Urban Design Guidelines PDF - University of Maryland, Baltimore

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U N I V E R S I T Y O F MARYLAND, BALTIMORE
/
URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
2010
2
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
CONTENTS
OVERVIEW
3
CONTEXTUAL IDENTITY
7
SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES
11
SITE DEVELOPMENT
21
ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES
29
PRECINCT STUDIES
37
LANDSCAPE GUIDELINES
63
2
SECTION 1 / Overview
3
4
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
OVERVIEW
The design guidelines contained within the 1991
The Guidelines are not intended to prescribe solutions
Facilities Master Plan and the subsequent 1996 and
or limit creativity, but rather, to establish a flexible
2002 Facilities Master Plans have been a design
framework that respects UMB’s past, addresses
reference for the University of Maryland Baltimore for
its present needs, and encourages innovation in
almost two decades. The sheer quantity of completed
the future. This document refines development
projects realized under these documents underscores
opportunities for the University’s buildings and
their importance. As with any institution, however,
grounds, providing a series of recommendations for
circumstances within and around the University
the following topics:
of
Maryland
Baltimore
(UMB)
have
changed,
necessitating the Guidelines to respond in turn.
• Sense of place
• Sustainability
This document, known as UMB’s Urban Design
• Site development
Guidelines or “the Guidelines,” revises previous
• Architectural guidelines
recommendations, with expansion mainly in the
• Streetscapes
area of sustainability. In addition, this document
• Open space
consolidates multiple reference guidelines into one
• Urban horticulture
volume to be the primary resource for future building
• Landscape standards
and grounds development on the UMB campus.
The Guidelines are an integral part of the 2010
Purpose of Design Guidelines
Facilities Master Plan Update, and together they
The UMB campus, as it has evolved over the past 200
define the goals and principles that will guide the
years, possesses a unique, urban quality, characterized
development of the University. As future projects are
by the density and scale of its schools and buildings,
implemented, the identity of the campus environment
palette of materials, preservation of older structures,
will be reinforced with streetscape elements, a strong
and relationship to non-University buildings and
building presence, an enhanced network of open
historic districts within the City of Baltimore. The
spaces, and recognizable gateways. These features
Guidelines ensure that the quality and relationships
will create a collegiate and memorable sense of place.
within the built environment continue to support the
mission of the University well into the future.
5
6
SECTION 2 / Contextual Identity
7
The boundaries of UMB in red. The Inner Harbor can be seen in the far, bottom right corner
Historic Davidge Hall fronting Lombard Street
8
The Rieman Block (Lexington Street) is a historic collection of
buildings listed on the National Register. Pascault Row can be
seen in the background.
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
CONTEXTUAL IDENTITY
The University of Maryland Baltimore enjoys a
out in 1799. The cemetery provides an invaluable link
historically rich and urban setting that lends the
to the people responsible for the initial development of
campus much of its physical identity. Building and
the City of Baltimore. Westminster Cemetery, adjacent
open space projects on campus will respect and
to the University’s Law School, is the burial site of
strengthen the contextual identity of the University’s
Edgar Allen Poe. It is common to see roses, brandy,
campus.
and pennies left at his grave stone. Pascault Row,
on Lexington Street, is the last remaining example
Historic Fabric
of early 19th century townhouses in Baltimore.
The campus has matured over two centuries, with
The Rieman Block, at the southwest corner of West
each new building added in a way that expresses the
Lexington and Pearl Streets, records a post-Civil War
culture and influences of that particular time in history.
Baltimore. The North and South Loft historic districts
There are thirty-two campus properties that have been
include nineteen manufacturing buildings dating to
surveyed and analyzed for historical significance;
an era between 1870 and 1915. Architecturally, these
twenty-seven have been categorized as standing
buildings are stunning. Culturally, they capture the
structures and three as below ground (archeological)
history of Baltimore’s garment industry that grew to
sites. The University either falls within or abuts three
national renown. Another adjacent historic district,
different National Register Historic Districts, including
Market Center, is comprised of row houses, small
Market Center, the Loft District (north and south), and
commercial buildings, churches, schools, hotels,
Ridgley’s Delight.
department stores, and chain stores that display the
evolution of the City over a 100-year period. Spurred
The history of these buildings and districts is rich. For
by the activity of Lexington Market in the 19th century,
example, Davidge Hall, named after the first dean of the
the area evolved from a small-scale urban residential
College of Medicine of Maryland, is the oldest building
neighborhood into the City’s premier, early 20th
in the United States in continuous use for medical
century shopping district. The district also chronicles
education. Because public opinion at the time of its
the decline of urban retail centers within post WWII,
construction violently condemned human dissection,
automobile-oriented development patterns.
Davidge Hall’s dissection labs were hidden within
the building, below the sloping seats of the lecture
hall and the rectangular outer walls. Secret spiral
staircases led to these rooms. St. Paul’s Cemetery, at
Redwood and Martin Luther King Boulevard, is the
second oldest cemetery in Baltimore, originally laid
9
Future campus projects shall retain, to the greatest
extent possible, the historic features within campus.
Keeping the historic fabric intact ensures a strong,
recognizable identity for the campus and a link
to history that enriches both University and City
neighborhoods. UMB projects shall seek compatible
uses for historic buildings either currently owned
or acquired in the future. The University’s Historic
Preservation
Plan
complements
this
document
and provides further guidance concerning new
construction, renovation, and adaptive reuse of
historic structures.
The gate to St. Paul’s Cemetery, the second oldest cemetery
in Baltimore.
29 South Paca Street, the former Strouse & Brothers Building
built in the late 1800s
The burial place of poet and author Edgar Allan Poe, adjacent
to the Law School.
10
SECTION 3 / Sustainable Practices
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U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES
Built Environment
The University’s leadership, by signing the Ameri-
Building design today is a more integrated process
can College and University Presidents Climate Com-
than ever before. The classic elements of form,
mitment (ACUPCC) in 2007, has shown its intention
function, materials, and site orientation will be applied
to minimize the carbon footprint of the campus. As a
in concert with the latest technologies and innovations
signatory of this commitment, the University pledges
to optimize a building’s long-term performance. Each
to develop an institutional action plan that achieves
building must balance culture, history, function,
climate neutrality, and future campus projects will
material use, and technology in a setting that respects
adhere to the benchmarks and recommendations out-
the capacity and parameters of the site.
lined by that plan. The recommendations set forth in
these guidelines are part of the same concerted effort
The University prioritizes adaptive reuse of existing
to support the climate action plan.
buildings as a means to minimize its carbon footprint
and reduce the consumption of raw materials.
In the broadest sense, the University seeks to create
In addition, new construction projects will study
a campus environment that actively improves the
applicable opportunities for solar, wind, geothermal,
quality of life and the environment for its users.
and heat recovery systems as a means to reduce
University operations will address sustainability as a
and/or generate energy on campus. LEED Guidelines
continuous process affecting environmental, social,
shall be used for determining appropriate building
and fiscal concerns. Sustainable practices occur at all
performance levels.
scales -- from the city and campus, to buildings and
landscapes, to products used within those buildings.
Designers shall reduce impervious surfaces and
These Guidelines direct sustainable practices at the
encourage green landscapes with new projects.
“campus scale” by addressing goals within four broad
They should incorporate innovative stormwater
categories: the built environment, energy, ecology
management practices into the building design.
and hydrology, and sustainability education.
Likewise, designers shall incorporate alternative
means of access (i.e. bicycle, public transit, etc.) into
the building’s design to limit the impact to the existing
road network and reduce the need for personal
vehicles. Bicycle storage space and showers, and
facilities to accommodate use of public transportation
are all examples of elements that shall be explored in
campus projects.
13
Individual building projects shall be integrated into
Projects shall employ an integrated design approach
a sustainable campus network. This requires that
with whole-systems life cycle evaluations. Equipment
the designer pay particular attention to existing
selection must be coupled to operational performance
site infrastructure such as utilities, roadways, and
requirements to minimize building energy loads.
pedestrian paths. In addition, both the University and
Building projects should integrate innovative design
the designer must test appropriate capacity of the site
and engineering solutions at project inception, so that
to ensure that introducing a new infill project does not
the design supports energy conservation initiatives
create a burden to the surrounding area.
outlined in the University’s energy master plan.
Energy
The aesthetics of sustainable buildings are different
Renovations and new construction projects shall be
from traditional campus buildings. Likewise, the
design to reduce the energy consumption of buildings
user’s interaction with these buildings will also
and their mechanical, electrical, and plumbing
change. This new, evolving design language is one
systems (HVAC, hot water, bathroom fixtures, and
that the University embraces in support of its climate
lighting) by using appropriate high efficiency and
commitment.
energy conserving equipment with digital monitoring
systems. As well, designers shall integrate fresh air
ventilation, natural daylighting, and passive solar
design into building projects. The University will
evaluate the use of new technologies as they become
available and affordable.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Light shelf on the School of Dentistry
Sunshade at the Sidwell Friends School in Washington, DC
Sunshade at Messiah College in Grantham, Pennsylvania
Solar panels at Emory University
15
Ecology and Hydrology
Even in a dense urban area, a university campus
functions as a dynamic natural space that plays host
to smaller eco-systems while also connecting to the
wider ecology of the region around it. As such, UMB
will act within its power to honor and connect habitat
and stream corridors within the Patapsco River basin,
which drains into the Chesapeake Bay.
The streams that run through the campus are below
ground; however, new projects shall be sensitive
to the ways in which stormwater run-off affects
those downstream. The University will strive to
Stormwater inlet collects, filters, and detains run-off, Portland,
OR
act responsibly to protect this shared resource.
Building and landscape design must actively address
stormwater management issues of both quantity and
quality of runoff. As well, UMB will reduce potable
water demand through conservation, reuse, and
recycling. New building projects shall meet or exceed
City requirements.
By connecting the campus’s open spaces into a
network of green around the campus (“rings of
green”), the University will create small-scale wildlife
refuges for songbirds and beneficial insects on its
grounds. In a highly urbanized area, this becomes
an important function. The University will encourage
campus connections to the larger region through
support of greenways, fitness walks, bicycling trails,
building courtyards, and rooftop gardens.
16
Native grasses at the School of Dentistry require less
maintenance and improve stormwater collection on site.
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
OPEN SPACE PLAN
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
0
100
200
400
u
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As the University develops its physical grounds, it
will ensure that the massing of new buildings allows
daylight to reach active outdoor spaces. As well, new
landscaping projects on campus shall utilize a palette
of native species that reduce the need for irrigation,
chemical treatments, and general maintenance. By
planting streetscape trees, the University will support
the City’s commitment to reforestation. It is the
University’s intent to create healthy and ecologically
appropriate open spaces, provide pleasant outdoor
environments, and minimize stormwater runoff within
its campus.
The School of Dentistry walkway softens the building facade,
provides color, and is beneficial to birds and insects
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U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Sustainability Education
As a signatory of the ACUPUCC, the University will be
a leader in thought and cutting edge technologies that
address global climate change. New projects shall
be designed to encourage campus users to engage
in their surroundings. With proper design, features of
the physical campus will influence public education
and promote environmental sustainability. Featuring
elements of green infrastructure such as rain gardens,
cisterns, exposed stormwater runnels/channels, wind
turbines, roof gardens, pervious pavers, and solar
panels will stimulate curiosity and invite further
exploration of the campus.
“Green Streets” public education program in Portland, OR
Stormwater runnels in Vera Katz Park in Portland, OR
19
20
SECTION 4 / Site Development
21
SITE DEVELOPMENT
Campus organization
Architectural guidelines set the requirements for new
development and provide guidance on the shape
and location of campus buildings on available sites,
ensuring that a specific project will fit into the larger
whole of campus.This is a general level of architectural
control necessary to create a coherent campus
precinct while accommodating the programmatic
needs of the University.
Architectural styles range from Classical Revival
(Davidge Hall, 1812) to late nineteenth century
warehouse buildings, to contemporary high-rise
structures. Sense of place is dependent on architectural
character, which is derived from a broad set of
interrelated visual and spatial properties including
scale, rhythm, proportion, and texture that are both
respectful and contextual. The Guidelines that follow
provide basic principles in support of UMB’s existing
architectural character.
Classic Revival architecture of UMB’s Davidge Hall
22
The Southern Management Corporation Campus Center is of
a more modern style
Example of historic loft warehouse near UMB
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Buildings as Edge Definers
Campus buildings will front two types of spaces:
streets and open areas. In both situations, buildings
will form an edge that defines the space it abuts. On
the UMB campus, buildings most frequently define the
street edge. Each new building should contribute to
the aesthetic of the site and improve adjacent streets
and pedestrian walks. Use of the campus palette for
building and landscape materials, walkways, lighting,
signage, and street furniture will create an active
streetscape adjacent to the new building. In addition,
new buildings should reinforce connections within the
campus and provide enhanced entries, courtyards,
The Lexington Street Administrative Building creates a strong
edge along both Lexington and Pearl Streets; it is also an
example of a well-designed vertical setback.
and landscaped open space when appropriate for the
specific site.
Build-to Lines
New construction will extend to eighty percent of the
property line, with the exception of at-grade setbacks
recommended within this document. A floor-to-area
ratio of eight is appropriate for campus buildings.
Build-to lines may be relaxed to allow for small
courtyards, parks, and other open spaces that connect
to a larger network of green spaces around campus.
These spaces shall be anchored to building uses to
ensure their care, maintenance, and security.
23
Setbacks
There are two recommended setback types: at-grade
The existing City of Baltimore zoning permits a
and elevated. At-grade setbacks balance a strong street
Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of eight times the parcel area.
edge with the need for enhanced campus identity and
Historically, the University’s buildings have either
green space “relief” in an urban environment. The
met this requirement, or been constructed smaller
elevated setback requirement occurs in the central area
than allowed depending on the site and contextual
of campus where building heights of 80 feet and higher
conditions. New construction shall respect the scale of
are permitted. A minimum 15-foot setback above 65
its context, assess the site parameters, and satisfy the
feet in this zone is required. Elevated setbacks are also
requirements of the program. In addition, site density
required when a building, regardless of its height, is
shall reinforce a collegiate, pedestrian-friendly, and
adjacent to a residential neighborhood. Section 6.0 of
welcoming environment.
these guidelines provides the recommended building
setbacks on new construction projects.
MIN
Acceptable vertical setback ranges
24
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
Example of at-grade setback in front of the Southern
Management Corporation Campus Center
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Example of at-grade setback in front of the School of Law
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Building Height
Proposed building heights (distance from grade to
Each new building project is required to have a solar
cornice line) will fall into three general ranges:
study performed to assess and recognize the impact of
• 15 to 40 feet: This range is generally adjacent to
height and mass (as cast by its shadows) on adjacent
existing residential neighborhoods, including
buildings and open space. New buildings shall be
Ridgely’s Delight, Pascault Row, and residences
designed to allow as much daylight as possible to
west of MLK Boulevard. Building scale in these
penetrate the campus and minimize casting shadows
areas shall be smaller to fit appropriately within
on open spaces, important walkways, and neighboring
the context of the neighborhood.
buildings.
• 40 to 80 feet: The predominant building height
in this area ranges between 60 and 75 feet. New
construction adjacent to buildings in this range
shall be responsive to their scale.
• Above 80 feet: This is the most intensely developed
area of the campus and will continue to be so in
the future. A 15-foot setback shall be created above
65 feet to reduce the building’s scale and allow
natural light to reach adjacent open spaces.
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U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
HOWARD STREET
EUTAW STREET
PACA STREET
GREENE STREET
SARATOGA STREET
LEXINGTON STREET
FAYETTE STREET
BALTIMORE STREET
LOMBARD STREET
PRATT STREET
WASHINGTON BOULEVARD
KB
ML
OU
D
AR
LEV
BUILDING HEIGHTS
15 - 40 FT
0
100
200
400
u
80 + FT
40 - 80 FT
27
Access and Service
Building access needs to accommodate pedestrians,
The design of new projects must address the safety
vehicular drop-off, emergency vehicles, and service
of individuals by providing appropriate lighting levels
functions. In general, pedestrian and vehicular
around buildings and on campus grounds. Excessive
drop-off should have access through major building
light levels create contrast and shadows that should
entrances located on primary streets or on campus
be avoided. Buildings shall have windows facing the
open spaces. Service access should be separate from
street. Plants and physical objects must be selected
the other uses. To the extent feasible, service access
and designed to remain low to allow for clear visibility.
shall be located on the system of alleys and minor
Façade designs at the street level shall avoid niches or
roads serving the secondary facades of buildings so
places of concealment.
that their visibility from public areas is minimized.
Emergency access should be well marked and
obstacle free.
Security
The University is concerned with the security of its
students, faculty, staff, and visitors, and the security
of its buildings and the research contained within.
Building security shall be addressed at the inception
of each project with Public Safety and Facilities
Management. Specific opportunities and constraints
shall be identified for each site to ensure that the
building design is safe and secure. Street furnishings
may be used as a form of security at building
perimeters when appropriate.
28
The area in front of the University’s Campus Center feels safe
due to an abundance of lighting, windows that provide views
of street activity, well-maintained landscaping, and people
using the space.
SECTION 5 / Architectural Guidelines
29
ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES
Building Typology
Building Forms
Campuses are collections of buildings with similar
In cities, buildings tend to be tall, large in footprint,
programs representing academic, research, medical,
and large in scale. On the UMB campus, scale shall be
and support uses. These programs influence a
controlled to minimize the potentially overwhelming
building’s size and location on campus. Groupings of
appearance of buildings from the street or adjacent
similar uses occur because of a desire to maximize
open
functional
similar
buildings that function as singular object buildings
typologies. Buildings shall be designed to portray the
and do not relate to the urban fabric or characteristics
programs contained within through characteristics
of the campus. Designers shall also consider arranging
embodied in the building envelope, mass, and
a façade into three major vertical elements to create a
detailing. For example, laboratory buildings may be
tripartite that is comprehensible to the human scale.
adjacencies
and
congregate
spaces.
Designers
shall
avoid
extruding
characterized as having a low surface to glass ratio,
tall floor-to-floor heights to accommodate interstitial
Base
utility distribution, and roof treatments to conceal
Selection of materials for the base of buildings depends
fume hood exhaust stacks. Conversely, residence
on the following criteria: durability, maintenance,
halls might have higher surface to glass ratios, lower
and graffiti-resistance. It is preferable that buildings
floor-to-floor heights, with simple and efficient façade
fronting the principal streets and pedestrian spines
and roof details. The incorporation of sustainable
have stone bases in order to distinguish it at street
design practices, including the beneficial increased
level. The stone shall be light in color and relate to
use of glazing for natural daylight, may affect those
the limestone used on other campus buildings. Brick
traditional characteristics.
is also an acceptable material for the base portion of
buildings when detailed to differentiate it from the
upper levels.
30
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Middle
Top
The primary material of the walls above the base
Buildings in the above 80 feet zone shall employ
shall consist of standard-size indigenous red/pink
material changes to produce a landmark silhouette and
brick, traditionally associated with the architecture
varied skyline at the center of the campus. Buildings
on the UMB campus. Varying brick sizes may be used
outside the above 80 feet zone shall incorporate
for decorative purposes and/or on secondary walls
rooflines that are contextual to the identity of the
internal to the site. Stone is also an acceptable wall
campus. The top of the building shall be composed of
material if the significance of the building and the
materials and form as to be clearly discernible from
budget allow its use. Designers shall consider the
the middle section.
compatibility of brick and stone colors of adjacent
buildings during the design of the new facility. This
should not, however, discourage visual richness on the
campus. Window frames and mullions, sunscreens,
reflectors, shading devices, metal panels, and railings
may be used to introduce color into building facades
when appropriate. Larger expanses of glass and
variations in materials will be reviewed on a projectby-project basis, when alternative materials enhance
the performance of a sustainable, energy efficient
building.
School of Medicine
31
Roofs for low buildings function as a fifth façade. In
these instances, rooftop terraces or other designed
roofscape
elements
are
desirable.
Sustainable
green roofs, where used, shall be integrated into
the stormwater management systems of buildings.
Materials and paint colors shall be specified which
reflect the light and heat from the sun; however,
materials should not produce a glare toward adjacent
building occupants. Metal on roofs shall be painted,
when appropriate. Unless aesthetically designed to
be visible, mechanical equipment shall be screened.
As the University pursues campus-wide sustainability
efforts such as LEED certification and enhanced
building performance, both the function and look of
its buildings will change. UMB is an urban campus
that consists of a range of building styles. With
proper design, many building functions – stormwater
treatment, solar collection, etc. – will serve a dual
purpose of enhancing a building’s performance and
its visual appeal.
Fenestration
The placement and size of the fenestration for a
facade generates hierarchical patterns and rhythms
that are visually stimulating and contribute to the
overall building aesthetic. Openings (doors, windows,
and loggia) reduce the perceived scale of a building
by dividing continuous wall surfaces into smaller,
more comprehensible parts. The Guidelines limit
large expanses of solid wall surface or continuous
glass curtain walls. When such a condition does occur,
Across campus, roof styles span a century’s worth of
architectural styles.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
walls shall be carefully detailed and articulated. The
use of tinted or reflective glass is not allowed; fretted
glass for sun control is permissible.
Windows
Window openings shall be vertically oriented (or
articulated as such by use of frames and mullions),
and generally consist of masonry or stone heads and
sills where appropriate. Ample fenestration at the
base of a building will maximize visual connections
between the ground level of the building and the
adjoining open space. Double-skin glazing and other
innovative window wall systems shall be considered if
they enhance the energy performance of the building.
Academic activities within the building shall be visible
from the exterior whenever possible to enhance the
streetscape of the campus and promote security.
Examples of campus window fenestration; styles range from
traditional to modern
33
Examples of building entries
Entries
Articulation of the main public entry of the building is
Entrances shall be visible to visitors and contribute
crucial for promoting clear visual and intuitive access
to the life and activity of the streets and walks
to campus buildings. Architectural elements that instill
surrounding the building. These spaces shall be
a sense of hierarchical importance will enhance the
designed to encourage interaction as meeting and
primary entry of buildings. Canopies, loggias, change
gathering places. Well lit and glass entries provide
in vertical plane, change in grade, change in material,
unobstructed site lines to the sidewalk and enhance
and placement of signage highlight and distinguish a
campus security. Building vestibules, as weather
building’s entry.
breaks, prevent heat loss and gain and minimize
drafts to the interior spaces of the building.
All building entries shall provide a transitional
space between the public street and private building
environments.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Predominant Materials
The University has an established palette of materials,
consisting of brick, stone, and glass. By respecting this
palette, new building designs will foster a sense of
architectural continuity with existing buildings. Other
approved materials may be employed to highlight
particular features of the façade, and the University
encourages designers to use these accent materials
in a way that explores and expands upon the basic
vocabulary of the brick campus building. The interplay
of materials and textures with the traditional building
palette respects the campus’ historic building styles
while creating a modern aesthetic.
Examples of the materials found in UMB’s material palette
35
36
SECTION 6 / Precinct Studies
37
PRECINCT STUDIES
The Guidelines divide the campus into seven
precinct areas of study based on locations where the
University expects new construction in the next five to
twenty years (as outlined by the 2010 Facilities Master
Plan Update). The following section makes specific
recommendations for building height and mass, setbacks and build-to lines, site open spaces, primary
entrances and service access within each precinct.
The precinct areas include surrounding buildings, not
just the parcel targeted for development, so that the
area is seen in context.
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U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
HOWARD STREET
FAYETTE STREET
EUTAW STREET
B
SARATOGA STREET
LEXINGTON STREET
URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PACA STREET
GREENE STREET
A
/
C
D
G
BALTIMORE STREET
F
LOMBARD STREET
E
PRATT STREET
WASHINGTON BOULEVARD
KB
ML
OU
D
AR
LEV
CAMPUS PRECINCTS
0
100
200
400
u
39
Precinct A
Height and Massing
Orientation
This precinct accommodates three new buildings on
Building 1 will have a strong southern orientation
infill sites. Key to site development is recognition that
to respond to the existing north-south pedestrian
two of these buildings will be on gateway sites and
corridor on Pine Street. This long view corridor and
highly visible from adjacent arterial streets. Building
building façade will be visible from the School of
footprints will be large to capitalize on the available
Medicine four blocks to the south. Also, as a primary
area of each site. The building heights will respond
gateway building to the campus from the north
to the northern edge location of the campus and
and MLK Boulevard, the building will have a strong
be sized to complement adjoining structures and
orientation to the northwest and southwest.
neighborhoods.
Construction of Building 2 will require demolition
Building 1. This building is proposed to be six stories,
of the existing warehouse building. The primary
with a 42,000 GSF footprint. It will provide 252,000
orientation will be to the west to reinforce the strong
GSF of total space. Massing will provide strong
pedestrian corridor on Pine Street. A secondary
frontage on both MLK Boulevard and Saratoga Street.
facade will face north and reinforce the development
of the Saratoga Street corridor as a primary east –
Building 2. While not as prominent and smaller in
west arterial corridor.
area, this location is still a very visible site adjacent to
the northern gateway into the campus. The building
Building 3 will be oriented to the south with a strong
is proposed to be four stories, with a 16,200 GSF
façade composition that compliments the adjacent
footprint, providing 64,800 GSF of space. Massing will
residential scale buildings comprised of Pascault
provide strong “edge defining” facades on Saratoga
Row, Hope Lodge, and the Ronald McDonald House.
and Pine Streets.
Building Access and Transportation Network
Building 3. This infill site will play an important role
The primary entrance to Building 1 will face Saratoga
in scaling down the adjacent large parking garages to
Street, on axis with the Pine street corridor. Its service
the smaller residential buildings nearby. The building
access will be from the north, off West Mulberry Street.
is proposed to be six stories, with a 17,000 GSF
Building 2 will have its main entry from Pine Street.
footprint providing 102,000 GSF of space.
Its service will be from Saratoga Street. Building 3
will have its main entry facing Lexington Street, with
service access from the north alley.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PRECINCT A
SOCIAL SECURITY
ADMINISTRATION
BUILDING 4
SARATOGA BUILDING
BUILDING 1
T
EE
A
G
TO
RA
R
ST
BUILDING 2
BUILDING 3
SA
MA
RT
IN
LEXINGTON
GARAGE
LU
STUDENT
CENTER
TH
ER
PIN
KIN
ES
GB
LV
D
TR
EE
T
POLICE
ON
ET
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GT
N
XI
MASSING
Massing diagram of proposed construction within Precinct A (brick-colored buildings represent new construction).
u
LE
This area is served by existing parking in the adjacent
Saratoga and Lexington Street Garages. Future
parking will be available when the Social Security
Administration building is acquired.The proposed Red
Line under MLK Boulevard will provide convenient
mass transit capabilities adjacent to these sites in the
future.
41
PRECINCT A
Open Space
The open space in this area will serve a variety
of important functions. The east side of the MLK
Boulevard and Saratoga Street intersection will be an
architectural gateway to campus.The siting of Building
BUILDING 1
1 will provide for an entry courtyard on the southwest
corner of the building to signify the importance of
both the campus gateway and main entrance to the
building. A landscaped auto court will anchor the
east side of the building and provide a welcoming
BUILDING 2
vehicular arrival sequence. Building 2 will receive
the standard University streetscape treatments on
the north and west facades to support the existing
pedestrian corridor on Pine Street. Building 3 will
BUILDING 3
have a landscaped courtyard on the south façade
BUILDING ENTRANCES
Blue circles indicate primary entrances, and yellow
circles indicate service access
42
to embrace the residential character of the site and
provide a place for socialization, relaxation, and
recreation.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PRECINCT A
BUILDING 1
BUILDING 3
BUILDING 3
BUILDING 2
BUILDING 2
BUILDING 1
LANDSCAPE
BUILDING FRONTAGE
Proposed open spaces
Frontage and setback recommendations
43
Precinct B
Height and Massing
Building 5 will have two facades with similar functional
This precinct will accommodate two large, new
orientations to the adjacent public streets on the
buildings. Existing structures on both sites will need to
north and east sides. The west façade is intended to
be demolished in preparation for construction. These
be more service oriented, while the south facade will
infill sites are intended to house future administrative
compliment the adjacent park.
and support unit functions on campus.
Building Access and Transportation Network
Building 4 is ten stories, with a footprint of 25,500 GSF,
The primary entry to Building 4 will be on the west
providing 255,000 GSF of total space. Massing and
façade. Service access is intended to be from the
height are intended to compliment the scale of the
north on Saratoga Street.
adjacent Saratoga Street Garage and Office Building
and the Social Security Administration building.
Building 5 will have its primary entrance on the south
façade. Service access will be from Saratoga Street.
Building 5 is six stories, with a 40,000 GSF footprint,
providing 240,000 GSF of space, coupled to a smaller
This area is served by existing parking in the Univer-
wing of three stories with a 2,200 GSF footprint
sity’s adjacent Saratoga, Lexington, and Pearl Street
providing 6,600 GSF. The total is 246,000 GSF. This very
Garages, and the privately operated Lexington Mar-
large building is intended to match the scale of the
ket West garage. In addition, convenient bus stops are
surrounding buildings, and will need to be carefully
located nearby on Green Street and Saratoga Street.
articulated to minimize its perceived size.
Orientation
Building 4 will have four facades that address different
conditions. The west façade will relate to Saratoga
Towers, its parkers, and the pedestrians using the
north-south Pearl Street corridor. The north façade will
front Saratoga Street, and the south façade will face
a landscaped courtyard. The east façade will support
more service oriented functions.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PRECINCT B
SARATOGA BUILDING
BUILDING 3
BUILDING 4
SA
RA
TO
GA
LEXINGTON
BUILDING
LE
XIN
GT
ON
ST
ST
RE
ET
BUILDING 5
RE
ET
ET
RE
N
EE
GR
T
ES
Massing of proposed construction within Precinct B (brick-colored buildings represent new construction).
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MASSING
45
PRECINCT B
BUILDING 4
BUILDING 4
BUILDING 5
BUILDING 5
BUILDING ENTRANCES
BUILDING FRONTAGE
Blue circles indicate primary entrances, and yellow circles
indicate service access
Frontage and setback recommendations
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PRECINCT B
Open Space
The park north of the 620 Lexington Building and the
setting that surrounds the existing Post Office to the
south provide open space in this precinct.The standard
University streetscape treatments will be installed
on the perimeters of the new buildings. Additional
landscape and plaza treatments will highlight building
BUILDING 4
entries.
BUILDING 5
LANDSCAPE
Proposed open spaces
47
Precinct C
This precinct is dominated today by the existing
Building 7 will be primarily oriented to the south as
Walter P. Carter Center building and the adjacent
an edge defining building on Fayette Street. The east
School of Pharmacy Learning Center. These buildings
and west facades will have strong relationships with
will be demolished when they reach the end of their
the facing buildings as they create urban courtyards
useful lives, creating three additional building sites.
within the spaces between the buildings. This building
will be setback on the north to provide visual and
Height and Massing
physical relief from the adjacent historic residential
Building 6 will be an “edge definer” that facilitates
buildings.
the transition in scale between the large buildings on
campus and the residential scale neighborhood on
Building 8 will also be oriented to face Fayette Street,
the west side of MLK Boulevard. This building will be
with a complimentary façade addressing Arch Street
four stories, with a 17,700 GSF footprint, and provide
as an important north-south pedestrian corridor. Its
70,800 GSF of total space.
west face will help define a landscaped courtyard
framed by Building 7.
Building 7 will be eight stories, with a 18,800 GSF
footprint, providing 150,400 GSF of space. The scale
Building Access and Transportation Network
of this building is intended to step down the taller
The primary entry to Building 6 will be from Pine
buildings to the south, as one moves from a south
Street near the intersection with Fayette Street.
to north direction into the Lexington Street residential
Because of the building’s length, service entrances
neighborhood.
would be located further north on Pine Street.
Building 8 will ten stories, with a 21,200 GSF footprint,
The main entrance to Building 7 will be located on
providing 212,000 GSF of space. This building is sized
axis to the landscaped courtyard to the south, and
by its proximity to the center of campus and the
face Fayette Street. Service access will be from the
relative size of the adjacent buildings.
north, from an interior vehicular court.
Orientation
Building 8 will have its main entrance on Fayette
Building 6 provides an excellent opportunity as a
Street. Service access will be from the northwest,
campus edge building to enliven MLK Boulevard with
from an interior vehicular court.
a long façade of windows facing west, balanced with
a pedestrian friendly façade on the east that activate
the Pine Street corridor.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PRECINCT C
ET
RE
O
GT
IN
LEX
BUILDING 8
OW
R
LT
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CA
S
PA
T
NS
BUILDING 7
DENTAL SCHOOL
BUILDING 9
M
TI
AR
BUILDING 6
N
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T
ER
TH
E
FAY
T
EE
TR
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TE
NG
KI
VD
BL
PHARMACY HALL
MASSING
Massing of proposed construction within Precinct C (brick-colored buildings represent new construction).
u
This area is served by the existing parking in the Pearl
Street Garage and convenient bus stops on Fayette
Street. The proposed Red Line under MLK Boulevard
will provide mass transit access to these sites in the
future.
49
BUILDING 7
BUILDING 8
BUILDING 6
PRECINCT C
BUILDING ENTRANCES
Dark blue circles indicate primary entrances; light blue indicate secondary entrances, and
yellow circles indicate service access
Open Space
Street to create more lawns and landscaping, and
The open space in this area will be an integral element
provide much needed massing relief in this dense
in supporting the “ring of green” concept established
area of the campus. A new courtyard will be created
in the 2002 Master Plan. In addition, the University’s
between Building 7 and 8 to provide a passive area for
standards for streetscape will be implemented
socialization and to provide a location for sustainable
around each of the proposed new buildings. The
initiatives. Landscaped areas to the north will provide
site for Building 7 presents an opportunity to create
buffers with tall tree canopies between these academic
larger courtyards to the south, east, and north. A
buildings and the adjacent residential buildings.
portion of the building will be setback from Fayette
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BUILDING 7
BUILDING 8
BUILDING 6
PRECINCT C
BUILDING FRONTAGE
BUILDING 7
BUILDING 8
BUILDING 6
Frontage and setback recommendations
LANDSCAPE
Proposed open spaces
51
Precinct D
This precinct today is the site of the former Hayden
Orientation
Harris Hall, and its central location ranks it as one
The prominence and size of the site allows Building 9
of the greatest opportunities for the University to
to be viewed from all four sides; however, its primary
institute a number of important urban planning
orientation will be to the south and west. Significant
paradigms. At the forefront is the ability to capitalize
setbacks will be created by landscaped courtyards on
on a central location situated prominently between
the south and west facades to reinforce the contextual
the Schools of Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Medicine.
setting and to strengthen the relationship with the
This site is strategic in reinforcing the relationships
adjacent Schools.
between these Schools, the pedestrian corridors
that knit the campus together, the open spaces that
Building Access and Transportation Network
support the ring of green, and the opportunities to
The primary building entrance will face West Baltimore
showcase sustainable practices on campus.
Street. Service access will be on the northeast corner
of the building.
Height and Massing
Building 9 will be ten stories, with a 31,500-GSF
The building will be served by existing parking in
footprint, that provides 315,000 GSF of space. The
the Pearl Street Garage and convenient bus stops on
scale of this building compliments the height of the
Fayette and West Baltimore Streets. The proposed Red
adjacent buildings and figures prominently as an
Line below MLK Boulevard will provide mass transit
iconic symbol for this area of campus. Because of its
access near the site in the future.
size, the height and mass will need to be responsive
to the site and surrounding buildings. Building
form, façade articulation, and horizontal and vertical
setbacks will all play a significant role in establishing
the right contextual fit within this campus setting.
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
PRECINCT D
BUILDING 7
BUILDING 9
DENTAL
SCHOOL
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
MEDICAL CENTER
EET
E STR
TT
FAYE
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
ET
TRE
ES
PIN
PHARMACY
HALL
EET
E STR
IMOR
BALT
HOWARD HALL
MASSING
Massing diagram of proposed construction within Precinct D (brick-colored buildings represent new construction).
u
53
PRECINCT D
BUILDING 9
BUILDING ENTRANCES
Dark blue circles indicate primary entrances; light blue indicate secondary entrances, and yellow circles indicate service access
Open Space
Large
landscaped
The open spaces are of the size and prominence
courtyards
will
signify
the
that they can also support honorific features to
importance of this building and contextual setting.
commemorate people or events. In addition, the
While the courtyards will be important amenities to
University’s sustainable practices could be evident in
the new building, they will also benefit the adjacent
this area as well.
Schools of Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Medicine. The
site holds the potential for a significant proportion of
trees, lawns, seat walls, formal and informal walks,
and a water feature. The building orientation will also
create a courtyard between Building 9 and the School
of Dentistry. This space by design will be quieter for
contemplation, reading, and socialization.
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PRECINCT D
BUILDING 9
BUILDING FRONTAGE
Frontage and setback recommendations
BUILDING 9
LANDSCAPE
Proposed open spaces
55
Precinct E
This precinct represents an important infill site on the
Open Space
south edge of the campus since it abuts Pratt Street,
Building 10 will have the University’s streetscape
one of the major access routes to downtown Baltimore
standards applied to the south and west facades.
Site preparation will require the State of Maryland
Forensic
Medicine
building
to
be
demolished.
Conceptually, this area is intended to act as a catalyst
for continued economic development along the Pratt
BUILDING 10
Street Corridor.
Height and Massing
Building 10 will be eight stories, with a footprint of
17,400 GSF, and provides 139,200 GSF of total space.
The tower will have a two story ancillary wing that
connects to and wraps the south face of the Pratt
Street Garage. The building tower will be separated
BUILDING ENTRANCES
Dark blue circles indicate primary entrances; light
blue indicate secondary entrances, and yellow circles
indicate service access
from the Pratt Street Garage to allow more daylight
to penetrate the site and to produce programmable
BUILDING 10
floor plates with greater flexibility. This approach will
eliminate vehicular access to the Pratt Street Garage
from the west side.
Orientation
Building 10 will face Pratt Street. The two-story
“wrapper” on the existing Pratt Street Garage will be
BUILDING FRONTAGE
Frontage and setback recommendations
a mixed-use development that produces and enlivens
street activity and supports the businesses on the
BUILDING 10
south side of Pratt Street.
Building Access and Transportation Network
The main building entrance will be on Penn Street.
Service access will be from the north, off Lemmon
Street.
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LANDSCAPE
Proposed open spaces
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PRECINCT E
RD
MBA
EET
STR
LO
SCHOOL OF NURSING
EMPLOYEE PARKING GARAGE
NN
PE
ET
RE
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BUILDING 10
ET
TRE
TT S
PRA
MASSING
Massing diagram of proposed construction within Precinct E (brick-colored buildings represent new construction).
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Precinct F
This precinct anchors the southeast corner of the
Building Access and Transportation Network
campus, and fills in the fourth corner of the Lombard
Building 11 will have its main entrance on Lombard
and Green Street intersection. This architectural
Street facing Davidge Hall. Service access will be
gateway is bounded by several of the most significant
from Paca Street through a service alley. Building 12
and frequently visited buildings on campus – Davidge
will have its main entrance on Greene Street. Service
Hall and the Health Sciences Library; along with the
access will be from the service alley to the south that
University of Maryland Medical Center.
adjoins Paca Street.
Height and Massing
The buildings will be served from the existing parking
Building 11 will be six stories, with a 33,600 GSF
garage beneath each building. In addition, convenient
footprint that provides 201,600 GSF of total space. The
bus stops are located nearby on both Lombard Street
mass will need to respond to contextual drivers that
and Pratt Street. The proposed Red Line will provide
dictate that this important corner “open up” to the
mass transit access in the future, including a below
surrounding buildings and the proposed courtyard
grade station stop under the Lombard and Green
on the site. Building 12 will be seven stories, with a
Street intersection.
22,800 GSF footprint that provides 159,600 GSF of
total space.
Orientation
Building 11 will perform multiple functions. The north
façade will face Davidge Hall and be set back from the
street. The east face will step back to allow for more
open space and to accommodate the entry/exit from
the garage below. As an “edge definer,” this building
will play an important role with a façade that faces
Pratt Street to the south and Green Street to the West.
Building 12 will also be an “edge definer” with
important facades on both Lombard Street and Paca
Street. Its west façade should complement the large
landscaped courtyard it faces.
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PRECINCT F
PACA-PRATT BUILDING
A
C
PA
STR
EET
BUILDING 12
S
NE
EE
LOM
BA
RD
AN
M
HU
S&
CE RY
N
IE A
SC BR
H S LI
T
AL CE
HE RVI
SE
E
TR
GR
ET
STR
EET
DAVIDGE HALL
MASSING
Massing of proposed construction within Precinct F (brick-colored buildings represent new construction).
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AG TER
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H
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SO RP.
CO
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BUILDING 11
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PRECINCT F
BUILDING 12
BUILDING 12
BUILDING 11
BUILDING 11
BUILDING ENTRANCES
BUILDING FRONTAGE
Dark blue circles indicate primary entrances and
yellow circles indicate service access
Frontage and setback recommendations
Open Space
This precinct area has the existing landscaping
surrounding Davidge Hall and the Health Sciences
Library, with pedestrian plazas and landscaped
planters marking the entries to the Medical Center
BUILDING 12
and the Library. A combination of formal and informal
landscaped spaces are intended to reinforce the
significance of the setting between the new buildings
and compliment the heritage and importance of the
BUILDING 11
existing campus. In addition, the size of the open
space will allow for special features to honor people,
events, and the University and also support of the
architectural gateway elements.
LANDSCAPE
Proposed open spaces
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URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Precinct G
This precinct will be the symbolic quad of campus.
The center of the park is challenged with providing
UMB’s School of Law, School of Social Work, and
a large area for gatherings such as commencement
UMMC currently face University Plaza. The Master
ceremonies and other special and seasonal events.
Plan preserves and improves this open space, with
In addition, the balance of lawns and trees will be
only limited development allowed that would support
supported with benches, pedestrian lighting, and
the functions programmed for the park.
other furnishings to encourage active and passive
uses within the space.
Height and Massing
Architectural
gateway
elements
will
mark
the
Building Access and Transportation Network
northeast and northwest corners of the park to
Vehicular egress and ingress and primary pedestrian
reinforce the identity of the University. At the
access to the below-grade University Plaza Garage
discretion of the University, small, one-story pavilions
will be from the west, off Green Street. Emergency
may be constructed to provide functional access to
egress stair towers from the garage will be integrated
the below-grade University Plaza Garage or support
into the landscape and plaza features. The edges of
programmed functions that would be appropriate for
the park will serve as paths to facilitate pedestrian
the park.
movement within the campus and surrounding
neighborhoods. Bus stops will be located nearby,
Orientation
but not on the edges of the park. The University Plaza
Unlike a building that presents multiple facades
Garage and the Grand Garage will accommodate
outward, the park is the space “in between” that is
parking for events.
framed by a grid of existing building edges. The
University Plaza has four sides, each serving a slightly
different purpose. The north edge faces Baltimore
Street and the School of Law and needs to support
and address this busy pedestrian corridor. The east
edge faces commercial, mixed uses, and this edge
will respond to that context. The south edge supports
a constant stream of people and activity as it connects
many adjacent destinations. The west edge will have
a water feature that generates ambient noise to mask
the sounds of the city with more soothing sounds.
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PRECINCT G
Open Space
The nature of this precinct is open space, framed by
buildings. The University’s standard streetscape will
be installed around the perimeter of the park and
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
on both sides of each street where permitted. The
interior of the park will be a combination of lawns,
trees, walks, plazas, and a major water feature. These
elements will be embellished with a variety of site
furnishings to support the programmed uses within
Below ground parking access
the park. Sculpture and other intriguing features will
be encouraged to enliven the space and make it a
popular destination within the University and the City.
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
Proposed open spaces
62
SECTION 7 / Landscape Guidelines
63
LANDSCAPE GUIDELINES
Campus Portals
The boundaries of UMB’s campus are dynamic and
structures will remain as valuable place-makers,
will expand and adjust over time. However, certain
marking history. Additional portals may be identified
locations noted in the 2010 Facilities Master Plan
in the future, requiring similar enhancements.
Update currently function as portals, or entry points,
to the campus, and the University will distinguish
Opportunities for architecturally significant portals
these places as formalized gateways. Three categories
have been identified at the following intersections:
establish a hierarchy for these portals, signifying their
West Baltimore Street and MLK Boulevard
relative importance.
Greene and Lombard Street
Architectural Portals
Paca and West Baltimore Street
By marking campus entry points with a physical
Greene and West Baltimore Street
structure, the University reinforces its identity. This
Saratoga and MLK Boulevard
place-making strategy elevates the importance of the
University within the City, enhances the memorable
(See diagram on opposite page)
aspects of the campus, and facilitates wayfinding for
visitors. If the campus expands in the future, these
A physical, monumental architectural structure, such as a wall, arch, pylon, or a combination
Architectural
that will serve to identify a significant entry point or place on campus. The height and mass of
these elements will be larger or more ornate than similar elements placed at secondary portals
and other locations on campus.
Secondary
Minor
64
Piers, seat walls, fencing, wayfinding signage, maps, and kiosks placed at intersections and
locations where there are moderate pedestrian and vehicular traffic volumes.
Upgrades in landscaping, inclusion of banners, or other changes in streetscaping to mark
informal, minor portals to campus.
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HOWARD STREET
EUTAW STREET
PACA STREET
GREENE STREET
SARATOGA STREET
LEXINGTON STREET
FAYETTE STREET
BALTIMORE STREET
LOMBARD STREET
PRATT STREET
WASHINGTON BOULEVARD
KB
ML
OU
D
AR
LEV
CAMPUS PORTALS
0
100
200
400
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Examples of architectural portal elements from the
UMB campus
Architectural portals shall consist primarily of natural
The character of the street will dictate qualities of the
stone, brick, and precast stone. Accent materials
portal’s design, including scale, street presence, and
should echo materials used elsewhere on campus.
materials. In all cases, the scale of the portal shall
Black metalwork used in existing campus walls and
reinforce the pedestrian experience of place. Portal
fencing is one example of an appropriate material to
design may include special lighting features as a way
incorporate into the design. Portals across campus
to identify the campus and provide improved safety
will not be identical in design but will reflect variations
and security to edge conditions of the campus. Entry
upon a theme to provide continuity and visual interest.
and arrival to campus will be a layered experience,
between the University, the Biopark, and the
University of Maryland Medical Center. Coordination
between these entities is encouraged.
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Examples show appropriate scale for secondary portals; all new signage shall conform current University signage plan
Secondary Portals
Secondary portals will combine a number of elements
such as seat walls, piers, fencing and signage but at
a scale that is less monumental than architectural
gateways.
In
comprehensive
2002,
the
Signage
University
Plan
for
adopted
campus
a
that
provided standards for signage, lighting, banners,
and wayfinding tools. Standards specified by this
document shall be used in the design of all campus
portals. Should the University update this document,
it is expected that the new standards will be employed
at portal sites.
Example of existing secondary portal elements
67
Campus Streets
Minor Portals
“Sidewalk contacts are the small change from which a
The Designer shall create additional informal gateways
city’s wealth of public life may grow.”
to campus through the use of unified sidewalk pavers,
Jane Jacobs
clear building signage and landscaping, and standard
streetlights and benches.. By creating a visually
Existing Conditions
unified edge to the campus through consistent use
University campuses are special places, often shaped
of landscaping and streetscaping, visitors will know
by the spaces between buildings. The spaces between
when they have entered the University’s precinct.
the buildings on the UMB campus primarily consist
At these minor portals, literal gateways are less
of public rights-of-way (i.e. streets). Therefore, the
important than perceived ones.
condition and quality of the street is tantamount to
the condition and quality of the campus itself. The
attention and care that might ordinarily go into the
maintenance of a quad on another campus is, on
the UMB campus, best directed at its streetscapes.
Future designs shall continue with the University’s
established brick paving system, streetlight fixtures,
and amenities package (bollards, trash cans, seating,
etc.). However, certain streetscape conditions shall be
improved.
The UMB campus is dominated by public streets. With
so much of the campus precinct devoted to spaces for
vehicles, it is difficult for the University to establish
Minor portal achieved through landscaping, banners, and
consistent streetscape elements
its presence as a campus intended for people. For
this reason the University re-assessed its current
transportation and roadway conditions as part of the
Master Plan Update.
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Proposed improvements
Proposed streetscape typologies and street sections
The University has long considered a plan that would
Both the 1991 and 2002 Facilities Master Plans include
convert one-way streets through campus into two-way
guidelines pertaining to the treatment of streetscapes
streets to slow traffic and make pedestrian crossings
on the campus. They focus primarily on mid-block
easier. To this end, transportation engineers studied
conditions and include recommended paving types
this concept during the 2010 Facilities Master Plan
and patterns, street furniture (including lighting), and
Update. The study concluded that simply improving
street tree plantings. These Guidelines elaborate on
the one-way street system would provide greater
these urban design recommendations, with additional
advantage and safety to pedestrians.
attention paid to the conditions that exist at street
intersections.
The transportation engineers recommended that the
University construct curb bump-outs at intersections
Campus street intersections are places of heightened
and building entrances. Doing so narrows traffic
activity and interest, where the UMB community
from four lanes to two through most of the campus
and Baltimore residents most frequently interact.
and creates additional “real estate” reclaimed by
Intersections are also areas of pedestrian-vehicular
eliminating the outer two lanes of the road. This space
conflict, and they represent a special design challenge.
may be used as planting areas for trees and flowers,
These
stormwater collection areas, or on-street parking that
develop greater consistency between the campus’
will buffer pedestrians from traffic. These changes,
intersections. Projects should also extend the well-
if approved by the City, will drastically change the
established consistency of mid-block conditions into
look and feel of the campus. The UMB identity will
the intersections.
guidelines
recommend
that
designers
be better displayed, and the bump-outs will allow for
a better-connected network of pedestrian circulation
and green spaces.
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Typical sidewalk paving types and patterns
SIDEWALK DETAILS
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Standard Campus Sidewalks
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Sidewalks w/ curb moved outward for planting buffer
SIDEWALK DETAILS
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0 1’ 2’
4’
“Carpet” at building entrance with bump-out
PAVING PLAN
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Sections showing options for planted buffer
PLANTER DETAIL
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Typical corner at minor intersection
Typical corner at larger intersection with bumpouts
PAVING PLAN
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PENN STREET
W. LOMBARD STREET
Intersection at Lombard and Penn
PAVING PLAN
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N. PINE STREET
W. LEXINGTON
Intersection at Pine and Lexington
PAVING PLAN
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N. GREENE STREET
W. BALTIMORE STREET
Intersection at Baltimore and Greene
PAVING PLAN
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M AR
TIN
LUT
HER
KING
BLVD
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Intersection at MLK and Baltimore
PAVING PLAN
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HOWARD STREET
EUTAW STREET
PACA STREET
GREENE STREET
SARATOGA STREET
LEXINGTON STREET
FAYETTE STREET
LOMBARD STREET
PRATT STREET
WASHINGTON BOULEVARD
KB
ML
OU
D
AR
LEV
The University and the BioPark will improve landscaping on Martin Luther King,
Boulevard, and Freemont Park, greatly expanding the University’s open space network.
0
OPEN SPACE PLAN
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100
200
400
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Landscape and Open Space Design
Philosophy
Open Space Typologies
In an urban downtown location, real estate is at a
The landscape open spaces at the UMB campus
premium. Land values require maximum develop-
generally fall into one of several categories:
ment within the building site footprint, leaving little
landscaped open space for general, public use. How-
GREENS AND LAWNS
ever, the University is not a typical real estate land-
Healthy places to live, work, and study have ample
holder. Connected, organized open spaces on the
access to greens and outdoor spaces. One particularly
UMB campus will reinforce campus identity, activate
effective type of landscape for accommodating these
streetscapes, and soften the harshness of the urban
activities is the “Green.” This landscape is essentially a
environment. Since 2001, UMB has begun strategical-
flat, open lawn area, sometimes framed by a planting
ly “collecting” open spaces in order to create a ring of
of trees to provide shaded seating. Public greens
green around the campus. This concept reinforces the
will be within a short, five-minute walk from offices;
University’s identity, visually reminding the campus
otherwise, the distance will overwhelm the need.
community and visitors that UMB is a unified campus.
Greens will help cool surrounding temperatures
and reduce the heat island effect, making campus a
Moving forward, the 2010 Facilities Master Plan
more enjoyable place to be. Using native grasses and
Update proposes not a single ring of green, but
plantings will minimize the irrigation requirements of
several connected “rings.” This concept serves to tie
greens.
each of the seven schools of the University together,
giving each a common open space to share. The
rings of green will be created by strengthening and
visually connecting already existing green spaces on
campus and by implementing the proposed campus
streetscape.
Open space at the School of Nursing and
Campus Center
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POCKET PARKS AND ACCESSORY LANDSCAPES
At UMB, remnant or “left over” areas between
buildings are too valuable to remain undeveloped.
The design of new projects should thoughtfully
address these spaces so that they integrate into the
campus open space network and serve the needs of
the University community. Landscape enhancements
will transform such locations into valuable assets, as
has been down in front of the Heath Sciences Facility
and the School of Nursing. Wherever their location
on campus, these remnant spaces shall be open and
inviting to the University community, yet also shield
and protect from the noise and traffic of surrounding
public streets.This balance of openness and protection
must be determined on a site-specific basis using
existing buildings, carefully sited new structures, site
masonry and fencing, and site furniture and plantings.
Examples of “pocket parks” tucked between buildings on
campus
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COURTYARDS
A final type of open space on the UMB campus is
the Courtyard. Courtyards, when designed correctly,
create welcoming, well-used spaces associated with
a specific school or building. To the extent possible,
courtyards shall be designed to connect into the rings
of green to provide benefit to the overall campus open
space network. To be successful, courtyards need to
have exposure to sunlight and a view or opening into
a larger space. Natural connections to other spaces
and integration into primary pedestrian paths will
draw people into the space, thereby activating it. The
Law School courtyard represents a very successful
example of this type of landscape.
Since opening, the School of Nursing courtyard has become a
popular location on warm days. The opening of the University
Campus Center further enhances this area of campus.
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Principles
Principles to ensure optimal use and quality of open spaces:
OPEN SPACE HIERARCHY
Open spaces must relate in a hierarchical manner.
They have greater meaning when integrated with
one another through a progression of scale. Small
courtyards and spaces shall be designed to connect
to one another in an intentional manner within the
rings of green.
CONTEXTUAL DESIGN
The design of open spaces shall be sensitive to the
context of surrounding buildings, expressed through
the selection of materials. Context will also influence
scale and proportions of the designed landscapes.
SOUTH FACING OUTDOOR SPACES
Whenever possible, buildings shall be placed to the
north side of sites to preserve the sunny areas to
the south for outdoor uses (trees will be required to
provide select areas of shade for days of extreme
heat). Designers for particular parcels shall perform
sun and shade studies, ensuring that the deep shade
Baltimore City public park featuring water elements
of buildings does prevent sun from reaching open
spaces.
element shall be part of the redesign of University
Plaza and other University spaces as appropriate.
URBAN WATER FEATURES
When possible, water features shall make use of
Water, when expressed in an articulated and defined
condensate from adjacent buildings, collected and
way, imbues a space with a refreshing sense of
stored in cisterns as a source of make-up water. Such
urbanity and civil generosity. On a practical level, the
collection systems are also appropriate for campus
sound of moving water neutralizes city noises. A water
irrigation purposes.
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BUILT ENVIRONMENT
The University’s Urban Design Guidelines specify
treatments for buildings, entrances, and street frontage
to ensure an inviting, pedestrian-oriented campus.
These same guidelines also improve the quality of the
campus open spaces by enabling active, lively areas
at the exteriors of buildings. Campus buildings must
have some degree of outward orientation. Buildings
shall have edges with depth to create pockets for the
placement of seats, benches, planters, flowers, etc.
Building entrances shall have space for those using
the building to sit, congregate, and socialize.
ENERGY-EFFICIENT DESIGN
The University landscape design shall serve the needs
of an energy-efficient, environmentally sustainable
campus. Plantings of trees or vines will shade the
southern or western facades of buildings. Trees shall
be planted sparingly on the north sides of buildings
to give building users access to natural light. Paving
materials within landscape areas shall be selected
to reduce heat-island effects, which will also reduce
Public park in front of Baltimore City Hall featuring
water elements
energy costs within adjacent buildings.
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
Stormwater
bio-filtration,
or
the
diverting
of
stormwater run-off flows to planted holding areas,
offers a simple and effective way to manage
stormwater in an environmentally sustainable way.
Planting areas shall be designed as bio-filtration areas
for stormwater run-off, cleaning water before surface
run-off is piped to the storm water system. Such areas
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thrive from the supplemental watering and become
Additional principles for planting design:
educational
• A subdued and consistent palette of plants shall be
demonstrations
for
the
University
used to reinforce the character and identity of the
community.
University
• Street trees shalll be scaled to mediate the height
PLANTING DESIGN
Planting design on campus shall allow for ease of
of buildings and the experience of pedestrians
maintenance and reinforcement of the collegiate
• Tree canopies shall be designed to form a green
setting. Urban-tolerant native species and adapted
non-invasive
exotics
shall
be
used
to
limit
maintenance and water consumption. Seasonal
fabric of healthy, vigorous trees
• Plantings shall reinforce the architecture of
buildings at entrances
plantings of annuals shall be limited to highly visible
locations such as building entrances, garden areas,
Urban Horticulture
and/or campus portals where they can be selectively
Within the UMB campus setting, strong urban
used to reinforce the identity of the University or of
horticulture practices are critical to the success of the
the individual school.
campus landscape. The following section provides
a condensed resource for urban horticulture. It sets
Water-efficient irrigation systems shall be included
appropriate standards for the design of planting areas
with future construction to protect plants and to limit
on future construction projects around campus.
hand-watering. Irrigation systems shall make use of
harvested (and filtered) stormwater from suitable
Planting in an Urban Environment
roof surfaces as well as harvested condensate
Urban
from building cooling systems. Where appropriate,
forethought, and a basic understanding of the unique
stormwater runoff shall be directed from paved areas
challenges faced by plants in the urban environment.
into planting beds as a natural water supply. (Note:
Some of these challenges include:
designs must avoid introducing salt-laden runoff from
• Higher temperatures during the day (Heat-Loading
heavily trafficked paved areas).
landscapes
require
thorough
planning,
on adjacent pavements)
• Higher temperatures during the night (Heat-Island
Effect)
• Higher wind velocity due to “tunneling effect” of
urban buildings
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• Poor soil nutrient quality
Good drainage is also essential for the health of all
• Poor drainage and carrying capacity
trees and plants. Most trees in urban environments will
• Homogenous soil structure
actually drown without special drainage provisions. An
• Higher pH, due to adjacent concrete run-of
interconnected 3-4 inch diameter perforated drainage
• Drought and/or lack of water access to roots
pipe tied to the storm drain system is recommended
• Poor aeration and gaseous exchange
for all street trees. This recommendation is essential
• Salt-spray and salt-laden run-off (De-icing
to protect the University’s investment in its trees.
compounds)
• Damage to limbs by passing trucks and buses on
Good drainage will also prevent excesses of salt from
building up near the tree roots.
the street
Poor drainage often results from soil compaction,
The designer shall investigate these site conditions
which has other negative consequences on plant health
and select proper plant materials and soil resources
such as reduced porosity, or micro-gaps between soil
accordingly.
particles. Porosity allows for the transmission of gasexchange (roots need to breathe) and the infiltration of
An urban horticultural “program” promotes and
water. Without adequate soil porosity, plant roots will
enforces consistent cultivation practices to overcome
suffocate. Compacted soils in existing tree pits around
the outlined challenges. Urban horticulture must meet
campus will be aerated or tilled as needed before new
the following conditions for plant health:
tree specimens are planted. With new construction,
root zones and planting areas must be protected from
Good Soil Characteristics
compaction during and after construction. Unsuitable
Trees require soils that have sufficient organic
materials shall be removed from tree pits and plant
material and nutrients for long-term growth and
beds following construction and replaced with good
health benefits. Urban soils are usually disturbed
planting medium.
soils, with low organic content and very poor nutrient
levels. Tree pits and planting strips need to be treated
Irrigation
like containerized planters. Existing soils may require
The use of native and adapted plantings will help
extensive modification and thorough amending with
reduce, but not eliminate, the need for irrigation
organic matter and fertilizers prior to tree planting.
water. The recommended species in the plant lists
In some instances, the designer will need to specify
below are generally drought tolerant, but for any of
the excavation of unsuitable materials from tree pits
these plants to flourish, proper irrigation systems are
before backfilling with topsoil.
required. In addition to nourishing the plant, irrigation
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Soils table
Sidewalk Tree Pits
systems help flush salts and other soil contaminants
Large areas of pavement, building foundations, and
from around the root system.
soil compaction on campus greatly limit the amount
of soil available for the mature growth of trees. The
Proper irrigation systems conserve water and reduce
soil volume chart below is included in the appendix,
operating
irrigation
which shows the minimum soil that is required to
system is the pressure compensating drip system
establish mature canopy trees. In order to provide a
manufactured by Netafim Corporation. This system
sufficient volume of un-compacted soils for tree roots,
only waters the tree well (or planter) and not the
these Guidelines recommend the use of Deep Root’s
surrounding pavement, thus conserving water. Water
Silva Cell system under sidewalks with street trees.
costs.
One
recommended
conservation shall also be achieved by harvesting and
reusing stormwater runoff from suitable roofs and
Silva Cells are modular, hollow blocks made of
condensate from building cooling systems.
fiberglass-reinforced polypropylene with galvanized
steel tubes. The combination of perforated plates and
rigid columns create soil vaults meeting any size or
configuration. These vaults also provide structural
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Silva Cell tree pit structure
Single Cell with Deck
support for sidewalk paving and take the load off soils
Future construction projects on campus shall integrate
immediately under the paving slab. This allows the
systems similar to the Silva Cell system into the
zone under sidewalks, adjacent to tree pits, to be filled
streetscape. In instances where the Silva Cell system
with planting soils, which have higher organic content
is not appropriate (e.g. areas with significant vehicular
and lower compaction rates. The Silva Cell system
loading), a system of reinforced concrete slabs and
also functions as part of a stormwater management
concrete piles should be designed to support the load
system by collecting, detaining, and treating runoff
of the vehicles. Reinforced concrete slabs should be
onsite. These tree pits will be designed with irrigation
cast-in-place above the piles as a base for high-traffic
and subsurface perforated drainage piping that
paving. On larger projects, the use of pre-cast panels
overflows into the city’s stormwater sewers.
and piles will minimize the added cost and allow for
the removal of specific areas for access to utilities.
Such a system will need to be custom-designed on
a project-by-project basis, with oversight by the
University.
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Tree Pit perspective
Structural soil systems, such as the Amsterdam Soil
Cornell University (CU) Structural Soil is a designed
and Cornell University (CU) Soil, are satisfactory
medium that can meet or exceed pavement design
alternatives to Silva Cell or Pile-based systems, but
and installation requirements while also remaining
only when these first two options are not feasible.
root penetrable and supportive of tree growth. It is a
proprietary soil product produced by licensed local
Amsterdam Soil consists of varying grades of semi-
manufacturers. The soil mixture consists of graded
rounded silica and organic matter. The sand’s uniform
stone, clay loam, and hydrogel. Though the planting
texture evenly distributes loads from pedestrian and
medium conveniently services the structural needs of
vehicular traffic above, while offering a displaceable
paving and the growth requirements of plantings, it
substance for extended root growth. In addition, vital
only provides 15% actual soil per volume.
air and moisture exchange can happen freely. One
drawback is the low organic content (roughly 4.9%)
and the tendency of the sand to absorb heat from
adjacent utilities, such as steam lines.
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Tree Pit section
Streetscape Plant Beds
Plant beds in sidewalk areas need to be protected from
salt-laden runoff in the winter months. The Guidelines
recommend raised plant beds with a perimeter curb.
The exception is when the plant bed is used as a
vegetated swale in service of stormwater treatment.
These beds shall be flush or slightly lower than the
adjacent pavements, or, if the beds have a perimeter
curb, the curb shall be interrupted in a number of
places to allow stormwater runoff to run into the plant
bed.
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Plant Palette
Campus Lawns
Lawns should consist of native plants and non-native
plants that have adapted to the regional climate.
Irrigation systems that use reclaimed gray-water
or harvested stormwater will ensure that the lawn
keeps a maintained, well-kept aesthetic. This, in turn,
illustrates clear ownership of the space, discouraging
vandalism and other undesirable activities. Designers
shalll study campus microclimates, conditions on
the north side of buildings, and tight spaces between
buildings before recommending design approaches.
TREES
Street tree species selected for the campus must have
the ability to withstand urban conditions, be pollution
and drought tolerant, have long life spans, and ideally
have a rapid growth rate when young that slows with
maturity. Street trees also need to have a root structure
that will not easily upend curbs and pavements. In all
cases, the designer shalll consider site conditions,
such as shallow utility lines and pedestrian lighting,
before choosing a tree species for planting. In the case
of shallow utilities, smaller trees or a raised planter
may be used. Pedestrian safety is a primary concern
of the University. Therefore, trees should be pruned
annually so as not to disrupt street lighting.
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Example of a successful tree-lined street on UMB’s campus
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The recommended trees that meet these requirements are:
BOTANICAL NAME
COMMON NAME
Corylus colurna
Turkish Filbert
Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis ‘Shademaster’
Thornless Honeylocust
Platanus x acerifolia ‘Yarwood’
London Plane Tree
Quercus bicolor
Swamp White Oak
Quercus phellos
Willow Oak
Quercus palustris ‘Crownright‘
Pin Oak
Quercus shumardii
Shumard Oak
Sophora japonica ‘Regent’
Scholar Tree
Taxodium distichum ‘Shawnee Brave’
Bald Cypress
Tilia americana ‘Redmond’
American Linden
Ulmus parvifolia ‘Allee’
Lacebark Elm
Ulmus americana (to reference the grand specimen
at Davidge Hall—now lost)
American Elm
Table of tree species
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Existing street trees suggests campus-wide strategy of planting blocks of single species.
TREE LOCATION PLAN
EXISTING TREE LOCATION
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SHRUBS
Designers shall select shrub species for their ability
reasons. For ease of security surveillance, shrubs
to withstand urban conditions, wind, and salt. All of
should be planted far enough from building edges to
the recommended shrubs listed below attain heights
eliminate hiding places.
no greater than two to three feet (2’-3’). Intermediate
level plantings (like shrubs) can pose a security issue
The recommended shrubs that meet these require-
if species exceed the 4-feet height range. Shrubs that
ments are:
produce berries are discouraged, for health and safety
BOTANICAL NAME
COMMON NAME
Berberis x gladwynensis ‘William Penn’
William Penn Barberry
Buxus x ‘Green Velvet’
Hardy Boxwood
Caryopteris x cladonensis ‘Dark Knight’
Blue Mist Spirea
Clethra alnifolia ‘Hummingbird’
Dwarf Summersweet
Deutzia gracilis ‘Nikko’
Dwarf Slender Deutzia
Hydrangea macrophyllum ‘Lanarth’
Bigleaf Hydrangea
Ilex verticillata ‘Jim Dandy’
Winterberry Holly (male)
Ilex verticillata ‘Red Sprite’
Winterberry Holly (female)
Rhus aromatic ‘Gro-Low’
Dwarf Aromatic Sumac
Photinia davidiana var. undulata prostrata
Dwarf Chinese Stranvaesia
Potentilla fruticosa ‘Abbotswood’
Cinquefoil
Spirea japonica ‘Alpina’
Daphne Spirea
Stephanandra incisa ‘Crispa’
Cutleaf Stephanandra
Viburnum carlesii ‘Compactum’
Dwarf Koreanspice Viburnum
Table of shrub species
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GROUNDCOVER AND PERENNIALS
Groundcover and perennial species shall be selected
The recommended groundcovers and perennials that
for their ability to withstand urban conditions and
meet these requirements are:
provide vigorous and evenly distributed coverage.
Perennials need to be drought-tolerant and withstand
heat from adjacent sidewalks.
BOTANICAL NAME
COMMON NAME
Agastache ‘Summer Love’
Hyssop
Amsonia x ‘Blue Ice’
Blue Star
Baptisia australis ‘Carolina Moonlight’
Yellow False Blue Indigo
Galium odoratum
Sweet Woodruff
Geranium ‘Rosanne’
Rosanne Cranesbill
Liriope spicata
Lilly Turfgrass
Hemerocallis
Day Lily
Juniperus horizontalis ‘Bar Harbor’
Bar Harbor Low Juniper
Liatris spicata ‘Kobald’
Dwarf Gayfeather
Nepeta x faasserii ‘Walker’s Low’
Dwarf Catmint
Pachyandra terminalis ‘Green Sheen’
Dark Green Japanese Spurge
Veronica spicata
Speedwell
Table of groundcover species
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Site Amenities and Furniture Product Standards
PAVING
• Pre-Cast Concrete Unit Paver
1.Manufacturer: Hanover
2.Finish: Ground Tudor Finish, non-slip surface
3.Color: Limestone Gray
4.Dimensions: 18”x24”x2-1/2” thick (pedestrian)
5.Dimensions: 18”x24”x3” thick (vehicular)
Concrete Pavers
• Brick
1.Manufacturer: Pine Hall Brick Company
2.Finish: Wire Cut
3.Color: Pathway Red (with Iron Spots)
4.Dimensions: 4” x 8” x 2-1/2” thick (pedestrian)
5.Dimensions: 18” x 24” x 3” thick (vehicular)
• Brick (city standard)
1.Manufacturer: Glen-Gery
Brick Pavers
2.Finish: Wire Cut
3.Color: Rosecroft
4.Dimensions: 4” x 8” x 2-1/2” thick (pedestrian)
5.Dimensions: 18” x 24” x 3” thick (vehicular)
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Street Tree Planting Systems
• Soil/Pavement Support System (recommended for
all campus tree pits)
1.Manufacturer: Deep Root
2.Product: Silva Cell
Stairs and Ramps
• Pre-Cast Concrete Unit Paver
1.Manufacturer: Hanover
2.Finish: Ground Tudor Finish, non-slip surface
3.Color: Limestone Gray
4.Dimensions: 18”x24”x2-1/2” thick (pedestrian)
5.Dimensions: 18”x24”x3” thick (vehicular)
Handrails and Guardrails
• Handrails
1.Manufacturer: Julius Blum
2.Rail Product: Moulded Rail 4441
3.Rail End Product: Forged Lamb’s Tongue End
4.Mounting Wall Bracket: Cast Bracket 381
5. Finish: Galvanized steel, powder-coated
6.Color: Black
Handrail example on campus
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Fencing, Guardrails and Gates
1.Style: Majority of fence panel to be defined
between the bottom rail and mid-rail. Top rail
to define upper extend of fence with no pickets
protruding above. Fence design to incorporate
larger components to emphasize horizontal
expression. University shall adopt a single
product standard similar to campus images, see
below.
2.Finish: Galvanized steel, powder-coated
3.Color: Black
Guard rail example on campus
• Gates
1.Style: Utilitarian gates to follow the above
description. Entrance gates or gates defining
the perimeter of courtyards will be designed in
accordance with the style of the courtyard and
architecture. For example of entrance gate, see
Nursing School courtyard gate below.
2.Finish: Galvanized steel, powder-coated
3.Color: Black
Guardrail example
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Lighting
• Lighting: Pedestrian
1.Manufacturer: Louis Poulsen
2.Product: Satellit Maxi
3.Finish: Stainless steel, brushed
4.Color: Natural
5.Size: Large (25”) fixtures for streets
Small (18”) fixtures for courtyards
6.Pole: 12’, dual round pole
• Lighting: Vehicular
1.Manufacturer: General Electric
2.Product: M-400A Luminaire, Cobra Head
3.Color: Silver
Pedestrian light fixture
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Site Furnishings
• Trash Receptacle
1.Manufacturer: Victor-Stanley
2.Product: Ironsites (Bethesda series) S-42
3.Finish: Powdercoat, steel
4.Color: Black
• Ash Receptacle 1
1.Manufacturer: Forms + Surfaces
2.Product: Buttler Ash Receptacle
3.Finish: Powdercoat
4.Color: Black
Trash receptacles
• Ash Receptacle 2
1.Manufacturer: Forms and Surfaces
2.Product: Butler
3.Finish: Powdercoat
4.Color: Black
Ash receptacle
Vehicular light fixture
99
• Bench: Metal
1.Manufacturer: TimberForm
2.Product: Renaissance Bench 2806-6
3.Finish: Powder coat
4.Color: Black
• Bench: Wood
1.Manufacturer: Country Casual
2.Product: Brittany Teak Bench (#6304)
3.Finish:
Bench
4.Color: Wood
5.Notes: For gardens and courtyards
Bench
Bench
10 0
U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A R Y L A N D , B A LT I M O R E
/
URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
• Tables and Chairs: Metal
1.Manufacturer: Landscapeforms
2.Product: Parc Centre table and chairs. Table:
square 28”
3.Finish: Panguard II polyester powdercoat
4.Color: Titanium
• Tables and Chairs: Wood
1.Manufacturer: Landscapeforms
Table and chairs
2.Product: Wellspring dining table and chairs
3.Finish: Unfinished teak
4.Color: Wood
• Bike Rack
1.Manufacturer: A A A Ribbon Rack Co.
2.Product: Ribbon rack (RB-11)
3.Finish: Stainless steel
4.Color: Silver
• Bollard (breakaway w/ shear pin)
1.Manufacturer: Forms and Surfaces
2.Product: Light Column Bollard (Series 600)
3.Finish: Satin Stainless Steel
4.Color: Silver
Bike rack
Bollard
5.Notes: Lit, non-lit and break-away all available
101
PLANTERS
Where planters are used in lieu of tree pits (i.e. above
steam lines or duct banks), they are to match those
along Arch Street, to the east of the Dental School
building. The planters shown in these images below (1,
2, 3, and 4) are to be used on a ad hoc basis when used
as portals or as decorative elements. Planters 1 and 2
should only be used in garden or park areas.
Planter 1
• Planter 1
1.Manufacturer: GSA
2.Product: Bristol
• Planter 2
1.Manufacturer: GSA
2.Product: Dorset Bowl
Planter 2
• Planter 3
1.Manufacturer: GSA
2.Product: Chelsea Box
• Planter 4
Planter 3
1.Manufacturer: BandH Security
2.Product: TF4241
• Security Phones
1.Manufacturer: Rath Securities or approved equal.
2.Notes: Security phones (blue phones, call boxes)
will be located across campus, along major
pedestrian routes, in all parking garages, and in the
lobbies of University buildings. The areas around
security phones will be well lit and visible from
both street level and adjacent buildings.
102
Planter 4
1040 Hull Street, Suite 100
Baltimore MD 21230
410.347.8500
410.347.8519
www.asg-architects.com

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