2012 - Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans

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Appendix 5: Full Rreport from the Indian Training Programme
FINAL REPORT FOR THE TRAINING PROGRAMME AT HYDERABAD, INDIA
The Application of Ocean Colour Remote Sensing in
Primary Productivity and Ecosystem Modelling
Under the Auspices of:
Nippon Foundation – Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans (NF – POGO)
As a Component of:
The NF – POGO Centre of Excellence in Observational Oceanography (CofEOO)
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Bermuda
In Association with:
Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS)
National Institute of Oceanography (NIO)
Andhra University, Visakhapatnam
Conducted by:
Dr. T Srinivasa Kumar
Seconded by: Dr. Aneesh Lotliker
INCOIS
and guest instructors:
Dr. Trevor Platt, PML
Dr. Shubha Sathyendranath, PML
Dr. Bala Krishna Prasad Mathukumalli, University of Maryland
Prof. K. Gopala Reddy, NIO/AU
Dr. V.V.S.S. Sarma, NIO/AU
Prof. Nittala Sarma, NIO/AU
Dates: February 05 – February 26, 2012
Venue: Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS), Hyderabad;
National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) / Andhra University (AU), Visakhapatnam
Table of Contents INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................... 387 SCOPE OF THE TRAINING PROGRAMME ...................................................................................... 389 TRAINEE BACKGROUND PROGRAMME ........................................................................................ 389 TRAINING ACTIVITIES .................................................................................................................. 390 FINAL REMARKS .......................................................................................................................... 391 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ............................................................................................................... 391 APPENDIX 1. LIST OF INSTRUCTORS AND TRAINEES ..................................................................... 392 APPENDIX 2. DAILY CURRICULUM: LECTURES AND PRACTICALS .................................................. 395 APPENDIX 3. FIELD TRIP DETAILED SCHEDULE ............................................................................. 398 APPENDIX 4. LIST OF TRAINEE PROJECTS ..................................................................................... 402 APPENDIX 5. VALEDICTORY FUNCTION (SCHEDULE) .................................................................... 403 INTRODUCTION
The India training programmer was focused on ocean colour/remote sensing of primary
production and ecosystem modeling, and represented synergistic interests of the host
organizations. The course was focussed on the following:
•
•
•
•
Ocean modelling with data assimilation for providing description of past, present and
future state of ocean at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions.
Contribution to weather/monsoon/mlimate forecast by providing forcing for
Atmospheric Models.
Understanding of the variability of ocean and marine environment.
Simulation experiments to optimize the observation system.
INCOIS and NIO/AU have played a dominant role in study of the Indian Ocean over the
past several years. It is not possible to review all accomplishments related to the Indian
Ocean, but those most relevant to the training program include two areas within satellite
oceanography:
•
•
Satellite Coastal and Oceanographic Research (SATCORE). The goal of
SATCORE is to establish long-term time-series in situ observations of key physical
and bio-geo-chemical parameters in Indian coastal waters and the generation of webdisseminated near-real-time satellite data products that are of benefit to science and
society.
ChloroGIN – Chlorophyll Global Integrated Network. The Indian Ocean
component of ChloroGIN (called ChloroGIN-IO), is endorsed by GOOS and
IOGOOS as one its pilot projects. INCOIS is the coordinating and implementation
agency. The aim of the project is to provide ocean colour data products to users at
near real-time (NRT) for research as well as operational activities such as
identification of potential fishing zones (PFZ advisories).
INCOIS and NIO/AU have also played a significant role in the development and
implementation of ecosystem modelling of the Indian Ocean. Specially, activities to date
include:
•
Ocean Modelling. The goal of the ocean modelling program is to enhance the basic
understanding and knowledge base on oceanic and atmospheric processes. This
knowledge and database will be used, for instance, to enhance predictability of ocean
and climate, coastal processes, catastrophic weather events, and to improve
operational prediction by respective national agencies. A few key projects are worth
mentioning:
o Observing and Modelling the Interaction between the Indian Ocean,
Atmosphere, and Coastal Seas.
o Indian Climate and Phytoplankton Variability
o
India, like other developing countries, requires an educated, well-trained cadre of young
scientists to enhance on-going and future research and outreach in ocean sciences. In fact, a
major tenet Lack of trained personnel is considered to be a major obstacle to development of
a global ocean observing system. The following summarizes some of the most important NF
– POGO contributions to capacity building in India.
Dr. Trevor Platt provided a training program hosted by NIO in Kochi from November
2004 to March 2005. The title of the program was “Calculation of Regional-Scale Primary
Production for Indian Waters and Applications to Ecosystem Dynamics”. Training was
offered to 24 students from India, Vietnam, Thailand and Tanzania. The training was built
around the use of remotely sensed data on ocean colour as a tool for the analysis of the
marine ecosystem. The course also covered the bio-optical basis of ocean colour, the retrieval
of pigment biomass, the calculation of primary production and the interactions between
physical and biological processes in the ocean.
Dr. Srinivas Kumar, local organizer for the current Training Programme, attended the
2004 – 2005 training program in Kochi offered by Dr. Platt. Dr. Kumar was employed by
INCOIS at the time and subsequently was granted his PhD from Berhampur University with a
thesis entitles “Study of Coastal Dynamics Using Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS
Applications”. Dr. Kumar continues to be employed by INCOIS, steadily rising through
promotion after promotion.
The seventh annual meeting of POGO (i.e., POGO-7) was hosted by INCOIS in
Hyderabad from 18 – 20 January 2006. Dr. Srinivas Kumar, the organizer of the current
Training Programme, was the local organizer for POGO-7. This meeting provided POGO
members a chance to see the fantastic developments in ocean sciences made in India over the
last few years.
Dr. Annesh Lotliker, the co-organizer for the current Training Programme, was a POGOSCOR Fellow in 2011. Dr. Lotliker visited the Plymouth Marine Laboratory and worked in
the laboratory of Drs. Trevor Platt and Shuba Sathyendranath. His project title was
“Modeling Primary Productivity and Inherent Optical Properties”. Dr. Lotliker returned to
INCOIS after his fellowship. He received his PhD in marine science from Goa University in
2009.
In February 11-13 2010, a SAFARI Training Course was offered at NIO/Kochi on the
topic of “Remote Sensing Applications in Fisheries and Ecosystem Analysis”. Many of the
participants of the current training programme participated in the SAFARI programme (e.g.,
Drs. Trevor Platt and Shubha Sathyendranath; Dr. Annesh Lotliker; and Sweety Halarneker).
Mr. Nimitkumar Dilipbhai Joshi, a current employee of INCOIS working in the
identification of potential fishing zones based on remote sensing data (i.e., PFZ advisories)
was able to attend many of the lectures offered during this training program. Mr Joshi was a
participant in the Year 1 NF – POGO CofEOO. Nimit received his undergraduate training in
at Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University.
Ms. Gayatri Dudeja was a participant in the Year 3 NF – POGO CofEOO. Gayatri worked
for INCOIS in Hyderabad prior to attending the CofEOO; she is currently pursuing her PhD in
oceanography at the University of Southampton.
This report covers the continuation of NF-POGO training in India, with special emphasis
on activities associated with INCOIS, NIO, and AU from 5 – 26 February 2012. The Centre
of Excellence in Observational Oceanography (CofEOO) in Bermuda, through NF - POGO,
was the main sponsor of the training course.
A total of twelve Lecturers and/or Professors participated in the current Training
Programme. The three visiting professors included Drs. Trevor Platt and Shubha
Sathyendranth, both from PML (UK), and Dr. Bala Krishna Prasad Mathukumalli, currently
at the University of Maryland (USA).
Among the 23 selected trainees, there were five foreign trainees, one each from China,
Indonesia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Yemen. The local trainees were from a variety of
laboratories around India, including INCOIS, and NIO.
SCOPE OF THE TRAINING PROGRAMME
Ocean colour remote sensing is one of the newest techniques that can be applied broadly
in global oceanographic studies. Some important applications include forecasting offshore
pelagic fisheries as well as coastal fishery grounds, demarcating coastal erosion, studying the
bio-oceanographic processes in near shore waters, and coastal waters. Over the years, the
field of ecosystem modelling have expanded into the world oceans and, more recently, have
been coupled with remote sensing data to provide synoptic views of coastal and/or near short
and/or offshore ecosystem habitat status; modelling has proven extremely useful both in the
forecast and hindcast modes.
The techniques and protocols involved in remote sensing and ecosystem modelling have
been used effectively in developed countries (e.g., Japan, Korea, USA, UK, Canada), not
only for science and theory, but also for practical applications. These techniques have been
used far less effectively in developing countries, though India is making rapid progress in
becoming a world leader in these areas. One impediment to advancement in these areas is the
shortage of skilled young scientists, capable of conducting these studies; this is true not only
for India, but also for other countries surrounding the Indian Ocean (e.g., China, Indonesia,
Kenya, Tanzania, and Yemen).
In this training course, the goal was to have trainees learn about ocean colour remote
sensing techniques and be exposed to the new ideas and methodologies in ocean colour
science. In addition, trainees were exposed to the basics of ecosystem modelling theory
along with some practical applications. The specific objectives of this training course were
therefore set as follow:
+ To promote Ocean Colour Remote Sensing Science in the Indian Ocean.
+ To enhance the knowledge of oceanic optical properties related to marine environment.
+ To familiarize the trainees with satellite data processing
+ To familiarize trainees with the basics of primary production methodologies
+ To familiarize the trainees with the basics of ecosystem modelling
+ To build the nucleus of a satellite ocean science/ecosystem modeling community in the
Indian Ocean.
TRAINEE BACKGROUND
A total of 63 students applied for the current training program, including 47 from India and
16 from regional countries. The 23 trainees selected all had a very high level of proficiency in
one or more areas covered within the training programme, for instance, many had experience in
remote sensing, others in ecosystem modelling, others had experience in ocean sciences. All
selected trainees were in positions that would be useful to their home country, either
immediately or in the very near future. Because of the high qualifications of the applicants, the
training programme was taught at a very high level, which is very desirable given the large
strides that India and other countries bordering the Indian Ocean have made in the last few years
(i.e., see Section 1).
TRAINING ACTIVITIES
Training consisted of a combination of lectures and practicals. The first seven days was
devoted primarily to lectures on the Basics of Marine Optics and the Basics of Primary
Productivity as determined from remotely sensed satellite data. The corresponding practicals
were on Satellite Sate Processing and Determination and Modelling of Primary Productivity.
The lectures were by Drs. Trevor Platt and Shubha Sathyendranth, with practical sessions led
by Drs. Aneesh Lotliker and Mini Raman.
A list of lecture topics and practical projects is provided as part of Appendix 2. Lectures
on a given topic (e.g., primary productivity; marine optics) started with a very broad and
general introduction, as many of the trainees had little-to-no experience on a given topic
(though they may have had advanced training/study in other subject matter covered during
the Training Programme). The lectures became increasingly more ‘advanced’ as the days
progressed. Many of the trainees with a more advanced level of training in a specific topic
area noted that they appreciated the broad overview, having either never heard all the
‘introductory’ material and/or had never quite put it together the way it was being presented.
In all cases, trainees were encouraged to ask questions as the lectures progressed. This made
the lectures more ‘interactive’. Lecturers also asked trainees questions as the lectures
progressed, again increasing the level of interactivity between trainees and lectures as well as
trainee-to-trainee interactions.
The practicals during the first seven days of the Training Programme were on topics
related specifically to the lecture material. As above, practicals started at a very basic,
rudimentary level, and progressed daily in terms of degree of difficulty. Trainees worked in
pairs, building friendships and potential future working/networking relationships. A list of
practical topics is provided in Appendix 3.
The last four lectures days in Hyderabad/INCOIS covered two topics, numerical
modelling, led by Dr. Swathi, and ecological modelling, led by Dr. Prasad. For both lectures
and practicals, the same general format as described above was followed: material started at a
more general/rudimentary level and progressed to more advanced topics. As above, questions
were posed frequently by the lectures and questions were received from the trainees. The
sessions were highly interactive, with considerable discussion on many different topics. The
students worked in pairs on practicals, again creating friendships that should lead to better
networking capabilities in the future.
Trainees were involved in two other activities during their time at INCOIS/Hyderabad.
First, students were asked to start research/development of their ‘mini-projects’, which would
be reported near the termination of the Training Programme. Trainees worked in pairs on a
project of mutual interest. More details about the mini-projects is provided below.
A second type of activity in Hyderabad included cultural exchange events. The first was a
welcome dinner for all instructors and trainees held at the Aalankrita Resorts. The
landscaping, scenery, and architecture blended to provide a very nice view of ethnic India.
The food was fantastic. The outdoor seating allowed trainees and instructors a chance to get
to know each other in a relaxed setting; everyone had a good time.The second cultural
exchange event started with breakfast, then a trip to the Salar Jung Museum. The family of
Salar Jungs assumed great importance during the 19th and 20th century; five of its family
members served as Prime Ministers to the Nizams, who were the erstwhile rulers of
Hyderabad. The next trip was to the old city of Hyderabad, and its famous Charminar
Monument, built in 1591. Besides the historical significance of the monument, this was a
great area for shopping and wonderful Indian food. The day ended with a trip to The City
Fort of Golkonda. Golkonda, or Golla konda (shepherd's hill), was a city of south-central
India and capital of the ancient Kingdom of Golkonda (c. 1364–1512). Golkonda was
originally built by the Kakatiya dynasty, however the most important builder of Golkonda
was Ibrahim Quli Qutub Shah Wali, the fourth Qutub king of the Qutub Shahi Dynasty. It
was a very informative and fun day for the trainees and the instructors who participated; it
was also a strong day of team building, enriching friendship between trainees, and fostering
long-term network capacity in the out years.
For the second component of the Training Programme, training moved from land-locked
Hyderabad to the coastal city of Visakhapatnam, home of the regional NIO and Andhra
University.
After a tour of the Bay of Bengal Centre, trainees were given lectures about sample
collection and analysis in preparation for the field trip aboard the Srinivasa to a site a few
kilometers offshore to man a station for light measurements using a hyperspectral radiometer
(Satlantic Model Hyper OCRII) and take water samples for later analyses. Trainees spent
most of the next three days analysing data and/or receiving hands-on training in sample
analyses, experimental protocols, and/or subsequent data workup. A complete list of
equipment used and experiments performed is found in following sections. Briefly, trainees
performed a P vs I experiment using 13-C as a tracer, determined light absorbing properties
of the particles in the water using an integrating sphere attachment and spectrophotometer,
measured fluorescence properties of particles using a Turner Design Fluorometer, analysed
pigments using an Agilent HPLC, and determined CDOM levels. Following data analyses,
trainees prepared tables/figures, wrote up their results and gave oral presentations.
A second cultural exchange event took place in Visakhapatnam early one morning before
the training sessions began. Trainees visited Simhachalam Temple, located on top of a
nearby mountain. Simhachalan (Simha = Lion; achalan = Hill) is a Hindu temple dedicated to
the incarnation of Vishnu known as Narasimha (the man-lion). The temple is a mix of
Orissan and Dravidian styles of architecture. All who visited held the temple and the deities
inside in respect and admiration.
The final days of the Training Programme involved trainee mini-projects.
Graduation. A closing dinner was hosted by the Organizing Committee on the final day of
the Training Programme. Dinner was held at the Nivedika, a component of Hotel Daspalla.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
We would like to thank the Nippon Foundation for financial support, POGO for its
important role in capacity building exercises in India (and other developing countries), and
BIOS for its role in enabling this Training Programme. We would like to give special
gratitude to Dr. Srinvas Kumar for organizing this Training Programme and Dr. Aneesh
Lotliker for handling the high-level logistics. The Training Programme would not have been
possible without the dedication and proficiency of the many visiting professors and
instructors: Drs. Trevor Platt, Shubha Sathyendranath, Srinivas Kumar. We would like to
thank the staffs at INCOIS, NIO, and AU for their attention to the many logistical details
required in executing a Training Programme with so many participants and individuals with
their varied needs. The crew of the Srinivasa made our time at sea both relaxed and
worthwhile. APPENDIX 1. List of Instructors (#1 – 12) and Trainees (#13 – 35).
Sl
1
2
3
4
5
Name, Designation & Affiliation
Dr. Francis Gerald Plumley
Director, NF-POGO Centre of Excellence
in Observational Oceanography
Email: [email protected]
Fax: 441‐297‐8143
Dr. T. Srinivasa Kumar
Scientist-E
Email: [email protected]
Ph: +91-40-23895006
Fax: +91-40-23895001
Prof Trevor Platt
Professorial Fellow, Plymouth Marine
Laboratory &
Executive Director, Partnership for the
Observation of the Global Oceans (POGO)
Email: [email protected]
Dr. Shubha Satyendranath
Head of Remote Sensing and Marine
Optics &
Assistant Director, Partnership for the
Observation of the Global Oceans (POGO)
Email: [email protected]
Dr. P. S. Swathi
Sr. Principal Scientist
Email: [email protected]
Ph: +91-80-2505-1926
Dr. Bala Krishna Prasad Mathukumalli
Email: [email protected]]
6
Dr. Mini Raman
Scientist-SG
Email: [email protected]
Ph: 91-79-26914340
Fax:91-79-26915825
7
Dr. Aneesh Lotliker
Scientist-C
Email: [email protected]
Ph: +91-40-23886038
Fax: +91-40-23895001
8
9
Dr. Sisir Kumar Dash
Scientist C
Email: [email protected]
Ph: +91-44-22460992
Fax: +91 44 22460657
Prof. K. Gopala Reddy,
Director, Centre for Studies on Bay of
Bengal,
Email: [email protected]
Ph: (O) +91-891-2844638
Fax: 0891-2525611
Corresponding Address
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences,
17 Biological Lane, St. George's GE01,
BERMUDA
Fax: 441‐297‐8143
Indian National Centre for Ocean Information
Services (INCOIS),
“Ocean Valley”, Pragathi Nagar B.O. Nizampet S.
O.,
Hyderabad – 500090,
Andhra Pradesh
Plymouth Marine Laboratory,
Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth
United Kingdom PL1 3DH
Centre for Mathematical Modelling and Computer
Simulation (CMMACS)
NAL Belur campus,
Bangalore - 560 037
Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center,
University of Maryland
5825 University Research Court, Ste. 4001
College Park, MD 20740, USA
Marine Biology Division (MBD)
Marine Geo and Planetary Sciences Group (MPSG)
Earth, Ocean, Atmosphere, Planetry Sciences and
Applications Area (EPSA)
Space Applications Centre (ISRO)
Jodhpur Tekra, Satellite Road, Ahmedabad,
Gujarat-300015
Indian National Centre for Ocean Information
Services (INCOIS),
“Ocean Valley”, Pragathi Nagar B.O. Nizampet S.
O.,
Hyderabad – 500090,
Andhra Pradesh
ICMAM Project Directorate,
2nd Floor, NIOT Campus,
Velacherry-Tambaram Main Road,
Pallikkaranai,Chennai - 600100, India
Andhra University, Visakhapatnam – 530 003
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Prof. Nittala S. Sarma,
Email: [email protected]
Ph: (O) 0891-2844671
Fax: 0891-2525611
Dr. V.V.S.S. Sarma
Scientist EII
Email: [email protected]
Ph: (O) 0891-2539180
Fax: 0891-2543595
Prof. P Rajendra Prasead
Ex- Principal,
College of Science and Technology,
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Abdulsalam Abdullah Sultan Alkawri
Assistant Professor
[email protected]
Ph: 00967777046603
Fax: 009673235116
Mr. HaiJun YE
Ph.D. Scholars
[email protected]
Ph: 8620-15989104014
Fax: 8620-89023203
Mr. Majambo Jarumani Gamoyo
Assistant researcher
[email protected]
Ph: +254 721969237
Mr. Widhya Nugroho Satrioajie
M. Si.
[email protected]
Ph: +62911 322 677
Fax: +62911 322 700
Mr. Robert Jeremiah Kayanda
Research Officer
[email protected]
Ph: +255784338017
Fax: +255222650043
18
Mr. Nagaraja Kumar Masuluri
Scientist-C
[email protected]
(+91-40-23895013)
19
Mr. Sourav Maity
Project Scientist-B
[email protected]
(+91-40-23886031)
20
Mr. Srikanth Ayyala Somayajula
Project Scientist- B
[email protected]
(+91-40-23886038)
21
Mr. Kumara Swami Munnoor
JRF
[email protected]
Dept. of Physical & Nuclear Chemistry & Chemical
Oceanography,
School of Chemistry,
Andhra University, Visakhapatnam – 530 003
National Institute of Oceanography, Regional
centre,
176, Lawsons Bay Colony
Visakhapatnam - 530 017, Andhra Pradesh
Andhra University,
Visakhapatnam - 530 003,
Andhra Pradesh, INDIA.
Department of Marine Biology,
Faculty of Marine Sciences & Environment,
Hodeidah University,
Republic of Yemen
Research Center for Remote Sensing and Marine
Ecology & Environment,
State Key Laboratory of Tropical Oceanography,
South China Sea Institute of Oceanology,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
164 West XinGang Road, Guangzhou, China,
510301
Coastal Oceans Research Development in the
Indian Ocean (CORDIO),
P.O. Box 1013580101, Mombasa, Kenya
JL. Y. Syaranamual, Guru-Guru Poka, AmbonMoluccas,
INDONESIA 97233
Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute,
P.O. Box 9750,
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Indian National Centre for Ocean Information
Services (INCOIS),
“Ocean Valley”,
Pragathi Nagar B.O. Nizampet S. O.,
Hyderabad – 500090,
Andhra Pradesh
Indian National Centre for Ocean Information
Services (INCOIS),
“Ocean Valley”,
Pragathi Nagar B.O. Nizampet S. O.,
Hyderabad – 500090,
Andhra Pradesh
Indian National Centre for Ocean Information
Services (INCOIS),
“Ocean Valley”,
Pragathi Nagar B.O. Nizampet S. O.,
Hyderabad – 500090,
Andhra Pradesh
Geoinformatics,
Dept of Marine Geology,
Mangalore University,
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
(+91-9964026849)
Ms. Madhubala Talaulikar
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-9420766625)
Mr. Shaju S S
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-9895909457)
Ms. Sweety Halarnekar
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-8806111532)
Mr. Sanjiba Kumar Baliarsingh
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-9776083915)
Mr. Srinivasa Rao Balivada
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-9390305796)
Mr. Sudarsanarao Pandi
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-9493907090)
Ms. Suchismita Srichandan
Project Assistant
[email protected]
(+91-9938464194)
Dr. B. R. Smitha
Project Scientist
[email protected]
(+91-484-2427738)
Ms. Bandana Das
Ph.D. Scholar
[email protected]
(+91-9597539475)
Ms. Vidya Shree Bharti
Scientist
[email protected]
(+91-22-26320451)
Mr. Manoj Kumar Mishra
Sci-SC
[email protected]
(+91-8866808163)
Ms. Preethi Latha Thalathoti
JRF
[email protected]
(+91-40-23884576)
Mr. Tamoghna Acharyya
SRF
[email protected]
(+91-9492532866)
Mr. Aziz Rahman Shaik
CSIR Fellow
[email protected]
(+91-8096648825)
Mangalore – 574199
Marine Instrumentation Division,
National Institute of Oceanography (NIO),
Dona-Paula, Goa - 403004
Fishing Technology Division,
Central Institute of Fisheries Technology
Matsyapuri P.O. Cochin 682029
House No. 627/1,
Murmusem Wado,
Tuyem, Pernem - Goa, 403512
P.G Dept. of Marine Sciences
Berhampur University, Bhanjabihar
Odisha-760007
D. No: 58-11-74/1,
RamalayamStreet, Karasa,
Visakhapatnam – 530009, Andhra Pradesh
Department of PNCO, School of chemistry
Andhra University,
Visakhapatnam – 530003, Andhra Pradesh
Integrated Coastal Zone Management Project
Chilika Development Authority, Govt. of Odisha
BJB Nagar, C-11, Bhubaneswar, Odisha-751014
Centre for Marine Living Resources and Ecology
(CMLRE),
th
6 Floor, C-Block, Kendriya Bhavan, CSEZ (PO),
Kochi – 37, Kerala
CAS in Marine Biology,
Faculty of Marine Sciences,
Annamalai University, Parangipettai-608502
Tamil Nadu
Aquatic Environment and Health Management
Division,
Central Institute of Fisheries Education (CIFE),
Panch Marg, Off Yari Road,Mumbai-61
MPSG/EPSA,
Space Application Centre (SAC),
Jodhpur Tekra, Ambawadi Vistar P.O.
Ahmedabad. 380015 Gujarat
C/o R. Subba Rao, I.A.S.,
Plot No. 167, Sri Srinivasapuram Colony,
Vasanthalipuram, Hyderabad – 500070
Andhra Pradesh
National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Regional
Centre (RC),
8-44-1/5, Old CBI Road, Chinawaltair,
Visakhapatnam – 530003
National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Regional
Centre (RC),
8-44-1/5, Old CBI Road, Chinawaltair,
Visakhapatnam – 530003
APPENDIX 2: Daily Curriculum: Lectures and Practicals
09:30
–
10:30
05-Feb
06-Feb
07-Feb
08-Feb
09-Feb
10-Feb
11-Feb
12-Feb
13-Feb
14-Feb
15-Feb
16-Feb
17-Feb
18-Feb
19-Feb
20-Feb
21-Feb
22-Feb
23-Feb
24-Feb
25-Feb
26-Feb
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
3
Fri
Sat
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
10:30
–
11:00
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:30
15:30
16:00
–
–
–
–
–
–
12:00
13:00
14:30
15:30
16:00
17:00
Arrive Hyderabad
Registration
Coffee LP-01 LP-02 Lunch PS-01 Coffee PS-02
LP-03
Coffee LB-01 LB-02 Lunch PS-03 Coffee PS-04
LP-04
Coffee LB-03 LB-04 Lunch PS-05 Coffee PS-06
LB-05
Coffee LP-05 LP-06 Lunch PS-07 Coffee PS-08
LP-07
Coffee LB-06 LB-07 Lunch PP-01 Coffee PP-02
LP-08
Coffee LB-08 LB-09 Lunch PP-03 Coffee PP-04
HOLIDAY
LP-09
Coffee LP-10 LB-10 Lunch PP-05 Coffee PP-06
LE-01
Coffee LE-02 LE-03 Lunch PE-01 Coffee PE-02
LE-04
Coffee LE-05 LE-06 Lunch PE-03 Coffee PE-04
LE-07
Coffee LE-08 LE-09 Lunch PE-05 Coffee PE-06
LE-10
Coffee LE-11 LE-12 Lunch PE-07 Coffee PE-08
BREAK
Lunch PD-01 Coffee PD-02
Field Trip (FT)
PA-01
Lunch
PA-02
PA-03
Lunch
PA-04
PA-05
Lunch
PA-06
BREAK
Coffee
PI-01
PI-02
Lunch
Mini Project
Mini Project
Lunch
Mini Project
Mini Project
Lunch
Mini Project
Departure from Visakhapatnam
LB
LP
LE
LI
::::-
Lectures focusing on Basics of marine optics, ocean colour remote sensing and application
Lectures focusing on Primary Productivity
Lectures focusing on Ecosystem Modelling
Lectures focusing on Instrumentation
PS
PP
PE
PD
PA
PI
::::::-
Practical on Satellite data processing
Practical on Primary productivity modelling
Practical on Ecosystem Modelling
Practical on Demonstration of instruments their calibration, standardization ect.
Practical on Analysis of water samples
Practical on In situ data processing
3
Trainees leave to Visakhapatnam for the field trip around 20:00 hrs by bus.
Sr.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Code
LB-01
LB-02
LB-03
LB-04
LB-05
LB-06
LB-07
LB-08
LB-09
LB-10
Lecture Topics
Introduction to Ocean Colour
Introduction to Marine Optics
Optical Properties of the Sea
Phytoplankton Absorption Coefficient
Modelling Ocean Colour and Ocean-Colour Algorithms
Ocean Colour Model Comparisons
Fluorescence in the sea
Phytoplankton Community Structure from Space
Biological-Physical Interactions in the Ocean
Ocean Colour Revision
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
LP-01
LP-02
LP-03
LP-04
LP-05
LP-06
LP-07
LP-08
LP-09
LP-10
Introduction to marine primary production
P-I experiments and model parameters
Spectral characterization of PP model
Vertical structure in PP model
Daily integrals of PP
Ecological Provinces in the Sea
Operational estimation of primary production
Ecological Indicators by remote sensing
Fisheries applications of remote sensing
Primary Production Revision
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
LE-01
LE-02
LE-03
LE-04
LE-05
LE-06
LE-07
LE-08
LE-09
LE-10
LE-11
LE-12
Introduction to Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Methods
Numerical Methods-II
Marine Ecosystem Modelling-I
Marine Ecosystem Modelling: The FDM Model
FDM Model - II
Arabian Sea Test Bed - Description
Introduction to Ecological Modelling
CBFS
Regional Earth System Modelling
Phytoplankton Dynamics
Ocean carbon cycle
Ocean acidification
Instructor
Shubha
Satyendranath
Trevor Platt
P. S. Swathi
Bala Krishna
Prasad
Sr
Code
Tutorial
The field trip will consist of one day cruise where hyperspectral
radiometer will be operated and water sample will be collected for
analysis of chlorophyll, CDOM, TSM, phytoplankton absorption and PI
parameters
1
FT
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
PS-01
PS-02
PS-03
PS-04
PS-05
PS-06
PS-07
PS-08
10
11
12
13
14
15
PP-01
PP-02
PP-03
PP-04
PP-05
PP-06
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
PE-01
PE-02
PE-03
PE-04
PE-05
PE-06
PE-07
PE-08
25
26
PD-01
PD-02
Demonstration of radiometer, its data logging software, calibration of
fluorometer and standardization of spectrophotometer
27
28
39
31
32
PA-01
PA-02
PA-03
PA-04
PA-05
Analysis of water sample for Chlorophyll (HPLC & Fluorometer),
CDOM (Spectrophotometer & spectrofluorometer), TSM (Weighing
Balance), phytoplankton absorption (integrating sphere) and PI
13
parameters ( C)
33
PA-06
34
35
PI-01
PI-02
Instructor
Aneesh
Lotliker
Introduction to SeaDAS, processing capability and available tools
Processing, Projection and Binning of satellite ocean colour data
using GUI of SeaDAS
bash and idl based scripting for automatic processing of ocean colour
satellite data using SeaDAS
Aneesh
Lotliker
OCM – II data processing using SeaDAS
Demonstration of software for generation of PI parameters, in situ
production and maps of Primary productivity using satellite data
Mini Raman
Num. solution of ODE, PDE using Fortran, Ferret
P S Swathi
Arabian Sea Test Bed - Practicals
Hands on exercise with ROMS-Indian Ocean Model
Processing data acquired from Hyperspectral radiometer
Computation of phytoplankton and CDOM absorption coefficient
Bala Krishna
Prasad
Aneesh
Lotliker
Aneesh
Lotliker
VVVS Sarma
N S Sarma
Aneesh
Lotliker
APPENDIX 3: Field Trip Detailed Schedule
Date
18-022012
Saturday
Time
13.45 Hrs
14.00 to 14.30Hrs
14.30 to 15.30 Hrs
15.30 to 16.00 Hrs
16.00 to 17.00 Hrs
17.00 Hrs
07.30 Hrs
08.00 to11.00 Hrs
10.30 Hrs
11.00 Hrs
19.02.2012
Sunday
11.00 to 14.00 Hrs
14.00 Hrs
17.00 Hrs
09.00 Hrs
09.30 to 10.30 Hrs
20.02.2012
Monday
10.30 to 11.00 Hrs
11.00 to 12.00 Hrs
12:00 to 13:00 Hrs
13.00 Hrs
13.00 to 14.00Hrs
14.00 Hrs
14.30 to 15.30 Hrs
15.30 to 16.00 Hrs
16.00 to 18.00 Hrs
18.00 Hrs
09.00 Hrs
09.30 to 10.30 Hrs
21.02.2012
Tuesday
10.30 to 11.00 Hrs
11.00 to 12.30 Hrs
12.30 Hrs
13.00 to 14.00Hrs
14.00 Hrs
14.30 to 15.30 Hrs
15.30 to 16.00 Hrs
16.00 to 17.30 Hrs
17.30 Hrs
Particulars
Departure from Hotel to Andhra University
Interactive session – CSBOB
PD-01: Radiometer demonstration for Batch I
PD-02: Fluorometer demonstration for Batch II
Tea break
PD-01: Radiometer demonstration for Batch II
PD-02: Fluorometer demonstration for Batch I
Return to Hotel
Batch-I: Departure from Hotel to Fishing harbour
Batch-I: Field cruise on-board Srinivasa
Batch-II: Departure from Hotel to Fishing harbour
Batch-I: Departure from Fishing harbour to Lab-02 for CDOM
analysis
(Packed lunch will be provided)
Batch-II: Field cruise on-board Srinivasa
Batch-I: Return to Hotel from Lab-02
Batch-II: Departure from fishing harbour to Lab-02
(Packed lunch will be provided)
Batch-II: Return to Hotel from Lab-02
Departure from Hotel to CSBOB/NIO-RC
Batch-I moves to Lab-01 for Chl analysis (Fluor & Spectro)
Batch-II moves to Lab-03 for Chl analysis (HPLC)
Coffee break (CSBOB & NIO-RC)
Cont ….
Batch-II moves to Lab-01 for Chl analysis (Fluor & Spectro)
Batch-I moves to Lab-03 for Chl analysis (HPLC)
Departure to Hotel from CSBOB/NIO-RC for Lunch
Lunch at Hotel Daspalla - Dimple
Departure from Hotel to CSBOB/NIO-RC
Cont ….
Tea break (CSBOB & NIO-RC)
Batch-II moves to Lab-03 and joins Batch-I for PI experiment
Departure for NIO-RC to Hotel
Departure from Hotel to CSBOB/NIO-RC
Batch-I will move to Lab-01 for IOP Analysis
Batch-II will move to Lab-03 for PI experiment
Coffee break (CSBOB & NIO-RC)
Cont ….
Departure to Hotel from CSBOB/NIO-RC for Lunch
Lunch at Hotel Daspalla - Dimple
Departure from Hotel to CSBOB/NIO-RC
Batch-I moves to Lab-03 for PI experiment
Batch-II moves to Lab-01 for IOP analysis
Tea break (CSBOB & NIO-RC)
Cont ….
Return to Hotel from CSBOB/NIO-RC
398
22-­‐02-­‐
2012 Wednesday 23-­‐02-­‐
2012 Thursday 24-­‐02-­‐
2012 Friday 25-­‐02-­‐
2012 Saturday 09.00 Hrs Departure from Hotel to CSBOB/NIO-­‐RC 09.30 to 10.30 Hrs Batch-­‐I: Moves to Lab-­‐03 for PI experiment (NIO-­‐RC) Batch-­‐II: Moves to Lab-­‐01 for IOP & TSM analysis (CSBOB) 10.30 to 11.00 Hrs Coffee break (CSBOB & NIO-­‐RC) 11.00 to 13.00 Hrs Batch-­‐I: Continues at NIO-­‐RC Batch-­‐II: Continues at CSBOB 13.00 Hrs Departure to Hotel from CSBOB/NIO-­‐RC for Lunch 13.00 to 14.00Hrs Lunch at Hotel Daspalla-­‐ Dimple 14.00 Hrs Departure from Hotel to CSBOB/NIO-­‐RC 14.30 to 15.30 Hrs Batch-­‐I: Continues at NIO-­‐RC Batch-­‐II: Continues at CSBOB 15.30 to 16.00 Hrs Tea break (CSBOB & NIO-­‐RC) 16.00 to 17.30 Hrs Batch-­‐I: Continues at NIO-­‐RC Batch-­‐II: Continues at CSBOB 17.30 Hrs Return to Hotel from CSBO /NIO-­‐RC 09.00 Hrs Departure from Hotel to Central Computing Lab -­‐ AUCST 09.30 to 10.30 Hrs All participants moves to Central Computing Lab -­‐ AUCST for demonstration of radiometer data processing 10.30 to 11.00 Hrs Coffee break (CSBOB) 11.00 to 11.15 Hrs All Participants moves to Lab-­‐03 (NIO-­‐RC) 11.15 to 13.00 Hrs Demonstration of Mass spectroscopy analysis for all participants 13.00 Hrs Departure to Hotel from NIO-­‐RC 13.00 to 14.00Hrs Lunch at Hotel Daspalla-­‐ Dimple 14.00 Hrs Departure from Hotel to Central Computing Lab – AUCST 14.30 to 15.30 Hrs Processing primary production data & generation of PI curve at Central Computing Lab – AUCST 15.30 to 16.00 Hrs Tea break 16.00 to 17.00 Hrs Mini Project 17.00 Hrs Return to Hotel from Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST 09.00 Hrs 09.30 to 10.30 Hrs 10.30 to 11.00 Hrs 11.00 to 13.00 Hrs 13.00 Hrs 13.00 to 14.00Hrs 14.00 Hrs 14.30 to 15.30 Hrs 15.30 to 16.00 Hrs 16.00 to 17.00 Hrs 17.00 Hrs 19.00 to 21.00 Hrs 09.00 Hrs 09.30 to 10.30 Hrs 10.30 to 11.00 Hrs 11.00 to 13.30 Hrs 13.00 Hrs 13.00 to 14.00Hrs 14.00 Hrs Departure from Hotel to Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST Mini Project -­‐ Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST Coffee break Cont ….. Departure to Hotel from Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST for lunch Lunch at Hotel Daspalla-­‐ Dimple Departure from Hotel to Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST Mini Project -­‐ Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST Tea break Cont …. Return to Hotel from Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST DINNER-­‐ Hotel Daspalla Departure from Hotel to Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST Mini Project -­‐ Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST Coffee break Cont …. Departure to Hotel from Central Computing Lab-­‐AUCST for lunch Lunch at Hotel Daspalla -­‐ Dimple Departure from Hotel to CSBOB 399
26-­‐02-­‐
2012 14.30 to 15.30 Hrs 15.30 to 16.00 Hrs 16.00 to 17.00 Hrs 17.00 Hrs Mini project presentation at CSBOB High Tea Valedictory Function Return to Hotel from CSBOB Departure from Visakhapatnam 400
Lab01 Lab02 CSBoB Marine Chemistry (Prof. K. Gopala Reddy) (Prof. Nittala Sarma) • Chlorophyll concentration • CDOM absorption •
using Turner Fluormeter • CDOM Fluoroscence •
• aph & adg • TSM Sl. Batch I Batch II 1 Mr. Kumara Swami Mr. Srikanth 2 Ms. Sweety Ms. Madhubala 3 Mr. Shaju Mr. Srinivasa Rao 4 Ms. Suchismita Ms. Bandana Das 5 Mr. Sudarsanarao Pandi Mr. Baliarsingh 6 Mr. Aziz Rahman Shaik Mr. Tamoghna Acharyya 7 Ms. Vidya Shree Mr. Sourav Maity 8 Mr. HaiJun YE Mr. Abdulsalam Abdullah 9 Mr. Widhya Satrioajie Mr. Majambo Gamoyo 10 Mr. Robert Kayanda Mr. Devender Raju 11 Ms. Preethi Latha Ms. B. R. Smitha 12 Mr. Nagaraja Kumar Mr. Manoj Kumar Mishra Lab03 NIO-­‐RC (Dr. V.V.S.S. Sarma) P-­‐I parameters Chlorophyll concentration using HPLC Remarks Radiometer Water sample analysis 401
APPENDIX 4: Trainee Mini Projects (Trainee names, times of oral presentations,
titles).
Sl No.
1
Time
10 30 -10 42
2
10 45 –10 57
Trainee Names
Smitha B R,
Vidya Shree Bharti
Shaju, Kumara Swami
3
11 00 –11 12
Sudarshan and Srinivas
4
1115 –11 27
Bandana
5
6
11 30 –11 42
11 45 –11 57
Sanjib and Suchismitha
Sreekanth
7
12 15 –12 27
8
12 30 –12 42
9
12 45 –12 57
10
13 00 –13 12
11
13 15 –13 27
12
13 30 – 13 42
Title
Decadal changes in the bio-optical fields of
the coastal waters off Mumbai, India
In situ and satellite derived absorbance and
reflectance in a bloom and non bloom
condition of west coast of India
Comparison of Chl algorithms and in situ
measurements in BoB coastal water.
Chlorophyll distribution and their influence in
fishery production in Tamil Nadu coast
Phytoplankton dynamics and seasonality in
Vishakpatnam coastal water using
Hyperspectral data analysis.
Robert
Application of remote sensing on the
identification of PFZ
Introduction to NANO by Dr. Shubha Sathyendranath
Widhya and Haijun
Typhoon enhanced phytoplankton
concentration detected by satellite data in the
southern BoB
Madhu and Sweety
Winter-spring characteristics of phytoplankton
in the northeastern Arabian sea during 20082010.
Nagaraj and Sourav
Utilization of daily primary productivity in
Indian fishery advisory services: feasibility
analysis-a preliminary case study
Preethi and Manoj
A study on the estimation of primary
productivity in the coastal water of BoB
Mojambo and Abdul
Remote sensing of phytoplankton distribution
in the Red sea and gulf of Aden
Thamogna and Aziz
Time series analysis of the impact of fresh
water discharge on the seasonal and inter
annual variation of chl in Godavari river plume
402
APPENDIX 5: Valedictory Function (Schedule)
Regional Training Programme on
The Application of Ocean Colour Remote Sensing
in Primary Productivity and Ecosystem Modelling
th
th
6 to 25 February 2012
VALEDICTORY FUNCTION
th
Date: 25 February, 2012 Time: 14.00 – 15.00 Hrs,
Venue: Centre for Study of the Bay of Bengal (CSBOB)
Prayer:
Ms. V. Naga Kalyani
Ms. S. Vijaya Lakshmi
Ms. G. Swathi
Welcome & Presidential Address by:
Prof. K. Gopala Reddy,
Director, CSBOB
Response by Participants:
1. Mr. Tamoghna Acharya
2. Mr. HaiJun YE
3. Dr. B.R. Smitha
4. Ms. Madhubala Talaulikar
Remarks by course coordinators:
Dr. Gerald Plumley, Director Education,
NF-POGO Centre for Excellence at BIOS
Dr. T. Srinivasa Kumar
Head, ASG, INCOIS
Remarks by resource persons:
Prof. Trevor Platt, FRS, Executive Director, POGO
Dr.Shubha Satyendranath, Asst. Director POGO
Distribution of Certificates:
Valedictory address by:
Prof. P. Rajendra Prasad, Chief Guest
Sir Arthur Cotton Geospatial Chair Professor
Vote of thanks by:
Dr. Aneesh Lotliker, INCOIS
High Tea:
15.00 Hrs - CSBOB
403

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