2012Internal Medicine Residency Curriculum 6

Document technical information

Format doc
Size 1.7 MB
First found May 22, 2018

Document content analysis

Category Also themed
Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts
no text concepts found

Persons

Organizations

Places

Transcript

Jacobi Medical Center
Internal Medicine Residency
Curriculum
6-2012
Table of Contents
Topic
Residency Goals and Objectives by Year
Floor Intern
Floor Resident
Floor Night Medicine Intern
Floor Night Medicine Resident
CCU Intern
CCU Resident
ICU Intern
ICU Resident
Emergency Department
Day Float
Specialty Floor Oncology Intern
Specialty Floor Oncology Resident
Specialty Floor HIV Intern
Specialty Floor HIV Resident
Specialty Floor Pulmonary Intern
Specialty Floor Pulmonary Resident
Senior Medical Resident
Consult
Ambulatory Care Intern
Ambulatory Care Resident
Anesthesia Elective
Cardiology Elective
Dermatology Elective
Endocrinology Elective
Gastroenterology Elective
Hematology Elective
Oncology Elective
Hematology/Oncology Elective
Infectious Diseases Elective
Nephrology Elective
Neurology Elective
Pain and Palliative Care Elective
Pulmonary Elective
Radiology Elective
Rheumatology Elective
Geriatrics
Research Elective
Parasitology Elective
Other (Occupational medicine, ENT, Ophthalmology, PM&R, Orthopedics,
Urology, Psychiatry, Gynecology, Sleep medicine, Adolescent medicine, Evidence
based medicine, Women’s health, Ethics, Cultural competency)
Curriculum by Topic
EKG Curriculum
2
Page
3-8
9-14
15-20
21-24
25-28
29-32
33-36
37-41
42-46
47-50
51-54
55-59
60-64
65-68
69-72
73-77
78-82
83-85
86-92
93-98
99-103
104-107
108-111
112-124
125-128
129-131
132-136
137-140
141
142-145
146-149
150-153
154-157
158-161
162-163
164-166
167-176
177-179
180-182
183-204
205-240
241-245
Goals and Objectives by Year
Jacobi Internal Medicine Residency
PGY-1
By the end of the PGY1 year residents should:
Patient Care
1. be able to do a complete and accurate history and physical
examination
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the correct
diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days worth of
work
5. have demonstrated compassion for patients and their relatives
and treat them in a dignified manner
6. be able to handle emergency situations
7. be able to perform all of the following procedures skillfully and
with the least discomfort to the patient: ACLS, drawing venous
blood, drawing arterial blood, placing a peripheral venous line, pap
smear and endocervical culture
8. Perform in a satisfactory way on mini-CEX
Medical
Knowledge
1. have begun becoming familiar with current literature
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of pathophysiology
and clinical medicine
3. know the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and how to
get informed consent, for most of the following procedures: ACLS,
drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood, abdominal
paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, pap smear and
endocervical culture, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
Practice Based
Learning and
Improvement
1. understand his or her own limitations of knowledge
2. ask peers and faculty for help when needed
3. accept feedback and develop self-improvement plans
3. be self-motivated to acquire knowledge
4. be able to use electronic references and literature to learn about
patients diseases
3
Interpersonal and
Communication
Skills
1. write clear, organized, legible notes and orders
2. be able to use their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently
and effectively interview a patient and/or family members
3. interact with other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner
Professionalism
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. be honest, reliable, cooperative and accepting of responsibility
3. show regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. demonstrate respect, compassion and integrity
5. acknowledge errors and work to minimize them
6. put the needs of the patient above self-interest
Systems-Based
Practice
1. have begun working with all health professionals to provide
patient centered care
2. have begun working on quality improvement projects that
involve improving the systems in which they practice
3. be a patient advocate
4
PGY-2
By the end of the PGY2 year residents should (underlines are on material above the
PGY1 goals):
Patient Care
1. be able to do a complete and accurate history and physical
examination
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the correct
diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days worth of
work
5. have demonstrated compassion for patients and their relatives
and treat them in a dignified manner
6. be able to handle emergency situations
7. be able to perform all of the following procedures skillfully and
with the least discomfort to the patient: ACLS, drawing venous
blood, drawing arterial blood, placing a peripheral venous line, pap
smear and endocervical culture, arterial line placement, central line
placement, nasogastric intubation
8. be able to perform some of the following procedures skillfully
and with the least discomfort to the patient depending on future
practice interests: abdominal paracentesis, arthrocentesis, incision
and drainage of abscess, lumbar puncture, pulmonary artery
catheter placement, thoracentesis
9. perform in a satisfactory way on mini-CEX
10. be able to manage multiple problems at once
11. be showing ability to triage patients to appropriate level of care
Medical
Knowledge
1. have become familiar with current literature
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of pathophysiology
and clinical medicine
3. know the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and how to
get informed consent, for all of the following procedures: ACLS,
drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood, abdominal
paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, pap smear and
endocervical culture, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
4. have demonstrated knowledge of evidence based medicine and
epidemiology principles, and be able to relate these to patient care
Practice Based
Learning and
Improvement
1. understand his or her own limitations of knowledge
2. ask peers and faculty for help when needed
3. accept feedback and develop self-improvement plans
5
3. be self-motivated to acquire knowledge
4. be able to use electronic references and literature to learn about
patients diseases
5. facilitate the learning of interns and students by holding
intelligent discussions regarding patient’s problems and
management
Interpersonal and
Communication
Skills
Professionalism
Systems-Based
Practice
1. write clear, organized, legible notes and orders
2. be able to use their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently
and effectively interview a patient and/or family members
3. interact with other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner in a leadership role
4. provide education and counseling to the patients and their
families
5. be able to discuss end of life decisions and care with patients and
their families
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. be honest, reliable, cooperative and accepting of responsibility
3. show regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. demonstrate respect, compassion and integrity
5. acknowledge errors and work to minimize them
6. put the needs of the patient above self-interest
7. display initiative and leadership
8. be able to delegate responsibility appropriately to others
9. demonstrate sensitivity to patient culture, gender, age,
preferences and disabilities
1. be actively working with all health professionals to provide
patient centered care
2. have worked on several quality improvement projects that
involve improving the systems in which they practice
3. be a patient advocate
4. be able to do the appropriate patient work-up in a cost effective
way
5. be able to supervise PGY1 residents and medical students
6
PGY-3
By the end of the PGY3 year residents should (underlines are on material above the
PGY2 goals):
Patient Care
1. be able to do a complete and accurate history and physical
examination
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the correct
diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days worth of
work
5. have demonstrated compassion for patients and their relatives
and treat them in a dignified manner
6. be able to handle emergency situations
7. be able to perform all of the following procedures skillfully and
with the least discomfort to the patient: ACLS, drawing venous
blood, drawing arterial blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a
peripheral venous line, pap smear and endocervical culture, arterial
puncture/line placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central
line placement, thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
8. perform in a satisfactory way on mini-CEX
9. be able to manage multiple problems at once
10. be showing ability to triage patients to appropriate level of care
11. reason well in ambiguous situations
12. spend time appropriate to the complexity of the problem
13. be able to function and manage patient decision making
independently
Medical
Knowledge
1. have become familiar with current literature
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of pathophysiology
and clinical medicine
3. know the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and how to
get informed consent, for all of the following procedures: ACLS,
drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood, abdominal
paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, pap smear and
endocervical culture, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
4. have demonstrated knowledge of evidence based medicine and
epidemiology principles, and be able to relate these to patient care
5. be ready to take and pass the ABIM board certification
examination
7
Practice Based
Learning and
Improvement
1. understand his or her own limitations of knowledge
2. ask peers and faculty for help when needed
3. accept feedback and develop self-improvement plans
3. be self-motivated to acquire knowledge
4. be able to use electronic references and literature to learn about
patients diseases
5. facilitate the learning of interns and students by holding
intelligent discussions regarding patient’s problems and
management
6. analyze personal practice patterns to self-improve
Interpersonal and
Communication
Skills
1. write clear, organized, legible notes and orders
2. be able to use their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently
and effectively interview a patient and/or family members
3. interact with other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner in a leadership role
4. provide education and counseling to the patients and their
families
5. be able to discuss end of life decisions and care with patients and
their families
6. have developed expertise in communicating with difficult
patients
Professionalism
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. be honest, reliable, cooperative and accepting of responsibility
3. show regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. demonstrate respect, compassion and integrity
5. acknowledge errors and work to minimize them
6. put the needs of the patient above self-interest
7. display initiative and leadership
8. be able to delegate responsibility appropriately to others
9. demonstrate sensitivity to patient culture, gender, age,
preferences and disabilities
10. be an effective consultant to other specialties
Systems-Based
Practice
1. have begun working with all health professionals to provide
patient centered care
2. have worked on several quality improvement projects that
involve improving the systems in which they practice
3. be a patient advocate
4. be able to do the appropriate patient work-up in a cost effective
way
5. be able to supervise PGY1 residents and medical students
6. understand different types of medical practice and how they
function and integrate with society
8
Intern Floor Month Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
1 month rotation (3 to 4 over the year)
Goals:
1) To learn to function on a general medicine floor team and be the first responder to
patient situations
2) To begin to handle floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotation the residents will:
1. begin to feel comfortable with current literature
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine
3. have begun to demonstrate knowledge of evidence based
medicine and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate
these to general medicine floor patients.
By the end of this series of rotation the residents will have
begun to know the indications, contraindications,
complications, techniques, specimen handling, result
interpretation, and how to get informed consent, for most of
the following common floor procedures: ACLS, drawing
venous blood, drawing arterial blood, abdominal
paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial
puncture/line placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture,
central line placement, thoracentesis, and nasogastric
intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-MyEvaluations Procedures
Tracking List
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotation the residents will:
1. be able to do a complete an accurate history and physical
examination in most situations
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
9
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and usually
arrive at the correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and prioritize
their days worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their PGY2 resident
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will be
able to perform all of the following common floor
procedures skillfully and with the least discomfort to the
patient: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
blood, placing a peripheral venous line, placing a
nasogastric tube
-mini-CEX
-Direct Bedside Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will
understand his or her own limitations of knowledge, ask
peers and faculty for help when needed and accept feedback
and develop a self-improvement plan.
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will be
self-motivated to acquire knowledge including being able to
use electronic references and literature to learn about
patients’ diseases
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will be
able to use their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently
and effectively interview a patient and/or family members.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will be
able to communicate in verbal and written form with their
resident, attending and other members of the health care
team in an effective, professional manner
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
10
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will have
begun working as a team with all other health care
professionals to provide patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will have
shown that they are a patient advocate.
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will be
able to effectively use the turnover report to minimize errors
in patient handoffs.
Supervision
The intern on the medicine floor is supervised by the floor resident. Also supervising are
the attending and the chief residents.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Attending Teaching Rounds occur Monday through Friday from 9:15-11:45am. Each
team is comprised of 2 PGY1 residents (interns) and 1 PGY2 or 3 resident, and generally
1-3 medical students (3rd and 4th year). The housestaff and attending spend the first few
minutes meeting with the nurses on each floor to setup the plan for the day. The next part
of these rounds occur in the conference room and focus on case presentation, education,
patient management decisions and through-put. Issues such as medical economics,
medical ethics, the social and spiritual needs of the patient, and humanistic aspects of
care are to be freely incorporated into the discussion. Next, the teams move to the
patients’ bedsides to demonstrate physical diagnosis and refine the plan of care. Finally
there are interdisciplinary rounds with care management, social work and the floor head
nurse which are typically lead by the attending and members of the housestaff.
Intern morning report is Thursday mornings from 8:30-9:15AM. This is a time for the
interns to handoff their beepers to their residents and go present cases and learn from
them.
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday, Friday with Chief of
Service Rounds on Thursday and Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months
are required to attend these conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core
11
topics in Internal Medicine and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement
Morbidity and Mortality conferences. During Chief of Service Rounds, a senior member
of the faculty hears a single case, selected to take advantage or the professor’s area of
expertise, and leads a discussion of the case. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from
inside the AECOM system or guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a
key topic of interest. Board Review is done once a month during noon conference.
Housestaff are also required to go to continuity clinic once a week while on the medicine
floors.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will see patients on the floors with diseases including but not limited to:
Fever +/- neutropenia/
Abdominal Pain/ Nausea/
Renal Stones
Vomiting/ Diarrhea
immuno-suppression
Alcohol Withdrawal
Fluid/ Dehydration/
Electrolyte & Acid-base
Disorders/ Hypotension
Sepsis/ Bacteremia other
than urine
Anemia
Gastrointestinal Bleeding/
BRBPR/ Melena/
Hematemesis
Sickle Cell Disease
Crisis
Arrhythmia
Cirrhosis and
Complications (Hepatic
Encephalopathy etc.)
Hypertensive Urgency/
Emergency
Substance Abuse
Cancer
Mental Status - Altered
UTI/ Urosepsis
Cellulitis
Nosocomial infection
Venous Thromboembolism (DVT/PE)
Chest pain/ Angina/ MI/
ACS
Pleural Effusion
CHF Exacerbation
Community Acquired
Pneumonia
COPD Exacerbation
Psychosomatic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus Uncontrolled/ DKA/ HONK
Renal Failure - Acute
Dyspnea/ SOB
Renal Failure - Chronic
Asthma Exacerbation
Syncope/ Pre-syncope/
Dizziness
Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department, other units, and
transferred from other hospitals. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds,
cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Interns take sign out from 7-7:30am and round on their own to check-in with their
patients, obtain vital sign trends for the past twenty-four hours and examine the patients.
12
at some point in the day. They then round with the resident from 7:30-8:30am on all new
patients and any very sick older patients. The intern should stop at the nursing station at
8:30am when the resident leaves for morning report to touch base with the nurses taking
care of common patients and then have time to call consults and see the rest of their less
sick patients. The interns must then go to attending rounds from 9:15-11:45am to talk
about all cases and specifically present the new admissions. 11:45am-12:30pm the interns
should call consults, do discharge summaries and then go to noon conference from 12:301:30pm. The rest of the afternoon they have time for notes and other work.
Interns write progress notes on all of their patients and either the resident or the intern
write admission notes on all new patients admitted. Only one note is required but if the
note is the interns then the resident should put a brief summary note showing
involvement. Interns are responsible for writing discharge summaries on all patients.
Interns are the first people called by the nurse when there is a patient problem or issue
and being first on the scene is a key clinical encounter. Interns on the floors do evening
admissions q4 days but can get admissions in the afternoon any day. Admissions are
received up until 7pm. The evening call intern’s shift ends at 9pm with sign out to the
night medicine crew and the evening admission intern must leave by 11pm at the latest to
be in compliance with the ACGME work hour regulations. Interns write notes 6 days a
week on their patients and have one day off in seven.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral formative feedback from
the attending. At the completion of the rotation, the attending will be expected to
complete a rotation evaluation form on MyEvaluations. There will also be a peer
evaluation form filled out. The Nursing Care Manager and Social Worker also evaluates
the interns function during the interdisciplinary rounds. Mini-CEXs are done on all
housestaff in the inpatient setting, usually while on the floors. These are also documented
in MyEvaluations. Residents at Montefiore-Weiler hospital on the floors are also
evaluated by the attending but on a system called New Innovations. These evaluations are
then printed out, faxed to Jacobi and added to the housestaff files.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP overall reading
Taking a sexual history website:
13
https://extapps.ama-assn.org/viral/Physician.jsp
CXR reading websites:
http://www.mc.uky.edu/education/images/flash/chestnew.swf
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/cxr/
http://rad.usuhs.edu/medpix/
http://info.med.yale.edu/intmed/cardio/imaging/contents.html
Key EKG practice websites:
http://library.med.utah.edu/kw/ecg/
http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/mavenmain.asp
Other EKG practice website:
http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/pstc/backup/prandekg.htm
http://www.ecglibrary.com/
http://www.whcmedicine.org/practicums
14
Resident Floor Month Curriculum
PGY:
2/3 (3-4 months throughout the 2 years)
Duration:
1 month rotation
Goals:
3) To learn to function in a supervisory role to first year resident and medical students,
and show sound judgment in delegating responsibility
4) To independently handle most of the floor patients diagnostic and management
problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotation the resident will:
1. be familiar with current literature regarding the care of
general medicine floor patients
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine
3. be able to demonstrate knowledge of evidence based
medicine and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate
these to general medicine floor patients.
By the end of this series of rotation the resident will know
the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and
how to get informed consent, for all of the following
common floor procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood,
drawing arterial blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a
peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotation the resident will:
1. be able to do a complete an accurate history and physical
examination
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
15
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the
correct diagnosis for general medicine floor patients
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a day’s
worth of work
5. be able to handle emergency situations
6. be able to manage multiple problems at once
7. be showing ability to triage patients to appropriate level
of care
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be able
to perform all of the following common floor procedures
skillfully and with the least discomfort to the patient: ACLS,
drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood, placing a
peripheral venous line, placing a nasogastric tube and have
begun to become proficient in central lines
Observation
-mini-CEX
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-MyEvaluations Procedures
Tracking List
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will
understand his or her own limitations of knowledge, ask
peers and faculty for help when needed and accept feedback
and develop a self-improvement plan.
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be
self-motivated to acquire knowledge including being able to
use electronic references and literature to learn about
patients diseases
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be able
to facilitate the learning of interns and students by holding
clinical discussions regarding floor patient’s problems and
management.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Journal Club Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be able -Global Faculty Assessment
to use their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and -Global Peer Assessment
effectively interview a patient and/or family members.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be able -Global Faculty Assessment
to communicate in verbal and written form with their
-Global Peer Assessment
students, interns, attendings and other members of the health -Interdisciplinary Team
care team in an effective, professional manner
Evaluation
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be able -Global Faculty Assessment
to provide education and counseling to the patients and their -Global Peer Assessment
16
families and be able to discuss end of life decisions and care
with patients and their families
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will have
displayed initiative and leadership with the floor team and
multidisciplinary team, and have shown the ability to
delegate responsibility appropriately to others on the team.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be
working as a team leader with all other health care
professionals to provide patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will have
-Global Faculty Assessment
shown that they are a patient advocate.
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Evaluation
By the end of this series of rotations the resident will be able -Global Peer Assessment
to effectively use electronic sign out to minimize errors in
patient handoffs, to evaluate their peers sign out, and to
report adverse occurrences to floor patients
Supervision
The resident on the medicine floor is supervised by the attending that is in charge of their
team, along with the chief residents.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Sign in rounds are from 7-7:30am in the Department of Medicine Library and include
supervised handoff of new patient admissions from overnight.
17
Attending Teaching Rounds occur Monday through Friday from 9:15-11:45am. Each
team is comprised of 2 PGY1 residents (interns) and 1 PGY2 or 3 resident, and generally
1-3 medical students (3rd and 4th year). The housestaff and attending spend the first few
minutes meeting with the nurses on each floor to setup the plan for the day. The next part
of these rounds occur in the conference room and focus on case presentation, education,
patient management decisions and through-put. Issues such as medical economics,
medical ethics, the social and spiritual needs of the patient, and humanistic aspects of
care are to be freely incorporated into the discussion. The next part of the rounds are
bedside rounds with the demonstration of physical diagnosis findings and refinement of
the plan of care. Finally there are interdisciplinary rounds with care management and
social work which are typically lead by the attending and members of the housestaff.
Resident morning report is Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from
8:30-9:15. This is a time for the residents to present cases to Drs. Bernstein, Fulop, and
Kamholz, and other selected faculty. The resident must be prepared to present the case
and discuss salient issues related to the care of the patient presented.
Journal Club occurs every Monday from 12:30am-1:30pm with Dr. Sidlow. This is an
Evidence-Based Medicine session where the housestaff pick a patient with a clinical
scenario that raises a question and research and bring an article that helps answer this
question.
Residents hold the beeper of the intern on Thursday mornings for 45 minutes 8:30-9:15
while they go to intern morning report.
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday, Friday with Chief of
Service Rounds on Thursday and Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months
are required to attend these conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core
topics in Internal Medicine and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement
Morbidity and Mortality conferences. During Chief of Service Rounds, a senior member
of the faculty hears a single case, selected to take advantage or the professor’s area of
expertise, and leads a discussion of the case. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from
inside the AECOM system or guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a
key topic of interest. Board Review session are held once a month during a noon
conference slot. These are run by the chief residents and involve MKSAP study
questions.
Housestaff are also required to go to continuity clinic once a week while on the medicine
floors.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The residents will see patients on the floors with diseases including but not limited to:
Fever +/- neutropenia/ immuno- Renal Stones
Abdominal Pain/ Nausea/
Vomiting/ Diarrhea
suppression
Alcohol Withdrawal
Fluid/ Dehydration/
Electrolyte & Acid-base
18
Sepsis/ Bacteremia other than
urine
Disorders/ Hypotension
Anemia
Gastrointestinal Bleeding/
BRBPR/ Melena/ Hematemesis
Sickle Cell Disease Crisis
Arrhythmia
Cirrhosis and Complications
(Hepatic Encephalopathy
etc.)
Hypertensive Urgency/
Emergency
Substance Abuse
Cancer
Mental Status - Altered
UTI/ Urosepsis
Cellulitis
Nosocomial infection
Venous Thrombo-embolism
(DVT/PE)
Chest pain/ Angina/ MI/ ACS
Pleural Effusion
CHF Exacerbation
Community Acquired
Pneumonia
COPD Exacerbation
Psychosomatic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus Uncontrolled/ DKA/ HONK
Renal Failure - Acute
Dyspnea/ SOB
Renal Failure - Chronic
Asthma Exacerbation
Syncope/ Pre-syncope/
Dizziness
Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department, other units, and
transferred from other hospitals. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds,
cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Residents on the floors do evening admissions q4 days but can get afternoon admissions
any day. The evening admission day ends at 8pm with sign out to the night float and the
resident must leave by 11pm latest to be in compliance with the ACGME work hour
regulations. Residents should review the interns’ notes 6 days a week on all patients and
have one day off in seven. Either the resident or the intern write admission notes on all
new patients admitted. Only one note is required but if the note is the interns then the
resident should put a brief summary note showing involvement.
Residents will be paged by their interns to help in patient care activities when needed.
Residents should assess every patient for Influenza vaccination and Pneumococcal
vaccination, especially Community Acquired Pneumonia patients, and this must be
documented in the chart.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
19
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral formative feedback from
the attending. At the completion of the rotation, the attending will be expected to
complete a rotation evaluation form on MyEvaluations. There will also be a peer
evaluation form filled out. The Nursing Care Manager and Social Worker also evaluates
the residents function during the interdisciplinary rounds. Mini-CEXs are done on all
housestaff in the inpatient setting, usually while on the floors. These are also documented
in MyEvaluations. Residents at Montefiore-Weiler hospital on the floors are also
evaluated by the attending but on a system called New Innovations. These evaluations are
then printed out, faxed to Jacobi and added to the housestaff files.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP overall reading
Taking a sexual history website: https://extapps.ama-assn.org/viral/Physician.jsp
CXR reading websites:
http://www.mc.uky.edu/education/images/flash/chestnew.swf
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/cxr/
http://rad.usuhs.edu/medpix/
http://info.med.yale.edu/intmed/cardio/imaging/contents.html
Key EKG practice websites:
http://library.med.utah.edu/kw/ecg/
http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/mavenmain.asp
Other EKG practice website:
http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/pstc/backup/prandekg.htm
http://www.ecglibrary.com/
http://www.whcmedicine.org/practicums
20
Floor Night Medicine Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
1/2 month rotation
Goals:
To learn to be the first responder to urgent and emergent floor patient situations and
handle these situations with the help of their night float resident and if necessary the
Senior Medical Resident and in-house attending.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will know about the
urgent and emergent situations that can occur to admitted
floor patients and the proper first steps to take to handle
those situations.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will be able to
prioritize the patient situations that occur at night and begin
to handle these situations with the help of their resident.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
more skill in performing all of the following common floor
procedures skillfully and with the least discomfort to the
patient: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
blood, placing a peripheral venous line, placing a
nasogastric tube.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will understand his
or her own limitations of knowledge and organizational
skills, ask peers and senior residents for help when needed,
and accept feedback.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
21
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident
and other members of the health care team in an effective,
professional manner.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate a patient handoff effectively.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will be able to
effectively use the turnover report to minimize errors in
patient care and in patient handoffs.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The intern on night float for the medicine floors is supervised by his PGY2 night float
resident, the Senior Medical Resident and the in-house attending.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The night float intern takes sign out at 9pm from the day on call team. They then do
coverage of those patients from 9pm to 7am and sign the patients back to the regular
teams from 7-7:30am. The intern then goes to morning report from 8:30-9:15am. The
intern then goes to the attending rounds and presents the cases that they admitted from
overnight. The intern must leave by 10:30am to be in compliance with ACGME work
hour regulations.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will see patients on the floors with diseases including but not limited to:
22
Abdominal Pain/ Nausea/
Vomiting/ Diarrhea
Fever +/- neutropenia/ immunosuppression/ HIV
Renal Stones
Alcohol Withdrawal
Fluid/ Dehydration/
Electrolyte & Acid-base
Disorders/ Hypotension
Sepsis/ Bacteremia other than
urine
Anemia
Gastrointestinal Bleeding/
BRBPR/ Melena/ Hematemesis
Sickle Cell Disease Crisis
Arrhythmia
Cirrhosis and Complications
(Hepatic Encephalopathy
etc.)
Hypertensive Urgency/
Emergency
Substance Abuse
Cancer
Mental Status - Altered
UTI/ Urosepsis
Cellulitis
Nosocomial infection
Venous Thrombo-embolism
(DVT/PE)
Chest pain/ Angina/ MI/ ACS
Pleural Effusion
CHF Exacerbation
Community Acquired
Pneumonia
COPD Exacerbation
Psychosomatic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus Uncontrolled/ DKA/ HONK
Renal Failure - Acute
Dyspnea/ SOB
Renal Failure - Chronic
Asthma Exacerbation
Syncope/ Pre-syncope/
Dizziness
Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department, other units, and
transferred from other hospitals. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds,
cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The night intern encounters various patients with changes in their conditions. These
urgent or emergent situations are quite varied but include new chest pain, shortness of
breath, headache, fever, hypotension, hypertension, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia,
abdominal pain, hematuria, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, constipation, insomnia, apnea,
and code situations. The intern also does new admissions with the night float resident.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
23
Evaluation
At the completion of the rotation, the Chief Resident will complete an evaluation form on
MyEvaluations. There will also be a peer evaluation form filled out. Housestaff do selfassessment forms every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP overall reading
24
Floor Night Medicine Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2
Duration:
1/2 month rotation
Goals:
5) To learn to function in a supervisory role to first year resident and show sound
judgment in delegating responsibility
6) To independently handle most of the floor patients diagnostic and management
problems
7) To independently do admissions coming in overnight
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will know about the
urgent and emergent situations that can occur to admitted
floor patients and the proper steps to take to handle those
situations.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
prioritize the patient situations that occur at night and handle
these situations.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated that they can do an admission at night with
oversight from the Senior Medical Resident including being
able to do a complete an accurate history and physical
examination, interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data and discuss a differential diagnosis and
arrive at the correct diagnosis for general medicine floor
patients
By the end of this series of inpatient rotations the resident
will be able to perform all of the following common floor
procedures skillfully and with the least discomfort to the
patient: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
25
-Global Peer Assessment
blood, placing a peripheral venous line, placing a
nasogastric tube and central lines.
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will understand his
or her own limitations of knowledge and organizational
skills, ask the Senior Medical Resident and in-house
attending for help when needed, and accept feedback..
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their interns,
Senior Medical Resident and other members of the health
care team in an effective, professional manner.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate a patient handoff effectively.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Chief Resident Focused
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will be able to
effectively use the turnover report to minimize errors in
patient care and in patient handoffs.
By the end of this series of rotations the residents will be
working as a leader with all other health care professionals
to provide patient centered care.
-Global Chief Resident
Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
26
Supervision
The resident on night float for the medicine floors is supervised by their Senior Medical
Resident, the chief residents and the in-house night attending.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The night float resident takes sign out at 8pm from the day on call residents about
specific patients that are not stable or very sick that they should keep an eye on. They do
admissions overnight and oversee their interns who are covering all the patients on the
service. They present the new admissions to the teams picking them up from 7-7:30am.
The resident then goes to morning report from 8:30-9:15am and then goes home.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will see patients on the floors with diseases including but not limited to:
Fever +/- neutropenia/ immuno- Renal Stones
Abdominal Pain/ Nausea/
Vomiting/ Diarrhea
suppression/ HIV
Alcohol Withrawal
Fluid/ Dehydration/
Electrolyte & Acid-base
Disorders/ Hypotension
Sepsis/ Bacteremia other than
urine
Anemia
Gastrointestinal Bleeding/
BRBPR/ Melena/ Hematemesis
Sickle Cell Disease Crisis
Arrhythmia
Cirrhosis and Complications
(Hepatic Encephalopathy
etc.)
Hypertensive Urgency/
Emergency
Substance Abuse
Cancer
Mental Status - Altered
UTI/ Urosepsis
Cellulitis
Nosocomial infection
Venous Thrombo-embolism
(DVT/PE)
Chest pain/ Angina/ MI/ ACS
Pleural Effusion
CHF Exacerbation
Community Acquired
Pneumonia
COPD Exacerbation
Psychosomatic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus Uncontrolled/ DKA/ HONK
Renal Failure - Acute
Dyspnea/ SOB
Renal Failure - Chronic
Asthma Exacerbation
Syncope/ Pre-syncope/
Dizziness
Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department, other units, and
transferred from other hospitals. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds,
cultures and races.
27
Types of Clinical Encounters
Besides doing admissions, the night resident will help the intern who encounters various
patients with changes in their conditions. These urgent or emergent situations are quite
varied but include new chest pain, shortness of breath, headache, fever, hypotension,
hypertension, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, abdominal pain, hematuria, diarrhea,
vomiting, nausea, constipation, insomnia, apnea, and code situations. The intern also does
new admissions with the night float resident.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
Evaluation
At the completion of the rotation, the Chief Resident will be expected to complete an
evaluation form on MyEvaluations. There will also be peer evaluation forms filled out.
Housestaff do self-assessment forms every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP overall reading
28
CCU Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
½ to 1 month at a time
Goal:
To learn to care for critically ill patients with acute cardiac conditions requiring CCU
care.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge regarding myocardial infarction, arrhythmias,
severe congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathies, valvular
diseases, pressor management, peripheral vascular disease
and the use of temporary pacemakers.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in interpretation of common cardiac laboratory
tests and imaging including ECG, stress testing,
echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and central
pulmonary artery catheter readings.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained a
basic understanding of the physiologic and pathophysiologic
principles of invasive hemodynamic monitoring by
echocardiography and central pulmonary artery catheter.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to begin
caring for a patient with MI, arrhythmia or severe CHF with
help from their resident and sub-specialty fellow and
attending.
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient
with an acute severe cardiac condition and do a thorough
cardiac examination including but not limited to palpating
the PMI, auscultating normal and abnormal heart sounds,
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
29
and examining peripheral arterial and venous pulses.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have familiarity
with echocardiography, central venous catheter placement,
central pulmonary artery catheterization and insertion of
temporary pacemakers in critically ill cardiac patients and
will have become familiar with interpreting hemodynamic
data.
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
cardiac studies and formulate a differential diagnosis and
treatment plan for cardiac patients in acute distress.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have begun to
learn to effectively evaluate and manage patients who have
undergone cardiac and peripheral interventional procedures
(Weiler) or peripheral interventional procedures (Jacobi).
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown that
they have learned to use local resources to research issues
and read regarding their acutely ill cardiac patient as an
independent adult learner.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown
continuous improvement in their care of acutely ill
cardiology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding acute cardiac conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding acutely ill
cardiac patients.
30
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when caring for CCU patients.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with acute cardiac diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can interact with the Cardiology attending, other consulting
attendings and allied health care personnel as a leader of the
health care team in a Cardiac Care Unit.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Supervision
In both the Jacobi and Weiler CCUs the resident on CCU month is supervised by the
CCU attending and Cardiology fellow with whom they round every day.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Teaching rounds are held daily in the CCU from 9am-12/1pm. Emphasis is placed on
bedside medicine with ancillary discussion of related pathophysiology and diagnostic and
therapeutic resources with an emphasis on echocardiography.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and acute cardiac diseases in the CCU. This
includes but is not limited to: MI, ACS, arrhythmias, pericarditis, syncope, HOCM,
valvular stenoses, peripheral vascular disease, severe congestive heart failure and
cardiomyopathies.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The entire rotation is in the CCU and seeing CCU candidates elsewhere in the hospital in
consultation.
Procedures
There will be opportunity to perform under the guidance of an attending or fellow the
following procedures: NGT placement, central venous catheter placement, central
pulmonary artery catheterization, and insertion of temporary pacemakers. Residents are
not required to become fully proficient in all of these by the end of the CCU month.
31
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations for the
Jacobi CCU and on New Innovations for the Weiler CCU. The New Innovations
evaluations are then printed by Jacobi staff and put in the residents files. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form, and others on the rotation will complete a peer
evaluation form.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Cardiology
Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine
Key EKG practice websitess:
http://library.med.utah.edu/kw/ecg/
http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/mavenmain.asp
Other EKG practice websites:
http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/pstc/backup/prandekg.htm
http://www.ecglibrary.com/
http://www.whcmedicine.org/practicums
Key Cardiac Auscultation websites:
http://www.blaufuss.org/
http://dms.dartmouth.edu/ed_programs/course_resources/ondoctoring_yr1/index.shtml
http://depts.washington.edu/physdx/heart/demo.html
Other Cardiac Auscultation websites:
http://www.wilkes.med.ucla.edu/inex.htm
32
CCU Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2 and 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month at a time (total of 2-3 months)
Goal:
1. To learn to care for very sick patients with acute cardiac conditions requiring
CCU care.
2. To become a team leader in the care of acutely sick cardiac patients in the CCU.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge regarding myocardial infarction, arrhythmias,
severe congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathies, valvular
diseases, peripheral vascular disease, pressor management,
and the use of temporary pacemakers.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interpret common cardiac laboratory tests and imaging
including ECG, stress tests, echocardiography, cardiac
catheterization, and central pulmonary artery catheter data .
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained an
advanced understanding of the physiologic and
pathophysiologic principles of invasive hemodynamic
monitoring such as with a central pulmonary artery catheter.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to begin
caring for a patient with MI, arrhythmia or severe CHF with
help from their resident and sub-specialty fellow and
attending.
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient
with an acute severe cardiac condition and do a thorough
cardiac examination including but not limited to palpating
the PMI, auscultating normal and abnormal heart sounds,
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
33
and examining peripheral arterial and venous pulses.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have familiarity
with central venous catheter placement, Swan-Ganz
catheterization and insertion of temporary pacemakers in
critically ill cardiac patients and will have become familiar
with interpreting hemodynamic data.
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
cardiac studies and formulate a differential diagnosis and
treatment plan for cardiac patients in acute distress.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have begun to
learn to effectively evaluate and manage patients who have
undergone cardiac and peripheral interventional procedures
(Weiler) or peripheral interventional procedures (Jacobi).
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown that
they have learned to use local resources to research issues
and read regarding their acutely ill cardiac patient as an
independent adult learner.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown
continuous improvement in their care of acutely ill
Cardiology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding acute cardiac conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding acutely ill
cardiac patients.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
34
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when caring for CCU patients.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with acute cardiac diseases.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can interact with the Cardiology attending, other consulting
attendings and allied health care personnel as part of a
health care team in a Cardiac Care Unit.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Supervision
In both the Jacobi and Weiler CCUs the resident on CCU month or Unit Chief month is
supervised by the CCU attending and Cardiology fellow with whom they round every
day. The CCU unit chief works closely overnight with the Senior Medical Resident
regarding appropriate triage and evaluation of patients with cardiac conditions that may
come to the CCU. The CCU night resident are encouraged to call the Cardiology Fellowon-Call for cardiac issues and/or the Critical Care Attending for critical-care issues at any
time.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Teaching rounds are held daily in the CCU from 9am-12pm. Emphasis is placed on
bedside medicine and echocardiography with ancillary discussion of related
pathophysiology and diagnostic and therapeutic resources.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and acute cardiac diseases in the CCU. This
includes but is not limited to: MI, ACS, arrhythmias, pericarditis, syncope, HOCM,
valvular stenoses, peripheral vascular disease, severe congestive heart failure and
cardiomyopathies.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The entire rotation is in the CCU and seeing CCU candidates elsewhere in the hospital in
consultation.
Procedures
There will be opportunity to perform under the guidance of an attending or fellow the
following procedures: NGT placement, central venous catheter placement, central
pulmonary artery catheterization, and insertion of temporary pacemakers. Residents are
not required to become fully proficient in all of these by the end of the CCU month.
35
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations for the
Jacobi CCU and on New Innovations for the Weiler CCU. The New Innovations
evaluations are then printed by Jacobi staff and put in the residents files. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form, and others on the rotation will complete a peer
evaluation form.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Cardiology
Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine
Key EKG practice websitess:
http://library.med.utah.edu/kw/ecg/
http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/mavenmain.asp
Other EKG practice websites:
http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/pstc/backup/prandekg.htm
http://www.ecglibrary.com/
http://www.whcmedicine.org/practicums
Key Cardiac Auscultation websites:
http://www.blaufuss.org/
http://dms.dartmouth.edu/ed_programs/course_resources/ondoctoring_yr1/index.shtml
http://depts.washington.edu/physdx/heart/demo.html
Other Cardiac Auscultation websites:
http://www.wilkes.med.ucla.edu/inex.htm
36
ICU Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
1 month total for the year
Goal:
1. To learn the basics of caring for very sick patients with Critical Care conditions
requiring ICU care.
2. To get a basic understanding of the pathophysiology of systemic hypoperfusion,
hemodynamic measurements and classifications and the role of fluid and
pharmacologic therapies.
3. To get a basic understanding of the pathophysiology of respiratory failure, the
role and limitations of mechanical ventilation and the role of pharmacologic and
non-ventilator therapy for respiratory failure.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will have gained
knowledge regarding respiratory failure, systemic
hypoperfusion and a range of acute critical care conditions.
By the end of this rotation the intern will have gained
knowledge in interpretation of common critical care tests
including arterial blood gas results, EKG, central
hemodynamic monitoring, fluid status.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will usually be able to
identify patients who require mechanical ventilation and
initiate ventilator support, and will be able to evaluate
patients for potential discontinuation of mechanical
ventilation.
By the end of the rotation the intern will usually be able to:
identify systemic hypoperfusion and the approaches to
monitoring patients with circulatory failure, differentiate
hemodynamic subsets and relate their implications for
therapy, and fluid load and apply appropriate vasoactive
therapies to patients with circulatory failure.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
37
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
By the end of the rotation the intern will have gained some
familiarity with central venous catheter placement, and will
have become familiar with interpreting hemodynamic data.
By the end of the rotation the intern will usually be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
critical care studies and formulate a differential diagnosis
and treatment plan for critical care patients in acute distress.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the intern will have shown that
they have learned to use local resources to research issues
and read regarding their acute critical care patients, as an
independent adult learner.
By the end of the rotation the intern will have shown
continuous improvement in their care of acute critical care
patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The intern will have begun to learn to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding acute critical care conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
The intern will be usually able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding acutely ill
critical care patients.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the intern will have demonstrated
respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with regard to
patient care and maintain patient confidentiality when caring
for MICU patients.
By the end of the rotation the intern will have demonstrated
a commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities
and adherence to ethical principles regarding patients with
acute critical care illnesses.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
38
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the intern will have shown they
can interact with the Pulmonary/ Critical Care attending,
other consulting attendings and allied health care personnel
as part of a health care team.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The intern on ICU month is supervised by the PGY2 Resident on MICU month and the
Pulmonary/Critical Care attending and fellow that are rounding that month in the MICU.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The ICU is at 12 bed Intensive Care Unit specializing in the care of medically critically
ill patients from a wide spectrum of medical and neurologic etiologies. While in the
MICU, residents work closely with the pulmonary/Critical Care Attending and Fellow on
the MICU Service. Rounds are held daily in the MICU starting at 9am. The
Pulmonary/Critical Care attending physician assigned to this rotation meets with the
members of the house staff team comprised of three daytime interns, one nighttime
intern, three PGY2 daytime residents and one PGY3 night time resident considered the
unit chief. There is an ICU attending in house 24 hours a day now and the night ICU
attending does bedside rounds with the call team leaving and the night housestaff coming
on. The format is based on clinical discussions of all cases in the MICU. Emphasis is
placed on bedside medicine with ancillary discussion of related pathophysiology and
diagnostic and therapeutic resources. Issues related to medical ethics, medical
economics, the social and spiritual needs of the patient, and humanistic aspects of care
are strongly encouraged to be incorporated into the general learning process.
Housestaff will now participate in presenting ICU Curriculum topics (intern, resident,
fellow) on a weekly basis.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Interns see a broad diversity of patients and acute critical care diseases and patient care
issues in the MICU. This includes but is not limited to:
Septic shock
Cardiogenic shock
Cardio/Pulmonary Resuscitation
Vasoactive drugs
Hemodynamic interpretation
Oxygen metabolism
Hemorrhagic shock
Respiratory Failure
Blood gas interpretation
Ventilations and weaning
39
Pulmonary embolism
Pneumonia
Severe COPD Exacerbations
Severe Asthma Exacerbations
Complications of enteral and parenteral nutrition
Acute hepatic failure
Acute renal failure
ARDS
Acid-Base imbalances
CVA
Status Epilepticus
Coma
Types of Clinical Encounters
The entire rotation is in the MICU caring for the patients that are admitted there. Any
new admissions accepted by the Critical Care Fellow or Attending will be discussed with
the intern.
Procedures
There will be opportunity to perform under the guidance of an attending or fellow at least
the following procedures: NGT placement, central venous catheter placement, arterial
puncture, venipuncture, peripheral IV placement, endotracheal intubation, paracentesis,
lumbar puncture.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be peer evaluation forms filled out. Housestaff do self-assessments every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Critical Care
Paul Marino’s textbook: The ICU Book
Key Vent learning websites:
http://www.ccmtutorials.com/rs/index.htm
http://courses.washington.edu/med610/mechanicalventilation/index.html
Other Vent learning websites:
40
http://www.thoracic.org/clinical/critical-care/mechanical-ventilation/index.php
http://www.slideshare.net/fergua/basic-mechanical-ventilation
41
ICU Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2/3
Duration:
1-1.5 months
Goal:
4. To supervise the functioning of the unit and the teaching in the unit and be
responsible for patient care decisions in the MICU in concert with the Critical
Care fellow and attending.
5. To understand the pathophysiology of systemic hypoperfusion, hemodynamic
measurements and classifications and the role of fluid and pharmacologic
therapies.
6. To understand the pathophysiology of respiratory failure, the role and limitations
of mechanical ventilation and the role of pharmacologic and non-ventilatory
therapy for respiratory failure.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
have knowledge regarding respiratory failure, systemic
hypoperfusion and a range of acute critical care conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
have knowledge in interpretation of common critical care
tests including arterial blood gas results, EKG, central
hemodynamic monitoring, fluid status.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
identify patients who require mechanical ventilation and
initiate ventilatory support, and will be able to evaluate
patients for potential discontinuation of mechanical
ventilation
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to:
identify systemic hypoperfusion and the approaches to
monitoring patients with circulatory failure, differentiate
hemodynamic subsets and relate their implications for
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
42
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
therapy, and fluid load and apply appropriate vasoactive
therapies to patients with circulatory failure.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have familiarity
with central venous catheter placement, and will have
become familiar with interpreting hemodynamic data.
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
cardiac studies and formulate a differential diagnosis and
treatment plan for critical care patients in acute distress.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown that
they have learned to use local resources to research issues
and read regarding their acute critical care patients, as an
independent adult learner.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown
continuous improvement in their care of acute critical care
patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have learned to
communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with
patients and their families regarding acute critical care
conditions.
By the end of the rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and
verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel
regarding acutely ill critical care patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when caring for MICU patients.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
43
patients with acute critical care illnesses.
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can interact with the Pulmonary/ Critical Care attending,
other consulting attendings and allied health care personnel
as part of a health care team.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The resident on ICU month is supervised by the Pulmonary/Critical Care attending and
fellow who are rounding that month in the MICU.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The ICU is at 12 bed Intensive Care Unit specializing in the care of medically critically
ill patients from a wide spectrum of medical and neurologic etiologies. While in the
MICU, residents work closely with the pulmonary/Critical Care Attending and Fellow on
the MICU Service. Rounds are held daily in the MICU starting at 9am. The
Pulmonary/Critical Care attending physician assigned to this rotation meets with the
members of the house staff team comprised of three daytime interns, one nighttime
intern, three PGY2 daytime residents and one PGY3 night time resident considered the
unit chief. There is an ICU attending in house 24 hours a day now and the night ICU
attending does bedside rounds with the call team leaving and the night housestaff coming
on. The format is based on clinical discussions of all cases in the MICU. Emphasis is
placed on bedside medicine with ancillary discussion of related pathophysiology and
diagnostic and therapeutic resources. Issues related to medical ethics, medical
economics, the social and spiritual needs of the patient, and humanistic aspects of care
are strongly encouraged to be incorporated into the general learning process.
Housestaff will now participate in presenting ICU Curriculum topics (intern, resident,
fellow) on a weekly basis.
The PGY3 unit chief at night does the ICU consults throughout the hospital and presents
them all to the Pulmonary/Critical Care fellow. The unit chief gains independence in
patient care and clinical judgment through this rotation.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and acute critical care diseases and patient care
issues in the MICU. This includes but is not limited to:
Septic shock
Cardiogenic shock
Cardio/Pulmonary Resuscitation
Vasoactive drugs
44
Hemodynamic interpretation
Oxygen metabolism
Hemorrhagic shock
Respiratory Failure
Blood gas interpretation
Ventilations and weaning
Pulmonary embolism
Pneumonia
Severe COPD Exacerbations
Severe Asthma Exacerbations
Complications of enteral and parenteral nutrition
Acute hepatic failure
Acute renal failure
ARDS
Acid-Base imbalances
CVA
Status Epilepticus
Coma
Types of Clinical Encounters
The rotation is mainly in the MICU caring for the patients that are admitted there. Any
new admissions accepted by either the Critical Care Fellow or Attending will be
discussed with the MICU resident.
Procedures
There will be opportunity to perform under the guidance of an attending or fellow at least
the following procedures: NGT placement, central venous catheter placement, arterial
puncture, venipuncture, peripheral IV placement, endotracheal intubation, paracentesis,
lumbar puncture.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be peer evaluation forms filled out. Housestaff do self-assessments every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Critical Care
Paul Marino’s textbook: The ICU Book
Key Vent learning websites:
45
http://www.ccmtutorials.com/rs/index.htm
http://courses.washington.edu/med610/mechanicalventilation/index.html
Other Vent learning websites:
http://www.thoracic.org/clinical/critical-care/mechanical-ventilation/index.php
http://www.slideshare.net/fergua/basic-mechanical-ventilation
46
Emergency Department Curriculum
PGY:
2 (total of one month), 1 for preliminary interns doing into Anesthesiology
Duration:
1 month
Goal:
To become familiar with triage of Emergency Department patients and learn the basics of
evaluating and treating patients in an Emergency Department setting.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will have gained
knowledge about common visits to the Emergency
Department and have gained knowledge in the care of these
conditions.
By the end of this rotation the residents will have learned to
triage patients coming into the Emergency Department.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will have shown
that they can see and examine patients in the Emergency
Department, arrive at a provisional diagnosis, and present
the case to the Emergency Department attending.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they know how to order an appropriate, cost-effective workup and be able to interpret laboratory and radiological data
in the context of patient-centered care in the Emergency
Department.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
During the rotation the resident may perform and gain
competence in the following procedures under the guidance
of an Emergency Department attending (unless already
certified): ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
blood, placing a peripheral venous line, placing NGT,
placing central line, paracentesis, lumbar puncture,
splinting, casting, I&D of abscess, lancing paranychia, ear
cerumen/foreign body removal, suturing.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
47
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
-Global Faculty Assessment
use local resources to research issues and read regarding
their Emergency Department patient as an independent adult
learner.
By the end of this rotation the resident should have shown
-Global Faculty Assessment
the ability to continuously self-improve in their care of
patients in the Emergency Department.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will be able to
communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with
patients and their families regarding the acute or sub-acute
condition that brought them to the Emergency Department.
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding acutely or
sub-acutely ill patients in the Emergency Department.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when caring for Emergency Department
patients.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with acute and sub-acute diseases in the Emergency
Department.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can interact with the Emergency Department attending,
other consulting attendings and allied health care personnel
-Global Faculty Assessment
48
as part of a health care team.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
can help a patient in the Emergency Department navigate
the complicated health care system to get the care they need
either in the hospital or after discharge.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
can practice cost-effective patient care in the Emergency
Department setting.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
The housestaff working in the Emergency Department is supervised by the ED attending
that is on the same shift. Dr. Thomas Perera, the Emergency Department Residency
Program Director is responsible for the Internal Medicine housestaff in general while
they are on this rotation. Housestaff must present every case to a supervising attending
before discharging the patient from the Emergency Department.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The education during this rotation is all related to direct patient care. Housestaff see
patients and come up with their own differential diagnosis and plan. Patients are
presented to an Emergency Medicine attending who then sees the patient to verify history
and physical findings. Medicine resident and Emergency Medicine attending together
develop a diagnostic and therapeutic plan. While in the ED, Internal Medicine residents
also work side by side with residents from the Emergency Medicine residency. The
teaching is mainly centered around the patient cases. Internal Medicine housestaff may
attend the Emergency Medicine lecture series on Wednesday mornings which are from
8am-12pm in the 4th floor conference room.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
This is an opportunity for Internal Medicine housestaff to see patients that are not only
purely Internal Medicine. Since the housestaff are seeing patients before they are triaged
to one service or another they may be seeing patients that wind up with medical, surgical,
neurological, gynecological, psychiatric etc. diseases. The patients are walk-in and those
brought by ambulance. Internal Medicine housestaff are not expected to get involved
with trauma patients being brought in by helicopter.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The clinical encounters are with Emergency Department patients as they come, in before
any other clinician has seen them.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
placing a peripheral venous line, placing NGT, placing central line, paracentesis, lumbar
puncture, splinting, casting, I&D of abscess, lancing paranychia, ear cerumen/foreign
body removal.
49
Evaluation
Throughout the rotation as the housestaff member works with different Emergency
Department attendings they should get verbal feedback on all cases they present. They
should also ask that attending to fill out a written evaluation of them at the end of the
shift. At the completion of the rotation, Dr. Jones completes an evaluation form on
MyEvaluations that summarizes the thoughts of the ED faculty. The housestaff completes
a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
50
Day Float Curriculum
PGY:
2
Duration:
1/2 month rotation
Goals:
1. To become proficient at doing admissions to the Medicine Floors.
2. To maintain patient throughput to Medicine Floors in the Emergency Department
while keeping patient safety and residency function optimal at all times.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation and other resident floor rotations
the resident will be familiar with current literature and have
adequate knowledge of pathophysiology and clinical
medicine (textbook reading) regarding common Internal
Medicine Floor admissions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to obtain
a complete and accurate medical history, perform a
complete admission physical examination and decide based
on these what to order as the appropriate work-up for
medicine floor admissions.
During this rotation the resident will perform the following
procedures skillfully and with the least discomfort to the
patient as is appropriate: ACLS, drawing venous blood,
drawing arterial blood, placing a peripheral venous line,
place various central lines and know when to refer for other
appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
synthesize clinical history, physical examination findings,
laboratory results and current scientific evidence to arrive at
a diagnosis and treatment plan for each admitted patient.
During this rotation while caring for the patients the resident
will demonstrate a kind, caring, concerned and responsible
attitude and approach to patients that is sensitive to each
-Global Faculty Assessment
51
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
patient’s age, gender, cultural, economic, and social
circumstances.
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have increased
in their ability to critically evaluate and use current medical
information and scientific evidence for patient care of
common inpatient admission diagnoses.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have improved
in their communication skills with patients being admitted
as well as in written communication through admission
notes and verbal communication with the team that will be
taking over the care of each patient.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
During this rotation while caring for the patients the resident -Global Faculty Assessment
will demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and sensitivity to a diverse patient
population.
During this rotation while caring for the patients the resident -Global Faculty Assessment
will demonstrate that they can interface with the Emergency
Department and consulting physicians and hospital staff in
an appropriate and respectful manner.
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to apply -Global Faculty Assessment
the CMMS measures for Pneumonia and CHF and
document them in their notes.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Global Faculty Assessment
properly guide patients through the complex Emergency
Department and hospital systems to the optimal location, in
a reasonable amount of time, safely.
52
Supervision
The day float resident is supervised by the chief residents and Program director and other
faculty to whom the patients are being admitted.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The education during this rotation is in doing many admissions every day. This volume
will allow the resident to become proficient in common inpatient admissions scenarios.
All cases admitted are discussed with the Program Director. Key patient care issues
should be researched and consultants should be used to optimize both education of the
housestaff and care of the patient.
Monday through Friday – Here 7am-5pm to help out with admissions especially in the
7am-1:30pm time while rounds and conferences are occurring for the floor teams. The
day float also backs up teams with afternoon admissions whose resident is in clinic.
Sunday – Here 7am-5pm (or later if necessary). Day Float will help with excessive
(decided by SMR) admissions that come in that overwhelm the teams that are admitting
after 7am. After 5pm if the SMR deems the admitting and floors to be quiet the Day Float
can go home.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The patient variety spans all socio-economic levels and races and is completely inpatient
admissions to the Medicine Floor and Subspecialty Floors.
Diseases that are most commonly encountered include but are not limited to:
Abdominal Pain/ Nausea/
Vomiting/ Diarrhea
Fever +/- neutropenia/ immunosuppression/ HIV
Renal Stones
Alcohol Withrawal
Fluid/ Dehydration/
Electrolyte & Acid-base
Disorders/ Hypotension
Sepsis/ Bacteremia other than
urine
Anemia
Gastrointestinal Bleeding/
BRBPR/ Melena/ Hematemesis
Sickle Cell Disease Crisis
Arrhythmia
Cirrhosis and Complications
(Hepatic Encephalopathy
etc.)
Hypertensive Urgency/
Emergency
Substance Abuse
Cancer
Mental Status - Altered
UTI/ Urosepsis
Cellulitis
Nosocomial infection
Venous Thrombo-embolism
(DVT/PE)
Chest pain/ Angina/ MI/ ACS
Pleural Effusion
CHF Exacerbation
Community Acquired
Pneumonia
Asthma Exacerbation
53
Syncope/ Pre-syncope/
Dizziness
COPD Exacerbation
Psychosomatic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus Uncontrolled/ DKA/ HONK
Renal Failure - Acute
Dyspnea/ SOB
Renal Failure - Chronic
Types of Clinical Encounters
This rotation is limited to inpatient admissions to the Medicine teams and Subspecialty
teams only.
Procedures
Procedures to learn include: Venipuncture, Arterial Puncture, IV Placement, NGT
Placement, Central Line Placement, Paracentesis, Lumbar Puncture.
Evaluation
At the completion of the rotation, the Program Director or chief resident will complete an
evaluation form in MyEvaluations.The Program Director will do mini-CEX on most day
float residents and enter that evaluation along with a chart evaluation in MyEvaluations
as well. There will also self-assessment forms filled out by the resident every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
http://pier.acponline.org/index.html Pier from ACP has disease topic reviews that are
excellent (for ACP members only)
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
54
Specialty Floor Oncology Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
½ to 1 month rotation
Goals:
8) To learn to function on a specialty medicine Oncology floor team and be the first
responder to complex patient situations in this very sick population.
9) To begin to handle Oncology floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. have begun becoming familiar with current literature on
Oncologic diseases
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine relating to Oncologic
diseases
3. have begun to demonstrate knowledge of evidence based
medicine and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate
these to Oncology floor patients.
By the end of this rotation the intern will have begun to
know the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and
how to get informed consent, for most of the following
common floor procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood,
drawing arterial blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a
peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. be able to do a relatively complete and accurate history
and physical examination on complex Oncology patients
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
55
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and usually
arrive at the correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days
worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their PGY2 resident
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will understand his or
her own limitations of knowledge regarding complex
Oncology patients, ask peers and faculty for help when
needed and accept feedback and develop a selfimprovement plan.
By the end of this rotation the intern will be self-motivated
to acquire knowledge including being able to use electronic
references and literature to learn about Oncology patients
diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to use their
verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and effectively
interview a patient with an Oncologic disease.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident,
fellow, attending and other members of the health care team
in an effective, professional manner.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
56
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will have begun
working as a team with all other health care professionals to
provide patient centered care.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will have shown that
they are a patient advocate for patients with Oncologic
diseases.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to
effectively use technology and the turnover report to
minimize errors in patient handoffs.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The intern on Oncology specialty floor is supervised by their PGY2 resident and the
oncology fellow and attending who are on service during their rotation.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Extensive bedside rounds with each Oncology attending occur Monday through Friday.
Noon conferences from 12:30-1:30pm are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Grand
Rounds are at that time on Tuesday. Housestaff on specialty floor months are required to
attend these conferences.
Tumor Board conference is 12-1 PM on Thursday afternoons. There is also a
Hematomorphology conference in basement pathology which is optional. There is a
biweekly mutidisciplinary meeting with palliative care, nutrition, case manager, and
social work..
Housestaff go to clinic one afternoon a week for continuity sessions during the specialty
floor Oncology rotation.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will learn about and see patients on the Oncology floor with:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Principles Of Neoplasia
Chemotherapy - Mechanisms Of Action & Toxicity
Biologic Therapies
Cancer Pain Management
Radiation Therapy
57
6. Lung Cancer
7. Cancer Of The Head & Neck
8. Brain Tumors
9. Cancer Of The Esophagus
10. Gastric Cancer & Pancreatic Cancer
11. Hepatobiliary Malignancies
12. Colorectal & Anal Cancer
13. Prostate Cancer
14. Kidney & Bladder Cancer
15. Testicular Cancer
16. Ovarian Cancer
17. Endometrial & Cervical Cancer
18. Breast Cancer
19. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia & Paraneoplastic Syndromes
20. Mesothelioma & Sarcoma
21. Skin Cancer & Melanoma
22. HIV Related Malignancies
23. Oncologic Emergencies
24. Peripheral Blood Smear & Bone Marrow Review
25. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia & MDS
26. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia & Bone Marrow Transplant
27. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia & Hairy Cell Leukemia
28. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
29. Transfusion Medicine
30. Hodgkin’s Disease
31. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
32. Plasma Cell Neoplasia
Patients are admitted to the Oncology floor from the Emergency Department, other units,
and directly from the clinic. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds, cultures
and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Interns on the specialty floors are on call q4 but can get admissions any day. The call day
ends at 8pm with sign out to the night float and the intern on call must leave by 11pm
latest to be in compliance with the ACGME. Interns write notes 6 days a week on all
patients. The interns round on their own to catch up with their patients regarding
overnight occurrences and morning vital signs. Interns write progress notes on all of these
58
patients and admission notes on all new patients they admit. Interns are the first people
called by he nurse when there is a patient problem or issue and being first on the scene is
a key clinical encounter. Interns are involved in discharge planning. When the team has
>10 patients the resident follows the extra 1-2 patients on their own without the intern
writing notes or doing scut on those patients.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation. Although not required, interns should try to observe a bone
marrow biopsy to learn about this procedure, its’ indications and interpretation of results.
Housestaff should also observe intrathecal, intravenous, and intraperitoneal
chemotherapy administration although they do not perform it.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the assigned
sub-specialty attending. At the completion of the rotation, the assigned sub-specialty
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be a peer evaluation form filled out. Housestaff fill out self evaluation forms every 6
months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP Oncology
59
Specialty Floor Oncology Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2 or 3
Duration:
½-1 month rotation
Goals:
10) To learn to function on a specialty medicine Oncology floor team and respond to
complex patient situations in this very sick population.
11) To handle Oncology floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. have developed familiarity with current literature on
oncologic diseases
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine relating to oncologic
diseases
3. have demonstrate knowledge of evidence based medicine
and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate these to
Oncology floor patients.
By the end of this rotation the resident will know the
indications, contraindications, complications, techniques,
specimen handling, result interpretation, and how to get
informed consent, for the following common floor
procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous
line, arterial puncture/line placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar
puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. be able to do a complete an accurate history and physical
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
60
examination on complex Oncology patients
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the
correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days
worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their Oncology Fellow.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will understand his
or her own limitations of knowledge regarding complex
Oncology patients, ask peers and faculty for help when
needed and accept feedback and develop a selfimprovement plan.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be selfmotivated to acquire knowledge including being able to use
electronic references and literature to learn about Oncology
patients diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and
effectively interview a patient with an Oncologic disease.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident,
fellow, attending and other members of the health care team
in an effective, professional manner
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
61
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
can work as a team with all other health care professionals
to provide patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they are a patient advocate.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
effectively use electronic sign out to minimize errors in
patient handoffs, to evaluate their interns sign out, and to
report adverse occurrences to floor patients
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The resident on Oncology specialty floor is supervised by their Oncology fellow and
attending who are on service during their rotation.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Extensive bedside rounds with each Oncology attending occur Monday through Friday.
Resident morning report is Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 11:20am12:20pm. This is a time for the residents to present cases to Drs. Bernstein, Fulop, and
Coyle, and other selected faculty. The resident must be prepared to present the case and
discuss salient issues related to the care of the patient presented.
Journal Club/Clinical Questions occurs every Monday from 11:20am-12:20pm with Dr.
Sidlow. This is an Evidence-Based Medicine session where the housestaff pick a patient
with a clinical scenario that raises a question and research and bring an article that helps
answer this question.
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday and Friday with
Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months are required to attend these
conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core topics in Internal Medicine
and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Morbidity and Mortality
conferences. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from inside the AECOM system or
guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a key topic of interest.
Tumor Board conference is 12-1 PM on Thursday afternoons. There is also a
Hematomorphology conference in basement pathology which is optional. There is a
biweekly multidisciplinary meeting with palliative care, nutrition, case manager, and
social work..
62
Housestaff go to clinic one afternoon a week for continuity sessions during the specialty
floor Oncology rotation.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The residents will learn about and see patients on the Oncology floor with:
33. Principles Of Neoplasia
34. Chemotherapy - Mechanisms Of Action & Toxicity
35. Biologic Therapies
36. Cancer Pain Management
37. Radiation Therapy
38. Lung Cancer
39. Cancer Of The Head & Neck
40. Brain Tumors
41. Cancer Of The Esophagus
42. Gastric Cancer & Pancreatic Cancer
43. Hepatobiliary Malignancies
44. Colorectal & Anal Cancer
45. Prostate Cancer
46. Kidney & Bladder Cancer
47. Testicular Cancer
48. Ovarian Cancer
49. Endometrial & Cervical Cancer
50. Breast Cancer
51. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia & Paraneoplastic Syndromes
52. Mesothelioma & Sarcoma
53. Skin Cancer & Melanoma
54. HIV Related Malignancies
55. Oncologic Emergencies
56. Peripheral Blood Smear & Bone Marrow Review
57. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia & MDS
58. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia & Bone Marrow Transplant
59. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia & Hairy Cell Leukemia
60. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
61. Transfusion Medicine
62. Hodgkin’s Disease
63. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
63
64. Plasma Cell Neoplasia
Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department, other units, and
transferred from other hospitals. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds,
cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Residents on the Oncology floor are on call q4 and cross admit with general medicine as
well. They can get admissions to Oncology any day. Residents write admission notes on
all new patients they admit. When the team has >10 patients the resident follows the extra
1-2 patients on their own without the intern writing notes or doing scut on those patients.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation. Although not required, residents should try to observe a bone
marrow biopsy to learn about this procedure, its’ indications and interpretation of results.
Housestaff should also observe intrathecal, intravenous, and intraperitoneal
chemotherapy administration although they do not perform it.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
assigned sub-specialty attending. At the completion of the rotation, the assigned subspecialty attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations.
There will also be a peer evaluation form filled out. Housestaff fill out self evaluation
forms every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP Oncology
64
Specialty Floor HIV Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
1 month rotation
Goals:
12) To learn to function on a specialty medicine HIV floor team and be the first responder
to complex patient situations in this very sick population.
13) To begin to handle HIV floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. have begun becoming familiar with current literature on
HIV and related opportunistic diseases
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine relating to HIV and
related opportunistic diseases
3. have begun to demonstrate knowledge of evidence based
medicine and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate
these to HIV floor patients.
By the end of this rotation the intern will have begun to
know the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and
how to get informed consent, for most of the following
common floor procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood,
drawing arterial blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a
peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
-Resident Self Assessment
1. be able to do a relatively complete an accurate history and -Global Faculty Assessment
physical examination on complex HIV patients
-Global Peer Assessment
65
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and usually
arrive at the correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days
worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their PGY2 resident
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will understand his or
her own limitations of knowledge regarding complex HIV
patients, ask peers and faculty for help when needed and
accept feedback and develop a self-improvement plan.
By the end of this rotation the intern will be self-motivated
to acquire knowledge including being able to use electronic
references and literature to learn about HIV patients and
opportunistic diseases.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to use their
verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and effectively
interview a patient with HIV.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident,
attending and other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
66
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will have begun
working as a team with all other health care professionals to
provide patient centered care.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will have shown that
they are a patient advocate.
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to
effectively use the turnover report to minimize errors in
patient handoffs.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The intern on the HIV specialty floor is supervised by their PGY2 resident and the HIV
attending on service.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Attending Teaching Rounds occur Monday through Friday from 9-11:30am. Each team is
comprised of 2 PGY1 residents (interns) and 1 PGY2 or 3 resident, and sometimes
medical students (3rd and 4th year). Rounds start in the conference room and focus on case
presentation, education, patient management decisions and through-put. Issues such as
medical economics, medical ethics, the social and spiritual needs of the patient, and
humanistic aspects of care are to be freely incorporated into the discussion. The next part
of the rounds are bedside rounds with the demonstration of physical diagnosis findings
and refinement of the plan of care. Finally there are interdisciplinary rounds with care
management, social work and the floor head nurse which are typically lead by the
attending and members of the housestaff.
Intern morning report is Thursday mornings from 8:30am-9:15am. This is a time for the
interns to handoff their beepers to their residents and go present cases and learn from
them.
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday, Friday with Chief of
Service Rounds on Thursday and Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months
are required to attend these conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core
topics in Internal Medicine and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement
Morbidity and Mortality conferences. During Chief of Service Rounds, a senior member
of the faculty hears a single case, selected to take advantage or the professor’s area of
expertise, and leads a discussion of the case. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from
67
inside the AECOM system or guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a
key topic of interest.
Housestaff are also required to go to continuity clinic once a week while on the medicine
floors.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will see patients on the floors with HIV and various opportunistic infections.
Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department and other units.
Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds, cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Interns on the specialty floors get evening admissions q3 days but can get admissions any
day. The evening admissions end at 9pm with sign out to the night float and the intern on
call must leave by 11pm latest to be in compliance with the ACGME. Interns write notes
7 days a week on all patients. The interns round on their own to catch up with their
patients regarding overnight occurrences and morning vital signs. Interns write progress
notes on all of these patients. Either the resident or the intern write admission notes on all
new patients admitted. Only one note is required but if the note is the interns then the
resident should put a brief summary note showing involvement. Interns are the first
people called by he nurse when there is a patient problem or issue and being first on the
scene is a key clinical encounter.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the assigned
sub-specialty attending. At the completion of the rotation, the assigned sub-specialty
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be peer evaluation forms filled out. Housestaff do self-evaluations every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP Infectious Diseases
68
Specialty Floor HIV Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2 or 3
Duration:
1 month rotation
Goals:
14) To learn to function on a specialty medicine HIV floor team and respond to complex
patient situations in this very sick population.
15) To handle HIV floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. have developed familiarity with current literature on HIV
and related opportunistic diseases
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine relating to HIV and
related opportunistic diseases
3. have demonstrate knowledge of evidence based medicine
and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate these to
HIV floor patients.
By the end of this rotation the resident will know the
indications, contraindications, complications, techniques,
specimen handling, result interpretation, and how to get
informed consent, for the following common floor
procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous
line, arterial puncture/line placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar
puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. be able to do a complete an accurate history and physical
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
69
examination on complex HIV patients
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the
correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days
worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their HIV attending and the SMR.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will understand his
or her own limitations of knowledge regarding complex
HIV patients, ask peers and faculty for help when needed
and accept feedback and develop a self-improvement plan.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be selfmotivated to acquire knowledge including being able to use
electronic references and literature to learn about HIV
patients diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and
effectively interview a patient with HIV.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident,
attending and other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
70
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
can work as a team with all other health care professionals
to provide patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Interdisciplinary Team
Report Card
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they are a patient advocate.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
effectively oversee the use of the turnover report to
minimize errors in patient handoffs.
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The resident on HIV specialty floor is supervised by the HIV attending on service.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Sign in rounds are from 7-7:30am in the Department of Medicine Library and include
supervised handoff of new patient admissions from overnight.
Attending Teaching Rounds occur Monday through Friday from 9:15-11:45am. Each
team is comprised of 2 PGY1 residents (interns) and 1 PGY2 or 3 resident, and
sometimes medical students (3rd and 4th year). Rounds start in the conference room and
focus on case presentation, education, patient management decisions and through-put.
Issues such as medical economics, medical ethics, the social and spiritual needs of the
patient, and humanistic aspects of care are to be freely incorporated into the discussion.
The next part of the rounds are bedside rounds with the demonstration of physical
diagnosis findings and refinement of the plan of care. Finally there are interdisciplinary
rounds with care management, social work and the floor head nurse which are typically
lead by the attending and members of the housestaff.
Resident morning report is Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 8:30am9:15am. This is a time for the residents to present cases to Drs. Bernstein, Fulop, and
Coyle, and other selected faculty. The resident must be prepared to present the case and
discuss salient issues related to the care of the patient presented.
Journal Club occurs every Monday from 12:30-1:30 with Dr. Sidlow. This is an
Evidence-Based Medicine session where the housestaff pick a patient with a clinical
scenario that raises a question and research and bring an article that helps answer this
question.
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday, Friday with Chief of
Service Rounds on Thursday and Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months
71
are required to attend these conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core
topics in Internal Medicine and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement
Morbidity and Mortality conferences. During Chief of Service Rounds, a senior member
of the faculty hears a single case, selected to take advantage or the professor’s area of
expertise, and leads a discussion of the case. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from
inside the AECOM system or guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a
key topic of interest. Board Review session are held monthly during a noon conference
slot. These are run by the chief residents and involve MKSAP study questions.
Housestaff are also required to go to continuity clinic once a week while on the medicine
floors.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The residents will see patients on the floors with HIV and various opportunistic
infections. Patients are admitted to the floors from the Emergency Department and other
units. Patients are from all socio-economic backgrounds, cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Residents on the HIV specialty floor do evening admissions q4 days but can get
afternoon admissions any day. The evening admissions end at 8pm with sign out to the
night float and the resident must leave by 11pm latest to be in compliance with the
ACGME. Either the resident or the intern write admission notes on all new patients
admitted. Only one note is required but if the note is the interns then the resident should
put a brief summary note showing involvement. Residents help out their interns when
patient situations occur that the intern can not handle alone.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation. Although not required, residents should try to observe a bone
marrow biopsy to learn about this procedure, its’ indications and interpretation of results.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the assigned
sub-specialty attending. At the completion of the rotation, the assigned sub-specialty
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be peer evaluation forms filled out. Housestaff do self-evaluations every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP Infectious Diseases
72
Specialty Floor Pulmonary Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
½ - 1 month rotation
Goals:
16) To learn to function on a specialty medicine Pulmonary floor team and be the first
responder to complex patient situations in this very sick population.
17) To begin to handle pulmonary floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. have begun becoming familiar with current literature on
pulmonary diseases
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine relating to
pulmonary diseases
3. have begun to demonstrate knowledge of evidence based
medicine and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate
these to pulmonary floor patients.
By the end of this rotation the intern will have begun to
know the indications, contraindications, complications,
techniques, specimen handling, result interpretation, and
how to get informed consent, for most of the following
common floor procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood,
drawing arterial blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a
peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line placement,
arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement,
thoracentesis, and nasogastric intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
-Global Faculty Assessment
1. be able to do a relatively complete an accurate history and -Global Peer Assessment
physical examination on complex pulmonary patients
-Direct Faculty Bedside
73
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and usually
arrive at the correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days
worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their PGY2 resident
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will understand his or
her own limitations of knowledge regarding complex
pulmonary patients, ask peers and faculty for help when
needed and accept feedback and develop a selfimprovement plan.
By the end of this rotation the intern will be self-motivated
to acquire knowledge including being able to use electronic
references and literature to learn about pulmonary patients
diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to use their
verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and effectively
interview a patient with a pulmonary disease.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident,
attending and other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
74
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the intern will have begun
working as a team with all other health care professionals to
provide patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will have shown that
they are a patient advocate.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the intern will be able to
effectively use the turnover report to minimize errors in
patient handoffs.
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The intern on pulmonary specialty floor is supervised by their PGY2 resident and
Pulmonary attending who are on service that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Sign-in Rounds are from 7:00-7:30am in the 4A Conference room. The entire team will
have work rounds from 7:30-8:30am. Intern Morning Report takes place at 8:30-9:15am
on Thursdays only.
Attending Teaching Rounds occur Monday through Friday from 9:15-11:45am. Each
team is comprised of 2 PGY1 residents (interns) and 1 PGY2 resident, and sometimes
medical students (3rd and 4th year). Rounds start in the conference room and focus on case
presentation, education, patient management decisions and through-put. Issues such as
medical economics, medical ethics, the social and spiritual needs of the patient, and
humanistic aspects of care are to be freely incorporated into the discussion. The next part
of rounds is bedside rounds with the demonstration of physical diagnosis findings and
refinement of the plan of care. Finally there are interdisciplinary rounds with care
management and social work which are typically lead by the housestaff.
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday, Friday with Chief of
Service Rounds on Thursday and Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months
are required to attend these conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core
topics in Internal Medicine and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement
Morbidity and Mortality conferences. During Chief of Service Rounds, a senior member
of the faculty hears a single case, selected to take advantage or the professor’s area of
expertise, and leads a discussion of the case. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from
inside the AECOM system or guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a
key topic of interest.
75
Housestaff are also required to go to continuity clinic once a week while on the medicine
floors.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will see patients on the pulmonary floor with diseases that include but are not
limited to: asthma exacerbation, COPD exacerbation, respiratory failure, CAP,
Healthcare Associated Pneumonia, PE, IPF. Patients are admitted to the floors from the
Emergency Department, other units, and transferred from other hospitals. Patients are
from all socio-economic backgrounds, cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Interns on the specialty floors are on call q3 days but can get admissions any day. The
call day ends at 8pm with sign out to the night float and the intern on call must leave by
11pm latest to be in compliance with the ACGME. Interns write notes 7 days a week on
all patients. The interns round on their own to catch up with their patients regarding
overnight occurrences and morning vital signs. Interns write progress notes on all of these
patients and admission notes on all new patients they admit. Interns are the first people
called by he nurse when there is a patient problem or issue and being first on the scene is
a key clinical encounter.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation. Although not required, interns should try to observe a
thoracentesis to learn about this procedure, its’ indications and interpretation of results.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the assigned
sub-specialty attending. At the completion of the rotation, the assigned sub-specialty
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be peer evaluation forms filled out. Housestaff do self-evaluations every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MedStudy and MKSAP Pulmonary
PFT education websites:
http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/pulmonary/pul
monary-function-testing/
http://courses.washington.edu/med610/index.html
76
CXR reading websites:
http://www.mc.uky.edu/education/images/flash/chestnew.swf
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/cxr/
http://rad.usuhs.edu/medpix/
http://info.med.yale.edu/intmed/cardio/imaging/contents.html
77
Specialty Floor Pulmonary Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2 or 3
Duration:
½ - 1 month rotation
Goals:
18) To learn to function on a specialty medicine Pulmonary floor team and respond to
complex patient situations in this very sick population.
19) To handle pulmonary floor patients diagnostic and management problems
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. have developed familiarity with current literature on
pulmonary diseases
2. be able to demonstrate adequate knowledge of
pathophysiology and clinical medicine relating to
pulmonary diseases
3. have demonstrated knowledge of evidence based
medicine and epidemiology principles, and be able to relate
these to Pulmonary floor patients.
By the end of this rotation the resident will know the
indications, contraindications, complications, techniques,
specimen handling, result interpretation, and how to get
informed consent, for the following common floor
procedures: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial
blood, abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous
line, arterial puncture/line placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar
puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. be able to do a complete an accurate history and physical
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
78
examination on complex oncology patients
2. be able to interpret the history, physical examination and
laboratory data in most situations
3. be able to discuss a differential diagnosis and arrive at the
correct diagnosis
4. be able to prioritize the patients problems and a days
worth of work
5. begin to handle emergency situations with the help of
their Pulmonary Team attending.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-mini-CEX
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will understand his
or her own limitations of knowledge regarding complex
pulmonary patients, ask peers and faculty for help when
needed and accept feedback and develop a selfimprovement plan.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be selfmotivated to acquire knowledge including being able to use
electronic references and literature to learn about pulmonary
patients diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
their verbal and non-verbal skills to competently and
effectively interview a patient with a pulmonary disease.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate in verbal and written form with their resident,
attending and other members of the health care team in an
effective, professional manner
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will:
1. be able to establish trust with the patients and staff
2. have shown they are honest, reliable, cooperative and
accepting of responsibility
3. have shown regard for opinions and skills of colleagues
4. have demonstrated respect, compassion and integrity
5. have acknowledged errors and work to minimize them
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
79
6. have shown that they put the needs of the patient above
self-interest
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
can work as a team with all other health care professionals
to provide patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they are a patient advocate.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
effectively oversee the use of the turnover report to
minimize errors in patient handoffs.
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The resident on Pulmonary specialty floor is supervised by their Pulmonary attending
who is on service that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Sign in rounds are from 7:00-7:30am in the 4A-1 Conference room and include
supervised handoff of new patient admissions from overnight.
Attending Teaching Rounds occur Monday through Friday from 9:15-11:45am. Each
team is comprised of 2 PGY1 residents (interns) and 1 PGY2 or 3 resident, and
sometimes medical students (3rd and 4th year). Rounds start in the conference room and
focus on case presentation, education, patient management decisions and through-put.
Issues such as medical economics, medical ethics, the social and spiritual needs of the
patient, and humanistic aspects of care are to be freely incorporated into the discussion.
The next part of rounds is bedside rounds with the demonstration of physical diagnosis
findings and refinement of the plan of care. Finally there are interdisciplinary rounds with
care management and social work which are typically lead by the housestaff.
Resident morning report is Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 8:30am9:15am. This is a time for the residents to present cases to Drs. Bernstein, Fulop, and
Coyle, and other selected faculty. The resident must be prepared to present the case and
discuss salient issues related to the care of the patient presented.
Journal Club occurs every Monday from 12:30-1:30 with Dr. Sidlow. This is an
Evidence-Based Medicine session where the housestaff pick a patient with a clinical
scenario that raises a question and research and bring an article that helps answer this
question.
80
Noon Conferences from 12:30pm-1:30pm are Monday, Wednesday, Friday with Chief of
Service Rounds on Thursday and Grand Rounds on Tuesday. Housestaff on floor months
are required to attend these conferences. The Noon Conferences includes reviews of core
topics in Internal Medicine and also include Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement
Morbidity and Mortality conferences. During Chief of Service Rounds, a senior member
of the faculty hears a single case, selected to take advantage or the professor’s area of
expertise, and leads a discussion of the case. At Grand Rounds a faculty member from
inside the AECOM system or guest speaker from outside the system gives a lecture on a
key topic of interest. Board Review session are held monthly during a noon conference
slot. These are run by the chief residents and involve MKSAP study questions.
Housestaff are also required to go to continuity clinic once a week while on the medicine
floors.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The interns will see patients on the pulmonary floor with diseases that include but are not
limited to: asthma exacerbation, COPD exacerbation, respiratory failure, CAP,
Healthcare Associated Pneumonia, PE, IPF. Patients are admitted to the floors from the
Emergency Department, other units, and transferred from other hospitals. Patients are
from all socio-economic backgrounds, cultures and races.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The resident on the Pulmonary specialty floors is on call q3 but can get admissions any
day. Residents write admission notes on all new patients they admit. The call day ends at
8pm with sign out to the night float and the intern on call must leave by 11pm latest to be
in compliance with the ACGME. Residents help out their interns when patient situations
occur that the intern can not handle alone.
Procedures
Including but not limited to: ACLS, drawing venous blood, drawing arterial blood,
abdominal paracentesis, placing a peripheral venous line, arterial puncture/line
placement, arthrocentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement, thoracentesis, and
nasogastric intubation. Although not required, residents should try to observe a
thoracentesis to learn about this procedure, its’ indications and interpretation of results.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the intern should receive oral feedback from the assigned
sub-specialty attending. At the completion of the rotation, the assigned sub-specialty
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form in MyEvaluations. There will
also be peer evaluation forms filled out. Housestaff do self-evaluations every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
81
MedStudy and MKSAP Pulmonary
PFT education websites:
http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/pulmonary/pul
monary-function-testing/
http://courses.washington.edu/med610/index.html
CXR reading websites:
http://www.mc.uky.edu/education/images/flash/chestnew.swf
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/cxr/
http://rad.usuhs.edu/medpix/
http://info.med.yale.edu/intmed/cardio/imaging/contents.html
82
Senior Medical Resident (SMR) Curriculum
PGY:
3
Duration:
0.5 to 1 month at a time (total of 1.5-2 months)
Goal:
1. To effectively triage admissions and transfers to the floors and units.
2. To lead the floor and unit teams and help them when there are patient care issues.
3. To become comfortable leading the Rapid Response Team and running codes.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
have furthered their knowledge regarding admissions, acute
care situations and urgent inpatient consults.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown they
can triage and handle any acute inpatient care issue in the
entire hospital from floor admission to MICU patients to
medicine consults.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown
continuous improvement in their acute care of hospitalized
patients.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they -Resident Self Assessment
can communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and -Global Faculty Assessment
83
verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel
regarding any kind of hospitalized patient.
-Global Peer Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
the care of hospitalized patients.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can interact with the interns, junior residents, fellows,
attendings and allied health care personnel as part of a
health care team generally and a Rapid Response Team /
Cardiac Arrest Code Team specifically.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
recognize when a patient’s interest would be best served by
transfer to the medical service and make all necessary
arrangements to assure safe and efficient transfer.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
evidence-based, cost-conscious strategies in the care of
patients with medical illness going to the medical floors and
units.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
The SMR is supervised by the chief residents and for consults the assigned consult
attending. They also present new consults to the in-house attending or the consult
attending on call.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The SMR learns by actively providing triage for all patients admitted or transferred to the
medical service from the Emergency Department or other hospital acute care areas. They
also learn by being the team leader of the Rapid Response Team for acute care situations
that arise, and leading the code team during CAC following ACLS protocols. In addition,
the SMR learns by doing consults at night and on weekends for non-medicine services.
The consult curriculum is in a separate section of the residency curriculum.
84
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Senior Medical Residents see a broad diversity of patients being admitted to the floors
and unit. They see the gamut of diseases that were discussed in the consult team, unit,
medicine floor and specialty floor curricula.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The SMR learns by seeing a huge volume of patients that need to be evaluated for
admission and triaged to the appropriate location. They are involved in handling acute
patient care situations that come up on the floors and units around the entire hospital as
the leader of the Rapid Response Team and the CAC teams. They are called for medicine
consults after hours and on weekends. This multitasking and leadership role is also in
place to improve patient safety.
Procedures
There will be opportunity to perform under the guidance of an attending or fellow at least
the following procedures: central venous catheter placement, endotracheal intubation,
paracentesis, lumbar puncture. The SMR is the senior in house resident and is expected to
teach and observe other Internal Medicine housestaff who need to do procedures but are
not yet certified.
Evaluation
After each 24 hour SMR shift the chief resident should give verbal formative feedback
regarding how they functioned. At the completion of the rotation, the consult attending of
the month completes an evaluation form on MyEvaluations. There will also be a peer
evaluation form filled out. Housestaff do self-assessment forms every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
85
Consult Curriculum
PGY:
2 and 3
Duration:
During the 1.5-2 months of SMR/Consult rotation the PGY3 housestaff will have 1-2
weeks of consult mini-block time. PGY 2 and 3 housestaff also get exposure to outpatient
assessment of consults during the ambulatory block time.
Goals
The goals of the Consult mini-block rotation include:
1. to learn to be the medical consultant to various other subspecialties regarding the
care of their hospitalized patients
2. to learn what is involved in medical optimization of a patient for surgery
3. to practice and become adept at leading CAC/RRTs
Objectives
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
their medical knowledge to evaluate and medically optimize
patients in the peri-operative period.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
their medical knowledge to evaluate and medically aid
patients from other specialty services with medical issues.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to -Resident Self Assessment
optimize the care of a patient going for surgery.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Resident Self Assessment
provide recommendations to other specialty colleagues
-Global Faculty Assessment
regarding the care of their inpatients.
-Global Peer Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to have
-Resident Self Assessment
86
learned to use local resources to research issues and read
regarding their peri-operative patient as an independent
adult learner.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to have
learned to use local resources to research issues and read
regarding patients admitted to other specialty services as an
independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate effectively with patients and families
regarding pre-operative testing or post-operative medical
care.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate effectively both in written and verbal form
with surgical and other specialty colleagues regarding the
care of their patients
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with
regard to patient care and maintain patient confidentiality
when consulting on patients from other services.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with whom they are called to consult.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interact with the primary physician team, consulting
attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health
care team.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
recognize when a patient’s interest would be best served by
transfer to the medical service and make all necessary
arrangements to assure safe and efficient transfer.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to use
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
87
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
evidence-based, cost-conscious strategies in the care of
patients with medical illness on non-medical services and
patients being assessed for pre-operative medical risk.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
You are supervised by the faculty member doing Medicine consults that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The consult resident gets sign out on overnight consults from the Senior Medical
Resident (SMR) at 8am. The Consult resident provides preoperative medical risk
assessment and evaluation and assistance with management of medical disorders
occurring in patients admitted to other specialty services. Medicine PGY3’s perform new
consultations, present their cases to the faculty on the consult service that month and then
provide management advice and follow-up as needed. As soon as possible after receiving
the request for consultation, the resident interviews and examines the patient, gathers all
necessary information from the chart and other sources as appropriate. She/He then
presents the patient to the attending after which resident and attending see the patient
together at the bedside. A plan of care is developed by resident and attending together
and then communicated by the resident both verbally and in writing to the service
requesting the consultation. Thereafter, the resident rounds at least once daily on all
active patients on the consult service and discusses them with the attending. All patients
with active issues or whose status has changed are revisited with the attending later in the
day. The on-call SMR provides consultative functions for non-medicine services at
nights and on the weekends.
During ambulatory block time the PGY2 and 3 residents also work in the outpatient preoperative consult clinic with Dr. Lemberg. They see outpatients who are sent by surgical
services for preoperative medical optimization and risk stratification and then present
them to Dr. Lemberg. Together they finalize an optimization and risk stratification plan.
The PGY2/3 residents also receive lectures regarding medicine consult related topics.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
There is a broad range of patients that you will see as the Medicine consultant. There are
pre-operative evaluations for medical optimization, and post operative evaluations for
new symptoms. Patients will be on the Plastics/Burn, trauma surgery, thoracic surgery,
Neurosurgery, OB/Gynecology, Psychiatry, Orthopedic, General Surgery, ENT and
Ophthalmology services. The consult resident will also be called by other services to help
with management of their chronic medical problems such as hypertension, diabetes,
asthma, COPD etc.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Some services will call a consult regarding helping them take care of the active chronic
diseases that their inpatients have and seeing patients with new symptoms like fever,
shortness of breath, etc. The surgical services will also call for a consult either for
optimization (what they call ‘clearance’) pre-operatively, or to handle new symptoms
88
post-operatively like chest pain, shortness of breath, mental status changes or laboratory
value abnormalities.
In the ambulatory practice the encounters are all ambulatory patients who were referred
by the surgeons for pre-operative risk stratification and medical optimization.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team from that service which called the consult.
Evaluation
After each one week consult mini-block, the resident should receive oral feedback from
the supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the
supervising attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations.
There will also be a peer evaluation form filled out. Housestaff do self-assessment forms
every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
The most important resource for this curriculum is the General Medicine MKSAP
booklet which includes Peri-operative assessment.
You should also read the Hopkins Curriculum on Peri-operative medicine which is found
at the website: http://www.jhcme.com/site/ce.cfm.
Another resource you should review during this time is the coding curriculum of
Michigan: http://sitemaker.umich.edu/coding101/introduction_and_user_guides. This
way you know how to code for consults when you are graduated and practicing
Medicine.
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/gim/training/consult_curric.html See this curriculum
website for full list of important articles broken up by area.
Consultative & Perioperative Medicine Essentials for Hospitalists
(www.shmConsults.com) is now an official educational offering of SHM - The
Society of Hospital Medicine. shmConsults.com has the same editorial direction
and will continue to provide authoritative and comprehensive training in
perioperative and consultative medicine through CME-certified case-based
modules. We have updated all of our existing modules over the last few months
and will continue to produce new modules as well. Currently, 22 up-to-date
modules are available:
RECENTLY UPDATED MODULES
89






















Diagnosis and Management of Acute Mental Status Changes: Delirium
Management of Uncontrolled Pain
Perioperative Acute Kidney Injury: Diagnosis and Management
Perioperative Cardiac Risk Assessment
Perioperative Cardiac Risk Management
Perioperative Infections and Fever
Pulmonary Risk Management in the Perioperative Setting
The Role of the Medical Consultant
CURRENT MODULES
Evaluation & Management of Perioperative Anemia
Management of Hip Fractures
Management of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation
Managing Diabetes and Hyperglycemia in the Hospital
Medical and Perioperative Management of the Pregnant Patient
Perioperative Care of the Patient with Cancer
Perioperative Evaluation and Treatment of Adrenal Insufficiency
Perioperative Management of Anticoagulation
Perioperative Medication Management
Prevention and Treatment of Surgical Site Infections
Postoperative Acute Pain
The Hospitalist’s Role in the Perioperative Management of Hyponatremia
Vaccines and Health Maintenance
Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Surgical Patients
www.shmConsults.com is an online consultative medicine resource, specifically
created and designed for hospitalists, medicine subspecialists, primary care
physicians, surgeons, anesthesiologists, and residents interested in the field.
Auerbach A, Goldman L. Assessing and Reducing the Cardiac Risk in Noncardiac
Surgery. Circuluation 2006. 113:1361-76.
Eagle K, Berger P, Cakins H et al. ACC/AHA Guideline Update for Perioperative
Cardiovascular Evaluation for Non Cardiac Surgery; a Report of the American College of
Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Circulation.
2002: 105:1257-1267.
Fleisher L, Eagle K. Lowering Cardiac Risk in Noncardiac Surgery. NEJM 2001; 345:
1677-1682
Gilbert K, Larocque B, Patrick L. Prospective Evaluation of Cardiac Risk Indices for
Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery. Ann Intern Med 2001; 133: 356-9.
Grayburn P, Hillis L. Cardiac Events in Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery:
Shifting the Paradigm from Noninvasive Risk Stratification to Therapy. Ann Intern Med
2003; 138: 506 - 511.
90
Lee T et al. Derivation and Prospective Validation of a Simple Index for Prediction of
Cardiac Risk of Major Noncardiac Surgery. Circulation 1999; 100: 1043-1049.
Mangano D. Assessment of the Patient with Cardiac Disease; an Anesthesiologist’s
Paradigm. Anesthesiology 1999; 91: 1521-6.
Smetana G, Cohn S, and Lawrence V. Update in Perioperative Medicine. Ann Intern
Med. 2004; 140: 452 - 61.
Derivation and Prospective Validation of a Simple Index for Prediction of Cardiac Risk
of Major Noncardiac Surgery." Lee, Marcantonio, Mangione et al, Circulation 1999;
100; 1043-1049.
American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines
Perioperative Beta-Blocker Therapy and Mortality after Major Noncardiac Surgery"
Lindenaur et al. NEJM 353;4 July 28, 2005 p. 349
Beta-Blocker Therapy in Noncardiac Surgery" Don Poldermans, M.D., NEJM 353;4 July
28, 2005, p.412-13.
Update in Perioperative Medicine" Smetana, Gerald et al. Annals of Intern Medicine
2004:140;452-61. Read section on Cardiac Risk Stratification and Risk Reduction
Strategies
Risk Assessment for and Strategies to Reduce Perioperative Pulmonary Complications
for Patients Undergoing Noncardiothoracic Surgery: A Guideline from the American
College of Physicians. Qaseem et al Ann Intern Med 2006; 144:575-80
Preoperative Pulmonary Risk Stratification for Noncardiothoracic Surgery: Systematic
Review for the American College of Physicians. Smetana et al, Ann Intern Med
2006;144:581-585.
Strategies to Reduce Postoperative Pulmonary Complications after Noncardiothoracic
Surgery: Systematic Review for the American College of Physicians. Lawrence et al,
Ann Intern Med 2006;144:596-608.
Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism," Geerts, William et al. Chest 2001; 119:132S175S
Update in Perioperative Medicine" Smetana et al. Annals of Internal Medicine
2003;140:452-61. Read section of Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.
91
Extended Out-of-Hospital Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin Prophylaxis against DVT in
Patients after Elective Hip Arthroplasty: A systematic review," Hull, Russell et al.
Annals of Internal Medicine 2001;135:858-869
Duration of Prophylaxis Against Venous Thromboembolism with Enoxaprin After
Surgery for Cancer" Bergqvist, David et al. NEJM Vol.ol.346, No. 13, March 28, 2002;
pp. 975-80.
Prevention of Bacterial Endocarditis, Recommendations by the American Heart
Association," Dajani et al. Circulation. 1997;96:358.)
Antimicrobial prophylaxis for surgery :an advisory statement for the National Surgical
Infection Prevention Project" Braztler, Houck et al. American Journal of Surgery 189
(2005) 395-404.
Perioperative care of the elderly patient," Robert M Palmer, Cleveland Clinic Journal of
Medicine, Vol 73, supplement 1, March 2006
Managing Perioperative Risk in the Hip Fracture Patient," Wael K Barsoum et.al.,
Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, Vol 73, supplement 1, March 2006
Perioperative care for the elderly patient," Margaret M. Beliveau, MD, Mark Multach,
MD, Medical Clinics of North America, 87 (2003) 273–289.
The Medical Consultant's Role in Caring for Patients with Hip Fracture," R. Sean
Morrison, MD; Mark R. Chassin, MD, MPP, MPH et al, Annals of Internal Medicine 15
June 1998 | Volume 128 Issue 12_Part_1 | Pages 1010-1020
Minimizing Perioperative Complications in Renal Insufficiency, Schreiber, Martin,
Cleveland Clinic Journal Of Medicine, Volume 73, supplement 1, March 2006 , pp.
S116-120
An Update on Peroperative Management of Diabetes, Scott J. Jacober DO, Archives of
Internal Medicine, 1999:159;2405-2411
Assessing the risk of surgery in liver disease, Suman, A et al. Cleveland Clinic Journal of
Medicine, volume 73, number 4, April 2006, pp.398-403.
NEJM 1996;335:1713-1720 (atenolol for 7 days in patients with CAD or at risk for CAD
who are having non-cardiac surgery, decrease mortality even out to 2 years)
Guidelines for Assessing and Managing the Perioperative Risk from CAD Associated
with Major Non-cardiac Surgery: Annals of IM 1997;127:307-312 (ACP guidelines)
92
JAMA 2001;285:1865-1873 (stress testing only helped predict MI peri-operatively in
those with 3 or more Revised Cardiac Risk Index risk factors – if stress test is positive
with 3 risk factors, beta blockers were not protective)
Annals of IM 2003;138:506-511 (a more evidence based way to look at preoperative
evaluation and management)
CARP: NEJM 2004;351:2795-2804 (RCT showing preoperative coronary
revascularization in high risk patients does not change M&M if patients are medically
optimized – beta blockers are really the key)
Ambulatory Care Intern Curriculum
PGY:
1
Duration:
1 month rotation during PGY1
Goal:
To begin to become competent in a continuity of care experience in the outpatient setting.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
Prior to completing training, each resident will have shown
that they are familiar with the knowledge base essential to
the care of problems commonly seen in ambulatory
medicine.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-EKG quiz
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they are able to perform pap smear and endocervical culture
skillfully and with the minimal discomfort to the patient.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they are generally able to build a history and perform an
accurate physical examination appropriate to the presenting
problem of the patient.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they have begun to develop and propose an efficient
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
93
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation by mini-CEX
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
evaluation and management strategy for common
ambulatory problems.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they have learned to follow up on and manage laboratory
results during and between patient visits with the help of
faculty.
Observation by mini-CEX
-Global Faculty Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they can develop and execute a Quality Improvement
Project with the help of faculty.
-SBP QI Project Faculty
Evaluation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation each resident will have shown
they are able to communicate clearly, compassionately, and
sensitively with patients, families, support staff, and
physician colleagues in the ambulatory care setting.
By the end of this rotation each resident will have shown
improvement in clearly and succinctly presenting patient
information, both verbally and in writing, and in discussing
patient information with providers from all disciplines to
ensure the coordinated care of their patients in an
ambulatory setting.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
During this rotation each resident will demonstrate respect,
compassion, integrity, and altruism in relationships with
patients, families, and colleagues in all health professions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
During this rotation each resident will begin to be able to
properly utilize the multidisciplinary resources of the
ambulatory office and health care system to deliver safe,
-Global Faculty Assessment
94
efficient, and cost-effective care to this patient population.
During this rotation each resident will begin to be able to
evaluate the system in which they practice in order to make
changes to improve the care and health outcomes of his/her
patients.
-SBP Ambulatory QI
Evaluation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
Residents are assigned a specific faculty mentor to present to when there on their
assigned clinic day throughout the three years. The residents are supervised generally by
whatever attending is “DT” at that time (Designated Teacher). Dr. Dresdner oversees the
PGY1 ambulatory block as a whole with the help of the Ambulatory Chief.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Each internal medicine resident is required to have a continuity care experience providing
primary care to a panel of patients. This experience will occur one half day per week over
the course of three years with the exception of floor months, ICU/CCU blocks and Night
Medicine blocks. The goals of the continuity care experience are for the resident to
provide, oversee, and coordinate the medical care of his/her panel of patients, including
chronic disease management, acute illness evaluation and management, and preventive
medical care. This care is provided in the setting of a collaborative environment with the
support and assistance of the attending physician (‘DT’) of record and the clinic staff,
including nurses, nurse practitioners, social workers, dieticians, and clerical support staff.
In accordance with the growing experience and knowledge of the resident, the
independence and responsibilities will be increased over the course of the three years of
the training.
The Ambulatory Experience includes three components. The most important component
is the General Medicine Ambulatory Continuity Practice. Ratio of residents to faculty is
4:1; faculty do not see their own patients during sessions when they are precepting
residents. Every patient seen is reviewed with the DT before being released. Residents
attend one half-day per week except during vacation, ED, and Night Medicine rotations.
Interns go once every two weeks during unit rotations while the residents do not go
during unit rotation. Interns will not be expected to be in clinic during the week that their
regular clinic session falls on a call day. All housestaff are expected to attend their
continuity practice weekly during their elective blocks The approach to care in the
faculty-resident practice is multi-disciplinary. Social work and dieticians are available
on-site. Patient population in the faculty-resident practices is quite heterogeneous,
including individuals from a wide range of socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds.
The second component is Ambulatory Blocks. The PGY1’s have one month long block in
their schedule. These blocks are scheduled in September, December, January, February,
May and June. During this time they do extra sessions in their continuity clinic, but also
experience a variety of different ambulatory settings as well. These include: 1) Urgent
Visit and Walk-in Clinic: Patients from the faculty-resident practice who need urgent
95
assessment when their primary provider is unavailable and new patients referred from the
Emergency Department for follow-up and primary care. The Walk-in Clinic is conducted
in the same facility as the Continuity Practice, so there is easy access to patient records
and all support services 2) rotations in selected specialty clinics to demonstrate how these
disciplines operate in the out patient setting, 3) Experiences in the Women’s Health
Center to improve skills in the pelvic and breast examination skills, 4) The Med-Psych
clinic to provide experience with the intersection of medicine and psychiatry and
medicine disciplines such as ophthalmology and ENT. There is also a didactic component
which occur during the ambulatory block rotations. These programs include instruction in
the most common ambulatory disorders treated by internists, a rotating series of minicourses in Preventative Medicine, Women’s Health, Medical Consultation and EvidenceBased Medicine, medical ethics, systems based practice, medicine and society, and a
course on psycho-social medicine.
The current list of lectures for the Intern Ambulatory Block is as follows:
CHF/CAD/HTN
COPD/ASTHMA/URI’s
UTI/VAGINITIS/STD’s
Diabetes: Didactic on management/clinical skills, Registry, talk on Ancillary programs in
the clinic
PAP/Breast exam
Medical Interviewing
Obesity
Ethics
Back pain
Headache
Dizziness
EKG lecture: given by Cardiology Attending
Cognitive Errors in Medicine
Interns are also scheduled to attend Grand Rounds at Albert Einstein College of Medicine
during their block time, and join the Albert Einstein Med students for their weekly
didactics one afternoon per week.
Lastly, interns on the block rotation learn how to develop a Quality Improvement and
Patient Safety project which they carry on with their peers throughout the month block
and present at the end.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Outpatients come with a broad range of chronic and acute medical problems. Common
examples include:
Alcoholic
Allergic Rhinitis
Anemia of Chronic condition
Anemia, Iron Deficiency
Anxiety
96
Asthma
BPH
CHF Diastolic
CHF Systolic
Chronic Kidney Disease
Constipation
Coronary Artery Disease
Depression, Chronic Recurrent
Diabetes Mellitus Type 1
Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
DVT
Dyspepsia
GERD
Headache, Migraine
Headache, Tension
Hepatitis Type C
Hypercholesterolemia
Hypertension
Hypertriglyceridemia
Hypothyroidism
Insomnia
Low Back Pain
Obesity
Obesity Morbid
Osteoarthritis
PE
Schizophrenia
Stroke
Types of Clinical Encounters
Patients are seen in continuity panels at regular intervals. Housestaff are also assigned to
see walk-in patients.
Procedures
The following procedures may be done in the ambulatory setting but only the first is
required to sit for the boards: pap smear and endocervical culture, I&D of paranychia,
I&D of carbuncle, knee (and other) joint aspiration, knee (and other) joint injection.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete a “Ambulatory Evaluation v3” form on
MyEvaluations. Housestaff complete self-evaluations every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
97
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients and
scheduled session for Medline training
MKSAP on General Medicine
Jacobimed.org website has Ambulatory block lectures, updates and Team meeting
lectures/information
John’s Hopkins Curriculum Website
Coding education website:
http://sitemaker.umich.edu/coding101/introduction_and_user_guides
Physical Exam education websites:
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/pom1/videos/index.cfm
http://medinfo.ufl.edu/other/opeta/
http://meded.ucsd.edu/clinicalmed/
98
Ambulatory Care Resident Curriculum
PGY:
2/3
Duration:
2 month rotation during PGY2/3
Goal:
To become competent in a continuity of care experience in the outpatient setting.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
Prior to completing training, each resident will have shown
that they are familiar with the knowledge base essential to
the care of problems commonly seen in ambulatory
medicine.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In-Training Exam
-mini-CEX
-Written Ambulatory Exam
-Online Module Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this set of rotations the resident have shown
that they are able to perform pap smear and endocervical
culture skillfully and with the minimal discomfort to the
patient.
Prior to completing training, each resident will have shown
that they are able to build a history and perform an accurate
physical examination appropriate to the presenting problem
of the patient.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Prior to completing training, each resident will show that
they can independently develop and propose an efficient
evaluation and management strategy for common
ambulatory problems.
99
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-mini-CEX
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-mini-CEX
Prior to completing training, each resident will show that
they are able to consistently follow up on and manage
laboratory results during and between patient visits.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
Throughout the residency training, each resident will have
shown an ability to continuously improve their care of
ambulatory patients by identifying areas where their
knowledge is deficient and reading to fill their gaps.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of residency training, each resident will be able
to communicate clearly, compassionately, and sensitively
with patients, families, support staff, and physician
colleagues in the ambulatory care setting.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
By the end of residency training, each resident will be able
to clearly and succinctly present patient information, both
verbally and in writing, and discuss patient information with
providers from all disciplines to ensure the coordinated care
of their patients in an ambulatory setting.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
Throughout residency training, each resident will
demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity, and altruism in
relationships with patients, families, and colleagues in all
health professions.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
Prior to completing training, each resident will be able to
properly utilize the multidisciplinary resources of the
ambulatory office and health care system to deliver safe,
efficient, and cost-effective care to this patient population.
Prior to completing training, each resident will be able to
evaluate the system in which they practice in order to make
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
100
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
changes to improve the care and health outcomes of his/her
patients.
-Global Peer Assessment
Supervision
Residents are assigned a specific faculty mentor to present to when there on their
assigned clinic day throughout the three years. The residents are supervised generally by
whatever attending is “DT” at that time (Designated Teacher).
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Each internal medicine resident is required to have a continuity care experience providing
primary care to a panel of patients. This experience will occur one half day per week over
the course of three years. The goals of the continuity care experience are for the resident
to provide, oversee, and coordinate the medical care of his/her panel of patients,
including chronic disease management, acute illness evaluation and management, and
preventive medical care. This care is provided in the setting of a collaborative
environment with the support and assistance of the attending physician of record and the
clinic staff, including a nurse practitioner, nurse practice partners, social worker,
dietician, and clerical support staff. In accordance with the growing experience and
knowledge of the resident, the independence and responsibilities will be increased over
the course of the three years of the training.
The Ambulatory Experience includes three components. The most important component
in the General Medicine Ambulatory Continuity Practice. Ratio of residents to faculty is
4:1; faculty do not see their own patients during sessions when they are precepting
residents. Every patient seen is reviewed with the faculty preceptor before being released.
Residents attend one half-day per week except during vacation, ED, and Night Float
rotations. Interns go once every two weeks during unit rotations while the residents do
not go during unit rotation. The approach to care in the faculty-resident practice is multidisciplinary. Social work and dieticians are available on-site. Patient population in the
faculty-resident practices is quite heterogeneous, including individuals from a wide range
of socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds.
The second component is Ambulatory Blocks. Each PGY1 has one month long
ambulatory block at some point during their year. The PGY2 and PGY3 residents each do
two months of ambulatory block rotations yearly. The total, therefore, is five months of
ambulatory block time for each resident. During these blocks, the PGY1’s have extra
sessions in their continuity clinic, but also experience a variety of different ambulatory
settings as well. These include: 1) Urgent Visit and Walk-in Clinic: Patients from the
faculty-resident practice who need urgent assessment when their primary provider is
unavailable and new patients referred from the Emergency Department for follow-up and
primary care. The Walk-in Clinic is conducted in the same facility as the Continuity
Practice, so there is easy access to patient records and all support services 2) rotations in
HIV, Endocrinology and selected specialty clinics to demonstrate how these disciplines
operate in the out patient setting, 3) Experiences in the Women’s Health Center to
improve skills in the pelvic and breast examination skills, 4) The Med-Psych clinic to
provide experience with the intersection of medicine and psychiatry and medicine
101
disciplines such as ophthalmology and ENT. The final component of the ambulatory
educational program is the Ambulatory Didactic Programs which occur during the
ambulatory block rotations. These programs include instruction in the most common
ambulatory disorders treated by internists, a rotating series of mini-courses in
Preventative Medicine, Women’s Health, Medical Consultation and Evidence-Based
Medicine, medical ethics, systems based practice, medicine and society, and a course on
psycho-social medicine. Geriatrics is specifically the month long theme for one of the 4
ambulatory months during either PGY2 or 3. This is an ACGME requirement and all
categorical housestaff go through this rotation.
Residents will be assigned topics in the web-based Johns Hopkins Curriculum in the
Ambulatory Medicine. Residents are obligated to complete pre-and post-test exercises.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Outpatients come with a broad range of chronic and acute medical problems. Common
examples include:
Alcoholic
Allergic Rhinitis
Anemia of Chronic condition
Anemia, Iron Deficiency
Anxiety
Asthma
BPH
CHF Diastolic
CHF Systolic
Chronic Kidney Disease
Constipation
Coronary Artery Disease
Depression, Chronic Recurrent
Diabetes Mellitus Type 1
Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
DVT
Dyspepsia
GERD
Headache, Migraine
Headache, Tension
Hepatitis Type C
Hypercholesterolemia
Hypertension
Hypertriglyceridemia
Hypothyroidism
Insomnia
Low Back Pain
Obesity
Obesity Morbid
102
Osteoarthritis
PE
Schizophrenia
Stroke
Types of Clinical Encounters
Patients are seen in continuity panels at regular intervals. Housestaff are also assigned to
see walk-in patients. Housestaff get to choose among several specialty clinics to gain
experience including but not limited to: psychiatry, allergy/immunology, dermatology,
ophthalmology, gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, orthopedics, palliative care, sleep
medicine, rehab medicine.
Procedures
The following procedures may be done in the ambulatory setting but only the first is
required to sit for the boards: pap smear and endocervical culture, I&D of paranychia,
I&D of carbuncle, knee (and other) joint aspiration, knee (and other) joint injection.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete a “Ambulatory Evaluation” form on
MyEvaluations which is based on feedback from the ambulatory attendings at large and
the results of the written ambulartory exam and online module completion and exams.
Housestaff complete self-evaluations every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on General Medicine
John’s Hopkins Curriculum Website
Coding education website:
http://sitemaker.umich.edu/coding101/introduction_and_user_guides
Physical Exam education websites:
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/pom1/videos/index.cfm
http://medinfo.ufl.edu/other/opeta/
http://meded.ucsd.edu/clinicalmed/
103
Anesthesia Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1, 2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month
Goal:


To become more familiar and be certified in a range of invasive procedures in a
controlled setting.
To learn about sedation techniques.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the residents will have gained
-Global Faculty Assessment
knowledge about the indications, contraindications,
complications, sterile technique, and informed consent
regarding multiple invasive procedures including but not
limited to: endotracheal intubation, arterial line placement,
and possibly central line placement.
By the end of this rotation the residents will have gained
-Global Faculty Assessment
knowledge about sedation techniques, basic fundamentals of
induction of general and regional anesthesia and basics of
airway management.
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
procedural skill regarding multiple invasive procedures
including but not limited to: endotracheal intubation, arterial
line placement, and possibly central line placement.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have improved
in their ability to take care of patients requiring sedation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
-Global Faculty Assessment
104
they seek feedback and continually improve in their
procedural skills.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they can communicate clearly, compassionately, and
effectively with patients and their families regarding
procedures and sedation.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they can communicate clearly, and effectively with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding procedures
and sedation being performed.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintained patient
confidentiality when performing any procedures.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
procedures done on patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they -Global Faculty Assessment
can interact with the Operating Room staff in a safe, patient- -Direct Faculty Bedside
centered, effective manner.
Observation
Supervision
Dr. Golden the Chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology will supervise Medicine
housestaff during this rotation.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The Medicine housestaff report to the Anesthesiology Department a day or two before
the rotation and receive material and instructions from Mayra Lopez office 1226 Building
1 (call 3-6864). On the first day, Medicine housestaff should go to the OR at 7:30am and
looks for their assignment. The bulk of the rotation will be in the operating room to learn
105
procedures and sedation techniques appropriate to their learning needs. This education is
done one on one with the Anesthesiology attendings. Medicine residents are also
expected to learn the pre-sedation / anesthesia evaluation and will perform pre-op rounds.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
The patients are made up of inpatients and outpatients going for surgeries of all kinds in
the Operating Rooms. During this rotation, the specific diseases they have is only of
concern depending on how they effect what sedation or procedures is performed.
Types of Clinical Encounters
The clinical encounters are all related to sedation and procedures that a patient requires.
These are done in the Operating Rooms.
Procedures
endotracheal intubation
arterial line placement
central line placement
Evaluation
After every procedure the attending should give verbal feedback to the resident regarding
technique. At the completion of the rotation, Dr. Golden will complete a JMC Internal
Medicine rotation evaluation form on MyEvaluations.
Educational Resources & References
The New England Journal of Medicine website:
http://content.nejm.org/misc/videos.dtl?ssource=recentVideos which has videos showing
how to do many procedures step by step. Housestaff should review these during this
rotation.
Anesthesia textbooks will have considerable basic information on central lines, LP,
ultrasound, as well as airway assessment/management including endotracheal intubation.
Schmidt UH et al. Effects of supervision by attending anesthesiologists on complications
of emergency tracheal intubation. Anesthesiology 2008;107:973-7
Friedman Z et al. Teaching lifesaving procedures: the impact of model fidelity on
acquisition and transfer of cricothyrotomy skills to performance on cadavers. Anesth
Analg 2008;107:1663-9.
Mashour GA et al. The extended Mallampati score and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus are
predictors of difficult laryngoscopy in the morbidly obese. Anesth Analg 2008;
107:1919-23.
Gali B. Identification of patients at risk for postoperative respiratory complications using
a preoperative obstructive sleep apnea screening tool and postanesthesia care assessment.
Anesthesiology 2009;110:869-77.
106
Casati A et al. A prospective, randomized comparison between ultrasound and nerve
stimulation for multiple injection axillary brachial plexus block. Anesthesiology
2007;106:992-6.
Cook TM et al. Major complications of central neuraxial block: report on the Third
National Audit project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists. Br J Anaesth
2009;102:179-190.
107
Cardiology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of Cardiac conditions essential to Internal Medicine
training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have gained medical knowledge in the
field of Cardiology and be able to evaluate and treat
common cardiac conditions.
The resident will have gained knowledge in interpretation of
common cardiac laboratory tests and imaging including
ECG, stress testing, tilt-table testing, echocardiography, and
cardiac catheterization.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
- Resident Self Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate the ability to gather
information from a patient with a cardiac condition and do a
thorough cardiac examination including palpating the PMI
and auscultating normal and abnormal heart sounds.
The resident will be able to interpret the history, physical
exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and arrive at a
differential diagnosis and treatment plan for cardiac
patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have learned to use local resources to
research issues and read regarding their cardiac patient as an
independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
108
The resident should identify personal knowledge gaps in
cardiology and work to continuously improve in their
knowledge and care of cardiology patients.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding cardiac conditions.
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding cardiac
patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity
and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a Cardiology patient.
The resident will demonstrate a commitment to carrying out
professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical
principles regarding patients with cardiac diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will interact with the primary physician team, -Global Faculty Assessment
consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part
of a health care team.
The resident will learn to help the patient navigate the
-Global Faculty Assessment
healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those
with cardiac conditions.
The resident will learn to use evidence-based, cost-Global Faculty Assessment
conscious strategies in the care of cardiac patients.
Supervision
Dr. Meisner is the designated Cardiology Education Coordinator for the Jacobi
Department of Medicine. The resident on Cardiology elective is directly supervised by
the Cardiology Consult Attending and Consult Fellow that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Cardiology Fellow to see inpatient consults and
present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up inpatient
consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results and
109
ready for new consults for the day. While on elective medicine housestaff are still
required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and must be excused for this
session.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and cardiac diseases on inpatient consults. This
includes but is not limited to: MI, ACS, arrhythmias, pericarditis, syncope, HOCM,
valvular stenoses, peripheral vascular disease and cardiomyopathies, decompensated
CHF.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults on patients with a variety of cardiac disorders. The standard structure
of the elective is inpatient based with the residents evaluating new patients and following
up with old patients in the morning, with the team including resident, fellow and
attending rounding in the afternoon. In addition, the resident is expected to attend at least
one outpatient clinic in the discipline to learn about the outpatient aspects of the subspecialty.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. When seeing patients in the ED for a consult the resident may be
needed to do arterial puncture, venipuncture, ECG, IV placement, central line placement
or even to help with placement of a temporary pacemaker with the fellow.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete a “standard evaluation v2” form on
MyEvaluations. Housestaff complete a self-assessment every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Cardiology
Key ECG practice websitess:
http://library.med.utah.edu/kw/ecg/
http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/mavenmain.asp
Other EKG practice websites:
http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/pstc/backup/prandekg.htm
110
http://www.ecglibrary.com/
http://www.whcmedicine.org/practicums
Key Cardiac Auscultation websites:
http://www.blaufuss.org/
http://dms.dartmouth.edu/ed_programs/course_resources/ondoctoring_yr1/index.shtml
http://depts.washington.edu/physdx/heart/demo.html
Other Cardiac Auscultation websites:
http://www.wilkes.med.ucla.edu/inex.htm
6th ACCP Consensus Conference on Antithrombotic Therapy: Chest 2002;119:22S38S (evidence based guidelines on coumadin management)
HOPE: NEJM 2000;342:145-153 (ramipril given to patient with vascular disease or
DM+1 risk factor improved outcomes)
CAPRIE: Lancet 1996;348:1329-1339 (patients with CAD, PVD, carotid disease were
pooled and plavix beat ASA for combined cardiovascular outcomes. The only statistically
significant arm is the PVD patients though)
JNC7: JAMA 2003;289:2560-2572 (latest guidelines for HTN)
NCEP ATP3: JAMA 2001; 285:2486-2497 (lipid management guidelines)
111
Dermatology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1, 2 and 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month at a time
Dermatology is also learned during rotations to that clinic during ambulatory block time.
Goal:
Dermatology is a field esoteric to many within the field of internal medicine. It includes
any condition that manifests with changes in the skin, hair, nails, and mucous
membranes. This includes primary skin diseases such as acne, psoriasis, atopic
dermatitis, and skin cancers. It also includes internal diseases that manifest secondarily
with skin involvement, such as allergic and autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases,
hematologic diseases, and malignancies. The field has a diverse practice treating patients
from neonates to the elderly; it involves medical care with assorted topical and systemic
medications, surgical care with excisions and repairs, and examination and interpretation
of dermatopathology specimens.
1. Learn to describe skin conditions, using primary lesions and secondary lesions.
2. Understand how dermatologists generate differential diagnoses based on descriptions.
3. Learn when a dermatology consult is indicated, either inpatient or outpatient.
4. Obtain a basic understanding of the clinical presentations, pathophysiology, and
treatment of the most common dermatologic skin conditions.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
1. Develop independence in the topical and systemic
management of basic dermatologic diseases. Make
appropriate referrals to dermatology specialists. To
be able to recognize dermatologic emergencies.
2. Make a differential diagnosis for common primary
skin disease groups, i.e. macular, papular, vesicular,
pustular diseases.
3. Master basic dermatological terminology. Master
112
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Exam
basic techniques for examination of the skin (to
include microscopic exam of skin scrapings, etc.)
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic
pathophysiology and management of the most
common skin diseases.
5. Know the indications for cryosurgery, electrosurgery
and referrals for surgery.
6. Utilize appropriate laboratory examinations for
evaluating patients with cutaneous disease and for
monitoring systemic therapy.
7. To be able to recognize the cutaneous signs of
systemic disease. To be able to recognize skin cancers
and their precursors, including basal cell carcinoma,
squamous cell carcinoma, dysplastic nevus, and
melanoma.
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
1. Synthesize clinical history and physical examination
findings to arrive at a correct diagnosis and
treatment plan for common dermatological
conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
2. Perform critical visual examination of the patient’s
skin.
3. Perform or know when to refer for appropriate
diagnostic and therapeutic procedures including but
not limited to analysis of biologic specimens (fungal
and ectoparasite scrapings, Tzanck preparations,
immunofluorescence), microbial cultures (bacterial,
fungal, viral), patch and photopatch testing, and
phototherapy.
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
1. Critically evaluate and use current medical
information and scientific evidence for patient care
regarding dermatologic conditions.
113
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
1. Communicate effectively with patients and families
regarding dermatologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
2. Present precise word descriptions of dermatologic
findings to colleagues.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
1. The resident will demonstrate respect, compassion,
integrity and honesty with regard to patient care and
maintain patient confidentiality when consulting on a
patient with dermatologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
1. Know the relative costs of dermatologic procedures
and treatments including common topical therapies.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
In the Dermatology clinic the Internal Medicine resident will be supervised by the
Dermatology attending who is precepting clinic that day. During the elective when on
consultation, the Internal Medicine resident will be supervised by the dermatology
resident and attending who are assigned to consults in Jacobi for that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
During clinic month residents see patients with dermatologic diseases in Dermatology
clinic if that specialty clinic was chosen or assigned. During an elective month housestaff
join the Dermatology resident and attending in their clinics and on their consults to learn
with them.
Wednesdays 1pm - 3pm, Dr Fisher conducts "walking inpatient rounds" as well as gives
a lecture with kodachromes, etc, to the derm residents. The rotators are expected to
attend unless they have a continuity clinic at that time.
114
Montefiore Dermatology Elective Schedule
MON
AM Academics
7:30-12
Academic
lectures
Derm Suite
3411 Wayne
2nd Floor
WED
7:30-8:15
Basic Science
Derm Suite
(Sept-April)
9am
NCB 3C clinic
AM Clinic
THURS
FRI
7:30-8:00 Patient viewing at
MAP 2nd floor
8:00-9:00 Grand Rounds –
3450 Wayne Avenue, Ground
Floor conference room
9-12 Academic lectures –
Derm Suite
9am
Clinic MAP
2nd floor
9am
Clinic MAP 2nd
floor
Dr. Mann
kodachromes
(sometimes)
Lunch
PM Clinic
TUES
1pm
Continuity
Clinic, MAP
2nd floor
1pm
Peds/Surgery
Clinic, MAP
2nd floor
1st and 3rd Wed
CPL Clinic
DTC Bldg 3rd
floor
(Usually not
for rotators, too
small)
Optional: Jacobi 1pm clinic
Optional: Jacobi
1pm clinic
Jacobi Dermatology Elective Schedule
MON
AM Academics
7:30-12
Academic
lectures
Derm Suite
3411 Wayne
2nd Floor
TUES
7:30-8:15
Basic Science
Derm Suite
(Sept-April)
9am
Surgery Clinic,
4th floor
AM Clinic
THURS
FRI
7:30-8:00 Pt viewing at
MAP 2nd floor (except 3rd Thursdays)
8:00-9:00 Grand Rounds –
3450 Wayne Avenue, Ground Floor
conference room
9-12 Academic lectures –
Derm Suite
9am
Clinic, 4th floor
9am
Peds Derm Clinic,
1st floor (Green)
Dr. Fisher
rounds and
kodachromes
(not in summer)
Lunch
PM Clinic
WED
1pm Continuity
Clinic, 4th floor
(Purple)
1pm Clinic, 4th floor
Optional: Monte
1pm clinic
1pm
Clinic, 4th floor
Typically, on a month long elective, medical student rotators will spend 2 weeks in
Montefiore clinics and 2 weeks in Jacobi clinics. In a 2 week elective, 1 week at each
site. Montefiore resident rotators spend all their time in Montefiore clinics.
While on the Montefiore or Jacobi elective, rotators may attend optional clinics at the
other site, depending on the schedule.
115
One Thursday a month (usually the 3rd), Grand Rounds features a speaker instead of
cases, so there is no patient viewing, with the lecture starting at 8am.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
In the clinic the patients are ambulatory and coming in with common outpatient
dermatologic conditions for diagnosis and care. On the inpatient consult service the
patients are all admitted patients, typically very sick and many dermatolgic findings will
be those of systemic diseases and drug reactions.
Disease entities encountered will include but not be limited to:
I.
Connective Tissue – Vascular
A. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus
B. Dermatomyositis and polymyositis
C. Vasculitis / hypersensitivity vasculitis
II.
Skin Cancer
A. Basal cell carcinoma
B. Squamous cell carcinoma
C. Melanoma
III.
Inflammatory Disease
A. Severe psoriasis
B. Erythrodermic psoriasis
C. Pustular psoriasis
D. Psoriatic arthritis
E. Sarcoidosis
F. Pruritus
. Malignancy
. Carcinoma
. Hepatic disease
. Renal disease
. Iron deficiency
. Polycythemia
. Endocrine disease
. AIDS
IV.
AIDS
A. Oral candidiasis
B. Seborrheic-like dermatitis
C. Xerosis
D. Telangiectasias
E. Kaposi’s sarcoma
F. Herpes simplex and herpes zoster
G. Folliculitis and papular eruption
116
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
M.
N.
O.
Cutaneous hypersensitivity to bactrim
Yellow nails
Impetigo
Oral “hairy” leukoplakia
Dermatophyte infections
Scabies
Molluscum contagiosum and condyloma acuminatum
Cutaneous manifestations of unusual and opportunistic infections
Types of Clinical Encounters
Clinic based ambulatory patients and admitted inpatients.
Procedures
The residents will see how to take skin biopsy (shave and punch) and specimens (fungal
and parasite scrapings, Tzanck preparations, specimens for immunofluorescence), patch
testing, phototherapy, electrocautery and cryotherapy. Housestaff will only be allowed to
perform these procedures if directed by the attending in the clinic or on the consult
service. In the medicine clinic housestaff may only do these procedures (if available)
under the direction of an attending who is certified to perform them.
Evaluation
The residents are tested on Dermatologic conditions on the in-training exam. At the end
of an elective the resident would be evaluated by the faculty on MyEvaluations. They
would also do a self-assessment every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Dermatology
Fitzpatrick TB, Johnson RA, Polano MK et al. Color Atlas and Synopsis of Clinical
Dermatology, 2nd ed. New York. McGraw Hill, 1994.
Arndt KA. Manual of Dermatologic Therapeutics. Boston. Little, Brown, and Co.
(current edition) Arndt therapeutics
Derm images website: http://www.dermnet.org.nz/doctors/
Derm images website: http://dermatlas.med.jhmi.edu/derm/
Derm images website: http://www.dermis.net/dermisroot/en/home/index.htm
117
Derm images website: http://www.pediatrics.wisc.edu/education/derm/
118
Appendices:
HOW TO DESCRIBE A RASH
Though it seems deceptively simple, learning to describe skin findings is definitely an
important skill to work on during your rotation. Listen to the residents in
particular during Grand Rounds.
LESSON ONE:
BE SPECIFIC. In medicine, in a cardiac exam, you wouldn’t just say a patient
has a murmur; you mention the location heard, systolic vs. diastolic, holosystolic
vs. crescendo/decrescendo, intensity (I to VI), pitch, and radiation. Then based on
that information, you deduce what valve is involved. Derm is analogous. You
wouldn’t just say the patient has a rash. You describe it carefully, and given its
features, you can come up with a differential. And if you don’t know the right
words, it’s ok. It’s always better to use a non-technical term correctly than a
dermatologic term incorrectly.
A good description should describe distribution, configuration, primary and
secondary lesions, colors, borders, and shapes. If relevant, mention texture and
patterns.
– Remember: the important thing is to be generating a good differential diagnosis;
this is far more important than getting the one right diagnosis (The reaction
pattern concept really helps with this). In theory, your description should allow a
listener who has not seen the patient to develop a good differential.
– Your description should lead you to your differential, not the other way around
(Often we think we know the diagnosis and then describe things to match our
impression. Try to catch yourself so that you keep your differential open.).
1. Distribution/location
– What part of body? Generalized, bilateral/unilateral, sun exposed,
intertriginous, extensor/flexural surfaces, acral (distal body, like hands and feet)?
– Make sure you know the difference between distribution and configuration
2. Configuration
– How lesions are arranged: geometric/linear, Blaschkoid, nevoid, dermatomal,
serpiginous, confluent vs. discrete, scattered, clustered/grouped
– Certain shapes and configurations are almost always caused by external forces
(e.g. geometric/linear) suggesting an “outside job,” such as contact dermatitis or
Koebner phenomenon.
– Blaschkoid = linear/whorled (like marble) along a line of Blaschko
– Nevoid = A distinct configuration, well-demarcated, unilateral
3. Primary lesions
= Primary lesion of disease, unmodified
– Remember, there might not be any primary lesion (e.g. prurigo)
– Tip: always ask, which came first, the itch or the rash? (If the itch, suggests
these might all be secondary lesions from scratching)
119
4. Secondary lesions/ secondary changes
= Modification of primary lesion from evolution, trauma, or other external
influence.
5. Color
– This can be subjective sometimes, but describe the best you can
– You can only call something depigmented (no color/white) if have used Wood’s
lamp or have biopsied the lesion (Wood’s lamp enhances epidermal pigment
change, but not dermal) to confirm complete loss of melanocytes
– Try to use specific colors with description of normal skin color as comparison
rather than “hyperpigmented” or “hypopigmented”
– If a lesion is the same color as the skin, it’s preferred to describe as “skincolored” rather than “flesh-colored,” since flesh is really internal tissue.
– Know the difference between these terms (especially erythema vs. purpura):
Erythematous = red and blanches (on palpation or diascopy) since from
vasodilatation
Violaceous = purple
Purpuric = red/purple non-blanching since from extravasated blood
Dusky = dark purple/grey (suggests necrosis)
– It can be difficult to distinguish between purpura and necrosis
7. Borders
– Regular vs. Irregular, Blurred vs. Sharp/well-demarcated, Scalloped, Smudgy
(suggests MF)
8. Shape
Note: try not to use “ill-defined” – be specific.
A. Annular (round with central clearing)
B. Round/nummular/discoid (no central clearing)
C. Ovoid (oval-like e.g. pityriasis rosea)
D. Serpiginous (snake-like)
E. Targetoid: refers specifically to EM lesions with dusky center, white ring, with
surrounding erythema (as opposed to urticaria, which has clear center)
F. Polycyclic (multiple overlapping annular)
G. Arcuate (incomplete annular arc)
H. Polymorphous (many shapes)
9. Texture
A. Soft (like fat)
B. Firm (indurated means firm/hard, boggy suggests edematous)
– Calcium and gout are particularly hard to palpation.
C. Fleshy (implies exophitic or pedunculated)
Note: exophytic = growing outward, vegetative = growing
D. Horny (thick pointy keratin)
10. Patterns
A. Follicular/ folliculocentric
B. Morbilliform ("measles"-like; macules and papules 2mm to 1cm)
– This is the so-called “maculopapular” pattern that can occur, but most
people in medicine use the term incorrectly.
120
C. Reticular (net-like)
D. Retiform
E. Guttate (drop-like)
F. Monomorphic/monomorphous (all lesions identical, in the same stage)
PRIMARY LESIONS
Lay term
Bump (raised)
Spot (flat)
Blister
Blister with pus
Lump (under the skin)
Derm term (<1 cm)
Papule
Macule
Vesicle
Pustule
Nodule
Nodule filled with fluid
= cyst
Wheal
Hives (lesions)/
Urticaria (disease)
Non-blanching red spot Petechia
Single blanching vessel/ Telangiectasia
“gin blossom”
Pimples/ comedones
(singular = comedo)
Burrow
Boil = a follicular
abscess
Open comedo =
blackhead
(when keratin is
exposed to air and
becomes oxidized, it
turns black)
Lesion specific to
scabies/parasites
Involving one hair
follicle =
Furuncle (furunculosis)
SECONDARY LESIONS
Mnemonic = ABCS
121
Derm term (>1 cm)
Plaque
Patch
Bulla
Lakes of pus
Tumor
Purpura
Closed comedo =
whitehead
(keratin is white when
not yet exposed to air)
Involving more than
one follicle = carbuncle
A: Atrophy and scarring
B: Breakage in skin: erosion, ulcer, fissure
C: Crap on skin: scale, crust (also, eschar)
S: Scratching: lichenification, excoriation (do not use in description: the
term excoriation uses inference. Use “linear erosion”)
Crust = scab = dried exudates or plasma from vesicle, pustule, trauma
Scale = flakes/plates of compacted stratum corneum
Erosion = breakage in the epidermis (not full thickness)
Ulcer = breakage in the epidermis down into the dermis
Fissure = breakage in the epidermis along skin fold
Lichenification = thickening of the skin with increased skin markings from
rubbing/scratching
Ulcers may be “punched out” suggesting vascular etiology, or may have “undermined
borders” suggesting it started with a bulla, as in pyoderma gangrenosum
“Branny” scale = exfoliating scale that is bran flake-like
Collarette of scale: small circle of scaling, which you can deduce must be from
ruptured/evolved vesicle or pustule
Eschars are thick black/necrotic crusts; commonly associated with rickettsialpox (in
the Bronx especially), anthrax, brown recluse spider bites, ecthyma gangrenosum
(Pseudomonas), tularemia, bubonic plague
Atrophy: shiny = epidermal atrophy, wrinkled = dermal atrophy
Poikiloderma = triad of atrophy, hypo/hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia
Exfoliation = peeling = loss of epidermal layer but not basal layer (distinguish from
scaling, which is just stratum corneum)
Denudation = loss of entire epidermis including basement membrane (as in TEN)
Epidermal change = scale, decreased/increased pigmentation, vesiculation, fissures,
lichenification, epidermal atrophy (shiny, thin), verrucous (papillation)
Dermal change = dermal atrophy (wrinkling), anetoderma (loss of elastic tissue),
erythema, papules, plaques, nodules, cysts, sclerosis/scar/keloid, peau d’orange
DERMATOLOGY ACRONYMS
Dermatologists (especially derm residents) use way too many acronyms. Here is a guide
to translate our codes:
AFX = atypical fibroxanthoma
AGEP = acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis
AK = actinic keratosis
122
ALHE = angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia
BCC = basal cell carcinoma
BCIE = bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (EHK)
BP = bullous pemphigoid
BXO = balanitis xerotica obliterans (lichen sclerosis of the penis)
CALM = café-au-lait macule
CARP = confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (of Gougerot and Carteaud)
CCCA = central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia
CTCL = cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (MF)
DEJ = dermal-epidermal junction, aka basement membrane zone (BMZ)
DF = dermatofibroma
DFA = direct fluorescent antibody (test for herpes simplex and zoster)
DFSP = dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans
DH = dermatitis herpetiformis
DIF = direct immunofluorescence
DLE = discoid lupus erythematosus
DM = may refer to dermatomyositis or diabetes mellitus
DN = dysplastic (atypical) nevus aka Clark’s nevus
DPN = dermatosis papulosa nigra (easy to confuse which word ends in osis!)
DRESS = drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (hypersensitivity reaction)
DSAP = disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis
EAC = erythema annulare centrifugum
EB = epidermolysis bullosa
EBA = epidermolysis bullosa acquisita
EDP = erythema dyschromicum perstans
EDV = epidermodysplasia verruciformis
EED = erythema elevatum diutinum
EHK = epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (path term for finding in bullous congenital
ichthyosiform erythroderma)
EIC = epidermal inclusion cyst aka follicular cyst or sebaceous cyst (misnomer)
EM = erythema multiforme
EPF = eosinophilic pustular folliculitis
EPP = erythropoietic protoporphyria
EPS = elastosis perforans serpiginosa
FEP = fibroepithelial polyp (skin tag/ acrochordon)
GA = granuloma annulare
GVHD = graft versus host disease
HC = hydrocortisone
IDN = intradermal nevus
ILK = intralesional Kenalog (triamcinolone)
ILVEN = inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus
IPL = intense pulsed light
IVIg = intravenous immunoglobulin (IgG)
JXG = juvenile xanthogranuloma
KA = keratoacanthoma
KP = keratosis pilaris
123
KS = Kaposi’s sarcoma
LCV = leukocytoclastic vasculitis (small-vessel vasculitis dermpath pattern)
LGV = lymphogranuloma venereum
LP = lichen planus
LPLK = lichen planus-like keratosis
LPP = lichen planopilaris
LS and A = lichen sclerosis et atrophicus (technically just lichen sclerosis now)
LSC = lichen simplex chronicus
LyP = lymphomatoid papulosis
MF = mycosis fungoides (CTCL)
MM = malignant melanoma (redundant)
MMIS = melanoma in situ
NBCIE = non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma
Nd:YAG = neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser
NF = neurofibroma/ neurofibromatosis
NLD = necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (just called necrobiosis lipoidica now because
not just in diabetics)
NXG = necrobiotic xanthogranuloma
PCT = porphyria cutanea tarda
PG = may refer to pyogenic granuloma or pyoderma gangrenosum
PIPA = post-inflammatory pigmentary alteration (hyperpigmentation/hypopigmentation)
PLC = pityriasis lichenoides chronica
PLEVA = pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta
PMLE = polymorphous light eruption
PPK = palmoplantar keratoderma
PR = pityriasis rosea
PRP = pityriasis rubra pilaris
PUPPP = pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (aka polymorphous
eruption of pregnancy)
PXE = pseudoxanthoma elasticum
SCC = squamous cell carcinoma
SCCIS = squamous cell carcinoma in situ aka Bowen’s disease
SCLE = subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus
SJS = Stevens-Johnson syndrome
SK = seborrheic keratosis
SLE = systemic lupus erythematosis
TAC = triamcinolone
TBSE = total body skin examination
TEN = toxic epidermal necrolysis
TMEP = telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans
124
Endocrinology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of endocrine conditions essential to Internal
Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
medical knowledge in the field of Endocrinology and be
able to evaluate and treat common endocrine conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in interpretation of common endocrine
laboratory tests and imaging including thyroid, parathyroid,
adrenal and diabetes blood tests, and thyroid imaging.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient
with an endocrine condition and do a thorough examination
of the thyroid gland and other parts of the body showing
common diabetic complications.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis
and treatment plan for endocrine patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
use local resources to research issues and read regarding
their endocrine patient as an independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
125
The resident should identify personal knowledge gaps in
Endocrinology and work to continuously improve in their
knowledge and care of Endocrinology patients.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
-Global Faculty Assessment
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with
patients and their families regarding endocrine conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and
verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel
regarding endocrine patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with
regard to patient care and maintain patient confidentiality
when consulting on an Endocrinology patient.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with endocrine diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Global Faculty Assessment
interact with the primary physician team, consulting
attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health
care team.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to help
-Global Faculty Assessment
the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain needed
aide and care for those with endocrine conditions.
The resident will learn to use evidence-based, cost-Global Faculty Assessment
conscious strategies in the care of cardiac patients.
Supervision
Dr. Schubart is the designated Endocrinology Education Coordinator for the Jacobi
Department of Medicine. The resident on Endocrinology elective is directly supervised
by the Endocrinology attending and fellow that are on consults that month and the
Endocrinology attendings that precepts in the Endocrine clinic.
126
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Endocrinology Fellow to see inpatient consults
and present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up
inpatient consults first so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results and be
ready for new consults for the day.
There is a weekly Endocrine grand rounds at 8-9 AM on Fridays, which are held in the
Price Center, 3rd floor conference room. Following the 8 AM Endocrine grand rounds,
there is a research talk related to diabetes at 9 AM in the auditorium of the Price Center
(level LL). These are presented by invited speakers, mostly leading investigators in their
field.
Residents also rotate through the ambulatory Endocrinology clinic:
Tuesdays and Fridays from 1:15-5pm in Building 6.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and endocrine diseases on inpatient consults
and in the clinic. This includes but is not limited to: hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism,
hyperparathyroidism, diabetes, pituitary diseases, adrenal disorders and male and female
reproductive abnormalities.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient Endocrinology clinic on patients with a variety of
endocrine disorders. On the inpatient service residents are involved in intensive insulin
management in critical care and surgical patients.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult, most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. In the Endocrinology clinic the resident will be exposed to thyroid
biopsies.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations. The
residents complete self-assessment forms every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Endocrinology
127
Gastroenterology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of GI conditions essential to Internal Medicine
training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have gained medical knowledge in the
field of GI diseases and be able to evaluate and treat
common GI conditions.
The resident will have gained knowledge in interpretation of
common GI laboratory tests and imaging including LFT,
Celiac tests, H Pylori, Hepatitis serologies, stool studies,
endoscopies, capsule endoscopy, MRCP, abdominal
imaging by CT.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate the ability to gather
information from a patient with a GI condition and do a
thorough GI examination including inspection, palpation,
percussion and auscultation of the abdomen.
The resident will be able to interpret the history, physical
exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and come up
with a differential diagnosis and treatment plan for GI
patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have learned to use local resources to
-Global Faculty Assessment
128
research issues and read regarding their GI patient as an
independent adult learner.
The resident should continuously improve in their care of
patients with GI diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding common GI conditions.
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding GI patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity
and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a patient with a GI
disease.
The resident will demonstrate a commitment to carrying out
professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical
principles regarding patients with GI diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will interact with the primary physician team, -Global Faculty Assessment
consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part
of a health care team.
The resident will learn to help the patient navigate the
-Global Faculty Assessment
healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those
with GI conditions.
The resident will learn to use evidence-based, cost-Global Faculty Assessment
conscious strategies in the care of GI patients.
Supervision
Dr. Simon is the designated Gastroenterology Education Coordinator for the Jacobi
Department of Medicine. The resident on GI elective is directly supervised by the GI
attending and fellow that are on consults that month.
129
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the GI fellow to see inpatient consults and present
them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up inpatient consults
from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results and ready for new
consults for the day. There are daily teaching rounds with the fellow and attending during
which the resident presents new consults and follow-ups on previously seen patients. The
resident should be prepared to discuss the differential diagnosis and pertinent medical
literature. The resident will be called upon to present in depth topics at rounds as well.
Residents should go to:
 GI Grand Rounds on Wed. at 5pm at JMC and Thurs. 5pm at Montefiore
 GI Tumor Board on Wed. at noon
Residents also attend GI clinic in Building 6 on Wednesday afternoons from 1pm-5pm.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and GI diseases on inpatient consults and in
outpatient clinic. This includes but is not limited to: hepatitis A/B/C/drug induced/
autoimmune, peptic ulcer disease, mesenteric ischemia, colon CA, esophageal CA,
gastric CA, diverticulitis, upper and lower GI bleeds, dysphagia, dyspepsia, diarrhea,
IBD, IBS, pancreatitis, celiac disease and other malabsorptive disorders.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient clinic with chronic care follow up on patients with a
variety of GI disorders.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. The resident should learn about the various endoscopies (examples:
EGD, colonoscopy, ERCP) but is not required to perform these procedures. The consult
resident may be involved in doing paracentesis on patients for whom they are called in
consult.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations. The
resident will complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on GI diseases
130
Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease
www.ASGE.org to review the current guidelines
131
Hematology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of hematologic conditions essential to Internal
Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
medical knowledge in the field of Hematology and be able
to evaluate and treat common hematologic conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in interpretation of common hematologic
laboratory tests and imaging including CBC, peripheral
smears, coagulation studies, iron studies, BM biopsy.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient
with an hematologic condition and do a thorough
examination of skin for signs of anemia or
thrombocytopenia.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis
and treatment plan for hematologic patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
use local resources to research issues and read regarding
their hematologic patient as an independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
132
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
continuously improve in their care of Hematology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with
patients and their families regarding hematologic conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and
verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel
regarding hematologic patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with
regard to patient care and maintain patient confidentiality
when consulting on an Hematology patient.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with hematologic diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Global Faculty Assessment
interact with the primary physician team, consulting
attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health
care team.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to help
-Global Faculty Assessment
the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain needed
aide and care for those with hematologic conditions.
Supervision
The resident on Hematology elective is supervised by the Hematology attending and
fellow that are on consults that month and the Hematology attendings that precept the
Hematology clinic.
133
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Hematology Fellow to see inpatient consults
and present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up
inpatient consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results
and ready for new consults for the day. While on elective medicine housestaff are still
required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and must be excused for this
session.
Residents can also rotate through these outpatient experiences and conferences:








Medical Oncology clinic Mon, Tues, Wed at 9AM in bldg 1, 6 south. All Jacobi
and NCB outpatient oncology comes here.
Hematology clinic is at NCB Friday 9 AM. All Jacobi and NCB outpatient
Hematology comes here.
Jacobi Hematology clinic is limited to BM biopsies only and takes place at 9 AM
on Thursdays (bldg 1, 6 south)
Chemotherapy and infusions are Monday through Friday 8-5, building 1, 6 south
Tumor Board, Thursdays, 12-1 PM, 4th Floor Aud., BLDG 1
Hematopathology Conference, Thursdays, 1:30-2:30PM, Pathology Conf Rm,
Basement East, Bldg 1
Bone Marrow Review Conference, Tuesdays, 3-4 PM, Rm 6N31, Bldg 1
NCCN/ASCO Guideline Review Conference, Wednesdays, 8-9 AM; 6S
Conference Rm., Bldg 1
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and hematologic diseases on inpatient consults
and in the clinic. This includes but is not limited to:
65. Peripheral Blood Smear & Bone Marrow Review
66. Anemia - Approach To The Patient With Anemia
67. Iron Deficiency Anemia
68. Iron Overload - Sideroblastic Anemia, Hemochromatosis & Anemia Of
Chronic Disease
69. Megaloblastic Anemia
70. Acquired Hemolytic Anemia - Immune, TTP/HUS, Spur Cell, PNH
71. Hereditary Hemolytic Anemia - G6PD, Hereditary Spherocytosis
72. Sickle Cell Anemia
73. Hemoglobin - Structure, Hemoglobinopathies, Methemoglobinemia
74. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia & MDS
75. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia & Bone Marrow Transplant
76. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia & Hairy Cell Leukemia
134
77. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
78. P. Vera, Essential Thrombocythemia, & Myelofibrosis
79. Aplastic Anemia, Red Cell Aplasia, Myelophthisis
80. Thrombocytopenia & ITP
81. Transfusion Medicine
82. Von Willebrand’s Disease & Platelet Defects
83. DIC
84. Hemophilia & Factor Deficiencies
85. Hemostasis
86. Hypercoagulable States
87. Eosinophillia & WBC Function
88. Hypercoagulable States
89. Anticoagulation, Thrombolytic & Antiplatelet Therapy
90. Plasma Cell Neoplasia
91. Amyloidosis
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient Hematology clinic on patients with a variety of
hematologic disorders.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. The resident is not required but may participate with the help of the
fellow or attending in doing bone marrow biopsies.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive verbal feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation in MyEvaluations. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Hematology
Key Blood smear learning websites:
http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/hematology/HessIDB/home.cfm
135
http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/HEMEHTML/HEMEIDX.html
Other blood smear learning website:
http://ashimagebank.hematologylibrary.org/
136
Oncology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of oncologic conditions essential to Internal
Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
medical knowledge in the field of Oncology and be able to
evaluate and treat common oncologic conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in evaluating and treating most medical
oncologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient
with an oncologic condition and do a thorough physical
examination for signs of cancer and its complications.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis
and treatment plan for oncology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
use local resources to research issues and read regarding
their oncology patient as an independent adult learner.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Global Faculty Assessment
137
-Global Faculty Assessment
continuously improve in their care of oncology patients.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with
patients and their families regarding oncologic conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and
verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel
regarding oncology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with
regard to patient care and maintain patient confidentiality
when consulting on an oncology patient.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with oncologic diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Global Faculty Assessment
interact with the primary physician team, consulting
attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health
care team.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to help
-Global Faculty Assessment
the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain needed
aide and care for those with oncologic conditions.
Supervision
The resident on Oncology elective is supervised by the Oncology attending and fellow
that are on consults that month and the Oncology attendings that precept the Oncology
clinics.
138
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Oncology Fellow to see inpatient consults and
present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up inpatient
consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results and
ready for new consults for the day. While on elective medicine housestaff are still
required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and must be excused for this
session.
Residents can also rotate through these outpatient experiences:








Medical Oncology clinic Mon, Tues, Wed at 9AM in bldg 1, 6 south. All Jacobi
and NCB outpatient oncology comes here.
Hematology clinic is at NCB Friday 9 AM. All Jacobi and NCB outpatient
Hematology comes here.
Jacobi Hematology clinic is limited to BM biopsies only and takes place at 9 AM
on Thursdays (bldg 1, 6 south)
Chemotherapy and infusions are Monday through Friday 8-5, building 1, 6 south
Tumor Board, Thursdays, 12-1 PM, 4th Floor Aud., BLDG 1
Hematopathology Conference, Thursdays, 1:30-2:30PM, Pathology Conf Rm,
Basement East, Bldg 1
Bone Marrow Review Conference, Tuesdays, 3-4 PM, Rm 6N31, Bldg 1
NCCN/ASCO Guideline Review Conference, Wednesdays, 8-9 AM; 6S
Conference Rm., Bldg 1
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and oncologic diseases on inpatient consults
and in the clinic. This includes, but is not limited to, leukemias, lymphomas, myeloma
and all solid tumors.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient Oncology clinic on patients with a variety of oncologic
disorders.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. The resident is not required but may participate with the help of the
fellow or attending in doing bone marrow biopsies, intrathecal and intraperitoneal
chemotherapy.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive verbal feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation in MyEvaluations. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
139
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Medical Oncology
140
Hematology&Oncology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of Hematologic and Oncologic conditions essential
to Internal Medicine training.
Objectives:
See the objectives from the Hematology and Oncology Elective Curricula separately.
Supervision
The resident on Hematology&Oncology elective is supervised by the Hematology and
the Oncology attending and fellow that are on consults that month and the Hematology
and Oncology attendings that precept those clinics.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
See the Hematology and the Oncology Curricula separately.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
See the Hematology and the Oncology Curricula separately.
Types of Clinical Encounters
See the Hematology and the Oncology Curricula separately.
Procedures
See the Hematology and the Oncology Curricula separately.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive verbal feedback from the
supervising attending faculty members. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attendings will be expected to complete an evaluation in MyEvaluations.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Medical Oncology and Hematology
141
Infectious Disease Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn in more detail about a variety of Infectious Diseases essential to Internal
Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
medical knowledge in the field of Infectious Diseases and
be able to evaluate and treat common infectious diseases
and evaluate the patient with fever and/or leukocytosis.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in interpretation of common Infectious Disease
laboratory tests and imaging including culture and
sensitivities, serologies and antibiotic susceptibilities.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated the ability to gather a pertinent directed
history from a patient with an infectious disease and do a
thorough examination looking for signs of infectious
diseases including lymph nodes, organ enlargement and
cutaneous signs.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis
and treatment plan for patients with a variety of infectious
diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
142
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
use local resources to research issues and read regarding
his/her patient with an infectious disease, as an independent
adult learner.
By the end of this rotation the resident will show
improvement in his/her care of patients with infectious
diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will improve his/her
skills in communicating clearly, compassionately, and
effectively with patients and their families regarding
common infectious diseases and related issues, and will be
able to take an appropriate history including pertinent issues
such as travel, animal contact, immunization history.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
improve his/her skills in communicating clearly and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding patients with
infectious diseases and related issues.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a patient with an
infectious disease.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with infectious diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
143
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
-Global Faculty Assessment
interact with the primary physician team, consulting
attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health
care team. The resident will also know when to involve
infection control personnel.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
-Resident Self Assessment
help the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain
-Global Faculty Assessment
needed aide and care for those with infectious diseases.
Supervision
The resident on Infectious Diseases elective is supervised by the Infectious Disease
attending and fellow who are on consults that month. They are also supervised by the
Infectious Disease attendings precepting in ID clinic.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Infectious Disease Fellow to see inpatient
consults and present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow
up inpatient consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test
results and ready for new consults for the day. While on elective medicine housestaff are
still required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and must be excused for this
session.
Residents attend ID clinic and conferences as long as they do not interfere with continuity
clinic.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and infectious diseases on inpatient consults
and in the outpatient clinic. This may include but is not limited to:
 Meningitis
 Encephalitis
 HIV/AIDS
 Pneumonia
 Bacteremia and sepsis
 Endocarditis
 Urinary tract infection
 Skin and soft tissue infections
 Intra-abdominal infections
 Bone and joint infections
 Head and neck infections
 Gastroenteritis and food poisoning
 Tuberculosis
 Viral hepatitis
144






Respiratory viruses
Infections of intravenous drug users
Tick borne diseases
Infections in surgical patients
Infections in pregnant patients
Infections in transplant patients
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient clinic with follow up on patients with a variety of
infectious disease.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. The resident on ID elective may be involved in obtaining cultures of
specimens such as wounds or doing lumbar punctures.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation in MyEvaluations. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on GI diseases
IDSA guidelines on many different infectious diseases (IDsociety.org)
Mandell textbook of ID
NY State HIV guidelines
145
Nephrology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of renal conditions essential to Internal Medicine
training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
medical knowledge in the field of renal diseases and be able
to evaluate and treat common renal conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in interpretation of common renal laboratory
tests and imaging such as: electrolytes, urine studies,
renal/bladder ultrasound, renal nuclear scan, renal biopsy.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient
with a renal condition and do a thorough examination
including various signs of fluid and acid base changes in the
body as well of glomerular diseases..
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and
radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis
and treatment plan for renal patients.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
-Resident Self Assessment
146
use local resources to research issues and read regarding
their renal patient as an independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
By the end of this rotation the resident will have improved
in their care of patients with renal diseases.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with
patients and their families regarding common renal
conditions.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and
verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel
regarding renal patients.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a patient with a renal
disease.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with renal diseases.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown an
ability to interact with the primary physician team,
consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part
of a health care team.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
help the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain
needed aide and care for those with renal conditions.
The resident will learn to use evidence-based, cost-
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
147
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Resident Self Assessment
conscious strategies in the care of renal patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
Dr. Acharya is the designated Nephrology Education Coordinator for the Jacobi
Department of Medicine. The resident on Nephrology elective is directly supervised by
the Nephrology attending and fellow that are on consults that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Residents are responsible to work with the Nephrology Fellow to see inpatient consults
and present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up
inpatient consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results
and ready for new consults for the day. There are daily teaching rounds with the fellow
and attending during which the resident presents new consults and follow-ups on
previously seen patients. The resident should be prepared to discuss the differential
diagnosis and pertinent medical literature. The resident will be called upon to present in
depth topics at rounds as well.
Residents should go to:
 Nephrology Grand Rounds at 12.30PM on Tuesdays or Fridays as designated on
the monthly academic schedule
 Nephrology case report on Friday at 12.30PM
 Nephsap: Board review at 12.30PM once a month
 Nephrology Journal Club at 12.30PM once a month
Residents also rotate through these outpatient practices:
Wednesday morning 9am-12.30 pm – Renal clinic
Friday morning 9am- 11am – Renal Transplant clinic-twice a month
Friday morning 9am-11am Vascular access clinic- twice a month
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and renal diseases on inpatient consults and in
outpatient clinic. This includes but is not limited to: Electrolyte imbalances, disturbances
in Acid-Base balance, nephrolithiasis, Glomerular diseases, Tubulointerstitial diseases,
Acute Kidney Injury-AKI (pre-/intra-/post-), Chronic Kidney Disease, UTI, Hereditary
renal disorders, Hypertension, Nephrotic Syndrome, Nephritis, SLE renal disease,
Diabetic Nephropathy, HIV Nephropathy, Hepato-Renal Syndrome. Residents should
also learn the indications for acute as well as chronic dialysis and Continuous renal
replacement therapy.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient clinic with chronic care follow up on patients with a
variety of renal disorders.
148
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. The resident is not required but may participate with the help of the
fellow or attending in doing temporary access for renal replacement therapy.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations. The
resident will complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Nephrology
Primer on Kidney Diseases-NKF
Handbook of Dialysis
149
Neurology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of neurologic conditions essential to Internal
Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have gained medical knowledge in the
field of Neurology and be able to evaluate and treat
common neurologic conditions.
The resident will have gained knowledge in interpretation of
common neurologic testing and imaging including: head
CT, brain MRI, lumbar puncture results, EEG testing, EMG
testing, carotid doppler.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate the ability to gather
information from a patient with a neurologic condition and
do a thorough neurologic examination including mental
status, cranial nerves, and motor and sensory testing.
The resident will be able to interpret the history, physical
exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and come up
with a differential diagnosis and treatment plan for patients
with neurologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have learned to use local resources to
research issues and read regarding their patient with a
neurologic condition, as an independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
150
The resident should continuously improve in their care of
patients with neurologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding neurologic conditions.
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding patients with
neurologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity
and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a Neurology patient.
The resident will demonstrate a commitment to carrying out
professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical
principles regarding patients with neurologic diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will interact with the primary physician team, -Global Faculty Assessment
consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part
of a health care team.
The resident will learn to help the patient navigate the
-Global Faculty Assessment
healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those
with neurologic conditions.
The resident will learn to use evidence-based, cost-Global Faculty Assessment
conscious strategies in the care of patients with
Neurological diagnsoes.
Supervision
Dr. Ocava is responsible overall for the Neurology elective at Jacobi Medical Center. The
resident on Neurology elective is supervised by the Neurology attending and fellow that
are on consults that month.
151
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Neurology Fellow to see inpatient consults and
present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up inpatient
consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results and
ready for new consults for the day.
In the clinic the outpatient education is to gain experience in the diagnosis, evaluation,
and treatment of common outpatient problems such as headache, dizziness, low back
pain, and peripheral neuropathy. The neurology clinic is held on Tuesday and Thursday
afternoons in JMC Building 8 4B.
Residents should go to all scheduled neurology conferences.
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
West Campus
(Moses)
East Campus
(Jacobi and Weiler)
4th – Vascular Neurology
12:30-1:30 PM
STARTS AT 7:30AM
with Neurosurgery and Neuroradiology
Movement Disorders (JMC)
5:30-6:30 PM
2nd – Journal Club, Kennedy 901
8-9 AM
8-9 AM
Rotating Conferences, Kennedy 901
1st – Headache
2nd – Neuroscience
3rd – Contemporary Issue in
Neurology/Ethics
4th – Professor’s Rounds
with Dr. Mehler**
12-1 PM
Sleep Medicine Conference
8-9 AM
Neuromuscular Conference
12-1 PM
Rotating Conferences
(JMC)
1st – Movement Disorders
2nd – Electrophysiology
3rd – Neuropathology
4th – Vascular Neurology
1st – Neuromuscular*
2nd – Vascular Neurology*
3rd – Neuromuscular*
4th – videoconference
8-9 AM
12-1 PM
Grand Rounds, Cherkasky
Auditorium
1st and 3rd
Brain Cutting
(Rm C231)
152
Will join conference at Moses or
videoconference
* local conference done depending on
availability/workload – I could take this
off the schedule
Will join conference at Moses
Friday
8-9 AM
12-1 PM
2-3 PM
Case Conference (NW1)
Case Conference (Kennedy 901)
1st and 3rd
Videoconference
Residents’ Board
review
2nd and 4tt Neuro Ophthalmology
Rounds (Weiler)
2nd and 4th Neuro
Ophthalmology Rounds
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and neurological diseases on inpatient consults
and in the clinic. These include but are not limited to: TIA, stroke, other cerebro-vascular
diseases, degenerative disorders such as, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, Multiple
sclerosis, Seizure disorders, Dementia, HIV, and other nervous system and various
neuromuscular diseases.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults on patients with a variety of neurologic disorders and outpatients
coming to the Neurology clinic with a variety of neurologic disorders.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. The resident should use this elective as an opportunity to do lumbar
punctures when needed. The resident on Neurology elective may do lumbar punctures on
patients for whom they are called in consult.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the one month rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback
from the supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the
supervising attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations.
The resident will complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Neurology
153
Pain and Palliative Care Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 and 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn to deliver care to patients in pain in an effective and safe manner. To learn
pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic methods to ease the suffering of patients with
chronic, life-limiting illnesses.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation, the resident will have acquired
knowledge of pain management, including the
pharmacology of opiates, other analgesics and alternative
medicine.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Examination
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In-Training Examination
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
By the end of the rotation, the resident will have acquired
knowledge of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic
methods to ease the suffering of patients with chronic, lifelimiting illnesses.
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation, the resident will have learned to
provide care that embodies attention to the control of
distressing physical, psychological, and spiritual symptoms;
awareness of different cultural backgrounds and their impact
upon the dying experience.
By the end of the rotation, the resident will be able to take
care of patients with a variety of painful conditions using
both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic methods.
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
154
-Resident Self Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation, the resident will be able to make
improvements in their own care of patients with chronic,
life-limiting illnesses.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation, the resident will know how to
break bad news to a patient or their family in a sensitive
respectful manner.
By the end of the rotation, the resident will be able to
communicate with ancillary staff regarding the care of
patients with chronic, life-limiting illnesses.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation, the resident will appreciate that
dying is a normal part of the life cycle and understand the
meaning and privilege of attending to patients and families
at this difficult time.
By the end of the rotation, the resident will be able to apply
bioethical principles that maintains both the patient’s
autonomy and physician’s professionalism.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation, the resident will consider timely
referral and smooth transition to other care settings that
meet patient and family goals in dying.
By the end of the rotation, the resident will appreciate the
importance of an interdisciplinary team approach to meet
the diverse medical, social, psychological, and existential
issues facing the patient and family.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
The resident will be supervised by the pain and palliative care attending assigned for the
month and by Stephanie Reynolds the Palliative Care NP and Dawn Kilkenney, CSW.
155
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Palliative Care NP to see inpatient & outpatient
consults and present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow
up inpatient consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test
results and ready for new consults for the day. While on elective medicine housestaff are
still required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and must be excused for this
session. There is now an outpatient palliative care clinic for housestaff to work in during
this rotation.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
On the inpatient floors and units, and now in the outpatient palliative care clinic, the
housestaff see a broad range of patients that have a chronic, life-limiting illness who are
exhibiting symptoms of emotional or physical distress. These patients range in
socioeconomic status and span all races and religions.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults on patients with pain and/or are at the end-of life and necessitate
palliative care efforts. Outpatient visits by patients to the palliative care clinic. Patients
encountered include but are not limited to patients with: cancer, dementia, COPD, sepsis,
respiratory failure, coma, and minimal cognitive function.
Procedures
None.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation in MyEvaluations. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form every 6 months.
Educational Resources & References
American Cancer Society – Pain Management Pocket Tool available at www.cancer.org
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
www.aahpm.org
Center to Advance Palliative Care
www.capc.org
Fast Facts, over 200 short "cheat sheets" on Pall Care topics, can be downloaded to
Palm
http://www.mcw.edu/EPERC/FastFactsIndex
156
End-of-life education for physicians
http://www.epec.net/EPEC/webpages/index.cfm
Excellent self-guided teaching about Palliative Care
http://endoflife.stanford.edu/M00_overview/intro_lrn_overv.html
Opioid conversion tool, free with registration
http://www.hopweb.org/
Pain scales in different languages (Arabic, Chinese, Polish, etc.)
http://www.britishpainsociety.org/pub_pain_scales.htm
Out of Hospital DNR form for NY State
http://www.health.state.ny.us/forms/doh-3474.pdf
AMA modules on pain management, CME
http://www.ama-cmeonline.com/pain_mgmt/
157
Pulmonary Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of pulmonary conditions essential to Internal
Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have gained medical knowledge in the
field of pulmonary diseases and be able to evaluate and treat
common pulmonary conditions.
The resident will have gained knowledge in interpretation of
common pulmonary laboratory tests and imaging including
spirometry, PFT, ABG and sleep studies.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
-Global Faculty Assessment
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate the ability to gather
information from a patient with a pulmonary condition and
do a thorough pulmonary examination including inspection,
palpation, percussion and auscultation of the lungs.
The resident will be able to interpret the history, physical
exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and come up
with a differential diagnosis and treatment plan for
pulmonary patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have learned to use local resources to
research issues and read regarding their pulmonary patient
as an independent adult learner.
-Global Faculty Assessment
158
The resident should continuously improve in their care of
patients with pulmonary diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding pulmonary conditions.
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding pulmonary
patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity
and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a patient with a
pulmonary disease.
The resident will demonstrate a commitment to carrying out
professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical
principles regarding patients with pulmonary diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will interact with the primary physician team, -Global Faculty Assessment
consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part
of a health care team.
The resident will learn to help the patient navigate the
-Global Faculty Assessment
healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those
with pulmonary conditions including pulmonary
rehabilitation.
Supervision
The resident on Pulmonary elective is supervised by the Pulmonary attending and fellow
that are on consults that month.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Pulmonary Fellow to see inpatient consults and
present them on attending rounds that day. Residents should see all follow up inpatient
consults from 8-9am so that they are updated on the plan of care and test results and
159
ready for new consults for the day. While on elective medicine housestaff are still
required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and must be excused for this
session.
Attendance at Pulmonary conferences and as long as it doesn't conflict with their
continuity clinic.
Tuesday 8AM Divisional Conference - lecture given by a Pulmonary faculty member
or a guest speaker.
Tuesday 4:30 PM - Clinical Conference given by a PCCM fellow. It can be a Journal
Club or Case-based Conference.
Wednesday 8AM Divisional Conference – given by a PCCM fellow. It can be a Journal
Club, CPC, Topic Review, Basic Science, Case Conference, or Research conference.
Chest Clinic takes place Wed PM and Fri AM.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and pulmonary diseases on inpatient consults
and in outpatient clinic. This includes but is not limited to: asthma, COPD, interstitial
diseases, PNA, empyema, sleep apnea, PE, lung CA.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults and outpatient clinic with chronic care follow up on patients with a
variety of pulmonary disorders.
Procedures
When seeing patients on the floors in consult most procedures will be done by the
primary floor team. When seeing patients in the ER for consult the resident may be
needed to do arterial puncture for an ABG. The resident should learn about thoracentesis
and bronchoscopy but is not required to perform these procedures.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation in MyEvaluations. The resident will
complete a self-assessment form every 6 months. Other housestaff on the rotation will
complete a peer evaluation form.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Pulmonary diseases
PFT education websites:
160
http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/pulmonary/pul
monary-function-testing/
http://courses.washington.edu/med610/index.html
CXR reading websites:
http://www.mc.uky.edu/education/images/flash/chestnew.swf
http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/cxr/
http://rad.usuhs.edu/medpix/
http://info.med.yale.edu/intmed/cardio/imaging/contents.html
161
Radiology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1, 2 or 3.
Duration:
½ to 1 month elective.
Goals: To gain experience in reading plain films that would be useful for the practicing
internist.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
knowledge in basic radiologic techniques and their
interpretation.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will better know how
to interpret plain films of the chest and abdomen to aid them
in patient care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will find out in what
areas they need improvement in knowledge of radiologic
techniques and seek self-improvement during the month and
afterwards during the rest of their residency.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have improved
in their communication with radiology specialists in order to
optimize patient centered care.
-Global Faculty Assessment
162
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown
professional attitudes in their interactions with their
Radiology colleagues.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will better know
what tests to order in the Radiology part of our healthcare
system for improved patient-centered outcomes.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
The resident on Radiology elective is supervised by Dr. Friedman.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Residents join Dr. Friedman and other faculty to read films from 9am-5pm. Residents are
to attend the 11-11:30am chest film reading session with the Pulmonary team. Residents
can pick an area of concentration in Radiology to study if interested. While on elective,
medicine housestaff are still required to go to their weekly continuity clinic session and
must be excused for this session.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
All manner of diseases seen in radiological formats including but not limited to X-ray,
CT, MRI, ultrasound.
Types of Clinical Encounters
None.
Procedures
None.
Evaluation
Dr. Friedman will fill out the Standard Evaluation form in MyEvaluations in the 6
competencies at the end of the rotation. If the housestaff worked more with a different
faculty member they must tell Dr. Zelefsky and Laura Scully that persons name so that
they can fill out the evaluation instead.
Educational Resources & References
http://eradiology.bidmc.harvard.edu/
163
Rheumatology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1,2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn and be exposed to a variety of Rheumatologic conditions and procedures
essential to Internal Medicine training.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have gained medical knowledge in the
field of Rheumatology and be able to evaluate and treat
common Rheumatologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-In Training Exam
The resident will have gained knowledge in interpretation of -Global Faculty Assessment
common Rheumatologic laboratory tests and imaging.
-In Training Exam
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate the ability to gather
information from a patient with a Rheumatologic condition
and do a thorough Rheumatologic examination of joints and
other appropriate areas.
The resident will be able to interpret the history, physical
exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and come up
with a differential diagnosis and treatment plan for
Rheumatology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will have learned to use local resources to
research issues and read regarding their Rheumatologic
patient as an independent adult learner.
The resident should be able to show continuous
improvement in their care of patients with Rheumatologic
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
164
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
disorders.
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will be able to communicate clearly,
compassionately, and effectively with patients and their
families regarding Rheumatologic conditions.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
The resident will be able to communicate clearly, and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding
Rheumatologic patients.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity
and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a Rheumatologic patient.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Direct Faculty Bedside
Observation
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
The resident will demonstrate a commitment to carrying out
professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical
principles regarding patients with Rheumatologic diseases.
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
The resident will interact with the primary physician team,
consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part
of a health care team.
The resident will learn to help the patient navigate the
healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those
with Rheumatologic conditions.
The resident will learn to use evidence-based, costconscious strategies in the care of Rheumatology patients.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Peer Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
The resident on Rheumatology elective is supervised by the Rheumatology attending and
fellow that are on consults that month.
165
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with the Rheumatology fellow to see inpatient consults
and present them on attending rounds that day. There are teaching rounds at least three
times per week with the fellow and attending during which the resident presents new
consults and follow-ups on previously seen patients. The resident should be prepared to
discuss the differential diagnosis and pertinent medical literature.
The residents will participate in weekly educational and clinic activities:
Monday AM Jacobi Joint Pain Clinic Building 8, 4A
Tues AM Lupus Clinic at MMC
Wed AM- Fellows Journal Club and Rheumatology Clinic, MMC
Thurs AM- Jacobi Rheumatology Clinic Building 8, 4B
Friday 8AM-10AM Journal Club and Grand Rounds, AECOM
There are also Rehab and Radiology teaching sessions during each month.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients and Rheumatologic diseases between the
outpatient clinics and the inpatient consults. This includes but is not limited to: SLE, RA,
Spondyloarthropathies, crystal-induced joint diseases, Sjogren’s, and OA.
Types of Clinical Encounters
Inpatient consults from any service and outpatient Rheumatology clinic visits.
Procedures
When appropriate, residents can learn arthrocentesis, joint and tendon/bursal injections
under the tutelage of a credentialed attending or fellow.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive verbal feedback from the
supervising attending faculty member. At the completion of the rotation, the supervising
attending will be expected to complete an evaluation form on MyEvaluations. The
resident will complete a self-assessment form every 6 months. If there are other residents
on elective that month they will complete a peer evaluation form as well.
Educational Resources & References
American College of Rheumatology on-line Educational Resources
http://www.rheumatology.org/education/resources/index.asp
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
MKSAP on Rheumatology
Kelly’s Textbook of Rheumatology
166
Geriatrics Curriculum
OBJECTIVES
In the effort to achieve a consistent, quality educational experience for the housestaff the
following teaching objectives provide guidelines for the didactic sessions.
COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIATRIC ASSESSMENT
1.Recognize the usefulness of functional assessment as a combined measure of
chronological age with physical and psychological parameters.
2.Know the 6 areas of activities of daily living (ADL’s) and the general aspects of
instrumental activities of daily living (IADL’s).
3.Appreciate the advantage of an interdisciplinary approach to patient care.
4.Know appropriate preventive health care measures for the elderly.
5.Understand the available options for patients with self care deficits. Community
resources include in home caregivers, Visiting Nurse Services and home care services.
PRESSURE SORES
1.Understand the significance of pressure sores in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost.
2.Know the 4 factors that contribute to the development of pressure sores (pressure,
friction, shearing, moisture) and know the staging criteria.
3.Know the general treatment guidelines for each wound stage.
URINARY INCONTINENCE
1.Understand the physical and psychological components necessary for continence.
2.Know the causes of acute, reversible forms of urinary incontinence and their
management.
3.Know the 4 causes of persistent urinary incontinence (stress, urge, overflow,
functional) and their management.
167
DRUG THERAPY/ POLYPHARMACY
1.Know the age associated changes of pharmacokinetics with regards to absorption,
distribution, metabolism, and excretion.
2.Understand common medication issues in elderly. i.e. polypharmacy, iatrogenesis,
inappropriate dosing, appropriate selection.
3.Understand medication management strategies for elderly patients.
4. Know about common herbal medicines and alternative medicine.
DYSPHAGIA/ NUTRITION
1.Know the factors which predispose feeding/ swallowing disorders.
2.Understand the morbidity associated with nutritional compromise.
3.Know appropriate evaluation and management options for feeding/ swallowing
disorders.
DEMENTIA / DELIRIUM
1.Know the similarities and differences between delirium and dementia.
2.Know the common etiologies for delirium and dementia.
3.Know the administration and scoring of the Folstein Mini-Mental Status Examination.
4.Know management approaches which include searching for reversible conditions,
medication use, behavior modification, rehabilitation and placement consideration.
SENSORY DEPRIVATION
1.Understand the morbidity associated with sensory deprivation.
2.Understand the common etiologies of sensory deprivation. i.e. visual impairment, and
hearing deficits, and their management.
168
FALLS AND IMMOBILITY
1 Understand the morbidity and mortality associated with these conditions.
2. Know common etiologies for these conditions and their management.
SLEEP DISORDERS
1.Know age associated changes in sleep pattern.
2.Understand the terms, sleep efficiency and sleep hygiene
3.Know the appropriate evaluation and management of sleep disorders including
insomnia.
WEIGHT LOSS, FRAILTY, FAILURE TO THRIVE
1.Understand the causes of weight loss and a definition of “failure to thrive syndrome”.
2.Know the appropriate evaluation and management.
OVERVIEW
Geriatrics focuses on the acute, chronic and preventive care of the elderly. Its content
includes normal aging physiology, common diseases in the elderly, altered clinical
presentations and multiple coexisting problems (mental, physical and social), altered drug
pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and functional status assessment. Clinical
exposures include acute inpatient care and ambulatory care as well as home care
programs.
General Training Objectives
Encourage and develop medical residents’ ability to deliver competent, respectful and
compassionate care of older people in all healthcare settings utilizing appropriate
technology while encompassing an awareness of the limits of intervention in light of
individual patient values.
169
Develop physician skills in working effectively with other healthcare professionals in a
multidisciplinary team dedicated to the care of older patients.
Develop an understanding of and facility in performing comprehensive geriatric
assessment of older patients including screening assessments and an awareness of the
importance of patient function in medical care. Promote knowledge of and appropriate
utilization of screening examination for remedial and preventable disease in older
patients.
Improve skills in taking sensitive and focused history and physical examinations in older
patients and learn how to use the observations of patients’ families and significant others
in patient care and management.
Incorporate basic working knowledge of aging physiology and pharmacology and train
medical residents to evaluate and manage syndromes or diseases unique to or more
common in older persons.
Become familiar with the interpersonal, social and cultural influences in the psychology
and psychopathology in older adults.
Improve skills in making sensitive and appropriate decisions using the principles of
medical ethics in caring for older people.
Develop an understanding of the demography of aging and its implications for healthcare;
develop an awareness of the current financing and reimbursement issues for Medicare.
Identify available social resources and programs for planning care for elderly patients.
GENERAL CURRICULUM
Content
Knowledge of age-associated changes to the history and physical examination important
in the care of older adults. Identification of normal or usual aging versus disease
processes. Identification of atypical presentations of disease in older adults.
Knowledge of age-related changes in pharmacology, polypharmacy, drug-drug
interactions and drug- food interactions. (Including knowledge of herbal and alternative
medicine)
Ethical issues frequently encountered in care of older adults. (Patient autonomy, pain
management in terminally ill patient, death and dying, advance directives, driving safety,
elder abuse)
Knowledge of the psychosocial aspect of aging including housing, bereavement, anxiety.
170
Knowledge of medicolegal issues such as incompetence, DNR orders, Living will and
Health care proxy.
Skills
Ability to perform a comprehensive geriatric assessment of older patients including site
specific screening assessment.
Ability to determine the optimum setting for care.
Ability to appropriately and selectively refer older adults to consultants and other health
professionals.
Ability to determine decision-making capacity.
Cite the cost and payment sources for medications, devices (hearing aids, walkers etc.),
home care.
Attitudes
Demonstrate appropriate communication and interpersonal skills when interacting with
elderly patients.
Appreciate the importance of a multidisciplinary “team approach” to patient care.
Respect for patient autonomy.
Awareness of need to incorporate the family and caregivers in patient evaluation
decisions and development of treatment plans.
Realize that the geriatric syndromes, although often time not life-threatening, markedly
impair the quality of life for patients and their caregivers.
Awareness of the great heterogeneity of older persons. Awareness of the importance of
cultural differences in patient decision- making.
OUTPATIENT CLINIC
Content
Knowledge of following geriatric syndromes: dementia, depression in late life, urinary
incontinence, falls and gait instability, osteoporosis, and sensory impairment ( vision,
hearing).
Health promotion and disease prevention strategies for older adults regarding
immunizations ( Influenza, pneumococcus, tetanus), osteoporosis, cancer ( breast,
prostate, colorectal, skin), alcohol use, tobacco use and exercise and nutrition.
171
Preoprative evaluation of the older adult.
The importance of promoting independent function and delaying dependency when
developing care plans for elderly patients.
Geriatric assessment scales: Mini-mental status, geriatric depression scale, Katz ADL
Community resources for elders (e.g. senior centers, meal programs, adult day health
care, hospice, respite, visiting nurses): access and appropriate use.
Skills
Ability to manage multiple acute and chronic illnesses, including above-mentioned
specific geriatric syndromes.
Develop proficiency in recognizing factors that impede or preclude, and those that can
enhance, safe independent living for frail elderly people.
Learn to administer assessment instruments: Mini-mental status, Geriatric Depression
Scale, Katz ADL.
Attitudes
See Attitudes General (above).
Inpatient Geriatric Curriculum
There is a noon conference every month on important and useful Geriatric topics.
JULY 2011: Approach to the vulnerable hospitalized Geriatric Patient: addressing
Geriatric assessment and goals of care
AUGUST 2011: Transitions in care: Discussing about safe discharge, communication
with PCP and post hospital care
SEPTEMBER 2011: Delirium in hospitalized patient
NOVEMBER 2011: How to address End of Life Issues
DECEMBER 2011: Drugs and Aging
JANUARY 2011: Pain assessment in elderly
FEBRUARY 2011: Pressure ulcers and wound care
MARCH 2011: Falls and immobility
APRIL 2011: Dementia and Depression.
172
Homecare Services
Content
Familiarity with varying level of care for the frail elderly. Distinctions between short and
long term home health care, short and long term institutional care and terminal care
(subacute care).
Patient suitability for care in the home and appropriate patients for physician home visits.
Functional assessment in the home.
Nutritional assessment in the home and management of intravenous therapy and enteral
feedings in the home.
Medication use and compliance issues in the older persons.
Assessment and management of immobility and pressure ulcers.
Physician’s role in coordinating rehabilitation in the home.
Elements of home safety assessment.
Physician’s responsibilities and approach to elder abuse and neglect.
Skills
Ability to manage geriatric syndromes (e.g. dementia, urinary incontinence) in the home
setting.
Ability to assess function including fall risk.
Ability to manage pain effectively in the home setting.
Ability to selectively and appropriately order community services for patients at home.
Attitudes
Awareness of great heterogeneity of older persons and their home environment.
Awareness of roles of interdisciplinary team members in home care.
Appreciation of the importance of the family or caregiver in managing older patients in
the home.
Activities
Residents provide direct patient care under faculty supervision. Faculty members closely
supervise patient care through one on one precepting.
173
References
In addition, other Standard Geriatric text Books, individual hand outs prepared by
attendings relevant to lecture topics, peer review medical journals and the MKSAP will
be used as educational material.
Geriatrics and Aging
Useful Websites
National institute of Aging
nih.gov/nia/health/health.htm
The Merck Maual of Geriatrics Access
merck.com/pubs/mm geriatrics/toc.htm
Novartis Foundation for Gerontological Research
www.healthandage.com/hphysi.htm
Doctor’s Guide to Internet
http://www.pslgroup.com/dg/geriatricsnews.htm
Healthandage.com
http://www.healthandage.com/physi/f10.htm
Administration on Aging
http://www.aoa.dhhs.gov
Clinical Strategies in Long term care
http://www.ltcnutrition.org
GeroWeb
http:www.iog.wane.edu/GeroWebd/Geroweb.html
Elder Web
www.elderweb
Predictors of Cardiovascular Death:
The Normative Aging Study- 1963-1998
http://www.mmhc.com/cg/articles/CG9909/lee.html
Home Health
http://www.mmhc.articles/HHc9909/commentary.html
End of Life
Last Acts
174
http://www.lastacts.org/lexis/nexis frameset.html
National Hospice foundation
nho.org
Hospice web
www.teleport.com/~hospice
Culture, End of Life, and Bioethics:
What differences make a difference?” Decisions at the end of life: Withholding and
Withdrawing Life support”
www.med.stanford.edu/heathlibrary/catalog/realvidea.html
ENT News
http://www.ent-news.com
Alzheimer’s Disease
Alzheimers.com
http://alzheimers.com/news
Mediconsult
http://www.mediconsult.com/mc/mcsite.nsf/conditionnav/alzheimers~medicalnews
Alzheimer’s Research Forum
http://www.alzforum.org/members/research/news/index.html
The care giver’s Handbook
www.biostat.wustl.edu/alzheimer.care.html
Arthritis
JohnHopkins Arthritis Center
http://www.hopkins-arthritis.som.jhmi.edu
Arthritis Resource Center
http://members.aol.com/healwell/javanews.htm#arthritis
Alternative Medicine
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
http://nccam.nih.gov/nccam/news-events
Mayo Clinic Alterative Medicine Library
http://www.mayohealth.org/mayo/library/htm/natural.htm
Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center
http://www.osteo.org/whatsnew.html
175
National Osteoporosis foundation
nof.org
Doctor’s Guide to Internet
http://www.pslgroup.com/osteoporosis.htm#News
WebmedLit: Neurology
http://webmedlit.silverplatter.com/topics/cns.html
176
Research Elective Curriculum
PGY:
1, 2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month at a time (though some research work usually continues between blocks)
Goal:




To learn how to develop a research project idea
To learn how to gather data and do statistical analysis
To learn bench research methods and/or research techniques used in studies
involving animals as applicable
To learn how to write up and submit research as an abstract, poster and paper for
competition or publication
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
-Global Faculty Assessment
knowledge about research methods including statistics.
By the end of this rotation the residents will have gained
-Global Faculty Assessment
knowledge about the topic in which they are doing research
By being involved in the actual data acquisition and analysis
process the residents will be better equipped to evaluate
published research studies. The research experience will
also aid the residents in deciding on their carreer choice.
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have improved
in their ability to apply research to patient care in general,
and specifically related to their research interests.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that
they can use a research topic to develop the literature in that
area towards improvement of medical care of patients in
-Global Faculty Assessment
177
general.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have shown that -Global Faculty Assessment
they can communicate clearly in appropriate research
related language with others on their own research project as
well as on related ongoing research.
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
-Global Faculty Assessment
demonstrated respect for and gained appreciation of
scientists involved in biomedical research and of the
dedicated commitment of patients volunteering to
participate in research studies.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
-Global Faculty Assessment
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
research practices.
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can interact with all members of the research team.
By the end of the rotation the resident will have shown they
can work towards goal of improving biomedical knowledge
as well as healthcare or the healthcare system through
research.
-Global Faculty Assessment
178
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
There must be an assigned research mentor in charge of leading, supervising and
evaluating any housestaff member who is on a research elective. This person can be at
Jacobi, Montefiore or AECOM. The housestaff may also be supervised by a fellow
working on the research project as well.
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
The resident will learn to construct a research idea, develop an IRB approved research
plan and conduct the research according to ethical principles of conduct. The resident
may also be involved in writing up the research for abstract, poster or article publication.
Housestaff should take the CITI course (Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative)
online at: https://www.citiprogram.org/login.asp?strKeyID=70871B17-0A24-428D9E9A-39B86FB87463-9370711&language=english
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
This will vary considerably depending on the research topic or area.
Types of Clinical Encounters
There may be no patient encounter during the research elective or depending on the
protocol information may be gathered by interacting with patients. The resident still must
go to continuity clinic weekly while on research elective at any of these facilities.
Procedures
A few research projects may involve procedures done to patients. Residents must be
certified or supervised by someone who is certified if they are involved in any
procedures.
Evaluation
At the completion of the rotation, the research mentor will complete a JMC Internal
Medicine Research Elective evaluation form on MyEvaluations.
Educational Resources & References
One of the aims of this elective is to stimulate residents to seek out appropriate
educational resources and references for the purpose of developing a research plan. They
will be guided in this effort by the supervising mentor.
179
Parasitology Elective Curriculum
PGY:
2 or 3
Duration:
½ to 1 month duration
Goal:
To learn in more detail about a variety of Parasitic Diseases.
Objectives:
Medical Knowledge
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have gained
medical knowledge in the specialized field of Parasitology.
-Global Faculty Assessment
Patient care
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated the ability to gather a pertinent directed
history from a patient with a suspected or known parasitic
disease and do a thorough examination looking for signs of
parasitic diseases.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
recognize and treat common and some uncommon parasitic
diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Observation
in Clinic
-Global Faculty Assessment
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned and
started to use resources to begin a research project in the
field of Parasitology.
-Global Faculty Assessment
180
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will improve his/her
skills in communicating clearly, compassionately, and
effectively with patients and their families regarding
parasitic diseases and related issues, and will be able to take
an appropriate history including pertinent issues such as
travel, animal contact, immunization history.
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
improve his/her skills in communicating clearly and
effectively both in written and verbal form with other
clinicians and health care personnel regarding patients with
parasitic diseases and related issues.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Observation
in Clinic
-Global Faculty Assessment
Professionalism
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated respect, compassion, integrity and honesty
with regard to patient care and maintain patient
confidentiality when consulting on a patient with a parasitic
disease.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have
demonstrated a commitment to carrying out professional
responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding
patients with parasitic diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Direct Faculty Observation
in Clinic
-Global Faculty Assessment
Systems Based Practice
Objective
Assessment Method
By the end of this rotation the resident will be able to
interact with allied health care personnel as part of a health
care team taking care of patients with parasitic diseases.
By the end of this rotation the resident will have learned to
help the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain
needed aide and care for those with parasitic diseases.
-Global Faculty Assessment
-Global Faculty Assessment
Supervision
The resident on Parasitology elective is supervised by Dr. Coyle.
181
Education Plan/Teaching Methods
Resident are responsible to work with Dr. Coyle in the Parasitology clinic two days a
week. The other time is spent working under the direction of Dr. Coyle on a research
project directly related to Parasitology or Infectious Diseases in general. While on
elective medicine housestaff are still required to go to their weekly continuity clinic
session and must be excused for this session.
Mix of Diseases/Patient Characteristics
Residents see a broad diversity of patients with parasitic diseases in the Parasitology
clinic. This may include but is not limited to:
 Strongyloides Stercoralis
 Echinococcus
 Cysticercosis
 Chagas
 Pinworm
 Giardia
Types of Clinical Encounters
Outpatient Parasitology clinic patients.
Procedures
As per the direction of Dr. Coyle in the Parasitology clinic.
Evaluation
At the mid-point of the rotation, the resident should receive oral feedback from Dr.
Coyle. At the completion of the rotation, Dr. Coyle will complete an evaluation in
MyEvaluations.
Educational Resources & References
Up-To-Date for topic review
AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
IDSA guidelines on many different infectious diseases (IDsociety.org)
Mandell textbook of ID
182
Occupational Medicine Curriculum
Goals
The educational program aims to create general internists who have a basic understanding
of this specialty area (e.g., know what occupational health and safety professionals do,
are aware of major concerns regarding environmental hazards, understand the term
ergonomics).
Objectives
By the end of residency residents:
1.
are familiar with the epidemiology of occupational and environmental disease
(e.g., lung cancer in asbestos workers, the effect of air quality on asthma)
2.
can assess patients’ exposure to occupational and environmental hazards through
history taking and physical exam.
3.
incorporate occupational and environmental etiologies in case assessments.
4.
are able to counsel patients concerning the prevention of occupational and
environmental diseases.
5.
know how to update their knowledge concerning OEM (e.g., search for toxicity
date using computerized databases, know how to contact OSHA and NIOSH)
6.
exercise occupational safety in their own practice of medicine to avoid injury to
self and colleagues.
Teaching Methods
1.
Lectures (e.g., on Occupational Safety in the Hospital, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome)
2.
Case discussions (e.g., on rounds, during the ambulatory care lecture series)
Content Areas
1.
The field of OEM
2.
Agencies protecting workers and the environment (e.g. OSHA, NIOSH)
3.
Known hazards (e.g., their identification and measurement, safety standards)
4.
The hazard-disease connection (e.g. epidemiology, protection)
5.
Protecting safety and health of health care workers
183
6.
Medical monitoring programs (e.g., record keeping, bioethical issues)
7.
The occupational history and physical exam screenings
8.
OEM related resources (e.g., guidelines, telephone hot lines, computer data bases)
Evaluation Methods
1.
OEM issues are included in the training in-service exam.
2.
During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by
the supervising faculty.
184
ENT Curriculum
Goals
More and more responsibility is given to the general internist to diagnose and mange
different diseases involving the ears, nose and throat. It is the ultimate goal of this
curriculum to expose the resident to these disease entities and their specific management
modalities.
Objectives
By the end of their residency residents:
1. when evaluating a patient with hearing loss, the diagnostic strategy should
determine the mechanism of loss, the likely cause, and the need for referral to the
otolaryngologist for further evaluation.
2. will be able to diagnose and manage certain ENT diseases
3. will be able to identify and evaluate different symptoms of common otologic,
nasal and throat disorders, usually encountered in the primary care setting
4. Will be able to outline a diagnostic and treatment plan for common ENT disorders
5. will be able to identify ENT disorders which need referral to the specialist
6. will be able to confidently perform Weber and Rhine test and interpret the results
7. will be able to adequately perform otoscopy and nasal inspection with a nasal
speculum
Teaching Methods
1. Lectures
2. Case discussions (e.g., on rounds, during the ambulatory care lecture series)
Content areas
EAR
Ear structure
Hearing Loss – history, physical findings and causes
Hearing Testing
Conditions of the external ear
Impacted Cerumen
Foreign Body
Otitis Externa
Malignancies
Conditions of the Middle Ear
Serous Otitis Media
Acute Otitis Media
Barotrauma
185
Temporal Bone Fractures
Complications of Otitis Media
Chronic Sensori-Neural Hearing Loss
Presbycusis
Noise Induced Hearing Loss
Drug-induced Hearing Loss
Meniere’s Syndrome
Acoustic Neuroma
Tinnitus – subjective and objective
Permanent Hearing Loss
Hearing Aids
NOSE
Nose Structure
Nose/Paranasal Sinus Infections
Rhinocerebral Mucormycosis
Allergic Rhinitis
Olfactory Dysfunction
Epistaxis
Nasal Trauma
Tumors
Miscellaneous: Wegener’s granulomatosis, Sarcoidosis, etc.
THROAT
Leukoplakia, Erythroplakia, Oral Cancer
Candidiasis
Glossitis, glossodynia
Ulcerative Lesions
Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis
Aphthous Ulcers
Herpetic Stomatitis
Pharyngitis & Tonsillitis
Peritonsillar Abscess & Cellulitis
Deep neck Infections
Diseases of the Salivary Glad
Hoarseness and Stridor
Common Laryngeal Disorders
Foreign Bodies in the Upper Aerodigestive Tract
Evaluation Methods
1. ENT issues are included in the training in-service exam.
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by
the supervising faculty.
186
Ophthalmology Curriculum
Goal
To learn and understand certain ophthalmologic disorders, commonly encountered in the
primary care setting
Objectives
By the end of residency residents will:
have learned the pathophysiology, etiology and management of common ophthalmologic
disorders, encountered in the primary care setting
be able to identify and triage ophthalmologic emergencies effectively
have familiarized themselves with the ophthalmologic presentations of common medical
problems i.e. diabetes, hypertension, CMV retinitis etc.
be able to discuss, diagnosis, treatment and management of these problems:
a. Red eye and Trauma
b. Foreign body in the eye
c. Glaucoma
d. Strabismus
e. Ophthalmic manifestations of common systemic diseases such as diabetes,
hypertension and thyroid disease
be exposed to and practice these skills
Evaluation of CN II-VII
Fundus and optic nerve examination
be able to explain when primary care physicians can handle these problems, and when
they should be referred to subspecialist.
demonstrate proper professional behavior towards patients, house staff, attendings and
hospital staff.
Teaching Methods
1. Didactics during clinical conferences, grand rounds, and ward rounds
2. Clinical experience during the Ambulatory block rotation
3. Formal discussions with the Ophthalmologists regarding in-patient consultations
4. Excellent website which includes self-quiz!
http://www.kellogg.umich.edu/theeyeshaveit/index.html
Evaluation Methods
1. Ophthalmologic issues are included in the training in-service exam.
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
187
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Curriculum
Goals
1. By the end of residency the resident should have an appreciation that Physical
Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) deals with the diagnosis and treatment of acute and
chronic physical disorders including neuromusculoskeletal disorders and neuromuscular
dysfunction in an effort to restore patients to a maximal level of physical, psychological,
social, and vocational function.
2. They should also know that it uses electrodiagnostic techniques, therapeutic exercise,
mechanical agents, as well as heat, light, and water, to assess physical disabilities,
prevent further deterioration, and promote recovery or adaptation.
Objectives
Residents should
know about general and specific physiatric examinations and procedures such as
electromyography, nerve conductions, evoked potentials and articular injection
techniques.
be able to modify history-taking techniques to include data critical to the recognition of
physical and psychosocial impairments which may create functional disabilities.
be able to recognize neuromusculoskeletal pain and weakness.
be able to design rehabilitation strategies to minimize and prevent impairment and
maximize functional independence.
understand the role of allied health professionals from disciplines such as rehabilitation
nursing, occupational therapy, orthotics, prosthetics, physical therapy, psychology,
social work, speech-language pathology, audiology, recreational therapy, and
vocational counseling.
Teaching Methods
1. During ambulatory block time residents have the opportunity to go to the Jacobi
Medical Center Physical Therapy division to learn more about PM&R.
2. Selected lectures during the core general medicine lecture series
Evaluation Methods
1. PM&R topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
188
Orthopedics Curriculum
Goals
Residents need to become familiar and be able to diagnose and treat common orthopedic
medical issues that will be seen by the practicing internist.
Objectives
By the end of residency the residents will:
1. be able to discuss diagnosis, treatment and management of:
a. Uncomplicated traumas, fractures and dislocations
b. Infections of bone and joints
c. Back problems, including herniated disks
d. Metastatic and bone tumors
e. Congenital and developmental abnormalities
2. be exposed to and practice these skills
a. Performance of an orthopedic exam pertinent to each of the common problems
outlined
b. Application of simple splints and casts in the emergency care of orthopedic
patients
c. Use of simple slings
d. Neurovascular evaluation of extremities
e. Interpret simple fracture x-rays
3. be able to explain when these problems can be handled by primary care physicians,
and when they should be referred to the subspecialist.
Teaching Methods
1. During ambulatory block time residents have the opportunity to go to the orthopedics
clinic.
2. Selected lectures during the core general medicine lecture series
Evaluation Methods
1. Orthopedic topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
189
Urology Curriculum
Goals
Residents should know about and be able to treat common urologic conditions that the
internist need to be able to diagnose and treat.
Objectives
By the end of residency the residents will:
1. be able to discuss diagnosis, treatment and management of these problems
a. Cancer of the prostate
b. BPH
c. Calculous disorder
d. Cancer of the bladder (Urothelial tumor)
e. Testicular tumor
2. be exposed to and practice these skills
a. Rectal examination
b. Scrotal and testicular examination
c. Examination of the flank and suprapubic area
3. be able to explain when primary care physicians can handle these problems, and when
they should be referred to the specialist.
Teaching Methods
1. During ambulatory block time residents have the opportunity to go to the urology
clinic.
2. Selected lectures during the core general medicine lecture series
Evaluation Methods
1. Urology topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
190
Psychiatry Curriculum
Goals
Residents should know about and be able to treat common psychiatric conditions that the
internist need to be able to diagnose and treat.
Objectives
By the end of residency the residents will:
1. be able to diagnosis and manage:
a. Generalized Anxiety Disorder
b. Major Depression
c. Panic Attacks
2. be exposed to and familiar with these disorders:
a. Schizophrenia
b. Bipolar Disorder
3. be able to explain when primary care physicians can handle these diagnoses, and when
they should be referred to the specialist.
Teaching Methods
1. During ambulatory block time residents have the opportunity to go to the psychiatry
clinic and have lectures of psychosocial and psychiatric issues.
2. Selected lectures during the core general medicine lecture series
Evaluation Methods
1. Psychiatry topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
191
Gynecology Curriculum
Goals
Residents should know about and be able to treat common gynecologic conditions that
the internist need to be able to diagnose and treat.
Objectives
By the end of residency the residents will:
1. be able to diagnose and manage these problems:
a. UTI
b. BV
c. Vaginal candidiasis
d. trichomonas
e. vaginal bleeding
f. vaginal itching
g. vaginal discharge
h. PCOS
2. be exposed to and familiar with these disorders:
a. pelvic pain
b. endometrial CA
c. vaginal CA
d. ovarian CA
e. cervical CA
3. be able to explain when primary care physicians can handle these problems, and when
they should be referred to the specialist.
4. be able to do a proper pap smear and pelvic exam
Teaching Methods
1. During ambulatory block time residents have the opportunity to go to the gynecology
clinic.
2. Selected lectures during the core general medicine lecture series
Evaluation Methods
1. Gynecology topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
192
Sleep Medicine Curriculum
Goals
Residents should know about and be able to treat common sleep disorders that the
internist need to be able to diagnose and treat.
Objectives
By the end of residency the residents will:
A. be able to diagnosis and manage these possible causes of insomnia and sleep
disturbance:
1.OSAS (Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome – snoring/ obesity/ daytime
somnolence)
2.RLS (Restless Leg Syndrome – motor restlessness and pacing in the evening,
crawling sensation in the
legs/ associated with iron deficiency and renal failure)
3. PLMD (Periodic Limb Movement Disorder – kicking of legs during sleep/
frequent arousals from
sleep/ daytime sleepiness)
4. REM Behavior Disorder (thrashing or seemingly purposeful behaviors during
sleep)
5. Circadian Sleep Disorder (working night shifts) [this and jet lag are also called
sleep-wake cycle
disturbance]
6. Drugs – caffeine, diet pills, nicotine, amphetamines, theophylline, Albuterol,
quinidine, sudafed,
SSRI’s, beta blockers, methyldopa, clonidine, OCP’s, thyroid
preparations, cortisone, progesterone, phenytoin, levodopa, several
antineoplastic agents, alcohol (intoxication or withdrawal – this is why
the drink before bed hurts some people’s sleep)
7. Pain or Dyspnea
8. Thyrotoxicosis
9. Depression, anxiety, mania, hypomania
10. Jet Lag
11. Advanced Sleep Phase Disorder – frequently the elderly will go to sleep early
and wake up early but
still get a reasonable amount of time asleep.
12. Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder – hospitalized patients may be unable to sleep
in the new environment
and then have a hard time waking up when they do fall asleep.
13. Irregular Sleep Phase Disorder – many nursing home patients have disrupted
sleep patterns.
B. be able to explain when primary care physicians can handle these problems, and when
they should be referred to the sleep specialist.
C. know how to effectively counsel a patient on sleep hygiene measures:
193













No napping after 3pm and when you do nap, it should be for no more than 30
minutes
Exercise no later than 4 hours before bedtime; maintain regular exercise to
promote sleep
Avoid caffeine (in coffee, cola, tea, chocolate, medicines, diet pills)and other
stimulants after midday; some patients have a substantial sleep problems even
with morning caffeine consumption
Avoid alcohol before bed even though it can make you fall asleep it may wake
you wake up again later in the night
Avoid tobacco and any other stimulating drugs at bedtime – including
medications the doctor prescribes for you
Try a light snack before bed – but no heavy meals
Establish a regular sleep schedule – go to sleep at the same time every night and
wake up at the same time every morning
Avoid clock-watching during the night
Limit noise and light in the bedroom and be sure the temperature is comfortable
(slightly toward the cold side)
Avoid stress and worry before bedtime – try setting up a different time of day to
worry and think about life
Only use the in bed for sleep and sexual activity (Do not read in bed! Your body
will get used to being in bed and not sleeping!)
If you can not fall promptly asleep (within 20 minutes) get out of bed. Choose a
quiet activity such as reading, handwork or similar non-stimulating pursuits. Then
when tired, lie down again. [these last two are referred to as stimulus control
therapy]
Try relaxation therapy – soft music, (EMG) biofeedback, abdominal breathing
exercises, or progressive muscle relaxation techniques, among others.
Teaching Methods
1. Selected lectures during the core general medicine lecture series and ambulatory
lecture series
2. Optional elective at Montefiore
Evaluation Methods
1. Sleep medicine topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
194
Adolescent Medicine Curriculum
Goals
Resident should know that adolescence represents the stage of human growth and
development between childhood and adulthood and encompasses biological changes in
addition to cognitive development and psychological and social maturation.
Objectives
By the end of residency the resident should:
1. recognize unique features of the physician-patient relationship during adolescence,
including privacy, confidentiality and the informed consent.
2. be able to describe strategies for interviewing and counseling adolescents.
3. know the characteristics of early, mid, and late adolescence in terms of physical,
cognitive, and psychosocial growth and development.
5. know the major causes of mortality and morbidity in adolescents.
6. be able to discuss the approach to preventive counseling and identification of risk
behaviors for these key areas: sexuality/sexual activity (sexual orientations,
contraception and sexually transmitted infections), substance abuse, and personal
safety (firearms, violence, motor vehicles).
7. be able to identify medical and psychosocial difficulties encountered by adolescents
with chronic diseases.
8. recognize psychosocial and mental health problems common in adolescence,
including school avoidance/failure, eating disorders, depression and suicide.
9. be able to demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the general principles of adolescent
medicine including such specifics as:
Ability to describe the physical, emotional and social changes that characterize the
adolescent period.
Ability to list and describe specific medical and psychosocial problems associated
with adolescence.
Knowledge of pertinent elements of history taking for adolescent patients.
Ability to describe unique characteristics of physical examination for adolescents
(including Tanner staging
for sexual development) and to carry out an examination.
Ability to describe and identify adolescent psychosocial stages.
10. be able to detect deviation from normal behavior such as depression, stress or violent
behavior and initiate counseling or referral to appropriate services.
11. be able to demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the principles of adolescent
gynecology including:
Ability to recognize the hormonal changes associated with menarche and normal
ovulation.
Ability to perform a routine gynecologic examination and take cultures and PAP
smears.
Ability to perform adequate breast and testicular examinations
Ability to evaluate delayed sexual development and primary and secondary
amenorrhea.
195
Ability to diagnose and treat sexually transmitted infections.
Ability to counsel on the prevention of STD, Hepatitis, and HIV/AIDS
11. be able to demonstrate knowledge of contraceptive methods including:
Ability to list various types of contraception such as the pill, the Depo-Provera
injection, the diaphragm,
foam/jellies/cream, the condom, sponges, cervical cap, coitus interruptus
and abstinence.
Ability to describe efficacy and side effects of the various methods of
contraception.
Ability to diagnose pregnancy
Knowledge of community resources for the pregnant teenager.
12. be able to demonstrate a thorough knowledge concerning drug and alcohol use in
adolescence including:
Recognition of the factors influencing adolescents use of drugs, depression,
anxiety, need to be
accepted, etc.
Ability to describe the specific actions and side effects of marijuana, angel dust
(PCP), alcohol,
stimulant drugs, depressant drugs, cigarette smoking, fad drugs (e.g. amyl
nitrate, aerosol sprays), crack/cocaine and heroin.
Recognition of the “street names” of the various abused substances.
Knowledge of community resources for the treatment of the adolescent substance
abuser.
13. have a thorough knowledge of sports readiness, an appreciation of the role of
exercise in the general well
being, knowledge of nutrition among adolescent athletes and be able to counsel
on the abuse of drugs and steroid in sports.
14. be able to demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the orthopedic problems and sports
related injuries that
present in adolescence including:
Ability to diagnose scoliosis, kyphosis and other abnormalities of the
spine.
Ability to diagnose referred knee pain, as it related to slipped capital
femoral epiphysis
and toxic disease of the hip.
Knowledge of common sports related injuries, and ability to carry out
appropriate diagnosis and
treatment on: injuries of the elbow (e.g. “little league elbow”,
overuse syndromes (e.g. osteochondritis dissecans), patellofemoral pain syndrome, jumper’s knee, Osgood Schlatter, patellar
instability, chondromalacia, tendonitis, stress fractures.
15. be able to counsel the patient on the prevention of injuries.
16. be able to demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the appropriate medical
management of adolescent acne.
196
Teaching Methods
During ambulatory block time residents learn about adolescent medical issues.
Evaluation Methods
1. Adolescent medicine topics are included on the In-Training Exam
2. During rounds and supervision residents’ knowledge and skills are assessed by the
supervising faculty.
197
Evidence Based Medicine Curriculum
Goals
1. To introduce internal medicine residents to general concepts of evidence based
medicine.
2. To help participants develop critical appraisal and evidence based medicine skills.
4. To help resident develop familiarity with computerized databases.
Objectives
By the end of residency the resident will be able to:
1. describe different types of studies (RCT, Cohort, case series, case reports) and their
strength of evidence
2. list validity criteria for articles dealing with questions of therapy, diagnosis and
prognosis
3. show familiarity with such concepts as absolute risk reduction, relative risk, relative
risk reduction, numbers
needed to treat, intention to treat analysis, prognostic factors, risk factors, survival
curves, likelihood ratios, positive predictive values, negative predictive values,
specificity, sensitivity
4. approach scientific literature with an open and critical eye
5. make clinical decisions that involve risk and benefit assessments
6. appreciate that a clinical question should begin and always end with the patient in
question
7. formulate a question using the PICO approach – (population, intervention, comparison,
outcome)
8. determine the type of articles (therapy, prognosis, diagnosis) that would best answer
their question
9. use the Users Guides to the Medical Literature from the Evidence-Based Medicine
working group, assess the
validity of articles dealing with a therapy, prognosis, or diagnosis question
10. Develop and execute a QI project.
Teaching Methods
PGY2 and 3 residents prepare articles to present to Dr. Sidlow and their peers at the
weekly Journal Club. These articles are chosen to answer a specific clinical question
related to a patient the housestaff have seen recently. Faculty when available are to
attend along with the housestaff. The entire department is invited. The article review is
presented by the resident and should include a powerpoint presentation with background
of the topic and validity criteria of the article. Dr. Sidlow leads a discussion.
PGY1 residents now do a QI project in groups during their ambulatory month block. The
Ambulatory Chief Resident and Dr. Gutwein teach and guide them in QI techniques.
Their projects are presented at the end of the month and at departmental QI meetings.
They can also be written up for the yearly poster competition.
198
Evaluation Methods
Dr. Sidlow fills out a Journal Club Practice-Based Learning and Improvement evaluation
in MyEvaluations at the end of the session.
EBM learning websites:
http://library.umassmed.edu/EBM/tutorials/index.cfm
http://www.hsl.unc.edu/Services/Tutorials/EBM/
http://www.rationalrx.org/
QI learning websites:
http://meded.ucsd.edu/clinicalmed/
http://www.asq.org/learn-about-quality/quality-tools.html
http://www.ihi.org/ihi/programs
http://gunston.gmu.edu/healthscience/708/default.asp
199
Women’s Health Curriculum
Goals
Residents must understand and act appropriately on women’s health related aspects of
patient care and need for timely referral to the subspecialist.
Objectives
By the end of residency the resident will have gained comprehensive knowledge to
deliver optimal care to women while using resources, such as diagnostic tests and
specialty referral in a wise and effective manner in the following:
Health Maintenance, Disease prevention and risk assessment
Family planning and reproductive health
Cancer screening and principles
Menopause: management, and risks and benefits of therapies
Understanding, recognition and management of violence and abuse
Common gynecological disorders: Management and prevention
Health and disease: Sex, age and gender related biologic differences
Gender-related social and psychological issues
Urinary and fecal incontinence: Principles and management
Breast examination
Pelvic examination/Rectal examination
Pap smear including wet mount
Pregnancy termination
Knowing when to refer for fertility counseling
Teaching Methods
Continuity clinic sessions
Ambulatory block lectures and conferences
Gynecology Outpatient Clinic rotation during ambulatory block
Evaluation Methods
In-Training Examination
Suggested Web Sites and Educational Materials
Primary Care for women, Appleton & Lange
Women’s Health Care Handbook, Hanley & Belfus, Johnson
American Medical Woman’ Association
http://www.amwa-doc.org
WebMedLit: Women’s Health
http://webmedlit.silverplatter.com/topics/womens.html
The Partnership for Women’s Health at Columbia
www.Cpmnet.columbia.edu/dept/partnership
200
Mediconsult
http://www.mediconsult.com/mc/mcsite.nsf/conditionnav/women~medicalnews
The National Women’s Health Information Center
http://www.4women.org/nwhic/News/index.htm
JAMA Women’s Health
http://www.ama~assn.org/special/womh/newsline/newslne.htm
201
Ethics and Cultural Competency Curriculum
Goal
To educate and train residents to practice the principles of medical ethics.
Objectives
1. By the end of their residency the residents will understand the principles of
beneficence, malfeasance and respect for patient’s autonomy.
2. By the end of their residency the residents will understand ethical issues in research
and clinical investigations.
3. By the end of their residency the residents will be able to apply the principles of
medical ethics to their day to day patient care.
4. By the end of their residency the residents will have improved communication skills in
discussing treatment options, end-of-life issues, advance directives.
5. By the end of their residency the residents will be able to behave as an ethical,
professional physician.
6. By the end of their residency the residents will be able to work in the complicated
health care system in an ethically appropriate way.
7. By the end of their residency residents are expected to take into account the patients
cultural background when treating them and interacting with them in a sensitive way.
Teaching Methods
In the practice of medicine, physicians must include essential principles such as,
beneficence, non-malfeasance, respect for patient’s autonomy and social justice.
Beneficence encompasses the physician’s duty to promote good and prevent harm. Nonmalfeasance is the physician’s duty not to harm the patient. Respect for patient’s
autonomy includes one’s duty to protect and foster an individual’s free and un-coerced
choices. All of these principles constitute medical ethics. Social justice is the
consideration of societal needs when deciding on patient care and patient care systems
(getting an MRI when not really needed takes away money for others to get proven
screening tests or immunizations).
Medical ethics has become very important in practice, that the President’s Commission
for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biochemical and Behavioral Research
was formed in the 1970’s, to ensure its existence. This Commission had included issues
on: 1) informed consent, 2) access to health care, 3) genetic screening and engineering,
and 4) forging life sustaining treatment. Other modern dilemma have since been added,
i.e. AIDS, physician-assisted suicide, decisions to limit treatment and the nature of the
physician-patient relationship.
Today, scientific advances, public education, the civil rights and consumer movements,
laws of economics on medicine, and moral heterogeneity of our society, all demand that
physicians must clearly articulate the ethical principles that guide our behavior, whether
in clinical care, research or as citizens. It is the goal of this curriculum to educate and
train the future physicians to keep in mind and practice these principles, for the sake of
202
the patient and society. It is important that they can make distinctions and identify
potential conflicts between legal and ethical obligations when making clinical decisions.
And that they must seek counsel when concerned about potential legal consequences of
ethical issues.
Housestaff learn throughout their residency to deal with the issues listed below:
I: The Physician-patient relationship
a.
principles of beneficence, malfeasance and respect for patient’s autonomy
b.
initiating and discontinuing treatment
c.
Confidentiality
d.
Patient and the medical record
e.
Consent
f.
Disclosure
g.
Decision about reproduction
h.
Medical risks to the physician and patient
i.
Physician and unorthodox treatments
j.
Care of the physician’s family
k.
Sexual contact between the physician and the patient
l.
Financial arrangements
II: Dilemmas in life-sustaining treatments
a.
Withdrawing and withholding treatment
b.
Do-Not-Resuscitate orders
c.
Terminally ill patients
d.
Determination of death
e.
Irreversible loss of consciousness
f.
Intravenous fluids and artificial feedings
g.
Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia
III: Physician-physician relationship
a.
Teaching
b.
Physicians-in-training
c.
Consultation
d.
The impaired physician
e.
Peer review
IV: Ethics and managed care
V: Ethics, research and clinical investigations
VI: Cultural Competency
They learn these things through attending rounds regarding patients with end-of-life
ethical issues and through having to deal with patients from multiple different cultures in
the Bronx. They also learn through didactic lectures on these topics.
Evaluation Methods
203
1. Residents evaluate themselves on an ongoing basis every 6 months and this should
include their ability to practice in an ethical manner.
2. The In-Training test has questions on medical ethics and cultural competency.
3. Global Faculty Evaluations done every rotation include professionalism which
involves ethics and cultural competency
Educational Resources & References
Key Cultural competency websites:
http://www.rationalrx.org/
http://www.hrsa.gov/healthliteracy/default.htm
Other Cultural competency website:
http://webcampus.drexelmed.edu/doccom/user/
204
Curriculum by Topic
ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge
Competency
Amb.
Block
Specialty
Rotation
Allergic Rhinitis
1
1
Anaphylaxis
Clin.
Pharm
Minicourse
2
Floor
Rotation
2
Other
Rotations
Noon
Conference
ED
ICU
Asthma
Acute Asthma
Chronic Asthma
1
Pulmonary 1
ICU
Pulmonary
Pulmonary 2
Contact Dermatitis
1
1
2
2
1
Lecture
Primary
1
2
Lecture
Secondary
2
1
Oncology
HIV
2
Drug Allergy
Immunodeficiency
Syndromes
Urticaria
Lecture
Lecture
1
Clin.
Pharm
Minicourse
2
1
Hypersensitivity
Pneumonitis
Ordering and
Understanding tests
Allergy Testing
Derm
Lecture
ED
1
ED
Pulmonary ICU
Oncology
1
Allergy
Procedural Knowledge
205
Lecture
Spirometry
Drug desensitization
1
Allergy
206
1
Pulmonary
1
ICU
Antibiotic
Lecture
CARDIOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge Competency
Continuity
Clinic
Cardiology
Elective
1
2
Jacobi
CCU
ED
Rotation
Weiler
CCU
Floor
Noon
Lecture
Angina Pectoris
Chronic Stable
2
Lecture
2
2
1
Lecture
2
2
2
1
2
Conduction Disturbances
2
1
2
1
Lecture
1
Pacemaker Management
2
1
Ventricular
2
1
Lecture
2
1
Lecture
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
Lecture
2
2
Lecture
2
2
Lecture
1
2
Lecture
2
1
Unstable
Post-Operative Care
1
1
2
1
Lecture
2
2
Arrhythmias
Atrial
Lecture
Lecture
Congestive Heart Failure
Acute Pulmonary Edema
Chronic
1
Hypertension
1
Hypertensive Emergencies
Secondary Hypertension
2
Treatment
1
Lecture
2
2
2
Lecture
1
Lecture
1
2
Lecture
1
2
Lecture
1
Lecture
Myocardial Infarction
2
Acute Management
Follow-up/Rehabilitation
2
1
2
1
Lecture
2
Peripheral Vascular Disease
2
Aortic Disease
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
2
Arterial Insufficiency
1
1
1
2
Lecture
Valvular Heart Disease
Aortic Stenosis
2
2
207
1
1
2
Lecture
Aortic Insufficiency
2
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Mitral Stenosis
2
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Mitral Insufficiency
2
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Right-Sided Lesions
2
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Endocarditis
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Myocarditits
2
1
1
2
Pericarditis (Incl. Non-infectious)
2
1
1
2
1
Lecture
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
Infectious Diseases of the Heart
Lecture
Other Cardiac Diseases
Congenital Heart Disease
Hyperlipidemia
Pre-Operative consultation
1
Lipid Clinic
Amb. Block
Case-based
Review
1 Consult
Mini-course in
Amb. Block
PROCEDURAL KNOWLEDGE
ACLS
Swan-Ganz Catheterization
1
1
Insertion of Temporary P.M.
1
1
TEST INTERPRETATION
Electrocardiography
Up-date
in ICU
Orientati
on
2
1
1
1
Lecture
Echocardiography
2
Intern Amb.
Block
Update/Review
2
2
1
1
1
Lecture
Stress Testing
2
2
1
1
1
Lecture
2
1
E.P.S.
Ambulatory ECG Monitoring
2
2
1
1
2
Nuclear Cardiology
2
2
1
1
2
208
Key: 1 = Primary Site at which you will learn about and see patients with this
problem
2= Secondary site at which you will learn about and see patients with this
problem
Lecture: A formal lecture will cover this topic
Orientation: You will be ACLS certified during orientation
Update: You will have ACLS update during your MICU rotation
Consult: Pre-operative consultation is covered during A.C. rotation and during the senior
resident consultation rotation
Cardiology: Physical examination skills and maneuvers
Pulsus paradoxus (measurement of)*
Tile Test (measurement of orthostatic changes in heart rate and blood pressure)*
Carotid bruits and thrills (detection of)*
Irregularity of the arterial pulse*
Kussmaul’s sign*
Estimation of central venous pressure by inspection*
Aortic stenosis (murmur of)*
Aortic regurgitation (murmur of)*
Mitral regurgitation (murmur of)*
Click/murmur complex of mitral valve prolapse*
Normal splitting of heart sounds*
Palpation of the precordium for apex beat, other impulses and thrills*
Pericardial friction rub*
S3 gallop*
S4 gallop*
Palpation of aortic stenosis thrill
Tricuspid regurgitation (murmur of)*
Water hammer (Corrigan’s) pulse
Pulse parvus*
Pulse tardus*
Cannon A waves
Giant V wave
Pulsatile liver of tricuspid regurgitation
Fixed split S2*
Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis
Mitral stenosis
Patent ductus arteriosus
Paradoxical split S2*
Pulmonary regurgitation
Recognition of radiation pattern of various murmurs*
Rivera-Carvallo’s maneuver (accent, right-sides findings in inspiration)*
Increased, creased or variable intensity of SI, S2*
209
Snap of mitral stenosis
Squatting maneuver (correct performance of)
Valsalva’s maneuver (correct performance of)*
Measure BP lower extremities (hypertensive patient)*
Measure BP upper extremities (right and left arm)*
Pulse deficit
Sustained left ventricular apex beat
Hand-gripping maneuver (correct performance of)*
Right ventricular heave*
Inspection of precordium for impulses
Pulmonary stenosis
Abnormal quality of apex beat by palpation (double/triple impulse)*
Assess heart size by location of apex beat*
Ventricular septal defect
Widened split S2*
210
DERMATOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Competency
Amb. Block/
Continuity
Clinic
Elective
Walk-In
Eczematous Reaction Pattern
Acute Contact Dermatitis
Atopic Dermatitis
Stasis Dermatitis
Dyshidrotic Eczema
Nummular Eczema
Papulosquamous Reaction Pattern
Funal yeast infections
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Syphilis
Lichen Planus
Psoriasis
Vascular Reaction pattern
Drug hypersensitivity
Urticaria
Viral Exanthema
Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis
Vasculitis
Vesiculous Reaction Pattern
Herpes Simplex Infection
Herpes Zoster Infection
Varicella
Bullous Pemphigoid
Pemphigus Vulgaris
Skin Signs of Systemic Disease
Malignancy
Actinic Keratosis
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Melanoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Follicular Disease
Acne
Rosacea
Condyloma
Erythema Nodosum
Paronychia
Pityriasis Rosea
Warts
Molluscum Contagiosum
Scabies
Procedure Knowledge
Scraping of skin for KOH
Application of chemical destructive
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
ED
Rotation
Floor
Noon Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
2
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
1
1
1
1
2
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
2
1
1
2
Lecture
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
In-Service
In-Service
2
211
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
agents: warts, condyloma, molluscum
Test Interpretation
Tzank Smear
Dark Field Microscopy
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
Dermatology: Skills* Maneuvers* Disease processes
Abuse: cutaneous finding in physical abuse
Acne
Chronic actinic damage (i.e. freckles, actinic lentigos, actinic Keratosis)
Allergic contact dermatitis*
Angiomas
Atopic dermatitis
Atypical nevus pattern (pre-melanoma
Basal cell carcinoma*
Burns
Carbuncle/furuncle
Dry skin (ichtyosis
Erythema chronicum migrans
Eczema (Dyshidrotic/nummular)*
Erythema multiforme/Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN)
Erythema Nodosum*
Butterfly rash of systemic lupus erythematosus
Ischemic ulcer of foot*
Necrosis/gangrene*
Herpes simplex
Impetigo*
Kaposi’s sarcoma
Lice (scalp/body/pubic)
Lichen simplex chronicum (localized neurodermatitis
Main categories of lesions
Malignant melanoma*
Nevi (acquired vs. dysplastic vs. congenital)
Petechiae/purpurae/ecchymosis*
Pityriasis rosea
Psoriasis*
Palpable purpura
Rhus dermatitis
Scabies
Seborrheic dermatitis
Seborrheic Keratosis
Squamous cell carcinoma
Syphilis (primary/secondary)
Urticaria*
Varicella*
Herpes Zoster*
Pemphigus
Bullous Pemphigoid
212
2
2
Erythroderma
Tinea versicolor of trunk
Ringworm (dermatophyte)
Verruca (warts, including genital condylomata)
Acne Rosacea
Lupus pernio (sarcoidosis of the face)
Lichen Planus
Molluscum Contagiosum
Livedo reticularis
Stasis ulcer and dermatosis
Physical Examination Skills in Dermatology
Abuse: cutaneous finding in physical abuse*
Acne*
Chronic actinic damage (i.e. freckles, actinic lentigos, actinic Keratosis)
Allergic contact dermatitis*
Angiomas
Atopic dermatitis
Atypical nevus pattern (pre-melanoma
Basal cell carcinoma*
Burns
Carbuncle/furuncle
Dry skin (ichtyosis
Erythema chronicum migrans
Eczema (Dyshidrotic/nummular)*
Erythema multiforme/Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN)
Erythema Nodosum*
Butterfly rash of systemic lupus erythematosus
Ischemic ulcer of foot*
Necrosis/gangrene*
Herpes simplex
Impetigo*
Kaposi’s sarcoma
Lice (scalp/body/pubic)
Lichen simplex chronicum (localized neurodermatitis
Main categories of lesions
Malignant melanoma*
Nevi (acquired vs. dysplastic vs. congenital)
Petechiae/purpurae/ecchymosis*
Pityriasis rosea
Psoriasis*
Palpable purpura
Rhus dermatitis
Scabies
Seborrheic dermatitis
213
Seborrheic Keratosis
Squamous cell carcinoma
Syphilis (primary/secondary)
Urticaria*
Varicella*
Herpes Zoster*
Pemphigus
Bullous Pemphigoid
Erythroderma
Tinea versicolor of trunk
Ringworm (dermatophyte)
Verruca (warts, including genital condylomata)
Acne Rosacea
Lupus pernio (sarcoidosis of the face)
Lichen Planus
Molluscum Contagiosum
Livedo reticularis
Stasis ulcer and dermatosis
214
ENDOCRINOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Competency
Thyroid Disease
Thyroid Function Testing
Hypothyroidism
Hyperthyroidism
Non-Toxic Goiter & Other
Diabetes Mellitus (See Nephrology)
Ketoacidosis
Hyperosmolar State
Non-Insulin Dependent
Complications/Management
Pituitary/Hypothalamic Disease
Prolactinoma
Growth Hormone
Empty Sella Syndrome
Pituitary Adenoma
Adrenal Disease
Cushing’s Syndrome
Adrenal Insufficiency
Gonadal Dysfunction
Primary/Secondary Amenorrhea
Menopause
Male Gonadal Failure
Bone Disorders
Osteopenia/Osteoporosis
Paget’s Disease
Calcium Metabolism
Hyper/Hypo-parathyroid
Urinary Tract Stone (See Nephrology)
Obesity
Hyperlipidemia (See Cardiology)
Hypertension (See Cardiology &
Nephrology)
Procedural Skills (None)
Test Interpretation/Performance
Home Glucose Monitoring
Amb. Block
Continuity
Clinic
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
Diabetes
Clinic
2
2
1
1
Sub
Specialty
Floor
Noon
Lecture
2
2
1
1 Lecture
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1 Lecture
1 Lecture
1
1
1Women’s
Health
1Women’s
Health
1 Lecture
2
1 Lecture
1
2
1
2
1 Women’s
Health
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1 Lecture
1 Lecture
1 Lecture
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
2Nephrology
Lecture
2
2
2
1 Demo
2
1
1
Endocrinology Physical Examination Skills:
Palpation of Thyroid Gland*
Identification of Thyroid Nodules
215
2
2
1
Lecture
Lecture
GASTROENTEROLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
ED
Floor
Acute Abdomen
Specialty
Rotation
2
1
2
Acute Appendicitis
2
1
2
Competency
Amb Care
Block
Continuity
Clinic
Biliary Tract Disease
Noon
Lecture
Lecture
Acute Cholecystitis
2
1
2
Cholelithiasis
2
2
1
Cholangitis
2
2
1
1
1
Cirrhosis Including Complications
2
2
2
Colonic Polyps
1 Lecture
1
2
Lecture
2
Diarrhea
Lecture
Acute
2
2
2
Chronic
1
1
2
1
1
2
Diverticular Disease
Diverticulitis
Diverticular Abscess
GI Bleeding
2
1
1
2
1
1
Lower
Lecture
Upper (See Critical Care)
2
1
1
2
1
1
Occult
1 Lecture
1
Gastro-esophageal Reflux
Lecture
2
Esophageal Stricture
Lecture
Uncomplicated
1
Barret’s Esophagus
1
1
Hemorrhoids
1
1
Hepatitis
2
2
216
2 Lecture
Lecture
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
1
1
2 Lecture
2
2
1
Esophagus
1
2
Colon
1
2
Gastroparesis
1
2
Small Intestine
1
2
Malnutirition
Motility Disorders
Pancreatitis
Lecture
Acute
2
Chronic
2
Peptic Ulcer Disase
Lecture
Bleeding (See Critcal Care
2
H. Pylori
1 Lecture
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
Lecture
1
Perforation/Obstruction
2
1
1
Ascites
2
2
1
Bowel Obstruction
2
1
Cholestatic Liver Disease
Lecture
Lecture
Primary Biliary Cisshosis
2
1
Primary Sclerosing Chol.
2
1
2 Lecture
1
Lecture
Bilirubin Metabolism
2
1
Lecture
Mesenteric Vascular Dis
2
1
Lecture
Metabolic/Genetic Dis. Of Liver
2
1
Lecture
2
2
Gastric
2
1
Esophageal
2
1
Hepatoma
2
1
Inflammatory Bowel Dis.
2
2
1
Neoplasms
Colon
1 Lecture
1
217
Biliary
2
1
Alcohol
Cirrhosis
2
2
Varices
2
2
1
Lecture
2
2
1
Lecture
2
1
Lecture
1
Lecture
Withdrawal
Neurologic Complications
2
Procedure Skills
Sigmoidoscopy
1
1
Paracentesis
2
1
Nasogastric Tube
1
1
Gastroenterology/Abdominal Physical Examination Skills:
Abdominal aneurysms (detection by palpation)
Blumberg’s sign (rebound tenderness)*
Changes in frequency of bowel sounds (hypo/hyperactive)*
Palpate the enlarged bottom of the gallbladder (Courvoisier)*
Inguinal area (palpate for hernias)*
Identify and palpate lower edge of the liver at rest and deep inspiration*
Identify and palpate lower edge of the spleen at rest and deep inspiration*
Abdominal arterial murmurs/bruits
Elicit and recognize Murphy’s sign*
Rectal and prostatic examination*
Palpation of testes, epididymis and spermatic cord*
Locate the dome and lower edge of the liver by percussion*
Shifting dullness (maneuver for)*
Iliopsoas sign (in peritonitis)*
Palpate Pulsatile liver*
Any visible pulsations
Scrotal area (palpate for hermias)*
Assess splenic dullness (e.g., Traube’s space) by percussion*
Abnormalities/localizations in the distribution of tympany
Dilated vein, discolorations, straiae of tumors
Fluid wave (maneuver for)*
Detect any visible persistalsis
Femoral area (palpate for hernias
Measure the width of hepatic dullness by percussion*
218
HEMATOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Competency
Amb. Care
Clinic
Hematology
Elective
Floor
Noon Lecture
2
2
1
Lecture
2
1
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
D.I.C.
2
1
Lecture
Hyper coagulable state
1
2
Lecture
Thrombocytopenia/
Thrombocytosis
Platelet Dysfunction
1
1
Hemostasis and thrombosis
Anticoagulation
Fibrinolysis
Assessment of coagulation
2
1
Neoplasia
Lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and Non
Hodgkin’s)
1 Oncology
2 Hematology
1
Lecture
Leukemia
1 Oncology
2 Hematology
1
Lecture
Myeloma and Waldenstrom’s
1 Oncology
2 Hematology
1
Lecture
Monoclonal Gammopathy
2
1
Polycythemia
Myelodysplastic Syndrome
1 Oncology
2 Hematology
2
Neutropenia
1 Oncology
2 Hematology
2
Leukocytosis
1
1
White Cells
219
Lecture
Red Cell Disorders
Primary Polycythemia
1
1
Lecture
Secondary Polycythemia
2
1
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
1 Hematology
2 GI
1
Lecture
Sickle Cell Disease
2
1
Lecture
Thalassemias
1
2
Lecture
Transfusion Therapy
2
1
Lecture
Anemia
1
Hemochromatosis
Hemoglobinopathies
220
INFECTIOUS DISEASE TOPIC CURRICULUM
ID Elective
AIDS
Rotation
ED
Floor
Noon
Lecture
Meningitis
2
2
2
1
Lecture
Encephalitis
2
Lecture
2
2
1
2
1
Knowledge Competency
Continuity
Clinic
CNS
Brain Abscess
Cardiac
Myocarditis
2
1
Pericarditis
2
1
Lecture
Endocarditis
2
1
Lecture
Gastrointestinal
Biliary Tract Infection
2
Infectious Diarrhea
2
Viral Hepatitis
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
Peritonitis
2
1
Lecture
2
Genitourinary
Cervicitis/Vaginitis
STD’s
PID
Prostatitis/Epididymitis
Urethritis
1
Lecture
1
Lecture
1
Lecture
1
Lecture
1
Lecture
ED/Walk
in / WH*
ED/Walk
in / WH*
ED/Walk
in / WH*
2
2
Urinary Tract Infection
(Upper/Lower)
ENT Infections
Epiglottitis
Pharyngitis
1
1 (Case-
2
221
2
2
Lecture
Sinusitis
based
discussion)
1
1
Otitis
1
2
Respiratory Tract
Pneumonia/Bronchitis
1
2
Empyema
2
2
2
1
Lecture
1
Pulmonary
Musculoskeletal
Cellulitis
2
Osteomyelitis
2
1
Septic Arthritis
Skin
1
2
1
1
Tuberculosis
Active Infection
2 Lecture
2
1
Lecture
Pulmonary
PPD/Conversion
1
Lecture
2
Viral
HIV Disease
2
1
2
Herpes Simplex
1
Influenza
1
Mononucleosis
1
Varicella-Zoster
1
2
2
CMV
1
2
2
Conjunctivitis
2
2
Lecture
Series
2
Lecture
1
Miscellaneous Topics
Pathogenesis of Fever
Lecture
Fever of Unknown Origin
2
222
2
1
Infection in Immunocompromised
Patients
Sepsis Syndrome
2
2
1
2
1
1
Lecture
Antibiotic Usage
1 Lecture
2
1
Lecture
Other specific disease entities
Lyme Disease
1
Malaria
1
Fungal Infections
2
2
1
Procedural Knowledge
KOH Preparation (Vaginal Fluid and
Skin Scrapings
PPD/Anergy Panel
1
In-Service
1
Gram Stain Sputum/Urine
1
In-Service
1
In-Service
India Ink
AFB Stain of Sputum
Ordering/Interpretation of Tests
Antibiotic Sensitivity Testing/Serum
Levels
Serologic Testing for Infectious
Disease
ELISA/Western Blot in ID
1
In-Service
1
In-Service
KEY: 1 = Primary Site in which you will see patients and learn about this topic
2 = Secondary Site in which you can expect to learn about this topic
In-Service: You will receive specific instruction in either performing this test or
observing this procedure
Lecture: A formal lecture on this topic will be given
W.H.* = Women’s Health Center (A site for some residents)
223
NEPHROLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge Competency
Continuity
Clinic
ICU
Rotation
Nephrology
Rotation
ED
Floor
Noon
Lecture
Lecture
Acid-Base Disorders
Respiratory Acidosis
1
2
Respiratory Alkalosis
1
2
Metabolic Alkalosis
1
2
2
1
Pulmonary
Rotation
1
Pulmonary
Rotation
1
Anion Gap Acidosis
1
2
2
1
Lecture
1
2
2
1
Lecture
Lecture
Renal Tubular Acidosis/Non-Anion
Gap Acidosis
Acute Renal Failure
Acute Tabular Necrosis
2
1
Drug-Induced Renal Disease
2
1
Interstitial
2
1
Atheroembolic
2
1
1
2
Hemodialysis (Acute)
2
1
Hemodialysis (Chronic)
1
2
Peritoneal Dialysis
1
2
Lecture
Chronic Renal Failure
Conservative management
2 lecture
Kidney transplantation
Lecture
Fluid and Electrolytes
2
2
1
Lecture
Potassium
2
2
1
Lecture
Sodium
2
2
1
Lecture
Calcium
2
2
1
Lecture
Magnesium
2
2
1
Lecture
224
Hypertension
Hypertensive Emergencies
2
1
Secondary Hypertension
2
2
1
Treatment
1 Lecture
2
2
Lecture
Urologic Disorders
Obstructive Uropathy
2
1
Urinary Tract Infection
1 Lecture
2
Cancer of Prostate
1 Screening
1
Erectile Dysfunction
1
Incontinence
1
2
Prostatic Disease
1 Lecture
2
Bladder Dysfunction
1
Lecture
Neoplasia
Bladder Carcinoma
Oncology
Floor
Oncology
Floor
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Nephrolithiasis
Renal Stone Disease
1 Lecture
Acute Renal Colic
1
2
Other Kidney Diseases
Glomerulonephritis
2
2
1
Lecture
Nephrotic syndrome
2
2
1
Lecture
Hypertension and the Kidney
2
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Diabetes and the Kidney
2 (Includes
Diabetes
Clinic)
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Lecture
Polycystic Kidney Disease
1
2
Renal Disease and Pregnancy
2 Lecture
Medical
225
Consult
PROCEDURE KNOWLEDGE
Urinalysis
1 In-Service
2
Foley Catheter Insertion (M/F)
2
1
ORDERING/UNDERSTANDING
TESTS
Measures of Renal function
2
1
Cystometrics
1 Lecture
Renal Biopsy
1
2
Urine Electrolytes
2
1
Key: 1 = Primary Site at which you will learn about this and see patients with this
problem
2 = Secondary site at which you may learn about this and see patients with this
problem.
Lecture: A formal lecture will cover this topic
In-Service: The technique will be demonstrated
226
Lecture
NEUROLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Neuro.
Floor
Floor
ICU
Noon
Lecture
Meningitis (See also ID)
2
1
1
Lecture
Encephalitis (See also ID)
2
1
1
Abscess
2
1
1
Lecture
In AIDS (See also ID)
2
1
1
Lecture
Epidural Abscess
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
Lecture
2
1
1
2
Lecture
Sub-Arachnoids Hemorrhage
1
2
2
Sub-Dural Hematoma
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
Knowledge Competency
A.C. Block
Continuity
Clinic
C.N.S. Infections
Cerebrovascular Disease
Stroke
T.I.A.
2
Lecture
Neuromuscular Disease
Guillain-Barre
Multiple Sclerosis
2
Lecture
Myasthenia Gravis
Myopathies/Muscular Dystrophies
2
2
1
2
Alzheimer’s
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Vascular Disease
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Uncommon causes of Dementia
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Epilepsy
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Headache
1 Lecture
1
2
2
Dementias
Miscellaneous Neurological Diseases
227
Lumbar/Cervical Disc Disease
1 Lecture
1
2
2
1 Lecture
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
Lecture
2
2
2
Lecture
Toxic Encephalopathy
2
2
Neoplasm’s
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
Parkinson’s Disease
Neuropathy
Sleep Disorders
Spinal stenosis
1 Lecture
2
Vertigo
1 (P.B.L.)
1
1 (Pharm.
Lecture)
2
TESTING ORDERING /
INTERPRETATION
Anti-convulsant Drug Levels
C.N.S. Imaging Technology
(CT, MRI, PET, Angiography)
EEG
EMG, Nerve Conduction Studies
2
2
Carotid Vascular Studies
1
Lecture
PROCEDURE
Lumbar Puncture #
1
# Formal certification in this procedure is required.
Neurological Findings:
CNI – XII (Elicitations of normal and abnormal)*
Nystagmus (horizontal and vertical)*
Mini-mental status examination*
Correct performance of examination of muscle strength with major muscle
groups)
Peripheral sensory examination for light touch*
2-point discrimination*
Pain*
Proprioception*
Vibratory sensation*
Cutaneous Dermatomes*
Cogwheel rigidity*
Asterixis*
228
Lecture
Athetoid movements
Tremors (Rest Vs. Intention)*
Clonus*
Myoedema
Horner’s syndrome*
Erb’s paralysis
Radial nerve paralysis
Median nerve paralysis
Ulnar nerve paralysis
Reflexes:
Deep tendon reflexes*
Brain stem reflexes*
Corneal*
Ciliospinal*
Jaw*
Gag reflex*
Other reflexes
Anal reflex
Abdominal reflex
Cremasteric*
Babinski*
Hoffman’s sign*
Grasp*
Palmomental*
Snout*
Kernig’s sign*
Brudinski’s sign*
Dysdiadokinesia (R.A.M.)*
Dyssynergia & Dysmetria*
Abnormalities of Gait
Cerebella ataxia
Posterior column disorders
Foot drop*
Spastic gait of hemiplegia
Scissors gait
Festinating gait*
Wernickes’s*
Doll’s eyes*
Kussmaul’s breathing*
Cheyne-Stokes respiration*
229
ONCOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge Competency
Ambulatory Care
General Issues Related to
Oncologic Disease
Mechanisms of Oncogenesis
Screening for Malignancy
Chemotherapy (principles and
practice)
Advance Planning/End of Life
Decision Making (See Ethics
curriculum)
Behavior Modification (Smoking
Cessation, etc.)
Nutrition in malignancy
Weiler
Oncology
Floor
Sub-Specialty
Medical
Floor
2
1 Preventive
Mini-Course
2 Epid. MiniCourse (See Prev.
& Public Health)
Clinical Pharm.
Mini-course
Noon Lecture
Lecture
2
2
2 Journal
Club
1
2
1
Various
Lecture
Topics
1
1
1
2
1
1
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
Epidural Cord Compression (See
Neurology)
Hypocalcaemia (See Renal)
1
1
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
Other Clinical Syndromes
1
1
Lecture
1
Lecture
1
Women’s
Health
Dermatology
2
Lecture
1
GI
2
Lecture (S)
2
Lecture
Pain and Symptom Control in
Malignancy
Specific Clinical Syndromes of
Malignancy
Adenocarcinoma of Unknown
Primary
Superior Vena Cave syndrome
Orientation,
Lecture
See Prevention/
Psycho-social
Clinical Pharm.
Mini-course
Specific Malignancies
Breast Carcinoma (See Women’s
Health Curriculum)
Dermatologic Malignancy (see
Dermatology Curriculum)
GI Malignancy (See GI Curriculum)
2
1
Head and Neck
1
230
Thyroid
1
Endocrine
1
Men’s
1
Endocrine
1
Hematologic (See Hematology
Curriculum)
Pulmonary (See Pulmonary
Curriculum)
1
Hematology
1
Lecture (S)
1
Pulmonary
1
Lecture (S)
Neurological (See Neurology
Curriculum)
Gynecologic (See Women’s Health
Curriculum)
Renal (See Renal Curriculum)
2
1 Neuro.
Floor
2
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
Testicular
1
2
Cardiac Tumors
1
2
Prostate (See Renal Curriculum)
1
Lecture
Lecture
1
Amb. Block
Lecture Minicourse on Epid.
231
PSYCHIATRY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge Competency
Ambulatory Block
Continuity
Clinic
Other Floor
Assessment of the patient and
screening for psychiatric disorders
1 Prime MD (See
curriculum on
Medical History)
1 Prime
MD
1
Adjustment Disorders
1
1
1
General Floor
Anxiety Disorders
1
Patient Actors
1
1
General Floor
Lecture
1 General Floor
ED
ICU
1 General Floor
ED
ICU
2
Lecture
Delirium
Dementia
Depression
1
Patient Actors
1
Panic Disorders
1
Patient Actors
Lecture
1 Women’s Health
Curriculum
2
2
2
Substance Abuse
2
2
1
Bipolar Disorders
1
Patient Actors
2
Personality Disorders
1
Patient Actors
2
2
Schizophrenia
2
2
2
Eating Disorders
1 Women’s Health
Curriculum
2
2
Sexual Disorders
Noon Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
See substance
abuse
Curriculum.
Lecture
Lecture
For explanation of patient actors and “Prime MD” see curriculum on the Medical
History and also specific curriculum for each of these areas.
232
PULMONARY/CRITICAL CARE TOPIC CURRICULUM
Continuity
Clinic
Pulm.
Elective
Asthma
2
2
1
Bronchitis
1
2
2
C.O.P.D.
2
2
1
Knowledge Competency
Jacobi
ICU
Weiler
ICU
Pulm.
Floor
Other
Floor
Noon
Lecture
Airway Disease
Upper Airway Obstruction
2
2
2
1
A.R.D.S.
2
1
1
1
Bronchiectasis
2
1
Restrictive Lung Disease
2
1
Aspiration Pneumonia
Lecture
2
Lecture
Lecture
Lecture
2
1
1
1
2
Lecture
2
2
2
1
2
Lecture
Hospital Required
2
1
1
2
2
Lecture
AIDS Associated
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Lecture
Infection
Pneumonia
Community Acquired
Influenza
1
1 Lecture
2
2
AIDS
Floor
2
2
1
2
2
2
Tuberculosis
Active Infection
PPD/Conversion
1 Lecture
Atypical Mycobacteria
2
1
Lung Abscess
2
1
AIDS
Floor
1
Emphysema
2
1
2
Other Pulmonary Infections
2
1
2
2
1 Lecture
2
2
1
Onc.
Neoplasia
Solitary pulmonary Nodule
Lung Carcinoma
2
233
Lecture
Floor
Lecture
Mediastinal Tumors
2
1
Pleural Disease
2
1
2 Onc.
Floor
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
Lecture
Pneumothorax
2
Smoking Cessation
1 In-Service
Lecture
2
Sleep Disorders
2
2
2
2
Vascular Disease
Pulmonary Embolism
2
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Cor Pulmonale
2
2
2
1
2
Lecture
Primary Pulmonary Hypertension
2
2
2
1
Pulmonary Vasculitis
2
Pulmonary Hypertension
1
Interstitial Lung Disease
Lecture
Sarcoidosis
2
1
2
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
Asbestos
2
1
2
Asthma
2
1
2
Pneumoconiosis
2
1
2
Alpha 1 antitrypsin Deficiency
2
1
2
Cystic Fibrosis
2
1
2
Lecture
Sickle Lung Syndrome
2
1
2
Lecture
Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis
Other interstitial Lung Disease
Occupational Lung Disease
Congenital Lung Disease
234
Critical Care Knowledge
Competency
A.C.L.S.
Update
Update
Drug Overdose
1
2
2
Lecture
GI Bleeding
1
1
2
1
1
Lecture
(See GI)
Lecture
1
1
2
Lecture
(See
Renal)
Septie
1
1
2
Cardiogenic
1 (With
CCU)
1
2
Lecture
(See LD)
Lecture
(See
Card.)
Hypovolemic
1
1
2
Coma
1
1
2
2
1 Lecture
& InService
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
Lecture
2
Respiratory Failure
2
Acute Renal Failure
Orientation
1
2
Shock
Management of Respiratory Failure
Lecture
Procedural Knowledge
Arterial Blood Gas
PPD/Anergy Testing
1
Spirometry/Peak Flow
2
Thoracentesis
2
2
Pulmonary Artery Catheterization
2
1 (With
CCU)
1 (With
CCU)
2
Understanding/Ordering Tests
Pulmonary Function Testing
2
Bronchoscopy
2
2
Pleural Fluid Analysis
2
2
Ventilation/Perfusion Scanning
2
2
Sleep Studies
2
235
1 Lecture
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
Lecture
1
2
Lecture
Diagnosis of D.V.T.
2
2
1
# Skills in which formal credentialing is applied
Pulmonary Medicine: Physical Examinations Skills * Maneuvers
Stridor*
Bronchial breath sounds*
Crackles*
Abnormal percussive note*
Paradoxical respiration*
Respirator alternant
Pleural friction rub*
Vesicular breath sounds*
Wheezing and rhonchi*
Discrimination of early/mid-late crackles*
E to A change (egophony)*
Assessment of pulmonary excursion by percussion*
Use of accessory respiratory muscles*
Abnormal tactile fremitus*
Deviated trachea*
Amphoric breath sounds
Cheyne - Stokes respiration*
Late-inspiratory squeak
Kussmaul’s respiration*
Whispered pectoriloquy*
236
2
Lecture
RHEUMATOLOGY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge Competency
Ambulatory
Block
Continuity
Clinic
SubSpecialty
E.D.
Floor
Noon
Lecture
1
Lecture
Vasculitis
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
2
Temporal Arthritis
1
2
2
Lecture
Giant Cell Arthritis
1
1
2
Lecture
Polyarteritis
Polymyositis/Dermatomyositis
2
Osteomyelitis (See ID)
Rheumatoid Arthritis
2
Scleroderma
2
1
Lecture
1
1
Lecture
2
(I.D.)
1
1
2
Lecture
2
1
Lecture
Sernegative spondyloarthritis
2
2
1
1
Lecture
Crystal-Induced Synovitis
2
2
2
1
Lecture
Degenerative Joint Disease
1
2
2
Osteoarthritis
1
Lecture
1
2
1 Lecture/
Demo
1
(Demo)
1
(Demo)
1
(Demo)
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
Regional pain Syndromes
Shoulder Pain
Knee Pain
Back/Neck Pain
Hip Pain
Foot Pain
Septic Arthritis (See ID)
Gonococcal
2
1
1
Lecture
Non-Gonococcal
2
1
1
Lecture
Procedural Knowledge
237
Diagnostic Arthrocentesis
1
2
2
1
1
Therapeutic Injections
1
(Demo)
2
2
2
2
1
(Demo)
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
Diagnostic Testing/Evaluation of
Tests
Examination of Synnovial
Fluids for crystals
Ordering and interpretation
Rheumatology: Skills* Maneuvers* Diseases to recognize
Examination of all joints*
Identify palpation points at the shoulder for:
Greater tuberosity
Biceps tendon groove
Subdeltoid bursa
Perform the following diagnostic maneuvers at the shoulder:
Elicit impingement sign
Opposed supination for biceps tendonitis
Inspect for kyphosis/scoliosis/lordosis*
Straight leg raising for radiculitis*
Tempomandibular joint
Swan neck deformity
Heberden’s nodules*
Phalen’s test (carpal tunnel syndrome)*
Tinel’s sign (carpal tunnel syndrome)*
Thenar atrophy (carpal tunnel syndrome)*
Interphalangeal joint Synovitis
Impingement sign (shoulder)
Finkelstein’s test
Ballottement sign
Bulge sign
Maneuver to elicit collateral ligament tear
Lachman’s maneuver to elicit crucial ligament tear
Detect crepitus during passive flexion/extension
Bouchard’s nodules*
Identification and palpation of anserine bursa
238
1
Lecture
MISCELLANEOUS SPECIALTY TOPIC CURRICULUM
Knowledge Competency
A.C. Block
Continuity
Clinic
Floor
Other
Floor
Noon
Lecture
1 (Diabetes
Clinic)
1
2
Endocrine
Lecture
2
ED
Allergy
ED
Lecture
Ophthalmology
Cataracts
Conjunctivitis
Allergic
2
Infectious
2
1
Glaucoma
1
1
Corneal Abrasions
2
2
1
Lecture
ED
Orbital/Periorbital Cellulites
1
Optic Neuritis
1
Neurology
1
HIV
Retinitis
Retinal Detachment
I.D.
Lecture
2
2
Lecture
Otitis
1
1
See ID
Pharyngitis
1
1
EAR/NOSE/THROAT
Epiglottises
1
Epitasis
2
2
Laryngitis
1
1
Sinusitis
1
1
Labrynthitis
2
2
Malignancy
Peritonsillar Abscess
2
2
Allergic Rhinitis
1
1
Sleep Apnea
2
2
239
ED
See ID
ED
See ID
ED
2
ED
See ID
ED
1
Oncology
2
Pulmonary
Lecture
See ID
Hearing Evaluation
1
1
Ophthalmology: Physical Examination Skills* Maneuvers* Disease
Process
Anisocoria*
Conjunctivitis
muscles)
Retinal exudates*
Acute glaucoma
Retinal hemorrhages*
Pus in anterior chamber
Retinal micro aneurysms
Papilledema*
Sclera icterus*
Drusen bodies
Conjunctival petechiae*
Proliferative retinopathy*
Partial or full cornea arcus*
Retinal scar (eg toxoplasmosis)
Hypertensive retinopathy*
Cataracts*
Test for muscle strength (extraocular
Visualization of the retina with funduscope*
Test for gross acuity*
Blood in anterior chamber (hyphema)
Iritis
Narrow anterior chamber (flashlight test)
Increased cup0to-disc ratio
Test for visual fields*
Fatigue of elevator palpebrae (myasthenia)
Hollenhorst plaque (micro embolic disease)
Crossing defect (A-V nicking)*
Partial afferent defect marcus-Gunn pupil)
Venous pulsations (presence/absence)*
Otolaryngology: Physical Examination Skills, Maneuvers, Diseases to
recognize
Peritonsillar abscess
Candida infection of the oral cavity*
Submandibular glands infection
Maxillary/frontal sinusitis by palpation/percussion*
Inspect nasal mucosa using otoscope*
Inspect oral cavity using penlight/tongue blade*
Tympanic perforation
Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity
Parotid/submandibular glands tumors
Detection of adenopathy (cervical/axillary/ulnar)*
Detection of thyroid nodule*
Acute Otitis externa (“swimmer’s ear”)
Apthous ulcers*
240
Acute Otitis media*
Gingival hyperplasia*
Leukoplakias
Malignant Otitis externa*
Nasal Polyps
Parotitis*
Acute Pharyngitis*
Acute tonsillitis*
Detection of thyromegaly*
Nuchal rigidity*
Palpation of the thyroid*
Gingivitis
Nasal septal ulcers in cocaine sniffers
Atrophic glossitis*
Herpes simplex infection*
Allergic rhinitis*
Nasal septal perforation
Caries and periodontal disease*
Telangiectasias*
Tophi in the external ear
Torus palatinus
Use of valsalva’s maneuver to detect supraclavicular adenopathy
Palpate tongue and oral cavity
241
WOMEN’S HEALTH TOPIC CURRICULUM
Ambulatory
Clinic
Ambulatory
Block
Women’s
Health
Center
Floor
Breast Mass
1
1
2
Fibrocystic Dis.
1
2
Lecture
2
Knowledge Competency
Noon
Lecture
Breast Diseases
2
1
2
1 Oncology
2 Other
1
2
Cervical Carcinoma
1
2
(Includes
HIV Floors)
Endometriosis
1
Lecture
Gynecology
Pap Smears
1
1
Lecture
Fibroids
2
2
1
2
P.I.D.
2
2
1
1
Vaginitis
1
1
1
Menstrual Disorders
2
2
Lecture
1
Osteoporosis
2
1
Lecture
Contraception
2
2
Sexual Dysfunction
2
2
242
2
1
Family
Planning
Lecture
Lecture
EKG CURRICULUM
Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine
Evaluation Task Force
EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE AND GOALS
Cardiac disease is a major health problem that internists will come in contact with on a daily basis. Part of
evaluating cardiac disease rests upon interpretation of EKGs. This EKG curriculum is designed to identify
those EKG findings that residents are required to recognize in order to become competent interpreters of
EKGs. These required findings are based on the consensus statement issued jointly by the AHA, ACC, and
ACP-SGIM and published in the December 2001 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
By the completion of their residency training, residents will be expected to show competency in interpretation
of EKGs as required by the RRC.
COMPETENCIES FOR THE CURRICULUM
Using the above reference as a guide, the Evaluation Task Force has identified typical EKG findings that
graduating Internal Medicine residents must be able to identify to show competency in EKG interpretation. In
addition, the Task Force has identified an additional group of findings that graduating residents in Internal
Medicine should be able to identify by the end of their training.
PGY 1 residents MUST be able to identify the following EKG findings and features:
1)
2)
3)
General Features
a)
Normal EKGs
b)
Normal variants
c)
Incorrect electrode placement
d)
Motion artifact
Atrial Rhythms
a)
Sinus Rhythm
b)
Sinus Bradycardia (<60)
c)
Sinus Tachycardia (>100)
d)
Atrial Premature Complexes
e)
Multifocal Atrail Tachycardia
f)
Supraventricular Tachycardia
g)
Atrial Flutter
h)
Atrial Fibrillation
AV Junctional Rhythms
a)
4)
AV Junctional Rhythm
Ventricular Rhythms
243
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
a)
Ventricular Premature Complexes (uniform and multiform)
b)
Ventricular Tachycardia (>3 consecutive complexes)
c)
Ventricular Fibrillation
d)
Torsades de pointes
AV Conduction Abnormalities
a)
AV dissociation
b)
AV Block, 1°
c)
AV Block, 2°--Mobitz type I (Wenckebach)
d)
AV Block, 2°--Mobitz type II
e)
AV Block, 3°
f)
Wolff-Parkinson-White Pattern
Intraventricular Conduction Disturbances
a)
Right Bundle Branch Block, Incomplete
b)
Right Bundle Branch Block, Complete
c)
Left Bundle Branch Block, Complete
P Wave Abnormalities
a)
Right Atrial Enlargement/abnormality
b)
Left Atrial Enlargement/abnormality
Abnormalities of QRS Voltage or Axis
a)
Low Voltage, Limb Leads Only
b)
Low Voltage, Limb and Precordial Leads
c)
Left Axis Deviation
d)
Right Axis Deviation
Ventricular Hypertrophy
a)
LVH by Voltage Only
b)
LVH by Voltage and ST-T segment Abnormalities
c)
RVH
10) Myocardial Infarction (Acute vs Old/Age Indeterminate)
a)
Anterior
b)
Septal
244
c)
Lateral
d)
Inferior
e)
Posterior
11) ST, T, U Wave Abnormalities
a)
ST and/or T Wave Abnormalities Suggesting Myocardial Ischemia
b)
ST and/or T Wave Abnormalities Suggesting Myocardial Injury
c)
ST and/or T Wave Abnormalities Suggesting Acute Pericarditis
d)
Prolonged QT Interval
12) Suggested or Probable Clinical Disorders
a)
Hyperkalemia
b)
Chronic Lung Disease
c)
Acute Cor Pulmonale
d)
Pulmonary Embolism
e)
Acute Pericarditis
f)
Coronary Artery Disease
g)
Effects of Digitalis
13) Myocardial Infarction Scenarios
a)
RV infarct
b)
LBBB
14) ST, T, U Wave Abnormalities
a)
Early Repolarization, normal variant
15) Pacemaker rhythm - identify
PGY-2 and 3 residents MUST be able to identify all those features required of PGY-1 residents
and the following EKG findings and features:
1)
Atrial Rhythms
a)
Sinus Arrhythmia
b)
Sinus Pause
c)
Atrial Tachycardia
d)
Ectopic Atrial focus
e)
Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia
245
f)
2)
AV Junctional Rhythms
a)
3)
4)
5)
6)
8)
a)
Ventricular Bigeminy
b)
AIVR
Conduction Abnormalities
a)
AV Block, 2:1
b)
AV Block, variable
c)
Short PR interval (normal QRS) – not WPW
Intraventricular Conduction Disturbances
a)
Left Anterior Fascicular Block
b)
Left Posterior Fascicular Block
c)
Nonspecific Intraventricular Conduction Disturbance
d)
Supraventricular Arrhythmia with Aberrant Intraventircular Conduction
Abnormalities of QRS Voltage or Axis
Pericardial Effusion with Electrical Alternans
ST, T, U Wave Abnormalities
a)
Prominent U Waves
b)
ST and/or T Wave Abnormalities Suggesting Ventricular Aneurysm
c)
ST and/or T Wave Abnormalities Secondary to Hypertrophy or IVCD
d)
Evolution of Pericarditis
AV Junctional Rhythms
a)
9)
Accelerated AV Junctional Rhythm
Ventricular Rhythms
a)
7)
Wandering Atrial Pacemaker
AV Junctional Escape Complexes
Ventricular Hypertrophy
a)
Combined Ventricular Hypertrophy
10) ST, T, U Wave Abnormalities
246
a)
Nonspecific ST and or T Wave Abnormalities
11) Suggested or Probable Clinical Disorders
a)
Hypokalemia
b)
Evolution of hyperkalemia
c)
Hypercalcemia
d)
ASD, Primum
e)
ASD, Secundum
f)
Hypothermia
247

Similar documents

×

Report this document