Executive Director
Adult Day Center of Somerset County
Purpose: To provide evidence-based education and adequate stress-coping skills for family caregivers
while promoting the well-being of informal caregivers and their care recipients.
Significance: Family caregiving is the main source of long term care for older adults and the disabled and
often take on the burden of caring for loved ones with complex chronic diseases and disabilities
(Healthsense Inc., 2012). Providing care for patients with comorbidities and/or neurodegenerative
diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease can be overwhelming for most caregivers while placing them at high
risk for stress burnout and health deterioration (LeadingAge, 2015). In order to meet the demands of the
growing aging population, there is a need for innovative approaches and effective community-based
resources for family caregivers which can benefit caregivers and their care recipients. Research literature
shows that psychosocial educational programs can lead to improvements in the health-related quality of
life of individuals with multiple health conditions and suggest that similar approaches could potentially be
beneficial for patients and their caregivers (Paller et al).
Approach: Ken A. Paller et al conducted an investigation involving a mindfulness-based stress reduction
intervention for patients with mild progressive cognitive decline as well as their caregivers. The
participants assisted to weekly sessions over an eight week period during which all individuals were
exposed to a series of attentional and emotional skills developed to reduce stress, improve mood, and
reduce the tendency for maladaptive responses to environmental stress. Mindfulness practices included
activities such as attending to breathing, bodily sensations, movement, and awareness of thought with
acceptance. The participants practiced specific exercises during sessions and performed assigned
homework activities between sessions based on a 60-minute audio guide which focused on a weekly
goal. Some of the battery tests used before and after the intervention include: Quality of Life in AD,
Geriatric Depression Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of
Neuropsychological Status.
Outcomes: This research will facilitate the creation of a handout with stress management tips based on
mindfulness techniques developed for ADC family caregiver support group.
Evaluation: The effectiveness of the mindfulness approach will be tested by measuring the systems of
stress inventory (SOSI) which is designed to physical, psychological and behavioral responses to stressful
situations; and the profile of mood states (POMS) which provides a mood disturbance score. The internal
consistency scores of SOSI and POMS is .97 and .90 and above respectively (Minor et al). In addition,
surveys will be used to measure subjective feelings of stress in caregivers and to obtain feedback about
this mindfulness technique.
Acknowledgements: Thanks to Diann Robinson and Professor Franzione for mentoring me.
31
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Relationship Between Infant Mortality Rates and the Utilization of Prenatal Care among
Adolescents aged 15-19 in Newark, New Jersey
Marwa Chebli
Michelle E. Michel, Manager of Outreach and Enrollment; Sunita Mookerjee, Program
Manager
Strong Start Program for Centering Pregnancy
Purpose: To examine the relationship between late or no prenatal care to the high rate of infant mortality
in Newark, New Jersey and understand the most common barriers faced in utilization of prenatal care
among 15-19 year olds.
Significance: The city of Newark, New Jersey holds a higher infant mortality rate than the state with a
rate of 7.3, compared to the state rate of 5.3. 1 Along with high infant mortality rates, Newark also has one
of the highest rates in New Jersey of mothers receiving no prenatal care, children with low birth-weight,
and mothers on welfare. In 2011, about 40% of Newark women received late or no prenatal care.2
Adolescent mothers are less likely than older mothers to obtain adequate prenatal care. Mothers who do
not receive prenatal care are three times more likely to give birth to a low-weight baby, and their baby is
five times more likely to die. 3
Method/Approach: Identifying, synthesizing, and critically analyzing unique facilitators and barriers to
early prenatal care initiation among adolescent girls between the ages 15-19 in Newark, New Jersey by
conducting a critical review of literature. Popular search terms used to identify relevant materials were
“prenatal”, “care”, “adolescent pregnancy”, “teen pregnancy”, “Newark prenatal care”, “barriers”, “infant
mortality” , “access”, and “disparities.” A search for appropriate studies was conducted using three
strategies; a systematic search of electronic reference databases, manual searches of related articles, and
consultation with experts in the field. Key informant interviews were conducted to get better insight on
the city of Newark.
Outcomes: A total of 12 relevant studies were used in the review. Results from the review show a strong
association has been found between poor prenatal care and low birth weight infants, neonatal morbidity,
and infant mortality. Review of relevant literature indicates better birth outcomes for women receiving
early prenatal care. Adolescents are less likely to obtain early prenatal care than older women due to the
barriers they face. The most frequent barriers were limited resources, transportation issues, initial attitude
of being pregnant and long waiting times in clinics.
Evaluations: Although there are many studies on prenatal care, limitations of the literature include few
studies on region specific areas such as Newark, New Jersey. Much of the literature focuses on barriers
women face in access to prenatal care. Future research should explore adolescent perspective on prenatal
care barriers as well as proposing interventions to increase early access.
1
"Health Rankings - Infant Mortality." County & Roadmaps. N.p., n.d. Web. Apr. 2015.
"2015 Newark Kids Count." (n.d.): n. pag. Web
3
"Late or No Prenatal Care." Child Trends. N.p., 12 Feb. 2015. Web. 08 Apr. 2015
2
32
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Healthcare Facility Evacuation Coordination Plan
Amelia Chen
Direct Supervisor: Grant Shea
Philadelphia Office Of Emergency Management (OEM)
Purpose: Prepare the City of Philadelphia to evacuate healthcare facilities due to either man-made or
natural disaster incidents, as evacuations are a labor intensive and complicated process.
Significance: Partial or full healthcare facility evacuation during an emergency is a challenging and
resource demanding procedure. Evacuation of the facility must be well planned and organized due to
patients in these facilities having a wide range of acute medical conditions including individuals
dependent on life sustaining and/or supporting medical equipment. The City of Philadelphia is home to 30
hospitals, including 21 acute care facilities and 8 trauma centers which thousands of patients rely on daily.
The healthcare infrastructure in Philadelphia is at an increased risk to disaster due to the high
concentration of healthcare facilities and Philadelphia is considered one of the densest cities in the
country.
Method/Approach: The Healthcare Facility Evacuation Plan consists of four operational strategies all of
which addresses the notification, coordination, resource management, and patient movement process. The
operational strategies are centered around healthcare facilities in the Philadelphia region and the types of
assistance needed by these facilities. Information for this project was obtained at meetings with liaisons
from Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania (HAP), Philadelphia North Healthcare
Emergency Coordination Zone, Philadelphia South Healthcare Emergency Coordination Zone, SEPA
Children’s Healthcare Subgroup, Philadelphia Fire Department, and Philadelphia Police Department. In
addition, a survey was sent out to every healthcare facility in Philadelphia to address specific information
about each individual facility such as the facility’s evacuation plans, height of ambulance bays, patient
occupancy levels, etc.
Outcomes: A finalized written plan will serve as an annex to the city’s emergency operations plan. The
plan will ensure a coordinated response among healthcare facilities, HAP, Philadelphia Office of
Emergency Management, and other response partners in the case of a healthcare facility evacuation.
Evaluation: After the Healthcare Facility Evacuation Plan is complete and revised, Grant Shea, the
Health and Medical Planning Coordinator will send the plan to the Hospital and Healthsystem
Association of Pennsylvania and the partners in coordination with the evacuation process to evaluate the
plan and provide feedback.
33
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Cost Effectiveness at the JFK Adult Medical Day Program
Justin Chen
Dawn A. Giakas, MPH, LNHA, CALA, FABC, Administrator; Mary Buglio, CTRS,
Director
JFK Hartwyck Nursing, Convalescent and Rehabilitation Centers,
Adult Medical Day Program
Purpose: To raise the Adult Medical Day Program Profitability at JFK by increasing daily census by
marketing to the local community.
Significance: The Adult Medical Day Program is part of the wide, patient-focused continuum of care that
JFK provides to the local community. It offers a medical program with a social component to participants.
The program is designed to reduce costs due to its day-by-day fee structure rather than providing 24 hour
care such as in a nursing home or assisted living facility.
Method/Approach: Due to the winter weather and the loss of patients, the daily census at the Adult
Medical Day Program has dropped below the breakeven mark of 52 patients per day to an average of
approximately 38 patients. In order to continue providing these services, the program at a minimum must
cover its cost. This project will involve reaching out to the local community through flyer distribution,
support groups, and charitable and networking events in order to market the facility to the public.
Outcomes: The predicted outcome is an increase in the average daily census at the JFK Adult Medical
Day Program by finding new patients and bringing back previous participants. Clear results in
profitability will come to fruition by the end of the semester during the onset of spring.
Evaluation: This project will involve an in-depth analysis of the history of the daily census, financial
management, and project development. The effectiveness of this project will be evaluated by the
administrator and director after implementation. Results will be clear as the daily census is recorded and
kept in check by all staff.
34
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
University Hospital Operating Procedure Analysis & Process Improvement
Samuel Chen
Direct Supervisor: Achalanka Dalawella, Lean Project Manager/Black Belt
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Lean Department
Purpose: To analyze and improve the current hospital operating procedure of stress testing at the Robert
Wood Johnson’s Somerset Campus to decrease the overall turnaround time (TAT) from the initial request
for the test till completion.
Significance: Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital recently acquired Somerset Medical Center and
is currently undergoing many changes to align the two hospitals so that maximum productivity is
achieved. My project specifically looks at stress testing turnaround times. Currently, TAT for inpatients
are round 18.7 hours while TAT for observation patients are 15.1 hours. Being able to reduce that time to
the industry baseline of approximately 4 hours will garner a financial impact that could significantly
improve other services, client relations, and overall generate a more desirable - higher quality hospital for
patients.
Method/Approach: Lean is a valuable and indispensable tool that departments can utilize to help them
reach their departmental goals. The first step is scoping, followed by data analysis which will allow us to
hone in on where to focus. Following Six Sigma’s DMAIC (define measure, analyze, improve, control)
process we will hopefully be able to improve the overall business process. Through scoping, fishbones
and data we received - we found that the current turnaround time for a singular stress test was around 19
hours. The baseline and generally accepted number is around 4 hours. We then delve into what the
bottleneck and root cause of the extended TAT was.
Outcomes: Thus far, the discovery that a singular stress test requires multiple personnel of different
specializations seems to be the speed bump. Coordination of several people is require to ensure a smooth
and rapid test. However, some of the MD’s are community physicians and cannot be present at all times thus leading to delays. In addition thallium has to be ordered and has a rapid expiration date, so it needs to
be added to the equation. With all the pieces we found that at maximum, the department should process 3
patients before noon, given a 7am start time.
Evaluation: The current workflow and appointment structure is being implemented for testing and to see
if the changes to scheduling will be able to sustain the volume and turnaround time for Nuclear Stress
Testing.
35
Internship Abstract
Title:
Increasing Student Awareness on the Safety and Health Concerns for Child Laborers in
Less Developed Countries (LDCs)
Name:
Shumaila F. Chishti
Preceptors:
Dr. Derek G. Shendell, D. Env, MPH
Agency:
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey- School of Public Health,
Center for School and Community-Based Research and Education, and New Jersey Safe Schools Program
Purpose: To bring awareness amongst undergraduate and graduate students at Rutgers University
regarding the complexities surrounding child labor through a three-part film and discussion series in
conjunction with the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs (GAIA) Biennial Theme
of “Global Health!” Complexities are political, social, economic, and safety and health-related issues.
Significance: Research studies have indicated approximately 200 million children are compelled into
hazardous work worldwide. In light of unsanitary working conditions to which they are regularly
exposed, child laborers are significantly at risk for acute to severe safety and health complications as their
bodies continue to develop. The U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) and the International Labor
Organization (ILO) also frequently release reports highlighting the implications of forced labor on the
growth of another approximately 20 million children—physically and intellectually—and most
importantly, suggesting there is still much to be done to regulate and reduce the existing, yet intolerable
forms of child labor.
Method/Approach: As part of its commitment to “Jersey Roots, Global Reach,” Rutgers University
strives to educate students on various aspects of Global Affairs. In collaboration with GAIA, CSCBRE
and NJSS organized and hosted three film screening and discussion series across the Rutgers New
Brunswick campuses to increase awareness among Rutgers undergraduate and graduate students
regarding child labor in the six World Health Organization administrative regions. Approximately 3-5
(short and long) videos on relevant topics were presented at each screening and participating students
engaged in dialogue expressing their reactions to scenarios viewed.
Outcomes: At the end of each event, participants were asked to fill out an evaluation form to assess the
overall presentation, their interests in global health, and where improvements are needed in future events
conducted on this topic.
Evaluation: The three events were evaluated by analyzing the completed evaluation forms and
examining for areas that were either successful or in need of improvement to improve similar events in
the future. The results of the evaluation forms will be used as a future indicator of interest among Rutgers
students—both undergraduate and graduate—on issues of global health.
36
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
A Home Fire Preparedness Campaign between the City of Orange and the American Red
Cross
Jontae Claiborne
Director of Community Services; Wali-Abdul Salaam, Public Health Officer; Vincent
Difillipo, Director of Older Adults/Emergency Management Coordinator; Pamela Taylor,
Emergency Management Coordinator; Yvone Ikner
City Hall of Orange, N.J Health Department
Purpose: To prevent fatalities from house fires through the installment of new smoke alarms and/or
batteries in the homes of Orange residents.
Significance:
• According to the National Fire Protection Association More than one-third (37%) of home fire
deaths occur during the winter months of December, January, and February.
• From December 1, 2014 to March 6, 2015 885 lives have been lost due to house fires.
• 60 percent of house fires emerge from the lack of smoke alarms in the home.
• In the event of a house fire working smoke alarms and a fire escape plan can save lives.
Method/Approach:
• The operation focused on approximately 350 to 375 single and two family homes in the East ward
of the City of Orange Township.
• Teams of 5 to 6 members was assigned to one street to install smoke alarms or replace batteries
for all homes.
• Team members explained to Orange residents the initiative taking place to prevent home fires .
• Smoke alarms were installed and/or batteries were replaced in all the homes of residents who
requested the service.
• Fire safety education was provided by the American Red Cross to all homes who did or did not
have their smoke alarms installed or batteries replaced.
Outcomes:
• Most homes did not have smoke alarms or the smoke alarms had been removed due to lack of
replacing batteries.
• (Will include number of homes that was serviced).
• (Will include how many smoke alarms and/or batteries were replaced).
• Orange residents level of awareness on fire safety increased.
Evaluation:
• Monitor homes that had smoke alarms installed and/or batteries replaced to prevent fatalities.
• The smoke installation campaign will be ongoing until all homes in the City of Orange have been
serviced.
• Once all smoke alarm installations are complete a follow-up process can be implemented
37
Internship Abstract
Title:
Statistics of Diagnosis of Breast Cancer within the Organization and the African
American Community: New Member Packet
Name:
Mercy A. Cobbinah
Preceptor:
Dorothy Reed, President and Co-Founder of Central New Jersey Chapter
Agency:
Sisters Network of Central New Jersey A National African American Breast Cancer
Survivorship Organization
Purpose: To compare the rate of breast cancer diagnosis within the African American (AA) community,
the levels at which a majority of AA women are diagnosed, and compare death rates within the
organization to Center for Disease Control and Prevention statistics.
Significance: Breast cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death among African-American
women, surpassed only by lung cancer. The prevalence rate of breast cancer among women, under the age
of 45, is higher for African American women compared to white women (breastcancer.org). AfricanAmerican women who get breast cancer are more likely to die from the disease than white women and are
less likely to survive for 5 years after diagnosis. (CDC.gov). Studies suggest that the disparity is due to
AA women being diagnosed with breast cancer at a later stage and receiving treatment later after
diagnosis (CDC.gov). An estimated 26,840 new cases of breast cancer are expected to occur among
African American women in 2013.In 2013; about 39,620 women in the U.S. were expected to die from
breast cancer (breastcancer.org). AA women are more commonly at risk of a triple negative
diagnosis/treatment.
Methods: Data has been collected from the Central New Jersey chapter on the number of members that
are deceased since the organization started in 2000. The ages of the women were collected, as well as the
stage of cancer at which the women were diagnosed. The numbers will be compared to statistics from the
Center for Disease Control and Prevention during the period of 2000 to the first quarter of 2015.
Outcomes: The results should show an increase in the number of AA women dying from breast cancer
because they were not diagnosed early enough. The result will also show an increase in triple negative
diagnosis and treatment, which is also prevalent within the AA community.
Evaluation: Data from a span of fifteen years (2000-2015) will be compared to data from the Center for
Disease Control and Prevention from the same time with the use of excel and charts.
38
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Patient Education and Tracking
Michelle Cohen
Mr. Gilbert Baez, Manager of Outpatient Oncology Services
Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Medical Center
Purpose: To implement easily accessible patient education process including provision of materials and
promotion of a distress screening process and to create an updated and more efficient logging system to
document interactions between Cancer Resource Volunteers with patients and caregivers.
Significance: Through the recent and upcoming changes in the healthcare field, the duration of visits
between doctors and patients are becoming dramatically shorter. This leads to the observation that many
patients are experiencing higher levels of stress regarding their subsequent non-medical needs. Working
with the social work staff to implement distress screenings is a step towards the prevention of a
potentially hazardous situation to a patient or caregiver’s mental or emotional well-being. Part three of
this project will be creating a logging system for the Cancer Resource Volunteers to appropriately
document their interactions with patients for current or future reference in studying trends in incidence
rates, mortality rates, etc. This system will allow for the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center and the American
Cancer Society to be working in collaboration with one another so that they can study and respond to
situations as needed.
Method/Approach: Patients will now have access to credible education materials through the Emmi
Solutions system. The reception desk will receive and input the patient’s contact information with the
appropriate, relevant modules assigned by a nurse. Once the new patient comes in to the treatment
facility, distress screenings will be put into place to monitor the level of concern during his/her first
session of chemotherapy about subjects including how to get transportation to the hospital, how to pay
medical bills, and how to cope with family concerns during this stressful time. The distress screening will
provide the social work staff with a better understanding of the patient’s needs at this current point in
time. When a patient reveals that they are experiencing a level of four or below (on a scale of 1-10), a
CRV is prompted to navigate the patient and provide the appropriate resources. A patient revealing a five
or above will be referred directly to the social work staff for further intervention.
Outcomes: Patients are provided with reliable education materials that let them prepare for doctor visits
better and reduce stress from not having answers to their questions. This in turn, will reduce time with
physicians, and will allow the patient/caregiver to be more proactive in his or her/their loved one’s care.
The patient’s non-medical concerns will be mended through the use of the distress screenings because the
appropriate resources will be provided.
Evaluation: Surveys sent to the staff and patients will provide feedback on the effectiveness of the
Cancer Resource Volunteer program. Surveys sent to the Cancer Resource Volunteers will track their
knowledge and understanding of the new logging system, as well as to generate more specific reports to
evaluate the program.
39
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Were you born outside of United States?
Shantavia Cowan
Marybeth Caruso, RN
Middlesex County Tuberculosis Clinic
Purpose: To evaluate the relationship/correlation between the BCG vaccine and later onset of
Tuberculosis infection. A need to identify and treat high risk Tuberculosis(TB) groups in order to
eradicate this disease.
Significance: One third of the world’s population is infected with Tuberculosis. In 2013, 9 million people
around the world became infected with TB, and around 1.5 million died as a result. In this same year, the
US was responsible for. The US has a mortality rate of 3.0 per 100, 000. Tuberculosis is a treatable
disease and although there has been a 45% decrease in its mortality rate since 1990, there are still many
challenges face in presenting treatment. Around 3 million people each year who become ill with TB are
still unable to receive treatment. There is also a growing Multi-Drug Resistance Tuberculosis crisis in
detection and treatment. Tuberculosis is still the leading killer of people infected with HIV.
Method/Approach: A retrospective study was conducted, with a sample size of a hundred. Data was
gathered from the Middlesex County TB clinic 2013 files. Statistics were recorded using the variables
gender, country of origin, previous BCG vaccine, and the classification of the patient file. Data was
imputed into Microsoft excel as a chart/table record of the information. A STATA language computer
programing was created to further analyze the correlation of variables BCG vaccine and TB infection.
Outcomes: Of the sample size, n=100, 84 were foreign born patients, and of the 84 born outside the US
75 were given a BCG vaccine as a child. 61% of the sample size were female, while 49% were male.
Immigrants from the Dominican Republic accounted for 29% of the sample, Indian immigrants accounted
for 23% of the data, US born patients accounted for 16%, while other countries account made up 32%.
The correlation coefficient for the variables BCG vaccine and TB infection is r=.68. This is a strong
relationship between the two variables and although BCG is not causal, it is highly associated with the
infection in adults.
Evaluation: Around 75% of the sample size, taken from the Middlesex County TB clinic, were given the
BCG vaccine as a child in their birth countries outside of the US. The World Health Organization has set
in place the END TB strategy, which is a global strategy and targets for TB prevention, care, and control
after 2015. The End TB epidemics global strategy will be evaluated through the decline in TB deaths and
cases. And also in the elimination of economics and social burden of TB.
40
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
2015 Young Adults and Children In-Transition (YAC-IT) Needs Assessment Plan
Christopher Crawley
Sarah Murchison, Human Services Coordinator
Somerset County Department of Human Services (SCDHS)
Purpose: To assist the Human Services Advisory Council (HSAC) in completing a comprehensive needs
assessment plan that identifies and details solutions for meeting the needs of youth-in-transition (YIT)
aged 18-21 years who are either chronically homeless or en-route to transition out of DCP&P supervision
at age 22 and are at-risk of becoming chronically homeless.
Significance: Without housing, a high school/vocational/college education, a source of steady income,
the appropriate life-skills, and many other life-readiness experiences, these youth struggle to transition
into adulthood and are more at-risk for becoming chronically homeless. Through identifying and creating
comprehensive solutions to assuage the five key risk factors that stunt YIT from attaining independence
and self-sustainability, we hope to dramatically curtail the epidemic of chronic youth homelessness within
Somerset County.
Method/Approach: Focus groups for young men and women aged 18-21 years were conducted in 2014
and the information obtained was utilized to identify the five key risk factors most responsible for
inducing homelessness to YIT: affordable housing, transportation, basic health care, mentoring, and
education (from providers to youth). Representatives from the 13 TLPs, shelters, and applicable
supportive services throughout Somerset County were then contacted to discuss the number of YIT
housed within their TLPs from 2013-2015, the resources provided to these youth, and how each
organization plans to improve future implementation of services to YIT. The results revealed that the
emergence of new TLPS, expansion of existing TLPs, and aggressive implementation of preventative
services are critical in steadily decreasing the amount of YIT that experience homelessness each year
within Somerset County.
Outcomes: In 2013, there were 85 YIT within the various TLPs and shelters throughout the county; in
2014, there were 76. Through contacting the TLPs, shelters, and applicable supportive services
throughout Somerset County and discussing how they alleviate the five key risk factors of YIT, SCDHS
was able to improve their understanding of how an annual distribution of local and state grant funds
should be amended to be better allocated to these programs for the future.
Evaluation: The HSAC YIT Committee will evaluate the progress of the plan one year after
implementation through new focus groups, the dissemination of surveys to be completed by YIT, and
scheduled follow-up meetings with representatives of each TLP, shelter, or supportive service every three
(3) months to gauge the efficacy of grant funding (i.e. is the TLP under or overfunded) and the program’s
abilities to provide the necessary resources in alleviating the risk factors responsible for inhibiting
attainment of adulthood/self-sufficiency, and ultimately causing chronic homelessness in YIT.
41
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Guiding Good Choices Program
Antonio Creagh
Luann Dias, Service Area Director of Youth and Services; Raysa, Program Manager
Catholic Charities Diocese of Metuchen
Purpose: To implement a program called Guiding Good Choices to the parents of Woodbridge and help
them understand the importance of prevention of substance abuse.
Significance: Some sixty-one million Americans who once used illegal drugs have now rejected them;
many suffered as a result of drug abuse. Accidents, addiction, criminal involvement, damaged
relationships, impaired judgment, and lost educational or employment opportunities were common. Of the
fourteen million Americans who currently use illegal drugs, some four million are chronic abusers.
Preventing America's sixty-eight million children from using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco will help
safeguard our society. Preventing drug abuse is one of the best investments we can make in our country's
future.
Method/Approach: In order to implement the program, the first objective that needed to be done was
finalize a date, time, and incentives that would be convenient to parents. There were flyers that were
handed out at assemblies and during other family oriented programs that listed all the information needed
and there was an email and phone number to contact if interested. The program runs for five weeks and
would have pre and post tests along with guidebooks so that the parents could review the information
whenever they liked.
Outcomes: After three weeks from the initial flyer handout and two weeks before the first session only
one parent contacted us and was interested. While popular in the past, the program appeared to be
outdated, at least in the interest of finding parents. Research on best practices and model programs that
will include using social media and other more modern approaches was recommended. Also updating the
program to reach out to younger and technologically literate people is now being assessed.
Evaluation: After researching what methods work to procure parents and how to get the message of drug
awareness and prevention across a few sample PowerPoint slides will be shown to a small population of
parents of teenagers to see if they understand the message given or not. A pretest will also be given to
obtain data. If successful a pilot of the updated program may be tried in the Fall of 2015.
42
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Community Outreach Program Evaluation and Analysis
Andrea D’Agostino
Gilbert Baez, Manager Carol G. Simon Cancer Center & Amy Lewis, Coordinator of
NJCEED Program
Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Memorial Hospital and NJ Cancer
Education and Early Detection Program (NJCEED)
Purpose: To determine whether outreach/education sessions conducted by NJCEED outreach workers are
an effective way to influence decision-making about cancer screenings. To assess which
outreach/education locations yielded the most participants.
Significance: While the Morris County area has some of the best healthcare and highest rates of insured
population in the Nation, the Community Health Needs Assessment showed that many people do not have
access to the basic health and preventive services. Approximately one in ten residents reported that they
were uninsured, did not have a doctor, or could not see a physician because of the cost. These people
were representative of a large number of the Morris county population. Outreach and screening through
the NJCEED aim to educate and encourage the community to make health conscious decisions.
Method/Approach: Data is collected and analyzed from information and outreach sessions. If patients
enroll in the program, applications are tracked with particular attention to program referral source and
location. This serves as a second point of reference and helps provide accurate data. Additionally,
conducting research to identify the communities with the lowest recorded annual incomes and highest
population or at risk groups will ensure that outreach workers are prioritizing cities in Morris County.
Outcomes: Grant Year 2014 had 9822 total participants in education/outreach sessions, but male and
female statistics were not recorded. Participants accounted for in Grant Year 2015 through March 2015
total 2309; 1724 female and 585 male. Of the 128 individuals who signed in at informational sessions in
Grant Year 2014, 33 patients followed up for screening; 18 new patients and 15 established patients. Of
the 60 individuals who signed in at informational sessions in Grant Year 2015, 15 patients followed up
for screening; 10 new patients and 5 established patients. This information is contingent upon whether or
not the individual signed into the education or outreach session with their personal information.
According to the outcomes, most patients were self-referral and called the office (21.1%) or had outreach
at a religious institution (16.8%) and only 5.5% were referred by Atlantic Health System or another
provider.
Evaluation: The effectiveness of outreach methods on the community will be measured by new patient
enrollment against compared to outreach participants. By looking at two separate grant years, analysis can
be conducted to find if outreach makes an impact on patient decision making.
43
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Dedicated Observation Unit
Marisa D’Ambrosia
Sara Gonzalez JD Assistant Lean PI Director, Achalanka Dalawella Black Belt Project
Manager
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: Determine best practices for a new Dedicated Observation Unit at Robert Wood Johnson
University Hospital through observations and analyzing data.
Significance: By implementing a Dedicated Observation Unit it has been proven through an Emory
Study that there is a 23%-38% shorter length of stay as well as 17%-44% lower probability of subsequent
inpatient admit. Aside from improving the overall patient experience, the addition of a Dedicated
Observation Unit leads to major cost savings of $950 million dollars per year nationally (Ross, 2013).
This evidence indicates that by implementing a Dedicated Observation Unit at Robert Wood Johnson
University Hospital there is potential for cost savings for both the patient and the hospital cutting by
cutting back on length of stay and price of inpatient treatment.
Method/Approach: Best practice research was done to find information on other hospitals’ Dedicated
Observation Units including staffing, standard operation time, bed numbers and average length of stay.
Different types of observation units were identified and researched. Information was used to determine
whether open/closed and scattered/dedicated approaches were best. Data was taken at the hospital by
observing patients to determine their length of stay as well as reasons for being admitted to
observation. Pros and Cons charts were established to come to the decision best for the hospital.
Outcomes: After analysis, it was decided that a closed Dedicated Observation Unit is the model best
suited for the hospital. The overall goal for the unit is, from the decision to admit the patient to time of
discharge, a length of stay of 15 hours. At this time the most common tests ran on observation patients at
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital are in laboratory, hematology and echo. Other observation
units show a higher amount of orders for MRI/MRA and stress testing. Research is now being conducted
to evaluate other hospitals’ turnaround times and goals for testing of observation patients to create goal
turnaround times in this specific Dedicated Observation Unit.
Evaluation: Using the data obtained prior to the implementation of a Dedicated Observation Unit,
changes in turnaround times for patients in observation can be compared. Data will be recorded on
observation patients once the unit is put in place. By comparing the data of observation patient prior to the
implementation of the Dedicated Observation Unit to patients in once the unit is in place it will be
determined if goal turnaround times and length of stay has been met. Financial statements will also give
information as to if the Dedicated Observation Unit has generated an annual cost savings.
44
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Using Clinical Priority in Smoking-Alcohol Comorbidities to Evaluate Clinical Culture
Jeffrey Hipolito David
Dr. Michael Steinberg, M.D., MPH, Medical Director
Robert Wood Johnson Tobacco Dependency Program
Purpose: To gather rudimentary data which evaluates how the specific conditions of tobacco use and
alcoholism are differentially given clinical priority in treatment. To use resultant data to characterize
clinical culture surrounding substance-abuse/addictions treatment.
Significance: In many cases, addiction is a field where comorbidities are commonly presented. In this
case, problematic drinking or alcoholism tends to be associated with low rates of smoking cessation
(Kahler et al 2010). Pre-existing data implies that this association persists irrespective of nationality or
sex. While current data aims to quantify the link between alcoholism and smoking, there is a pervasive
and varied culture in how to intervene given the unique pathologies of alcoholism and smoking. This
culture of treatment can only be given clinical significance after a targeted evaluation of the decisionmaking extant in an addictions specialist/healthcare professional. This relative gap in understanding the
processes of clinical decision-making can only begin assessment by qualitatively characterizing these
traits.
Method/Approach: A short cross-sectional survey was disseminated, via Qualtrics survey-design
programming, from April 6 to April 14, 2015 targeted for healthcare professionals ( “HCP”) specializing
in substance addictions. Using Qualtrics survey-design programming, the qualitative survey will
characterize healthcare professionals into those with smoking/drinking histories, age, gender and work
setting. From there, a series of clinical case scenarios will evaluate a system of beliefs held by the
addictions treatment professional field to test if there are any differences in preferences of treatment
protocol. The presentation of these hypothetical cases will further group participants along treatment
preferences between alcohol treatment or cigarette treatment. Data analysis was carried out at a
confidence level of 95% [ 0.05] .
Outcomes: The survey acquired 23 responders as of April 16, 2015. Demographic spread was
characterized by female (70%), light-drinkers or “less than 2 drinks per sitting” (61%), never smokers
(61%) describing themselves as coming from a “specific addictions policy” institution (61%) versus a
“comprehensive addictions policy” (35%). Nonresponse rate was 23%.
Evaluation: The survey found that there are significant relationships between HCP beliefs and how they
view the value/ treatment-priority of smoking cessation to alcoholism interventions. Treatment priority,
according to survey data, is unrelated to HCP smoking status, drinking status, institution policy [ p = 0.08,
0.99, 0.99] but is more strongly related to patient factors as they interface with HCP personal beliefs
surrounding specific treatment and perspectives of the patient [ p = 0.02, 0.01, 0.00] . In other words,
clinical priority is an intrinsic but observable property and its underlying factors come from beyond the
clinical culture fostered in the addiction treatment field. However, the nature of the significant and no
significant relationships should be treated with discretion since the sample size too small to create
generalizable relationships.
45
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Annual OSHA Report Log for Woodbridge Township
Kristen Della Sala
Magdalena Frangos: Personnel Clerk/Typist
Woodbridge Township Personnel Department
Purpose: To assure timely and accurate reporting of job related injury to OSHA.
Significance: Approximately 4.1 million workers suffer from a serious job-related injury each year and
12 workers daily, die from work-related injuries. These startling numbers are a harsh reality that affects
many Americans today. Put in place to protect workers’ rights, the OSHA 300A Form enables workers to
report when they have been injured or have fallen ill on the job. Every eligible company has to report
their workplace injuries and illnesses and are subject to inspections and citations for purposefully
endangering their workers or failing to provide a safe workplace environment.
Method/Approach: Woodbridge Township reports these injuries to OSHA by reviewing the Initial
Report forms filled out throughout the year by workers. Each report is read and reported onto the
submission form once it is determined if it needs to be reported. If the report indicates “No medical
treatment”, keep it for reference only for if future injuries result from the initial incident. By reading
through the case, the number of days of missed work, or job transfer is determined. The type of condition
is determined by the standards set on page 4 under classifying illnesses. These are injury, skin disorder,
respiratory condition, poisoning, hearing loss, and all other illnesses. The date of injury, job title of
employee, and where the event occurred are to be noted on the form as well.
Outcomes: Of the 1,242 employees of Woodbridge Township, there were reports of 77 injuries, 6 skin
disorders, and 11 respiratory conditions. There were 37 cases that resulted in days away from work, 12
cases of job transfer or restriction, and 45 cases of other recordable illnesses. Also noting, these exclude
all of the police personnel, as their OSHA reporting is handled by the state, even though they are included
in the total number of employees of the township. In short, there was a total of 765 days away from work
and 238 days of transfer or restriction.
Evaluation: An unfortunate amount of workers were injured from on the job situations that could have
been prevented. This leads to many hours of production lost and wages lost. This hurts both the township
and the employee. By patrolling the worksites more thoroughly, having workers trained more extensively,
and teaching them their rights, companies can avoid these tragedies and exponential losses.
46
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Expanding an Aesthetics Medispa Private Practice
Lauren Devecka
Boris Vernovsky, Director of Operations. Dr. Sneha Jacob, Director of HIV Clinical
Services
Quality Health Care and Wellness Center
Purpose: To determine the best equipment and services offered to provide clients with state-of-the-art
procedures in order to enhance their natural beauty with the most advanced cosmetic and medical
procedures while maintaining economic soundness.
Significance: As defined by the International SPA Association, a Medical Spa is an institution whose
primary purpose is to provide comprehensive medical and wellness care in an environment, which
integrates spa services as well as conventional and complementary therapies and treatments. Many plastic
surgeons and dermatologists are joining these medi- spas to become acquainted with the next level of
aesthetics procedures; Cool sculpting, Laser Hair Removal, Botox, Juvederm, Voluma, IV (vampire)
Facial, microdermabrasion facials, etc. It is important to be able to help people with their trouble areas to
bring out the natural beauty in everyone.
Method/Approach: In order to develop this company into what the team strives for it to become their
needs to be additional staff. Both medical doctors and technicians need to be hired. The team is in the
process of finding a dermatologist, to diagnose skin conditions and recommend specific skin care
procedures and promote the medical grade product that we offer, as well as an internal medicine doctor,
to begin medical procedures in office. More lasers are also needed to keep up with the high-demand of
clientele we have been receiving. There are many different types of wavelengths for the laser which are
more suitable than others for different skin tones, hair color, and hair thickness. The most important task
prior to purchasing another machine is to find out the majority demographics of the clients so that we can
most effectively treat those clients as well as make the most profit. A vast amount of research and phone
calls are constantly being made to find adequate staff and affordable equipment to expand this business.
Outcomes: The major goal of my internship is to determine efficient ways to expand the business fiscally
and promote better success for the company. The majority population that uses this facilities service is of
the Indian nationality, which can only use the wavelength ND-YAG due to the darker shade of skin tone.
It would be beneficial for the medi-spa to invest in lasers that have this wavelength so that they can better
service a broader range of people.
Evaluation: There has been a numeric dollar amount set for an appropriate goal of monthly revenue for
the business that has yet to be met. There has been an average monthly income but by buying a laser and
having multiple different doctors, the monthly income should increase and ultimately bring the business
to the next fiscal level in an appropriate manner. If the findings are implemented and revenue is increased
monthly, the project will be a success.
47
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Public Health Education and Promotion for U.S. Fund for UNICEF Campus Initiative
Leaders
Julia Dickhaus
Hillary Larman, Program Engagement Fellow
U.S. Fund for UNICEF
Purpose: To engage college-aged U.S. Fund for UNICEF volunteers on current global public health
issues and academic understanding, making them more informed and qualified to volunteer and lead
Campus Initiatives throughout the United States and the world, as well as contribute to humanitarian
work and public health efforts for their future careers and volunteer work.
Significance: There is an ongoing need for humanitarian work throughout the world, especially in the
area of health. This causes an increased need for volunteers. However, it is also essential that these
volunteers are knowledgeable and qualified. A study conducted by a team of researchers from 4-H found
through surveying approximately 1,400 of their organization’s volunteers, that their volunteers display
and desire a need for improvement in a wide array of competencies (over 30), and this is not uncommon
for volunteers among other organizations as well(VanWinkle, R et al.). By educating and exposing
college-aged students who are already involved in volunteer work through the U.S. Fund for UNICEF’s
Campus Initiative to current public health issues and academic facts, we will create a community of
informed volunteers, decrease their learning curve after graduation, improve the quality of work carried
out by the volunteers, and make them even more passionate and engaged in global public health issues as
a whole.
Method/Approach: The intern, Julia Dickhaus, and preceptor created an introductory survey to assess
need within the population. The survey was distributed to multiple college Campus Initiatives throughout
the United States to evaluate average level of public health education of typical Campus Initiative
volunteers. It will also be used to evaluate the level to which these volunteers are interested in learning
more about public health. The project also includes the creation and distribution of material including, but
not limited to, one-pagers, article summaries, advocacy for online public health learning courses, and
more to provide educational opportunities for these volunteers.
Outcome: This project will educate and prepare UNICEF Campus Initiative volunteers to be engaged
public health workers and advocates. This project will also help future methods of outreach and
education.
Evaluation: The assessment of the outgoing survey in comparison to the introductory survey will
demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach of this project to promote public health education for
engaged volunteers.
48
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Radiation Therapy Elapsed Time for Early Stage Breast Cancer
Feiyang Du
Sheenu Chandwani, PhD
Rutgers School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
Purpose: To expand awareness about breast cancer radiation therapy through data management and data
analytical skills.
Significance: For breast cancer, studies have shown that African-Americans are less likely to receive
radiation therapy than Whites, due to the lack of access to health services. Furthermore, even when
radiation therapy is initiated, African-Americans are more likely to prolong the treatment process or
discontinue early. However, this has not been examined at a national level. Additionally, effect of
prolonged elapsed time during radiation therapy on survival has not been examined.
Method/Approach: We conducted analysis using the National Cancer Database (NCDB), an oncology
outcomes database for accredited cancer programs in the US and Puerto Rico. The study included adult
women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer, who received radiation therapy following surgery, and
survived for at least six months after diagnosis. After cleaning the data and creating data dictionary, we
compared racial differences in socio-demographic, clinical and radiation therapy elapsed time
characteristics between African-Americans and Whites. Then we also examined the association between
radiation therapy elapsed time and overall survival using cox regression. All tasks were completed using
SAS version 9.3.
Outcomes: A total of 404668 women were included in the analysis. African-American women were more
likely to be younger, less educated, have lower income, higher comorbidity, and with late stage and poor
grade tumors. The mean overall elapsed time was 46.2 days (SD= 7.5), 29.8% had > 49 days and 6.0%
had >56 days elapsed time. Elapsed time >49 days was seen among 29.1% White and 36.4% AfricanAmerican women (p<0.001) and >56 days was seen among 5.7% Whites and 9.3% African-Americans
(p<0.0001). A >49 days elapsed was associated with HR= 1.12 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.15) and >56 days was
associated with HR= 1.36 (95% CI: 1.31, 1.41).
Evaluation: African-Americans were more likely to take longer time for radiation therapy than Whites
and longer elapsed time was associated with poor survival. Effort need to be made to improve access and
completion of treatment in a timely manner to reduce disparities in breast cancer outcomes. This study
can be evaluated by analyzing the dataset collected from NCDB - running basic proc formats and
correlations among different variables which can influence the overall survival among those who have
completed radiation therapy in the United States.
49
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Improving HIV Suppression of Viral Load in Patients
Kritika Dubey
Joy Melendez, MSW Program Coordinator, Infectious Diseases; Dr. Sneha Jacob,
Director of HIV Clinical Services
Eric B. Chandler Health Center
Purpose: To match Eric B. Chandler Health Center’s HIV delivery of care with the HIV Cascade stages
and to then study the impact of patient outreach within the “engagement and retention” stage on the
overall patient population’s suppression of viral load rate.
Significance: Based on the CDC data, of the “1.2 million people living with HIV in the U.S. in 2011, an
estimated 86% were diagnosed. This means that 14% (approximately 1 in 7 people living with HIV) were
unaware of their infection and therefore not accessing the care and treatment they need to stay healthy and
reduce the likelihood of transmitting the virus to their partners.” In order to improve this public health
issue, Dr. Gardner established HIV Cascade Stages. The outlined stages serve to bridge the steps a patient
takes from initial diagnosis to successful treatment with HIV Medication. The strategy lies in
incorporating different actions under the cascade. This works to ultimately control a patient’s viral load
while minimizing their risk to others by targeting the issues that tend to cause a patient to fall behind with
their care.
Methods/Approach: Key demographic data was accessed through EMR and data was also entered into
EvaluationWeb, which matched the first step in making sure patients were all linked to care. Engagement
and retention were then matched by reaching out to patients with upcoming appointments and this data
was recorded. Also, for the months from January to March, databases were updated, analyzed to see
patients with missing bloodwork, and these patients were then contacted as well. Records were tabulated
to see how many patients were unreachable, how many patients received voicemails/confirmed, and then
how many of those patients showed up for their appointments. The viral load suppression rate was also
derived from CAREWare at the end of each month.
Outcomes: From the months of January to March and of the sample size cohort (n=214), 11.2% were
unreachable. Of the remaining sample, 159 patients (83.4%) attended their appointments after being
contacted. This number was compared to an sample from a three month period directly before, when no
patients were being contacted, which was 72.0%. Also, the viral load suppression rate was reported from
CAREWare to be 90.02% in January, 90.87% in February, and 93.35% in March.
Evaluation: The data shows a significant 11% increase in patient engagement and retention to care after
the outreach initiative. The viral load suppression rate also shows a 3.33% increase over the time of the
outreach (with the involvement of other factors), which can signify a positive association between patient
outreach and suppression of viral load. Therefore, maintaining the HIV Cascade structure and continuing
patient outreach will serve as effective means of improving HIV Viral Load Suppression Rate and
keeping a patient’s HIV in control while minimizing risk to others.
50
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Impact of Traffic-Related Air Pollution on Childhood Asthma Exacerbation
Nataki Duncan
Dr. Robert Laumbach, M.D., M.P.H., C.I.H. Associate Professor of Environmental and
Occupational Medicine
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI)
Purpose: To determine if chronic stress down-regulates acute stress responses in asthma, which may
make children with higher levels of chronic stress more vulnerable to the effects of air pollution and other
environmental triggers in asthma.
Significance: In the United States, asthma prevalence is at an all-time high. Asthma prevalence is
significantly higher among children, non-whites, and families living below the poverty line. Furthermore,
several studies have suggested traffic pollution contributing to asthma exacerbation. Exposure to stress
and traffic pollution often co-occur in urban communities with high levels of stress. This project aims to
determine if SES, race, and other nonchemical factors affects interact with exposure to air pollutants.
Method: This is a community-based participatory research project in collaboration with the Ironbound
Community Corporation, representing the Ironbound neighborhood, a community with high rates of
asthma and impacted by diesel truck traffic serving the adjacent seaport of Newark. To date, twenty-six
participants, aged 9-14 years, have been recruited and monitored for exposure to black carbon, a marker
of diesel exhaust exposure, and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), a marker of airway inflammation, over a 30day period. To assess chronic stress, diurnal variability of salivary cortisol is measured over 3
consecutive days, using an ELISA assay.
Outcomes:
Data on salivary cortisol and eNO will be assessed for quality assurance (i.e. outliers, coefficient of
variation) with individual plots and distributions. Data will be assessed for normality. Individual mean
diurnal variation (AM cortisol concentrations minus PM cortisol concentrations) will be plotted against
mean eNO level for each participant.
Evaluation:
Pearson’s correlation and tests of statistical significance of any association between mean diurnal
variation in salivary cortisol and mean eNO among children with asthma in the Ironbound will be
conducted. Assessment of this relationship will help determine if chronic stress may be affecting asthma
among children in the Ironbound.
51
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
An Intervention on Hookah Misconceptions and Use among New Jersey Youth
Helena Economikos
Michael B. Steinberg, MD, Tobacco Dependency Program
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Purpose: To educate students about the hazards of hookah smoking
Significance: The use of hookah, a waterpipe used to vaporize and smoke flavored tobacco, remains
widely prevalent among New Jersey young adults and is dangerously shrouded in misperceptions. In the
United States over 25% of young adults are estimated to smoke hookah. Overwhelmingly, studies have
shown that smokers believe that a waterpipe produces a “safer” smoke that is less dangerous than
cigarette smoke. However, hookah tobacco exposes smokers to addictive levels of nicotine, higher levels
of carbon monoxide than cigarettes, and many carcinogens common to cigarettes.
Method/Approach: Information sessions within undergraduate residence halls of Rutgers University
were conducted by medical students attending Robert Wood Johnson. A pre-survey with questions
regarding demographics and general positions towards hookah smoking was distributed to the attendees.
A pamphlet outlining the myths and truths regarding hookah smoking was created and distributed to the
students, accompanied by a presentation on hookah. A post-survey was distributed to the students with
questions asking if their perceptions have been altered due to the presentation. The data obtained from
these surveys was assessed and analyzed.
Evaluation: In order to measure the students’ changes in perceptions, a pre and post survey will be
developed. The pre-survey includes general demographic questions as well as questions regarding hookah
and cigarette usage. After the presentation on hookah, students will be asked to complete the post survey,
which asks how their perceptions on hookah have changed. Data from both surveys will be analyzed and
compared in order to measure the effectiveness of the presentation given.
Outcomes: Twenty students including 8 female and 12 males received the presentation and participated
in the survey. These undergraduate students ranged between the ages of 19 and 23. Of those who have
smoked hookah, 15 tried it before coming to college while only one person tried it after attending college.
Before being educated on the harmful effects of hookah smoking, students were asked to rate how
dangerous they perceive hookah on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 = not at all, 10 = extremely dangerous). Presurvey results indicate a mean rating of 5.2 while post-survey results indicate a mean rating of 7.3
regarding perceptions of danger with hookah smoking. In conclusion, 55% of the participants indicated
that they are less likely to smoke hookah as a result of the information presented to them. Educating
young Americans on the negative impacts of hookah use can decrease the likelihood that they will engage
in this activity.
52
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Exploring the Relationship between media and substance abuse usage
Joanne Ekpeni
Angela Conover
Partnership for a Drug Free New Jersey
Purpose: To analyze the effect of Media Exposure of Marijuana and Alcohol Use Among Adolescents
Significance: Research has made connections between the amount media exposure among adolescents to
drug use. This is important because if researchers are able to identify the root of this substance abuse
issue, they will be able to come up with solutions to help prevent further drug use among the citizens of
New Jersey especially the youth.
Method/Approach: Research will be conducted on alcohol advertising and media exposure on youths.
Then, research will be conducted on the impact of substance abuse advertising and media exposure. After
analyzing the case studies, review of whether media makes any contribution to the alcohol/ substance
abuse usage among youths/ adolescents will be done.
Outcomes: This research will continue to raise awareness among all individuals especially stakeholders
who may be directly impacted by the results presented. Also, it will explore the different factors that are
contributing to drug use among teens other than known causes such as peer pressure.
Evaluation: The results presented should be incorporated into school-based programs that will help
adolescents become aware of the detriments of substance abuse. Subsequent studies should be conducted
to ensure that adolescents understand the dangers of using drugs. In addition, surveys should be used as
markers to measure success of the school based programs
53
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Patients Outcomes through Cardiac Rehabilitation
Sarah M. Eldin
Direct Supervisor: Jose Maniquis; Registered Nurses: Nancy Scalice, Ellen Weiss,
Maureen Atzori
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Cardiac Rehabilitation
Purpose: To analyze physiological and psychological factors in the recovery of post-op open-heart
patients.
Significance: Thousands of heart surgeries are performed every day in the United States. In fact, in a
recent year, surgeons performed 500,000 coronary bypass procedures. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a
branch of rehabilitation medicine like physical therapy dealing with optimizing physical function in
patients with cardiac disease or recent cardiac surgeries. There are good and bad outcomes.
Method/Approach:
•Observe patients throughout the entire Cardiac Rehab process, between the ages of 30-80.
•Research patient history
•Monitor patients heart rate, blood pressure, blood sugar before, during, and after Cardiac Rehab
•Assess patient’s progress
•Adjust patients exercises according to progress
•Reevaluate patients medical stance (BP, metrics, telemetry)
Outcomes: For this study, I observed a patient from the start of cardiac rehabilitation to the very last
session. We named this patient, Patient X. From the first to the last, Patient X strived from a fifteenminute exercise session to a fifty-two minute session. During session 18, Patient X’s ejection fraction
(EF),the amount of blood pumped out of the heart with each heartbeat, rose from 28% to 39%, allowing
him to cease from wearing a Life Vest wearable defibrillator everyday. As Patient X continued, his body
grew stronger, his stamina increased, and his quality of life improved.
Evaluation: This study can be evaluated by analyzing completed exercise reports through the course of
the 36 sessions and evaluation forms for trends in patient treatment plans.
The patient’s cardiologist will assess and evaluate the data and conclude if the patient is ready to move on
to Phase III Independent Cardiac Rehabilitation or if the patient needs further coaching and directing.
54
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Medical Leadership Academy
Amal Elmogahzy
Direct Supervisor: Vincent Joseph
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: To establish a Medical Leadership Academy for high potential physicians at RWJ in order to
develop them as leaders, and allow for collaboration between them and administration.
Significance: Physicians graduate with the clinical skills they need in order to successfully assess,
diagnose, and treat patients; however, few if any, will receive any formal instruction on leadership and
leadership tools. These ‘tools’ are essential in them advancing in their careers as department chairs,
division leaders, or even dean. These tools are equally as essential for bridging the gap that physicians
face when communicating and negotiating with administration. The formal teaching of planning,
budgeting, team management, and hospital finances, among many other topics, will aid in bridging the
gap between physicians and administration at RWJ.
Method/Approach: A review of five of the top physician leadership academies around the nation was
conducted. Based off of the experiences observed at the top five institutions, positives and negatives were
taken into play. Meetings with key stakeholders were conducted in order to ensure everyone was on the
same page with the mission. After gathering all of the prior information, as well as doing ample research
on all academy topics, a curriculum was formulated and adjusted to the mission of RWJ. To accompany
the lecture aspect of the curriculum, research was done in order to develop interactive activities for the
physicians to put their learning into play. Prior to the first class logistical operations need to be carried
out. These include putting together a selection committee to select the inaugural class, setting up a
calendar and location for the classes, and preparing the required materials for the selected physicians.
Outcomes: The curriculum will consist of twelve different topics that will be taught by highly qualified
professionals in their respective fields. The course will be taught over a period of nine months. Each class
will include a lecture as well as an interactive group activity where the physicians can bring their learning
into realistic role-play. This will allow for increased interaction and interpersonal skills between different
physicians at both the New Brunswick and Somerset campuses. At the conclusion of the course, the
physicians will be able to actively play a role in the planning, executing, and final decision making
process of many projects at RWJ.
Evaluation: During the first class a pre test will be given to the physicians in order to assess the
knowledge, or lack there of, the physicians possess on the academy topics. During the last class a posttest
will be administered in order to compare to the pre test and assess whether or not the academy was
successful in reaching its purpose. The success of the course will remain as tools the physicians will use
and incorporate into their interactions with their peers as well as hospital administration. In order to assess
if the tools they are taught are being translated in their work, a satisfaction survey will be conducted six
months post graduation.
55
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
New Jersey Local Information Network and Communications System Program
Princess Chisom Emeana
Ms. Carrie Johnson
New Jersey Department of Health—Middlesex County
Purpose: To create a database that targets NJ LINCS audience (i.e. physicians, assisting living center,
adult day care centers, etc) with current and prevalent health topics and collect metrics of response rates
among each category.
Significance: Often, the public relies on the media and social networks to get their information but it is
not always correct or up-to-date. To make good decisions about health care, good information is needed.
The New Jersey Local Information Network Communications System (LINCS) program provides
accurate public health information from the New Jersey State Department of Health, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC), Local Health Departments, and other reliable, accredited sources to all
healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, emergency medical technicians and other first
responders. The information from these various sources links together local, state, and federal partners to
protect communities from both man-made and natural occurring disasters.
Method/Approach: A database with 1,939 contacts was created that collected information (practice,
phone number, fax number, electronic mail address, and type of practice) on physicians (e.g.
pediatricians, family practice, and internal medicine) in Middlesex County. In addition, two other
databases were created: long term and assisted living facilities (56 contacts) and adult day care facilities
(20 contacts). The 1,939 contacts collected from the initial database was consolidated into 219 unique
contacts by practice and address. Each of these contacts received a mailing containing an informational
letter about the NJ-LINCS program and an application sheet to be returned to the Middlesex County
Office of Health Services inviting them to enroll in the NJ-LINCS program. In addition to the letter and
application, each contact received a pocket reference guide of reporting requirements for communicable
diseases and work-related conditions paraphernalia provided by the New Jersey Department of Health
(NJDOH). The 56 contacts of long term and assisted living facilities and the 20 contacts of adult day
care facilities required no further consolidation. The long term and assisted living facilities received the
same information as the physicians, but the adult day care facilities only received the introductory letter
and application.
Outcomes: Of the 219 physicians mailed, 14 mailings were returned due to invalid mailing addresses, so
of the 205 contacts remaining, 37 physicians responded, yielding an 18.05% success rate. Of the 56 longterm care and assisted living facilities contacts, 2 mailings were returned due to invalid mailing addresses.
Of the 54 remaining contacts, 8 facilities enrolled for a or 14.81% success rate. Lastly, of the 20 adult day
care facilities, there were 10 enrollments, yielding a 50% success rate.
Evaluation: The results can be evaluated through the number of the responses received from the actual
practices and/or individuals that are being contacted. In addition, follow up emails are sent to each
individual and practice who sends in a completed NJ-LINCS form to confirm their participation in the
program and the success rate of NJ-LINC.
56
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Healthy Living Program
Shanequa Evans
Laura Eppinger, Program Associate
New Brunswick 4-H, Youth Development Program
Purpose: To provide informal education to the youth about the essential components of a healthy
lifestyle, in an effort to enable them to make better healthier decisions.
Significance: The 4-H Healthy Living curricula is catered to urban, at-risk youth. Individuals living in
urban communities are subjected to various social determinants of health that adversely impact their
health. Findholt and Izumi, et al. (2014) found that low-income urban communities have limited
availability of healthy snacks and fruit in the stores near their communities. According to Healthy People
2020, limited access is a social determinant of health. Individuals in urban communities have limited
access to many resources, which inhibits their abilities to make healthier decisions.
Methods/Approach: A pretest of the healthy living curricula was given to six out of ten middle school
students in the after-school program. The participants include both females and males. The participants
are between the ages of 11-13 years old. Specific materials are developed throughout the 6-week
program, which supplement the lessons that are taught. The participants are taught a different health
lesson every week. At the end they will be given a posttest to assess their growth of their knowledge
throughout the program.
Outcomes: Out of the sample size cohort (n=10), 4 (40%) of students reported that they were now
comfortable reading nutrition fact labels, 3 (30%) of students reported that they would like more lessons
on healthy living, and 3 (30%) of students indicated that they would attempt to make better food choices.
Through this program the students gained awareness, knowledge, and skills needed to promote healthy
lifestyles. The data collected from this sample will gear how the healthy living curricula will be delivered
in the future.
Evaluation: A pre-test was distributed to test the knowledge of the students prior to the program. Posttests were distributed to gage how the students’ knowledge has increased after the program. In addition, a
satisfaction survey was given to the school’s coordinator to rate the overall effectiveness of the program.
More than half (n = 7, 70%) of the participants from the sample size cohort (n = 10, 100%), reported that
their knowledge of a healthy lifestyle increased from the program. Take-home pamphlets, and health
education workshops will serve as effective strategies to (a) Improve intake of nutritional food group
servings, and (b) decrease risk factors for potential health problems.
57
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Community Health Promotion Programs
Yumna Fahmy
Christopher Chapman, Health Officer
Health Department-Borough of Ringwood
Purpose: Promote health and wellness to the underserved people in the community through health clinics
and recreational activities. Health will be promoted by advertising our clinics and activities throughout
the town.
Significance: 4.7% of Ringwood residents live in poverty. This percentage constitutes 2,602 residents
(2010 US Census Bureau). When assessing the utilization of current programs in regards to the
population it was discovered that only 8.35% of the community participated in the Community Health
Programs offered in Ringwood. This could be due to the fact that clinics are not currently advertised on
the Ringwood website, community areas, or any social media outlets.
Method: Seeking to improve the awareness of these programs through numerous communication outlets
is very important. The spring calendar of events starts April 29 for the Child Health Clinic. Confirmation
of the Child Health Clinic and it offerings (description) are needed so that a flyer can be created and
promoted for this event. People who do not have computers or may be computer illiterate need to be
reached so they will be mass mailing, distribute fliers, and post fliers in prominent parts of town. If the
clinics are for children, information will be sent out to schools and daycare centers to inform the students
of when the clinics will be held.
Outcome: An increase of Ringwood residents will participate in going to the health clinics. An increase
number of people coming to our clinics will mean that people do not have to worry about paying their
huge deductibles but can get service for little or no money. 20 people currently made appointments for the
clinic, which is a start in the good direction.
Evaluation: After the clinic, the number of people who showed up will be compared to last year’s
numbers and look for any increases, which would be a result of the advertisement.
58
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Living Life to the Fullest
Claudia Felix
Melanie M. Ford, Director
New Brunswick Senior Citizen Resource Center
Purpose: To enhance the quality of life, mentally, physically, and educationally, by creating a supportive,
caring, and nurturing environment for the elders
Significance: The main goals for senior resource centers are to keep independent seniors active and
healthy. Their overall mission is a five fold one; first to provide information and referral services, second
is to provide a caring and nurturing environment, third is to help seniors create a support system which
helps them to lead an independent lifestyle, fourth is to make connections in the community, and lastly is
to promote the celebration of life through physical and mental well-being. The New Brunswick Senior
Citizen Resource Center serves approximately 1,000 New Brunswick members who are sixty years and
older, by engaging them in a variety of programs related with health, physical, cultural enrichment. These
activities are theatre, music appreciation, hospital visits, social, and recreational. Their purpose is to help
the participants stimulate their interests, creativity, and artistic expression. A cultural program that will be
implemented is going to transform the senior center into an Egyptian City, so members can enhance their
knowledge by actively learning about Egypt through this cultural forum. Active learning will enhance the
quality of life.
Method: The New Brunswick Senior Center community room will be transformed into an Egyptian City
on April 16th with books, pictures, music, and food. A guest speaker and live entertainment incorporating
the belly dance troupe will be added to the experience. By creating an Egyptian atmosphere members will
be exposed to the history, culture, customs, and cuisine of Egypt.
Outcomes: The New Brunswick Senior Community Center will produce a fun filled experience and will
stimulate the seniors’ interests. It will be a day where the seniors join together with their support group to
enhance their well being mentally, physically, and educationally.
Evaluation: Satisfaction surveys will be passed around, and post games such as educational jeopardy,
scrambled word games, and crossword puzzles will be implemented to see if active learning of the culture
was acquired.
59
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Regional Elementary School Hand Washing Needs Assessment
Gabrielle Galati
Cleo Hendrickson, Regional Officer, Volunteer Services
American Red Cross South Jersey Region
Purpose: To determine the current hand-washing habits of elementary students grades K-2, to be able to
decide if there is a need for a program implementation.
Significance: Hand washing is a simple, effective way to reduce the spread of illness. Curtis et al.
estimated that 1 million lives could be saved a year if everyone washed their hands consistently. Young
children often do not understand what germs are and how they spread. That is why it is important they are
educated on proper hygiene. Conducting this needs assessment will give us an idea of the hand washing
habits of elementary students grades K-2.
Method/Approach: A survey was created with questions about students hand washing habits and
whether the school taught about hand washing. The survey was mailed to 45 school nurses; 5 randomly
selected from each of the 9 counties in the covered region. A needs assessment was written based on the
results of the returned surveys, and also other online research on local hand washing programs.
Outcomes: This needs assessment will aid in the possible reimplementation of a youth hand washing
program to be offered throughout the region.
Evaluation: The project can be evaluated by analyzing the completed surveys for trends.
60
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Power of Health Education and Data Management
Charline Ganthier
Alyssa Schaffer, Coordinator of Community Health and Education; Jessica Walsh,
Communications and Data Manager
Susan G. Komen Philadelphia Affiliate
Purpose: To understand the appropriate, effective and efficient tools needed to plan events and breast
health program that motivates people to take action steps that may reduce their risk of breast cancer. This
is done by analyzing data from previous registrants, participants and sponsors to build upon these events
and programs to achieve our mission.
Significance: According to Susan G. Komen in 2015 estimated that among United States women there
will be 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer, 60,290 new cases of in situ breast cancer and 40,290
breast cancer deaths. Proper data management and Health Education are crucial when dealing with a
detrimental disease.
Method/Approach:
Methods used to complete this project include:
Step 1: Prepared flyers and invitations for health education events within the upcoming months
Step 2: Registered individuals for these events
Step 3: Analyzed pre and post surveys
Step 4: Deleted duplicate constituent records without the software and database
Step 5: Sent out recognition letters to previous race participants, fundraising team captains from previous
year
Step 6: Sent out reminders to those who attended and participated in the previous year
Step 7: Updated postings about event information on social media accounts
Step 8: Reached out to past volunteers in reference to this year’s events
Outcomes: There has been a huge decrease in the number of participants and fundraising efforts when
compared to last year’s figures. There is an expected slow increase in the number of race participants and
attendance at the educational events. There will be an increase due to the projected number of walk on
participants. There is also an expected difference between the pre and post test distributed at the
educational events. Some future outcomes may include more action steps taken by the community to
reduce their risks of breast cancer through the I AM THE CURE program on race day.
Evaluation: The results are real because of the pre/post tests and follow up surveys distributed
throughout the events. Data entry is very accurate. It is spot checked very thoroughly by the
Communications and Data Manager. Benchmarks that will demonstrate success include the number of
participants on race day and total fundraised on race day. A final document with the facts and figures on
Race day, May 10, 2015 will be accessible.
61
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Head Shop Ordinance
Steve Garcia
Donna Ivy, Director of Department of Health & Human Services
City of Paterson - Department of Health & Human Services
Purpose: To create a city ordinance that will regulate the proliferation of head shops in order to protect
the health, safety, and quality of life for Paterson residents.
Significance: There are many new and unknown psychoactive substances that are being marketed and
sold as legal intoxicants in head shops. These substances can be potentially dangerous to one’s health as
they can contain a number of harmful chemicals with unknown properties. In 2013 and 2014, the City of
Paterson issued 7 business licenses for new head shops. Additionally, there are 4 pending head shop
license applications. Adopting a moratorium on the establishments of head shops will allow the city to
review its zoning ordinances so that these businesses are restricted from operating within certain distances
of other establishments.
Method/Approach: After reviewing the city businesses registry, it was determined that there are 14 legal
head shops within city limits. The city’s Municipal Alliance Prevention Program (MAPP) conducted
research to assess the locations of head shops and their proximity to other businesses. With the help of
Passaic County officials, MAPP coordinators also reviewed head shop business practices and the
merchandise they carried. After receiving approval from the Paterson Board of Education, assessments
were followed up with a survey of local teens to ascertain their knowledge and opinion about head shops.
Outcomes: It was determined that 7 head shops are less than 1000 feet from 8 of the city’s 48 public
schools. 13 head shops were found to be located less than 1000 feet from other establishments including
churches, grocery stores, laundromats, liquor stores, beauty parlors, etc. Of the students surveyed
(n=447), 234 (52%) had entered a head shop within the past month. Out of the 234 students that had
entered a head shop in, 140 (59%) had made a purchase within the past month, including 43 seniors, 57
juniors, 28 sophomores, and 12 freshmen. Some of the items purchased included smoking pipes, water
pipes, gel caps, powders, herbal mixes, rolling papers, and other drug paraphernalia. Interestingly, survey
results revealed that 309 students (69%) agreed that individuals should have to be 18 or older to enter a
smoke shop and make a purchase.
Evaluation: If the Mayor and City Council vote to pass the Head Shop Ordinance, Donna Nelson-Ivy,
the Director of Health & Human Services along with Tenee Joyner, the Municipal Alliance Prevention
Program Director will conduct follow-up assessments to ensure that these businesses are in compliance
with zoning ordinances and that individuals who are making purchases are being asked for identification
before they make a purchase.
62
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Women Empowerment & Leadership Summit Program
Faidat Gbajabiamila
Dr. Yetunde Odugbesan-Omede
Young Woman’s Guide, INC
Purpose: The purpose of this program is to empower young women to lead by providing a “roadmap” on
how to achieve personal success alongside leadership development and personal empowering skills.
Significance: Gender equality is a right but the world faces a consistent gap in the access to opportunities
for women to lead. In this current day and age, there is a global gender revolution where women are
starting to grow into the social and economic power to use their talents and skill and lead with passion.
With women’s empowerment being a critical factor in achieving gender equality, it is important that
young women from all backgrounds know their true worth and begin to lead in their schools and
communities and eventually learn to lead their own company. Women’s empowerment increases a
woman’s sense of worth, decision-making power, access to opportunities and option to influence change.
Method/Approach: A Leadership Summit Program that will give students tips on leadership
development and women empowerment including leadership building activities, panelist discussions and
workshops such as the “Dream Board Project” workshop.
Outcomes: Place for young women to network in their various fields. Making a platform for young
women to launch their careers and goals. Guiding young women who are unsure of future endeavors.
Conducting a roadmap to entrepreneurial success. In the works of creating an organization where fellow
women leaders have the platform to empower other women on campus through various network streams
and leadership activities for years to come.
Evaluation: Building young women’s leadership development in various clubs and organizations here at
Rutgers University. Analyzing young women’s vision and goals in life and how to implement it toward
success.
63
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
American Health Lawyers Association’s Representing Physicians Handbook Publication
Yasmine Givehchi
Lisa Gora, Esq. and Michael Schaff, Esq.
Wilentz, Goldman & Spitzer
Purpose: To publish the AHLA’s Representing Physicians Handbook in a timely and efficient manner by
organizing the revisions of authors and editors of all 24 Chapters to create a publication which will serve
as a guide to Health Lawyers.
Significance: The third edition of AHLA’s Representing Physicians Handbook was published in
2012. An update for the handbook is necessary, as a result of the changing healthcare landscape and
expanding healthcare laws and regulations. The handbook serves as a guide for lawyers in representing
physician clients on a wide range of issues, including, but not limited to, Telemedicine, Industry
Relationships, and Concierge Medicine. The 4th edition of AHLA’s Representing Physicians Handbook
is expected to be ready for purchase in May 2015.
Method/Approach: In the initial stages, the handbook’s coordinating editor reached out to potential
authors and editors within AHLA and created charts with the contact information for each author and
editor and designated certain roles to each person. The project has three stages of involvement: author, 1st
round editor, and 2nd round editor. The project management process includes scheduling, troubleshooting,
and communicating with authors and editors on a regular basis. Troubleshooting required constant
monitoring of the process and strategic problem solving.
Outcomes: Most authors and editors are cooperating and meeting deadlines. A deadline extension was
provided to some who needed additional time. However, the book is expected to be completed on time
and be an invaluable resource to lawyers working with physician clients.
Evaluation: The project will be evaluated based on whether or not it is published by May 2015. Also, it
can be evaluated for it’s success by the purchase volume for the book, whether or not edits need to be
made post-publication, and the review and feedback of AHLA members, other peers and the overall
health law community.
Lessons Learned: An obstacle faced were authors not wanting to work with other authors or authors,
which demonstrated the importance of adaptability when circumstances changed. Additionally, when
authors or editors dismissed themselves from the project, members with the least responsibilities were
contacted to fill these vacancies. This emphasized the importance of establishing a strategy or plan of
action for when things go off track.
64
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Increase Family Bonding
Joice Goag
Dominque Garrett and Medji Jean, Family Partner; Priscilla Muchado, Family Success
Center Director
Prevention Links- Bayway Family Success Center, Elizabeth, NJ
Purpose: To encourage and increase family bonding by participating in weekly community sponsored
activities and games.
Significance: Family bonding time is an important time to build and make relationships stronger within
the family because it helps family members to learn how to communicate and work together effectively.
Children learn how to behave and communicate in society by watching and interacting with their parents
and other family members. Setting a designated family time influences the child’s later development as an
adult, as it inspires positive growth and a happier and healthier individual. Family bonding is especially
emphasized in the Bayway community because its been observed that there has been lack of interaction
between parents and their children. The Family Activities program stresses the importance of interacting
and spending time together as a family unit.
Method/Approach: The approach that will be taken to initiate and promote this program is to notify
residents weekly by personally making phone calls to each home to remind of this event. Ensuring
attendance allows determining careful preparation in setting up rooms with adequate food and supplies for
the expected number of families that day. As families come in, they follow the routine of signing sign-in
sheets. The designated activities differ from week to week, which may range from arts and crafts, game
nights, and nutrition workshops.
Outcomes: These events benefit families by strengthening family bonds by improving communication
and improving relationships within the family. As families gather together, this also provides as an
opportunity for the community to build friendships with other residents and the family partners in the
center. Weekly gatherings also gives residents a sense of ownership that promote neighborhood action
when necessary, and increases trust and security, and appreciation toward the community.
Evaluation: After conducting interviews and surveys for the participants of the program, it can be
concluded that this program has positively influenced the community. However, it can be concluded that
parents do not attend the activities weekly, whereas the children are more consistent in their participation.
There needs to be more incentives for parent involvement, as well as other community outreach methods
to promote family participation.
65
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Sisters Informing Healing and Empowering (SIHLE)
D’Juana Gordon
Deloris Dockrey
Hyacinth AIDS foundation
Purpose: To empower and educate African American teenage girls affected directly and indirectly by
HIV to live a successful and healthier lifestyle through educational workshops.
Significance: In 2010, the youth (ages 13-24) made up 17% of the United States population but
accounted for nearly 26% of all new HIV infections. In that same year black youth accounted for an
estimated 27% of all new HIV infections amongst youth. According to the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, in the year 2012 62,400 young people are living with HIV but half are unaware of their
status. By educating women about HIV it can help prevent new infections because they are equipped with
knowledge how to protect themselves. HIV education also plays a vital role in reducing stigma against
HIV. By reducing stigma and providing people with basic scientific facts women can turn their
knowledge into action. Empowering women is also important because they are in a position where they
can take control of their sexual behavior or general lifestyles.
Method/Approach: SIHLE is a peer-led, social-skills training intervention that is aimed at reducing HIV
sexual risk behavior among sexually active, African American teenage females, ages 14-18. This program
was implemented in a high school located in Plainfield, New Jersey. The pretests and posttests for the 14
girls that attended the workshop was exported on to an excel spreadsheet. The pretest and posttest focused
on if the knowledge of basic scientific HIV facts (“A positive HIV Antibody test means that you have
AIDS”), sexual partner confidence/respect (“Can you discuss condom use with your main partner”) and
condom usage (“Are you going to use a condom the next time you have sexual intercourse?”)
Outcomes: For Objective 1 (Basic Scientific HIV facts) of the 14 girls 64.45% answered correctly on the
pretest and 67.86% answered correctly on the post test. This is a 3.41% overall improvement. For
Objective 2 (Sexual partner confidence/respect) of the 14 girls 62.67% answered that they were confident
in speaking to the sexual partners about birth control method and in the posttest 71.55% answered that
they were confident. This is an 8.88% improvement. For Objective 3, in the pretest 20% girls responded
that they were not most likely to use a condom the next time they had sexual intercourse and in the post
test 84.62% responded that they would use condoms upon next sexual intercourse. This is a 64.62%
improvement.
Evaluation:
All 14 participants have shown improvements in basic scientific HIV facts, sexual partner
confidence/respect and condom usage. Every percent increase in each objective reflects that participants
have gained information that can help empower themselves as well as combat HIV.
66
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Strategizing to Promote Healthy Environments for Rutgers Students
Keyla Grullon
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach, Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E.), Rutgers Health Services
Purpose: To create a healthier environment for the Rutgers community by encouraging healthy decisions,
through HERO, for both the university’s on campus and off campus populations.
Significance: According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 1,825 college
students between the ages of 18 and 24 die every year due to unintentional alcohol-related injuries. This is
a public health concern especially with the alcohol related death of a 19 year old Rutgers student last year
which affected the Rutgers community deeply.
Method/Approach: H.O.P.E.’s resources and HERO materials will be recycled in order to create
outreach strategies for contacting key stakeholders and members of the community. Research in outreach
strategies can also help reach students in such a diverse and crowded campus. Tabling events and the use
of HERO materials such as decals, posters, brochures and bracelets, is a way to approach reaching on and
off campus students as well as creating a constant presence of responsible decision making. After
contacting key members of the community, businesses that provide alcoholic beverages near campus will
be visited to procure support.
Outcomes: The expected outcome for this project is to create a higher level of awareness at Rutgers as
well as in the entire public health community. This project attempts to directly affect students to make
intelligent decisions but on the larger scope, it indirectly attempts to affect all communities to promote
peer safety as well as individual and group responsibility. Having at least 6 bars, restaurants and
neighboring business who agree to support the program, as well as having at least 50 students take the
pledge to become designated friends is anticipated.
Evaluation: Surveying the students to determine what other factors influence healthy decision making
and whether they got any insight from the HERO project will be undertaken to test its effectiveness.
67
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Establishing an Online Platform for Cross-Sharing of Health Information and Resources
in Central Jersey
Ewelina Gwiszcz
Direct Supervisor: Marge Drozd, Director of Community Mobile Health Services of Saint
Peter’s University Hospital, Project Supervisor: Zachary Taylor, MEd, CHES,
Coordinator of the Community Health Consortium for Central Jersey, Project Supervisor:
Tara Gunthner, BSN
Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Community Mobile Health Services
Purpose: To create a sustainable web-based system that ensures a method of communication between
community health partners on health issues pertaining to the Middlesex and Somerset* County
Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP).
Significance: Creation of a centralized website would provide a system of information sharing among
community health partners and members of the general public who are in Middlesex County and the
southeast section of Somerset county hospital catchment areas. Accumulation and condensation of this
information would provide a simple and accessible way to connect to organizations as well as the
services, information, and events they provide.
Methods/Approach: Multiple preparation steps were carried out in anticipation of the consortium’s
future website launch. Government and hospital documents containing the main content for the website
were reviewed and separated into manageable fragments for ensured understanding by the public.
Community health partners recognized as an asset to the goals of the CHIP were contacted for data
collection efforts and new relationships were established during this process. A relationship with the
Rutgers University Imaginate was established to develop a marketing campaign for both a website name
and logo. Additionally, a budget outlining the costs of creating and maintaining the website was created.
Anticipated Results/Outcomes: It is anticipated that once launched, the website will be a frequently
used information hub that can be accessed by health organizations and the public. Updates will be
performed on a monthly basis to keep information current and aligned with the goals of the CHIP.
Evaluation: The consortium will evaluate efforts and come to a decision on how to proceed with the
development of the website. Once online, effects of the website will be evaluated by tracking the number
of unique monthly page hits it receives. Increased participation in available programs due to website
participation will also be assessed through collaboration with the community partners.
*Refers to the Southeast Section of Somerset County
68
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
The Effects of Methadone Maintenance Therapy on the Health and Well-Being of
Pregnant Women Addicted to Opioid Drugs and Their Infants
Nicole Halasan
Ellen Shuzman, PhD, RNC-OB, APN
Central Jersey Family Health Consortium (CJFHC)
Purpose: To educate healthcare professionals, specifically nurses, about promoting women’s health
services for pregnant women with opioid addictions and their newborns. This project focuses on the
Central Jersey area using Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) programs.
Significance: It is a common misconception that Methadone Maintenance Therapy can lead to Neonatal
Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). NAS is a set of complications that occur in newborns that are exposed to
addictive opiate drugs while in the womb. In fact, women who breastfeed while in the Methadone
Maintenance Therapy program are decreasing the likelihood of NAS symptoms. Breastfeeding transfers
methadone in the breast milk at small doses relieving withdrawal symptoms. Furthermore, MMT has been
the gold standard for pregnant women addicted to opioids since the 1970’s. Women who are in the MMT
programs are less likely to abuse illicit opioid drugs and less likely to experience withdrawal. This
decrease in drug abuse can also decrease the risk of pregnant women contracting diseases from IV drugs
such as Hepatitis B and C, further preventing the risk of infants being born with these diseases.
Method/Approach: Data are being collected through the literature provided by the Central Jersey Family
Health Consortium. Any additional resources are found through Rutgers databases and public domains.
Background information and diagrams about addiction: the physical and mental effects are found through
the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration (SAMHSA).
Outcomes: This data will then be presented as a learning module for a continuing education module
called “Methadone a Self-Study Module Developed for Healthcare Professionals” at the Central Jersey
Family Health Consortium.
Evaluation: This project can be evaluated through surveying nurses in the Central Jersey area, three
months later after they have studied the learning module. The nurses will be sent a survey asking whether
they had patients who were addicted to opioids, and if these patients were referred to a Methadone
Maintenance Therapy program. Furthermore, these nurses will be questioned on other concepts they
learned from the module and whether the concepts were applied in the hospitals.
69
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
R.I.S.E. (Reaching Into Self Empowerment)
Kerri Hanson
Sue Wasserman, Community Services Director
National Council of Jewish Women/Essex County, Center for Women
Purpose: The purpose of this project is to empower women through either a 6-week intensive workshop
series. The goals of the workshops are to provide guidance, to encourage a network of peer support,
improve self-esteem, and to prepare women for the process of finding work opportunities. The R.I.S.E.
program facilitates lessons in setting goals, utilizing self-affirmations, and practicing meditation and
includes alumni connection groups at the end of the program.
Significance: Self-esteem is a very important indicator of overall wellness. Self-esteem involves an
understanding of the self and a positive attitude toward the self. By having a positive self image, women
are able to find a purpose or goal in life that allows for further successes. Individuals with self-esteem are
empowered to undertake new opportunities, to contribute more effectively to groups and societies. People
with self-esteem are more adept to find solutions to difficult situations (Di Paula and Campbell 2002).
Method/Approach: A survey of demographic information and self-reported levels of self-esteem using
the Rosenberg Self Esteem scale was provided by a Licensed Professional Counselor to the participants at
the start and end of the program. The Rosenberg Self Esteem scale uses values 0-30 to indicate self
esteem levels. A range of 0-14 indicates low self-esteem. Values within a range of 15-25 indicate normal
self-esteem levels. A range of 26-30 indicates a high self-esteem level. Data was collected to evaluate the
change in self-esteem levels of the participants. Evaluation of these results show the effectiveness of the
goals and objectives of the program with respect to self-reported self-esteem levels over the course of the
program.
Outcomes: Of the 8 women who participated in the survey, 1 (13%) had self-reported levels of self
esteem from 26 to 28, 1 (13%) reported self-esteem levels within the normal range of 23, and 1 (13%)
participated in the initial survey and did not participate in the second survey. Of the 8 women, 1 (13%)
showed a slight increase in self-reported self-esteem levels within normal range, 1 (13%) showed a slight
decrease within normal range, and 3 (38%) had self-reported self-esteem levels that rose from a normal
range to a high range.
Evaluation: Although the sample size is not large enough to provide conclusive results, self-esteem
levels did rise in individual cases (n=5, 63%) over the course of the R.I.S.E. program. A view at the
Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale in a structured study with a larger sample size demonstrates greater
variation in self-esteem levels. This could suggest a similar pattern in the R.I.S.E. program with a larger
sample size. In a larger study, results may show that the components of achieving goals, positive selfaffirmations, and creating a mind and body connection within the R.I.S.E. program contribute to
increased levels of self-esteem.
70
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Women and Heart Disease
Rahdley Hao
Vicky Coll Susan Massad, M.D., Faculty Member
The American Heart Association
Purpose: To determine how knowledgeable and informed women are about heart disease and their
susceptibility to it.
Significance: Heart disease causes 1 in 3 deaths each year amongst women, making it the number one
cause of death for women. Approximately 90% of women have one or more risk factors for developing
heart disease. A majority of women are unaware about how serious of a threat heart disease is to them and
instead believe that breast cancer is their greatest health concern. But, only 1 in 31 American women die
each year to breast cancer while 1 in 3 die from heart disease. More awareness and education on the
prevention of heart disease is important for women across America to live happier and healthier lives.
Method/Approach: An online survey was used asking three simple but important questions regarding
people’s opinions and knowledge of heart disease in relation to women.
Outcomes: There were 32 people who participated in this online survey. For the first question, 22/32
people (68.8%) said that men and women are not affected in the same way by heart disease, 6/32 (18.8%)
said that they are, and 4/32 (12.5%) said that the do not know. In the second question, 17/32 (53.1%)
believed that 1 in 10 women are killed each year by heart disease, 11/32 (34.4%) believed that 1 in 3
women are killed each year by heart disease, 2/32 people (6.3%) believed that 1 in 15 women are killed
each year by heart disease, and 2/32 people (6.3%) believed that not many women are killed each year by
heart disease.. For the third question, 14/32 (43.8%) believed that breast cancer is not a greater health
concern that heart disease for women, while 11/32 (34.4%) believe that it is, and 7/32 (21.9%) did not
know or could not form an opinion on the matter.
Evaluation: The original goal was to determine women’s knowledge on heart disease and their
susceptibility to it, but the online survey made it difficult to recruit just women to participate. It is also
important to note that a majority of the people who participated in this survey had college level education
and also had knowledge in public health and the healthcare field in general. This may have led to bias in
answering the questions as these people are more likely to be aware of heart disease and women’s
susceptibility to it.
71
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Public Health Implications of Psychiatric Nosology
Jennifer Hegarty
Melissa Meyer, International Training and Programs Coordinator
Matthew Gonzalez, Intern Coordinator; Susan Massad, M.D., Faculty
The East Side Institute for Group and Short Term Psychotherapy
Purpose: To assess the adverse impact of the current psychiatric taxonomy, or diagnostic model, of
mental disorder on community mental health awareness and service accessibility within the New York
Metropolitan Area, in an effort to promote and develop adequate alternatives for improvement.
Significance: According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), the public mental health
system in the State of New York currently services only 57% of its near 900,000 residents who suffer
from a serious mental illness (SMI). Albeit contributory, the state’s own inefficacy in delivering mental
health services to the aggregate population in need does not comprehensively explain dissonance of this
magnitude. Analysis of survey data on community mental health perspectives will locate areas of both
success and deficit in mental health promotion and practice within the public sector. Additional
assessment of the East Side Institute’s research, development, and implementation of communityorganization practices and therapeutic alternatives to mental disorder diagnostics will provide insight into
one organization’s efforts to improve accessibility of quality community mental health services.
Method/Approach: A thorough analysis was performed on a community outreach study conducted by
the co-founder of the East Side Institute, Lois Holzman, Ph.D, to gather data on the current status of
mental health awareness, with regard to emotional distress and psychiatric diagnosis, in New York City
communities. Supplementary research was conducted on the subject to obtain credible, comparable data
that substantiates other significant impediments to adequate public mental health awareness and
accessibility of mental health services. Investigative comparisons examined New York State mental
health legislations alongside the above evidentiary materials to assess their impact on the public burden of
disease, followed by an in-depth evaluation of the alternative approaches developed and implemented by
the East Side Institute and its syndicated organizations.
Outcomes: Projected results should yield insight into the role of diagnostic taxonomy, amongst other
factors, in contributing to insufficiencies in the accessibility and/or delivery of mental health services, and
the overall burden of mental illness in the New York Metropolitan Area. These results should also
demonstrate the success of alternative practices in making comprehensive improvements to the
community mental health sector. The aforementioned theoretical results will be superseded by actual
data, as it becomes available in the coming days.
Evaluation: The accuracy and success of this project will be evaluated through scholarly comparison
with the results of similar research studies, as well as previously defined statistics published by official
agencies.
72
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Social Media as a Tool of Civic Engagement Amongst College-Aged Students
Shaila A. Huq
Direct supervisor and project supervisor Jennifer Fraser, Regional Organizer for ONE
Campus program
The ONE Campaign
Purpose: This study seeks to examine the most efficient methods of utilizing social media to engage
college-aged (18-24) students and generate quantifiable advocacy actions, specific to a campaign on
public health and wellbeing.
Significance: Some social scientists argue that “social media is used as part of a project of reappropriation of public space” and a critical component of the current activist movement (Gerbaudo,
2012), while others argue that it is lazy “clicktivism” that shows no real results or change. While many
studies exist continuing this debate, a perusal of the literature shows a gap in data on the efficacy of
specific forms of social media as a tool of civic engagement, specifically on collegiate campuses.
Method: Example social media posts were created, either based off or directly taken off of real social
campaigns that the ONE Campaign has employed in previous years. Content included text-based articles,
“listicles”, graphics, and a video, posted in the form of popular social media sites (i.e. FB, Instagram,
Twitter). A Likert scale-based survey paired with qualifying text-response questions was administered to
sixty students, ages ranging from 17-24 in order to find 1) preference towards social media site 2)
preference towards social media content and 3) likelihood of advocacy action generation (civic
engagement).
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=60), 49 answered both the Likert and text-based responses to
completion. With a scale for likelihood of completing an advocacy action (1= least likely; 5= most
likely), the average responses are as follows: text-based articles (3), “listicles” (4), graphics (3), and video
(4). In evaluating text-based responses, some trends included a paradoxical desire for more and less
information, and a clear call-to-action or form response ready made for their completion.
Evaluation: 18% of the respondents did not fully complete the survey. The overall sample size was too
small to make any meaningful conclusions about the data provided. Follow up will include redistribution
of this survey to a larger sample size with completion requirements.
73
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Healthy Eating And Physical Activity
Ayesha Imtiaz
Gina Stravic
Raritan Valley YMCA
Purpose: To implement a health standard at childcare facilities.
Significance: Forty eight percent of school age children in New Brunswick are obese, while this statistic
does not exist in East Brunswick; there is significant lack of education and reinforcement of nutritious
eating and physical exercise for children. This project is meant to increase the physical activity and
nutritious standards at childcare facilities, which in turn will better the physical activity and nutrition of
young children.
Method/Approach: A full document review of the Raritan Valley YMCA and a few other daycare
facilities will be done. On site visits will take place after documentation review to observe the daily
functions of these facilities. After documentation review, and in person evaluations, a report will be
drafted based on the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) program guidelines. This report will
highlight what is lacking in these facilities and suggestions to improve the faults present.
Outcomes: Of the four schools evaluated, all will be provided with resources that inform them which
HEPA guidelines they are missing in their programs and which they are excelling in. All schools will
implement a better menu strictly following the HEPA rules in the coming future. Schools will also
increase the amount of physical activity for children, and the type of physical activity that is undertaken.
The schools will have to rewrite some of their policies to include the importance of healthy foods and
physical exercise. Lastly, the schools will provide regular outreach programs to parents informing them of
the importance of a healthy lifestyle at home.
Evaluation: The evaluation will be based on the HEPA guidelines. The schools will be evaluated on a
qualitative scale. The written data and on-site visits will be used to compile a pre-evaluation based on
HEPA checklist. After the suggestions and advice has been given to facilities, another evaluation will take
place using the same HEPA checklist to see if the requirements have been met.
74
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Community Support Program for Lupus Patients and Their Loved Ones
Alison Ip
My-Lan Tran, LCSW
LANtern (Lupus Asian Network) - Hospital for Special Surgery
Purpose: The goal of the annual patient program includes collaborating with community members to
promote chronic disease self-management knowledge and engaging patients in their care through peer
connections as a way to provide psychosocial support and bring awareness to community resources
available for those affected by Lupus.
Significance: Lupus is a chronic long-term inflammatory disease that occurs when the body's immune
system attacks its own tissues and organs causing inflammation to the joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells,
brain, heart and lungs. There is a higher prevalence, severity, and mortality amongst Asians with Lupus,
which is further complicated by socioeconomic variables such as access to healthcare and cultural factors
such as cultural attitudes and beliefs, which affect self-care behaviors among Asian Americans. Friends
and family, also, play a crucial role in chronic disease management and are important aspects in medical
treatment, language assistance, and decision-making. Cross-cultural communication between patients and
healthcare providers is important in understanding the disease and improving treatment adherence and
outcomes.
Method/Approach: The event took place around the time of the annual lunar New Year, which is
commonly recognized as a time for friends and families to come together and celebrate the start of a new
year. This program provided a culturally relevant medium to bring the Asian Lupus community together
through a luncheon and promote good health for the upcoming year. Community engagement activities
were utilized in order to provide psychosocial support at the program and engage patients in their care
through peer connection. Community was built through working together to establish trust and
relationships, and by creating connections through common interests to create a comfortable environment
at the table. Speakers and health-care professionals were, also, present to share their knowledge with the
community
Outcomes: The organization successfully reached out to the lupus community to provide patients with
an environment where patients could freely share chronic disease self-management strategies and
encourage peers to be proactive in their treatment. Members of the Lupus community were able to
engage one another and create connections through common experiences
Evaluation: The impact of the program was assessed using open-ended questions and surveys. Postprogram evaluations and survey feedback provided a better understanding of the impact of its
program. The event provided a place where the Lupus community could come together and talk about
common interests, and experiences, while also addressing a major Asian American health concern.
75
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Hackensack Weight Loss/Wellness Challenge Evaluation
Alexandrina Itile
Mary Sullivan, Director of Healthy Lifestyles
YMCA of Greater Bergen County
Purpose: To incorporate a positive fitness lifestyle in Hackensack and neighboring towns.
Significance: Obesity and excessive weight gain due to overeating and poor eating habits is increasing
among adults. Death and other chronic illnesses across the United States are major factors because of this.
This increase can be seen from 2000 to 2001 as explained by Ali H. Mokdad, et al, in the study,
Prevalence of Obesity, Diabetes and Obesity-Related Health Risk Factors, 2001 (76). It is advised by Ali
H. Mokdad, et al to eat fewer calories and be physically active for at least 150 minutes per week for
weight loss and maintenance in order to combat all possible health risks. The Hackensack Weight
Loss/Wellness Challenge is a 10-week program that targets the adult community in Hackensack to get
individuals excited about being active more consistently.
Methods/Approach: The Grand Kickoff for the Hackensack Weight Loss/Wellness Challenge was on
the evening of February 24th, 2015. Only those who were 18 and older, and lived in Hackensack were able
to register. This event promoted the sponsors of the challenge, what each fitness and wellness site had to
offer, and the opportunity for the individuals to registered for the Wellness program. The YMCA offered
a free 10-week membership pass, only to the first 50 participants. The YMCA also served as a main site
for regular weekly weigh-ins so we can keep track of participants progress. Weigh-in data from
Hackensack Health Department (the main weigh-in site) was collected bi-weekly.
Outcome: The Hackensack Health Department had 276 participants registered for the wellness challenge.
Only 67 participants have been weighing in at either site. At the YMCA, of the 50 recipients,
only 29 signed for their temporary memberships. 14 did not come in to sign their temporary membership
contract (e.g. unable to be reached, no time, forgot) and 7 wellness challenge participants did not accept it
(e.g. member of another gym, too far, not really interested). From the 67 participants who have weighed
in (at either site), only 35 of them have been weighing in regularly (bi-weekly as advised from the start of
the challenge) and consistently losing weight. On average each person that has been weighing in has lost
at least 1.5 pounds, 6 weeks into the program.
Evaluation: Although the challenge has not yet reached 50% of its weight loss goal, there is great
motivation and consistency amongst participants who have been weighing in. Follow up calls were
crucial in informing and reminding participants that they have received the free 10-week membership
with the YMCA. The weigh-in values stand as short term and intermediate term outcomes (depending on
the participant’s goals and results) for the wellness challenge. The long-term outcome is whether
participants have permanently enrolled/signed up for membership at the fitness institutions, with which
they were committed to during the challenge. The wellness challenge’s ultimate goal is to give the
Hackensack community the opportunity to join fitness centers in the community at reduced or free prices.
In hopes that participants will continue their healthy lifestyles well after the challenge concludes.
76
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Health Impacts of Flooding for Residents of Coastal New Jersey
Aram Jaffery
Karen Lowrie, Rutgers University Bloustein School
New Jersey Health Impact Collaborative and Edward J. Bloustein School
of Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: To analyze the impact that coastal flooding (storms and nuisance flooding due to sea level rise)
has on health of residents, and propose recommendations to improve health outcomes.
Significance: The New Jersey Health Impact Collaborative is undertaking a health impact assessment
study to inform local decision-making about resilience options include support of local voluntary property
buyouts in Mystic Island and supporting green infrastructure in Hoboken, so that these decisions result in
healthier communities and citizens. Therefore, it is important to understand how the physical, social,
mental and economic health of residents is affected by flooding caused by weather disasters like
Hurricane Sandy, and also by other more routine flooding that is beginning to occur in low-lying coastal
areas and will become more severe in the future for residents of Little Egg Harbor (Mystic Island) and
Hoboken.
Method/Approach: The project purpose was to conducted research about the health risks of flooding, in
the context of Hurricane Sandy specifically, but also looking at more general impacts of flooding. The
approach included: Conducting a literature review to gather as much information as possible in reference
to health outcomes associated with flooding. Assisting in developing a survey instrument to examine
current health of residents in impacted areas of Mystic Island and Hoboken, and to find out how flooding
impacts their health. Uploading the surveys (Mystic Island and Hoboken, each with a common set of
baseline health questions) into the Qualtrics system. Assisting in note taking for a roundtable discussion
meeting in Mystic Island to obtain qualitative data from local stakeholders representing health and safety
interests and organizations to inform both the baseline health assessment and the health impact
projections of the Mystic Island Voluntary Buyout HIA. Pre-testing Mystic Island Survey, to make sure
the system was working properly and no errors occurred.
Outcomes: Literature about the impact of flooding on health reveals these primary impacts:
Physical health, mental health, and social health. The roundtable meeting in Little Egg Harbor community
center indicated that many people were traumatized by Hurricane Sandy. Due to the storm many people
were left with damaged property, psychological stress, which other health problems and people counted
on each other for support and help. The survey was launched on April 17, so data are not yet available.
Local organizations and contacts will distribute the survey via an online link, which will be distributed to
both Little Egg Harbor and to Hoboken residents (mostly online).
Evaluation: A final report detailing project design, methods and outcomes was completed for department
personnel and supervisor feedback.
77
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
An Evaluation Study: Birth Control Education at Eric B. Chandler Health Center’s Social
Service Department
Imani Jarvis
Carlos Cordero, Program Director of Social Services
Eric B. Chandler Health Center
Purpose: To evaluate the affectivity of education about available birth control methods to expecting
mothers at Eric B. Chandler Health Center
Significance: Rising birth control use has been found to lower the number of maternal deaths by 40%
over the past 20 years (Cleland, J.,. et al., 2012). By preventing high-risk pregnancies, increased birth
control use has reduced the maternal mortality ratio (the risk of maternal death per 100 000 live births) by
about 26% in over more than a decade (Cleland, J.,. et al., 2012). Birth control can also better perinatal
outcomes and child survival by lengthening the time in between pregnancies (Cleland, J.,. et al., 2012)..
Birth control education can help mothers make better decisions for their health and to continue decreasing
the the number of maternal death rates.
Method/Approach: Patient medical history located at Eric B Chandler were collected and
analyzed. Data was collected of all patients, who received birth control counseling by a social worker
during their OB care between January 13, 2014 and June 23, 2014. Charts listing response to which birth
control the patients most likely preferred to utilize after they deliver was analyzed and recorded. Data
from each patient chart was collected and compared with the electronic health record regarding: patient’s
age at the start of pregnancy, the number of children patient has after delivery, whether the patient
returned for their 6 week postpartum appointment, and what form of birth control the patient recorded to
have received. Data was compared to see which contraceptive was most popular among all patients that
received counseling on birth control options. The number of patients that showed recorded use of birth
control was analyzed to observe the affectivity of the birth control education program.
Outcomes: Of the sample size (n= 125), 79 women (62%) returned to their postpartum apartment. 76
(61%) showed recorded use of birth control. Of the 76 women that showed recorded use of birth control
27 (36%) preferred to use bilateral tubal ligation.
Evaluation: More than half (n= 79, 62%) of women from the sample size collected (n=125) returned to
their postpartum visit. Also, more than half (n=76, 61%) of women showed recorded use of a
contraceptive. Birth control educational programs are effective strategies to help patients choose a
contraceptive to improve family planning and health.
78
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
New Jersey’s Overdose Prevention Act
Marquis Johnson
Amanda Bent, Policy Associate, New Jersey
Drug Policy Alliance
Purpose: To assess knowledge that pharmacists across the state have about the Overdose Prevention Act
and, likewise, whether or not pharmacies are stocking and dispensing naloxone.
Significance: Accidental death is the fifth leading cause of death in New Jersey with drug overdose
being the leading cause of accidental death, not only within the state, but also on a national level. Drug
overdoses kill more people a year than car accidents. Just between the years 2009 and 2010, there was a
225% increase in overdose-related deaths. Many of these deaths could have been prevented if the
emergency opioid antidote, naloxone hydrochloride (Narcan), was readily available to people in a
position to help. While naloxone is not a solution for this growing problem, it will help to reduce fatalities
because it reverses the respiratory depression caused by an overdose. The Overdose Prevention Act
(OPA) was signed into law by Governor Christie in May 2013. The OPA protects anyone who prescribes,
dispenses, or administers the medication naloxone from civil and criminal liability, including peers,
friends and family of overdose victims and emergency responders such as police and EMTs, who can
administer naloxone if they are first to arrive on the scene of an overdose. The OPA also includes a
“Good Samaritan” policy to protect overdose victims and witnesses seeking help from arrest for drug use,
drug possession, paraphernalia use/possession, and revocation of probation or parole.
Approach: Pharmacies across the state of New Jersey were contacted via phone using a pre-developed
phone script and survey tool. Three pharmacies were visited in-person to collect data as well. The
subsequent data regarding Naloxone availability and knowledge of the Overdose Prevention Act was
collected and recorded for analysis.
Outcomes: Of the 75 pharmacies who gave a response when being contacted, 60 (80%) said they didn’t
stock Naloxone while 13 (17.3%) stocked naloxone. The remaining 2 (2.7%) were unsure. Of the
pharmacies contacted, 14 were willing to complete the survey. When the pharmacist were asked if they
were aware the 2013 enactment of the Overdose Prevention Act, 11 (78.6%) said yes, 2 (14.3%) said no,
1 (7.1%) was unsure. When asked about the 2015 addition allowing pharmacist to dispense Naloxone
under a standing order 6 (42.9%) said yes, 7 (50%) said no, 1 (7.1%) was unsure.
Evaluation: Since this is a small sample size (74), further outreach should continue in order to adequately
assess how knowledgeable pharmacist in New Jersey are about the Overdose Prevention Act as well as if
they are stocking and dispensing naloxone. Future evaluation should include a follow-up survey of the
pharmacies contacted to analyze what impact the OPA has had on pharmacy professionals in the state as
well as determining if there has been an increase in naloxone availability, i.e an increase in the stocking of
naloxone.
79
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor(s):
Agency:
Sexual Health Outreach
Sherdrain Johnson
Francesca Maresca, Director of H.O.P.E.
Rutgers University’s Health Outreach Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Purpose: To create and disseminate messages about sexual health and wellness to increase healthy sexual
behaviors amongst students at Rutgers.
Significance: Sexual health is an issue that is important to the college community as majority of students
is sexually active by the time they enter college. Bryant (2009) found that college women “between the
ages of 20-24 have one of the highest rates of unintended pregnancies due to lack of contraceptive use and
unsafe sexual practices”. While there have/has been improvement in the use of condoms amongst college
students over the years, “1 in 4 students currently have an STD, according to Stanford University’s
Sexual Health Peer Resource Center” (Bergman, 2013). Evidence shows that there is still a lack of
understanding, importance and use of safer sex practices and contraceptives. There is a need for students
to understand the risks of these behaviors while also learning how to have safer and fun sex.
Method/Approach: Participant and process evaluations handed out by H.O.P.E. staff and were
completed by program participants during the week of “Sexapalooza” events to analyze condom use and
STI knowledge. The data collected was transferred to a Excel document. Social media outlets were used
to help disseminate information about the events and safer sex messages in order to initiate discussion
among students, in an enjoyable way. Activities were performed at the programs to assist in invigorating
learning. Free HIV/STI Testing was offered by the Rutgers Health Services to keep students updated on
their status and promote positive health habits. Freaky Firsts and Sexaploosa are events held to assist the
propagation of important sexual health information.
Outcomes: H.O.P.E. serves the University community, providing holistic health and wellness approach
to reduce risky behavior amongst students. This project will provide awareness of the sexual health and
condom use to the Rutgers community in which it will help outreach in the future. Of the sample size
(n=129), 98 students stated they were very likely to engage in safe sex after attending the event while 4
students stated the opposite. 27 students said they were unsure of how likely they would engage in safe
sex after attending the event.
Evaluation: Data for this project will be collected through process evaluations of the events. The process
evaluations were distributed via in-person interactions at events and programs like the HIV/STI Testing
and Sexaploosa. The evaluations were given to participants and SHA. As compensation, participants were
entered into a raffle to win an incentive for their contribution. The data collected was given to the
internship preceptor and personnel for approval. It will be put in a final report for H.O.P.E. in order to
better assist the community each year.
80
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor(s):
Agency:
Understanding the Mixer Chiropractic Approach in Relation to Lower Back Pain
Jaskaran Kaur
Rosa Corey
Corey Chiropractic
Purpose: Understand the types of “mixer” chiropractic methods that are most effective in treating lower
back pain amongst patients at Corey Chiropractic.
Significance: Back pain is the most common cause for missed work and job related disability. According
to American Chiropractic Association, 31 million Americans experience low back pain annually (ACA,
2015). However, with the aid of a chiropractor, patients can find the relief that they need. There are two
approaches to chiropractic healing of lower back pain: "mixer" and "straight". The traditional approach to
treating lower back pain is the "straight approach", which sticks only to traditional procedure that allows
for the adjustment of the spine. At Corey Chiropractic, the doctors practice an alternative treatment for
lower back pain called the "mixer approach". The mixer approach incorporates other therapies such as
physical therapy, cold lasers, massage, nutritional supplements and herbal remedies. The mixer technique
is practiced because it is meant to offer fast recovery and less pain for the patients. This study will focus
on researching variables that make the "mixer" approach a more effective method in treating lower back
pain.
Method/Approach: Information was gathered through questionnaires about patient demographics
(gender, age), pain assessment (initial pain and present pain), and therapies used. A sample of 50 patients
were selected via random stratified sampling to ensure that the patients have been seeking chiropractic
treatment for at least 5 months to allow for sufficient data. Data was collected using patient medical
information from the patient’s files. Pamphlets will be created that demonstrate the best exercises and
other the mixer techniques that have helped relieve pain in the patients at Corey Chiropractic.
Outcomes: The pamphlets will be used for educational presentations on helping the community be more
informed about the mixer chiropractic approach to help rehabilitate the injured parties suffering from back
pain.
Evaluation: These pamphlets can help inform clients about the benefits and risks of the therapies used in
the mixer chiropractic approach. The pamphlets will be evaluated by asking the clients the follow
81
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Oral Health in Children Outreach
Jastej Kaur
Dr. Andrea Barrett
Belbar Dental Associates
Purpose: To analyze and expand knowledge on dental health problems among children in lower income
families
Significance: Research Studies show that between the years of 2002 to 2004, the prevalence of dental
caries among children was around 54.1 %, while the percentage of children with untreated dental caries
was around 33.1 %. Most of these untreated caries in children were prevalent in children from lowincome families. According to the statistics collected by Healthy People 2010, children from low-income
homes visit the dentist less frequently than they should. Obstacles to treatment for children with oral
health problems can include: lack of insurance, access to health care., and lack of education. Loss of teeth
in any early age can lead to impaired speech development, inability to concentrate in school, and reduced
self-esteem. Poor oral hygiene has also been related to poor social relationships and permanent
disabilities. Bad oral health can take a child’s attention away from their schoolwork and make them
vulnerable to bullying at school.
Methods/Approach: To address this issue a community outreach program was developed. This
community outreach program will be centered on providing free screenings for young children located in
the Somerset area. The target population is children from lower income families who would otherwise not
be able to afford the treatment. Alongside the screening we also want to provide health education to both
the parents and children. It is important to educate children and parents on the importance of good oral
health due to the consequences that a child may have to face if they are not educated. Techniques such as
proper brushing and flossing will be discussed, as well as how a child’s diet can impact their oral health,
and tips for parents with young children on how to help them achieve their best oral health. Through this
screening it is possible to learn more about how a child’s socioeconomic status can be a determinant of
their oral health by looking at the prevalence of dental caries and other diseases among the children that
we see.
Outcomes: This study will show the current oral health problems in young children; this will help the
dentist to see what type of health information is important to educate her young patients on. The results of
the study will be used for health education.
Evaluation: This study can be evaluated by analyzing the results we obtained from the screening Dr.
Barrett did on the children. These results can help us to see what are the primary oral health problems
children face in lower socioeconomic areas.
82
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Traumatic Brain Injury and ImPACT Testing
Oumou Keita
Diana Starace, Coordinator of Injury Prevention and Maureen Sharlow, Concussion
Center Outreach Coordinator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: Utilize the ImPACT Concussion Management Model to raise awareness regarding the
importance of proper concussion management and as a tool to track recovery of cognitive processes
following concussion.
Significance: According to the American College of Sports Medicine, sports-related concussions have
reached an epidemic level, as approximately 1.6 to 3 million concussions occur annually in the United
States. A significant amount of attention has been given to the recognition, diagnosis, and management of
sports related concussions with an effort to prevent the development of cognitive impairments including
personality changes and language impairment. In an attempt to reduce the prevalence of concussions, a
mandated set of guidelines have been put in place by The American Academy of Neurology to encourage
safe athletic environments for students. These guidelines promote the use of precautionary measures that
have the potential to drastically reduce further injury.
Method/Approach: The ImPACT Concussion Management Model has been implemented in five high
schools throughout Middlesex County and Union County including Edison High School, Bishop AHR
High School, Wardlaw-Hartridge School, Highland Park High School, and Scotch Plains/Fanwood High
School. Student athletes complete an online 25-minute assessment that is used as a baseline measurement
of cognitive functioning. If an athlete is diagnosed with a concussion, this baseline report is compared to
post-concussion ImPACT tests. Clinicians utilize this information as a tool, along with other measures, to
objectively evaluate the concussed athlete’s post-injury condition and track recovery for safe return to
play and academics.
Outcomes: A sample size of n=2375 high school students have been tested using the ImPACT
Concussion Management Model. In addition, concussion outreach programs within Middlesex County
Schools have been set in place to educate students, teachers, and coaches in all grade levels to gain a
better understanding of concussion symptom recognition and overall management of the athlete’s return
to play and academics.
Evaluation: ImPACT tests serve as an objective tool when evaluating the various effects of sports related
concussion injuries. Educating athletes, coaches, and other school personnel about concussion prevention,
recognition, and management will create awareness about symptoms and encourage the use of safety
measures that will subsequently help student athletes return to learn and return to play safely.
83
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Smoking-Cessation: Nicotine Replacement Therapy
Naseer Khan
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education
Purpose: To analyze the effects of how smokers’ determination, behavioral mindset, and knowledge of
available resources such as nicotine replacement therapy contribute to smoking cessation.
Significance: Cigarette smoking is the single most preventative cause of illness and death in the United
States. Tobacco smoke contains over 4000 chemicals and about 70 of them are known carcinogens. It can
cause inflammation, cell damage, and can weaken the immune system, making smokers more prone to
disease and infections. The secondhand smoke, a smoke exhaled by smokers, is classified as a class A
carcinogen by the FDA. There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Carbon monoxide (CO)
is a deadly gas that is odorless, colorless, and tasteless. It is produced when tobacco is burned and is
inhaled by both smokers and people around them as part of secondhand smoke. Hemoglobin has a higher
affinity for CO than oxygen, which prevents cells from getting adequate amount of oxygen. By quitting
smoking, current smokers can live a much healthier and a more fulfilling lifestyle.
Method/Approach: A descriptive research study design was used to conduct this experiment. A survey
was prepared and handed out to smokers willing to comply. A sample size included smokers from
Rutgers University campus in the New Brunswick area. Because of the conclusive quality of surveys,
they were used as a dependable tool to collect the data. They were pre-planned and structured in a manner
that respondents complete with full honesty and clarity. Another advantage of using this study design was
the likelihood of capturing smokers’ knowledge, attitude, and behavioral mindset regarding nicotine
replacement therapy and smoking cessation in general.
Outcomes: Of the surveys completed by smokers, 26 out of 30 (86.7%) smokers acknowledge that
learning and knowing what nicotine replacement therapy does would persuade them to actually use it. Out
of the 30 test subjects, 28 (93%) believed that their behavioral mindset (the idea that they have decided to
quit smoking) and a strong desire and determination would contribute to them more likely to quit
smoking.
Evaluation: The current finding suggests the importance of education and informing smokers about
available resources that could help them to quit smoking. By knowing about available resources,
primarily nicotine replacement therapy, 86.7% smokers were more likely to use it to quit smoking. Their
level of motivation and a strong desire to quit (93%) also contribute towards smoking cessation, where
smokers may be more likely to withstand the withdrawal symptoms.
84
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
UTI-Stat® Trial
Patille Kiledjian
Hourig Karalian, DON
Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center
Purpose: To monitor and report statistics of patients on a three-month UTI-Stat® Trial.
Significance: Urinary tract infection is the most frequent bacterial infection in residents of long-term care
facilities. Most infections are asymptomatic, with a remarkable prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria of
15%-50% among all residents. The major reasons for this high prevalence are chronic comorbid illnesses
with neurogenic bladder and interventions to manage incontinence. Prospective, randomized, comparative
trials of therapy and no therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria among nursing home residents have
repeatedly documented that antimicrobial treatment had no benefits. However, there is substantial
diagnostic uncertainty in determining whether an individual with a positive urine culture has symptomatic
or asymptomatic infection when there is clinical deterioration and there are no localized findings. In the
non-catheterized resident, urinary infection is an infrequent source of fever, but may not be definitely
excluded. The use of antimicrobials for treatment of urinary infection is part of the larger concern about
appropriate antimicrobial use in long-term-care facilities and the impacts of the selective pressure of
antimicrobials on colonization and infection with resistant organisms.
Method/Approach: The entire facility’s census was reviewed throughout the 2014 year. 29 residents
were chosen, subject to recurrent UTI positivity or current acute infection, and put on a 3-month trial of
UTI-Stat®.
UTI-Stat® with Proantinox is a urinary tract cleansing complex to combat uropathogenic bacteria from
adhering to the urinary tract wall and proliferation. It contains a proprietary blend of concentrated
Cranberry Poanthocyanidins, Ascorbic Acid, D-Mannose, FOS, and Bromelain. UTI-Stat® inhibits
adhesions of infection causing E. coli bacteria to urinary tract walls, increase urinary acidity to create a
less tolerable environment for E. Coli, and stimulate the growth of probiotic bacteria in the small and
large intestines. Residents with active urinary stone disease or known allergy to cranberry-containing
products should not take UTI-Stat®. The decision to start UTI-Stat® is at the discretion of the primary
physician and resident/family. (UTI-Stat® Policy).
Procedure is put in place by the facility to obtain for UTI-Stat® after reviewing contraindications with the
resident’s physician. UTI-Stat® may be administered orally or via enteral route. UTI-Stat® may be mixed
with hot or cold beverages. When administering via enteral feeding, it does not need to be mixed with
water or juice. (UTI-Stat® Policy).
Outcomes: In the three-month period, 7 of the 29 chosen residents were found positive for UTI, at
24.14%. There were 5 cases of E. coli, 1 case of Klebsiella, and 1 case of Providencia Stuartii. After the
first month, 4 of the 29 residents were positive for UTI, at 13.79%. After the second month, 3 of the 29
residents were positive, at 10.34%, with one recurring resident. After the third month, 2 of the 29
residents were positive, at 6.89%, with the same recurring resident.
3 of the 29 residents were D/C-ed since the first month, at 10.34%. Further discussion with each of their
physicians will determine if being put back on UTI-Stat® is necessary.
There was a 75.86% effectiveness of UTI-Stat® based on the trial. Due to positive outcomes, continued
use will be beneficial. An interdisciplinary discussion with the provider will determine if prolonged use is
85
effective and necessary for residents that continued to have acute UTI infections, despite UTI-Stat®
usage.
Evaluation: In comparison to the national average of 6%, the facility’s percent of residents who were
UTI positive in 2014 was 7.2%. The UTI-Stat® was introduced to residents in 2015, so follow up for the
next year will show improvement of the facility’s rate post-trial.
There were 7 other residents (not on UTI-Stat®) that were UTI-positive throughout the three months that
will need to be reviewed to determine whether UTI-Stat® is not necessary.
The cost of each bottle of UTI-Stat® is $24.52, with 887 mL per bottle, averaging about 30 doses per
bottle, at $0.82 per dose. Each resident is given a dose of 30 mL, twice a day, and averaging $137.76 total
per patient for the duration of the three months. After the three-month period, the dose is reduced to just
once a day for maintenance, averaging $22.96 each month for each resident. In comparison to other
medications that are not as successful, the cost-effectiveness and success rate of the UTI-Stat® is
extremely suitable for cases of recurrent UTI positivity in elderly residents."
86
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Issues of Follow-up Appointments in a Dental Practice
Brian Koyfman
Dr. Esfir Samoylovich DDS
Alabrami Dental Care, P.C.
Purpose: To examine how having a public, major, or private insurance policy affects patients’
recall/follow-up frequency in a dental practice.
Significance: In being a quality improvement study, the knowledge gained can potentially improve the
study site’s ability to aid patients in keeping follow-up appointments.
Methods/Approach: A qualitative and quantitative review of a dental practices’ patient follow-ups was
assessed to examine how public, major, and private insurance policies may create issues in follow-up
appointment frequencies. Qualitative data was collected through an anonymous survey completed by
patients that visited the study site between February 17th, 2015 and April 10th, 2015. Quantitative data
was collected through an electronic review of the study site’s claims data from January 1st, 2014 to
December 31st, 2014 on the Dentimax program. An analytic insurance breakdown of patient follow-up
frequencies was then compiled and analyzed using Microsoft Excel.
Outcomes: Of the sample size reviewed for the quantitative data (n=300), 167 (56%) patients with public
insurance policies successfully followed-up on appointments, 110 (37%) patients with major insurance
policies successfully followed-up on appointments, and 23 (7%) patients with private insurance
successfully followed-up on appointments. Of the sample size that completed the anonymous survey for
the qualitative data (n=63), 21 patients had public insurance policies, of which 13 (62%) always followedup on appointments, 6 (28%) sometimes followed-up on appointments, 1 (5%) rarely followed-up on
appointments, and 1 (5%) never followed-up on appointments. 21 patients also had major insurance
policies, of which 5 (24%) always followed-up on appointments, 8 (38%) sometimes followed-up on
appointments, 6 (29%) rarely followed-up on appointments, and 2 (9%) never followed-up on
appointments. Finally, 21 patients had private insurance policies, of which 3 (14%) always followed-up
on appointments, 1 (5%) sometimes followed-up on appointments, 11 (52%) rarely followed-up on
appointments, and 6 (29%) never followed up on appointments.
Evaluation: More than half (56%) of the patients that successfully follow-up on appointments (n=300)
have public insurance policies. Also, more than half (62%) of the patients surveyed with public insurance
policies (n=21) always followed-up on appointments in the dental practice. Only 24% of patients with
major insurance policies (n=21), and 14% of patients with private insurance policies (n=21) always
followed-up on appointments in the dental practice.
87
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Virtual Dementia Tour Empathy Training
Anna Krymchanskaya
Supervisor: Joanne Prospero, Betty Lou La Rocca
Chelsea Assisted Living Facility – Manalapan
Purpose: This Virtual Dementia Tour will sensitize caregivers of Dementia patients to their struggles.
This training is meant to reduce elder abuse and increase proper care for patients.
Significance: Research indicates that the rates of elder abuse in dementia populations are higher than in
the general population. A 2010 study found that at least 47% of participants with dementia had been
mistreated by their caregivers. Dementia is one of the hardest illnesses to have empathy for since only the
patients can experience it. Through this experience based workshop, empathetic learning in caregivers can
be simulated in order to foster more compassionate care.
Method/Approach: This workshop was developed by the nonprofit Second Wind Dreams and is
scientifically proven to increase sensitivity toward those with dementia. At the Chelsea it will mainly be
used as a staff inservice for the 55 staff members of the Chelsea at Manalapan. One to two workshops per
day were conducted based on the availability of facilitators. Department directors submit the names of
staff that will be participating in the workshops on a given day. After all participants finish with the
activity they participate in a facilitated discussion. This workshop was also conducted with the Dementia
support group that is led by the Chelsea at Manalapan as well as with members of the community through
a marketed event.
Outcomes: Staff revealed that they felt more sympathetic to the Dementia residents that they service.
Many workshop groups set goals for themselves in order to provide more compassionate care for their
residents. Caregivers in the support group were able to understand the actions of their loved one and put
more experiences into perspective.
Evaluation: Pre- and Post- test responses will be tabulated to observe the impact that the workshop has
on participants. Department directors will use the responses to remind staff of the goals they set for
resident care. A town hall meeting will also be planned to bring the staff together and discuss the various
goals that were set among all the departments. Common experiences will also be discussed.
88
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Public Health Accreditation Quality Improvement Processes and Outcomes
Kelly Kulakowski
David Henry, Health Director
Monmouth County Regional Health Commission
Purpose: To improve and protect the health of the public by advancing the quality and performance of
public health departments.
Significance: Nationally recognized, practice-focused and evidence-based standards are created to
advance quality and performance within a health department. Accreditation standards define expectations
for public health departments that improve service, value and accountability. Public Health Accreditation
allows department’s to understand their strengths and weaknesses and improve overall to better benefit
the jurisdictions served. The CDC states accreditation catalyzes quality and performance improvement,
and allows better preparation and proactive response to emerging and re-emerging health challenges.
Increasing accountability is likely to lead to public health breakthroughs.
Method/Approach: The health department seeks the accreditation status through seven steps, which are
intended to be inclusive yet flexible to meet the needs of their local serving jurisdiction. The department
must meet standards set forth by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB). PHAB creates an
intensive list of documentation required by the department that proves it is accreditation ready. The
department becomes accredited by documenting: proper assessment of health- monitoring, investigating
and diagnosing, policy development- mobilizing community partnerships, and informing and educating
the public, and assurance- providing care and creating a competent workforce.
Outcomes: The documentation process will lead to a more successful workplace- for staff, patients,
partners, governing entities and the communities. Staff morale will be increased with increased training
and greater incentives. Accreditation will lead the department to improved performance, identifying
strengths and weaknesses, and stimulating continuous improvement.
Evaluation: The success of this process can be seen by the changes in the health department before,
during, and after the accreditation process. Benefits can be seen during and after the accreditation process
and the department improves in every area, becomes more accountable (internally and externally), has
greater communication with governing entity and has better funding opportunities.
89
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
NJ POLST Compliance in Nursing Homes
Katrina Labayen
Direct Supervisor: Andrew Harris, LNHA. Supervisor: David Barile, MD
Bridgeway Care and Rehabilitation Center, Hillsborough, NJ
Purpose: To increase completed POLST (Practitioner Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment) among subacute and long-term residents in Bridgeway Care Center.
Significance: Most recent data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) show that
“U.S. health care spending increased 3.6 percent to reach $2.9 trillion, or $9,255 per person” in
2013. New Jersey is among the top six states in the country with the highest “Total Medicare spending
per decedent” during the last two years of life in 2012 (Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare). In NJ skilled
nursing facility (SNF)/long-term care settings, $16,900 was spent per decedent in Medicare costs during
the last two years of life in 2012 (Dartmouth Atlas). This number is well above the national spending
average of $12,779 in that same year (Dartmouth Atlas). A goal of CMS is to reduce avoidable hospital
readmissions in order to decrease Medicare costs and to improve patient safety and quality of care. Cost
reduction can take place by coordinating transitions of care between settings. The new national POLST
initiative seeks to improve this stage in care delivery. The NJ POLST form can prevent “unwanted or
medically ineffective treatment and reduce patient and family suffering” and subsequently reduce
avoidable readmission rates and overall costs in a SNF (NJ.gov). The portability and thoughtfulness in
advanced care preferences gives POLST the competitive edge over well-known traditional advanced
directives. The novelty of the POLST initiative must overcome unfamiliar boundaries in implementation
and recognition among the public.
Method/Approach: Initial data gathering for this project was conducted by evaluating resident’s
electronic medical records (EMR) for current advanced directives and completed POLST forms. From
this point, the primary plan of action was to convert current DNRs to POLST among long-term residents.
A new brochure on POLST was created to focus on educating residents and families through social
services. In addition, an information session was held with the Bridgeway community to introduce them
to the POLST initiative and Dr. David Barile. At the outset of a month of family outreach, another EMR
data analysis took place to find changes in advanced directives or POLST form completion.
Outcomes: This project will demonstrate the effect of public education and outreach on POLST
completion in a skilled nursing setting. The outcomes of this project can provide a framework for similar
facilities around the state of New Jersey and the country that wish to introduce POLST to its residents.
Evaluation: This project can be evaluated by analyzing electronic medical records to find any increases
in completed POLST forms since the initial period of study. The next approach will concentrate on
POLST compliance for all long-term care residents and for post-acute rehab patients.
90
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Sleep Hygiene Workshop for Rutgers Students
Erica Lee
Francesca Maresca, Ph.D, Director, H.O.P.E., with Rutgers Health Services
Health, Outreach, Promotion, and Education (HOPE)- Rutgers Health Services
Purpose: To create and conduct a sleep hygiene workshop for the Rutgers University community to
educate about the importance of sleep for students to help them thrive academically,
mentally/emotionally, and physically and to provide practical tips for improving sleep.
Significance: Lack of sleep and/or bad sleeping habits are fairly common among students. The risks of
sleep deprivation is often overlooked or unknown to many students, and they don’t realize that it can have
a negative effect on them not only mentally, but academically as well. A recent study (Hershner and
Chervin, 2014) revealed that sleep deprived students often had lower grades, mood changes or disorders,
and an effect on their learning and memory skills. What was further shared by the study was that among
college students, sleep deprivation and other related issues were highly prevalent, 70% of these students
were sleep deprived. The study showed that sleep is an issue that needs to be addressed among college
students. It is important for students to be healthy not only for their well-being, but for them to succeed
and perform at their best academically.
Method/Approach: Research was conducted on the importance of sleep. A pilot workshop was then
facilitated among a small group of Rutgers University community members to determine the effectiveness
of the material. The pilot workshop consisted of interactive activities to keep the participants engaged and
to stimulate conversation on the material. Interactive activities included Questions and Answers and a
quiz. An evaluation questionnaire was utilized to analyze and determine the effectiveness of the pilot
workshop’s content for a future sleep workshop.
Outcomes: Of the sample size population (n=6), 4 (67%) of the participants were familiar with the risks
that sleep deprivation has on a person’s well-being and health prior to the workshop. 67% (n=6) of the
participants reported to be willing to utilize any tips to improve their quality of sleep. 33% (n=2) of the
participants reported to be willing to utilize techniques suggested for better time management, stress, and
technology in order help improve their sleep hygiene.
Evaluation: Every participant from the sample size population (n=6, 100%) found the pilot workshop to
be helpful. More than half the participants (n=4, 67%) were interested in gaining more information
regarding sleep and other related topics to help improve their quality of sleep and utilize their tips on
better sleep hygiene. The interactive activity of a game or quiz will be the most effective strategy to (a)
engage the student’s focus (b) educate the importance of sleep, and (c) create awareness on the effects
sleep deprivation has on a person’s well-being and health.
91
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
New Jersey Hepatitis B Coalition
Sonia Lee
Dr. Carolyn Daniels, Dr. Su Wang
NJ Department of Health, Office of Minority and Multicultural Health &
St. Barnabas Medical Center, Center for Asian Health
Purpose: To coordinate efforts in the prevention and control of Hepatitis B through education, screening,
and linkage to care programs.
Significance: Although Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) make up less than 5% of the total
US population, they account for over 50% of Americans living with chronic Hepatitis B. Hepatitis B
causes deadly liver disease in 1 out of every 4 infected people. Asian Americans are a sizable minority
group in NJ, making up about 8.3% of the population. It is therefore important to mitigate the language
and cultural barriers that hold them back from seeking and accessing healthcare. The primary goals of the
NJ Hepatitis B Coalition are to educate providers and communities to reduce this health disparity, as well
as to improve testing and linkage to care to prevent Hepatitis B-related liver disease and cancer.
Method/Approach: Deliverables include establishment of social media presence via Twitter and
Wordpress and co-writing a grant (sponsored by the Hep B United Foundation) for additional community
outreach funds. The grant is being done in response to a call for proposals from Hep B United, which
requires information about experience and capacity, project goals, objectives, program activities,
evaluation standards, and a budget narrative. St. Barnabas’ purpose in applying for this grant is to set up a
media campaign that addresses both community health education and partnering with local businesses to
set up screening events.
Outcomes: The broad scope of the Hepatitis B Coalition is to increase collaboration and coordination
among program partners, increase HBV identification and management capacity of providers, screen atrisk foreign-born persons for HBV, and successfully link those with chronic HBV to medical care.
Establishing this regional network in NJ is meant to effectively leverage existing resources, improve
provider capacity to deliver culturally competent HBV care, and reduce the burden of HBV on Asian
Americans and other impacted populations.
Evaluation: Evaluation for the community education grant will involve how many ads/surveys were
placed in Chinese-language newspapers and magazines, how many responses were mailed back, and how
many of the surveys were correctly answered (to test for comprehension of the HBV education material).
To evaluate business engagement (of the businesses willing to host educational events on-site), a pre and
post survey will be conducted to measure changes in knowledge.
92
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Redefining Virginity, Healthy Relationships, and Sex Under the Influence for Newark
Youth
Mae Lesko
Stephanie Franklin, Founder/CEO
Masakhane Center
Purpose: To educate Newark youth and young adults about myths behind virginity, healthy relationships,
and sex while under the influence of drugs and alcohol through the creation and distribution of Zines and
workshop attendance.
Significance: This project is needed in Newark due to high rates of teen pregnancy and sexually
transmitted infections in Essex County. Teenagers ages 15-18 in Essex county have the highest teen
pregnancy rate than the rest of the state of New Jersey with 30 out of every 1,000 pregnancies occurring
amongst teenagers (National Center for Health Statistics - County Rankings: NJ, 2008). Similarly, the
rates for sexually transmitted infection transmission are disproportionately higher in Essex County (NJ
Department of Health, 2010). In fact, the rate of chlamydia in Essex county is eight times the national rate
for transmission (2010). The HIV/AIDS prevalence rate is three times higher than the statewide rate with
2,108/1,000 Newark residents living with HIV/AIDS (NJ Department of Health, 2011). Educational
interventions are needed to inform Newark residents, especially youth and young adults, about safer sex
practices and positive lifestyle choices.
Methods: This project will be conducted through the creation of informational Zines that
cover a variety of topics. All researched information must be comprehensive, geared towards youth and
young adults, and be sex positive in nature. After distribution of the Zines, a supplemental workshop will
be delivered to participants.
Outcomes: The series of workshops and distribution of Zines aims to increase sexual health
knowledge amongst all participants. By the end of the workshop series, participants should be able to
dispel virginity myths, list three signs of a healthy relationship, and explain the laws in New Jersey
regarding sex under the influence, especially as minors. This project aims to improve sexual health
behaviors to help reduce the rates of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
Evaluation: Participants will receive a satisfaction assessment at the conclusion of every workshop.
These assessments will be collected and evaluated for accuracy of information, satisfaction with the
program, and usefulness of Zines and safer sex materials distributed in workshops.
93
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Evolution of Capreomycin Resistance in New York City’s Tuberculosis Outbreak.
Derek Lewis
Direct Supervisor: Dr. Barry Kreiswirth, Director of Public Health Research Institute: TB
Center; Intern Supervisor: Zachary Schneider
Public Health Research Institute (PHRI)
Purpose: To analyze the genetic diversity of the tuberculosis W strain to observe the evolution of
capreomycin resistance as result of tlyA gene mutation.
Significance: Tuberculosis remains an urgent public health problem worldwide. Capreomycin is a drug
that was used to treat multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR) during the NYC W outbreak. A 2005 study
by Shinnick et all revealed that mutation of the tlyA gene, encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase,
confers capreomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The W outbreak of MDR in New York
City infected 357 patients with W strain tuberculosis, and had a 90% mortality rate amongst HIV patients.
Understanding the emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis during the 1990 W outbreak, on a molecular
level, can provide insight to how resistance may arise in future epidemics.
Method/Approach: Research was conducted to formulate a general outlook of the tuberculosis W strain
during and after the 1990 outbreak, focusing specifically on the distribution of capreomycin resistance
over that same time. PCR was performed to amplify the gene in order to begin sequencing to investigate
mutations. After DNA sequencing, analysis was conducted to determine accumulation of resistanceassociated mutations from treatment during the outbreak. Finally, we cultivated the information collected
into easily readable graphs and tables to analyze the data, and make conclusions about tlyA gene
involvement in capreomycin resistance during the W outbreak.
Outcomes: DNA sequencing of the W strains was preformed then analyzed. Illustrative graphs were
created to better show the analysis and evolution of resistance mechanisms. This project is part of a larger
scope of research geared to further investigate the New York City W outbreak. This project aids in
understanding the evolution of resistance during the W outbreak. It was also utilized to validate the data
in the PHRI database for the W outbreak to confirm it is an accurate representation of the population.
Evaluation: We determined the quality of the sequencing of the tlyA gene and our ability to make
conclusions about its connection to capreomycin resistance development. We compared the sequencing
data from the resistant W strains to the unknown W strains and a susceptible control strain. We compared
what we know about capreomycin resistance to the findings in this project.
94
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Alcohol and Drug Peer Educator Project
Adrienne Ley
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach Promotion and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Purpose: To enhance and assess the peer education team and the information distributed by this team to
Rutgers students.
Significance: Peer educators are effective because they are trusted by classmates to provide accurate
information and reliable answers regardless of the health topic. Peer education has the potential to
enhance the ability of young people to provide each other with accurate information on health and other
issues (Parkin, 293). Peer education has been proven to be the most successful in increasing knowledge
about drugs and their effects, in promoting personal responsibility for individual actions and in promoting
positive behavior within youth (Parkin, 304). Consequences that have resulted on college campuses from
excessive drinking or using of drugs include: 1.2 to 1.5 % of students attempted suicide due to drinking or
drug use (Presley, 1998). 31% of students met the criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6% met the
criteria for alcohol dependence in the past year (Knight, 2002). Based on this data, peer education has
become a beneficial strategy used to distribute information to college students.
Method: Alcohol and drug workshops were attended and observations were made on the information
being distributed to students. Online surveys were completed where the effectiveness of the workshop
was described. A literature review was completed which contributed to updating H.O.P.E.’s evidence
based strategies. Continuing education was available which allowed for additional training in the forms of
a retreat and meetings. In these events future goals and strategies were discussed to improve the program.
Outcomes: ADAwGs will learn new ways to reach out to the college community. The information being
distributed may be adjusted to ensure undergraduate students are learning the appropriate quality and
quantity of information. ADAwGs will have a better understanding of the purpose of H.O.P.E. campaigns
in regards to helping college students and improving the peer education program. A new method of
training peer educators will be implemented for fall 2015.
Evaluation: Evaluations will be determined by the online satisfaction surveys completed by students and
staff after alcohol and drug workshops and other outreach events. These surveys collect observations to
determine whether the information being provided was informative while also being able to evaluate the
performance and effectiveness of peer educators.
95
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
CSCCNJ Participant Records Update
Michelle Librojo
Amy Sutton, Executive Director
Cancer Support Community of Central New Jersey
Purpose: To update participation records with specific demographic information of program participants
Significance: In 2015, the American Cancer Society expects New Jersey to have 51,410 new cases of
cancer in all sites. The Cancer Support Community of Central New Jersey strives to assist anyone
affected by cancer by providing various classes, workshops, and support groups in order to ensure that
“no one faces cancer alone”. The staff at CSCCNJ works hard to collect funds through donations and
grants, being a not for profit organization, in order to continue to provide these programs free of
charge. By conducting surveys based on patient demographics, the Cancer Support Community can apply
for certain grants with the information that is collected.
Method/Approach: All participant records were audited to determine who is missing information and
what information is missing. A survey was then developed to address the missing fields. All active
participants were notified of the available survey through email while some, who did not have access to
email, were notified via postal mail. This survey was conducted by the intern through various platforms,
including online surveys, phone interviews, and face-to-face interviews. The participant database was
updated in accordance to the survey responses.
Outcomes: Out of 699 people who were notified, both by email and postal mail, 118 participants
responded via the online survey link while one participant provided information via a phone interview
and one participant provided information via a face-to-face interview.
Evaluation: The surveys are evaluated by the intern who then inputs the collected information into the
online patient database to be used by the Cancer Support Community of Central New Jersey staff in the
future. The survey website that was used (www.surveymonkey.com) allows the intern to see each
individual survey and all the answers for each question. The information gathered with this survey will
give the intern the information to use when updating participant records.
96
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
BFSC Tutoring Program
Germondy Louis
Priscilla Muchado, Director; Alexandra Linunes, Senior Family Partner; Diana Lodeno,
Family Partner; Medji Jean, Family Partner; Dominque Garrett, Family Partner
Bayway Family Success Center (BFSC)
Purpose: To ensure academic success through learning skill workshops geared towards parents and to
monitor positive progression in their children academics through one-on-one tutoring in reading and
math.
Significance: The quality of time that is supposed to be spent studying each curriculum subject is not
occurring on the regular for many children. With distractions such as technology and work related tasks
and issues, research finds that the primary reason why it happens it’s due to time and effort. Time and
effort has played a major factor in causing the quality of many relationships and academic achievements
to decline. To resolve the issue, initiatives set aside time from parent’s schedules and encourage
interaction with their children has been developed. This method is to not only teach and motivate kids to
academically, but build healthy relationship through fun creative activities
Method/Approach: During this project, an assessment for young youth from 1st grade to 6th grade was
conducted to see what grade level in curriculum the tutors should tutor them in. By providing appropriate
materials for each child in the program, we create an opportunity for the child to grow and develop tools
needed for the transition to the next grade level. A way that also provided for the parents to engage
themselves in the lives of their children by encouraging mandatory workshops to learn social skills that
will benefit their child academically. In the first workshop, parents are shown the importance of setting
time aside primarily for studying and enforcing the appropriate hours of sleep among kids. In the second
workshop, parent’s and children participate on a hands on project that encourages making healthy meals.
Outcomes: At the end of the program, there will be an increase percentage among academic progression
for young youth from 1st grade to 6th grade. Relationships with their families should have a stronger
bond, and results from the program will contribute to there over well-being of their child. Changes in the
way the child present him/herself with the guidance of their parents will contribute to how these children
will improve in understanding basic concepts and achieve success in their lives.
Evaluation: Out of the 9 student’s who participated in the BFSC Tutoring Program, 7 students completed
and graduated from the program showing increase in both their academics and social skills.
97
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Basic Nutritional Knowledge of School-aged Children
Luiphdjina Louis
Executive Director: Gina Stravic
Raritan Valley YMCA
Purpose: To assess knowledge of nutrition in children grades kindergarten through 5th grade.
Significance: Each year, while adult obesity rates have been increasing, childhood obesity rates have
leveled off. However, obesity rate disparities among children still remain a concern. With these
disparities still remaining, the childhood obesity rate may be on the rise once again. According the report,
The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, more than 10% of children will become
obese between the ages of 2 and 5. About 33% of children ages 2-19 are already obese. Overall, 31.8% of
children are overweight or obese. This evidence reveals a lack of education on nutrition and the amount of
physical activity and child should get on a daily basis.
Method/Approach: A review by YMCA staff was done to observe how much knowledge on nutrition
children in grades kindergarten through 5th grade had. Data was collected from 25 school-aged children
(11 in the K-2 grades and 14 in the 3-5th grades) via a pre test consisting of 10 open-ended questions. Of
the 25 students, 23 had very little knowledge on basic nutritional facts while 2 knew the basics. With
these results, a nutrition curriculum will be created and administered to the children every Thursday
during afterschool hours. This will enhance their knowledge on what to do to lead a healthier lifestyle.
Outcomes: I found that more than half (50%) of the sample size (n=25) did not have knowledge of the
basic nutritional facts such as, but not limited to, food groups, recommended serving size, and daily
allotted time for exercise. Many were aware of a limited number of healthy food options but did not know
the corresponding food groups for said options. It was also observed that more than half of the students
did not know what activity was considered “physical activity.” The children’s knowledge of food groups
and daily allotted time for exercise improved significantly as confirmed by the increase in scores on the
post test given at the end of the 6 week lesson.
Evaluation: Roughly the entire sample size (n=25) or 92% did not have the proper knowledge of basic
nutrition. A pre test will be given to determine the information known by the students prior to the
curriculum and a 6 week nutrition curriculum will be administered. To best serve evaluation purposes, a
post test will be given at the end of 6 weeks. These components combined will be used to serve as
sufficient methods to teach proper eating and physical activity habits.
98
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Educational Initiative: Knowledge and Awareness About Diabetes Among the Youth
Roheena Malik
Benita Rosario R.N.; Registered Nurse, Dr. Tayyaba K. Malik, Pediatric Physician
Westside Pediatrics
Purpose: To develop a lesson plan that educates families with children of age group 10-15 to make
healthier choices that will reduce likelihood of obesity and diabetes.
Significance: Annually, an estimated 18,436 youth are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, and 5,089 youth
are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Among older youth (ages 10–19 years), the highest incidence of type
1 diabetes is in non-Hispanic white youth (26.2/100,000 per year), followed by Hispanics (18.9/100,000)
and African American (17.7/100,000), and lowest among American Indian (6.1/100,000) and
Asian/Pacific Islanders (5.8/100,000). In 2004, the CDC stated that Hudson County was ranked as one of
the top ten counties within New Jersey that have a high prevalence of diabetes. The evidence stated above
shows the prevalence of diabetes within the youth of the United States specifically within New Jersey.
Education based interventions can address this gap to improve awareness and allow one to make better
lifestyle decisions.
Method/Approach: A retrospective review was done on male and female patients ranging from the ages
of ten to fifteen. A baseline on the patient's education level on diabetes was determined through a prequestionnaire. Data from approximately fifty-eight patients was received and exported to a spreadsheet
for analysis. An average score from the all the completed pre-questionnaires were calculated to create a
starting point for analysis. From the analysis, an educational program was created based on the area of
weakness from the patients. 2 lessons presented PowerPoint format with hands out such as pamphlets and
visual aides were utilized for the workshops. Participants were asked to complete the post questionnaire at
the conclusion of the workshop. Questionnaire data was analyzed using SPSS to determine if participation
in the workshop affected patient’s knowledge and awareness.
Outcomes: Of the sample size (n=58), 28 males (48.2%) and 31 females (53.4%) completed the
questionnaires. From the sample size, 31 participants (53.4%) reside directly in Jersey City while 27
participants (46.6%) reside in neighboring towns. Of the sample size, 3 participants (5.2%) were 10 years
old, 3 participants (5.2%) were 11 years old, 12 participants (10.3%) were 12 years old, 8 participants
(13.8%) were 13 years old, 9 participants (15.5%) were 14 years old and 30 participants (51.7%) were 15
years old. From all the participants, 36 (62.1%) have an immediate family member or relative that has
been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), while 22 participants (37.9%) have no relation to
diabetes. The pre-questionnaire average was a 60.6% while the post questionnaire average was 77.34% so
an overall 16.74% increase.
Evaluation: The retrospective study provided rich data and evaluative measures. Participants within the
program utilized visual aids, a PowerPoint presentation, and pamphlets during the health education
seminars as components to further their knowledge and awareness of diabetes. From the study, it became
clear that awareness and education is a vital part of making better lifestyle choices and living a healthier
life.
99
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Educational Initiative: Management & Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Among
Pregnant Women
Margaret Manfredini
Michelle Michel, Manager Outreach & Enrollment;
Sunita Mookerjee, Program Manager, Strong Start Program for Centering Pregnancy
New Jersey Primary Care Association
Purpose: To develop an Educational Initiative (EI) that increases knowledge of
Gestational Diabetes Management and Prevention for pregnant women diagnosed with this condition in
NJ.
Significance: Gestational Diabetes affects nearly 1 in 20 (4.6%) pregnancies in the United States. This
means a substantial number of women are at risk for obstetric complications and for developing type 2
diabetes later in life. (2012) At New Jersey’s Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), women of
childbearing age make up a majority (44%) of the patient population. Many of the children born to these
mothers are also more likely to develop impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic complications.
Therefore, management and prevention of gestational diabetes is of great importance to women users at
FQHCs in New Jersey to improve overall health of mothers and prevent complications passed on to the
child.
Method/Approach: A pre/posttest was developed that will be conducted at a future time among pregnant
women at an FQHC in Newark, NJ. The pre/posttest questions were chosen from previous surveys on
Gestational Diabetes and questions included focused on: basic Gestational Diabetes knowledge and
glucose testing, maternal socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle habits, use of health services, and
medical and reproductive histories. After the pretest, a fifteen minute lesson plan will be presented to
increase knowledge and awareness of the topic. Following the presentation, a posttest will be completed
and a brochure disseminated that outlines prevention steps for GDM.
Outcomes: This EI will demonstrate basic knowledge and perception of GDM in the Newark community.
The outcome of the survey will be used to develop prevention programs that are applicable to the
population.
Evaluation: Pre/posttest qualitative responses and trends among knowledge and management of
Gestational Diabetes will be evaluated to determine the effect of the EI. The information obtained will be
used for future program design and planning that is directed at pregnant women in the community.
100
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
American Red Cross Home Fire Preparedness Campaign
Ashley Martinez
Chris Dempsey, Disaster Program Manager North-East Territory
American Red Cross Jersey Coast Chapter
Purpose: To reduce the number of deaths and injuries due to fires by 25% over the next five years and to
educate residents on fire safety through the installation of free smoke detectors into their homes by the
local fire departments and volunteers.
Significance: Seven people die and thirty-six suffer injuries each day, on average, from home fires. These
fires result in over $7 billion in property damage each year. According to FEMA’s website, 48.7% of fires
are due to cooking within the home. The National Fire Protection Agency (2014) states that “three out of
five home fire deaths resulted from fires in properties without working smoke alarms,” so in an effort to
reduce these numbers, the American Red Cross is partnering with local fire departments to install free
smoke detectors into the homes of residents.
Method/ Approach: First, certain towns in Monmouth and Ocean counties are chosen based on their fire
risk. Local fire departments of these towns are contacted and informed of the program. From there, a date
for the campaign is set, and volunteers are sent to canvas the neighborhoods and inform the residents of
the program. All of the supplies needed are organized and labeled and placed in a trailer for the campaign.
Volunteers then go door-to-door to install the detectors, documenting how many needed new detectors
installed- if any- if batteries needed to be replaced in old detectors, if everything was up-to-date and
working properly or if they refused assistance. The educator helps the residents create fire escape plans
and makes sure they know the dangers associated with home fires.
Outcomes: Out of 200 apartments canvassed in the Country Club Apartments located in Eatontown, NJ,
the Eatontown local fire department alongside volunteers have installed 63 detectors. The volunteers also
replaced 53 batteries into existing fire alarms. According to the National Fire Protection Agency (2014),
“the risk of dying in a home fire is cut in half in homes with working smoke alarms.” More than 2,500
people die a year from home fires, and the American Red Cross aims to reduce that 25% to less than
2,000 deaths a year.
Evaluation: As part of the five year campaign, the detailed records taken by team documenters are input
into an online database created by the Red Cross. These records will be used to see how many smoke
alarms were installed and in what areas. Once annual statistics are calculated, it will be very clear to see
whether this campaign has been successful in its goals, or if more work and outreach are needed in order
to reach those goals. Residents have the opportunity to provide the Red Cross Jersey Coast Chapter with
their contact information for future follow-up.
101
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Health Awareness Amongst Rutgers University Students
Nicole Mathews
Mark Cruz, Health Education Specialist
H.O.P.E.: Rutgers Health Services
Purpose: To increase awareness of public health issues relevant to college community through alternative
online social media forums.
Significance: Statistics show that about 72% of Rutgers students have never smoked marijuana or
cigarettes, 71% of Rutgers students who are sexually active have used condoms and at least 2/3 of
Rutgers students who do drink, stop at 3 drinks or less-- which prove that most Rutgers students are aware
of the consequences of excessive drinking, drug abuse and unprotected sex. H.O.P.E’s goal is to reach out
to the other students that are not part of the data above by using alternative online social media forums to
increase awareness of public health issues relevant to the Rutgers student community. Comparing the data
from the beginning of Spring 2015 and mid-semester Spring 2015, it is visible that the Health Services
has increased their visibility and relevance of the Rutgers University Health Services to the students.To
increase the visibility of these services to students even more, H.O.P.E. has conducted collaborative
efforts, projects and programs with university stakeholders to promote Health and Wellness within the
Rutgers University.
Method or Approach: The team was divided into two sections, one would collaborate with the other
department members of H.O.P.E for research and then execute and update social media outlets
periodically with public health messages related but not limited, to the following health topics: mental
health, sexual health alcohol/drug prevention and nutrition; the other team member would aid in the
collaboration and evaluation. The success is measured in the amount of viewers that are visible to the
department through social media in terms of “shares, comments, likes, and feedback”.
Outcomes: Out of the sample size= 30,10 had an idea of what H.O.P.E was before the interview and the
rest of the 20 had no idea what H.O.P.E was. Many of them knew that H.O.P.E helped students out but
did not know all that it entails. After liking the Facebook page and going through the twitter account and
instagram accounts, they saw that it was like an outlet and guideline to a better and healthier lifestyle
(through the nutritional posts, HIV flyers, importance of DO Something and being involved in the
community by volunteering and supporting autism). The Rutgers H.O.P.E. facebook page also gained
over 100 likes/followers. This type of quantitative interviewing will assess the content and it's visibility
and relevancy.
Evaluation: The success of this project was measured by the survey that was taken and the amount of
responses received on social media through likes. Through the survey, not only were feedback obtained
but improvements for future public health messages via social media forums.
102
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
What Do Students Know About Advance Care
Melissa McCleery
Doctor David Barile
Goals of Care, NJ
Purpose: To survey and analyze the knowledge high school seniors have about advance care planning.
Significance: It is important for all people to understand the choices they have when it comes to end of
life care, people need to be educated on what their choices are and how to communicate with their doctors
and family members about what their wishes are. Surveys done of teenagers with terminal diseases have
shown that the adolescents want to be involved in the decision making and there are no negative effects
related to involving them. Parents who have had to deal with the death of a young child have had an
easier time if their children have written down what their wishes are. Studies have also shown that
discussing end of life care with teens and young adults has no negative physiological effects.
Method/Approach: Create a survey to give to high school seniors to learn what they know, and are
willing to learn, about advance care planning. Once the survey is completed the results will be analyzed
to see what students would be receptive to learning.
Outcomes: The results of the survey will show how many students have previous knowledge of advance
care planning, how many of them have this knowledge because they have been in / are currently in life
threatening situations and how many would be interested in gaining further knowledge about advance
care planning.
Evaluation: It is expected to see that students are willing to learn more about advance care planning, as
previous studies have shown that teens are open to learning about this area of healthcare.
103
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Sling Inspection Training Session
Linard McCormick
Director of Environmental Health and Safety, Maintenance Supervisor, Lift-all
Representative
US Ecology
Purpose: To train all employees whose work activities consists of the usage of alloy chain, synthetic,
wire rope or fiber slings the methods of inspecting slings prior to usage.
Significance: Sling inspection is imperative to the safety of the workers who use slings for rigging heavy
machinery. The employees must know what to look for when inspecting and how much of a load a sling
can take before it breaks. The inspections of these slings are an important facet in the average employee’s
workday and could possibly mean the difference between life and death. The loads that slings hoist can
range upwards of up to 4 tons so employees must be made aware of the equipment that they are using
prior to usage.
Method/Approach: A representative from Lift-all, a hoisting and rigging company based out of Aston,
PA, had agreed to travel to the US Ecology office in Rahway, NJ in order to train the Rahway
maintenance crew on how to inspect slings. The representative will also inspect the slings that were in use
by the maintenance crew and if they fail the inspection, he would tag the slings and take them out of
service. A replacement sling would be provided at a discounted rate.
Outcomes: The employees learned more about the slings that they were using on a daily basis. One of the
slings that the crew was using was not rated for rigging and hoisting but rather for transportation only.
The crew was surprised at the revelation and the sling was taken out of service immediately. The
maintenance supervisor was advised as to what to purchase and was given a brochure by Lift-all but
decided to make purchases immediately.
Evaluation: The performance of the program is dependent upon the findings of audits in the maintenance
shop and follow up with all of the attendees of the training session. Employees will be asked to inspect
the slings that they are using by the health and safety department in an effort to drive home the
seriousness of the pre use inspections
104
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
NJ Health Insurance Migration Project
Jamila McLean
Margaret Koller
Rutgers Center for State Health Policy
Purpose: To look at trends in individual and small business health insurance enrollment plans prior to
and after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.
Significance: The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has increased access to care for
thousands of individuals in New Jersey. With the individual mandate requiring individuals get health
insurance and the development of Health Insurance Exchanges there have been significant changes in
coverage throughout the state. This project is significant as it allows us to understand the impact of the
ACA on NJ’s private insurance market and examine how individuals and small business have altered their
purchasing choices.
Method/Approach: Enrollment data are collected by the New Jersey Department of Banking and
Insurance and organized by insurance carrier and plan offering on the department’s website. In addition to
analyzing the DOBI administrative data, data on the uninsured from 2008-2013 were also examined from
the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC)
Outcomes: Since the implementation of the ACA there has been a significant increase in the number of
NJ residents enrolled in health insurance plans both directly from the providers and through the health
insurance exchanges. In addition, the “Basic and Essential plan”, the most popular plan in NJ’s pre-ACA
individual market is no longer available because it does not meet benchmark standards. Those consumers
had to choose other plans in 2014.
Evaluation: The greatest limitation was the lack of data on the uninsured population. Moving forward
detailed data on the insured would be useful to integrate into the analysis.
105
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Internship Abstract
Durable Medical Equipment
Lester Julian McRae
Michael Prasad, Director of Disaster Support Functions
The American Red Cross - North Jersey Region
Purpose: To analyze and expand knowledge and awareness about the importance of having the necessary
durable medical equipment available at shelters throughout New Jersey during a disaster.
Significance: Disaster relief is one of the key services areas that the American Red Cross provides during
an emergency. The American Red Cross designs disaster relief plans that increase execution and decrease
the amount of adversity faced when a disaster strikes. Durable medical equipment is used by people with
Access and Functional Needs (AFNs) to maintain their independence. After an emergency or disaster
strikes, some people arrive at shelters without the durable medical equipment (DME) that they require
maintaining their AFNs (FEMA, 2015).
Method/Approach: Request durable medical equipment in the form of donations or loan agreements
from healthcare organizations and facilities such as hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, and assisted living
facilities for use in the event of a disaster striking the region. Durable medical equipment includes among
other items wheelchairs, walkers, 4-prong canes, and shower chairs . These key items will be stored along
with the rest of the inventory in shelter trailers only to be distributed to shelters during a disaster (FEMA,
2015). Other DME may be obtained from partners on demand.
Outcomes: This study will give northern New Jersey health care facilities an alternative to disposing
durable medical equipment. The American Red Cross will be able to form agreements with these facilities
to receive this donated equipment on a frequent basis and establish partnerships for loaning of equipment
during disasters.
Evaluation: This study was evaluated by placing a sufficient amount of equipment at each American Red
Cross trailer supporting each county in the Red Cross Region. Calls to providers resulted in 6
wheelchairs, 36 walkers, 16 commodes, 21 canes, and 21 pairs of crutches added as donations to the Red
Cross, which are key components to 6 shelter trailers.
106
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) Access Program
Daniel Mervil
Derrick Gibbs, Prevention Team Leader
Hyacinth AIDS Foundation
Purpose: To educate health care personnel/consumer about Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). In addition
to the education component, we will also provide a network of resources to aide service providers in
making appropriate referrals for PrEP services.
Significance: Each year, nearly 50,000 people in the United States are becoming infected with HIV; with
1,500 new infections occurring within the state of New Jersey. With this constant rate, a number of
prevention methods have been used in order to reduce the acquisition of HIV. PrEP is a single dose
antiretroviral medication (ARV) used once a day for individuals who are at the highest risk of becoming
HIV infected. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, PrEP has been proven and
shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in people who are at a higher risk for HIV infection by up to
92%.
Method/Approach: In the initial phase of the PrEP Access Program, the approach will be to conduct a
community needs assessment around PrEP. This will be done, by contacting local clinics, health
departments, and CBOs to access how many entities in each county provide PrEP. If they are not
providing PrEP, then we will gain an understanding of the barriers and challenges to prescribing PrEP.
Phase II will be done by compiling a resource directory for service providers around entities that are
currently providing PrEP. Phase III will be conducted by creating an educational component about PrEP
which will be serviced to the Hyacinth community. This educational component will consist of a
pamphlet that discusses the essence of PrEP, and it will inform health care personnel/consumers about
PrEP services and recommendation for PrEP treatment. Final phase, is to participate in the Hyacinth’s
National Youth HIV Awareness Day and educate personnel about PrEP and it services.
Outcomes:
By the end of the project, approximately thirty individuals within the Rutgers and New Brunswick
community were educated about PrEP. Additionally, with this initiative, a plan for other methods of
educating personnel about PrEP and its services was reviewed based on the results. After educating
personnel about PrEP, an outreach plan to several clinics in New Jersey about the services that are
provided for PrEP would be developed.
Evaluation:
This study was evaluated by analyzing surveys that asked personnel about PrEP and the services that are
provided for PrEP. By analyzing this information, we confer that individuals from various ethnicities
with ages ranging from 18 to 50 have minimal knowledge of PrEP and its services. With this
information, we realized that PrEP needs to be promoted to this demographic and the most efficient way
of advertising is through social media.
107
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Spring Cleaning Initiative
Karon Millar
Direct Supervisor: Joel Torres, Senior Coordinator; Project Coordinator: Jaclyn Lagasca;
Regional Organizer: Lisa Joseph; Prevention Educator: Victoria Joseph
ADAPT: The Essex Coalition
Purpose: To promote the proper disposal of prescription and over-the-counter medication by promoting
the use of secure community-based drug disposal locations in police departments throughout Essex
County.
Significance: In 2012, 54.2% of NJ 12th graders reported that it was easy to obtain prescription
medication that was not prescribed to them (Source: 2012 NJ Monitoring the Future Survey).
In 2013, 12% of NJ Middle School Students stated that they took a prescription drug without a doctor’s
prescription on one or more occasions (Source: 2013 NJ Middle School Survey).
Method/Approach: In previous years, the DEA conducted a Take Back Day, which promoted the same
idea of disposing of old or unused prescription drugs. The Spring Cleaning Initiative is based upon the
same concept but involves municipalities and encourages them to promote the initiative through media.
The increase in awareness will be measured by the number of municipalities involved. Data collected
from the participating police stations in the towns will be exported to a spreadsheet. The rate of disposal
will be measured by the amount of pounds collected at each collection site involved in the initiative.
Outcomes: Twenty two municipalities in Essex County (100%) participated in ADAPT’s first Spring
Cleaning Initiative. This is a 55% increase from the number of municipalities (n=10, 45%) that
participated in the final Drug Enforcement Administration Take Back Day in April 2014. In the past, 3040% of the municipalities were involved in the DEA’s Take Back Day in Essex County. Four hundred
twenty-five pounds of prescription medication was collected during the Spring Cleaning Event, which is a
10% increase from April 2014. On a larger scale, ADAPT is aiding in a country wide act to promote the
safe disposal of prescription drugs in order to reduce prescription drug abuse in all age groups. By
increasing levels of awareness to this issue and sparking the interest of community members, the Spring
Cleaning Initiative helps to increase the number of prescription medication disposal sites in the country.
Evaluation: A follow up survey will be distributed to the municipalities after the completion of the event
to determine ways to improve for future prescription disposal. Public service announcements discussing
proper monitoring, securing, and disposing of prescription medication at disposal sites will serve as
monthly reminders for residents to use the disposal sites on a consistent basis.
108
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Integrating Behavioral changes for COPD patients
Consolata Mogeni
Administrator and Direct Supervisor: Mr. Steven Salvanto, Head Clinician: Sylvia Rose
Admission Coordinator: Renee Ricardo
Care One Assisted Living and Senior Living, Livingston NJ
Purpose: To create awareness on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases and to help patients change
health behaviors in order to improve their quality of life.
Significance: COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases) is a group of lung diseases that block
the airway and make it difficult for individuals to breathe. It is very common in USA and the third leading
cause of death with an estimated 3 million diagnosed cases. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are the
two most common conditions that make up COPD. Concurrent diseases can also result with COPD. Heart
disease and diabetes, among many other diseases, are common in COPD patients, and several
epidemiological studies have shown that lung function impairment is associated with an increased risk of
comorbid diseases. Management of COPD can be enhanced in order to prevent hospitalizations,
disabilities and depression. Apart from medication, physical activity and diet changes have been
attributed to the positive prognosis of COPD.
Method/Approach: Thirty patients with COPD started a physical regime; these exercises included a
warm up phase, conditioning phase and a cool down phase. There was endurance shuttle walk test.
Incremental walk test and a six-minute walk test. Each individual participated in breathing exercises
everyday. The patients were fed a balanced diet, consisting of three full meals a day, natural sugars, fruits,
vegetables and multivitamins. There was no fried foods or junk foods. These patients were monitored
daily using a Sensewear Arm Band. They also measured heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen levels.
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=30), over the past one-month, patients were able to significantly
reduce the use of oxygen masks and could breathe on their own. 18 patients did not need their
bronchodilators or corticosteroids .80% of the patients achieved a healthier BMI. All the patients
progressively reported lower blood pressures up until the end of the experiment.
Evaluation: Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaires were handed to patients to survey their
continuance in physical activity and nutritional management. In other studies; study showed that a higher
level of physical activity decreased the loss of lung function. Physical exercise lowers oxidative stress,
has an anti-inflammatory effect, and reduces the frequency of respiratory tract infections. Furthermore,
malnourished COPD patients demonstrate, and a reduced exercise performance when compared with
heavier, non-malnourished patients with a similar severity of disease
109
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
“Do Something” Campaign Visibility Assessment
Tarloh L. Mouphouet
Mr. Mark Cruz, Social Media and Evaluation
H.O.P.E. (Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education)
Purpose: To analyze the “Do Something” Campaign in the Rutgers - New Brunswick community
through reach and engagement and enhance visibility using social media forums.
Significance: Bystander intervention is one promising component of any prevention strategy. Consistent
research showed the benefits of combining a bystander-focused social marketing campaign to improve
attitudes increase knowledge and raise awareness of public health issues (i.e. substance abuse, sexual
health, mental health, nutrition, etc.). The “Do Something” campaign was created using a “bystander
intervention” strategy, encouraging the Rutgers community (current students, incoming students, graduate
students, parents, faculty and staff) to Do Something when concerned about one of its community
members. This evidence indicates an understanding of bystanders’ perceptions of helping, trust, and
commitment among community members; trust in campus authorities; and their willingness to step in and
take action as an active bystander.
Method/Approach: Process-monitoring data for the “Do Something” campaign visibility were collected
every month throughout the course of the semester (from Jan-May). The “Do Something” process
monitoring utilized qualitative and quantitative survey questions to assess the number of reach- the
number of individuals impacted by the social media content and engagement-individuals with access to
the campaign. Data for 70 students was exported to a spreadsheet, and of those, 52 did not know where to
access the campaign. The survey addressed the visibility of the campaign logo on & off campus, social
media sites the logo is visible, daily Posts, Comments, Likes, Shares, and webinars.
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=1), 52 individuals, both male and females (74.3%) lack reach to
the social media content of the campaign, 49 (70%) understood the importance of the message, but did
not know how to engage or interact with the social media content of the message, 11(15.71%) did not
understand the importance of the social media content, and 25 (36%) were impacted by the social
marketing strategy. Of the sample size, 24 (34.29%) did not respond or answer to some of questions and it
was reported as missing data.
Evaluation: Almost half (n=25, 36%) of sample size cohort, both male and female was impacted by the
social marketing strategy of the campaign. Colorful, bold writing, text, infographics, Did you know posts,
Q’s & A’s, and mini videos along with the campaign logo will serve as important strategies to: (1) attract
the entire Rutgers community to the social media content (2) inspire them to act and give them a sense of
responsibility to step in and take action-be positive and active bystanders. The campaign visibility will be
reevaluated by other interns in the future.
110
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Internship Abstract
Physiological and Psychological Reactions to Marijuana Cues
Hena Narotam
Jennifer Buckman, Associate Research Professor
Center of Alcohol Studies
Purpose: Understand how prior marijuana use can influence physiological and psychological reactions to
marijuana cues.
Significance: Marijuana is a major reason why many teenagers are admitted to substance abuse
treatment. Whereas 8 percent of all treatment admissions were for marijuana use in 1993 (NIDA, 2009);
by 2009, the number had increased to 18 percent (NIDA, 2009). Marijuana use has been shown to
differentially affect parts of the brain responsible for memory, learning, attention and reaction time (Hall
& Degenhard, 2009). This study focuses on heart rate variability (HRV), which provides insight into the
how the brain and the heart communicate with each other. It is an important time to understand how
marijuana-related information is processed by young adults. Social and policy shifts within the United
States have ignited a national dialog on marijuana use, which is culminating in increasing media
coverage, references in popular culture, and storefront prominence in local communities. Therefore,
increasing the public’s understanding of marijuana is vital, particularly increasing scientific knowledge
about the social and physical effect of marijuana use.
Methods/Approach: Participants included 68 young adult volunteers, who provided written consent to
take part in a study on physiological reactivity to emotional and drug-related stimuli. Twenty- one
participants were recruited as college student athletes and the remaining forty-seven were college students
who had previously violated university policies related to on-campus substance use. We created two
groups: people who have ever been a daily smoker and those who have not been daily smokers. We
compared physiological and psychological reactions to marijuana cues in both groups using T test.
Specifically, this study compared reactions in HRV when participants viewed marijuana drug cues versus
when they performed a simple baseline task. We analyzed the average heart rate at baseline and high
frequency HRV. We also assessed psychological differences between groups, such as alcohol use and
depression and anxiety.
Outcome: This study will increase community understanding of how marijuana cues in the real world
may affect a person psychologically and physically. This may help create new intervention programs to
reduce use and harm related to marijuana.
Evaluation: This study will analyze completed questionnaires and physiological data using SPSS
statistical software) to help understand how prior marijuana use can influence physiological and
psychological reactions to marijuana cues.
111
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Evaluating Functional Goals of Twin Boro Physical Therapy Patients (Union Clinic)
Anthony Nascondiglio
Dr. Tom Greene, Director of Physical Therapy; Joel Silverman, Physical Therapist
TwinBoro Physical Therapy, Union Clinic
Purpose: To evaluate the success of physical therapy on fifty Twin Boro patients by analyzing the
percentage of patients who meet their functional goals that were set for them to reach over a four week
period.
Significance: This project is important because it analyzes the rate of success of therapy and workout
routines that are designed to improve the quality of life of a physical therapy patient. The Guide to
Physical Therapist Practice provides a context for defining patient-centered functional goals. It promotes
a patient-centered approach in which physical therapists “actively facilitate the participation of the
patient, family, significant others, and caregivers in the plan of care.” The Guide defines “function” as
“those activities identified by an individual as essential to support physical, social, and psychological
well-being and to create a personal sense of meaningful living.
Methods: Each patient has their own functional goals that they aim to accomplish after twelve sessions
(four weeks). Depending on the type of injury, each patient fills out a specific form (lower extremity,
neck, back etc) at the beginning of the four week period to see which functional activities they are able to
perform. At that time the therapist sets functional goals that he/she wants the patient to accomplish after
the four weeks. After those four weeks, the patient fills out the same form to measure their progress. The
goal of this project is to analyze and share the percentage of patients who are indeed able to meet these
functional goals.
Outcomes: At the end of this project, graphs will be produced representing the statistics that show the
number of people who were able to meet their functional goals. This data will be separated by age, type of
injury (area of impairment), and the percentage of those who were able to meet their goals in order to see
which injuries have higher success rates and if there is any relation between age and success rate.
Evaluation: Evaluation of this project will be done by analyzing the mobility and function of the patients
both before and after the four week period and if they met their goals. Some examples of these functional
goals can be, “patient will be able to stand for an hour straight,” “patient will be able to walk down steps,”
or “patient will be able to get back to a sport or physical activity.” The amount of patients who succeeded
will be compared to the ones who didn’t. Age related success will be evaluated as well as injury related
success.
112
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Global Perspective of Gender Based Violence
Thobekile Ndlovu
Stephanie Perez, Senior Program Coordinator
Rutgers Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs
Purpose: To educate and engage with Rutgers students by expanding their knowledge of global health
and gender based violence issues as well increasing their effectiveness in finding solutions to these global
challenges.
Significance: Gender based violence occurs when an individual is assaulted physically, sexually or
emotionally simply because of their gender. According to the United Nations, 1 in 3 women around the
world experience gender based violence within their lifetime. This type of violence has a negative impact
on health often leading to physical trauma, mental health issues such as depression and anxiety as well as
a decline in general well-being. Women in all corners of the globe, including students at Rutgers
University, are subject to gender based violence. It is necessary to educate and inform the Rutgers
population of issues that have such detrimental impacts on global culture.
Method/Approach: To improve students’ knowledge on gender based violence issues, two student
organizations (n = 37) attended outreach sessions. A series of short educational videos were shown to
participating students. Videos included testimonials and factual evidence of experiences from various
women around the world, including Rutgers students. Following the videos, facilitated small group
discussions were held to promote critical thought and engagement. The sessions permitted students to
actively participate in a movement to reduce the worldwide gender inequalities which negatively
influence health.
Outcomes: Through these sessions, Rutgers students increased their knowledge of gender based violence
issues by 51%. Students are able to critically discuss issues pertaining to gender based violence and it’s
health implications. Students can engage in solution based discussions in order to combat the global and
societal structures that perpetuate gender based violence.
Evaluation: To effectively evaluate the sessions, pre and post tests were conducted. Participating
students were asked to fill out a questionnaire before the sessions. Following the sessions, students were
asked to complete the same questionnaire to assess the knowledge that was gained during the educational
session. The data was analyzed and the participants’ understanding of gender based violence was
assessed.
113
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Effectiveness of American Red Cross CPR Classes
Priscilla Nechrebecki
Michelle Esposito, Regional Director of Volunteers, North Jersey Region; &
Joelle Piercy, Program Specialist Volunteers and Youth Services.
American Red Cross, Princeton Chapter
Purpose: To teach community members the knowledge and skills necessary to respond to life-threatening
cardiac emergencies.
Significance: In the United States, more than a half million adults and children experience a cardiac
arrest, with a survival rate of less than 15%. According to statistical data from the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (2012), this establishes cardiac arrest as one of the most lethal public health
problems in the United States, claiming more lives than certain types of cancer, influenza, pneumonia,
auto accidents, HIV, firearms, and house fires combined. The American Red Cross Preparedness, Health
and Safety classes ensure that high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed in all
resuscitation attempts.
Method/Approach: The main objective is to evaluate student’s retention of knowledge after receiving
CPR training. In order to achieve this objective, a non-experimental survey design will be applied,
consisting of a 13-item questionnaire that collects information on the knowledge and self-rated perception
of the ability to perform CPR, before and after the training for lay responders is administered. Survey
participants are composed of students taking an American Red Cross community class between February
1st and April 31st. Exclusion criteria include refusal to participate or partially filled surveys. Informed
consent is to be obtained from all the participants. At the end of the data collection period, a total of 80
completed surveys is expected for result analysis.
Outcomes: Throughout the study, pre and post tests will indicate whether training for lay responders
increased knowledge among participants. Greater knowledge related to CPR skills is anticipated after
students complete training.
Evaluation: Results from this study will be analyzed in a quantitative and qualitative manner by
obtaining means, standard deviations and percentages of values from surveys. Moreover, a t-test will be
performed between pre and post tests in order to determine overall efficacy of training.
114
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Long-Term Affordable Housing for Survivors of Domestic Violence
Eunice Nho
Reverend Susan Kramer Mills, Executive Director of Town Clock Community
Development Corporation
Town Clock Community Development Corporation
Purpose: To create ten units of long-term affordable housing and to provide supportive services to
survivors of domestic violence and their children.
Significance: Domestic violence is a growing epidemic which leaves many women and children
homeless. After leaving their abusers, financial issues are common to see within this population. With
thousands being turned away from shelters and other various housing programs at full capacity, there is a
huge shortage of other options that these women can turn to, especially in the state of New Jersey.
Housing is one of the biggest burdens a recovering survivor can face. With housing assistance, survivors
have more time and energy to devote to transforming other aspects of their lives, such as securing a job,
caring for their children, attending counseling services, and more. Town Clock Community Development
Corporation is dedicated to assisting solely women and their dependents experiencing homelessness who
are survivors of domestic abuse by providing ten units of affordable housing.
Method/Approach: Once completed, these units of housing, named Dina’s Dwellings, will be one of the
very few long-term affordable housing options for survivors of domestic abuse. Dina’s Dwellings, with
the collaboration of other organizations dedicated to combating the violence against women in the area,
will offer a variety of services for future residents to partake in, such as counseling, job readiness training,
life skills training, and more. Town Clock CDC will also prepare these women to handle their own
finances. Residents will have access to everything they need for them to gain independent living.
Outcomes: The completion of construction around the end of 2015 will come with finalized
programming and social service planning. By assisting survivors, these women will have the opportunity
of a second chance at life - one without abuse or detrimental health effects. By having Dina’s Dwellings,
New Brunswick will become a safer community with greater awareness of the issue of domestic violence.
Evaluation: This project can be evaluated by analyzing how many women exit the program with the
ability to live independently. Evaluations could also be given to women to evaluate their experience and
time within the program. Assessments by the case manager of Dina’s Dwellings could also evaluate how
successful various programs are for the residents.
115
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Counseling Testing and Referral
Francia Noel
Cecil Wilder, CTR Coordinator
Hyacinth AIDS Foundation
Purpose: To create a universal counseling, testing, and referral (CTR) for the different Hyacinth locations
across the state of New Jersey to use.
Significance: HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic disease. Hyacinth's goal is to prevent the spread of
HIV/AIDS by testing and prevention education. Hyacinth creates many policies and procedures to help
its various locations that specialize in HIV/AIDS counseling. One of the policies is creating a universal
counseling, testing and referral (CTR) template to be used throughout the state. Currently, each location
currently has different procedures for CTRs. It is in the best interest of Hyacinth and future clients to have
a single counseling, testing, and referral procedure and database.
Methods/Approach: To create a universal CTR, information from each of Hyacinth agencies needs to
be collected. The information collected includes how counselors collect information from patients who
come to get tested. The procedures on how each Hyacinth office throughout New Jersey collects
information from their patients is recorded. This includes background information on the client and the
steps taken if a patient is tested HIV positive or negative. Once all information needed is received, the
process of creating a universal CTR will begin.
Outcomes: At the end of this project, a universal counseling, testing, and referral will be used by all
Hyacinth offices. The collected information from the CTR will be sent to the Center of Disease and
Control and Prevention.
Evaluation: This project will be evaluated by analyzing how useful the offices find the universal
counseling, testing, and referral to be for their patients.
116
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Promoting Health and Wellness in the Community
Donald Ntuk
Yesenia Hernandez, Program Coordinator
Robert Wood Johnson: Community Health Promotions Program
Purpose: Promote physical activity by providing alternative methods to the youth in the community and
raising awareness about health and wellness.
Significance: Many within the community have little to no knowledge with regards to their health. New
Brunswick children are more likely to be overweight or obese compared to their national counterparts.”
Furthermore, compared to the national percentage (21%), 48% of New Brunswick students are obese and
overweight. Overall, 57% of 3–18 year old children in New Brunswick are not active at least 30 minutes a
day 6–7 days a week while 61% of Hispanic children are not active at least 30 minutes a day 6–7 days a
week, Many children spend much of their days watching television with very little physical activities due
to different circumstances [1]. Lloyd and Brownlee, et al (2010).
Method/Approach: The Family Arts Festival featured dance workshops that educated attendees on how
to incorporate dance into healthy living. Health tables were present to help distribute information on
health and wellness. Ciclovia is a city wide initiative that offers various physical activities such as
crossfit, rock climbing and basketball and also provides attendees with ways to improve and maintain
their health and wellness through proper eating habits.
Outcome: The events were attended by hundreds of people. Each event promoted health awareness and
provided physical education to those who attended. At the end of the Family Arts Festival, the attendees
will learn new ways to incorporate dance into health and wellness. Ciclovia will provide attendees with
the proper education in injury prevention, proper eating habits and a full day of various physical activities
that can be implemented in their everyday lives such as yoga and crossfit.
Evaluation: Children that attended Ciclovia will receive a survey as a tool of evaluation. At a specific
checkpoint, a survey will be distributed to assess newly acquired knowledge about proper eating habits
and reassert the information that was given.
117
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Meridian Health Online Medical Records (RelayHealth)
Kaitlyn O’Hare
Peggy Skudera, Supervisor of Volunteer Services. Jason Beelitz, Guest Relations
Manager.
Ocean Medical Center; Meridian Health
Purpose: To provide patients with constant access to their health records online at any point beyond their
visits. Propose educational tools on their personal health concerns.
Significance: Personal health records keep patients aware of their health and care needed. Having access
to important health information electronically; including immunization records, lab results, medications
and screening due dates makes it easy to keep themselves and their doctors updated. With the availability
to access records online, patients will be able to coordinate care for themselves and for loved ones. A
study of 140 discharged emergency room patients were questioned on the understanding of their
diagnosis and 78% of patients did not understand one thing from their visit (Tarkan, New York Times).
Providing information that the availability of online personal medical records is needed for patients to
better understand their medical issues.
Method/Approach: Daily patient reports are printed out on the patients currently in the hospital. Each
report provides the room, age and name of the patient staying. Patients who were not online with
mymeridianhealth.com would be contacted and provided with information, explaining the benefits of
online medical records. If the patient was willing to sign up, an invite from the hospital will be sent
through their email to allow registration. Help for patients not computer literate would also be provided,
guiding them through the whole registration process.
Outcomes: At Ocean Medical Center there is an estimated amount of 13,311 patients discharged yearly,
the annual goal is to sign up 998 patients for online medical record access, with a weekly goal of 37. This
year starting from October there has been 676 patients reached with a weekly increase of registrations to
55 patients. An average of 99 new patients signed up on mymeridianhealth.com weekly in the month of
March. Overall, there has been 10.56% of patients registered. Ocean Medical Center has 322 left to sign
up to accomplish their goal by the end of year.
Evaluation: More than half of the registrations were possible when the patient was guided through the
registration process personally. Most of the patients who have got an invite, but did not follow through
with registration were the patients who reported they would sign up on their own time.
118
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Promoting Healthy Lifestyles to the Youth
Iyanosa Ogbevoen
Direct Supervisor- Barry Smith
Youth Empowerment Services
Purpose: To improve children’s fitness by teaching them about healthy foods and involving them in
multiple physical games
Significance: In America, 17% of adolescence are either overweight or obese, and that percentage is
steadily rising every year (Center for Disease Control, 2012). There is also a positive correlation between
child obesity and children who have parents that have not graduated college (Center for Disease Control,
2012). This seems to be the case for many children in the inner city New Brunswick area. This program
was structured to not just improve children’s health, but to also take their fitness into consideration when
doing daily activities.
Method: The Youth Empowerment Services held an event every Monday and Thursday night called
“Xcite Night”, where inner city youth can come out to a local building and partake in physical activities.
After the workout, the kids would be fed a healthy snack and drink to be taken home. A good indicator of
fitness is counting a heart’s bpm (beats per minute). Many of the children that attended the program were
middle schoolers, with ages ranging from 10-14. The typical bpm for people this age is 60-100 bbm
(nlm.nih.gov). The strategy was to take the heart rate of the children two minutes after the workout was
over. The heart rate was to be taken at the beginning of the internship, and again at the conclusion to see
if there was a decline in the heart rates among the children within the two month span. The most efficient
games to play were the ones that required a lot of moving, changing of direction and running. Capture the
flag, football and soccer were the games most often used throughout the course of the fitness program.
Outcomes: As predicted, the children were able to lower the heart rate due to their biweekly workouts.
Most heart rates dropped by only a few beats per minute, but this still indicated a better-conditioned body.
The participants have adopted the slogan “An hour of play a day, keeps the doctor away” to use as
motivation to workout. The ultimate goal is to have to have the kids adopt the methods of being fit and to
incorporate it into their lives as they get older.
Evaluation: To evaluate the success of the program, children’s bpm was measured after two months
worth of bi-weekly workouts.
119
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
New Brunswick Youth Nutritional Education Assessment
Babatunde Okesola
Director Barry Smith
Youth Empowerment Services
Purpose: To assess inner city youth nutritional habits and expand their knowledge and awareness of
healthy eating. The purpose of the project is to eventually change behavior of the students in order to
promote good nutritional health. Educating youth about their nutritional health and the risks of unhealthy
eating can prove impactful on their eating habits. Therefore emphasizing on the need for these eating
habits can help students avoid health issues like diabetes and obesity in the future.
Significance: Research has shown that youths who adapt unhealthy eating habits are likely to carry them
over into adulthood. This leaves them susceptible to obesity and chronic diseases such as cancer, heart
disease and diabetes. Inner city youth in particular are at a disadvantage since many come from lower
income families. They face food insecurity in many of their neighborhoods and less likely to receive
quality education on the importance of good nutrition. There have been many initiatives to promote
healthier eating amongst adolescents, the most notable being the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act
championed by Michelle Obama to promote healthy eating. With the increased awareness to good
nutrition, studies such as the Favorable Impact of Nutrition Education on California WIC Families are
able to report a positive impact and acceptance of nutritional education on adolescents.
Method/Approach: The students will be distributed with a survey, which gauges their overall knowledge
of nutritional facts healthy eating, adverse effects of poor diet, and food preferences. The survey will be
used to understand how seriously students take their nutrition. After the presentations on good nutrition
the surveys will be given again to see the impacts on the student’s nutritional values. The group of
students will then be assessed of their overall knowledge of good health habits and supplement it with
informational activities about nutrition. Food choices of those educated by this workshop on nutrition and
those who are not exposed to this information will be able to demonstrate the level of change that the
project had on nutritional preferences.
Outcomes: This study will demonstrate the necessity for a hands-on approach to nutritional education
and will help students understand the benefits of healthy eating. The result of the study will demonstrate a
way to get youth involved in maintaining good nutrition.
Evaluation: This study can be analyzed by viewing the pre and post presentation surveys, searching for
healthier eating choices and a better understanding of nutritional facts.
Approved by preceptor: Barry Smith
120
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Physician’s Order for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) Compliance and Assessment
Chizoba Okoro
Direct Supervisor: Bob Reyes, Administrator; Project Supervisor: Felicia Lynne Santos,
Director of Social Services, Assistant: Marcia M. Bristol, Social Worker
Abingdon Care & Rehabilitation Center
Purpose: To analyze and increase the compliance rates for elders in this facility in accordance to the
guidelines and benefits of developing or having a POLST “POLST is the Physician’s Order for Life
Sustaining Treatment. This is the End-of-life planning based on conversations between patients, loved
ones, and healthcare professionals designed to ensure that seriously ill or frail patients can choose the
treatments they want or do not want and that their wishes are documented and honored”.
Significance: In the United States, the overall annual prevalence of mental disorders is about 21% of
adults and children (DHHS, 1999). On average, 19% of less-educated people have disabilities, compared
to 11% among the better educated. These groups are growing rapidly; current projections show that by
2025, they will account for more than 40% of all Americans. Also the older population: persons 65 years
or older--represented 12.9% of the U.S. population, about one in every eight Americans. By 2030, there
will be about 72.1 million older persons, more than twice their number in 2000. People 65+ represented
12.4% of the population in the year 2000 but are expected to grow to be 19% of the population by 2030.
As their health is chronic, may not be terminal and therefore they may have many years of quality life
ahead. Also, they may or may not have the capacity to make or the ability to assist in making their own
health care decisions. POLST ensures that superior care provided in the last moments of life.
Method/Approach: Education and lack of awareness are the issue with the this population. Not every
resident needs a POLST, but upon admission and during orientation, they are introduced to the idea. After
initial 72 hours assessment, a plan of care meeting is scheduled with the residents and their families
about their health status. An effort to reconcile differences in terms of prognosis, goals, hopes and
expectations is provided. Finally a POLST to guide the choices and finalize patient/family wishes. Once
the forms are completed, the doctor reviews and revisits periodically.
Outcome/Results: Of the sample size (n=157), 13 (8.2%) had an advanced directive, 18 (11.5%) had
living will, 100 (64%) had either a living will or advance directive, and 26 (17%) did not want to discuss
it. Also, it was surprising to learn that family members believe that once they sign the POLST forms, their
loved ones will be neglected.
Evaluations: From the facilities’ sample size of 157, 39 POLST forms have been signed and documented
indicating a 5% increase in total. The number of people that did not want to discuss POLSTs stayed the
same and there was slight decrease in the undecided.
121
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Impact of Health Regulations on E-Cigarette Retailers in NJ
Chinemelum Onwumelu
Karen Blumenfeld, Executive Director; Cara Murphy, Policy Attorney and program
Coordinator
New Jersey Global Advisors on Smoke-free Policy (NJGASP)
Purpose: To review all NJ Electronic device retailers in violation of the NJ Smoke-free Air Act and
measure the outcome in those retailers after Health officer enforcement intervention.
Significance: Electronic cigarettes are comprised of a metal tube with a battery that heats and vaporizes a
liquid nicotine/propylene glycol solution that contains other chemicals and products, creating a vapor
‘smoke’ that is breathed in and then exhaled. A recent study from Portland University found that
formaldehyde-containing hemiacetals can be formed during the e-cigarette “vaping” process. Researchers
noted that in many samples of the aerosol in “vaped” e-cigarettes, more than 2% of the total solvent
molecules have converted to formaldehyde-releasing agents, reaching concentrations higher than
concentrations of nicotine. The uncertainty of the levels of toxicity in e-cigarettes contribute to the
difficulty of passing stronger legislation and protecting public health. In 2010, New Jersey Governor
Corzine signed into law A4227/4228 which bans the use of “electronic smoking devices” in public places
and workplaces (amended the 2006 NJ Smokefree Air Act), and bans the sale of electronic smoking
devices to persons 18 years and younger. This is the first state law of its kind, in the nation. In order to
ensure that electronic cigarette vendors stay in compliance with the law and to protect the public health of
NJ, doing a review of the stores to ensure no violation is essential.
Method/Approach: A review of all Electronic cigarette stores (Vape Stores) in New Jersey by the intern
was completed to assess which stores are in violation of the NJ Smokefree Air Act. A preliminary
overview of the list was conducted and it was determined that more stores have opened up since it was
last updated. An updated list of Electronic cigarette stores by county was made and a comprehensive list
of current Health officers assigned to those towns was also drafted. Through research of social media
sites, websites and survey pages, Vape stores that are shown to be in violation, either by smoking indoors
or sampling the products indoors is recorded. Follow up emails and calls are put across to the Health
officers in charge of the counties who will then address these violations. A follow up investigation of the
stores in violation is conducted after Vape stores have been contacted by Health Officers.
Outcomes: There are currently One hundred and forty-seven (147) Vape stores across Twenty (20)
counties in the state of NJ (n=147). Out of the 147 stores reviewed, fifty-nine(59)Vape Stores were
allegedly found in violation. Videos and pictures plus live witnesses of customers and vendors sampling
products indoors and hosting smoke parties indoors constitute violation. After Health Officer contact was
made, Eighteen stores are recorded to be in compliance, thirty-two stores are still under investigation and
nine are either online stores or require more information.
Evaluation: Our evaluation is summative ongoing one. After conducting our research, review and update,
a comprehensive revision of the list of Electronic device/ Vape store locations was successfully
conducted. Our observations and review show that health officer intervention has significant effect on
electronic device/vape store retailers.
122
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Consumable Medical Supplies for Individuals with Access and Functional Needs
Eman Osagie
Michael Prasad, Director of Disaster Support Functions
The American Red Cross - North Jersey Chapter
Purpose: To maintain an adequate supply of Consumable Medical Equipment for the American Red
Cross on a 24/7 basis to respond to shelters in need of these supplies for individuals with access and
functional needs during a disaster.
Significance: Every year, a list of consumable medical equipment needs to be maintained and updated
for the Red Cross. Because the Red Cross is a non-profit organization, it gets most of its supplies and
equipment from donations. These donations of consumable medical supplies from businesses and
organizations help go towards individuals in shelters who have access and functional needs. Therefore, if
a disaster occurs and people were evacuated to a shelter that the Red Cross is in charge with, the Red
Cross needs to support individuals with access and functional needs with these consumable medical
supplies.
Method/Approach: Develop a spreadsheet with businesses and organizations (ie. the Menlo Park
Veteran’s home and the county level Centers for Independent Living) who may be able to supply (for free
or at a cost) Consumable Medical Equipment on a 24/7 basis. Contacts with these businesses and
organizations will be made to evaluate if they can accommodate the Red Cross need for Consumable
Medical Supplies items. A Consumable Medical Supplies Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) from a
template will also be created.
Outcomes: The Standard Operating Procedure for Consumable Medical Supplies will be the end product
of the project. After calling businesses and organizations that will donate Consumable Medical Supplies
to the Red Cross, the supplies will be collected by Red Cross. Those supplies will be documented into the
Standard Operating Procedure.
Evaluations: The project will be evaluated by the Standard Operating Procedure, which will act as a
guidance document for the Red Cross.
123
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Blood Pressure Reading Assessment
Camila Palad
Maria Victoria Coll, DDS, Health Equity/Multicultural Initiatives Director, HeartSaver
Instructor
American Heart Association
Purpose: Record blood pressure in high risk populations and educate the risks of high blood pressure.
Significance: High blood pressure is a big health concern particularly in African Americans. According
to the American Heart Association, more than 40% of non Hispanic African Americans have high blood
pressure. Some reasons why this is the case is that there are higher rates of obesity and diabetes in African
Americans, which puts them in a greater risk of heart disease.
Method/Approach: Blood pressure data was collected from Mt. Zion Methodist Church after mass
services twice a month. Using a blood pressure reading device, arm straps were placed around
participants’ arms to begin the readings. Participants were black, ages 18 and up.
Outcomes: Since February, 42 people agreed to have their blood pressure monitored. 16 of the
participants were male while 26 were female. Based on the collected data thus far, most participants have
pre or hypertension. 8 Males and 15 Females have high blood pressure, while 4 males and 3 females have
prehypertension. Many of the participants who wanted to record their blood pressure were female and
some have mentioned they were on medications.
Evaluation: Many of the participants express concern for their blood pressure and reported that they are
on medication. It is recommended that blood pressure should be recorded twice a month. By visiting Mt.
Zion twice a month, participants can have their blood pressure recorded to see how their heart is doing.
Checking blood pressures twice a month has made an impact on some participants. In the cases where
participants with high blood pressure had their reading regularly, they discovered that their blood pressure
was decreasing. Other strategies recommended to reduce hypertension are reducing sodium intake,
increasing exercise, losing weight, and to quit smoking.
124
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
School to Prison Pipeline: A Public Health Approach
Nikki Parekh
Eliza Straim & Professor Debbie Borie-Holtz
American Civil Liberties Union
Purpose: Assessing the influence of labeling theory on the School to Prison Pipeline program.
Significance: The Newark School District has a robust presence of law enforcement, which gives rise to
the idea that students may develop individual characteristics based upon a group treatment. Labeling
theory takes the view that people become criminals when labeled or treated like criminals. These labels
present a public health issue as they can influence the behavior of students by decreasing performance.
Methods/Approach: A voluntary non-probability student feedback survey was distributed by the Newark
Student Union on behalf of the New Jersey American Civil Liberties Union during the fall semester of
2013. The independent variable studied, “presence of law enforcement”, is measured by a four
dichotomous variable scale which asked students if they had had their property searched, were frisked
inside school, believed police officers treated students with respect or witnessed physical force used
towards students. The dependent variable is a proxy for student performance measured by school
graduation rate. I hypothesized that higher labeling scores decreases overall student performance.
Evaluation: The survey was distributed among all grade levels so I controlled for grade level to
determine whether a student’s time influenced the dependent variable measured as the school’s
graduation rate.
Outcomes: The study did not show a strong relationship between the presence of law enforcement and
performance; however, there were patterns that suggested strong inferences. On a scale of 0 to 4, students
were asked about their exposure to four kinds of behavior in which they were treated like criminals from
frisking to property searches. The analysis showed that the more students were exposed to these behaviors
(3 to 4 on the scale), graduation performance decreased overall at that school. Forty five percent of
students who were exposed to one labeling treatment had a graduation rate ranging from 90-100 percent
as compared to only 33 percent of students who experienced three or more criminal behaviors by school
law enforcement. When I controlled for grade level, the patterns were more prominent for students who
were closer to graduation. Students who were seniors and attended schools with a strong presence of law
enforcement, scoring 3 or higher on the scale, were less likely to attend schools with the higher school
graduation rates as compared to students who had a lower exposure to labeling behaviors.
125
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Do Something Initiative
Jennifer Park
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Health Outreach, Promotion, and Education (H.O.P.E.)
Purpose: To encourage students, staff/faculty, families, and the New Brunswick community to become
positive active bystanders by educating individuals on the importance of intervening any concern a fellow
student or friend may have.
Significance: There are many incidents of dangerous and life-threatening situations that occur on Rutgers
campus, as well as in the surrounding communities. Many of these events, related to alcohol and drug
use, sexual assault, or any kind of violence, are noticed by the public. However, statistics show that fewer
than 65% of people intervene in situations when someone’s life is at risk. For example, 40% of opiate
admissions for treatment involved persons 25 years old or younger. This is due to the fact that problems
are ignored and individuals are hesitant to intervene the problem at hand because they are afraid of getting
involved in the problem or they simply do not know what to do. This is an example of an innocent
bystander. In contrast to an innocent bystander, there are positive active bystanders who intervene when
necessary in a positive way to change the outcome of a potentially life-threatening situation.
Method/Approach: An evaluation survey was distributed to undergraduate students in order to retrieve
data about their knowledge of the campaign. Data for 62 students was compiled into a spreadsheet to
analyze how much health services are being used by people at Rutgers University. With the collected
data, the interns are working with supervisors to spread the word about how to use the button and where
to navigate it by arranging tabling events for the community.
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=62), 25 individuals (40%) had seen the Do Something logo
on/off campus, 35 (57%) had never seen the logo, and 2 (3%) were unfamiliar with the campaign. 38
persons (61%) felt the website addressed confidentiality, 16 (26%) felt that it was not secure, and 8 (13%)
had no input. Finally, of the 62 individuals, 52 (84%) were unaware of different sites the button can be
accessed.
Evaluation: From the sample size cohort (n=62), more than half (n=35, 57%) of the Rutgers population
had never seen the logo around campus and 52 individuals (84%) of the sample size were unaware of
different sites to access the button. Having effective strategies such as distributing information about the
campaign via email or during transfer student orientations, tabling events, and health workshops hosted
on campus will (a) help draw the attention of students towards the campaign and (b) allow students,
families, staff, and faculty become aware of the importance of actively intervening any given situation.
126
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency :
Improving Patient Satisfaction Using Bedside Rounding
Anisha Parmar
Dolores VanPelt, Director- Organizational Effectiveness, Karen Hepworth, Patient
Improvement Specialist
Hunterdon Medical Center
Purpose: To improve overall patient satisfaction and experience in the hospital through the
implementation of bedside rounding.
Significance: Bedside rounding in hospitals has decreased in frequency of teaching services. Perceived
barriers toward bedside rounds are inefficiency and patient and house staff lack of preference for this
method of rounding. Bedside rounding is a series of activities that are designed to promote patient safety,
improve patient outcomes, satisfaction, and enhance care delivery. It is used to address patient needs and
respond to any concerns the patient may express.
Method/Approach: A comprehensive rounding program includes regular and meaningful rounds on
patients and staff. A series of survey questions are asked on a daily basis to patients and nurses including,
“Is there anything getting in the way of providing great care?” or “Do you feel that your healthcare team
is meeting your needs by visiting hourly?”
Outcomes: Overall, patients are satisfied with their visit to the hospital and feel that their needs are being
met from their healthcare providers. However, one area that needs to be improved is the communication
of discharge information between nurses and patients.
Evaluation: Press Ganey’s Point of Care Solution is a tool to help facilitates’ purposeful rounding and
service intervention polling. Results from bedside rounding surveys over a three month period will be
analyzed to ensure patient’s needs were met and if not, will demonstrate an increase in improvement. A
consistent approach to measure and monitor rounding can ensure effectiveness, give patients an expanded
voice and allow for service interventions to ensure expectations are met.
127
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Awareness of Cancer and Prevention in College Seniors
Veenat Parmar
Sandra D’Elia, CGC; Sarah Nashed, CGC; Stephanie Pachter, CGC
The LIFE Center at the Rutgers, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Purpose: To assess awareness of cancer and prevention strategies within a senior college student
population.
Significance: Mouw, et al. found that education inequalities in cancer incidence have long been noted.
Seniors are likely to be more aware of cancer and prevention strategies than they were as high schoolers
or freshmen. In her survey, Foland found that female and male respondents with a college degree were 2.2
times and 2.1 times, respectively, more likely to report knowing ‘a lot’ about genetic testing (from options
‘none, little, some, a lot’) compared to female and male respondents, respectively, with a high school
degree or less. The American Cancer Society found that cancer mortality rates among men with 12 or
fewer years of education are almost 3 times higher than those of college graduates for all cancers
combined and four to five times higher for lung cancer. One identifiable gap that may attribute to cancer
diagnoses is lack of knowledge regarding cancer and its prevention. College seniors are at an
advantageous age of having consumed a significant amount of knowledge about cancer and prevention.
Method or approach: Research will be conducted on a cohort of senior students at Rutgers, The State
University of New Jersey. Students will be given an anonymous online survey through Rutgers Qualtrics
survey database to fill out about their knowledge of cancer and prevention strategies. Students will have
until April 19th, 2015 to complete the survey. The survey questions will ask about tobacco and alcohol
usage, diet choices, exercise habits, and if knowledge of cancer incidence and prevention strategies, e.g.
screenings or genetic testing, changed, increased or remained the same throughout their college
experience.
Outcomes: This study will display senior students’ current awareness about cancer risk factors and
prevention strategies. The results of the study will assess any gaps in knowledge about cancer and
prevention. The results will qualitatively show how much cancer/prevention education, in which exact
field (e.g. in tobacco use, screenings) is needed.
Evaluation: The results will determine the amount of cancer prevention education needed for college
students. For example, whether more awareness is needed about prevention strategies such as increased
screening of HPV and awareness of its transmission or avoidance of cigarette smoking or alcohol intake.
Mandatory classes or presentations even before high school could be effective strategies to prevent habits
that lead to cancer.
128
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
MLTSS IPRO Audit
Bhumi Patel
Akanksha Kapoor, Process Improvement Associate; Suzanne Bardenhagen, Senior
Administrative Assistant; Sabrina Gilliam, Process Improvement Associate; Jennifer
Langer, Operation Vice President.
Amerigroup RealSolutions
Purpose: To create MLTSS (Managed Long Term Services & Support) workflow to deliver to the New
Jersey State for IPRO audit through extensive research of Article IX of Amerigroup’s contract with the
state.
Significance: Auditing is a means of evaluating the effectiveness of a company’s internal controls. Not
only is an audit an evaluation mechanism, but also a law that must be adhered to and upheld by
companies, large charities, clubs, and so forth. Auditing is a way for companies to obtain and achieve
their objectives, acquire trustworthy financial reports, avert any instances of fraud or mishandling of
company funds, and decreasing its cost of capital. Both internal and external auditors are instrumental in
the company’s audit system. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic,
disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and
governance processes.
Methods/Approach: A review, of the MLTSS staff, by the Audit team was conducted to breakdown the
workflow of the department. Medical Managers, Case Managers, Process Improvement Associates, and
Nurses were interviewed to gather information on how the process of enrollment came about for patients
eligible to be a part of the MLTSS program. Article IX of Amerigroup’s contract with the state was
researched, read and summarized to obtain critical information on employee job description and also the
chronological order of events that followed after enrollment. The information compiled turned into a
flowchart that explained the departmental flow from beginning to end.
Outcomes: The following information was gathered for the final workflow: New cases show up on
MLTSS Roster (834 File). The cases are then assigned to the Case Manager (CM) according to county
and weight. An introductory letter and three phone calls are made by the Medical Manager Service to the
member. If member responds to the calls, CM will schedule an appointment for an initial visit. After the
initial visit, the CM submits approval forms for services. Lastly, quarterly visits are scheduled to make
sure services are in place and member gets the services needed.
Evaluation: Awaiting results from IPRO/DMAHS.
129
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Improving Student Health through Active Recreation in Campus Design
Molly Patel
Karen Lowrie
Environmental Analysis and Communications Group, The Bloustein Group
Purpose: To analyze various outdoor recreation preferences that enhance physical and mental health for
the college-aged cohort and provide evidence-based recommendations for how to maximize health
benefits of the planned outdoor spaces in Rutgers University’s new master physical plan of College Ave
campus.
Significance: One problem universities are facing is the obesogenic environment designed that directly
correlates with lack of weight control, presence of chronic disease and poor mental health in students.
The University recognizes the issue and created a physical master plan to promote “health, wellness and
recreation” by adding a greenspace to the College Ave. campus, the Raritan River bridge and a boardwalk
along Denier Park. It is necessary to start changing the social consciousness among the student body to
prepare them for the future. Understanding student preferences and challenges for engaging in outdoor
physical activity through this study will help develop the best ways to maximize the health benefits of the
Rutgers Master Plan.
Method/Approach: The researcher conducted a literature review, survey and focus group. Recruitment
protocol for both survey and focus groups consisted of on-site location flyering outside Rutgers gyms and
fitness activity facilities. The anonymous survey was comprised of questions created by the researcher
with supervision and advisory contributions by the preceptor and fellow associates of the EAC.The
questions center around the behavior and physical habits of Rutgers students, motives and preferences for
exercise and basic demographics. A similar template was asked in the focus group with follow up
questions based on the direction of the collaboration. The survey was implemented with an online survey
tool, Qualtrics, and transmitted through social media portals.
Outcomes: The data showed many students enjoying being outside as much as possible but their fitness
preferences does not reflect it. Students preferred to exercise indoors in proper facilities such as the gym
or a fitness classes. Motives for exercise ranged from aesthetic purposes to pure physical challenge.
Common reasons include weight control and muscle tone, many students did not feel inclined to exercise
for the social aspects or monitoring of chronic disease. If the proper facilities are put in place, the level of
usage for the green space will increase.
Evaluation: Based on the data presented by students, there are multiple recommendations that could be
made to the Rutgers planning committee. There should be access to bike rentals, walking/ jogging
pathways, exercise stations along the path, and patrol surveillance. This will ensure safety and maximal
physical health benefits of the area, which are the two greatest concerns in this study.
130
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
MLTSS IPRO Audit
Mona Patel
Process Improvement Associate: Akanksha Kapoor Senior Administrative Assistant:
Suzanne Bardenhagen, Process Improvement Associate: Sabrina Gilliam, Operation
Vice President: Jennifer Langer Jacobs
Amerigroup RealSolution
Purpose: Create Manage Long Term Service and Support (MLTSS) Workflow to deliver to NJ State
forIPRO Audit using Microsoft Visio and other programs to create a flowchart.
Significance: From March 23, 2015 to March 27, 2015, IPRO conducted a MLTSS Care Management
Audit of Amerigroup’s compliance with the New Jersey Division of Medical Assistance and Health
Services (DMAHS), this processes is an onsite visit. This audit recognizes a department gap analysis; by
doing this it allows Amerigroup to better serve and support the community and the members through out
the following year.
Method/Approach: The steps that were taken for this audit are, create Visio workflow to proved to IPRO
prior to the beginning of the audit. Outlines of high-level processes in the MLTSS department were made
for the auditors to make the process easier and it provides guidelines prior to audit. After all of this was
completed structurally organize binders representing each of the 100+ member being audited were
completed with the correct labels and documents.
Outcomes: Upon completion of the final workflow the following information was obtained. Firstly, new
cases show up on MLTSS Router 834 file. The cases get assigned to a Case Manager (CM) according to
their county weight (1-2.5). Three outreach’s are made in order to contact the member and if those three
phone calls are not answered an introductory and outreach letter are sent out by Medical Manager
Services (MMS). If the members do respond to the calls and letter, the CM will schedule an onsite visit.
Once the CM submits approval form for the service quarterly visits are schedule to make sure the member
is getting the service they deserve.
Evaluation: Awaiting result from IPRO/DMAHS.
131
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Advancing Excellence in the Nursing Home
Riddhi Patel
Direct Supervisor: Lisa Slater, Director of Professional Education; mentor: Carol Burt,
LNHA CALA Sr. administrator; Project Supervisor: Michael Yannotta, Senior Director
of Nursing; Roberto Muniz: President and CEO
Francis E. Parker Memorial Home
Purpose: To analyze the number of residents who do not have a psychiatric diagnosis and are given
antipsychotic medication in order to propose interventions to decrease inappropriate antipsychotic use in
nursing homes. 1Sackman conducted similar analysis and proposed that results would show better health
and quality of life for residents.
Significance: Medications, when used appropriately, can help promote the resident’s highest practicable
mental, physical, and psychosocial well being. Ensuring that residents receive medications that are needed
and appropriate for their medical condition is a critical component of safe and effective care. 2Vance
reported that over 17% of all nursing home patients were receiving antipsychotic medications when they
were not prescribed it on a daily basis. Medications administered inappropriately can compromise a
resident’s well being and even lead to death.
Method/Approach: For the first quarter of 2014 and the first quarter of 2015, the residents who had a
current prescription for one or more antipsychotic medication were entered in a medication tracking sheet.
Also, the admittance/discharge of residents to/from the nursing home was noted. Examination from the
psychoactive medications report determined if residents had a psychotic diagnosis. The data collected
included resident name, year of stay, and whether the residents were given an antipsychotic diagnosis.
Moreover, the data was collected from 23 different residents.
Outcomes: Of the sample cohort (n=23), 4 people (17%) were given antipsychotic medications with did
not have a psychiatric disorder. A possible reason for this that many diagnoses have the same treatment.
Likewise, of this population, 19 people (83%) were administered antipsychotic medication in accordance
with their psychiatric diagnoses. The comparison between residents in the first quarter of 2014 to the first
quarter of 2015 showed that there was an increase in the total number of residents taking antipsychotic
medications. There were 14 (61%) residents out of the total residents taking antipsychotic medications in
2014 compared to 15 (65%) residents in 2015. This increase is due to the fact that new residents were
given anti psychotic medications in 2015.
Evaluation: 19 of the 23 (83%) residents at Parker had the correct psychiatric diagnosis. A thorough
medication assessment should be done upon admission to the nursing home and non-drug therapies
should be utilized. Yearly audits on reconciling medications and quarterly workshops would assist in
learning to ensure that nurses/certified nursing assistants can easily search resident medications with their
psychiatric diagnoses.
132
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Accuracy of Point of Care of CNAs
Risha Patel
Lisa Slater, Director of Professional Education; Gloria Zayanskosky, Chief Quality and
Community Services Officer; and Roberto Muñiz, President & CEO.
Francis E. Parker Memorial Home
Purpose: To analyze point of care that residents receive from certified nursing assessments; to form
conclusions and recommendations in which the staff can improve quality of care.
Significance: A main focus of quality of care in long term care facilities is individualized care. In order to
practice individualized care, long term care facilities have began implementing electronic health records.
1
Furukawa et. al studied the benefits of electronic health records; they found improved overall patient
care, easier access to patient’s charts remotely, and fewer occurrences of medication error. This project
seeks to analyze certified nursing assistants’ (CNAs) charting in an attempt to make residents’ electronic
health records accurate. Accurate charting will lead to more individualized care and an improvement in
quality of care.
Method/Approach: A thorough chart analysis was conducted on 30 residents within the skilled nursing
facility, 10 residents from each neighborhood (wing). Data was taken from these residents’ medical
records and exported to a spreadsheet. The data collected explored CNAs charting on the selfperformance of each resident in areas such as eating, locomotion in the neighborhood, bed transfer, and
bed mobility. The data was derived from a two-week period in January 2015. The data collected for these
specific Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) was compared to the nurse’s note on the baseline condition of
the resident. If more than 5 charting errors occurred a discrepancy was noted. A table was created to
record the rate of discrepancies.
Outcomes: Of the 63 residents, in the River Road Nursing Home, 30 residents had their charts audited.
Of the 10 resident charts audited in Deerview Way, 7 (70%) charts showed more than 5 discrepancies
when looking at the Point of Care charting for locomotion, which is how the resident moves about on the
unit. After totalling the rate of discrepancies for each neighborhood, we have found that locomotion has
the highest rate of discrepancies when compared to the other ADLs (140%). On the other hand, we found
almost no discrepancies (10%) when looking at eating and transfers in Magnolia Way.
Evaluations: More than half (n = 7, 70%) of the charts audited noted a discrepancy in locomotion in
Deerview Way; additionally, Deerview Way had overall highest rate of discrepancies out of the 3
neighborhoods. First, we must administer a survey to the CNAs to see what information about Answers
on Demand and Point of Care is known; definitions of ADLs and the levels of dependency must be asked.
Then, we must reevaluate the orientation and training CNAs receive on AOD to fully understand the
education gap. Lastly, we will implement refresher courses on AOD to help minimize the rate of
discrepancies. We hope to audit charts in the future and find increases in accuracy of charting to match
the quality of care at Parker Homes.
133
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Client Funding Department- Check Tracer Process
Shivani Patel
Manager of Client Funding Department: Chakira Santos, Director of Client Funding:
Kelliann Duffy
QualCare Inc
Purpose: To analyze check tracer data between January through April 2015 to examine efficiency within
the Client Funding Department.
Significance: QualCare utilizes Emdeon for printing and mailing of benefit checks. When the client
claims that the check is missing or lost, the check information is added into an Access database. Clients
will respond to a Check Tracer by either issuing a stop payment, cashing the check (once copies are
provided to the department who sent the check tracer request,) or the check is old and given permission to
reissue with no stop payment. The check tracer database is crucial because it keeps a record of all checks
that are reported missing and also keeps record of the status of each check received through QualCare.
Method/Approach: The Access database with the check tracer log was printed from January through the
end of April to analyze each month of check tracers and the status of each check logged. The date used to
separate each month was the date that the check tracer was registered into the Uniflow system. The results
were separated by the number of cashed checks, reissued checks, open, and closed checks. Totals were
recorded for each month to analyze the number of checks received by the department and the efficiency
of reports.
Outcomes: Of the sample size (n=655) of check tracers from January through April, 214 checks were
cashed, 167 checks were reissued, 271 were open, and 3 were closed. In the month of January itself, a
total of 119 check tracers were requested- 55 were cashed, 58 reissued, 5 open, and 1 closed. February’s
total check tracers were 209- 115 cashed, 79 reissued, 14 open, and 1 closed. March had a total of 164
check tracers, with 43 cashed, 26 reissued, 94 opened, and 1 closed. Majority of April’s 163 checks were
open (n=158.) Only one check from April was cashed and four were reissued.
Evaluation: Majority of March and April’s check tracers are still open- this is due to the fact that check
tracker reports for April have just been sent out to the clients. A response on the checks will be provided
and once given, the checks will be listed as cashed or reissued in the status. For the month of March, the
checks that are still open need to be evaluated and either reissued or cashed. The ones that are still open
are the checks that have not been sent back from the client. Checks that are open prior to the month of
March need to be evaluated on an individual basis and dealt will immediately. Phone calls and reminder
emails will serve as effective strategies to lessen the amount of open check tracers.
134
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Strong Start Program
Cecilia Pegler
Celeste Andriot Wood - Project Director. Andrea Loftus - Project Specialist
Central Jersey Family Health Consortium
Purpose: To reduce preterm births and improve outcomes for newborns and pregnant women on
Medicaid by promoting optimal health behaviors including nutrition, exercise, vitamin intake, avoidance
of drinking and smoking and other health and wellness methods.
Significance: Prematurely born babies are a growing public health concern. Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services reports that more than half a million infants in the United States are born prematurely
each year, which has grown by 36% over the last twenty years. Infants that are born preterm are at
increased risk for mortality and can suffer many developmental health problems and greater medical
needs throughout their lives. Additionally, complications for the mother arise from premature births. The
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices explains that babies of low birth weight or
premature delivery have hospital charges that average $75,000. This creates financial burdens for the
family as well as state and federal funding programs. The Strong Start program works to eliminate
preterm births by providing care and educational information to pregnant mothers on Medicaid.
Method/Approach:
Quarterly data based on Strong Start participants have been collected throughout
2014. Last year, there were 389 newly enrolled women in the program aged 15-40. Although the
information is not individualized, the data reports on race, risk factors, timing of enrollment, services,
pregnancy outcomes, discharge summary, and milestones. Based on the 2014 data, information on the
birth weight was unknown for 94 of the 178 births in that year. Using the known data, birth weight was
either classified as 1) very low (<1500 grams) 2) low (1500-<2500 grams) 3) normal (2500-<4500 grams)
or 4) macrosomia (4500+ grams). Additionally, gestational age at delivery was recorded and categorized
on a weekly basis: 1) very preterm, less than 32 weeks, 2) preterm, 32-33 weeks, 3) late preterm, 34-36
weeks, 4) early term, 37-38 weeks, 5) full term, 39-40 weeks, 6) late term, 41 weeks, 7) post term, 42
weeks. Gestational age at birth was known for all births in the year 2014.
Outcomes:
To measure the effectiveness of the Strong Start program, the available data concerning
birth weight and gestational age at delivery, which are indicators of premature/preterm births, should be
analyzed and compared to rates among the general population of births among women on Medicaid.
Additionally, the data should be compared to birth weights and gestational age at delivery of births
specifically in NJ in which the mothers are Medicaid recipients. This will take any state-to-state
differences into account.
Evaluation:
The level of success of the Strong Start program can be determined by comparing the
birth outcome results from participants in the program to those of the general population who are
Medicaid recipients, as well as data specifically from NJ. In order for Strong Start to continue to receive
grants and funding, promising results are necessary. If this analysis can show that preterm and premature
births are decreased among participants in the program, it proves it to be successful. Contrarily, if there is
little to no differences in the percentage of preterm/premature births among women in the program
compared to births among Medicaid recipients in NJ/the general population, it shows a lack of success.
135
Internship Abstract
Title
Name
Preceptor
Agency:
Here4Seniors Workshop Program
Jessica Perez
Angela McKnight, Founder of AngelaCARES, Inc.
AngelaCARES, Inc
Purpose: To increase awareness and the quality of the life for senior citizens in Hudson County through
education aimed at common health illnesses affecting this community especially, Arthritis, Cancer,
Cataracts, Depression, Heart Disease, Hypertension and others.
Significance: As our nation currently holds the largest population of seniors in our history, these diseases
are directly affecting our elderly. In fact, due to diet and lack of exercise many seniors are unaware of the
impact their lifestyle has on their health. In the recent decade, Americans have increased their likelihood
of developing heart disease and hypertension by 15%. Cancer is also a growing pandemic that is affect
more and more people each day.
Method/Approach: AngelaCARES, Inc. and CarePoint Health have teamed up to bring the
Here4Seniors Health Workshop Seminars. Each Saturday, seniors throughout the community will gather
at the Sanon Global Center in Jersey City, New Jersey for presentation on a various health topic like
Arthritis, Heart Disease, or Diabetes. Seniors will learn about proper diet, medications, and many other
lifestyle changes that can be done to improve their health.
Following the presentation by AngelaCARES, Inc., seniors will be provided with brief quiz and feedback
survey. The results will be compared as the workshops progress and the knowledge of the seniors
increases. Also, CarePoint will be doing on-site health screenings. Seniors will be provided with a free
screening to check their hemoglobin levels, blood pressure, temperature, breathing, heart rate, pulse, and
so much more.
Outcomes/Results: The first presentation was completed was on Cholesterol on March 14, 2015 and 15
seniors attended. 60% of the seniors noted never attending a workshop related to Cholesterol and noted
limited to minimal knowledge on the topic. 67% noted that they learned something new about Cholesterol
and expanded their awareness on the disease.
Following the presentation, two seniors were tested for Cholesterol and newly realized they also showed
signs of high cholesterol during the health screening conducted by CarePoint Health.
Evaluation: After just the first seminar, the seniors appear to be gaining more information about various
health and safety issues. The correlation between an increase in education and knowledge and the
improvement of health is very strong.
136
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Healthy Workspace Inventory
Kwame Phillips
Robyn Ginese
Rutgers Student Life Leadership & Training
Purpose: To assess the quality of health achievable for student employees in various on-campus sites and
provide educational resources to ensure that the work environment is a healthy space for all.
Significance: In the National College Health Assessment of Spring 2012, 45% of males and 58% of
female respondents indicate feeling a stress level higher than average in the last 12 months. This
assessment recorded that 13% of males and 16% of females feel that their academics are negatively
influenced by their work commitment. This suggests that some of the stress that students experience may
be related to their work environments. Our assessment considers individual and infrastructural
contributions to the quality of health a particular work environment offers their employees. The
assessment defines a healthy work environment as one that is supportive of individuality and
collaboration, challenges employees and assists in their growth and development, has resources and
services in place to promote wellness, and is inclusive of the values and morals of their employees.
Method/Approach: Through researching studies and reports on topics such as work environments,
college campuses, stress, and overall health; key characteristics of a healthy work environment are
identified. Student participants of the Leadership 360 Leadership Series will rate how much they agree
with each item on a scale of 1-3 points. These points are summed and attributed to a colored category.
Once students identify the color of their work environment, they are provided a description of the positive
and negative contributors to health. Students are also given resources to improve the health of the work
environment and what industries best fit their preferences.
Outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to assess the level of health achieved at their work
environments. Because this is self-determined, participants will feel more autonomy with improving the
health of their respective work environments. By implementing changes as suggested by the Healthy
Offices Fact Sheet and the discussion within the activity, the participants’ level of stress from the work
environment is expected to decrease. This will increase their overall their overall health and wellness. The
assessment’s long-term goal is to improve the achievable level of health of all student employment
structures.
Evaluation: A post assessment survey will be given to the participants. This survey will assess the
students’ efficacy with identifying strategies to improve the level of health of their respective work
environments.
137
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Space Management
Danielle Pierce
Linda Tanzer, CAO & Marco DiNicolangelo, Program Support
Rutgers, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Purpose: Provide digital visuals of all buildings, including staff seating, for the reconfiguration of floors
and departments, including treatment centers and research labs through new software implementation.
Significance: Cancer research, prevention, detection, and treatment approaches will continue to be
leading initiatives for the Cancer Institute, through an improved architectural design to allow for comfort
and efficiency among personnel and patients alike. When dealing with a disease as difficult and
stigmatized as cancer, the environment can make a huge difference and must host a peaceful, positive
attitude to provide optimum care.
Method/Approach: By updating CAD drawings of all of the buildings and creating a master list of all
employees, the software created a visual representation of all CINJ buildings.
The project began with a lengthy data collection process to identify and verify each department, area and
lab, including all employees. Ten floors housing nine hundred employees were uploaded into the software
resulting in highly sensitive and detailed data. Following construction / renovations, the software was
crosschecked with the actual floor plans and all updates were submitted. Lastly the software was used to
create scenarios, which consisted of repositioning departments, treatment areas, and research labs to
determine the most effective administrative design for CINJ.
Outcomes: By relocating individual employees to another floor, and moving an entire department to a
second building, space was saved and room for further expansion was provided in both buildings. The
software aims to improve employee entrance/exit management and act as an internal directory service to
ease the admin/research/clinical communication network.
Evaluation: Approximately twenty percent of employees moved within the same building, fifteen percent
moved into another building and sixty-five percent remained in their current space. Most of the research
labs remained unchanged, except for two, which were decommissioned to provide temporary moving
space for employees. After every move, I reach out to each department for feedback to get a better idea of
what changes could be implemented to improve the moving process.
138
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Streamlining Recruitment: A Project To Increase Study Enrollment
Humza Qureshi
Direct Supervisor: Joshua Gilens, Research Coordinator, Dr. Jeffrey Apter, Medical
Director
Princeton Medical Institute
Purpose: To establish a system and method to stay in contact with old patients and screens, and
categorize them in order to recruit them into incoming studies.
Significance: Research is a major part of public health, and this project makes it a point to increase the
research we are contributing to at our site. This project serves to increase the efficiency of patient
recruitment and care delivery at PMI.
Method/Approach: Analyze all old patient files and create a database organizing them based on their
symptoms at the time and what severity they reported. Determine what active trials at PMI each patient
would potentially benefit from, and reach out to these patients and tell them about how the new drugs and
treatments can help them. Schedule these patients to come in for screens and subsequently enroll them in
the respective studies if they are eligible within the inclusion/exclusion criteria
Outcomes: Implementation of this project has created a very efficient process to reach out to our a higher
volume of patients, who have disorders that they want treated and will offer them access to potentially
groundbreaking drugs and treatments not regularly available
Evaluation: A month following its implementation, this project has been a great success, already
showing a 45% increase in screenings from the previous month, and a 30% increase in study enrollment,
helping us achieve our commitment to our patients.
139
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Local Measures to Ban Fracking Throughout Coastal New Jersey Municipalities
Rohit Rangroo
Lauren Petrie, Organizer at Food & Water Watch
Food & Water Watch
Purpose: To educate and inform local municipalities in Monmouth and Ocean counties about the
dangerous effects of fracking, fracking waste and fracking infrastructure.
Significance: Hydraulic fracturing, also known as “fracking” is an intense method of extracting natural
gas from underground shale formations. To extract the gas, deep wells are drilled into the ground and
injected with millions of gallons of fresh water, toxic chemicals, and sand. Even though fracking poses
severe risks to the environment and public health, it is exempt from federal regulations such as the Safe
Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act and the Clean Air Act. Fracking has many negative
implications for water quality, air quality, and public health. The millions of gallons of fluids that are
pressure pumped into the ground often seep into local aquifers and drinking water sources and have been
known to contaminate water that residential homes rely on. There have been countless cases of water
contamination and illnesses from these chemicals. There have also been cases of individuals lighting there
tap water on fire due to the presence of methane in their drinking water. Also, the chemical mixtures used
for fracking, and the waste it produces, are known to contain endocrine disruptors and carcinogens, which
can severely affect one’s health. The disposal of fracking waste and the expansion of natural gas
infrastructure, such as pipelines and liquid natural gas facilities, also pose a threat to the health and safety
of the New Jersey coast through the potential for leaks, spills, accidents and explosions.
Method/Approach: A 15-week study was conducted to determine the impact of educating
municipalities in the coastal region about the negative impacts of fracking and fracking infrastructure.
Data was collected from 55 municipalities in Monmouth County and 33 from Ocean County. Outreach
was conducted through phone calls and email to all 88 towns inviting mayors, council members, various
boards and commissions, and members of the public to attend an educational event outlining the impacts
of fracking and ways to protect their communities. They were given fact sheets, official government
memos, and template ordinances to help them pass local measures against fracking and related
infrastructure in their respective areas.
Outcomes: Out of the 88 municipalities contacted, resolutions against Liquid Nitrogen Gas (LNG)
facilities were passed in Lavalette, Neptune Township, and Keyport. Elected officials and residents from
12 additional municipalities including Bradley Beach, Hazlet, Long Branch, Manasquan, Manchester,
Ocean Township, Point Pleasant, Red Bank, Shrewsbury, Toms River, Union Beach and Upper Freehold
have also expressed an interest in pursuing local measures.
Evaluation: The municipal clerks of each municipality were contacted and informed about the education
event. They were also given documents outlining the issue and what the towns can do to pass measures
against fracking and related infrastructure. Through outreach and education during the 15 week period,
representatives from 17% of the 88 municipalities contacted expressed an interest in pursuing local
measures.
140
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Trinkets and Trash
Jenny Redona
M. Jane Lewis, DrPH, Associate Professor at Rutgers School of Public Health; Mia
Zimmerman, MPH
Rutgers School of Public Health: Center for Tobacco Surveillance and Evaluation
Research
Purpose: To analyze emails received by Trinkets and Trash from 2010-2014 and observe and evaluate
tobacco marketing trends and tactics for Marlboro.
Significance: Smoking remains a huge public health issue, and tobacco companies continue to advertise
and market their products despite the health risks. Marlboro’s advertisements contain several recurring
content that keep people interested and exposed to their websites. These emails are filled with bar
locators, preservation projects, tips and guides for everyday living, and links to their main websites. In
addition to this, Marlboro emails also contain coupons sweepstakes, and direct mail gifts that continue to
keep people interested in their products and what they have to offer. These marketing techniques are a
concern because it shows the extent to which Marlboro has gone to promote their products and reach their
audience. Through their emails, Marlboro successfully reaches and exposes people to their websites and
thus their products.
Method/ Approach: First, a random sample of emails from Marlboro from 2010-2014 was generated and
coded using the Trinkets and Trash coding system and guide. Data were entered into an SPSS database,
and frequencies of this data were made and evaluated based on specific variables.
Outcomes: Research and content analysis of these emails will increase the publics’ awareness on what
tobacco companies like Philip Morris are doing in terms of advertising and marketing. It will add to the
already growing knowledge of the strategies of big tobacco companies, specifically the methods they use
to keep people exposed to their websites and products.
Evaluation: The results of the content analysis of Marlboro emails can be evaluated based on qualitative
research evaluations.
141
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Tuberculosis Eradication Program
Mishi Resian
Tefera Gezmu,
Timpiyian Yiare
Talaku Community Based Organization
Purpose: To eradicate TB deaths in the Maasai community through education of the Maasai people on
how to identify signs and symptoms of TB, and the importance of early screening and adherence to
treatment for TB.
Significance: Tuberculosis is more prevalent in the Maasai community compared to the rest of the
Kenya. In 2004, there were 1600 active TB cases in Kajiado area. Out of these, 1% were multidrug
resistant TB. The Maasai culture has been the major enabling factor of TB in the Maasai
community. The TB eradication project will educate the Maasai community about TB, how to prevent
the spread of TB infection and different treatment options available.
Method/Approach: A lesson plan was created on TB education. Classes will be taught using brochures,
posters, dramatization and power point presentation to educate the Maasai Community and increase TB
awareness. A pre/post community TB survey is distributed manually among the participants in the
Maasai community to assess the effectiveness of the classes on TB education. The survey will help
evaluate any change in their attitude and stigma towards TB and people with TB.
Outcomes: The Maasai community will be informed about TB and the impact it can have on their health
and their lives. They will learn how to construct houses using new technique that allows bigger windows
for better ventilation and chimney to let smoke out of the house. They will learn how to pasteurize their
dairy products, importance of adhering to TB treatment and healthy living.
Evaluation: Survey results will be collected and analyzed. Feedback on improvements to be made and
recommendations for further actions will be suggested to the Talaku organization.
142
Internship Abstract
Title
Name
Preceptor
Agency:
Rutgers Drug Education and Outreach Initiative
Ednan Rizvi
Professor Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez
Rutgers Health Services - H.O.P.E.
Purpose: To educate the student body at Rutgers University on the adverse effects of recreational drug
use and drug abuse.
Significance: Students suffer from adverse effects of drug use and abuse every day on university
campuses. Universities around the nation have unique populations with a majority of students in their
late-teens or early twenties. These students are often at higher risk of recreational drug use. It is in the
best interest of all university health departments to establish an education system in which students can
engage in a conversation about the adverse effects of drug use with university staff and their peers.
Method/Approach: Educational materials were prepared for common drugs abuse by university
students. Passive educational materials were created including a bulletin board. Brochures are being
created to be used at various tabling events around campus by Rutgers Health Services. The bulletin
board was created in collaboration with Rutgers Community Standards. The bulletin board was given to
every residence hall on the New Brunswick campus to be used in their front entrance for the month of
March.
Outcomes: Measurable outcomes are hard to assess with passive educational material. It can be stated
with confidence, however, that thousands of students around the Rutgers University campus in New
Brunswick have seen the material.
Evaluation: An obvious method to evaluating the success of this project is to compare the number of
drug related incidents reported to Rutgers Police department for the current year to that of previous years.
This will be a reliable method to measure if passive educational materials, in fact, help reduce the
incidence of negative outcomes from drug use on a university campus.
143
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Benefits of Public Access to the Raritan River
Sofia Rodriguez
Sara J. Malone, Senior Research Specialist
Environmental Analysis and Communications Group at Edward J. Bloustein School of
Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: The New Brunswick Raritan Public Access Project was designed to analyze the benefits that
public access can have on vulnerable populations
Significance: A vulnerable population is defined as a population that is not well integrated into the
healthcare system due to a variety of reasons including: socioeconomic status, ethnicity, location, or
health characteristics. Currently, public access to the Raritan is minimal due to the noxious chemicals
present in the water. New Brunswick is an extremely vulnerable population in which the low-income
residents suffer from disturbingly high rates of violence, disease, and death. Through extensive research,
it has been discovered that public access to recreational areas or open spaces can reduce crime as well as
greatly improve health. There is a connection between a person spending time in nature and having
reduced mental fatigue and aggression toward others. Other statistics show that areas with easy access to
recreation have lower prevalence of obesity and other comorbidities. Also, water-based recreation has
great direct economic benefits, by attracting tourists to the location, and indirect economic benefits,
because citizens who are healthier require less expensive healthcare. These proven connections exhibit the
benefits of public access and will hopefully incline other businesses and citizens to assist in making the
Raritan River available for recreation use.
Method/Approach: Extensive research will be compiled to support the correlation between public access
to recreation and improved health and well-being. This research will present statistical evidence to
support the positive effect that outdoor recreation has on crime rates as well as physical and mental
health. A survey will be created to determine the interest that New Brunswick citizens will have in using
the Raritan River for recreational activity. The overall purpose of the survey is to track what recreational
areas in New Brunswick are considered the best and most used, what areas need improvement, and to
determine the support this project will receive from the community.
Outcomes: Outlining the health benefits and determining the support and interest the community would
have in public access to the Raritan River would help bring more awareness to the benefit of cleaning up
the river. This research will make it apparent that the opportunity to reduce crime and improve health is
important in vulnerable populations where these issues are extremely problematic. Cleaning the Raritan
River for recreational use would be a lengthy process, but in the long-run, providing this opportunity for
physical activity and open space may reduce health problems and crime in New Brunswick.
Evaluation: To evaluate the success of this project, a follow-up survey would have to be administered.
More importantly, a review of crime rates and health problems in New Brunswick would have to be
recorded. Comparing these rates to previous ones would help determine if a correlation between public
access to recreation and better well-being in New Brunswick exists.
144
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Developing a Culture of Wellness in NJ DOH
Erik Romeo
Dr. Arturo Brito, Deputy Commissioner New Jersey, Lisa Asare, Executive Assistant to
Deputy Commissioner
New Jersey Department of Health
Purpose: To establish a culture of wellness in New Jersey’s Department of Health through a Worksite
Wellness Program using the New Jersey’s Worksite Wellness Toolkit along with feedback and
recommendations from NJ Department of Health officials.
Significance: Research studies have shown that chronic disease is related to sedentary work conditions.
Employees spend 36% of their total waking hours at work in sedentary conditions often contributing to
poor eating habits and physical inactivity. Heart disease and stroke are linked to common risk factors with
poor eating habits, physical inactivity, and tobacco use. In 2009, 59% of deaths in New Jersey were
caused by heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. Also, in 2009 according to America’s Health
Rankings, New Jersey spent an estimated 2.2 billion in obesity-attributable health care. This evidence has
suggested that preventive strategies can be implemented to prevent the healthcare cost and absenteeism of
New Jersey Department of Health workers, and promote a culture of wellness.
Methods: Semi structured interviews with key informants of the NJ Department of Health took place to
gain insight into programs available to NJ Department of Health workers related to chronic disease.
Online resources were used such as the CDC Workplace Health Promotion website along with other State
Government websites related to workplace wellness, to gain ideas into what to implement on Workplace
Wellness. The key resource to this project that was used was the New Jersey’s Worksite Wellness
Toolkit, which provides the steps to take to begin building a culture of wellness in the workplace.
Outcome: The proposed recommendations involving healthy eating, active living, smoking cessation,
social media and emotional health will be presented to the wellness committee involving the
Commissioner of Health, Deputy Commissioner of Health, Administrative Director from the Division of
Management and Administration, Director of Tobacco Control, Director of Human Resource Services,
Director of Occupational Health Services and Director of Chronic Disease with Prevention Consultant of
Chronic Disease; in the form of a white paper.
Evaluation: Feedback and response from the wellness committee on the white paper and presentation
will be in the form of a survey, and this will evaluate the plan and will determine any implementation.
145
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Warren County Chooses Healthy
Brenda Rosario
Sarah Shoemaker, Public Health Practice Standards Partnership Coordinator
The Warren County Health Department
Purpose: To promote and educate Warren County residents on the importance of nutrition, healthy
eating, and an active lifestyle.
Significance: The Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) was developed to identify and address
important health issues in Warren County, NJ. This includes the rise of obesity and lack of physical
activity present in the community. Rural communities especially have difficulty creating healthy
environments due to long commutes and hesitancy of organizations to institute healthy policy changes
due to their small audiences. Based upon previous local programs, health consciousness improved when
local businesses and authorities coordinated with the health department to establish and promote health
programs/events. This indicates a misunderstanding of being ‘healthy’ and health communication.
Method/Approach: Analysis and adaptations of menu items was completed in order to comply with the
standard nutritional profile. Recipes were put into a system where caloric, fat, sodium and sugar content
were precisely measured. Data collection of county farmers markets included location, inventory,
seasonal produce, and acceptance of government issued vouchers. Research regarding exercise and the
effects of food was conducted in order to properly create programs and events tailored to the community.
This addressed healthy substitutions, probability of possible health conditions, and strategies on
integrating healthful choices to daily routines.
Outcomes: 13 restaurants decided to participate in the Healthy Menu Options Program. Menu items and
dishes were altered to fit the nutritional profile. 16 municipalities signed the pledge for the Mayors
Wellness Campaign, and a pocket guide map focused on county farmers markets was created. Installation
of 6 bike racks were also placed in areas dedicated to outdoor physical activity. Events and activities
scheduled for future dates were based upon health issues pertaining to county residents and education
about overall personal health.
Evaluation: One survey will be distributed to restaurant and market owners and another to customers of
who visit these establishments. All feedback will be analyzed to assess if the programs are reflecting
health consciousness among customers and if businesses are encouraging and educating patrons about
healthier options. Assessment of brainstormed plans and events for future dates will occur to check for
appropriate physical activity for all ages. Bike racks will be monitored periodically to see if residents are
utilizing them.
146
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Regaining Function to Everyday Life
Pia F. Rossi
Shaloo Choudhary, Supervisor of Outpatient OT/PT Department
Robert Wood Johnson Outpatient Physical and Occupational Therapy
Purpose: To measure the functional limitations and gains, and their impact on activities
of hand injury patients before and after therapy.
of daily living,
Significance: Occupational therapists treat patients of all ages through the use of therapeutic use of
everyday activities. They use a patient-centered and occupation-based approach to identify the needs of
every patient that will enable meaningful function in their everyday lives. One specialty practice area of
occupational therapy is hand therapy, which typically involves orthopedic- based upper- extremity
conditions. Conditions treated in this area include fractures of the hand, lacerations, amputations, and
surgical repairs of tendons and nerves. Hand injuries account for nearly 10% of all hospital emergency
visits. Studies have shown that patients view themselves in relation to their occupational roles and
abilities. Hand injuries interfere with these roles and occupational experiences, which creates a sense of
dysfunction. And so, the ultimate goal of the therapist is to ensure that the rehabilitation process is both
promoting healing and enabling patients to perform fulfilling activities in their daily lives. An outcome
measurement test (OMT) therapists use is the QuickDASH, which measures a patient’s perceived ability
to perform daily functions. QuickDASH measures the functional limitations and gains of patients
throughout the rehabilitation process. Outcomes of therapy affect both social and psychological aspects of
their patient’s lives, and improvement cannot only be heard but experienced.
Method/Approach: A small-scale retrospective study will be conducted, which will include n patients
with hand injuries. The QuickDASH Outcome Measure is an 11-item self-report questionnaire designed
to measure physical function and the impact of upper-extremity injuries. A chart audit will be completed
and reviewed under the supervision of an occupational therapist. The initial and final QuickDASH of each
patient will be collected and calculated.
Outcomes: This study will demonstrate the impact the interventions of occupational therapy have had on
the selected patients.
Evaluation: This study will use the QuickDASH to measure the limitations and gains of the hand injury
patients throughout the therapy process. Further research will explain the mechanism of the occupational
therapy practice. The results of this study will show the impact of the intervention on these patients. A
poster and PowerPoint will be created, which will include this information and general information about
the occupational therapy intervention.
147
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Integrated Care Team Program
Nadianie Saint Fort
Judy Chester, Volunteer Nurse and Interior Designer
American Red Cross---Somerset County
Purpose: To help facilitate the recovery of individuals and family following a disaster whether big or
small
Significance: The Integrated Care Team wants to help individuals and families be able to deal with the
loss they have experienced whether it be a person or home. The team works together to ensure that the
overall health of an individual or family is well intact. Trials of collaborative care have been conducted in
diverse healthcare settings, including network and staff model health systems, and private and public
providers. Evidence-based studies have demonstrated the impact an integrated care team can play on a
community (Unutzer 5).
Method/Approach: The main approach for the project is to provide client support to families who have
experienced disaster-related death, including emotional and spiritual support, referrals, and where
necessary, relevant financial support. In an IMPACT study, there were 1,081 adults aged 60 and older
with depression. They were randomly assigned to a collaborative care program or to usual care. They also
added two members: a depression care manager and a consulting psychiatrist.
Outcomes: When the program is fully implemented, it will hopefully help those who have experienced
great loss get through the obstacles with ease. The ICT wants to be a part of that coping process to ensure
the overall health of the individual or family. IMPACT participants were more than twice as likely to
experience a significant improvement in their depression over the course of a year. They had an overall
quality of life. The effectiveness of the program has made an impact on depressed adolescents, depressed
cancer patients, and diabetics.
Evaluation: The program has not began, but has been approved to take action. Once volunteers are
found, the program will begin taking effect. Volunteers must have a manual, seen the presentation, and
have all documentation filled out before being considered. From the study, IMPACT has been recognized
as evidence based practice by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and
recommended as best practice. They are identified as one of the only studies demonstrating that PCMH
models can achieve the Triple Aim of improved health, improved quality of health, and reduced costs.
148
Internship Abstract
Title
Name
Preceptor
Agency:
Preventing Heart Disease and Strokes in Hispanic Populations
Bianca Santana
Maria Victoria Coll, DDS, Health Equity/Multicultural Initiatives,
The American Heart Association
Purpose: The purpose of this project is to see the effect that preventive education, on heart diseases and
strokes, has on the Hispanic community.
Significance: In 2010, the second leading cause of death for Hispanics was heart disease while strokes
rated number four. Therefore, it is important to find ways to prevent these diseases from occurring.
Method/Approach: First a 4 question pre-survey was given to groups of 20 Hispanics, ages ranging from
34-92. The pre-survey was written in a Likert scale style. Four statements were given about stroke
symptoms, processed foods, risks of high blood pressure, and the effects of healthy eating. After each
statement, each individual was asked to answer whether they agreed with the statement, were not sure if
they agreed with the statement, or if they did not agree with the statement. After pre-surveys were
collected, a presentation about the risks and prevention of heart diseases and strokes was given. Then,
each individual received a post- survey with the same style and questions as the pre-survey. However,
there was one additional question given on the post-survey, which asked each participant to state whether
they agreed, weren’t sure, or disagreed that they would make an effort to change their eating habits as a
result of what they learned in the presentation. The post and pre-surveys of each participant were then
compared to see if the presentation was effective in educating and changing the eating habits of the
participants.
Outcomes: Out of the 20 participants, 10 (50%) changed no answer between the pre and the post-surveys,
5 (25%) changed one answer, 3 (15%) changed two answers, 1 (5%) changed three answers, and 1 (5%)
changed all answers. However, 100% of participants answered that they would make an effort to eat
healthier after listening to the presentation. It is also important to note that this is a preliminary study due
to small statistical power.
Evaluation: According to this study, half of the participants did not change answers between the pre and
post-surveys, while the other half changed at least one. Yet, all participants said they would make an
effort to eat healthier. Therefore, this study showed that while the presentation was only half effective in
educating the participants, it was fully effective in getting participants to want to do more to prevent heart
diseases and strokes through healthier eating.
149
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Unplug and Recharge: The impact of technology usage on sleep patterns and other
behavioral traits.
Shiza Sarfraz
Dr. Francesca Maresca, Director of Rutgers HOPE
Rutgers H.O.P.E. (Health, outreach, promotion, and education)
Purpose: To illustrate the interconnected relationship between excessive technology use and its effects on
wellness and personality, while providing innovative solutions to make healthy changes.
Significance: From smartphones to laptops and even tablets, college students rely on technology on a
day-to-day basis. The University of Maryland (2011) wanted to see just how dependent their students
were on technology, which prompted them to conduct a study asking 200 students to go tech-free for just
24 hours. The results were shocking; more than 50% of the students were unable to complete the study,
describing withdrawal symptoms similar to those of people addicted to drugs. Students were asked to
write testimonials about their experiences and a staggering majority mentioned feeling “disconnected
from the world” and/or feeling “crazy” without their devices. Additional research has found a correlation
between technology use and sleep habits since most students will take their phones to bed with them, and
the exposure to the screen decreases melatonin (the hormone responsible for the regulation of sleep and
wake cycles) level in the body by at least 20%, indicating that technology usage (phones, laptops,
television) right before bed makes it harder to sleep.
Method/Approach: An interactive workshop was developed. The overall goal of the workshop is to
provide participants with information about excessive technology use and the impact it has on behavioral
traits and its correlation with unhealthy sleep habits. The workshop was pilot tested and changes were
made based upon participant feedback. The final workshop was implemented with the residents of Allen
Hall, Busch Campus.
Outcomes: The anticipated goal was to get students to engage in screen-free time by signing pledge cards
stating that they pledge to designate at least an X amount of hours of “screen-free” time daily/weekly.
This method measured student’s willingness to engage in a more intentional use of technology to reduce
the negative health and wellness effects of heavy use. Of all the participants (n = 10), 9 students signed
the pledge card with varying hours, between 1-3, daily that they would refrain from using technology.
Another long-term goal was to raise awareness for the National Day of Unplugging, hosted by the Reboot
organization, and get more students at Rutgers to pledge to Unplug for this national movement to stay
tech-free for a full 24 hours, and 90% of the participants indicated that if such a day was hosted by
Rutgers University, they would participate.
Evaluation: The evaluation consisted of a post-workshop questionnaire. Conclusively, 80% of the
participants indicated that they check their phones at least 3-5 or more times in an hour, and didn’t realize
the connection between screen exposure right before bed and melatonin. Furthermore, 70% of participants
indicated that they are utilizing the tips for reducing usage, with the most popular tips including:
monitoring usage and silencing their phones before bed.
150
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
How Mocha Mom Mothers Navigate The Daily Challenges of Their Lives
Janet Sarpong
Dr. Stephanie M. Curenton,
Ecology of School Readiness Lab, (ESR)
Purpose: To examine the process involved in how mothers make critical decisions regarding household
chores.
Significance: Mocha Moms is an organization that was initially established to support African-American
stay-at-home mothers, but now also includes mothers who work for pay. Mocha Moms organization
provides emotional, social, and physical support to its members and aims to unite all mothers through
community activism and advocacy on various issues affecting them and their communities. Prior research
done by Dr. Stephanie. M. Curenton and Dr. Jocelyn. E. Crowley shows that all of the mothers they
interviewed claimed that Mocha Moms organization was a great resource to them and their families.
Method/Approach: Our qualitative research utilized 25 previously transcribed interviews collected by
Dr. Jocelyn Crowley. There were two parts to the approach. Part one involved organizing the data for
later coding, and part two involved the use of Atlasti software to qualitatively code and analyze the data.
Interviews were organized by eight questions around work and family balance. The questions asked are as
follows: (1) how are responsibilities in the household shared? (2) How did you decide on who should stay
home? (3) Do you identify as a feminist? (4) What unique challenges have you experienced as a mother?
(5) What issues do you think all mothers could come to agree on? (6) How did they describe their faith?
(7) Are you politically involved? (8) And lastly, do you believe that there should be one ideal parental
style for children?
Outcomes: For my internship project, only two of the eight questions will be further discussed. The
outcomes will focus on the questions about feminist identity and shared household chores. When asked a
question about their identity as feminists, most of the mothers claimed to not identify as feminists,
although they supported equality for women. Sixteen out of 25 mothers claimed they did not identify as
feminists. Six of the mothers, however, identified as fully feminists. They claimed that their femininity is
dependent on the circumstance, while 3 identified as being feminists. On the question about shared
responsibilities in the household, almost all of the mothers claim that their husbands were actively
involved with household chores only after repeated reminders on a daily basis. Seventeen out of 22
mothers who responded to the question about shared household chores claimed to be satisfied with their
current partners’ involvement.
Evaluation: Out of the seventeen mothers who claimed to be satisfied with their partners’ household
chore contribution, 3 identified as feminists, 4 identified as being feminist sometimes and 10 identified as
not being feminists.
151
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
“Coming Out, Coming Home: South Asian Family Acceptance and LGBTQ Youth”
Hima Sathian
Aruna Rao, Associate Director, NAMI - New Jersey
SAMHAJ | NAMI - New Jersey
Purpose: To support South Asian families better care for the mental health of youth with marginalized
sexual and gender identities
Significance: According to a study conducted by the Family Acceptance Project, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,
Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) youth who do not have family acceptance are 5.9 times more likely to have
severe depression, and 8.4 times more likely to attempt suicide compared to LGBTQ youth with family
acceptance (Ryan 24). In the South Asian community, the misconception that LGBTQ identities are
“western illnesses” and thus do not exist within South Asian communities further reduces family
acceptance. Many South Asian LGBTQ youth expressing their sexual and or gender identity openly might
mean ostracization from their families and/or their cultural communities (Satrang and South Asian
Network 7). The event is geared towards dissolving such misconceptions and stigmas and replacing them
with healthier ways for parents and other family members to communicate with and care for their LGBTQ
youth.
Method/Approach: “Coming Out, Coming Home” was organized as a panel event featuring a South
Asian psychologist specialized in coming out issues, a South Asian LGBTQ student, the founder of a
counseling organization for South Asians who is also a parent of a LGBTQ child, and a student LGBTQ
activist. Various South Asian and/or LGBTQ organizations were asked to partner with the event to raise
visibility for the event and provide resources.
Outcomes: More than sixty people attended event and thirty-one completed in-person evaluation forms.
Thirty answered questions about the effectiveness and impact of the event by using a Likert scale. The
categories of “agree” and “strongly agree” were combined and charted.
Evaluation: All audience members will also receive an additional online evaluation survey a few days
after the event. These forms evaluated the effectiveness of the event by exploring if attitudes about
LGBTQ+ identities shifted after the audience has attended the event. Other factors, such as the number of
attendees and the demographics of the attendees will be analyzed.
152
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
SBIRT Substance Abuse Prevention Strategy Assessment
Illaha Sattar
Direct Supervisor: Nancy Parello, Communications Director
Advocates for Children of New Jersey
Purpose: To persuade schools, physicians, and healthcare facilities to incorporate the use of the screening
tool in their policies and practices
Significance: Substance and alcohol abuse has been a very important issue in not only the medical
approach but in the public health field as well. Alcohol abuse is very common, especially in adolescence.
Research has shown that in the previous year, 7 percent of 12 year olds and nearly 70 percent of 18 year
olds engage in drinking (“Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention for Youth”). By senior year of high
school, at least half of the adolescent population engaged in an illicit drug at least once (“Illicit and
Nonillicit Drug Use”). This evidence indicates that the current substance prevention strategy is not
producing effective results. SBIRT is a new public health approach, which shifts away from the current
punitive model of substance abuse prevention. The goal of this approach is to reduce the amount of
substance intake in adolescents before it mitigates to other psycho-social or health care problems.
Method/Approach: In depth-research will be conducted comparing current substance policies and their
effectiveness. A total of 6 school districts and their substance abuse policies across New Jersey will be
examined and compared to the guidelines of SBIRT. There will be literature review on districts that have
adapted SBIRT in their substance abuse model as well. Research will then be demonstrated in a
presentable organized chart as well as in a narrative written report. Along with research, more information
regarding SBIRT will be provided in coalition meetings with NJCADD.
Outcomes: At the end of this project, research will provide a more qualitative insight on this new
approach. After comparing results with old and new model of substance abuse prevention, ACNJ and
NJCADD can further progress in their coalition to persuade other facilities to adapt this new policy.
SBIRT can be adapted into substance abuse policies in not only primary care facilities but in schools as
well.
Evaluation: After developing a written report and an organized visual, the project can be further
evaluated by discussing the policy with school superintendents in several districts throughout New Jersey.
After implementing the idea with current school policies, the most effective strategies to assess the
approach would be through focus groups with the students and engaging in satisfaction surveys as well as
process evaluations with school superintendents.
153
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Patient satisfaction with a mobile cancer screening program.
Rolguens Saturne
Dr. Nancy Louis, Clinical Director
S.A.V.E. Women & Men Cancer Screening Program
Purpose: To analyze patient satisfaction through a mobile cancer screening program and formulate
recommendations to improve the efficiency of services for patients.
Significance: Low-income and minority women were disproportionately underrepresented in receiving
cancer screening services from 2005 to 2010. In addition the uninsured population in New Jersey
increased from 1.2 million (13.7% of the population) to 1.3 million (15.4% of the population). During this
time period, funding for NJ Cancer Education and Early Detection Program (NJCEED) increased by 5%,
due to the increasing uninsured adult population in NJ. The most important single barrier to cancer
screening are financial barriers such as the lack of insurance. Cancer screening can significantly reduce
cancer related mortality as screening allows for both early detection and treatment of cancer. It allows
intervention at an earlier stage, which often results in improved outcome for breast, cervical and
colorectal cancers.
Method/Approach: This cross section survey analysis focused on the open and close-ended patient
satisfaction question that examined issues such as access, cleanliness, friendliness and courtesy of staff,
efficiency, quality of education, likes and dislikes of the program and how the program can be improved.
Participants were provided with a self-administered voluntary survey during their visit to S.A.V.E site
about their experiences. Survey was provided in three different languages: English, Spanish and
Portuguese. Participant received $10 Pathmark gift card as an incentive to complete the survey. A total of
100 patients were surveyed. Data were analyzed using nominal scale variables due to the small sample
size, normal distribution and equal variance in each group could not be assumed
Outcomes: In general 80% or more respondents were very satisfied with the 12 items related to patient
satisfaction. An overall of 90% of patients were very satisfied with cleanliness, friendliness, and courtesy
of staff and a full 85% were very satisfied with access, efficiency, and quality of education. A major
domain that scored lower included the two items that measured the speed of services; only 72% of
respondents were very satisfied with the speed of registration and only 75% of respondents were very
satisfied with the speed of the exam.
Evaluation: In retrospect, SAVE patients were very satisfied with the program; however, steps needs to
be implemented in order to reduce the time patients need to complete the screening process. Additional
recommendations will be presented based on an analysis of how patients believed the program can be
made better for them.
154
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
A Snapshot of Substance Use and Abuse at Rutgers University
Baneet Sawhney
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, Health Education Specialist
Rutgers Health Services - Health Outreach Promotion and Education
Purpose: By conducting focus groups, this research project will identify common perceptions and
substances used and abused, while looking at the barriers to participation in health education
programming and interventions on-campus.
Significance: Knowing the substances that are used by students at Rutgers University is the first step in
prevention of substance use and abuse. Rutgers Health Services-H.O.P.E. is responsible in providing
alcohol and drug education to over 42,000 students. Gathering data on the substances used on campus and
the social behaviors around these substances will lead to the creation of effective health campaigns,
policies, and programs that will protect students from the harms of substance use and abuse.
Method/Approach: Flyers, social media, word-of-mouth and listservs from various Rutgers communities
will be utilized to recruit students for this initiative. The first part is conducting focus groups of a
minimum of 8-10 people to identify student perceptions of various substances and barriers to participation
in health education programming and interventions. Many classes will offer extra credit to students if
approved by the professor; for the organization of a focus group. A total of six questions will be asked in
each focus group. Students wishing to participate will call or e-mail and RSVP to Rutgers Health
Services- H.O.P.E. or Baneet Sawhney; by first name only. At the focus group, participants will be
handed consent forms and agree to a statement read by the focus group facilitator(s). Focus group
facilitators will be Health Services staff and Interns approved by the IRB. Students may cease
participation in the focus group at any time without loss of benefit or standing at the University. Each
focus group will be transcribed and analyzed to look for patterns in student responses.
Outcomes: This research will gather information on substances being used by students at Rutgers
University and also the social behaviors surrounding those substances. For example, finding out which
party settings have certain substances which are more prevalent than others. Preferred methods of
receiving information about substance use, abstinence, recovery and support groups will also be gathered.
This information will be used to create more effective prevention and treatment programs and policies to
prevent substance use and abuse on campus. Specifically, the goal is to create a targeted media campaign
for the Rutgers Student body.
Evaluation: Transcripts and audio recordings of each focus group will be evaluated to look for patterns
and trends in student responses. These transcripts and notes from each focus group will be aggregated to
also look for correlations between certain risk factors and drug use. The data will be able to pinpoint
which substances are most prevalent and accessible to the whole student body. This data will then further
be used to target the specific drugs being used the most and find ways which can show students the
harmful effects. Pamphlets, posters, and advertisements will also be placed in locations where students
may access these drugs and even bus stops while waiting to go to parties.
155
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Customer Survey Satisfaction Assessment
Taran Sayal
Sharon Copeland, Chief Executive Officer of Enable, Inc
Enable, Inc.
Purpose: To discover how services that are offered by Enable, Inc. could be improved and propose
strategies to strengthen these programs by analyzing data from the past five years.
Significance: People with disabilities are often excluded from public health programs and services and
this helps explain why this population fares worse than their nondisabled counterparts in relation to
determinants of health (Krahn, Klein, & Correa-De-Araujo, 2015). Fifty percent of people with learning
disabilities experience significant communication problems and being disabled can be an isolating
experience (Bell, 2005). Enable is a non-profit organization that provides programs to help these
individuals live as independently as possible and live a life filled with friends. Enable serves about 450 of
these individuals annually and it is critical that an in-depth analysis of surveys is completed to determine
how satisfied consumers and their family members are with the services. Obtaining satisfaction rates will
help determine the effectiveness of services and measure how included consumers feel within programs.
The analysis will determine how to benefit the consumers’ health and can help improve overall wellbeing..
Method/Approach: Consumers and/or guardians completed their surveys annually at home and mailed
them to the office. Staff members annually interviewed consumers who were unable to complete the
surveys independently. Consumers responded to statements, such as “Overall,I like my home and the
services Enable provides”, made within the survey with either “Strongly Agree”, “Agree”, “Disagree”, or
“Strongly Disagree”. Data from the surveys measured how well the consumers enjoyed the service
received from Enable, felt included within the community, how supported they were, along with many
other topics. This data was exported to a spreadsheet and clustered column graphs were created to
determine trends in how the consumers responded to the same questions over the past five years.
Outcomes: A clustered column chart for every question in every survey from 2010 to 2014 will be
produced. Trends from the data will be used to determine how services can improve, what aspects of
programs consumers are most dissatisfied with, and which aspects of programs are most enjoyable for
consumers. This analysis will focus on what percentage of consumers who responded to the survey
answered with “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” and attention will be paid to areas of decline in the graph.
This will help determine how to better the consumers’ experience and how to improve the quality of care
Enable provides.
Evaluation: Once changes are implemented within programs in relation to the suggestions made based
on the analysis of graphs, another consumer satisfaction survey can be sent to consumers in 2016. This
will determine whether those who responded negatively to statements in previous surveys will respond
more positively because of the changes.
156
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Addressing the Potential Risks of Comorbidity
Robyn Schreiber
Dr. Grace Lu-Yao, Cancer Epidemiologist and Team Science Leader
The Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Purpose: To develop a proposal for an observational study on the health effects of new prostate cancer
treatments in individuals with comorbidities and write a clinical review paper for publication on the
association between phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) use and increased risk of prostate cancer
biochemical recurrence.
Significance: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer and many patients have
one or several comorbidities. While randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are conducted to prove efficacy of
treatments, the results from RCTs may not be generalized to patients with comorbidities because such
patients are often excluded from RCTs. There are two major concerns with cancer comorbidity: the
oncologic impact of the disease and polypharmacy. Drug-drug interaction between cancer therapy and
concurrent medications is frequent and can lead to significant impact on cancer mortality. Erectile
dysfunction is among the most common long-term side effects of prostate cancer treatment and is
typically treated with PDE5is such as Viagra. Association between PDE5i use and prostate cancer suggest
an increased risk of cancer proliferation and biochemical recurrence. Large observational studies are
needed to assess the potential effects of comorbidity and concurrent medications on cancer outcomes.
Method/Approach: All RCTs for prostate cancer drugs abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and cabazitaxel
were analyzed according to exclusion criteria. A literature search was conducted on the most commonly
excluded comorbidities and erectile dysfunction. Detailed research contributed to a study proposal and an
academic paper on potential confounding mechanisms between prostate cancer and comorbidities.
Outcomes: The Team Science proposal was approved and the observational study project has advanced
to the funding and data acquisition phase. A paper on potential biochemical impacts of PDE5i use on
prostate cancer was completed. All research highlighted a deficit of studies on comorbidity and prostate
cancer. Related research supported the notion that prostate cancer outcomes may be negatively affected
by comorbidity and illustrated the need for future observational studies on the subject.
Evaluation: This study can be evaluated by the progress in study development as well as future successes
in journal publications and providing empirical data and tools that can be utilized in individual cancer
therapy.
157
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Developing an Urgent Care Model for RWJUH in New Brunswick
Olivia Shabash
Susan Krum, Vice President of Ambulatory Services
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital - Ambulatory Services
Purpose: To create a business model and proforma for urgent care in New Brunswick.
Significance: A great need for urgent care exists in New Brunswick. Currently, there are no urgent care
services available for the dense, urban population. As a result, many individuals frequent the emergency
room when they need immediate attention, even though emergency medicine is very expensive because of
the high overhead costs. Many of these visits do not require all of the capabilities of an emergency room,
however. Therefore, the addition of an urgent care center in New Brunswick would provide patients with
the care that they need while lowering costs for the hospital and for consumers.
Method/Approach: First, a demographic assessment was done using a 10-minute drive time radius around
New Brunswick. Relevant factors included population, age, median income, race, and ethnicity. Next, a
market analysis and competitive analysis were completed. These analyses showed that both a need and
opportunity for urgent care exist in New Brunswick. Possible locations were then evaluated based on
metrics such as cost, visibility, accessibility for patients and practitioners, and parking. To create potential
models for the center including staffing, services, hours, and billing, research was done using literature on
urgent care and interviews were conducted with employees at RWJUH Physician Enterprise. Finally, a
proforma was created to evaluate costs and revenue, allowing for the calculation of return on investment.
Outcomes: This project develops a model to show how RWJUH can best offer urgent care in New
Brunswick and the financial outcome of providing the service. The proforma demonstrates that the urgent
care center would begin becoming profitable in year 5. These results can influence future decisionmaking at the hospital regarding the development of an urgent care center.
Evaluation: Once the center opens, one can complete a cost analysis to determine its costeffectiveness. For instance, one can calculate the difference in cost of a particular procedure in the
emergency department versus in urgent care. Even though urgent care would only begin becoming
profitable in year 5, decision makers can analyze whether opening an urgent care center saves money
compared to doing business as usual. Quality can also be assessed by looking at metrics such as patient
satisfaction and turnaround time. This information can be gathered by conducting surveys and completing
a statistical analysis of the results.
158
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Patient’s Pipeline in the Emergency Department
Anooj Shah
Jennifer Curry, Supervisor of Data Control Clerks
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Emergency Department
Purpose: To analyze the patient flow through the Emergency Department, and to investigate and develop
new ideas on how to improve the patient flow.
Significance: Every day a large number of individuals come to the Emergency Department (ED) for
many different types of issues ranging from non-emergent to urgent and emergent. To accommodate all
types, the rate of patients seen per hour may be one method to investigate. Scribes play an important role
in the number of patients seen per hour since they assure proper documentation for each patient. They
also assure that an update on a patient is communicated to the ED physician. Thus, an increase in scribes
in the ED will also increase the number of patients seen per hour.
Method/Approach: Data collected from 2006 to 2007 by an ED physician, Dr. Rajiv Arya, concerning
the impact of scribes in the ED will be analyzed. From 2006 to 2007, there was only one scribe working
in the emergent and urgent area, with no scribe in the non-emergent area called intake. Dr. Arya
concluded that the number of patients seen per hour increased when there was a scribe in the emergent
and urgent areas. Currently, there is a scribe working in all the areas of the ED. Information on the
number of patients seen per hour in the emergent, urgent, and intake areas of the ED will be recorded.
Information on the number of charts written by a scribe in the different sections of the Emergency
Department.
Outcomes: The average number of patients seen per day in the ED is n=161. A scribe working an
average of 12 hours in intake would write an average of 40 charts per day and a scribe working 8 hours in
the emergent and urgent areas writes an average of 20 charts per day. The remaining charts are written by
Physician Assistants or residents, which the scribes do not work for or are turned over by previous
physicians to the physician currently working. An average charts takes 4 minutes to complete; thus the
intake scribe would spend about 160 minutes completing charts and the scribe in emergent and urgent.
With the help of two scribes, the ED physicians would be able to see 12 more patients in intake and 6
more patients in the emergent and urgent areas. Dr. Arya’s research shows that the number of patients
seen per hour increases by 0.05 when the number of charts written by a scribe increases by 10%. This
means that the number of patients seen per hour increases by 4 with only one scribe. With two scribes,
ED physicians are able to see 18 more patients.
Evaluation: Increasing the number of scribes working in the ED at a set time increases the number of
patients seen by the ED physician. Patients would receive a patient satisfaction surgery based on the time
it took for an ED physician to provide them care. It will improve the satisfaction rate of patients since
they are not waiting over an hour to be seen by a physician.
159
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Suggestions for Addressing Risk Factors for Child Abuse
Roma Shah
Jessica Nugent, Program Manager of Home Visitation
Prevent Child Abuse - New Jersey
Purpose: To determine service gaps for mental health and substance abuse problems in home visitation
programs in order to make recommendations for improvement.
Significance: Recently Home Visitation programs have fallen under the microscope. Home visitation
programs have been ineffective at addressing child abuse due to underlying problems of parental mental
health and substance abuse problems. The Child Welfare League of America found that children with
parents who abuse alcohol and other drugs are three times more likely to be abused and four times more
likely to be neglected. Maternal depressions increases the risk of abuse and may impact a child’s
attachment, language skills, performance of cognitive tasks, and behavior. Home visitors may lack the
adequate training and resources to address these issues with their clients. In one study, over 50 percent of
mothers enrolled in home visiting programs were identified as needing domestic violence, mental health,
or substance abuse services. However, only 27% of these mothers were successfully referred to
community resources. Knowing what other programs across the country and internationally are doing to
address these issues will provide insight into how to adequately close service gaps. Understanding how
New Jersey fares as compared to other others will help strengthen the technical assistance PCANJ
provides to its home visitation program sites.
Method/Approach: The current state of issues in New Jersey was assessed through analysis of critical
incident reports from 2014. The reports were coded for specific themes (i.e. child abuse, mental health,
domestic violence, etc.) and analyzed based on regional prevalence. A literature review was completed to
gather data on effective treatment programs occurring nationally. Collected information was then divided
into sub-categories to allow for a more organized final report. Programs were organized by location and
then type (i.e. home visitation, consultation, residential rehabilitation, community collaboration). When
necessary, further information was gathered by contacting organizations to provide insight into their
work.
Outcomes: Based on the analysis of critical incidents it seems a majority of child abuse incidents are
occurring in Northern New Jersey. Most prevalent trends across the regions are child abuse, child neglect,
substance abuse, and domestic violence. While not an exhaustive list, many programs were found to show
promise in terms of addressing the risk factors of child abuse. The final product is a detailed report of
effective measures that will be part of a larger report. Members of the agency are working on different
parts that will be brought together and presented to state and national funders. Recommendations for
policy and technical assistance changes will be made based on results. The report is a preliminary effort to
gain a better understanding on what other agencies have done to address these risk factors.
160
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Underrepresented Minorities in Science Education
Gannat Shalan
Dr. Kamal Khan, Director; Taruna Chugeria, Assistant Director
Office for Diversity and Academic Success in the Sciences (ODASIS)
Purpose: To educate and assist underrepresented minorities to excel in General Biology to prepare them
for careers in the allied health sciences
Significance: Although African Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans collectively make up 25%
of the population; only 6% of them are practicing physicians. This discrepancy is adversely affecting our
health-care system. A strong foundation in biology is the start of preparation of the studies of a premedical student.
Method/Approach: Students are of minority backgrounds who attend Rutgers- New Brunswick and are
registered for the General Biology 102 course. Students are provided with a structured two-hour weekly
recitation with approximately 10-15 other students. The course includes homework, quizzes, online
quizzes, and mock examinations. Office hours and reviews are available as well as additional
supplemental resources. Students are also a part of a Facebook group where they are able to ask questions
to clarify confusing topics. Instructors also post additional practice questions to ensure continued
exposure to the material even outside the classroom. Students are also required to attend study hall
sessions to ensure their reviewing of the material. Because the students enrolled in the program receive a
grade that counts as a one-credit recitation, most of them are self-motivated to complete all aspects of the
program.
Outcomes: The final grades for the course are yet to be determined but judging from the previous
semester’s scores and the first set of exam grades, the program has produced exceptional scores. Out of a
total of 77 students, 61 (80%) received a score higher than the Rutgers average of 66%. Comparatively,
the students in the ODASIS program averaged a 76%. Out of these 61 students, 7(9%) scored a 90 or
above and 29 (38%) scored an 80 or above. The remaining 25 students scored above a 66%, with 20
(26%)of them earning a 70 or higher. The remaining 16 (21%) students earned a score of 65% or less.
Evaluation: The final course grades will determine to what extent the program was successful. However
since those will not be calculated until the end of the semester, the main focus is on the first midterm
grades. Nearly 80% of the ODASIS students scored higher than the Rutgers General Biology
Department’s average. The students have voiced satisfaction with the recitations through weekly written
evaluations, crediting their instructor with facilitating their comprehension of the material. Overall the
General Biology program of ODASIS is effective, supported by both written evaluations and exam
statistics.
161
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Condom Distribution Pilot Program
Ambika Sharma
Stephanie Antoine, Prevention Team Leader
Hyacinth- The AIDS Foundation
Purpose: To encourage target populations to engage in safer sex practices, and reduce the spread of HIV,
by making condoms available, accessible and acceptable.
Significance: According to the World Health Organization, thirty-five million people were living with
HIV globally at the end of 2013. In that same year alone, about two million people became newly
infected, and one-and-a-half million people died of AIDS-related causes (2014). In fact, Middlesex
County in New Jersey had nearly 2,100 cases of HIV, 968 of which were in New Brunswick (2014).
Mahajan and Sayles, et al. (2010) stated that the complexity of HIV/AIDS related stigma is often is cited
for the primary reasons for the limited responses by society to HIV/AIDS. This evidence indicated a gap
in understanding the importance of HIV screening and HIV preventative techniques. The Center for
Disease Control states that latex condoms, when used consistently and correctly, are highly effective in
preventing the sexual transmission of HIV (2013). Evidence-based interventions, such as proper condom
use, will address these gaps with HIV/AIDS related stigma, and providing information and outreach
programs to prevent further spread of the infection.
Method/Approach: A pilot condom distribution program was implemented to ensure that all vulnerable,
target populations in the New Brunswick area have accessibility to condoms. This condom distribution
program encouraged these populations to engage in safer sex practices by making free condoms available
at specific, local areas, such as the Hyacinth office, and other local vendors in the New Brunswick area.
An event was held at SHAKA, a local restaurant in New Brunswick, as one of the condom distribution
events. Staff distributed condoms, raised awareness for HIV/AIDS, and encouraged safer sex practices
through various games and raffles for the vulnerable youth population.
Outcomes: By the end of this condom distribution program, the youth target populations of New
Brunswick community will have access to available and free condoms, to engage in safer sex practices,
and, in turn, reduce the spread of HIV. Since this is the first condom distribution program that is being
implemented in New Brunswick, it is a learning process to see what tools are successfully implemented,
and what are not. For example, by having an event at a bar/restaurant (an idea that has not been tried for
distributing condoms in the past), there can be a sound evaluation on the success of the event, and
whether to proceed with events like this in the future or not. Eventually, the idea is to have condom
distribution programs implemented all throughout New Jersey.
Evaluation: The success of the condom distribution event at SHAKA will be evaluated through a
feedback survey to see how the overall event was, and where improvements can be made.
162
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Hesitancy Among University Students
Marina Shayevich
Tefera Gezmu, PhD, MPH
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy – Public Health Program
Purpose: To explore factors that may influence university students’ hesitancy in receiving the seasonal
influenza vaccine.
Significance: Seasonal flu vaccine hesitancy among university students is remarkably high. Vaccine
hesitancy is defined as “a delay in acceptance or refusal of vaccines despite availability of vaccine
services.” Although the vaccine has been easily and often freely accessible or otherwise affordable in
several venues (doctor’s offices, clinics, on-campus health services and centers), vaccine acceptance
among such a high-risk population has remained low. Studies have shown that there is a 30% vaccination
rate among those aged 18-49 years, a relatively low vaccination rate. Identifying factors that may
contribute to a reduced acceptance of flu vaccines among university students can help address and even
lessen flu-related burdens from interfering with students’ health and academic work. It can also contribute
to improving the general health of college students.
Method/Approach: A survey questionnaire based on the World Health Organization’s SAGE working
group vaccine hesitancy model was developed using Qualtrics - an online survey software & platform.
Following Rutgers Human Subject study IRB approval, the survey was distributed to Rutgers students
through the membership e-mail listservs of several on-campus student organizations. The survey results
were analyzed using Software Package for Social Sciences (SPSS®).
Outcomes: This study identified several possible contributing factors to low acceptance of seasonal flu
vaccination among university students. Among them, residency and status as a health sciences student
affected students’ likelihood of getting the flu vaccine. Twice as many on campus residents reported
receiving the flu vaccine in previous flu seasons, compared to off campus residents and commuters. Over
three times as many health sciences students reported receiving the flu vaccine this flu season as nonhealth sciences students.
Evaluation: Findings from this study can help future researchers examine vaccine hesitancy at a
population level and improve general acceptance rates of vaccines.
163
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Fun N Fit Program
Jianna Sims
Serena Collado, Director of Community Health
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset
Purpose: To prevent chronic diseases due to obesity in the community by educating families on making
healthier lifestyle choices.
Significance: One in every three children in America are either obese or overweight. Obesity is a major
issue in America and a chronic disease that increases the risk for serious medical conditions. Studies have
also found that due to obesity, the current generation of children in America to be this first generation to
live a shorter lifespan than their parents. The community needs assessment that was done showed that
Somerset County specifically has a major issue with obesity.
Method/Approach: The Fun N Fit program is a ten-week program that meets once a week for two
hours. At each session, participants will receive an educational portion of the program as well as an
opportunity to partake in a fun physical activity. The program is designed to help children between the
ages of 8-14 prevent chronic disease with the support and participation of their families. The children in
the program all have a body mass index (BMI) in the 85th percentile or greater. Incentives will also be
provided throughout the program to encourage the families to stay motivated.
Outcomes: During the first session, participants undergo a pre-test and screening in which nurses, a
registered dietitian and an exercise physiologist record their blood pressure, blood-glucose levels, waist
circumference, weight, and ability to do various physical tasks. During the ninth session, the participants
undergo post-testing and the same medical measurements are recorded. Finally, at the tenth session, staff
will report where individuals have displayed improvements by discussing the various health indicators.
Evaluation: The community health department will determine whether or not the program is effective
based on the post-test results in comparison to the pre-testing measurements. Each participant should
demonstrate improvement in at least one of the health indicators. The participants will also receive pre
and post testing on the educational portion of the program. The results for each will be compared to see
how much information the participants were able to retain.
164
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Disaster Relief Preparedness- Consumable Medical Supplies
Aparajita Srikakulam
Michael Prasad
The American Red Cross
Purpose: To create a standard operating procedure for obtaining and distributing consumable medical
supplies throughout the North Jersey counties, during a disaster.
Significance: The Red Cross provides aid to those in light of a disaster according to The Red Cross Core
Processes of “Prepare, Respond, and Recover”. In order for proper resources and services to be provided
to individuals in need, the agency must place great importance on the preparedness aspect of the
processes. In order to “Prepare” for emergencies the American Red Cross focuses on creating a strong
database of contacts who can provide, in partnership with the agency, Access and Functional Needs
(ANS). To ensure that FNSS, or services that enable individuals to maintain their independence in a
general population shelter, a subgroup of services tailoring to Consumable Medical Supplies (CMS) must
be established. Consumable medical supplies are those supplies that are ingested, injected, or applied
and/ or are one time use only during a disaster (FEMA 2010).
Method/Approach: A course was taken to educate on the various needs for consumable medical
supplies, and when/how they must be administered. The intern contacted healthcare agencies to inquire
which if they will be willing to work with The American Red Cross in light of a disaster to provide CMS.
To those organizations who were interested in helping, the intern sent the spreadsheet of needed supplies.
Organizations were to check off which supplies they could provide, and in what quantity, and send the
spreadsheet back to the intern. Those who provided positive assistance were added to a standard operating
procedure of agencies who can and will help, along with the American Red Cross, when there is a disaster
in their region. A complete map of nurse kit locations was created
Outcomes: Some agencies/organizations offered aid, while some declined for various reasons. Of the 46
health care agencies that were contacted, only 15 did not respond. An attached SOP outlines the
commitment of healthcare agencies and the procedures necessary to obtain supplies from them during a
disaster.
Evaluation: To test if the CMS leg of the disaster standard operating procedure is efficient, can only be
done during a disaster. The organization can simply follow up with agencies every 2 months during
regular business hours to remind health care agencies of their commitment
165
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Hospital Length of Stay (LOS) and Quality of Care
Francelene Sta. Ana
Dr. Bernard Toro-Echague, Internist and Physician Advisor
JFK Medical Center
Purpose: To determine hospital practices that prolong hospitalization and propose policies that would
reduce length-of-stay, complications and improve the quality of care.
Significance: Recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveal that 1 in
25 hospital patients acquire at least one healthcare-associated infection. Excessive lengths of stay not only
pose economic costs, but it risks a patient’s already immunocompromised state of health. A quantitative
study done in 2010 by Hassan and Tuckman, et al., found that extending LOS by one day increases the
likelihood of acquiring an infection by 1.37 percent and an increase in the average LOS by 9.32 days.
This indicates a complex interdependency between hospital length of stay, the risk of acquiring
nosocomial infections and the underlying quality of care. Recommendations to reduce length of stay and
minimize the risk of infections will be based on evidence-based data. The study will assess whether other
quality improvement practices and initiatives will better enhance performance, efficiency and ultimately
improve patient-centered care.
Method: Surveillance methods will be utilized to narrow down top contributing practices that prolong
patient length of stay. Various members from the case management department as well as the medical
staff are asked to participate in standardized, open-ended interviews. A retrospective study is conducted
using physician lengths-of-stay data from Crimson Clinical Advantage. Data analysis identifies overall
LOS (n = 363), the lowest performing physicians within the past year (n = 56) and the averages were
compiled and exported to a spreadsheet. This web-based tool is also used to analyze and compare changes
in the performance of the physicians on a monthly and per quarter basis.
Outcomes: From the case management department, the following hospital practices were found to
contribute to longer LOS: (a) lack of physician communication, (b) excessive or unnecessary inpatient
procedures and (c) social issues and insurance status (private or public) and (d) bed availability. As for
members of the medical staff, physicians reported the following hospital practices that extended the LOS
as well as increase the probability of hospital-acquired infections: (a) delays in auxiliary services (such as
laboratory results), (b) fragmented flow of patient care, (c) antibiotic resistance. The LOS average of the
lowest performing physicians are as follows: (2014) (a) 1st quarter: 6.57 days, (b) 2nd quarter: 6.45 days,
(c) 3rd quarter: 5.92, (d) 4th quarter
Evaluation: Data obtained from Crimson indicates that the overall LOS compares favorably to the
national standard of under 5 days at an average of 4.67 days. The average LOS for the lowest performers
improved for the first 3 quarter of 2014 (lowest at 5.92 days) and rose to 7.11 days at its highest. While
the overall length of stay stayed on target, current quality measures for poorly performing physicians
needs stricter action. Better communication and patient management from providers, increased
involvement from administration and increasing the culture of accountability can (a) decrease lengths of
stay, (b), and ultimately (c) improve the quality of care.
166
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Promotion of the Health Administration Degree in New Jersey Community Colleges
Jenn Staab
Ann Marie Hill
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: Develop a marketing strategy aimed at increasing health administration direct transfers from
New Jersey community colleges.
Significance: Provide valid information to local community colleges about the opportunities at the
Bloustein School pertaining to the new major Health Administration. The HA major lays a strong
foundation for entry-level careers in health management and all the requirements for graduate
school. The career possibilities are endless as it is a $6.8 billion industry with an anticipated 24% job
growth throughout the next decade.
Method/Approach: A current list of 20 community colleges was provided that needed to be
contacted. A representative from Transfer Services or a department with similar services was identified
and information about the new major Health Administration was offered. A database of contracts, transfer
events and timelines was developed. Requests to participate in transfer fairs were made. Research was
then conducted to identify department chairs and teaching faculty who were responsible for HA related
courses. Outreach efforts were conducted to engage faculty in supporting transfers to EJB.
Outcomes: Contacts have been with all 20 community colleges. All of the community colleges have
available transfer fairs, although some of them are only in the fall. Many transfer counselors are
enthusiastic and want to know more about the major and are even interested in creating a specific course.
The community colleges want to understand how transferable credits work with this specific major. Next
in order is to clarify which school are interested in furthering the information Edward J. Bloustein School
has to offer.
Evaluation: Final report has been submitted to preceptor for final review. This will ensure the quality of
the information for the EJB Health Administration department to enhance the number of transfer students
into the HA major.
167
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Shelter Preparedness and Readiness
Matthew Suh
Lauri Gill (Regional Mass Care Manager/Logistics Support). Michael Prasad (Director of
Disaster Support Functions)
American Red Cross (Central New Jersey Chapter)
Purpose: To create a list of shelters that contains the four most likely to be used shelters per county in the
case of a disaster in North Jersey. The updated list will contain four total shelters for each of the counties
in North Jersey (48 shelters per 12 counties total in the final list) and will be created by comparing two
lists of shelters and finding the overlapping shelters (American Red Cross list and State County List).
Significance: With the emergence of different disasters and catastrophes, it is especially important for
individuals to be prepared for all types of public health disasters. In North Jersey alone there are nearly
1,000 different shelters but some individuals may have trouble identifying even one nearby shelter. A
narrowed down list will specify the four “most likely to be used” shelters in every county in North Jersey
and will also list the exact locations as well. This list can help individuals be fully prepared for such a
disaster. Certain standards and regulations help to keep shelters up-to-date as well. During the events of
Hurricane Sandy, nearly 51% (81,000) of the victims were located in shelters belonging to the American
Red Cross. The other 49% of victims belonged to other municipal and independent shelters. There is one
list of shelters compiled by the American Red Cross and another list compiled by state governments.
Method/Approach: My role is to assess both lists of shelters and to find overlapping shelters found on
both lists. The overlapping shelters will then be used to create a new, updated list of shelters for the North
Jersey region. The first step I took was to create an Excel spreadsheet to compare both lists of shelters and
to find the overlapping shelters.
Outcomes: From looking at both lists, nearly 76% of shelters are missing from the American Red Cross
list while the State County list contains many more shelters. For example, certain counties such as
Hudson County contain 29 total shelters between the two lists with no overlaps. This information is used
as a tool for my preceptor who sits on the New Jersey State Mass Care Workgroup for planning purposes
and is used to see the bigger picture in disaster preparedness.
Evaluation: An appropriate test to measure the effectiveness of this project is to distribute newly updated
shelter lists to individuals and to see what percent of the population was aware of the four most likely to
be visited shelters that are listed. An updated list of shelters in North Jersey should garner more positive
interest because it helps to keep individuals informed and prepared for future disasters.
168
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Fighting domestic violence & homelessness
Tahmina Sultana
Rev. Susan Kramer-Mills
Town Clock Community Development Corporation (TCCDC)
Purpose: To provide a safe place for domestic violence victims, where they will be provided with
resources and assistance to recover from the abuse and learn to live independently.
Significance: There are a large number of people plagued by homelessness caused by domestic violence.
After leaving their abuser, or leaving a shelter program, women who have suffered domestic abuse are
80% or more likely to have the only two choices of going back to their abuser or being homeless
(NCADV). The Town Clock Community Development Corporation (TCCDC) is working to change these
statistics, and the lives of domestic abuse survivors and their dependents, by creating 10 units of
permanent, affordable, and supportive housing in New Brunswick, NJ. This unit is called Dina’s
Dwellings. Not only will they have an affordable place to live in, but they will also receive counseling
and other services that may be necessary to lead an independent life.
Method/Approach: Dina’s Dwellings is the third ever project of its kind in the nation. The approach is to
engage community groups to become involved in funding and supporting Dina’s Dwellings, as well to
help tenants achieve self-sufficiency through participation in the social programs. Some tasks the intern
will carry out are writing grants, communicating with community partners, organizing fundraisers,
assisting the supervisor in creating rules and regulations that must be followed at Dina’s Dwellings and
raising awareness for domestic violence.
Outcomes: The interns will be contributing to this project by writing grants proposal and organizing
fundraisers. Writing grants and fundraising is vital to the project because if the funds are insufficient the
project will not be completed on time.
Evaluation: The housing unit is still under construction; it will be completed by December
2015. Whether the outcomes of Dina’s Dwellings is successful or not will be determined by how many
residents exit the program successfully and are able to be independent and support themselves after
leaving Dina’s Dwellings.
169
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Client Satisfaction in Laboratory Outreach Program
Sharjeel Tai
Karen Shepherd Director of Laboratory Outreach, Felecia Clark Business Liaison
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: To create a client experience and satisfaction survey aimed at quality improvement by gathering
data and analyzing the information to help create baselines and thresholds for the 5 major departmental
matrices.
Significance: HCOs are now starting to join in on the customer survey as a tool for market based
services. “Customer satisfaction surveys are used by small business owners to gauge how the company is
perceived by the patrons they service (Deeb 1)”, from small businesses to large satisfaction can be closely
linked to retention “If your customers know you care enough to ask what they like and dislike about your
company, you may have a high repeat business rate (Deeb 1)”. Gathering the data on what your
client/consumer perceives of your company can help fix errors and drive you towards a better practices
and outcomes.
Method/Approach: Gathering information from the leadership of the department along with reference
material from Mayo best practice guides, a 25-question survey along with a open ended comment section
was created to help gauge client satisfaction on 5 key aspects of the department. The question responses
were based on a Likert scale to help create an easier response for the clients. The survey was distributed
via fax and email to the recipients; using an online website (surveymonkey) the responses were kept
anonymous as to encourage more respondents. The option to self-identity was left on the survey if the
client should want to inform us of who they were.
Outcomes: of our (n=93) recipients 12 responses were recorded giving the survey a 13% response rate.
Within these respondents we had an 83% positive overall satisfaction rating. For 4 of the 5 key factors the
satisfaction level held at 92% while for customer service the numbers were much lower at 75%.
Evaluation: After a drill down into the reason behind the low scores given in customer service a weak
point in the response time for lab inquiries was discovered. An action plan was developed and
implemented in mid march. The scores from this year will be used as baselines and departmental
thresholds will be formed with the help of the various managers and supervisors. This survey will be used
to benchmark new clients on a 30 day, 60 day and, then 90 day mark along with the overall yearly survey
at the end of the 3rd quarter of the fiscal year.
Works Cited: "Importance of Customer Satisfaction Survey." Small Business. Ed. Carol Deeb. Houston
Chronicle, n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2015.
170
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Middlesex County Faith Health Initiative
Laurette M. Telemaque
Debbie Gash, Director of Nursing; John Dowd, Public Health Emergency Notification
Systems Coordinator
Middlesex County Office of Health Services
Purpose: The purpose of the Faith Health initiative is to promote health outreach and administer health
education and services of the Middlesex County health department to faith based organizations in the
community.
Significance: The significance of the faith health collaboration stems from the importance of social
capital and social ties in the community. Studies have shown that houses of worship are considered to be
a "historical center of comfort, guidance, and inspiration"(Kegler,Hall,&Kiser, 2010). With this
understanding, it can further emphasize the great potential for health services to connect with faith based
organizations. There has been even more research attesting to the fact that churches play a role as a "safe
haven and welcoming and trustworthy center" for congregants (Webler, Mendel,& Pitkin, 2014). The
faith health collaboration hopes to meet members of the community at a space where they are comfortable
and open to receive and participate in the health services we offer. Faith based initiatives have also
predicted positive outcomes for many municipalities throughout the nation. One popular form of a faith
based initiative is an evidence based program called Body and Soul. Body and Soul, which is what Faith
Based hopes to model, is a program that incorporates healthy lifestyle education, church events, and peer
counseling and has been proven to promote healthy choices among participants (CDC, 2013)..
Method: The Community Faith Health Collaboration will be implemented by creating a database of all
worship centers within Middlesex County. After the information is collected, a Faith Health Collaboration
survey measuring the denomination, demographics, health concerns, and interest in collaborating, will be
distributed to all churches in the database. After the survey is sent and responses are collected, invitations
will be sent out to coordinate meetings with interested religious centers to present programs and services
the Middlesex County Health Department offers.
Outcomes: This study will demonstrate the importance of building relationships between community
members and community health practitioners through using religious centers as an avenue.
Evaluation: This study can be evaluated through survey data collected from the interest survey and pre
and post evaluation surveys.
171
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Health Insurance Outreach Program
Dev Thaker
Issac Benjamin, New Jersey Organizer
Enroll America
Purpose: To conduct outreach in the New Brunswick and surrounding community to inform underinsured
and uninsured people about the health insurance options available through the Affordable Care Act and
assist in enrolling them in the health insurance marketplace.
Significance: More than a quarter of New Brunswick’s population currently lives below the poverty line
and because of it, cannot afford to get private health insurance. But under the Affordable Care Act
(ACA), these residents have a chance to obtain health insurance despite their income. With this, lower
income families would be able to get access to better healthcare facilities and improve their quality of life.
However, many New Brunswick residents who are uninsured are unaware of the access they could have
to health insurance through the Affordable Care Act and therefore remain uninsured. This problem can be
addressed by the distribution of information about the ACA to the uninsured residents of New Brunswick.
Also, assistance in the actual enrollment process will help people sign up with more confidence, even if
they are not familiar with the ACA.
Method/Approach: Enroll America, along with its interns reach out to the New Brunswick community
by being actively involved in public events. These events can include tabling at popular locations in the
area such as local health centers and stores. At the tabling events, information about the ACA is
distributed and uninsured or underinsured members of the public are asked to fill out “commit cards”
which allows their information to be stored in a database. From this database, individuals are contacted
via phone to inform them of upcoming enrollment events, methods to sign up for health insurance, and
other questions they may have regarding enrollment under the ACA. Other public locations are chosen
based on the demographics of the people living in the area and data taken from past surveys.
Outcomes: This study will demonstrate the number of uninsured people living in the New Brunswick
area and the need to distribute information regarding their options under the ACA. The results of this
study will be used to show how uninformed the public is about their health insurance options and help to
obtain universal healthcare for all.
Evaluation: This study can be evaluated by analyzing the number of people who have been approached
and those who have signed up with Enroll America to receive more information about how they can get
health insurance with the help of the ACA.
172
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Harlan Genotyping Standard Operating Procedure
Imran Uddin
Samantha Garcia, Principal Laboratory Technician; John Nuara, Laboratory Researcher
RUCDR Infinite Biologics
Purpose: To construct a standard operating procedure that includes the use of laboratory practices and
highly specified programs for the genotyping of cell samples to assure acceptable quality control.
Significance: Genotyping of Harlan samples occur on a daily basis at RUCDR Infinite Biologics. With
the continuous influx of samples and recruitment of lab technicians, it is essential for lab personnel to be
capable to carry out genotyping procedures to ensure timely reports. Without an accessible written
protocol, lab personnel will not be able to utilize maximum efficiency in bioprocessing cell samples
because of wasted time and resources on continuously having to confirm procedures.
Method/Approach: A review of current procedures was conducted by current lab technicians and
researchers. The most efficient guidelines with proper amounts of solutions were compiled into a
document with integration of visual images of procedures.
Outcomes: The end product of this project will be a completed standard operating procedure. This
standard operating procedure will be crucial in facilitating genotyping of Harlan samples. Such samples
consist of genetic information regarding things such as diabetes, obesity, and fats which Harlan
researchers for long term implications in the field of science and medicine.
Evaluation: Evaluation of the standard operating procedure will be conducted through a survey of
personnel carrying out genotyping on Harlan samples. They will be asked about their satisfaction and
confidence in carrying out the procedure by following the standard operating procedure as opposed to
having to carry out everything from memory.
173
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Overdose Prevention Act and 911- What’s Next?
Fatima Usman
Ezra Helfand, Program Director
National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence (NCADD)
Purpose: The purpose of the 2015 Legislative Event is to inform the Rutgers students and others
attending about the Overdose Prevention Act and the 911 Good Samaritan Law as it pertains to
prescription drugs by discussing the current trends, what has been done to address the issue, what is being
done now, and what needs to be done in the future.
Significance: Over the past years, the abuse of prescription drugs has become prevalent. According to the
Center for Disease Control, in 2013, 22,677 deaths as a result of drug overdose were related to
prescription drugs. To broaden that number, close to 1.4 million emergency department visits involved
the use of nonmedical prescription drugs. As a result of national surveys conducted, it has been reported
that 6.5 million people aged 12 or older have used prescription medications in the past month. Lastly, to
bring it down on a more local level, in the state of NJ alone, 6,651 individuals have been admitted into
treatment facilities for abusing prescription drugs. Considering that the abuse of prescription drugs is a
rising issue, several different bills have been passed to address the problem. Even though the bills execute
plans for when the overdose occurs, they do not incorporate the steps that should proceed the overdose to
prevent it from happening in the future again. Since Rutgers students are the target population and drug
abuse is common on the campus, they should be aware of the steps they should take to get help. Through
professional guidance, knowing the next steps will be beneficial.
Method/Approach: Working together, the two interns are responsible for the NCADD annual
Legislative Event/Policy Forum. Both will also be speaking at the legislative event by providing the
audience with facts and figures that are relevant to heroin and prescription drug abuse. At the events onset
and once the event is completed, the audience will be asked to use an electronic evaluation system to
determine base information level and then new information they gained from the event.
Outcomes: By attending the legislative event, the audience will be aware that there is more that needs to
be done to address the addiction issue on a larger scale. NCADD is a substance abuse prevention agency
in the Middlesex County, and it is their responsibility to educate its community about the precautions that
can be taken.
Evaluation: In order to have a successful and informative event, pre and post tests will be conducted at
the beginning and end of the event to determine what the audience got out of the event. The evaluations
will have questions regarding the drug use and abuse in the community and at Rutgers University. This
will enable the interns to determine how informed the target population is about their own community.
174
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Exercise Core Performance & Health Assessment
Chasity N. Uzuegbu
Michael Onorato, General Manager; Shaun Redding, Personal Training Manager;
Christian Thomas, Group Fitness Manager
Robert Wood Johnson Fitness & Wellness Center
Purpose: To empower and motivate the city of New Brunswick residents through personal training, using
tactics and core health principles to tackle obesity allowing them to live a healthier lifestyle.
Significance: Obesity has shaped the lives of many individuals throughout America today. Obesity can
lead to harmful diseases, such as diabetes, liver failure, and cardiovascular disease. According to Harvard
University Health Association, “In less than 40 years, the prevalence of obesity in the United States has
increased by over 50%, so that two of every three American adults are now overweight or obese
”(Harvard Health, 2012). By establishing a curriculum that has objective goals of increasing physical
activity through personal training, increasing exercise intensity and frequency, residents of New
Brunswick will be able to understand the importance of their health. Through exercise, maintaining a
proper Body Mass Index (BMI) range, and Body Fat Percentage (%), the prevalence of obesity will be
reduced and aid in significantly impacting an individual’s health.
Methods/Approach: An examination by the Robert Wood Johnson Fitness & Wellness Center Nursing
Department and Athletic Personal Training department was completed to assess health factors in males
and female patients aged 18 to 65 years within the past three years. By looking at the Body Mass Index
(BMI), Body fat percentage (%), weight loss, pre/post exercise frequency, and exercise intensity, we can
better assess how effective personal training is when looking at an individual’s health. Data from 601 NJ
residents was collected was recorded and examined to investigate an individual’s Body Fat Percentage,
BMI, weight loss, effectiveness of personal training, & exercise intensity and frequency. The pre/post
exercise intensity and frequency was recorded as 1) low, 2) poor, 3) average, & 4) high.
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=341), 196 residents (57.4%) had increased their post exercise
frequency and intensity from their initial training session (of at least 1 per week). These individual’s lost
more than fifteen pounds as well. Next, residents that increased their post frequency and intensity but did
not lose more than fifteen pounds were approximately 80 residents (23.5%). These individual’s also had a
decrease in their Body Fat Percentage (%), BMI, and weight. Lastly, 65 residents (19.1%) showed no
significant improvement.
Evaluation: It is important to denote that NJ residents (n= 260) that were excluded from the cohort study
did not receive personal training and 23.5% did not achieve the expected goals of the exercise core
performance assessment. Building relationships and motivating residents, personal training session flyers,
and focused fitness and exercise core clubs will serve as effective and efficient strategies to target
individual’s to receive personal training to improve their health and exercise performance.
175
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Promoting Healthier Lives For Babies
Ana Valenzuela
JoAnn Bartoli, Senior Community Director
March of Dimes in Pine Brook, New Jersey
Purpose: Educate and promote awareness in different counties of Northern New Jersey about conditions
affecting infant health, specifically, premature birth.
Significance: One in nine babies in the United States are born premature. This is significantly high
knowing that the U.S. is a developed nation. The March of Dimes aims to raise awareness to directly
outreach the community dealing with life threatening situations that is affecting maternal and infant
health. This organization is not based on the individual rather it attempts to deal with the population as a
whole.
Method/Approach
Between January and April 2015 the MOD created a logistic strategy for this year’s charity walk. For this
charity event intern and preceptor focused on reaching funding goals for the Passaic and Sussex counties
in which over 200 team kits containing information on how to contribute/ join the MOD. The materials
were gathered and distributed to each county. Conferences were also held with various potential
candidates/sponsors (Costco, Supermarkets, PSEG, Hospitals, and other companies in order to further
develop/ advance the campaign. The opinion of those responsible for different counties in Northern New
Jersey regarding these strategies was also obtained within weekly office meetings, in order to measure
progress and adapt the methodology.
Outcomes
The March of Dimes wants to reduce the nation’s preterm birth rate to 9.6 percent or below by the year
2020. As such they place a yearly grade on each state to measure their progress. This past year (2014)
New Jersey received a grade of C (Preterm birth rate greater than or equal to 11.3%, but less than 12.9%)
for failing to advance 2/3 preventive strategies. The following rates indicate the difference of 2013 to
2014:
Uninsured women: 16.9% vs. 18.5%
Late preterm birth: 7.7% vs. 7.9
Women who smoke: 16.5% vs. 14.4%
This year (2015) the March of Dimes hopes to advance these statistics and move New Jersey’s C rating
into an B or A.
Evaluation
This year because of the March of Dimes 4 million babies benefited from vaccines and research
breakthrough. Currently in Sussex and Passaic County the March of Dimes has raised over $70,000 (as of
April 13, 2015). Although the goal of raising at least $230,000 amongst both counties, the March of
Dimes hopes that with this year’s charity event, funding goals will not only be met but surpassed. Overall,
as a volunteer driven organization, the March of Dimes in Northern New Jersey takes pride in raising
funds through qualitative local relationships to enhance the public awareness regarding dilemmas that
affect both maternal and infant health.
176
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Enhanced Diabetes Education for High Risk Populations
Veronica Vargas
Dr. Marsha Rosenthal
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research
Purpose: To analyze beliefs about diabetes in patients with uncontrolled diabetes after receiving health
coaching from a pharmacy student.
Significance: Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States (CDC, 2015). Lowincome and racial/ethnic minority populations are disproportionately affected by diabetes. A nationally
representative study found that lower-income populations had diabetes related mortality rates double that
of higher incomes (Saydah & Lochner , 2010). Black and Latino Americans also have higher rates of
diagnosed diabetes compared to Whites (CDC, 2014). However, few intervention studies attempting to
improve self-management outcomes in diabetes patients have been successful. Health coaching as an
approach for health education in diabetes patients has not been studied in depth. Evaluations of this
approach are needed to make recommendations to health practitioners.
Methods: Data used for this evaluation was gathered from a self-management intervention study that
took place in the Eric B. Chandler Health Center, a federally qualified health center in New
Brunswick. This study was designed to aid high-risk, low-income patients with diabetes management
through the use of health coaching. Ernesto Mario School of Pharmacy students completing clinical
rotations at Chandler Health Center served as “patient navigators” to patients participating in the study.
Data were collected from 81 patients who agreed to participate in the study. Data were analyzed from a
total of 50 patients who completed questionnaires following the first intervention meeting with the
pharmacy student. This questionnaire asked about the patient’s change in perceptions of the causes,
duration, and treatment of diabetes.
Outcomes: 42% of patients report not having changed thoughts about the causes of diabetes and 58%
report not having changed thoughts about the duration of diabetes. However, 82% of patients reported
having changed thoughts about the best way to treat diabetes. Additionally, 74% of the study sample
report never skipping their medicines. Approximately 75% of the study sample report monitoring their
diabetes at least 2 to 3 times a week, with 49% of the sample reporting that they monitor their glucose
levels daily.
Evaluation: On average, participants who attended at least two intervention meetings from the study
have had a lower Hba1c levels. The mean value for these lowered scores was 1.4, with a range of .1 to
5.7. Study evaluations will further be assessed through statistical analyses and patient interviews.
177
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Implementation of a Patient Centered Medical Home
Jacqueline Veress
Direct Supervisor: Tara Gunthner, BSN, RN-BC; Director of CMHS: Margaret Drozd,
MSN, RN, APRN-BC
Saint Peter’s University Hospital: Community Mobile Health Services
Purpose: To implement a Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) for diabetic, hypertensive, nonpregnant uninsured adults at St. Peter’s Family Health Center.
Significance: According to data published by the US National Library of Medicine in 2010, low
socioeconomic adults have twice the mortality rate from diabetes than high socioeconomic adults. Factors
that contribute to the development of diabetes and hypertension in this population are obesity, financial
issues, medication noncompliance, and a lack of understanding of disease processes. The federally
sponsored and state-funded Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Program will enable
Saint Peter’s University Hospital (SPUH) to improve the healthcare of NJ residents and decrease costs. A
PCMH will accomplish this goal by providing patients with a focused education about chronic disease
self-management. A study published by the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative in 2014,
revealed significant results of the PCMH model with improved patient self-management of chronic
conditions, a 30% increase in patient satisfaction, and cost reductions of over 50% in expenses and
emergency department use.
Method: The pilot DSRIP program began in July 2014 and full implementation will begin on April 1,
2015. This is a joint effort between the patient, family, and primary health care provider along with
specialists and support from the community. Patients are recruited at SPUH from outpatient services, the
emergency department, inpatient services, same-day services, and community health screenings. To
provide continued assessment, treatment, education, and follow up, case management involves
physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, certified diabetes educators, and social workers.
Evidence-based strategies such as behavior modification, nutritional consultation, social services, hospital
discharge planning, and a patient navigation system are all components of chronic disease management.
Electronic medical records (EMR) and patient satisfaction surveys measure quality improvement and
patient satisfaction.
Outcomes: This project will reduce hospital readmissions, reduce avoidable emergency department
visits, improve patient satisfaction, and improve care processes. Patient satisfaction surveys show an
increase in patient satisfaction for all questions asked; patient satisfaction rated as good to very good (45), and decreased wait time. Combining data analysis and action will result in a more seamless approach
in the continuum of care of DSRIP patients at SPUH.
Evaluation: EMR data collection and patient satisfaction surveys will reflect improved patient outcomes
and population health, higher quality care, and a reduction in healthcare costs.
178
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Bringing Community Paramedicine into Avenel, New Jersey
Michelle Voter
Lt. Michael Giardina
Avenel-Colonia First Aid Squad
Purpose: To create a dual service agency to provide traditional emergency care while also visiting highrisk patients who need attention and help with medication distribution, ADL’s, and chronic disease
control.
Significance: Avenel-Colonia First Aid Squad responds to 3,742 calls yearly, with usually only having
one ambulance on duty at all times. Many calls however are non-emergency resulting in non-emergency
transports or patients refusing medical care. The National Congress for State Legislatures states,
“Between 1996 and 2006, hospital EDs experienced a 36 percent increase in patient visits. Many of these
are for non-emergent care.” For ACFAS, 627 out of the 3742 calls were calls where BLS care was refused
on scene. Emergency medical services are contributing tremendously to this statistic as patients with nonemergencies often call an agency for transport to the ED.
Method/Approach: The ACFAS will have two trucks on during the day shift, one for emergency calls,
and one for visits to ailing individuals who need attention everyday in order to avoid emergencies. The
emergency calls ambulance will stay in house until needed for calls, which will then usually include a
transport to a hospital. In this situation, there is a source for revenue as patients are billed for a transport.
For the second truck, EMT’s will have a daily schedule to visit ailing patients who might require nonemergency services. This service will have a cost and will create a new stream of revenue, however it will
be less than the cost spent on repeat BLS transport or repeat visits to the ED. For evaluation, the agency
can use the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Paramedicine Evaluation Tool, in which the
agency scores themselves on how well the concept is suited for the agency, off the three main principles:
Assessment, Policy Development, and Assurance.
Outcomes: An in-depth analysis will be completed within 6 months that will lay out the risk/benefits of
the program to decide whether to approve the dual program for the year 2016.
Evaluation: The trends over the next 6 months will be evaluated by U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services Paramedicine Evaluation Tool to determine whether Avenel-Colonia First Aid Squad is
an appropriate agency to provide this service. The Avenel-Colonia First Aid Squad administration then
has the right to follow through with this dual agency concept and propose to the state if wanted.
179
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of HIV among Asian-Americans and Asian
Immigrants in the U.S.
Wendy Wen
Dr. Tefera Gezmu
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: To study and observe the influence culture may have on the knowledge, attitude, and practice of
HIV among Asian-Americans and Asian immigrants in the US.
Significance: In an effort to reduce HIV incidence and prevalence, various public health programs have
been put forward including free HIV testing and free condom distributions. However, such programs may
not be as effective as originally intended due to cultural barriers. This study aims to observe the
influences culture may have on the knowledge, attitude, and practice of HIV among Asian-Americans and
Asian immigrants in the hopes to use such conclusions from the study to improve current public health
programs by implementing items of cultural competency.
Method/Approach: A survey for both Asian-Americans and Asian immigrants was created which tested
for HIV knowledge, attitudes, and practice. This survey was then distributed to students in Asian
communities at Rutgers University as well as to Asian immigrant adults in the local Middlesex County
area. The results were compiled and statistically analyzed using SPSS (Software Package for Statistical
Analysis). From this, comparisons of Asian-American students and Asian immigrant adults were made to
determine the significance Asian culture plays on HIV health behavior.
Outcomes: For questions measuring the comfort level of students talking about sex with their friends and
family, respondents were mostly comfortable with talking about sex with their friends, but very few were
comfortable talking about sex with their parents. For questions measuring HIV knowledge, most
questions were answered correctly, suggesting that most respondents are aware of basic HIV knowledge.
Questions measuring HIV risk perception showed that most respondents had a low risk perception and
that themselves to be less at risk than those in the same age or ethnicity group.
Evaluation: The disparity between comfort level with family and comfort level with friends when talking
about sex can be attributed to the fact that Asian families with more traditional Asian beliefs hold a
stronger stigma to the subject. Because American culture, especially in a diverse university setting such as
Rutgers University, is more open to the topic of sex and sexuality, Asian-American students could be
more exposed to HIV knowledge, explaining the high level of HIV knowledge reflected in the survey.
180
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Examining Depression Screenings amongst Acute Stroke Patients
Kia Williams
Florence Chukwuneke, MSN, APN
JFK Medical Center Neuroscience Institute
Purpose: To analyze depression screenings amongst acute stroke patients and propose planning
interventions to improve screening performance.
Significance:. Depression has become a significant health complication for acute stroke patients.
According to Goodwin and Devanand (2008) almost one third or 29.2% of adults with stroke in the past
year also had depression. Recent studies have found that depression post stroke can exacerbate and even
worsen an effective recovery. There are many instances where post-stroke depression is not only detected
but also left untreated. This evidence emphasizes the significance of accurate depression screenings. Most
importantly, proposing early interventions will help minimize inconsistencies in depression screening
rates.
Method/Approach: A retrospective chart review will be conducted in order to assess depression
screenings for male and female acute stroke patients aged 32 to 99 years within the time period of January
2014-December 2014. Data for 200 patients was randomly selected and exported into an excel
spreadsheet. Out of 200, 24 screened positive for depression and 30 did not receive an intervention. A
modified Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) conducted by nursing staff screened patients for
depression based on the following questions: 1) feel sad/depressed after stroke? 2) feel helpless now? 3)
history of depression? 4) thoughts of hurting oneself? 5) feel life is empty?
Outcomes: Of the sample size (n=200), 87 patients were men and 113 were women. 160 patients (80%)
had an ischemic stroke and 40 (20%) had an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke, 18 men (45%) had an
intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke and 92 women (58%) had ischemic stroke. 24 patients (12%) screened
positive for depression, 168 (84%) screened negative and 8 (4%) unable to respond. 12(6%) of patients
had a history of depression. Also, 169 of all patients (85%) received an intervention. Out of this sample
cohort (n=169), 143 (85%) received emotional support, 14 (8%) were prescribed medications and 12(7%)
were referred to a physician. Finally, 31 out of all patients (16%) did not receive an intervention.
Evaluation:
More than a tenth (n=31, 16%) of acute stroke patients from the full cohort (n=200) did not receive an
intervention. Since a PHQ-2 is a “soft” assessment, self-rating scales, active intervention programs, and
care management are effective methods to a) improve depression screening performance b) implement
appropriate treatment and intervention options and c) recommending screening tools that will be best for
detecting post-stroke depression.
181
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Exercise Prescription: A Recommendation for the Clinical Care of Midlife Women
Miriam Woodward
Gloria Bachmann, MD
Women’s Health Institute, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: To create a model for an exercise prescription program for midlife women which would provide
both an impetus for and guidance on how to create a healthy exercise regimen.
Significance: Physical activity is a widely recognized preventive and interventive health behavior, yet
few adults actually achieve the recommended amount of weekly physical activity. In the average state,
only 20.9% of adults reach the recommended amount of aerobic and strength building activity, and yet
only 34% of patients leave a clinical encounter having discussed exercise with their physician. Exercise
can help to prevent and/or manage a variety of chronic conditions of significance to midlife women, such
as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, depression, and osteoporosis. Introducing an exercise
prescription would emphasize the importance of physical activity to long term health and provide
guidance on how to improve activity levels so that patients leave with both a goal of increased activity
and a manageable plan for how to achieve it.
Method/Approach: A review of literature on the risks and benefits of exercise for midlife women on
PubMed spanning the last 20 years was conducted, as well as literature on the successes and failures of
previously implemented exercise prescription programs. Guidelines published by the CDC, the WHO,
and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) were also referred to.
Outcomes: Guidelines from the ACSM, CDC, and WHO agree that healthy adults should engage in at
least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity or 90 minutes of vigorous intensity activity weekly, as
well as engaging in strength building exercise targeting the major muscle groups at least 2 times per
week. Intensity can be measured with a variety of metrics, but for ease of application a relative intensity
measure - the “breath test” - is recommended so that patients can easily self-evaluate. A prescription
should include, at least, the frequency and duration of recommended exercise, the recommended intensity
of exercise, suggest some types of exercise, and provide a clear goal for the patient to reach - such as
increasing the time spent exercising.
Evaluation: A paper based on this work, which presents both the need for, benefits of, and a basic design
for an exercise prescription program, has been reviewed and accepted for publication by the journal
Maturitas.
182
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Effectiveness of Electronic Medical Records on Time Efficiency
Marcella Worthen
Deb Hall, LNHA, MSRD, Nursing Home Administrator
Alaris Health at St. Mary’s
Purpose: To analyze electronic medical records and to study the effectiveness it has on time efficiency
while improving the quality of resident care.
Significance: More medical practices are turning to electronic medical records as a source of viewing
patients’ health records. EMR’s is a way for healthcare professionals to view the interactions and
encounters of a patient's medical information and history. 94% of providers report that EMRs make
records readily available at the time of care. 75% of providers also reported that their EMR allows them
to deliver better patient care. Evidence has shown that this method has many benefits for any medical
practice. Studies have shown that it saves time, prevent medical errors and improve the quality of care for
patients.
Method/Approach: Research was conducted on the nursing staff at Alaris Health Nursing Home. There
are six floors in the building, each floor specializing on a specific service. The nurses were timed to see if
EMRs produced more time for them to spend with their patients. For several days, three nurses were
timed for an hour on each floor. In order for the nurses to not change their routine the nurses were
unaware of the timing process. After this process the nurses were followed during shift to see the
interaction between them and the patients. For a day research was conducted at another nursing home that
do not use electronic medical records. Both sets of data were compared to see if there were any
similarities between the two nursing homes.
Outcomes: This study will demonstrate the advantages of medical technology in an healthcare setting.
The results of the study will be used to further improve the quality of care for the residents at Alaris
Nursing Home.
Evaluations: A time study was done on the nurses to see if EMRs save time that can be used on patient
care. Once information were gathered time slot excel sheets were given to all the floors for the nurses to
fill out while on shift to see how time consuming that may or may not be. Another time study was
conducted to see if the nurses spent more time with patients once they were aware of the study.
183
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
ADAPT Drug Theft Prevention Campaign
Brittany Wright
ADAPT Senior Coordinator: Joel Torres, ADAPT Regional Organizer: Lisa Joseph, and
ADAPT Prevention Educator: Victoria Joseph
Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Team (ADAPT)
Purpose: To create a policy change within the Real Estate and Realtor practices which reduces
prescription drug theft within open houses and showings.
Significance: Prescription medication abuse in now an epidemic in the United States, with cases of abuse
increasing on a yearly basis. John Hogan (2014) found that nationally community organizations are
working with local real estate agents to educate current and potential home sellers about a new trend
where individuals steal prescription medication from medicine cabinets during open house events. This
new trend is another factor in the growing issue of prescription medication abuse and misuse in our local
communities.
Method/Approach: An informational workshop to realtors will address these issues to urge their clients
to lock up medicine cabinets and dispose of old medications properly to prevent future prescription drug
theft and abuse within open houses and communities. A presentation was prepared for local realtors in
Montclair, NJ to provide knowledge and awareness to prescription drug theft at open houses. Data for 16
realtors was exported to information sheets. The realtors received ADAPT briefer booklets, locked
pouches, stress balls, planners, realtor checklists and information sheets on how to prevent prescription
drug theft and abuse at open houses and in their communities. The realtors were assessed from the pre and
post surveys to see an increase in awareness and knowledge. After the pre and post assessment evaluation
will be based off of increased knowledge and awareness.
Outcomes: Of the sample size cohort (n=16), based on the pre and post survey an increase in 8/16 (50%)
realtors answer yes they believe prescription medication theft at open houses is a growing concern.
Overall, realtors improved in their understanding of this problem in the post test including 12 realtors
(75%) who answered that they will always use the lock pouches to help ensure prescription medication
security during open houses events.
Evaluation:
A follow up survey will be used every year to show that realtors are active in gathering information on
how well they perceive the locked pouches are working. This will serve as effective strategies to (a)
enhance realtor policies to urge clients to properly lock up and dispose of prescription medications and (b)
reduce prescription drug abuse and theft rates within open houses and communities.
184
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Trends in Healthcare Coverage for New Jersey Residents
Joe X. Yi
Wardell Sanders, President; Sarah Adelman, Vice President
New Jersey Association of Health Plans
Purpose: To provide information available to policy makers and member organizations of New Jersey
Association of Health Plans through data compilation so they can make informed decisions that impact
the healthcare system.
Significance: This type of data analysis is important for lawmakers and health policy advocates because
it can depict trends in health care coverage. Since the passing of the Affordable Care Act, New Jersey’s
health coverage has changed dramatically. Many lawmakers may not be aware of the scope of these
changes. In some instances, laws passed in the name of a constituent may not even apply to them if the
law does not apply to their type of plan. The graph from this project will provide valuable insight on
where New Jersey residents get their coverage and how the enrollment population changes. From this
information, policymakers can determine how many people will actually be affected by the laws they
make.
Methods: Using data from the Department of Banking and Insurance (DOBI), the New Jersey
Department of Human Services and the Census Bureau, this project will use 2010-2015 numbers to look
at the individual, small group, and Medicaid markets to depict where the numbers are trending towards.
Using these data sets, a timeline is created depicting how federal and state legislation changes enrollment
from the Federal Department of Health & Human Services.
Outcomes: This project will be used in an educational setting to give people insight in the direction the
state’s health insurance coverage. Future bills affecting New Jersey residents health plans may use this
project’s analysis to see how enrollment changes.
Evaluation: This project can be evaluated by compiling data from the New Jersey Department of
Banking and Insurance and the Department of Human Services. The timeline is created from information
provided by the Department of Human Services.
185
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Internship Abstract
Spirituality Outreach Substance Abuse and Prevention Program (SOSAPP)
Milena Zambrzycka
Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, MPH, Health Education Specialist and Professor
Rutgers Health Services-H.O.P.E (Health Outreach, Promotion, Education)
Purpose: To enlighten the Rutgers community on how spirituality can be a protective factor against
substance abuse and how spiritual coping mechanisms can be beneficial when battling an addiction.
Significance: The SOSAPP will primarily provide an alternative option for individuals coping with drug
addictions, and passively help prevent potential drug abusers from acquiring an addiction. A recent study
suggests a link between spirituality and drug abuse remission. According to Bradford Health, spirituality
helps addicts find their true identity and realize that they do not have to fall victim to dangerous
substances, suggesting a direct relationship between spirituality and recovery rate. Perhaps more
surprisingly, recent studies have suggested that spirituality and drug abuse are inversely related.
Method/Approach: A survey will be conducted of college students interested in becoming more spiritual
individuals. Prior to the survey, a learning session will be conducted where the benefits and shortcomings
of spirituality will be emphasized, along with individual spiritual enlightenment experiences. After
learning about the types of spiritual activities, such as meditation and yoga, students will be asked a series
of questions based on their experience, emphasizing the likelihood of engaging in spiritual activities, their
level of interest in spirituality, and their level of understanding spirituality before and after the learning
session.
Outcomes: This program will indicate the level of Rutgers students’ interest in spirituality and suggest
methods on how this information can help those battling an addiction. It will aim to explore how
individuals engaged in spiritual activities are more likely to lead a less stressful lifestyle, which can lead
to decreased level of drug addiction, and increased level of drug abuse recovery. Promoting spirituality to
the Rutgers community could help reduce the level of drug abuse by aiding those suffering from a drug
addiction, and possibly preventing some individuals from ever developing an addiction.
Evaluation: This project can be evaluated by performing a large-scale Rutgers survey, wherein drug
abusers are surveyed on their level of spirituality. A conclusion can be drawn by analyzing data from both
surveys and extrapolating a relationship between level of interest in spirituality and behaviors indicative
of drug abuse. An inverse relationship between the level of drug abuse and the abuser’s level of
spirituality would mirror recent studies and suggest a possible increased implementation of spiritual
activities in certain evidence-based drug rehabilitation programs.
186
Public Policy Students
187
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Assessing and Improving Higher Education in New Jersey
Marios Athanasiou
Mark Magyar, Associate Executive Director at the Senate Majority Office
New Jersey State Senate Majority Office
Purpose: To use statistical data, policy proposals and international comparisons that can provide policy
makers with opportunities to further the access, affordability and efficiency of higher education
institutions in New Jersey.
Significance: Funding per full-time student has fallen 29% since 2006. NJ ranks 42nd in higher ed
spending per $1,000 of personal income. (NJASCU) In-state tuition at NJ institutions of higher education
is 48% more than the national average ($3,885).(NCES) Average yearly tuition and fees at public fouryear institutions in NJ over the past two decades increased 136%. 65% of students graduating from public
four-year colleges in New Jersey in 2012 left with some student debt. The average debt of graduates has
risen 66% percent from 2006 to 2012, now at $29,306. (DEMOS) Ranked #1 for net out-migration of
students attending college. (NJASCU)
Methods: Utilizing reports and assessments on higher education funding levels, policy proposals, policy
analysis, interstate and international systemic comparisons, and extensive quantitative data on tuition
costs, state appropriations to determine where New Jersey stands, what programs and practices other
states can offer and the feasibility of potential solutions.
Outcomes: Amongst recommendations that will be provided to the New Jersey Senate Democratic Office
are the following; make higher education funding non-discretionary, increase higher education state
funding to pre-recession levels, pilot a performance based funding study, increase shared governance at
universities and above all do not pursue pay it forward as it would fail to address the underlying factors
associated with student debt, would create financial uncertainty for public colleges and may leave
graduates, campuses and states worst off.
Evaluation: These results are drawn from the extensive literature, which was researched and
reviewed. The outcomes will be provided to the Senate Democratic Office for consideration and potential
use by Senator Sweeney's higher education commission along with the numerous reports, data sets and
research materials amassed from which these findings were found.
188
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Improving the Bloustein Internship Program
Matthew Cordeiro
Ann Marie Hill
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: This project will assess areas in which the Bloustein public policy internship program could be
improved and suggest new experiential learning opportunities.
Significance: The Bloustein internship is an experiential learning program that combines an internship
with job readiness workshops. The goal is to provide a structured opportunity for students to gain work
experience, prepare for their entrance into the job market, and ensure that students have the chance to
expand their learning beyond the classroom. While the current iteration of the program has served many
students, it stands to benefit from a few updates. This project hopes to combine research, best practices,
and student interview to identify areas where the internship program could be improved. As a requirement
for graduation, all students in the Boustein program must take the internship class. This access to students
means there is a great opportunity to improve on the program in meaningful ways to better support the
students both during and after their time on campus.
Method/Approach: The project will combine a literature review, student interviews, and researching the
best practices from similar programs around the country. The goal is to provide a series of
recommendations for ways to improve the program.
Outcomes: A report with recommendations for changes will be provided to be review by the Bloustein
Faculty Internship Committee. New experiential learning models will be identified for consideration for
adoption.
Evaluation: This project will use informed interviews of representative students to identify concerns and
potential opportunities.
189
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
After-School Program Evaluation and Crime Reduction Initiative Implementation
James DiGenno
Michael Simmons, Program Manager; Kimaada Sills, Program Manager; Dr. Roland
Anglin, Executive Director
The Joseph C. Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies at Rutgers-Newark
Purpose: To evaluate an after-school program in McKinley Elementary School and to conduct research
and data analysis for a Crime Reduction Initiative in the Fairmount neighborhood.
Significance: Newark is a large and diverse city with numerous well-documented and systemic problems.
According to a grant proposal from La Casa de Don Pedro, McKinley Elementary School is routinely
rated as “in need of improvement,” and has a high percentage of students who are chronically absent. The
after-school program La Casa is spearheading needs to be evaluated to determine its overall effectiveness.
Newark’s Fairmount neighborhood has one of the highest crime rates of any neighborhood in the city.
According to a grant proposal from the Urban League of Essex County, in 2012, Fairmount only
contained 3% of the city’s population but had 13% of the city’s murders. Data-driven analysis will help
the community partners involved with the Crime Reduction Initiative in their implementation of the
program.
Method/Approach: Multiple observations of the after-school program were completed by staff members
of the Cornwall Center. Nearly every one of the 75 students in the program completed a pretest that asked
questions about community involvement and service-learning. Cornwall staff also completed a focus
group interview with parents whose children are in the program. For the FCRI, a community safety
survey was administered to 30 residents, and crime data was plugged into GIS to look for hotspot
locations and time patterns.
Outcomes: In the student pretest, over 90% of the students “agreed” or “strongly agreed” with the
statement “volunteering to help others in my community is important” and 60% said that they “were
concerned about social issues in [their] community.” The observations, however, indicated that the
program was chaotic and falling short of expectations. This data led to an evaluation report submitted to
La Casa that led to changes in the program. For the FCRI, the safety survey indicated that residents
generally felt safe during the daylight hours, but as soon as dusk approached, would simply go inside their
homes. The survey also informed Cornwall staff that Kaboom Park, located in Fairmount, was
underutilized because of the presence of drug dealers, prostitutes, and other undesirable individuals.
Evaluation: The grant proposal from La Casa and the pretest results indicated a strong desire to build a
productive and fulfilling after-school program and a student body that was receptive to such a program.
Observations indicated that the program needed to be better organized to fully succeed. For FCRI, the
program is still in the beginning stages of its implementation, but the safety survey and crime data
indicated that the community stakeholders involved need to work together to build a stronger
neighborhood.
190
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
The Implementation of a Higher Gas Tax to Improve New Jersey’s Infrastructure
Brianna Earle
Project Supervisor: Senior Associate, Jonathan Scharff
M Public Affairs
Purpose: To evaluate the public support for utilizing a gas tax as a policy solution to fix the funding
deficit in New Jersey’s Transportation Trust Fund.
Significance: In New Jersey thousands of miles of state roadways and hundreds of bridges are in
desperate need of repair and replacement. The Transportation Trust Fund is responsible for funding the
state portion of the capital programs of NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT, as well as Local Aid. On June 30,
2015, New Jersey's Transportation Trust fund will reach insolvency and the New Jersey government will
have no capacity to pay for any transportation projects. According to the Regional Plan association, the
TTF provides the state’s share of what’s necessary to maintain and upgrade New Jersey’s 40,000 miles of
highways, roads and streets, its 6,500 bridges its 1,100 miles of rail and other key infrastructure (RPA,
2010). Improvements to the states crumbling transportation infrastructure will prevent future disasters
from occurring and
save many lives.
Method/ Approach: An increase in the gas tax is a popular solution to the deficit issue amongst New
Jersey policy makers. In order to determine if the gas tax is just as popular amongst the public, a poll
conducted by Eagleton Institute entitled The Gas Tax Hike Still Opposed By New Jerseyans was
analyzed. All of the participants were asked two versions of the same question; the participants were then
randomly given one of the two versions to answer. One of the questions lacked specific context, the other
added “New Jersey’s gas tax is the third lowest in the nation and has not been raised in twenty years”
(Redlawsk, 2015). The participants in the study were also asked about their favorability of other policy
solutions in the study.
Results: Fifty four percent of New Jersey residents oppose a gas tax increase while 42% show support for
the tax (Redlawsk, 2015). The poll showed that less caucasian participants were opposed to the increase
in tax than their minority counterparts. The support for the increased gas tax grew with age and income.
The 51 percent of senior citizens and 56 percent with household incomes of $150,000 or more favor the
higher tax (Redlawsk, 2015). No other major demographic groups showed majority support. In order to
garner public support for policy makers should explore alternative funding avenues.
Evaluation: In order to evaluate the accuracy of the poll, other gas tax polls conducted by New Jersey
Universities will be compared.
191
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Framework for the Raritan State of the Bay Report
Sarah Harpaz
Direct Supervisor: Sara Malone
The Sustainable Raritan River Initiative
Purpose: To create a pre-read for the Bi-state Raritan Bay conference that identifies the significant
indicators of the Raritan Bay’s health and the relevant available data.
Significance: The Hudson-Raritan Estuary extends 6-7 km along one of the world’s most populated
coastal regions. The bay area provides a home to millions of New York and New Jersey residents,
supports trade activity in the world’s busiest harbor, the Upper New York Bay, and offers many uses that
boost the area’s economy and quality of life. Yet immense urbanization caused pollution build-up, greatly
compromising the bay’s biodiversity and jeopardizing much of its social and economic value. This
conference aims to further efforts to restore and sustain bay health. By Summarizing identified goals for
the Raritan Bay complex and by identifying existing data and data gaps, the pre-read will guide the
conference discussions about the future of the Raritan Bay and the challenges and opportunities. It will
help to create a shared vision for the future health of the Raritan Bay.
Method/Approach: Existing U.S. State of the Bay reports were examined to identify a comprehensive
list of key indicators of bay health. These were then organized into five general issue areas facing the
Raritan Bay: habitat restoration, resilience and risk management, fish and shellfish management, water
quality, and public and stewardship. Available data on the issue areas of the Raritan Bay were abstracted
from existing literature, consolidate, and summarized. This framework would elucidate what information
exists and where there are data gaps requiring further research, what the existing information reveals
about the current status of the indicators, what goals, challenges, and opportunities have already been set
for these areas, and what public or private bodies are most closely involved in governance of these areas.
Outcomes: The data collection is not yet completed. The result will be a large-scale collection of
information on many aspects of the bay condition and human stewardship and intervention. The expected
outcome is to have a clear matrix showing the relationship between these issues and the aligned objectives
for the Raritan that will direct discussions at the conference.
Evaluation: All data will be drawn from peer-reviewed literature and considered by a steering committee
of representatives from diverse organizations invested in bay health and accessibility.
192
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Rutgers Day 2015 Event Coordination: “Shore Restoration & Resilient Communities”
Shanice A. Huggins
Amy Cobb, Events Services and Facilities Manager; Karyn Olsen, Director of
Communications and Senior Public Relations Specialist
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: At the annual Rutgers Day event, to educate the public and the Rutgers community about
aspects of resilient communities and shore restoration that Planning, Public Policy and Public Health
students are working to resolve.
Significance: The United States has experienced some of the most destructive hurricanes within the last
decade, some from which it is still recovering. The hurricane that hit New Jersey’s shorelines the hardest
was Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Sandy wiped out homes, boardwalks, stores, buildings and
amusement park rides especially in the Seaside Heights, Point Pleasant and Atlantic City areas. In light
of these disasters, the residents of these towns have worked with many organizations to build strong
resilient communities. Resilient communities are classified by the residents’ ability to bounce back from
a moment of devastation within the community, by “actively influencing and preparing for economic,
social and environmental change.” (resilientcommunities.org)
Method/Approach: The following steps will be taken: 1. Collect data on resilient communities in NJ
(specifically lining the shore). 2. Create a fun interactive activity for the public to participate in and
promote awareness of severity. 3. Coordinate with other EJB organizations to showcase the work EJB
does in relation to this topic. 4. Encourage individuals varying from ages as young as 5 to adults that it is
always better to be safe than sorry, so they need to take necessary precautions to make sure they are ready
for just about any crisis.
Outcomes: The end goal of this project is to enlighten the public of the inner workings of the Edward J.
Bloustein, staff and students. In line with this year’s theme of “Shore Revitalization and Resilient
Communities”, hopefully, the public will realized how imperative it is that they plan ahead and prepare
for natural disasters. The American Red Cross is one of the top organizations that handles disaster relief
and community restoration. Preparing and educating the public can help organizations like the Red Cross
reduce disaster recovery time.
Evaluation: After presenting the data and facts to the public, based on their responses and whether they
are actively participating to learn, one can infer that there is a higher possibility they will be adopt a
refined lifestyle that will include disaster preparation. A mini survey will be distributed at the end of tent
visit to get the reaction of visitors and allow them to briefly reflect on what they learned and what they
could take away and apply to everyday life (steps of preparation).
193
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Jersey City Summer Works Assessment
Kira Kaur
Sarah Goldfarb, Aide to the Deputy Mayor; Vivian Brady-Phillips, Deputy Mayor of
Jersey City
Office of the Mayor, City of Jersey City
Purpose: JC Summer Works is a comprehensive summer youth employment initiative that addresses the
need for wide-ranging employment and enrichment opportunities for young people.
Significance: Over the last several years, the youth unemployment rate has increased dramatically across
the nation. The youth unemployment rate is far worse for minority youth. According to the July 2013
Bureau of Labor Statistics the unemployment rates for Black youth (28 percent) and Hispanic youth (18
percent) are higher than the 16 percent national average. Summer employment offers direct experience in
the workplace. Furthermore, research shows that employment reduces the high school dropout rate.1 This
program is significant because teenagers who have employment opportunities, mentoring and professional
support early in their lives are far better equipped to meet the demands of the contemporary workforce
than if they had entered mid-level or professional settings later in their career trajectories. Not only does
summer employment offer direct experience in the workplace, research shows that employment reduces
the high school dropout rate.
Method/Approach: The success of this program was evaluated through surveys. All students who were
employed through JC Summer Works were asked to complete a survey. They were asked about their
experience in the program, what they enjoyed the most, what they think needed to be improved. The
survey was distributed through survey monkey to all of the participants via email.
Outcomes: Most of the outcomes were qualitative, however an overwhelming majority (89%) of the
students stated that they had a positive experience with the program. Many of the students said that they
wished the program was longer and extended into the school year. A small minority (11%) of the
responding students were unsatisfied with their experience in the program. This was generally due to a
misalignment between their interest and the work they were doing over the summer.
Evaluation: The project was survey analysis to see the effectiveness of the JC Summer Works initiative.
194
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Implementing new procedures to increase compliance with the Stark Law
Victoria Lee
Director of Physician Relations and Executive Health: Anamika Desai
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
Purpose: To develop an efficient method of regulating physician outreach expenses and to promote
compliance with the Stark Law.
Significance: Prior to the introduction of the Stark Law, there was no way in regulating physician selfreferral practices. This meant that physicians could potentially refer patients to medical facilities that
favored their financial interest. This became a serious problem that caused an overutilization of services,
an increase in healthcare costs, and monopolization of health care services. The Stark Law was introduced
in 1995, which prohibited physicians from referring Medicare and Medicaid patients to inpatient and
outpatient services that financially benefitted the physician. This law also constructed regulations in how
Hospitals can promote physicians within their system. Without proper documentation on expenses used to
promote physician practices, the hospital can be fined and ultimately shut down.
Method/Approach: The project required analyzation of the past physician outreach expense records.
However due to the high accumulation of data dispersed within large amounts of paperwork, analyzation
had proven to be difficult and time consuming. After research was conducted on better record
documentation techniques, a new method of operation was developed to improve the Hospital’s
compliance with the Stark Law. This method included keeping the physician liaisons informed on the
updated spending regulations through routine powerpoint presentations, converting the data from paper
records into Excel, monitoring expenses per physician and service line through pivot tables, and
measuring change through a 360-feedback system.
Outcomes: The new analyzation technique validated that the current hospital expenses were in
compliance with the Stark Law regulations. The new method of documentation improves the Hospital’s
compliance with the Stark law, since it allows the physician liaisons to access updated expense records
per physician at any time. Use of pivot tables were beneficial and productive in looking up specific pieces
of information. The PowerPoint presentation also proved to be helpful in updating the physician liaisons
on the updated spending regulations.
Evaluation: Once the new method of implementing Stark Law compliance has been applied, a survey
will be sent to the physician liaisons inquiring their feedback on the new system. The survey will ask
them to rank their ease in operation of the new system, and informativity of the routine PowerPoint
presentation updates, and let them make suggestions for future improvements.
195
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Campaign Coordinator for “Go Solar, New Jersey”
Coryanne Mansell
Solar Campaign Organizer: David Beavers, Director: Doug O’Malley
Environment New Jersey
Purpose: Urge civic leaders to make commitments that will help New Jersey generate 20% of our energy
from the sun by 2025, through research, public education, and grassroots organizing.
Significance: Solar energy reduces pollution, saves consumers on their energy bills, and boosts local
economies. The report, “Star Power: The Growing Role of Solar Energy in New Jersey,” states that
achieving the goal of 20% solar by 2025 would cut as much carbon pollution as 2.6 million cars emit in a
year. Additionally, according to The Solar Foundation’s “National Solar Jobs Census,” the solar
installation sector “remains the single largest source of domestic employment growth, more than doubling
in size since 2010.” For businesses and residents alike, solar installations can cut utility bills providing for
a noteworthy investment. As the Natural Defense Council states, “Hawaii's Mauna Lani Bay Hotel began
saving enough on energy bills to pay for the investment in just five years.” Thereby, a goal of 20% solar
by 2025, will encourage a cleaner environment with a stronger economy from job creation and savings in
utility costs.
Approach:
• Reach out to community members, elected officials, and solar advocates to help gain support for
the campaign
• Create a letter of support that New Jersey civic leaders can sign on to support the goal
• Communicate with the community through letter to the editors, opinion editorials, and press
releases sent to local media outlets and newspapers
• Hold events, such as the “Solar Summit,” to educate the community about solar goals
• Research local zoning ordinances with barriers to roof-mounted solar panels
• Contact the town councils with these restrictions in hopes to encourage their removal
• Engage the public, through media outlets, petitions, emails, and phone-banking, to bring attention
to the campaign and the local ordinances that promote barriers to solar panels
Outcomes: An official letter of support for the Go Solar, New Jersey goal was endorsed by 72 elected
officials, which helped highlight the bipartisan political will and importance for solar energy in New
Jersey. The ‘Solar Summit,’ provided a productive informational session on the future market of solar in
New Jersey. Experts in the solar field provided their insights on how they are differentiating their solar
businesses and what the future of solar energy entails. The press release, drafted by Coryanne, was
published on the Central New Jersey website.
Evaluation: To evaluate the success of the project, one must gain feedback from the public. The feedback
must come from elected officials, students and homeowners, and also the supervisors. In the upcoming
weeks Environment New Jersey will be releasing and emailing a survey to audience members, who
signed up via the website or provided their email at the event, regarding the Solar Summit. This will help
evaluate what audience members learned and what can be approved for next time. In reference to the
restrictive solar panel ordnance research, Coryanne contacted the public officials in the towns to gain
insight on why the restrictions were originally adopted, why they are supported, and if their removal is
feasible.
196
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Municipal Profile Project
Alexis Miller
Kamal Saleh
County of Union: Economic Development Department
Purpose: To revise and format the economic and planning profiles for each town within Union County.
Significance: Municipal profiles provide data for municipalities that can be helpful in understanding the
unique features of a town. According to Camaj et al. (2014), the public respects a government that is
consistently transparent in its decision-making processes, as well as providing supporting documents.
Without inclusion and/or notice of government decisions and municipal trends, the public will be unable
to politically participate.
Method/Approach: United States Census Data were collected for each municipality in Union County.
The data collected will be revised and updated with the most recent information from the Census,
government databases, and additional data provided on municipal web pages. Once the data are revised,
the information must be formatted so that individual profiles do not exceed two pages. All graphics and
charts must be proportionally sized in reference to the text. The information found on the appendix pages
must be manually transferred from Excel spreadsheets to tables for the final document. Once complete,
the document must be saved in an editable file, in addition to an non-editable version.
Outcomes: The final version of the data book will comprise of three specific characteristics. First, the
data will accurately represent community characteristics, municipal features, municipal budget, and key
performance indicators. Second, the overall style will display fluent formatting of the individual
municipal profiles. Lastly, the concluding pages of the Data Book will depict appendix pages, which
outline additional information and sources. The finished product will give legislators, municipal official,
advocacy groups, researchers, and the media will have access to official data.
Evaluation: It is to be utilized as a tool for all municipalities, states, and federal government. Since the
data will be used for a variety of reasons, the book’s success can only be measured by satisfaction
surveys. Upon completion, the county will create a survey six months to a year after The Data Book’s
publication; The County will distribute the surveys to account for its effectiveness.
197
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Mark Conference
Kenya O’Neill
Robyn Ginese, Interim Director; Ryan Bissonnette, Associate Director; Stephanie
Cwynar, Graduate Intern
The Office of Leadership & Training
Purpose: To analyze the satisfaction, speaker suggestion, and flow of the Mark Conference, in an effort
to improve the conference in the future.
Significance: Many young adults are held back from turning their ideas into action because of lack of
representation. Latu and Mast, et al. (2013) found that because women are stereotyped to be a certain
way, their role in leadership is undermined. However, one way to circumvent this is to expose young
women to highly successful female role models. This concept can be applied to other marginalized
groups as well. People need representation in order to feel empowered. The Mark Conference aims to
inspire students by showcasing successful speakers. It is an annual event, and each year, a survey is given
to attendees in order to assess what they liked as well as what could be improved.
Method/Approach: A survey, hosted on Monkey Survey, was given out to attendees post-conference via
e-mail and facebook in order to gauge how students felt about the conference. Of 400 attendees, 81
attendees filled out the survey. The key trends that we looked out for were: overall satisfaction, speaker
suggestions, and flow of conference.
Outcomes: Of the attendees who filled out the survey (n=81), 58% loved the conference. 31% were
satisfied, 10% felt it met their expectations, and 1% were dissatisfied. Although 83% said they would
attend the conference next year, there were major suggestions in terms of speakers and flow. Because the
conference was held in the Livingston Student Center with over 400 attendees, 83% said that the space
was too crowded, and they suggested having less attendees. In addition to this, 36% said that speakers
needed to be more racially diverse.
Evaluation: Given these results, next year’s conference will sell out at 300 attendees, rather than
400. This will solve the overcrowdedness. In addition to this, more racially diverse speakers will be
picked in order to represent the student body. Lastly, because only 81 out of 400 attendees filled out the
survey, future surveys should offer some sort of incentive in order to receive more participation. 81 out
of 400 attendees is not a representative sample, and so, although many trends were reoccurring, the
sample would have been more accurate if we had more participation.
198
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptors:
Agency:
Progress of the Overdose Prevention Act in NJ
Abieyuwa Osamwonyi
Amanda Bent
Drug Policy Alliance
Significance: Accidental death is the fifth leading cause of death in New Jersey, and drug overdose is the
leading cause of accidental death, not only within the state, but also on a national level. This means that
drug overdoses kill more people a year than car accidents. Since 2004, there have been over 5,000 deaths
in New Jersey, and without proper state intervention, that number will only increase at an exponential
rate. Just between the years 2009 and 2010, there was a 225% increase in overdose-related deaths. This
staggering increase is largely due to opioid use, which causes the loss of two lives each day. Governor
Christie signed into law the Overdose Prevention Act to address this issue, after heavy campaigning from
advocacy groups. The OPA protects anyone who prescribes, dispenses, or administers the medication
Naloxone for use in an overdose emergency.
Method/Approach: A survey was created to administer to pharmacists primarily over the phone, with
some taking it in person. The survey includes information on naloxone supply, acknowledgement of the
OPA, and viewpoint on how pharmacists can be involved with helping with the overdose issue in NJ. The
responses are recorded on a physical and electronic copy. The electronic copy will be used to create a data
set to be analyzed by STATA.
Outcomes: Our response pool is made up of 75 pharmacies. 80% of the respondents said that they did not
stock Naloxone, while 17.3% said that they did stock it. 2.7% were unsure about whether or not they did
stock Naloxone. Out of the 75 pharmacies, 14 decided to take our phone survey. The questions include in
the data analysis were whether the pharmacist was aware of the provisions of the OPA and whether they
were also aware of the 2015 expansion allowing Naloxone to be dispensed under a standing order. We
had 78.6% say they were aware of the OPA, 14.3% were unaware, and 7.1% were not too sure. We also
had 42.9% say yes to knowing about the 2015 expansion, 50% said no, and 7.1% were not too sure.
Evaluation: The sample size is very small, so it would be good to continue data collection even after the
project presentation is over. A larger sample size would be better for assessing how knowledgeable New
Jersey pharmacists are of the OPA. Another provision to add to the data would be a comparison between
chain pharmacies and independents to see if a majority of the demographic that know of the OPA fall in
either category. A follow-up survey should be administered to pharmacists contacted to see if they felt
any major impact from the establishment of the OPA, and if they predict any surge in the supply of
Naloxone received and amount dispensed.
199
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
How the market values fossil fuel reserves, and fund exposure to fossil fuels
Shane Patel
Direct Supervisor: Tilak Lal,Director of Risk Management
Franklin Templeton Investments
Purpose: To analyze how financial markets value carbon reserves which could one day become sunk
assets, and to create a method to best quantify fund exposure to fossil fuels.
Significance: Our society’s economic success is based on the availability of cheap energy, largely
delivered through fossil fuels, making them an essential part of financial portfolios. Fossil fuels, however,
are known to drive anthropogenic climate change, and there is a large push for fossil-free funds from
grassroot climate action campaigns. In addition, fossil fuel companies report their reserve-replacement
ratio in order to quantify their future performance, though to avoid the worst impacts of fossil fuels, these
reserves must remain unexploited. Evaluating fund exposure to fossil fuels is essential to offering fossilfree reserves, as is understanding the potential impact of carbon regulations on economic performance.
Method/Approach: To quantify fund exposure, a list of the top 200 publicly traded fossil fuel companies
and their reserves is compared with investments found in a found. The percent of investments made in
that fund is multiplied by reserve amount, and then all of these are summed. We are working on a more
sophisticated measure that may include reserve replacement ratio, as well as a method that considers
sources.
A data set of historical reserve replacement ratio along with net income was put together for 10 of the top
private and nationally-owned publicly traded companies. Then, a comparison with historical market
capitalization will be done, with statistical analysis that compares the effects of net income/ reserve
replacement ratio on market capitalization, which will correct for the economic downturn of 2008.
Outcomes: The analysis of the role of reserve replacement ratio in fund performance is still in progress.
Evaluation: The accuracy of the project can be best judged by comparing to similar studies of how funds
are valued and seeing what other variables that may play a significant role were not considered.
200
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Transformation of the Brooklyn Waterfront
Yuvraj Ramsaywack
Kara Gilmour
Brooklyn Bridge Park Corp.
Purpose: This project will summarize the various actors and interests that played a role in the past and
future development of the Brooklyn Bridge Park. It will serve as a historical analysis and will identify and
note key developments in the park’s transformation and attempt to suggest potential applicability to other
waterfront areas in New York. What lessons can be learned from the development that can be applicable
to other waterfront communities?
Significance: With New York’s rapidly growing population, there is a need for new recreational and
residential space. As industry leaves the city, continuing a pattern of de-industrialization, new waterfront
areas open up for redevelopment. At the same time, post-Sandy New York must consider the
consequences of waterfront development and how to build more resilient infrastructure that could last for
future generations. It is important to examine the agencies and their relationships with the park to help
understand the feasibility of creating greenspace along formerly industrial waterfront areas.
Method/Approach: Research will largely be conducted using the book provided to me by the park and
interviews with the preceptor will help draw a conclusion. The book details the best practices and the
barriers faced in the development of new waterfront space. It also has potential barriers to park
development that I will address in the presentation. Additionally, the current timeline that I am working
on for the park will also aid in identifying key relationships between actors.
Outcomes: I hope to present these findings to the park and somehow have mention of it in the book.
These findings will be presented through a series of recommendations for the park system based on
lessons from the book.
Evaluation: Evaluations of the resource guide’s success will be based on supervisor and personnel
feedback. Will these recommendations actually be looked at? Is the Brooklyn Bridge Park a model for
planning and development in the New York City area?
201
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Student Loan Forgiveness Accessibility Program
Nabeel Rokerya
Mrs. Ashley Bencan, Special Projects Manager, Office of Recruitment, Preparation and
Recognition
NJ Department of Education
Purpose: To determine the impact of student loan forgiveness resource availability on program
enrollment and awareness.
Significance: According to the US Department of Education, current student loan debt is in excess of $1
trillion (Huffington Post OL). Further exacerbating this problem is the decrease in median inflationadjusted weekly earnings for full-time employees across all levels of educational attainment, as reported
by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (Huffington Post OL). Increasing awareness and accessibility to
loan forgiveness/cancellation program resources can help reduce these fiscal burdens for teachers who
qualify, but are currently unsure of how to determine their eligibility and apply.
Method/Approach: All loan forgiveness/cancellation resources will be revised where necessary and
adjusted to reflect the most recent federal guidelines. Language will be simplified, and the state’s website
directories will be condensed using breakdowns by career lifecycle location to facilitate resource
navigation. After all necessary changes are implemented, a sample of elementary and secondary school
teachers who had previously inquired about the aforementioned programs will be surveyed to determine if
they were better able to comprehend eligibility requirements and application procedures.
Outcomes: From a sample of 75 elementary and secondary school teachers that reached out to the NJ
Department of Education regarding loan forgiveness or cancellation, it is expected that at least 50 will
find the associated resources easier to navigate. Of these 50, it is expected that approximately 25 will be
eligible for loan forgiveness or cancellation, and of these 25, it is expected that 15-20 will complete the
full application and successfully enroll in one of the programs offered.
Evaluation: To determine if the results of our surveys regarding the ease of resource location and overall
website navigation are legitimate, we will simply track enrollment rates for all loan forgiveness and
cancellation programs offered after the proposed changes have been made. If an individual is eligible for
a certain program that will absolve them of, or assist them in any way with their student loan debt, but
does not enroll, we hypothesize that this is because of the difficulty of doing so. This is consistent with
the plethora of inquiries the department receives requesting clarification on these programs. Therefore, if
enrollment rates increase after resources have been simplified and website directories have been
condensed; it will be safe to assume a negative causal relationship between the complexity of the
application process and program enrollment rates.
202
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
The Self Help Group-Bank Linkage model of microcredit as an answer to the failure of
Microfinance Institutions in the State of Andhra Pradesh, India.
Prerna Shetty
Professor Meredeth Turshen
Research Internship at the E.J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
Purpose: Study why the microfinance crisis occurred in the State of Andhra Pradesh, India. Analyze
why the MFI model of microfinance failed and the SH model of microcredit succeeded in the State of
Andhra Pradesh, India. and understand why the originally established Self Help Group-Bank Linkage
model was promoted and seen as a more sustainable model by the government, after the failure of the
MFI model of microfinance in the state.
Significance: Microcredit activities in India began in the early 1980’s with the creation of informal SelfHelp Groups (SHGs) and a large number of them happened to be located in the southeastern region of
India, with the State of Andhra Pradesh being the center of microfinance activities. In the early 1990s, the
State Government of Andhra Pradesh established the Self Help Group-Bank Linkage model with the help
of NABARD, World Bank loans and the Government of India helped create an impressive microcredit
portfolio for the state. On the other hand, there was an emergence of Microfinance Institutions like SKS,
Spandana, Share, Basix, etc in the early 1990’s that changed the microcredit scene in the State of Andhra
Pradesh. These Microfinance Institutions as opposed to the SHG-Bank Linkage model grew at a quick
pace and reached many more borrowers after the economic liberalization in India, which was initiated in
1991. This created a huge divide and rift between these two models of microcredit within the State of
Andhra Pradesh and the government made a number of complaints against these MFIs, some of them
being that these MFIs charged exorbitant rates of interest (profit motive). the MFIs adopted unethical and
coercive fund collection practices which caused a number of poor borrowers to commit suicide and the
MFIs followed a practice of over lending funds.
This issue reached a crisis point in 2010, the State of Andhra Pradesh introduced an ordinance to protect
the women Self Help Groups from exploitation by the Microfinance Institutions.
Method/Approach: This study will analyze case studies of villages within the State of Andhra Pradesh to
see how the SHG (Self Help Group-Bank Linkage) model of microcredit has performed in terms of
poverty alleviation in comparison to the MFI (Microfinance Institutions) model of microfinance.
Outcomes: This research will demonstrate why the Government of Andhra Pradesh increased the role of
the SHG model of microcredit and heavily regulated MFIs after the microfinance crisis in the State of
Andhra Pradesh, India.
Evaluation: Evaluations will be based on how effective MFIs and SHGs have been addressing poverty
levels in the villages selected for this study within the State of Andhra Pradesh, India.
203
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Recreation and Open Space Element
Alef Tadese
Direct Supervisor: Nicholas Tufaro, Principal Planner/Landscape Architect; Project
Supervisor: Director of Comprehensive Planning, Mirah Becker
Middlesex County Planning Department
Purpose: To research and update components of the Recreation and Open Space element for the
Middlesex County Master Plan
Significance: The need of open space is vital to protect the public’s interest by ensuring limitations on
development and urban expansion. The US Forest Service states that open space “provides a multitude of
public benefits, ecosystem services, and products we all need and enjoy such as water, economic
prosperity, wildlife, recreation, and wildlife protection.” This translates to a promotion of and increase in
county wide initiatives to protect vital watersheds in the region.
Approach: Research will be used to recommend tools to increase accessibility, specifically for people
who are physically disabled, within parks, trails, and recreational lands. Analysis will be conducted on
most recently published and up-to-date inventory of parks and open spaces managed by municipal,
county, and state powers. Translate the data to begin “municipal snapshots” in regards to existing open
space.
Outcomes: The first page of the “snapshot” for all 25 municipalities will be completed. Data of previous
and existing inventory of parks and open spaces will be organized. This information contributes to the
updating of the Master Plan. The end goal of the overall project is to better serve the needs and prospects
of the County’s future through conservation efforts and spaces for relaxation for the County’s residents
and visitors.
Evaluation: To evaluate the study all latest copies of inventories of open spaces and parks for all
municipalities are collected and consistent checks are in place to ensure comparable data that are up to
date in the GIS software is relevant. To measure the success of the project is to have completed all
snapshots for every 25 municipalities.
204
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Destination Marketing in Central New Jersey
Connor Wallace
Lina Llona, President at the Middlesex County Regional Chamber of Commerce
GoCentralJersey (Central Jersey Convention and Visitors Bureau)
Purpose: This project will formulate a plan to attract tourists to Central New Jersey, stimulating
economic development throughout the region.
Significance: As our nation continues its shift toward a service-based economy, many of the country’s
regions find themselves struggling within a period of economic restructuring (Singh, 1999). Without the
job-creating strength that the manufacturing industry once presented to our nation’s metropolitan areas, a
diverse array of industries make the efforts to fill the economic void (Pierce, 2012). Given the budding
economic significance of the tourism industry, regions nationwide put together concerted efforts to
market themselves as a premiere location to visit.
Method/Approach: Research will be conducted through a literature review from scholarly journals on
tourism planning, economic development, and destination marketing. Analysis of past efforts from the
Central Jersey DMO will be employed to guide our future efforts for improvement in our marketing
strategies. Finally, we have begun distributing anonymous surveys to various hotels in the area, urging
guests to describe the reasons behind their visit to the region. These three methods combined will allows
us to gain an understanding of our region’s assets and develop a print and digital media marketing
campaign to increase tourism revenue in the region.
Outcomes: While our research currently remains in the development phase, our methods have allowed us
to define some of our major marketing opportunities. The three main sources of tourism revenue for our
region reside in eastern Pennsylvania, southern New York, and within the state of New Jersey itself.
However, we see potential opportunities in markets close to Ohio State University and Michigan State
University, as their traditionally avid fan base may want to travel to the area as they face off against
Rutgers University this upcoming Fall. Accordingly, we will develop our marketing strategies to appeal
to these demographics.
Evaluation: Once the digital and print media campaign is developed and launched, we will analyze any
measurable increases in tourism revenue stemming from our target markets.
205
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Enhancing the SCUT-Bloustein 2+2 Program for Planning and/or Public Policy Major
Steven Wang
Dona Schneider and Ann Marie Hill
Edward J Bloustein School of Policy and Planning (EJB) at Rutgers and Southern China
University of Technology (SCUT)
Purpose: The purpose of the internship is to enhance international cooperation with Sino America
College in Southern China University of Technology and to cultivate creative thinking of students.
Significance: Due to different curriculum setting, prospective students in Southern China University of
Technology can graduate at Rutgers on time on condition that Rutgers University allows them to transfer
at least 60 credits. Then Chinese students can pursue a master degree at Rutgers within one year. As for
current Chinese students at Rutgers finding an internship as senior students are mandatory, facilitators at
Rutgers help to lower the cultural and language barriers if Chinese students want to head back for
internship locating.
Method: Translating the material from the School of Public Administration and the School of
Architecture and matching it to the curricular material from EJB for the 833 and 971 majors. The
matching needed to create equivalencies between courses by title and the number of contact hours, so that
the number of transfer credits does not exceed 60. As of current Chinese students, several meetings to be
held help understand the requirements of internship and responsibility of students and preceptors. The
material named responsibility of supervisor is translated into Chinese for better understanding.
Outcomes: Comparison tables showing transfer credits are created according to the latest curricular
materials from Bloustein School at Rutgers and Southern China University of Technology. Transferrable
credit tables based on course description are submitted to Associate Dean for final confirmation.
Translation materials of supervisor’s responsibility in Chinese are submitted to EJB internship
coordinator for reference. Facilitation of students improves internship placements.
Evaluation: The Associate Dean will contact the counterpart staff in Southern China University of
Technology and negotiate with the School of Public Administration and the School of Architecture to
evaluate how many transferrable credits result.
206
Internship Abstract
Title:
Name:
Preceptor:
Agency:
Business Development and Green Building Education
Christine Winter
Matt Kaplan, CEO
ReVireo
Purpose: To develop a marketing plan to increase business. To inform the general public about the
benefits of green building and LEED Certification.
Significance: As technology improves along with our understanding of how the building process affects
the environment, requirements made by the municipal and state governments change. In addition to the
basic requirements of building codes, incentives are offered by New Jersey to encourage builders to meet
higher energy standards. The LEED program recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. It
provides a framework for identifying and implementing practical and measurable green building design,
construction, operations and maintenance solutions. Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and
Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, and Indoor Environmental Quality are the five areas that are
focused on. This program along with Energy Star, which is incorporated into New Jersey’s Clean Energy
Rebate Program, encourage the reduction of energy consumption.
Method/Approach: First a database of regional builders, architects, and other professionals in related
fields was compiled and organized into a spreadsheet. This was done through internet searches utilizing
keywords. Contacts were also acquired at the Atlantic Builders Convention through short conversations at
an exhibition booth. This information will be used by other employees to make direct contact about the
services offered by ReVireo. Current requirements and available program incentives were researched
including LEED, New Jersey’s Clean Energy, Energy Star, and WELL Building. This information was
used to prepare an outline for a client presentation on the available approaches for achieving an
Innovation in Design LEED credit.
Outcomes: An ebook and a video will be produced about the benefits of green building, for a client, to be
broadcast publicly as part of an Innovation in Design credit. This will satisfy a LEED requirement that
has been administered by ReVireo.
Evaluation: An increase in business and knowledge among the general public about green building
practices, including LEED.
207

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