course outline - Clackamas Community College

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COURSE OUTLINE
INSTITUTION OR SCHOOL: Clackamas Community College
COURSE TITLE: General Biology for Health Sciences
COURSE NO.: BI 112
TYPE OF PROGRAM: Lower Division Credit (Science/Biology)
CREDIT HOURS: 4
DATE: February, 2005
OUTLINE DEVELOPED BY: Jennifer Bown and Richard Rueb
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is a one-term preparatory biology course for students who want to
take BI-231, Anatomy & Physiology, and BI-234, Introductory Microbiology.
Included in this course are the scientific method; the chemicals and molecules of
life; cell structure and function; cellular respiration; cellular reproduction and
Mendelian genetics; DNA structure and replication; protein synthesis;
biotechnology; principles of evolution; homeostasis and feedback mechanisms;
and introduction to tissues, organs, and organ systems.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
During this course, students will be introduced to the following concepts using a
combination of lectures, videos, projects, and laboratory experiences:
□
Present the scientific method and the tools and procedures used in
solving scientific questions
□
Lecture on the diversity of cells and life, and the application of the
evolutionary process
□
Discuss the structure and function of cells as the basic unit of life, and
their chemical composition.
□
Illustrate the chemical basis of life, including atoms, molecules,
compounds, and organic families and include different types of bonds
□
Discuss the structure and unique properties of water and the pH scale
□
Model the various mechanisms involved in transportation across the
plasma membrane
□
Explore the chemical reactions that occur within a cell, the role of ATP and
the structure and function of enzymes
□
Compare and contrast processes that occur in cellular respiration and
fermentation
□
Illustrate the structure of DNA, its role in reproduction and its relationship
to the characteristics of organisms
□
Present the cell cycle and different forms of cellular division
□
Illustrate the principles of Mendelian genetics and investigate the patterns
of Inheritance
□
□
□
□
□
□
Lecture on the types of RNA and the processes involved in protein
synthesis
Discuss the role of viruses in gene cloning and recombinant DNA creation
Explore the application of the process of evolution and the types of
selection to the development of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains
Lecture on the structural hierarchy of living things and discuss the four
main tissues found in animals
Discuss the overall mechanism of homeostasis and feedbacks
Present a functional overview of organs and the different organ systems
seen in animals
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this course, the student should able to:
□
Present the scientific method and the tools and procedures used in
solving scientific questions
□
Explain the diversity of cells and life, and the application of the
evolutionary process
□
Diagram the structure and function of cells as the basic unit of life, and
their chemical composition.
□
Illustrate the chemical basis of life, including atoms, molecules,
compounds, and organic families and include different types of bonds
□
Illustrate the structure and unique properties of water and the pH scale
□
Summarize the various mechanisms involved in transportation across the
plasma membrane
□
Describe the chemical reactions that occur within a cell, the role of ATP
and the structure and function of enzymes
□
Compare and contrast processes that occur in cellular respiration and
fermentation
□
Illustrate the structure of DNA, its role in reproduction and its relationship
to the characteristics of organisms.
□
Describe the cell cycle and different forms of cellular division
□
Illustrate the principles of Mendelian genetics and investigate the patterns
of Inheritance
□
Describe the types of RNA and illustrate the processes involved in protein
synthesis
□
Discuss the role of viruses in gene cloning and recombinant DNA creation
□
Discuss the application of the process of evolution and the types of
selection to the development of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains
□
Map out the structural hierarchy of living things and compare and
contrast the four main tissues found in animals
□
Diagram the overall mechanism of homeostasis and feedback
mechanisms
□
Summarize the function of organs and the different organ systems seen in
animals
LENGTH OF COURSE:
33 lecture hours and 33 lab hours
GRADING METHOD: Letter Grades A – F or Pass/No Pass
PREREQUISITES: none
REQUIRED MATERIALS:
Biology: Concepts and Connections by Campbell, Reece, Mitchell, and Taylor
Biology 101 Lecture and Laboratory Activities by the CCC Life Science Staff
Symbiosis Biology 101 Laboratory Manual by Pearson Custom Publishing
MAJOR TOPIC OUTLINE
Weekly:
1.
Characteristics of Living Organisms, Scientific Method, the Metric System
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
2.
The Chemical Basis of Life, Water and Life, pH and Life
a.
b.
c.
d.
3.
Form and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.
Comparison of these four families of macromolecules found in living cells.
Microscopy, Cell Structure and Function
a.
b.
c.
d.
5.
The structure of atoms and the nature of ionic and covalent bonds.
Significance of water for living things.
How the properties of water define the environment in which living cells
can function.
The meaning of pH and its importance to living things.
Biochemical Organization of Cells
a.
b.
4.
Characteristics of living organisms.
Hierarchy and classification of living things.
Process of Evolution and its mechanism.
Application of the scientific method to problem solving.
Use of metric measurements for length, weight, volume, and temperature.
Use of the light and dissecting microscopes.
The concept of a cell and limits on cell size.
Comparison of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, their size, and structure.
Comparisons of plant and animal cells.
Energy and the Cell, How Enzymes Work, Membrane Structure and Function
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
The laws of thermodynamics and energy transfer in cells using ATP.
How enzymes speed up chemical reactions.
Relationship of the 3-dimensional structure of proteins to their action as
enzymes.
The structure of the cell membrane.
Fluid balance in cells.
How molecules move across membranes.
g.
h.
6.
Cellular Respiration
a.
b.
c.
d.
7.
b.
c.
d.
e.
How the movement of chromosomes explains segregation and
independent assortment of genes during meiosis.
Monohybrid and dihybrid crosses and their expected genotype and
phenotype results.
Analysis of patterns of inheritance using pedigrees.
Distinguishing whether traits are autosomal or sex-linked traits.
Sex determination by inheritance involving sex chromosomes.
DNA Structure and Replication, Protein Synthesis
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
10.
The structure of chromosomes.
Comparison of cell division - binary fission, mitosis, and meiosis.
Conditions resulting from abnormal numbers of chromosomes.
Mendelian Genetics
a.
9.
Gas exchange in cellular respiration.
Energy release and storage during oxidation-reduction reactions.
Aerobic and anaerobic pathways of cellular respiration.
Use of different kinds of organic molecules as fuel for respiration.
Mitosis and Meiosis
a.
b.
c.
8.
Membrane potentials in neurons.
Sodium-potassium pumps in neuronal membranes.
Evidence for DNA as the genetic material.
The structure and primary functions of DNA.
How the structure of DNA allows for its exact duplication.
The relationship between DNA, genes, and chromosomes in a eukaryotic
cell.
Relationship between DNA structure, protein structure, and the
characteristics of an organism.
The role of RNA in creating a specific protein based on the genetic code in
the DNA.
The origin and consequences of mutations.
Concepts of Animal Structure & Function
a.
b.
c.
d.
Hierarchy of body organization (cells, tissues, organs, and organ
systems).
Description of the overall mechanism of homeostasis.
Compare negative and positive feedback mechanisms.
Description of the organs and different organ systems that make up
the animal body.
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