Level II - Geology Courses - UWI Mona

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Level II Geology Courses
Department of Geography and Geology
The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus
Tel: 876-927-2728 or 876-927-2129
Fax: 876-977-6029
Email: [email protected]
COURSE TITLE:
PALAEONTOLOGY AND THE
HISTORY OF LIFE
COURSE CODE:
GEOL2201
CREDITS:
3
LEVEL:
II
SEMESTER:
2
PRE-REQUISITES: [GEOL1101 and
GEOL1102]
OR [BIOL1262 and BIOL1263]
RATIONALE
Palaeontology, the study of ancient life, is a
fundamental
core
course
in
an
undergraduate degree in the earth sciences.
It provides a key to determining the age of
ancient sediments, characterizing ancient
environments, describing the history of
sedimentary basins, and reconstructing
palaeogeography. The course thus provides
crucial tools by which students can interpret
earth history from the sedimentary rock
record and facilitate discovery and
exploitation of the energy and mineral
resources contained in these rocks.
Understanding the major patterns in life
history is also critical to understanding the
complex interactions between the biosphere
and the global environment. These ancient
patterns can be used as important baseline
data for comparison with the major
environmental and biotic changes facing the
modern world.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed as an overview of
the most important fossil groups, as well as
an introduction to modern palaeontological
methods and research. The practical part of
the course will cover the fundamentals of
fossilization and taphonomy and the
morphology of common fossil groups within
the major phyla, with an eye toward
enabling students to make inferences
concerning a sample’s general age and
environment of deposition. The lecture
portion of the course is designed to
introduce the most important topics in
palaeobiology, evolution, the species
concept in palaeontology, phylogenetics,
speciation and extinction. There will also be
an overview of the major patterns in life
history,
covering
large-scale
biotic
radiations and crises and their linkages to
global environmental change.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:






Discuss the mode of fossilization of a
specimen and make inferences regarding
its taphonomic history.
Identify major invertebrate macro- and
micro-fossil groups preserved in
geological samples.
Analyze the fossil content of a sample to
make broad estimates of its age.
Deduce fundamental characteristics of
palaeoenvironments based on the fossil
content of geologic samples.
Contrast and analyze the evolution and
speciation in modern organisms to
patterns seen in the fossil record.
Explain types of ontogenetic and
intraspecific morphologic variation and




illustrate how this can be measured and
analyzed in fossils.
Compare and contrast different methods
of phylogenetic systematics.
Describe the major mass extinction
events and examine the possible causes
for these different events.
Discuss the history of major biotic
radiations and turnover and illustrate
how this affects biotic community
composition through time.
Analyze links between changes in the
global environment and patterns in
global biodiversity through time.
COURSE CONTENT










•
•
•
•
•
•
Fossils and taphonomy
Evolution and natural selection.
Species and speciation in the fossil
record.
Intraspecific variation in fossils.
Systematics.
Palaeoecology.
Extinction and biotic turnover.
Major biotic radiations.
Biodiversity through time.
Global environments and marine
communities through time.
Fossil preservation and taphonomy
Microfossils and micro-palaeontological
techniques
Palaeontology of Corals, Sponges,
Bryozoa, Brachiopods, Arthropods,
Echinoderms and Molluscs
Morphometrics in Fossils
Systematics and Morphology
Palaeo-communities through Time
The course will be delivered by means of 18
interactive, multimedia presentations in the
area of modern palaeontology, and 24 hours
of laboratory investigations based on the
core material and nine tutorial sessions (39
contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT




PRESCRIBED TEXT

Lectures
Practicals (12
X 2 hours)
Tutorials
Total
Credit
Hours
9
51
9
39
18
12
Benton, M.J. & D.A.T. Harper (2009),
Introduction to Paleobiology and the
Fossil Record. Wiley-Blackwell.
RECOMMENDED TEXTS




METHODS OF DELIVERY
Contact
Hours
18
24
One 2-hour written examination
50%
One 2-hour practical examination
30%
One 1-hour in-course test
20%
One tutorial essay, 1200-1500 words
10%
Prothero, D.R. (2004), Bringing Fossils
to Life: An Introduction to
Paleobiology, McGraw-Hill, New York.
Clarkson, E.N.K. (1998). Invertebrate
Palaeontology and Evolution. Allen and
Unwin, London.
Prothero, D. & R. Dott (2010),
Evolution of the Earth. McGraw-Hill,
New York, 8th ed.
Shubin, N. (2009), Your Inner Fish – A
Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year
History of the Human Body. Random
House.
WEB RESOURCES



http://evolution.berkeley.edu/
http://www.mona.uwi.edu/geoggeol/Geo
lMuseum/index.htm
http://palaeoblog.blogspot.com/
COURSE TITLE:
SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY
COURSE CODE:
GEOL2202
CREDITS:
LEVEL:
SEMESTER:
PRE-REQUISITES:
and GEOL1102
3
II
1
GEOL1101
RATIONALE
Sedimentary Geology covers the processes
in the formation of sedimentary rocks in
order to provide the student with the
necessary tools to collect data related to
sedimentary rocks, classify the rocks, and
interpret and deduce their method of
formation. The course is one of several core
courses that build an essential basic working
knowledge of geological skills. The course
provides
the
tools
necessary
for
advancement into courses/fields including
facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy,
petroleum
geology,
hydrogeology,
geological mapping, and research projects.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provides the basic skills
necessary to understand sedimentary rocks,
and includes formal lectures, tutorial
sessions, laboratory exercises, and field
study. Classification schemes for clastic and
carbonate sedimentary rocks based on grain
size, grain type and grain fabric are
introduced, and their use in the field, in hand
specimens and under the microscope is
developed. A sound knowledge of
sedimentary
structures
(erosional,
depositional, and post-depositional) is
imparted, and students should be able to
identify various sedimentary structures,
deduce the processes that have created them,
and critically analyze their geological value.
Diagenetic features of rocks are presented
and diagenetic pathways are evaluated using
sedimentary fabrics, stable isotopes and
petrography. The student will develop the
necessary skills in describing sedimentary
rocks in the field, in hand specimens, and
under the microscope. The student will be
able to apply relevant classifications to
sedimentary rocks, to interpret the method
of formation of sedimentary rocks and
sedimentary structures, and be able to
deduce the diagenetic processes that have
occurred.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:





Observe, describe, analyze and classify
clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks
in hand specimens.
Collect, record and analyze field
information on sedimentary rocks.
Identify, explain the method of
formation, and deduce the geological
value of different forms of sedimentary
structures.
Observe, describe, analyze and classify
clastic and carbonate rocks in thin
section.
Describe the diagenetic features of
sedimentary rocks in thin section and
deduce their diagenetic histories.
COURSE CONTENT











Introduction and clastic grains.
Classification of sandstones and
conglomerates.
Erosional sedimentary structures.
Properties of flows.
Sedimentary structures in unidirectional
flows in water.
Sedimentary structures in bidirectional
flows in water and aeolian bedforms.
Sedimentary structures due to soft
sediment deformation.
Clastic diagenesis.
Carbonate chemistry and carbonate
sedimentary grains.
Classification of carbonate rocks.
Carbonate diagenesis.
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

Dolostones.
Evaporites.
Mudstones and mudstone diagnosis.
Other sedimentary minerals (cherts,
phosphates, ironstones, coal, petroleum).
Grain size analysis.
Clastic rocks in hand specimen.
Identification and use of sedimentary
structures.
Clastic thin sections under the
microscope.
Carbonate rocks in hand specimen.
Carbonate thin sections under the
microscope.
Identifying, recording and interpreting
sedimentary rocks in the field. The
student will learn how to record
sedimentary information in a field note
book and on a log sheet.

PRESCRIBED TEXT




Lectures
Practicals (12
x 2 hours)
Tutorials
Field class
Credit
Hours
18
12
6
6
54
6
3
39
The course will be delivered by means of 18
interactive, multimedia presentations in the
area of modern sedimentology, and 24 hours
of laboratory investigations based on the
core material. Six tutorial sessions and a 6
hours field-based class will adopt a problembased learning (PBL) approach to applied
sedimentary geology development (39
contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT


One 2-hour written examination:
50%
4 practical assignments
40%
Boggs, S. (2012), Principles of
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy.
Prentice-Hall, New Jersey. 5th ed.
RECOMMENDED TEXTS
METHODS OF DELIVERY
Contact
Hours
18
24
o 10% each assignment
1 field project
10%


Tucker, M.E. (2011), SedimentaryRocks
in the Field: A Practical Guide. The
Geological Field Guide Series. John
Wiley, 4th ed.
Tucker, M.E. (2003), Sedimentary
Rocks in the Field. The Geological Field
Guide Series. John Wiley, 3rd ed.
Adams, A.E., W.S. MacKenzie & C.
Guilford (1984), Atlas of Sedimentary
Rocks under the Microscope.
Longmans.
Tucker, M.E. & P.V. Wright (2000),
Carbonate Sedimentology. Blackwells.
Coe, A.L. (ed.) (2010), Geological Field
Techniques. Wiley-Blackwell.
USEFUL WEBSITE

USGS bedform sedimentology site:
http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/seds/
COURSE TITLE: PETROLOGY OF
IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC
ROCKS
COURSE CODE: GEOL2203
CREDITS: 3
LEVEL:
II
SEMESTER: 1
PRE-REQUISITES: GEOL1101 and
GEOL1103
RATIONALE
This core course will provide students with
the knowledge of the different types of
igneous and metamorphic rocks, two of the
main groups of rock found on Earth, which
contain many economically valuable
minerals. An understanding of these rocks
will provide students with critical geological
components necessary to understand the
evolution of Earth and plate tectonics. The
course will help students learn how to solve
geological problems and provide the
grounding for later courses in geological
field techniques, plate tectonics, and
economic geology.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Igneous and metamorphic rocks are two of
the rock types that complete the rock cycle.
They are the result of the crystallization of
minerals from the cooling of magma and/or
lava and solid state mineral and/or textural
change with respect to existing rocks. These
processes play a vital role in mountainbuilding, in plate boundary activities, in the
subduction zones, and at spreading centres,
whether prehistorically or currently. As a
result, there exists at or within these features
an accumulation of precious minerals
(diamonds), metal ores (bauxite), decorative
slabs (granite/marble), construction material
(anti-skid aggregates), and semi-precious
gemstones (agate). This course builds on the
two major rock types (igneous and
metamorphic rocks) and rock-forming
mineral
identification
introduced
in
GEOL1101 and GEOL1103, in the context
of mineralogy, chemical composition,
petrology, field geology, tectonics (at the
macro- and micro-scale), structure, and the
historical genesis of the aforementioned
rock types.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:






Observe, describe, interpret the
formation, and apply a classification
scheme to igneous and metamorphic
rocks and their mineral assemblages in
hand specimens and thin sections.
Explain the processes of igneous melt
generation, evolution and crystallization.
Distinguish between the properties that
occur at different tectonic settings that
lead to the generation of specific
igneous rocks.
Justify how pressure, temperature and
hydrothermal alteration give rise to
different mineral assemblages.
Utilize microstructures within thin
sections to interpret the history of both
rock types.
Use rock mechanics and laws of physics
to explain textures.
COURSE CONTENT




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

International Union of Geological
Sciences (IUGS) classification of
igneous rocks.
Cross, Iddings, Pirsson and Washington
(CIPW) normative mineralogy and
magma mineralogy.
Petrogenesis and magmatic associations
and fabrics of igneous rocks related to
plate tectonics.
The phase rule.
Classification of metamorphic rocks.
Metamorphic fabrics, zones, facies, and
facies series in relation to plate
tectonics.
Metamorphism and plate tectonics.





Metamorphic types, textures, processes
and rock mechanic s.
Describe various igneous rocks in a
hand sample
Describe various igneous rocks in thin
section using the petrographic
microscope
Describe various metamorphic rocks in
a hand sample
Describe various metamorphic rocks in
thin section using the petrographic
microscope.
Tutorials
Total





METHODS OF DELIVERY
Lectures
Practicals (12
x 2 hours)
RECOMMENDED TEXTS
Contact
Hours
2024
12
Credit
Hours
20
12
7
51
7
39


USEFUL WEBSITE

The course will be delivered by means of 20
interactive, multimedia presentations in the
area of igneous and metamorphic petrology,
and 24 hours of laboratory investigations
based on the core material and seven tutorial
sessions, (39 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT




One 2-hour written examination:
50%
Two in-course tests (1 hour each)
20%
o 10% each test
Assignment/project
10%
One-2-hour practical examination:
20%
PRESCRIBED TEXT

K. Hefferan & J. O’Brien (2010) Earth
Material. Wiley-Blackwell.
Best, M. (2003) Igneous and
Metamorphic Petrology. Blackwell, 2nd
ed.
Bucher, K. & R. Grapes (2011)
Petrogenesis of Metamorphic Rocks.
Springer, 8th ed.
Deer, R.A., Howie. R.A. & J. Zussman
(1992) An Introduction to the RockForming Minerals. Pearson, 2nd ed.
MacKenzie, W.S., Donaldson, D.H. &
C.Guilford (1982) Atlas of Igneous
Rocks and Their Textures. Pearson.
Wilson, B.M. (2007) Igneous
Petrogenesis: A Global Tectonic
Approach. Pearson.
Winter, J.D. (2009) Principles of
Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology.
Prentice-Hall, 2nd ed.
Yardley, B.W., MacKenzie, W.S. & C.
Guilford (1990) Atlas of Metamorphic
Rocks and Their Textures.
Geology.com website:
http://geology.com/rocks/
COURSE TITLE:
FIELD
TECHNIQUES FOR GEOLOGY
COURSE CODE:
GEOL2204
CREDITS:
3
LEVEL:
II
SEMESTER:
2
PRE-REQUISITES:
GEOL1101,
GEOL1102 and GEOL1104





RATIONALE
This course is an essential component of an
undergraduate geology degree because it
teaches the basic techniques of field data
collection. Geology is essentially a field
science and requires the collection of
geological data from field sites, so the
course is designed to develop students’ skills
in field data collection and geological
mapping. The course is also an essential
prerequisite to the geology research project
which all geology majors must complete at
Level III.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Field work is an essential part of Geology,
and involves the planning, observation,
collection, interpretation, and reporting of
field data. This course will introduce various
techniques for collecting field data in
geology. These techniques will include:
geological mapping, collection of structural
data, collection of data in a field notebook,
and sedimentary logging. The course will
distinguish between data (observation and
recording of information) and interpretation
of data. It will involve a 5-day residential
course as well as one-day field trips.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:

Undertake a risk assessment and
propose mitigation against identified
hazards.
Observe, record and interpret geological
data on a field map and in a field
notebook
Construct and interpret geological crosssections from their field data.
Construct and interpret a stereonet from
their collected structural data.
Plot, interpret and deduce the
significance of geological data using
computer programmes.
Produce a geological report.
COURSE CONTENT










Introduction to geological mapping and
lithostratigraphy.
Interpretation of geological maps.
Risk assessment/mitigation exercise.
Field training in geological mapping.
Field training in sedimentary logging.
Observing, recording and interpreting
data in a field notebook.
Structural data plotting on the computer.
Preparation of ‘top copy’ maps using
graphics software.
Preparation of a field report.
Preparation of a research proposal.
METHODS OF DELIVERY
Five-day
residential
field course
Two 1-day
field courses
Eight practical
sessions
Total
Contact
Hours
Credit
Hours
5 x 10 = 50
25
2 x 6 = 12
6
8 x 2 = 16
8
54
39
The practical classes are run across two
semesters to provide an introduction to field
techniques before, and allow for the
interpretation of data after the residential
field course. Field techniques will be
introduced through class discussions/brief
lectures at the start of labs after which
relevant exercises will be completed. The
residential field course will involve
demonstrations on how to collect field data
and daily assessment of the students’
progress.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT



Geological field map, cross-sections,
etc.:
40%
Field notebook reports:
20%
o 10% for each of 2 field trips
Laboratory exercises:
40%
o 5% for each of 8 exercises
PRESCRIBED TEXT

Coe, A.L. (ed.) (2010), Geological Field
Techniques. Wiley-Blackwell.
RECOMMENDED TEXTS


Barnes, J.W. with R.J. Lisle (2004),
Basic Geological Mapping. The
Geological Field Guide Series. Wiley,
4th ed.
Tucker, M.E. (ed.) (1988), Techniques
in Sedimentology. Blackwell.
COURSE TITLE: PLATE
TECTONICS AND GEOLOGICAL
STRUCTURES
COURSE CODE:
GEOL2205
CREDITS:
3
LEVEL:
II
SEMESTER:
2
PRE-REQUISITES:
GEOL1101,
GEOL1102 and GEOL1104
RATIONALE
This core course will build the student’s
understanding of plate tectonics which were
introduced at Level I. It links plate tectonics
to other core courses on igneous,
metamorphic and sedimentary rocks,
because plate tectonics is the underlying
paradigm of modern geology. Since plate
tectonics leads to deformation of rocks
(faults and folds) the course equips students
with the knowledge to understand the
processes of mountain-building and regional
deformation. The course will develop the
student’s understanding of structural
geology, with a special emphasis on the
Caribbean Basin, and will lay the
foundations for Level III courses in Geology
of the Caribbean and Petroleum Geology.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course builds on the first-year course in
plate
tectonics
and
sets
igneous,
metamorphic and sedimentary rocks within
their geological context. It will look at
igneous suites and their geochemical
characterization, and how this can be used to
identify their plate tectonic setting.
Metamorphic rocks will also be used to infer
geological indicators. The course will also
build on the student’s understanding of
structural geology from GEOL1104, and
will explore the different tectonic styles
found in different parts of the Caribbean and
the importance to geological resources.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:





Rationalize the evidence for the
structure of the Earth and other planets
in the solar system.
Explain the different types of plate
tectonic boundaries and the igneous and
metamorphic rocks associated with
them.
Deduce the plate tectonic settings of
igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic
rocks based on their classification and
geochemistry.
Interpret different styles of structural
deformation in the Caribbean and
deduce the geological history of selected
regions.
Rationalize the evidence for the
different models that explain the
formation of the Caribbean Plate.
METHODS OF DELIVERY
Lectures
Practicals (12 x
2 hours)
Tutorials
Field class
Contact
Hours
18
24
Credit Hours
6
6
54
6
3
39
18
12
The course will be delivered by means of 18
interactive, multimedia presentations in the
area of modern plate tectonics, and 24 hours
of laboratory investigations based on the
core material. Six tutorial sessions and a 6
hours field-based class will adopt a problembased learning (PBL) approach to applied
aspects of plate tectonics and geological
structures (39 contact hours).
COURSE CONTENT










Structure of Earth and the evidence on
which it is based.
Introduction to planetary geology.
Plate tectonics.
Igneous rocks and plate tectonics
(interplate settings; mantle plumes; midoceanic ridges; subduction zones).
Metamorphic rocks and plate tectonics
(oceanic subduction zones; burial
metamorphism; mountain-building).
Plate tectonic models for the Caribbean
(in-situ models; mobilistic models)
Structural geology.
Structural styles in the Caribbean
(strike-slip extensional deformation;
strike-slip compressional deformation;
subduction zones and fold belts).
Structural analysis of geological maps
and computer analysis of structural data.
Practical study and data collection
related to plate tectonics of eastern
Jamaica.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT



One 2-hour final examination: 50%
Field report, 2500 words
10%
Lab exercises:
40%
o 8 exercises, 5% each
PRESCRIBED TEXT

Hefferan, K. & J. O’Brien (2010),
Earth Material. Wiley-Blackwell.
RECOMMENDED TEXTS



Winter, J.D. (2009) Principles of
Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology.
Prentice-Hall, 2nd ed.
Marshak, S. (2006), Basic Methods of
Structural Geology. Prentice-Hall, 2nd
ed.
Park, R.G. & Park, R.G. (2004),
Foundation of Structural Geology.
Routledge, 3rd ed.
WEBSITES

Tectonic Analysis Ltd.:
http://www.tectonicanalysis.com/

Caribbean Plate Tectonic Site:
http://www.ig.utexas.edu/CaribPlate/Car
ibPlate.html
COURSE TITLE: WATER
RESOURCES
COURSE CODE:
GGEO2233
CREDITS:
3
LEVEL:
II
SEMESTER:
1
PRE-REQUISITES [GEOG1231 and
GEOG1232] OR [GEOL1102 and
GEOL1104]
RATIONALE
The course is designed to combine elements
of hydrology and hydrogeology so that the
course can form part of either a Geology
Major or a Geography Major because
elements of both require a basic knowledge
of the hydrological cycle, rainfall/runoff
processes, evaporation, infiltration, drought,
groundwater, and other water-related issues.
The course has an applied focus in order to
provide students with a scientific knowledge
of water resources which is critical to
national and regional development. The
course provides students with skills to
analyze and interpret data on the water
cycle, the flow of surface and ground water,
and the use and maintenance of the water
resource. The course is intended to pave the
way towards possible career opportunities in
water resources, particular with respect to
classical hydrological design procedures.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course provides an in-depth study of the
hydrological
cycle,
evaporation/transpiration, and rainfall-runoff
relationships in hydrogeology. It will deal
with the factors affecting evaporation and
evapotranspiration from free water surfaces
and soils. Different estimates and
measurements
fir
evaporation
and
evapotranspiration and soil moisture storage
and movement will also be considered as
part of the course. The course will also deal
with the nature and origin of different types
of aquifers, their geological properties, the
various types of groundwater flows to wells,
as well as flows within the aquifers under
steady/nonsteady conditions. Techniques of
hydrogeological investigation will be
presented, including drilling and pump
testing. The course will also explain the
hydraulics of surface water systems and
seasonal variability of the flow pattern in
streams and rivers. Flooding and drought,
the two extremes of water-related issues,
will also be covered. Special emphasis will
be given to the water resources of Jamaica
and other Caribbean islands.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:

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Analyze and interpret rainfall-runoff
data.
Explain spatial and temporal variations
in precipitation, with special emphasis
on Jamaica and the rest Caribbean.
Analyze streamflow data and estimate
return periods for rainfall and floods.
Explain the processes of evaporation,
evapotranspiration and interception, and
estimate the water budget for a region.
Distinguish between surface flow and
groundwater flow and discuss the
influence of topography, geology and
climate.
Calculate piezometric heads from well
data and draw flow nets showing the
groundwater flow pattern and variation s
with variation in climatic conditions.
Interpret and analyze aquifer properties
from pump test data of water wells.
Critically examine issues such as land
use, over-abstraction and climate change
and their potential effects on
groundwater availability in Jamaica and
the rest of the Caribbean.
Demonstrate best practices in collecting
and interpreting field data.
COURSE CONTENT
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Introduction: the water cycle, human
impact on the cycle.
Types of precipitation, spatial and
temporal variations in precipitation.
Measurement of precipitation.
Rainfall-runoff relationships.
Calculation of rainfall return periods.
Streamflow and hydrographs,
streamflow separation and flow duration
analysis.
Flooding and flood return periods.
Types of flooding and flood hazards in
Jamaica.
Interception: factors affecting
interception, measuring interception,
interception from different types of
vegetation.
Evaporation from free water surfaces,
soils and vegetation. Modelling and
measuring evaporation.
Factors affecting infiltration, infiltration
capacity.
Soil water movements and storage.
Physical properties of soils affecting soil
water, soil water storage, soil water
movement.
Aquifers: types and physical properties
of different aquifer materials.
Hydraulic properties of aquifers and
their methods of determination.
Groundwater flow and Darcy’s law.
Hydrogeological investigations for
groundwater sources.
Groundwater quality and contamination
of surface water and groundwater.
Groundwater wells: types and methods
of drilling.
Human impact on hydrological
processes.
Water resources of the Caribbean, with
special emphasis on Jamaica.
Climate change and challenges in the
water sector: Jamaica and the rest of the
Caribbean.
Creation of groundwater contour maps
Analysis of streamflow data and
separation of flow data into baseflow,
overland flow and interflow
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Determination of runoff from rainfall
data for both gauged and non-gauged
streams
Calculation of return periods of rainfall
and flow data
Calculation of aquifer properties (T, S)
using Darcy’s Law and pump test data
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METHODS OF DELIVERY
Lectures
Practicals (12
x 2 hours)
Tutorials
Total
Contact
Hours
24
24
Credit
Hours
24
12
3
51
3
39
The course will be delivered by means of 24
interactive, multimedia presentations in the
area of water resources, hydrology and
hydrogeology, and 24 hours of laboratory
investigations based on the core material and
three tutorial sessions (39 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT



One 2-hour written examination
50%
One 2-hour practical examination
30%
Two 1-hour in-course tests
20%
o (10% each test)
PRESCRIBED TEXTS


Todd, D.K. (2008), Groundwater
Hydrology. Wiley, 3rd ed.
Fetter, C.W. (2008), Contaminant
Hydrogeology. Waveland, 2nd ed.
RECOMMENDED TEXTS

Domenico, P. & F. Schwartz (2008),
Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology.
Wiley, 2nd ed.
Hiscock, K. (2005), Hydrogeology:
Principles and Practices. Wiley &
Blackwell, 2nd ed.
Rushton, K.R. (2003), Groundwater
Hydrology: Conceptual and
Computational Models. Wiley.
Fetter, C.W. (2000), Applied
Hydrogeology. Prentice-Hall, 4th ed.
Ward, R.C. & M. Robinson (2000),
Principles of Hydrology. McGraw-Hill,
4th ed.
USEFUL WEBSITES
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http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/
http://pr.water.usgs.gov/
http://water.usgs.gov/
http://www.wra.gov.jm
http://www.wasa.gov.tt
http://www.oas.org/dsd/waterresources.
htm
CREDITS:
3
LEVEL:
II
SEMESTER:
2
PRE-REQUISITES:
Any two of
[GEOG1131/GEOG1132/GEOG1231/GE
OG1232]
and map projections, and methods of
performing simple vector and raster spatial
analysis. In the lab exercises, students will
work with ArcMap to visualize geographic
data, create maps, query a GIS database,
perform spatial analysis using common
analysis tools, and solve geographic
problems using a systematic approach. The
course introduces the core functionality of
GIS software packages such as ArcMap,
ArcCatalog and ArcToolbox.
or Any two of
[GEOL1101/GEOL1102/GEOL1103/GE
OL1104]
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this course,
students should be able to:
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION
TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
COURSE CODE:
GGEO2232
or HOD permission
RATIONALE
This course is intended to provide a
foundation for understanding GIS, including
an appreciation of the wide range of
problems and topics that can be addressed
using GIS, and how GIS can be used to
solve
research
problems.
Because
proficiency in GIS is a fundamental skill for
the modern geography graduate and offers a
wide range of potential employment
opportunities, introducing a GIS course at
Level II rather than Level III enables
advanced and more subject-specific GIS
applications to be introduced into the
curricula in Level III courses. The course
will also provide the necessary skills for
students who wish to use GIS in their
undergraduate research project at Level III.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course introduces students to the theory
and general principles of GIS, and to
practical skills and hands-on experience in
its use. It teaches the fundamental concepts
and basic functions of a GIS, the properties
of GIS maps, and the structure of a GIS
database. It introduces coordinate systems

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Discuss the theory of Geographic
Information Science in relation to
Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
Conduct spatial data analyses using GIS
tools to create a GIS.
Produce cartographic outputs from a
GIS for presentation and dissemination.
Apply GIS software based on both
vector and raster models.
Identify, understand and solve
geographical research problems using
GIS.
Use and apply transformations,
reprojections, georeferencing and
digitization.
Create and edit spatial data.
Apply tasks of data acquisition and
input, data storage and management,
data manipulation and analysis, data
presentation and output in a GIS
Manipulate attribute tables and execute
query operations.
Apply the steps required to produce
standard cartographic outputs.
Use basic geoprocessing tasks – e.g.,
buffering and clipping.
Apply basic vector and raster spatial
analysis.
Use Global Positioning Systems (GPS)
and integrate GPS-collected data into
the GIS.

Use key software and hardware
components of ArcGIS desktop tools
such as the graphic use interface,
database management systems, tools
package, computers, input devices,
output devices.
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METHODS OF ASSESSMENT


COURSE CONTENT

a problem-based learning approach (PBL)
(39 contact hours).
Introduction to GIS: history and
applications.
Components of a GIS.
The nature of geographic data.
Data models.
Map projections and coordinate systems.
Cartography and map production.
Geographic databases.
Data sources and metadata.
Spatial data analysis: simple vector and
raster techniques.
Introduction to ArcGIS.
Symbology and classification.
Cartography.
Georeferencing.
Data sources and acquisition.
Queries, selecting by location, joins and
relates.
Building a geodatabase, creating and
editing features.
Preparing data for analysis and spatial
analysis.
Vector spatial analysis.
Introduction to raster spatial analysis.
Introduction to GPS.
PRESCRIBED TEXTS



Lectures
Practicals (12 x
3 hours)
Total
Credit Hours
21
36
21
18
57
39
The course will be delivered by means of 22
interactive, multimedia presentations
introducing Geographical Information
Systems (GIS), and 36 hours of laboratory
investigations based on the core material and
Bolstad, P. (2007), GIS Fundamentals,
A First Text on Geographic Information
Systems. Eider Press, White Bear Lake,
Minnesota, 3rd ed.
Chang, K.T. (2010), Introduction to
Geographic Information Systems.
McGraw-Ho: Toronto, 5th ed.
Mitchell, A. (1999), The ESRI Guide to
GIS Analysis, Vol. 1: Geographic
Patterns and Relationships. ESRI Press,
Redlands, California.
RECOMMENDED READINGS


METHODS OF DELIVERY
Contact
Hours
One 2-hour written examination:
50%
Coursework:
50%
o (6 Lab assignments, 5% each =
30%)
o (In-course test, 1-hour, = 20%)


De Smith, M.J., M.F. Goodchild & P.A.
Longley (2011), Geospatial Analysis: A
Comprehensive Guide to Principles,
Techniques and Software Tools. A free
web-based GIS resource, available
online at
http://www.spatialanalysisonline.com/.
The Winchelsea Press.
Janelle, D.G. & M.F. Goodchild (2011),
‘Concepts, principles, tools, and
challenges in spatially integrated social
science,’ in T.L. Nyerges, H. Couclelis
& R. McMaster (eds.), The Sage
Handbook of GIS and Society, pp. 2745. Sage, Thousand Oaks, California.
Longley, P.A., M.F. Goodchild, D.J.
McGuire & D.W. Rhind (2011),
Geographical Information Systems and
Science. Wiley, Hoboken, N.J., 3rd ed.
Goodchild, M.F. (2009), ‘Geographic
information systems and science: today
and tomorrow,’ Annals of GIS, 15(1),
pp. 3-9.



Gregory, I.N. (2003), A Place in
History: A Guide to using GIS in
Historical Research. Oxbow, Oxford.
2nd ed. Available online at
http://www.ccsr.ac.uk/methods/publicati
ons/ig-gis.pdf.
.Doorn, P. (2005), ‘A spatial turn in
history,’ GIM International, 19(4). See
http://www.gminternational.com/issue/articles/id453A_Spatial_Turn_in_History.html.
Gregory, I.N. (2008), ‘”A map is just a
bad graph”: why spatial statistics are
important in historical GIS,’ in A.K.
Knowles (ed.), Placing History: How
Maps, Spatial Data, and GIS are
Changing Historical Scholarship, pp.
151-178. ESRI Press, Redlands,
California.
DIGITAL BOOKS

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
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
GIS_Dictionary_ESRI.pdf
Using_ArcMap.pdf
Using_ArcCatalog.pdf
Getting_Started_with_ArcGIS.pdf
Editing_in_ArcMap.pdf
Geoprocessing_in_ArcGIS,pdf
USEFUL WEBSITES


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
http://www.esri.com/
http://gisind.com/gis.html
http://gislounge.com/free-gis-datasets/
http://linfiniti.com/dia/
http://www.paulbostad,net/3rdedition/sa
mplechaps/chanpter1_sample.pdf
http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/maps/gis/
tutorials.cfm
http://gislounge.com/basics-foundationsto-gis/
http://www.rrcap.unep.org/semis/projeto
utput/guide_output/Chapter%203.pdf
http://www.slideshare.net/deirdre/basicgis-theory-on-map-projections
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