social movements: politics, change, & challenges

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SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: POLITICS, CHANGE, & CHALLENGES
POL-GA.3100.003
Fall 2013
Wednesdays
10:00 – 11:50 am
19 W 4
Room 432
Instructor: Arnaud Kurze, PhD
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (202) 677 1709
Office hours: Wednesday 2:00 – 4:00 pm
Room: TBD
Course Description
The objective of this graduate level course is to introduce students to the critical study of
social movements. In the 1960s and 1970s, the world was undergoing deep dramatic
transformations, including the American civil rights movement, the Mai 1968 revolt in
France, and the growth of critical Catholicism from South America, among others. As a
consequence, the study of social movements developed at an unprecedented pace into
a major area of research. Today, the field of study is solidly established; yet, the social
and political events over the last five decades have hardly rendered the investigation of
bottom-up activism less relevant. In order to study how ideas, individuals, events, and
organizations are linked to each other in broader processes of collective action over time
this course is organized in four dimensions.
The first dimension refers to the relationship between structural change and
transformations in pattern of social conflict. The course identifies shifts in main conflict
patterns and discusses the varying theoretical underpinnings that explain these
changes. The second dimension examines questions related to the role of cultural
representations in social conflict. The focus here lies in the emergence and definition of
social problems among different groups of social actors. In conjunction with this
dimension, the third set of questions addresses the process through which values,
interests, and ideas are transformed into collective action. Questions include for instance
discussions on the organizational forms of movements in order to mobilize and ensure
participation of individuals. Finally, the course examines how certain social, political or
cultural contexts affect a movement’s chances of success. The theoretical discussions in
this course are illustrated by different case studies located in a variety of contexts, time
periods, and problem areas.
Course Objectives
The course will help students to think and write theoretically and critically about social
movements. Student analysis of the field through written papers throughout the
semester will help hone critical analysis skills.
By the close of this course, students should be able to:
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Have a firm grasp of the development and evolution of key topics in the field of
social movements
Identify, summarize and evaluate the fundamental questions and debates in the
field
Concisely summarize, connect and evaluate the research by writing short
reaction papers
Employ social movements concepts and theories in independent writing
Course readings
Diani, Mario, and Doug McAdam, ed. 2003. Social Movements and Networks: Relational
Approaches to Collective Action. Oxford University Press, USA.
Foran, John. 2005. Taking Power: On the Origins of Third World Revolutions.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Goodwin, Jeff, James M. Jasper, and Francesca Polletta, ed. 2001. Passionate Politics:
Emotions and Social Movements. 1st ed. University Of Chicago Press.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell.
Johnston, Hank, and Bert Klandermans. 1995. Social Movements and Culture.
University of Minnesota Press.
McAdam, Doug, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives
on Social Movements: Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Cultural
Framings. Cambridge University Press.
McAdam, Doug. 1999. Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency,
1930-1970. 2nd ed. The University Of Chicago Press.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA.
Schock, Kurt. 2005. Unarmed Insurrections: People Power Movements in
Nondemocracies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Smith, Jackie. 2008. Social Movements for Global Democracy. Baltimore: Johns
Hopkins University Press.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press.
Articles
All articles are available online unless indicated otherwise. Book chapters will be made
available electronically.
Current Events
Understanding current events is central to our study of social movements. You are
strongly encouraged to read at least one major news source (for example, the New York
Times or the Global Post) as part of your daily routine.
Course Requirements
Students must satisfy the following requirements:
1. Class participation (10% of final grade)
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§
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Students are expected to have completed the assigned readings prior to class
and participate actively in class discussions in an informed and intelligent way.
You cannot participate effectively if you are not in class on a regular basis.
Students are responsible for the material covered in class lectures and are urged
to take detailed notes. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to obtain notes
for that day from a classmate.
Students are expected to attend class regularly. Attendance will be taken at each
class. More than two unexcused absences may result in a reduction of your
grade.
2. Three short analytical papers (20% each for 60% total)
§
§
§
§
§
All students are required to write three (3) short analytical papers of a minimum
of 1500 words each (maximum 2000 words). Each paper is worth 20% of the
final grade.
These papers are not meant to be mere summaries of the readings, but rather
should critically analyze and synthesize the week’s readings, and should
contextualize the week’s readings within the broader literature on transitional
justice. Papers should discuss ALL the assigned readings for the chosen weeks
they decide to write their papers.
Papers are to be submitted by email. Email timestamps submissions will mark
papers received after the due date as late. Late papers will not be accepted.
Papers should pay particular attention to:
i.
The authors’ central arguments—what are the questions, outcomes or
puzzles the authors are directly or indirectly addressing?
ii.
What empirical evidence do the authors provide to support their
arguments?
iii.
How do the articles/books relate to the literature on transitional justice
more broadly?
iv.
What are the key contributions of the work under review?
v.
What are some of the potential shortcomings of the authors’ arguments?
Papers are to be submitted as .pdf files and saved in the following format: 1. First
name, underscore, last name, underscore, paper 1 (2 or 3), topic 2. For example:
Arnaud_Kurze_Paper 1_Mobilization
3. Research Paper (20% of final grade)
§
§
The paper should include the following:
o Introduction outlining the problem
o A section describing the methods used
o A review of the literature that the research builds on
o Analysis section with discussion of findings
o Conclusion, pointing to future research avenues
Due date TBD.
4. Research Proposal (10% of final grade)
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§
§
As part of the final research paper students submit a 2-page proposal on a topic
of their choice with the instructor’s approval
The proposal should contain a 300-500 word summary outlining the problem,
research question and hypothesis of the topic. It should be followed by an outline
of the paper.
Due date TBD.
**This syllabus may change as the semester progresses.
Grading
Class participation
Analysis papers
Proposal
Research paper
Total
50
75 each
50
175
50
225
50
175
500 points
Grading Scale
A+: 490-500
B+: 440-449
C+: 390-399
D+: 340-349
F: 299 and below
A: 460-489
B: 410-439
C: 360-389
D: 310-339
A-: 450-459
B-: 400-409
C-: 350-359
D-: 300-309
Classroom Expectations
Debate and discussion imply tolerance and respect for opinions other than one’s own.
All students must demonstrate courtesy toward professor and fellow students at all
times.
All assignments must be handed in on time. No late papers will be accepted except in
cases of documented emergencies. There will be no incompletes, make-up exams or
extensions except in cases of documented emergencies.
Cellular phones, pagers, and other such electronic devices that could disrupt class must
be turned off during class time. Computer use in the classroom must be strictly limited to
the course discussion and assignments. The professor reserves the right to ban
computers from the classroom if this proves to be a disruptive element.
Honor Code
The written work for this class will be submitted electronically through NYU classes.
Essays may be processed through on-line databases so as to access the originality of
work.
Plagiarism, cheating and any attempt thereof, lying, and stealing of academic work and
related materials constitute honor code violations. Any violation of these principles will
be pursed according to guidelines defined by the organizers of the summer program.
Course Outline
Part 1: Structural Chance and Transformations in Social Conflict
Week 1
Introduction to Social Movements
Week 2
Contentious Politics & Political Processes
Week 3
Levels of Analysis
Part 2: Cultural Representation in Social Conflict
Week 4
Symbolic Dimension of Collective Action
Week 5
Collective Action & Identity
Week 6
Collective Action Frames
Part 3: The Collective Action Process: Values, Interests, & Ideas
Week 7
Mobilizing for a Cause: Action Forms, Repertoires, & Cycles of Protest
Week 8
Movement Sustainability: Securing & Maintaining Resources
Week 9
Individuals, Networks, & Participation
Week 10
Outcomes & the Goal of Fostering Change
Part 4: Social Movements in International Political Contexts
Week 11
Social Revolutions
Week 12
Movements Outside Western Democracies
Week 13
Transnational Movements
Week 14
State Repression & Policing
Required Readings
Part 1: Structural Chance and Transformations in Social Conflict
Week 1
Introduction to Social Movements
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 2.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA. Chap 9.
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, ed. 2007. The Blackwell
Companion to Social Movements. 1st ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Chap. 1.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 1.
Touraine, Alain. 2002. “The Importance of Social Movements.” Social Movement Studies
1 (1): 89–95.
Recommended Reading
Almeida, Paul D. and Mark I. Lichbach. 2003. “To the Internet, from the Internet:
Comparative Media Coverage of Transnational Protest.” Mobilization 8 (3): 249272.
Dahlerus, Claudia and Christian Davenport. 1999. “Tracking Down the Empirical Legacy
of the Black Panther Party (or notes on the perils of pursuing the panthers).” New
Political Science 21(2): 261-279.
Klandermans, Bert, and Suzanne Staggenborg. 2002. Methods of Social Movement
Research. University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 2-6.
Melucci, Alberto. 1996. Challenging Codes: Collective Action in the Information Age.
First Edition. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 1-3.
Week 2
Contentious Politics & Political Processes
McAdam, Doug. 1999. Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency,
1930-1970. 2nd ed. The University Of Chicago Press. Chap. 4-6.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA. Chap. 1 & 10.
Gurr, Ted Robert, ed. 1989. Violence in America: Protest, Rebellion, Reform. SAGE
Publications, Inc. Chap. 1.& 3.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 3, 4.
Recommended Reading
Aminzade, Ronald. 2001. Silence and Voice in the Study of Contentious Politics.
Cambridge University Press. Chap. 1.
Gurr, Ted Robert, ed. 1989. Violence in America: Protest, Rebellion, Reform. SAGE
Publications, Inc. Chap. 11 & 12.
Kopecky, Petr, and Cas Mudde. 2002. Uncivil Society?: Contentious Politics in PostCommunist Europe. Routledge. Chap. 1, 5, & 9.
McAdam, Doug. 1999. Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency,
1930-1970. 2nd ed. The University Of Chicago Press. Chap. 7-9.
Rucht, Dieter, Ruud Koopmans, and Friedhelm Niedhardt. 1999. Acts of Dissent: New
Developments in the Study of Protest. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Chap. 13.
Week 3
Levels of Analysis
Diani, Mario, and Doug McAdam, ed. 2003. Social Movements and Networks: Relational
Approaches to Collective Action. Oxford University Press, USA. Chap. 10 & 12.
Goodwin, Jeff, James M. Jasper, and Francesca Polletta, ed. 2001. Passionate Politics:
Emotions and Social Movements. 1st ed. University Of Chicago Press. Chap 3 &
Conclusion.
Johnston, Hank, and Bert Klandermans. 1995. Social Movements and Culture.
University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 1 & 11.
McAdam, Doug. 1999. Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency,
1930-1970. 2nd ed. The University Of Chicago Press. Chap. 1-3.
Wieviorka, Michel. 2005. “After New Social Movements.” Social Movement Studies 4 (1):
1–19.
Recommended Reading
Engel, Stephen M. 2001. The Unfinished Revolution: Social Movement Theory and the
Gay and Lesbian Movement. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 1 & 2.
Foweraker, Joe. 1995. Theorizing Social Movements. Pluto Press. Chap. 2 & 3.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper. 2004. Rethinking Social Movements: Structure,
Meaning, and Emotion. Rowman & Littlefield. Chap. 13-15.
Johnston, Hank, and Bert Klandermans. 1995. Social Movements and Culture.
University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 9 & 10.
McAdam, Doug. 1999. Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency,
1930-1970. 2nd ed. The University Of Chicago Press.
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, ed. 2007. The Blackwell
Companion to Social Movements. 1st ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Chap. 7.
Croteau, David, William Hoynes, and Charlotte Ryan. 2005. Rhyming Hope And History:
Activists, Academics, And Social Movement Scholarship. U of Minnesota Press.
Chap. 14.
Part 2: Cultural Representation in Social Conflict
Week 4
Symbolic Dimension of Collective Action
Alexander, Jeffrey C., Bernhard Giesen, and Jason L. Mast. 2006. Social Performance:
Symbolic Action, Cultural Pragmatics, and Ritual. Cambridge University Press.
Chap. Introduction, 1, & 8.
Armstrong, Elizabeth A. and Mary Bernstein. 2008. “Culture, Power, and Institutions: A
Multi-institutional Politics Approach to Social Movements.” Sociological Theory.
26 (1):74-99.
Escobar, Arturo. 1992. “Imagining a Post-development Era? Critical Thought,
Development and Social Movements.” Social Text (31/32): 20–56.
Johnston, Hank, and Bert Klandermans. 1995. Social Movements and Culture.
University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 5-7.
Melucci, Alberto. 1985. “The Symbolic Challenge of Contemporary Movements.” Social
Research: 789–816.
Swidler, Ann. 1986. “Culture in Action: Symbols and Strategies.” American Sociological
Review: 273–286.
Recommended Reading
Alexander, Jeffrey C., Bernhard Giesen, and Jason L. Mast. 2006. Social Performance:
Symbolic Action, Cultural Pragmatics, and Ritual. Cambridge University Press.
Chap. 2, 3, & 5.
Benford, Robert D., and Scott A. Hunt. 1992. “Dramaturgy and Social Movements: The
Social Construction and Communication of Power.” Sociological Inquiry 62 (1):
36–55.
Broadbent, Jeffrey. 2010. East Asian Social Movements: Power, Protest, and Change in
a Dynamic Region. Springer. Chap. Introduction, Chap. 1, Conclusion.
Croteau, David, William Hoynes, and Charlotte Ryan. 2005. Rhyming Hope And History:
Activists, Academics, And Social Movement Scholarship. University of Minnesota
Press. Chap. 8.
Fine, Gary Alan. 1995. “Public Narration and Group Culture: Discerning Discourse in
Social Movements.” Social Movements and Culture 4: 127–43.
Hart, Stephen. 1996. “The Cultural Dimension of Social Movements: A Theoretical
Reassessment and Literature Review*.” Sociology of Religion 57 (1): 87–100.
Johnston, Hank, and Bert Klandermans. 1995. Social Movements and Culture.
University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 8.
Kane, Anne E. 1997. “Theorizing Meaning Construction in Social Movements: Symbolic
Structures and Interpretation During the Irish Land War, 1879–1882.”
Sociological Theory 15 (3): 249–276.
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi. 2008. The Blackwell Companion
to Social Movements. John Wiley & Sons. Chap. 5 &12.
Taylor, Verta, and Nella Van Dyke. 2004. “‘Get up, Stand up’: Tactical Repertoires of
Social Movements.” The Blackwell Companion to Social Movements: 262–293.
Williams, Rhys H. 1995. “Constructing the Public Good: Social Movements and Cultural
Resources.” Social Problems: 124–144.
Week 5
Collective Action & Identity
Diani, Mario, and Doug McAdam, ed. 2003. Social Movements and Networks: Relational
Approaches to Collective Action. Oxford University Press, USA. Chap 1.
Gamson, J. 1997. “Messages of Exclusion: Gender, Movements, and Symbolic
Boundaries.” Gender & Society 11 (2) (April 1): 178–199.
Goodwin, Jeff, James M. Jasper, and Francesca Polletta, ed. 2001. Passionate Politics:
Emotions and Social Movements. 1st ed. University Of Chicago Press. Part 2
Johnston, Hank, and Bert Klandermans. 1995. Social Movements and Culture.
University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 3.
McAdam, Doug, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives
on Social Movements: Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Cultural
Framings. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 11.
Morris, Aldon D., and Carol McClurg Mueller. 1992. Frontiers in Social Movement
Theory. Yale University Press. Chap. 5
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, ed. 2007. The Blackwell
Companion to Social Movements. 1st ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Chap. 5.
Recommended Reading
Ballard, Richard, Adam Habib, Imraan Valodia, and Elke Zuern. 2005. “Globalization,
Marginalization and Contemporary Social Movements in South Africa.” African
Affairs 104 (417): 615–634.
Bernstein, Mary, and Verta Taylor. 2005. “Identity Politics.” The Wiley-Blackwell
Encyclopedia of Social and Political Movements.
Buechler, Steven M. 1995. “New Social Movement Theories.” The Sociological Quarterly
36 (3): 441–464.
Cohen, Jean L. 1985. “Strategy or Identity: New Theoretical Paradigms and
Contemporary Social Movements.” Social Research: 663–716.
Diani, Mario. 1992. “The Concept of Social Movement.” The Sociological Review 40 (1):
1–25.
Edelman, Marc. 2001. “Social Movements: Changing Paradigms and Forms of Politics.”
Annual Review of Anthropology: 285–317.
Escobar, Arturo, and Sonia E. Alvarez. 1992. The Making of Social Movements in Latin
America: Identity, Strategy, and Democracy. Westview Press Boulder. Part 1.
Gamson, Joshua. 1995. “Must Identity Movements Self-destruct? A Queer Dilemma.”
Social Problems: 390–407.
Pichardo, Nelson A. 1997. “New Social Movements: A Critical Review.” Annual Review
of Sociology: 411–430.
Polletta, Francesca, and James M. Jasper. 2001. “Collective Identity and Social
Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology: 283–305.
Taylor, Verta, and Nancy E. Whittier. 1999. “Collective Identity in Social Movement
Communities: Lesbian Feminist.” Waves of Protest: Social Movements Since the
Sixties: 169–104.
Week 6
Collective Action Frames
Croteau, David, William Hoynes, and Charlotte Ryan. 2005. Rhyming Hope And History:
Activists, Academics, And Social Movement Scholarship. U of Minnesota Press.
Chap. 10 & 13.
McAdam, Doug, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives
on Social Movements: Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Cultural
Framings. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 12-14.
Morris, Aldon D., and Carol McClurg Mueller. 1992. Frontiers in Social Movement
Theory. Yale University Press. Chap. 3
Noonan, Rita K. 1995. “Women Against the State: Political Opportunities and Collective
Action Frames in Chile’s Transition to Democracy.” Sociological Forum 10 (1)
(March 1): 81–111.
Rohlinger, Deana A. 2002. “Framing the Abortion Debate: Organizational Resources,
Media Strategies, and Movement-Countermovement Dynamics.” Sociological
Quarterly 43 (4): 479–507.
Snow, David, E. Burke Rochford, Steven Worden, and Robert Benford. 1986. “Frame
Alignment Processes, Micromobilization, and Movement Participation.” American
Sociological Review 51: 464-481.
Recommended Reading
Benford, Robert D., and David A. Snow. 2000. “Framing Processes and Social
Movements: An Overview and Assessment.” Annual Review of Sociology: 611–
639.
Ellingson, Stephen. 1995. “Understanding the Dialectic of Discourse and Collective
Action: Public Debate and Rioting in Antebellum Cincinnati.” American Journal of
Sociology: 100–144.
Franceschet, Susan. 2004. “Explaining Social Movement Outcomes Collective Action
Frames and Strategic Choices in First-and Second-Wave Feminism in Chile.”
Comparative Political Studies 37 (5): 499–530.
Hank, Johnston, and John A. Noakes. 2005. Frames Of Protest: Social Movements And
The Framing Perspective. Rowman & Littlefield. Chap. 1.
Hercus, Cheryl. 1999. “Identity, Emotion, and Feminist Collective Action.” Gender &
Society 13 (1): 34–55.
Hewitt, Lyndi, and Holly J. McCammon. 2004. “Explaining Suffrage Mobilization:
Balance, Neutralization, and Range in Collective Action Frames, 1892–1919.”
Mobilization: An International Quarterly 9 (2): 149–166.
Morris, Aldon D., and Carol McClurg Mueller. 1992. Frontiers in Social Movement
Theory. Yale University Press. Chap. 8
Snow, David and Robert Benford. 1988. “Ideology, Frame Resonance, and Participant
Mobilization. International Social Movement Research 1: 197-217.
Steinberg, Marc W. 1999. “The Talk and Back Talk of Collective Action: A Dialogic
Analysis of Repertoires of Discourse Among Nineteenth-Century English Cotton
Spinners 1.” American Journal of Sociology 105 (3): 736–780.
Tarrow, Sidney. 1998. “Fishnets, Internets, and Catnets: Globalization and Transnational
Collective Action.” Challenging Authority: The Historical Study of Contentious
Politics: 228–244.
Part 3: The Collective Action Process: Values, Interests, & Ideas
Week 7
Mobilization: Action Forms, Repertoires, & Cycles of Protest
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 2.
McAdam, Doug, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives
on Social Movements: Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Cultural
Framings. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 6-8.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA. Chap. 2 & 5.
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, ed. 2007. The Blackwell
Companion to Social Movements. 1st ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Chap. 2.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 9-11.
Recommended Reading
McAdam, Doug, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives
on Social Movements: Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Cultural
Framings. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 9 & 10.
Offe, Claus, and Helmut Wiesenthal. 1980. “Two Logics of Collective Action: Theoretical
Notes on Social Class and Organizational Form.” Political Power and Social
Theory 1 (1): 67–115.
Traugott, Mark, ed. 1995. Repertoires and Cycles of Collective Action. Duke University
Press Books. Chap. 1 & 5.
Taylor, Verta. 1989. “Social movement continuity: the women's movement in abeyance.”
American Sociological Review 54 (5):761-776.
Walker, Jack L. 1991. Mobilizing Interest Groups in America: Patrons, Professions, and
Social Movements. University of Michigan Press. Chap. 2, 4, & 10.
Week 8
Movement Sustainability: Securing & Maintaining Resources
Ganz, Marshall. 2000. “Resources and Resourcefulness: Strategic Capacity in the
Unionization of California Agriculture, 1959-1966.” American Journal of
Sociology: 1003–1062.
Goodwin, Jeff, James M. Jasper, and Francesca Polletta, ed. 2001. Passionate Politics:
Emotions and Social Movements. 1st ed. University Of Chicago Press. Part 3.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 3.
McAdam, Doug. 1986. “Recruitment to High-risk Activism: The Case of Freedom
Summer.” American Journal of Sociology: 64–90.
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, ed. 2007. The Blackwell
Companion to Social Movements. 1st ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Chap. 6.
Recommended Reading
Irons, Jenny. 1998. “The Shaping of Activist Recruitment and Participation: A Study of
Women in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement.” Gender & Society 12 (6): 692–
709.
Jenkins, J. Craig. 1983. “Resource Mobilization Theory and the Study of Social
Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology: 527–553.
Nepstad, Sharon Erickson, and Christian Smith. 1999. “Rethinking Recruitment to Highrisk/cost Activism: The Case of Nicaragua Exchange.” Mobilization: An
International Quarterly 4 (1): 25–40.
Sherkat, Darren E., and T. Jean Blocker. 1994. “The Political Development of Sixties’
Activists: Identifying the Influence of Class, Gender, and Socialization on Protest
Participation.” Social Forces 72 (3): 821–842.
Taylor, Verta. 1989. “Social Movement Continuity: The Women’s Movement in
Abeyance.” American Sociological Review: 761–775.
Soule, Sarah A. 1997. “The Student Divestment Movement in the United States and
Tactical Diffusion: The Shantytown Protest.” Social Forces 75 (3): 855–882.
Wiltfang, Gregory L., and Doug McAdam. 1991. “The Costs and Risks of Social
Activism: A Study of Sanctuary Movement Activism.” Social Forces 69 (4): 987–
1010.
Week 9
Individuals, Networks, & Participation
Diani, Mario, and Doug McAdam, ed. 2003. Social Movements and Networks: Relational
Approaches to Collective Action. Oxford University Press, USA. Chap. 2,5, & 8.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 4 & 6.
Klandermans, Bert, and Dirk Oegema. 1987. “Potentials, Networks, Motivations, and
Barriers: Steps Towards Participation in Social Movements.” American
Sociological Review: 519–531.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA. Chap. 4.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 6.
Recommended Reading
Goodwin, Jeff. 1997. “The Libidinal Constitution of a High-risk Social Movement:
Affectual Ties and Solidarity in the Huk Rebellion, 1946 to 1954.” American
Sociological Review: 53–69.
Gould, Roger V. 1991. “Multiple Networks and Mobilization in the Paris Commune,
1871.” American Sociological Review: 716–729.
Kitts, James A. 2000. “Mobilizing in Black Boxes: Social Networks and Participation in
Social Movement Organizations.” Mobilization: An International Quarterly 5 (2):
241–257.
McAdam, Doug, and Ronnelle Paulsen. 1993. “Specifying the Relationship Between
Social Ties and Activism.” American Journal of Sociology: 640–667.
Snow, David A., Louis A. Zurcher Jr, and Sheldon Ekland-Olson. 1980. “Social Networks
and Social Movements: A Microstructural Approach to Differential Recruitment.”
American Sociological Review: 787–801.
Viterna, Jocelyn S. 2006. “Pulled, Pushed, and Persuaded: Explaining Women’s
Mobilization into the Salvadoran Guerrilla Army1.” American Journal of Sociology
112 (1): 1–45.
Week 10
Outcomes & the Goal of Fostering Change
Amenta, Edwin. 2006. When Movements Matter: The Townsend Plan and the Rise of
Social Security. Princeton University Press. Chap. 1, 9
Andrews, Kenneth T. 2004. Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: The Mississippi Civil Rights
Movement and Its Legacy. 1st ed. University Of Chicago Press. Chap. 1, 8, & 9.
Bosi, Lorenzo, and Katrin Uba. 2009. “Introduction: The Outcomes of Social
Movements.” Mobilization: An International Quarterly 14 (4): 409–415.
Giugni, Marco G. 1998. “Was It Worth the Effort? The Outcomes and Consequences of
Social Movements.” Annual Review of Sociology: 371–393.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 10.
Recommended Reading
Amenta, Edwin. 2006. When Movements Matter: The Townsend Plan and the Rise of
Social Security. Princeton University Press. Introduction & Conclusion.
Giugni, Marco. 1999. How Social Movements Matter. 1st ed. University Of Minnesota
Press. Conclusion.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 9.
Halebsky, Stephen. 2006. “Explaining the Outcomes of Antisuperstore Movements: A
Comparative Analysis of Six Communities.” Mobilization: An International
Quarterly 11 (4): 443–460.
Jenkins, Craig. 1995. The Politics Of Social Protest: Comparative Perspectives On
States And Social Movements. Taylor & Francis. Chap. 10-12.
Part 4: Social Movements in International Political Contexts
Week 11
Social Revolutions
Foran, John. 2005. Taking Power: On the Origins of Third World Revolutions.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Part 1 & 4.
Giugni, Marco G., Doug McAdam, and Charles Tilly. 1998. From Contention to
Democracy. Rowman & Littlefield. Chap. 6.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA. Chap. 6 & 8.
Nepstad, Sharon Erickson. 2011. Nonviolent Revolutions: Civil Resistance in the Late
20th Century. Oxford University Press, USA. Chap. 1-3.
Schock, Kurt. 2005. Unarmed Insurrections: People Power Movements in
Nondemocracies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 1, 2, & 6.
Recommended Reading
Almeida, Paul. 2003. “Opportunity Organizations and Threat-Induced Contention:
Protest Waves in Authoritarian Settings.” American Journal of Sociology 109(2):
345-400.
Goodwin, Jeff. 2001. No Other Way Out: States and Revolutionary Movements, 19451991. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chap. 1, 2, 3, 5, & 9.
Foran, John. 2005. Taking Power: On the Origins of Third World Revolutions.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Part 2 & 3.
Schock, Kurt. 2005. Unarmed Insurrections: People Power Movements in
Nondemocracies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 3-5.
Week 12
Movements Outside Western Democracies
Almeida, Paul D. 2010. “Globalization and Collective Action.” In Handbook of Politics,
edited by Kevin T. Leicht and J. Craig Jenkins, 305–326. Handbooks of
Sociology and Social Research. Springer New York.
Acre, Moisés. 2010. “Parties and Social Protest in Latin America’s Neoliberal Era.” Party
Politics 16 (5): 669–686.
Alvarez, Sonia E., Evelina Dagnino, and Arturo Escobar. 1998. Cultures of
Politics/politics of Cultures: Re-visioning Latin American Social Movements.
Westview Press Boulder, CO. Part 1.
Auyero, Javier. 2001. “Glocal Riots.” International Sociology 16 (1) (March 1): 33–53.
Boudreau, Vincent. 1996. “Northern Theory, Southern Protest: Opportunity Structure
Analysis in Cross-national Perspective.” Mobilization: An International Quarterly 1
(2): 175–189.
Eckstein, Susan. 2006. “From Urban Resistance to Neoliberal Democracy in Latin
America.” Colombia Internacional: 12–39.
Smith, Jackie. 2008. Social Movements for Global Democracy. Baltimore: Johns
Hopkins University Press. Chap. 8.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 8.
Tilly, Charles. 2003. “Contention over Space and Place.” Mobilization: An International
Quarterly 8 (2): 221–225.
Recommended Reading
Arce, Moisés, and Roberta Rice. 2009. “Societal Protest in Post-stabilization Bolivia.”
Latin American Research Review 44 (1): 88–101.
Ballard, Richard, Adam Habib, Imraan Valodia, and Elke Zuern. 2005. “Globalization,
Marginalization and Contemporary Social Movements in South Africa.” African
Affairs 104 (417): 615–634.
Bayat, Asef. 2000. “From ‘Dangerous Classes’ to ‘Quiet Rebels’ Politics of the Urban
Subaltern in the Global South.” International Sociology 15 (3): 533–557.
Lachenmann, Gudrun. 1993. “Civil Society and Social Movements in Africa: The Case of
the Peasant Movement in Senegal.” The European Journal of Development
Research 5 (2): 68–100.
Mkandawire, Thandika. 2002. “The Terrible Toll of Post-colonial‘rebel Movements’ in
Africa: Towards an Explanation of the Violence Against the Peasantry.” The
Journal of Modern African Studies 40 (2): 181–215.
Sachikonye, Lloyd M. (Ed.). 1995. Democracy, Civil Society and the State: Social
Movements in Southern Africa. Sapes Books. Chap. 4-11.
Stahler-Sholk, Richard, Harry E. Vanden, and Glen David Kuecker. 2007. “Introduction:
Globalizing Resistance: The New Politics of Social Movements in Latin America.”
Latin American Perspectives 34 (2): 5–16.
Wickham-Crowley, Timothy P. 1992. Guerrillas and Revolution in Latin America: A
Comparative Study of Insurgents and Regimes Since 1956. Princeton University
Press Princeton. Chap. 1.
Yashar, Deborah J. 1998. “Contesting Citizenship: Indigenous Movements and
Democracy in Latin America.” Comparative Politics: 23–42.
Week 13
Transnational Movements
Fisher, Dana R., Kevin Stanley, David Berman, and Gina Neff. 2005. “How Do
Organizations Matter? Mobilization and Support for Participants at Five
Globalization Protests.” Social Problems 52 (1): 102–121.
Keck, Margaret E., and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy
Networks in International Politics. Cornell University Press. Chap. 2
Porta, Donatella Della, and Sidney George Tarrow. 2005. Transnational Protest and
Global Activism. Rowman & Littlefield. Chap. 6, 7, & 10.
Smith, Jackie. 2008. Social Movements for Global Democracy. Baltimore: Johns
Hopkins University Press. Chap. 2, 6, 7, & Conclusion.
Tarrow, Sidney G. 2011. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious
Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge University Press. Chap. 12.
Recommended Reading
Byrd, Scott C. 2005. “The Porto Alegre Consensus: Theorizing the Forum Movement.”
Globalizations 2 (1): 151–163.
Bandy, Joe, and Jackie Smith. 2005. Coalitions Across Borders: Transnational Protest
and the Neoliberal Order. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated. Chap. 3.
Keck, Margaret E., and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy
Networks in International Politics. Cornell University Press. Chap. 1, 3, 4, 5.
Sklair, Leslie. 1997. “Social Movements for Global Capitalism: The Transnational
Capitalist Class in Action.” Review of International Political Economy 4 (3): 514–
Smith, Jackie. 2004. “The World Social Forum and the Challenges of Global
Democracy.” Global Networks 4 (4): 413–421.
Smith, Jackie, and Dawn Wiest. 2005. “The Uneven Geography of Global Civil Society:
National and Global Influences on Transnational Association.” Social Forces 84
(2): 621–652.
Week 14
State Repression & Policing
Adams, Jacqueline. 2000. “Movement Socialization in Art Workshops: A Case from
Pinochet’s Chile.” Sociological Quarterly 41 (4): 615–638.
Davenport, Christian, Hank Johnston, and Carol McClurg Mueller. 2005. Repression And
Mobilization. University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 5.
Goodwin, Jeff, and James M. Jasper, ed. 2009. The Social Movements Reader: Cases
and Concepts. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Part 8.
Kurzman, Charles. 1996. “Structural Opportunity and Perceived Opportunity in Socialmovement Theory: The Iranian Revolution of 1979.” American Sociological
Review: 153–170.
Meyer, David S. 2006. The Politics of Protest: Social Movements in America. Oxford
University Press, USA. Chap. 7.
Snow, David A., Sarah A. Soule, and Hanspeter Kriesi, ed. 2007. The Blackwell
Companion to Social Movements. 1st ed. Wiley-Blackwell. Chap. 8 & 9.
Recommended Reading
Brysk, Alison. 1993. “From Above and Below Social Movements, the International
System, and Human Rights in Argentina.” Comparative Political Studies 26 (3):
259–285.
Davenport, Christian, Hank Johnston and Carol Mueller. 2005. Repression and
Mobilization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Chap. 3.
Della Porta, Donatella. 2006. Social Movements, Political Violence, and the State: A
Comparative Analysis of Italy and Germany. Cambridge University Press. Chap.
1 & 3.
Ferree, Myra Marx. 2005. “Soft Repression: Ridicule, Stigma, and Silencing in GenderBased Movements.” Pp. 138- 158 in Davenport, Christian, Hank Johnston and
Carol Mueller. 2005. Repression and Mobilization. Minneapolis: University of
Minnesota Press.
Loveman, Mara. 1998. “High-Risk Collective Action: Defending Human Rights in Chile,
Uruguay, and Argentina.” American Journal of Sociology 104(4): 1063-1104.
Offe, Claus. 1985. “New Social Movements: Challenging the Boundaries of Institutional
Politics.” Social Research: 817–868.
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