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Full file at http://testbanksite.eu/Exploring-Sociology-A-Canadian-Perspective-2ndEdition-Test-Bank
1) Define the "sociological imagination" and discuss how this "quality of mind" would
apply to you as a university student.
Answer:
Sociological imagination – the ability to understand the dynamic relationship between
individual lives and the larger society.
As a university student, this quality of mind would allow you to see the impact of social
variables such as class, gender, race, age, family background, community, etc. on the
learning environment (i.e. choice of courses and programs) and on the interactions
between the various categories of people at the institution (students, faculty, employees,
administrators, etc.).
Diff: Moderate
Type: ES
Page Reference: 4-5
Skill: Applied
Objective: Describe, and provide personal reflections about, C.W. Mills' concept of the
sociological imagination.
2) Choose a social problem and explore it from a sociological perspective, making
reference to the ideas of C.W. Mills and Peter Berger. How has this exploration impacted
your initial views on the social problem? Explain Peter Berger's use of the terms general,
particular, strange, and familiar.
Answer:
Answers will vary.
General – the larger social forces acting on an individual in society
Particular – seemingly unique events or circumstances
Strange – asking why things are the way they are rather than just accepting them as
normal and familiar
Familiar – the usual and normal – our acceptance of the way things are without really
understanding the reasons
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 4-7
Skill: Applied
Objective: Describe, and provide personal reflections about, C.W. Mills' concept of the
sociological imagination, explain Peter Berger's use of the terms general, particular,
strange, and familiar.
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Full file at http://testbanksite.eu/Exploring-Sociology-A-Canadian-Perspective-2ndEdition-Test-Bank
3) Choose three social factors that you believe have been most influential for defining the
person you have become. From a sociological perspective, discuss how these social
factors have had an influence on your life.
Answer:
Answers will vary. Choice of: minority status (visible minority, physical disability,
mental disability, LGBT), gender, socio-economic status, family structure, urban-rural
differences.
Understanding of the way these factors can influence one’s opportunities or life chances.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 7-12
Skill: Applied
Objective: Describe, and provide personal reflections about, C.W. Mills' concept of the
sociological imagination.
4) Discuss some of the key features of Canadian sociology and some key Canadian
sociologists whose work embodies these features.
Answer:
Feedback: Four defining features and sociologists:
1. geography (survival; harsh and hostile elements) and regionalism (Quebec) –
Brym and St. Pierre
2. political economy (peace, order and good government) – Wallace Clement
3. staples thesis (hewers of wood, drawers of water) – Harold Innis
4. Canadianization movement (the Canadian sociological perspective) – Dawson,
Hughes, Innis
5. Radical nature (macrosociology, feminism, social change – structures of power) –
Margrit Eichler, Dorothy Smith
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 22-26
Skill: Conceptual
Objective: Describe the defining features of Canadian sociology.
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Full file at http://testbanksite.eu/Exploring-Sociology-A-Canadian-Perspective-2ndEdition-Test-Bank
5) Peter Berger is an American Sociologist who defined the sociological perspective as
the ability to see the world from two distinct and complimentary perspectives—seeing the
general in the particular and the strange in the familiar. Apply your sociological
imagination to any event of your choosing; it could be a sporting event, preparing dinner,
attending class, or any other activity which you carry out. Write a few paragraphs
describing your chosen event. At the end of your 'seeing the strange in the familiar'
ensure that you include a description of the event in familiar language.
Answer:
Answers will vary. Students can refer to page 5 of the textbook.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 5
Skill: Applied
Objective: The Sociological Perspective
6) Discuss the sociological perspective and the relationship between social forces and
personal social identity and give a modern example.
Answer:
C.W. Mills suggested that people who do not, or cannot, recognize the social origins and
character of their problems may be unable to respond to these problems effectively. In
effect, failing to appreciate how individual challenges are influenced by larger social
forces diminishes a person’s ability to understand and resolve them. For Mills, the
individual and the social are inextricably linked and we cannot fully understand one
without the other. As such, many personal troubles never become social issues because
people rarely equate what is happening to them with the larger social worlds in which
they exist.
Mills argued that sociologists need to expose individuals to what he called the
sociological imagination, which is the ability to understand the dynamic relationship
between individual lives and the larger society. It involves stepping outside of your own
condition and looking at yourself from a new perspective—seeing your -self as the
product of your family, income level, race, and gender.
Examples will vary by student.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 4–11
Skill: Applied/Conceptual
Objective: The Sociological Perspective and What Makes You, You?
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Full file at http://testbanksite.eu/Exploring-Sociology-A-Canadian-Perspective-2ndEdition-Test-Bank
7) Using Mill’s concept of the sociological imagination and Berger’s concept of seeing
the general in the particular, explain why Canada’s Aboriginal peoples have high levels
of poverty despite ongoing government assistance.
Answer:
The sociological imagination allows us to see the relationship between individuals and
society, while seeing the general in the particular is the ability to look at seemingly
unique events or circumstances and then recognize the larger features involved. By
applying these processes, we can see how the poverty that affects Aboriginal peoples is
not a result of individual circumstances, but rather an outcome of their position within the
larger society, and the historic and current processes of discrimination enacted against
them, which government assistance does nothing to ameliorate. Colonization, isolation,
segregation, loss of culture, loss of independence, loss of resources, loss of governance;
all of these general processes enacted against Aboriginal peoples have led to their
individual circumstances, and to their position in the larger society which puts them in a
disadvantaged position.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 4–6
Skill: Applied
Objective: The Sociological Perspective
8) Discuss the three Revolutions that inspired the rise of sociology, and state the major
contribution each made to the discipline.
Answer:
Feedback:
1.
The Scientific Revolution – the development of the scientific method and
explanations of the social and physical world based on science rather than the
supernatural and the religious.
2. The Political Revolution – the development of democratic principles and the
promotion of ideals such as individual rights, social responsibility, and equality of
opportunity.
3. The Industrial Revolution – the development of capitalism and the movement
from a agricultural and rural economy to an industrialized and urban one.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 12-18
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Full file at http://testbanksite.eu/Exploring-Sociology-A-Canadian-Perspective-2ndEdition-Test-Bank
Skill: Factual
Objective: Three Revolutions: The Rise of Sociology
9) Discuss the anti-positivists challenges to the primary assumptions of positivism.
Which side do you agree with more and why?
Answer:
1. While hard science may be useful for exploring the physical world, the social
world cannot be understood solely through numbers and formulas. Antipositivists assert that the formulas that positivists use to explain the universe have
meaning only when we collectively assign social value to them—that is, numbers
have only relative importance.
2. All sciences will not merge over time and no single methodological approach
(i.e., science) can reach a complete understanding of our world. Science has
been able to teach us a great deal about our physical world, but anti-positivists
suggest that to truly understand the human condition we need to appreciate and
validate emotions, values, and human subjectivity. In fact, as we begin to
understand more about our world, scientists are finding entirely new areas to
research, and in this sense our sciences are becoming more unique over time.
3. Science cannot be separated from our values. Sociologists define values as those
cultural assessments that identify something as right, desirable, and moral. As we
have seen, positivists argue that all sciences are equal and should not be tainted by
value judgments; after all, science is science. However, anti-positivists suggest
that what we choose to study is also a social expression. Responses will vary by
student.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 14-16
Skill: Conceptual
Objective: Three Revolutions: The Rise of Sociology
10) How is the 1967 Royal Commission on the Status of Women an example of the
radical nature of Canadian sociology?
Answer:
The final report was released in 1970 (with 167 recommendations) and became the
blueprint for mainstream feminist activism. The women’s movement inspired a new
generation of women to reflect on their social surroundings and question social
convention. The influence of the movement on early women pioneers was equally
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Full file at http://testbanksite.eu/Exploring-Sociology-A-Canadian-Perspective-2ndEdition-Test-Bank
important, as it allowed them to critique their own intellectual foundations and their
approach to sociology specifically and to society generally. The Royal Commission
report opened the debate on women’s position in Canadian society and also resulted in
the formation of the Status of Women Subcommittee of the Canadian Sociology and
Anthropology Association, which still exists today as the Canadian Sociological
Association.
Diff: Challenging
Type: ES
Page Reference: 23-24
Skill: Conceptual
Objective: Understanding sociology in Canada
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