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ST. JAMES PARISH
2013-14 COURSE CATALOG
Table of Contents
Scheduling Using the Individual Graduation Plan ...................................................................... 2
Louisiana Public University Minimum Admission Criteria ........................................................ 3
Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................................. 4
Career Diploma ……………………………………………………………………………………………5
TOPS Curriculum Requirements .................................................................................................. 6
Graduates of 2014 and after ............................................................................................. 6
TOPS Tech ......................................................................................................................... 7
Diploma Endorsements ………………………….………………………………………………………8
Areas of Concentration .................................................................................................................. 9
Graduation Exit Exam .................................................................................................................. 12
End-of-Course Exams .................................................................................................................. 12
Honor Graduates .......................................................................................................................... 12
Elective Courses .......................................................................................................................... 13
Course Descriptions 9th—12th grades ...................................................................................... 14
Appendix A: Forms ...................................................................................................................... 27
IGP College and Career Diploma Form ......................................................................... 28
IGP Career Diploma Form............................................................................................... 31
Scheduling Using the Individual Graduation Plan (IGP)
In planning your academic courses in high school, it is important to look at your plans after high school. Technical schools offer
training programs that vary according to the course of study from six months to two years. Students graduate from technical
schools with certificates in their major course of study.
Colleges and universities offer Associate Degrees (two year programs) and Bachelor Degrees (four year programs) to high
school graduates. The majority of the degree programs in college are Bachelor’s programs, although the number of Associate
Degrees is increasing. Students need to consult the guidance department for information on the degree programs offered by
individual universities.
Examples of Bachelor’s degrees offered in Colleges or Universities include:
Business………………..Marketing, Management, Accounting
Arts & Science…………Language, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Communications/Journalism
Education………………Elementary, Secondary (by subject)
Science…………………Biology, Chemistry, Zoology, Physics
Engineering…………….Chemical, Microbiology, Biochemical, Computer, Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, Petroleum
Examples of Associate’s Degrees at Colleges and Community Colleges include:
Aeronautical Science
General Stenography
Medical Record Technology
Computer Information Systems
Mechanical Engineering
Nursing
Criminal Justice
Technology
Office Management
Design Drafter Technology
Office Technology
Retail Management
Electronics Engineering Technology
Real Estate
Secretarial
Floricultural Technology
Respiratory Care
Substance Abuse
Food Service Supervision
Vocational Technical Certificates are offered as follows:
South Central Louisiana Technical College (Reserve)
Air Conditioning/Refrigeration
Business Office Administration
Drafting & Design Technology
Industrial Instrumentation
Industrial Maintenance Tech
Journeyman Indust. Electrician
Journeyman Indust. Pipetrades
Medical Assistant
Patient Care Tech
Practical Nursing
Process Technology
Welding
Every student will create an Individual Graduation Plan in Grade 8 with yearly review and
updates to reflect courses to prepare for the chosen postsecondary pathway. IGP forms may
be accessed in Appendix A.
Please visit http://www.louisianaconnect.org to review and update your IGP.
Return to top
Page 2 of 34
Louisiana Public University Minimum Admissions Criteria
(Published June 18, 2010)
Note: The requirements listed on this page are the Board of Regents’ minimum standards for regular admission to a
four-year (Flagship; Statewide; or Regional) university approved on April 22, 2010. Some institutions have adopted or may
choose to adopt additional requirements. Please check with the specific institution(s) for additional requirements.
Admission to 4-Year Universities
Effective: Fall 2012
(Graduates of 2012 and after must follow this criteria)
High School
Regents’ Core: 19 units (from Core 4 Curriculum)
Curriculum
Minimum
HS GPA
NO
Developmental
Courses
Needed
AND
Minimum overall HS GPA: 2.0
Flagship, Statewide, & Regional
AND
Minimum ACT subscore: English 18; Math 19
Flagship &Statewide - effective class of 2012
Regional - effective class of 2014
Students meeting minimum admission standards except for the need
for developmental courses may enroll in the summer and upon
successful completion of the developmental courses be admitted for
the fall.
AND ONE of the FOLLOWING
HS Core GPA
Or
ACT
GPA on the CORE– 3.0 – Flagship
GPA on the CORE– 2.5 – Statewide
GPA on the CORE– 2.0 – Regional
OR
ACT Composite – 25 – Flagship
ACT Composite – 23 – Statewide
ACT Composite – 20 – Regional
Rank in Class no longer a consideration
% Admission
Exceptions
Allowed
Flagship – 4%
Statewide – 6%
Regional – 8% calculated from the previous year’s
entering freshman class
Flagship: Louisiana State University A&M
Statewide: Louisiana Tech
University of Louisiana – Lafayette
University of New Orleans
Regional: Grambling State University
Louisiana State University – Alexandria
Louisiana State University – Shreveport
McNeese State University
Nicholls State University
Northwestern State University
Southeastern Louisiana University
Southern University,
Southern University of New Orleans
University of Louisiana – Monroe
Return to top
Page 3 of 34
Graduation Requirements
LA Core 4 Curriculum
Basic Core Curriculum
(Incoming Freshmen in 2008-2009 and beyond)
(Incoming Freshmen 2008-2009 and beyond)
English - 4 Units
 English I, II, III, IV
Math - 4 Units
 Algebra I or Algebra I-Pt. 2
 Geometry
 Algebra II
 Remaining unit from: Financial Math, Math
Essentials, Advanced Math/Precalculus,
Advanced Math-Functions, Calculus
Science - 4 Units
 Biology
 Chemistry
 2 units from: Physical Science, Physics,
Biology II, Chemistry II, Earth Science,
Environmental Science, Agriscience II,
Anatomy and Physiology, or a local science
elective approved by BESE*
Social Studies - 4 Units
 1/2 unit of Civics
 1/2 unit of Free Enterprise
 U.S. History
 1 unit from the following: World History, World
Geography, Western Civilization
 1 unit from: World History, World Geography,
Western Civilization, Civics (second semester
- 1/2 credit), Psychology, Sociology, or
African-American Studies*
 Students entering ninth grade in 2011-12 and
beyond need 1 unit of Civics
Health - 1/2 Unit
 JROTC I and II may be used to meet the
Health Education requirement
Physical Education - 1 1/2 Units
 Physical Education I and Physical Education II

A maximum of 4 units of Physical Education may be
used toward graduation
NOTE: The substitution of JROTC is permissible
Foreign Language - 2 Units
 •2 units from the same foreign language or 2
units of speech
Arts - 1 Unit
 1 unit Fine Arts Survey or 1 unit of Art, Dance,
Music, or Theatre Arts*
Electives - 3 Units
Total - 24 Units
*Approved IBC-related course may be substituted for the 4th
*requires parental conference after at least 2 years in high school
beginning Class of 2014
English - 4 Units
 English I, II, III, IV or Senior Applications in
English
Math - 4 Units
 Algebra I (1 unit), or Algebra I-Pt. 1 and
Algebra I-Pt. 2 (2 units)
 Geometry
 Remaining unit(s) from the following: Algebra
II, Financial Mathematics, Math Essentials,
Advanced Math—Pre-Calculus, Advanced
Math—Functions, Calculus
Science - 3 Units
 Biology
 1 unit from Physical Science cluster:
Physical Science, Chemistry I, Physics
 1 unit from: Biology II, Chemistry II,
Environmental Science, Earth Science,
Agriscience II, Anatomy and Physiology, an
additional course from the physical science
cluster, or a local science elective approved by
BESE
Agriscience I is a prerequisite for Agriscience II
and is an elective course
Social Studies - 3 Units
 U.S. History
 1/2 unit of Civics
 1/2 unit of Free Enterprise
 and one of the following: World History, World
Geography, Western Civilization
 Students entering ninth grade in 2011-12 and
beyond need 1 unit of Civics
Health - 1/2 Unit
 JROTC I and II may be used to meet the
Health Education requirement
Physical Education - 1 1/2 Units
 Physical Education I and Physical Education II

A maximum of 4 units of Physical Education may be
used toward graduation
NOTE: The substitution of JROTC is permissible
*Journey to Careers* - 1 Unit
Electives - 7 Units
*Beginning Freshmen 2010-11 must complete a Career Area of
Concentration*
Total - 24 Units
*Takes effect for incoming freshmen in 2010-2011 and beyond
science or social studies or for the art course if the course is in the
student’s career area of concentration
Page 4 of 34
LA CAREER DIPLOMA GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Before a student chooses to participate in the Career Diploma pathway the student, the student’s parent or
guardian, and the school counselor or school administrator shall meet to discuss the student’s progress and
determine what is in the student’s best interest for the continuation of his/her educational pursuit and future educational
plan.
If it is determined that the Career Diploma pathway is in the best interest for the student, it shall be understood that
a)the student will graduate without completing the Louisiana Core 4 or the Basic Core Curriculum
b) the student is eligible to enter a community or technical college upon graduation and may be eligible to enter a 4 year
collge/university after earning an associate degree;
c) the student may qualify for a TOPS Tech award by meeting the TOPS Tech curriculum requirements, earning a GPA
of 2.50, and scoring 17 or higher on the ACT; and
d) the student must participate in a dropot prevention and mentoring program during his/her first year of high school,
unless the student met the promotion requirements for the eighth grade LEAP.
ENGLISH ........................................................................................................... 4 units
English I, and II
remaining units shall come from: English III, English IV or Senior Applications in English
MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................. 4 units
Algebra I (one unit) or Algebra I Part 1 and Algebra I Part 2 (two units)
remaining units shall come from: Geometry, Algebra II, Financial Math, Math Essentials, Advanced Math
SCIENCE ........................................................................................................... 3 units
Biology
one unit from the following: Physical Science, Chemistry, or Physics
one unit from the following: Physical Science, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Biology II,
Chemistry II, or Agriscience II (Agriscience I is a prerequisite for Agriscience II and is an elective)
SOCIAL STUDIES ............................................................................................. 3 units
½ unit Civics, ½ unit Free Enterprise, American History
one of the following: Psychology, Sociology, World Geography, World History, Western Civilization, or
African American Studies
*Freshmen entering 2011-2012 will be required to take 1 unit of Civics.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ................................................................................... 1½ units
H&PE I and H&PE II; The substitution of JROTC is permissible.
NOTE: A maximum of 4 units may be used toward graduation
HEALTH EDUCATION....................................................................................... ½ unit
JROTC I and II may be used to meet the Health Education requirement.
CAREER/TECHNICAL EDUCATION ................................................................ 7 units
Education for Careers or Journey to Careers
Six credits required for a career Area of Concentration
TOTAL
Page 5 of 34
23 UNITS
TOPS Curriculum Requirements
WHAT IS TOPS? Louisiana’s Taylor Opportunity Program for Students (TOPS) is a comprehensive program of state
scholarships, and one of the most innovative and progressive student assistance programs in the nation. See your
guidance counselor for eligibility and renewal requirements for each award.
TOPS CORE CURRICULUM (Opportunity/Performance/Honors Awards)
For High School graduates of 2013
Students must take the courses required for TOPS within their LA Core 4 curriculum requirements.
UNITS
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
½
COURSE/S
English I, II, III, IV
Algebra I – Parts 1 & 2 (both units)
Algebra II
Geometry, Advanced Math, Calculus
Biology I or II
Chemistry I or II
Physical Science, Environmental Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics, or Agriscience I & II (both units)
Additional Math or Science: Geometry, Calculus, Advanced Math, Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics
American History
Civics and Free Enterprise (1 unit combined) or Civics (one unit)
*Freshmen beginning 2011-2012 will be required to take 1 unit of Civics.
World Geography, World History, or Western Civilization
Foreign Language (in the same language)
Fine Arts Survey
Or 2 units of performance courses in music
Or 2 units of art
Or 1 unit of an elective from among the other subjects listed in this curriculum
Business Computer Applications, Introduction to Business Computer Applications
Or substitute Word Processing, Desktop Publishing, Web Design,
Or ½ unit of an elective from among the other subjects listed in this core curriculum
Total: 17.5 units
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For High School graduates of 2014 and beyond
Students must take the courses required for TOPS within their LA Core 4 curriculum requirements.
UNITS
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
COURSE/S
English I, II, III, IV
Algebra I – Parts 1 & 2 (two units)
Algebra II
Geometry, Advanced Math, Calculus
Biology I or II
Chemistry I or II
Physical Science, Environmental Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics, or Agriscience I & II (both units)
American History
Civics and Free Enterprise (1 unit combined), Civics (one unit)
*Freshmen beginning 2011-2012 will be required to take 1 unit of Civics.
World Geography, World History, or Western Civilization
Foreign Language (in the same language)
Fine Arts Survey
Or 2 units of performance courses in music
Or 2 units of art
Or 1 unit of an elective from among the other subjects listed in this curriculum
Total: 19 units
Page 6 of 34
TOPS TECH AWARD CURRICULUM
UNITS
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
COURSE/S
English I, II, and III
English IV or Senior Applications in English
Algebra I Part 1 & Part 2 (two units)
Geometry, Algebra II, Math Essentials, Financial Mathematics, Advanced Mathematics
Biology
Chemistry
Physical Science, Environmental Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Physics, or Agriscience I & II (both units)
American History
World Geography, World History, or Western Civilization
Civics and Free Enterprise (one unit combined) or Civics (one unit)
*Freshman beginning 2011-2012 will be required to take 1 unit of Civics.
Remaining courses must be selected from one of the following options:
Option 1
1
Fine Arts Survey
Or 2 units of music
Or 2 units of art
Or 1 unit of an elective among the other subjects listed in the core curriculum
Or a Career/Technical course approved by BESE.
2
Foreign Language, Speech I or Speech II
1
Computer education program of studies approved by BESE
Total: 17 Units
Option 2
4
1
1
A career major comprised of a sequence of related specialty courses and approved for the school by BESE
Related or technical field course
Basic computer course
Total: 19 Units
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Page 7 of 34
Louisiana High School Diploma Endorsements
Career/Technical Endorsement
Academic Endorsement
Core Courses
Current
TOPS Opportunity
4 Units of English
3 Units of Math
3 Units of Science
3 Social Studies
1 additional Math or
Science
½ Unit Health
1½ Units PE
1 Unit of Fine Arts
2 Units of Foreign
Language
1 Unit of
Computer-related
course
4 Optional Electives
TOPS TECH
4 Units of
English
3 Units of Math
3 Units of
Science
3 Units of Social
Studies
½ Unit Health
1½ Units PE
Option 1 (4
credits)
OR
Option 2 (6
credits)
2011-2012
LA Core 4
4 Units of English
4 Units of Math
4 Units of Science
4 Units of Social Studies
½ Unit of Health
1½ Units of PE
1 Unit of Art
2 Units of Speech or
Foreign Language
3 Electives including
computer-related course
High School Area of Concentration
Student must complete four elective credits in an area of concentration
and two related elective credits. The areas of concentration shall be
developed locally by a district Curriculum-Design Team and approved
by BESE
Current
TOPS Opportunity
4 Units of English
3 Units of Math
3 Units of Science
3 Social Studies
1 additional unit Math or
Science
½ Unit Health
1½ Units PE
1 Unit of Fine Arts
2 Units of Foreign Language
½ Unit of Computer-related
course
3½ Optional Electives
2011-2012
LA Core 4 +
4 Units of English
4 Units of Math (Algebra I,
Geometry, Algebra II, and
one of: Advanced Math I or
II, Calculus, Pre-Calculus,
Probability & Statistics, or
Discrete Math)
4 Units of Science (Biology,
Chemistry, one advanced
science, and one other
science)
4 Units of Social Studies
½ Unit Health
1½ Units PE
1 Unit of Fine Arts
2 Units of Foreign Language
3 Units of Electives
Students satisfy this requirement by completing the Core
Courses listed above.
GEE
Pass all four components with a score of Basic or above OR one of the
following combinations with the English Language Arts score at Basic
or above:
1 Approaching Basic, 1 Mastery or Advanced, Basic or above in the
remaining two
2 Approaching Basic, 2 Mastery or above
Pass all four components with a score of Basic or above OR
one of the following combinations with the English Language
Arts score at Basic or above:
1 Approaching Basic, 1 Mastery or Advanced, Basic or
above in the remaining two
2 Approaching Basic, 2 Mastery or above
GPA/ACT
TOPS Opportunity GPA
ACT of 20 (or state average) or Silver Level on WorkKeys
TOPS Opportunity GPA
ACT of 23
Other Performance Indicators


BESE-approved Industry-based certification; OR completion
of all course work required to sit for the IBC exam, post
graduation; OR 3 college hours in a Career Technical area
that articulate to a postsecondary institution, either by actually
obtaining the credits and/or being waived from having to take
such hours; AND
A minimum of 90 work hours of work-based learning
experience OR a Senior Project related to students area of
concentration with 20 hours of related work-based learning
and mentoring
Senior Project OR
1 Carnegie unit in an AP course with a score of 3 or higher on
the AP exam OR
1 Carnegie unit in an IB course with a score of 4 or higher on
the exam OR
3 college hours of non- remedial, articulated credit in core area
(Mathematics, Social Studies, Science, Foreign Language, or
English Language Arts)
Page 8 of 34
Areas of Concentration
Required for students graduating with a Basic Diploma beginning Freshmen 2010-2011
AREA OF
CONCENTRATION
Agriculture
Production
(CTC)
PRIMARY COURSES
MUST COMPLETE 1 STARRED COURSE AND
3 ADDITIONAL COURSES
*Agriscience I, II, III
Env. Science
Agriscience Construction Nutrition and Food
Journey to Careers
*Welding I, II
Welding Technology
Agriscience I, II, III
Journey to Careers
*Cosmetology I, II
Journey to Careers
Nutrition and Food
FACS I
*Allied Health I, II
*Medical Term.
Anatomy
Biology II
Sports Medicine I, II
Journey to Careers
First Responder
Chemistry II
(CTC)
*Food Service I, II
*Pro Start I, II
Journey to Careers
Nutrition and Food
Petro Chemical
*Process Technician I, II
Chemistry
Journey to Careers
Journey to Careers
Welding
(CTC)
Cosmetology
(Personal Care Services)
(CTC)
Health
Professionals
(CTC)
Culinary Arts
(SCL Reserve)
Drafting
(SCL Reserve)
Air Conditioning &
Refrigeration
(SCL Reserve)
Automotive
Technology
(RPCC pending requests)
*Drafting & Design I, II
Basic Tech. Drafting
*AC/Refrig. I, II
Basic Electricity &
Electronics
Welding I, II
Journey to Careers
*Auto Tech I, II
Welding I, II
Journey to Careers
Welding Technology
RELATED COURSES
COMPLETE 1 COMPUTER COURSE AND 1 ADDITIONAL COURSE
OR COMPLETE 5 PRIMARY COURSES AND 1 COMPUTER COURSE
Approved computer course
Fine Arts Survey
Senior Project
Foreign Languages
Horticulture
Speech I
Accounting I
Keyboarding
Welding I
Biology II
Nutrition and Food
Welding Tech
Chemistry
Financial Math
World History
Earth Science
World Geography
Physics
Approved computer course
Keyboarding
Speech I
Foreign Languages
Math Elective
Trigonometry
Accounting I
Physical Science
Financial Math
Advanced Math
Physics
Geometry
Agriscience Elective I, II
Senior Project
Approved computer course
Keyboarding
Financial Math
Foreign Languages
Senior Project
FACS II
Adult Responsibilities
Speech I
Approved computer course
Forensic Science
Sociology
Foreign Languages
Keyboarding
Speech I
Advanced Math
Nutrition and Food
Financial Math
Algebra II
Psychology
Senior Project
Calculus
Child Development
Physics
Chemistry
Approved computer course
FACS Elective
Keyboarding
Foreign Languages
Financial Math
Psychology
Accounting I
Fine Arts Survey
Senior Project
Art I
Sociology
Speech I
Chemistry
Approved computer course
Financial Math
Speech I
Foreign Languages
Keyboarding
Senior Project
Approved computer course
Keyboarding
Speech I
Foreign Languages
Physics
Financial Math
Advanced Math
Biology II
Geometry
Algebra II
Art I
Senior Project
Approved computer course
Keyboarding
Speech I
Foreign Languages
Physics
Financial Math
Chemistry
Senior Project
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Accounting I
Page 9 of 34
Keyboarding
Financial Math
Physical Science
Speech I
Geometry
Senior Project
Areas of Concentration
Required for students graduating with a Basic Diploma beginning Freshmen 2010-2011
AREA OF
CONCENTRATION
Advanced
Studies
Engineering
PRIMARY COURSES
MUST COMPLETE 1 STARRED COURSE AND
3 ADDITIONAL COURSES
Advanced Math
Environmental Sci.
Algebra II
Fine Arts Survey
Biology II
Geometry
Calculus
Physics
Chemistry I, II
Psychology
Earth Science
Trigonometry
Economics
World Geography
Journey to Careers
World History
*Advanced Math
Journey to Careers
*Biology II
Calculus
*Chemistry II
*Physics
Sports Medicine
*Sports Medicine I, II, III
Allied Health I
Anatomy
Journey to Careers
Nutrition and Food
Psychology
Medical Term.
First Responder
Nutrition and Food
*Nutrition and Food
Chemistry
Journey to Careers
FACS
Food Service I
Social Services
*Child Development
*Sociology
Adult Responsibilities
*Pub. I, II (Newspaper)
*Pub. I, II (Yearbook )
Multimedia Production
Psychology
Speech I
Journey to Careers
Speech I
LVS Web Design
Desktop Publishing
Journey to Careers
Pub. I, II
(Newspaper)
Pub. I, II (Yearbook)
LVS Web Design
Multimedia Prod.
Journalism
Mass
Communications
*Speech I
Desktop Publishing
LVS Digital Graphics &
Animation
Journey to Careers
RELATED COURSES
COMPLETE 1 COMPUTER COURSE AND 1 ADDITIONAL COURSE
OR COMPLETE 5 PRIMARY COURSES AND 1 COMPUTER COURSE
Approved computer course
Keyboarding
Senior Project
Foreign Languages
Psychology
Sociology
Biology Elective
Publications
Art I
Chemistry Elective
(Newspaper
Science Elective
or Yearbook)
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Accounting I
Algebra II
Art I
Biology II
Chemistry I, II
Environmental Science
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Accounting I
Advanced Math
Calculus
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Adult Responsibilities
Child Development
Environmental Science
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Accounting I
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Social Studies Elective
English Elective
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Art I, II, III, IV
English Elective
Page 10 of 34
English IV
Financial Math
Fine Arts Survey
Geometry
Keyboarding
Physics
Earth Science
Speech I
Trigonometry
Welding I
World Geography
World History
Senior Project
Psychology
Biology II
Chemistry I, II
Financial Math
Keyboarding
P. E. III
FACS
Financial Math
Food Services II
Biology II
Physics
Senior Project
Sociology
Speech I
Trigonometry
Keyboarding
Prostart I, II
Senior Project
Speech I
Keyboarding
Senior Project
Financial Math
World History
Financial Math
Fine Arts Survey
Senior Project
Art I
Fine Arts Survey
Keyboarding
Psychology
Senior Project
Sociology
Speech I
Keyboarding
Sociology
World History
Financial Math
Areas of Concentration
Required for students graduating with a Basic Diploma beginning Freshmen 2010-2011
AREA OF
CONCENTRATION
Liberal Arts
Performing Arts
Administrative
Support
Business
Administration
Information
Systems
Banking and
Finance
ROTC
PRIMARY COURSES
MUST COMPLETE 1 STARRED COURSE AND
3 ADDITIONAL COURSES
*Art I, II
Journey to Careers
*Beginning Band
Fine Arts Survey
*Beginning Choir
Speech I
Advanced Band
Music Theory I
Beginning Band
Pub. I, II (Yearbook)
Journey to Careers
Speech I
Intermediate Band
Talented Music
*Accounting I, II
*Bus. Comp. App.
*Word Processing
Desktop Publishing
*Accounting I, II
Bus. Com. App.
Journey to Careers
Financial Math
Keyboarding
Speech I
Financial Math
Journey to Careers
Keyboarding
Speech I
Word Processing
*Bus. Computer App
*Desktop Publishing
*LVS Web Design
LVS Digital Graphics
and Animation
*Accounting I, II
*Bus. Com. App.
Multimedia Prod.
Psychology
Word Processing
Journey to Careers
*JR. ROTC I – IV
Journey to Careers
World Geography
*Financial Math
Journey to Careers
RELATED COURSES
COMPLETE 1 COMPUTER COURSE AND 1 ADDITIONAL COURSE
OR COMPLETE 5 PRIMARY COURSES AND 1 COMPUTER COURSE
Approved computer course
Psychology
Sociology
Foreign Languages
Pub. I (Newspaper)
Senior Project
Financial Math
Pub. I (Yearbook)
Keyboarding
Approved computer course
Fine Arts Survey
Senior Project
Foreign Languages
Keyboarding
Sociology
Art III
Financial Math
World Geography
LVS Digital Graphics &
Psychology
World History
Animation
Approved computer course
Financial Math
Senior Project
Foreign Languages
Psychology
Sociology
Business Education Elec.
Pub. I Newspaper
Calculus
LVS Digital Graphics & Animation Pub. I Yearbook
Advanced Math
Approved computer course
Psychology
Sociology
Foreign Languages
Senior Project
Speech I
Business Education Elec.
Advanced Math
World History
LVS Digital Graphics & Animation World Geography
Calculus
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Accounting I
Advanced Math
Algebra II
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Advanced Math
Approved computer course
Foreign Languages
Advanced Math
Social Studies Elec.
Financial Math
First Responder
Chemistry
Financial Math
Senior Project
Pub. I (Newspaper)
Pub. I (Yearbook)
Word Processing
Senior Project
Sociology
World Geography
World History
Keyboarding
Sociology
Speech I
Sociology
Speech I
Calculus
Physics
World History
Keyboarding
Calculus
P.E. III
Physics
Psychology
Senior Project
Biology II
Students who complete the LA Core 4 Curriculum will complete an Academic Area of Concentration; however, they may choose to complete a Career Pathway.
Students who opt out of the LA Core 4 Curriculum and complete the LA Basic Core Curriculum will be required to complete one of the Louisiana Career Clusters and
Career Pathways listed in this chart.
Page 11 of 34
Graduation Exit Exam
In addition to earning a minimum of 24 Carnegie units of credit, students who entered the ninth grade prior to
2010-2011 must also pass the GEE21 Graduation Exit Exam. The English Language Arts, Written Composition, and
Math sections of the test shall first be administered to 10th graders. The Science and Social Studies parts shall first be
administered to 11th graders. Students must pass the English Language Arts, Written Composition, Math, and either
Science or Social Studies. Remediation and retake opportunities will be provided for students who do not pass the
test. Practices tests are given during the year.
Return to top
End-Of-Course Exams
Beginning with Freshmen 2010-2011, students must earn 24 Carnegie units of credit and are required to pass
End-of-Course exams in three categories. To pass an End-of-Course exam, students must earn an achievement level.
Students must pass:
A. Algebra I or Geometry, and
B. English II or English III, and
C. Biology or American History
*Note: Students who take these courses in the middle grades (i.e., Algebra I or Geometry in 7th or 8th grade) must
take these exams at the end of the course. The scores on the EOC exams in middle grades will determine
graduation eligibility.
Beginning with the 2010-2011 school year, all students enrolled in the courses that have an End-of-Course exam
listed above will be required to take the End-of-Course exam. For Algebra I, Geometry, and English II, the scores on
the End-of-Course exam will count as the final exam for these courses and will count as 20% of the final grade. In
2011-2012, Biology was added to this list. The English III EOC will count as the final exam in 2012-2013. The
American History EOC will count at the final exam in 2013-2014. The grading scale for the EOC Exams is listed below.
Achievement Level
Excellent
Good
Fair
Needs Improvement
Letter Grade
A
B
C
D or F
Honor Graduates
To qualify as an Honor Graduate:
1. Student shall maintain a 3.000 grade point average and;
2. successfully complete a minimum of 16 core subject honors credits AND 2 Foreign Language credits and;
3. successfully complete and earn a minimum of 3 honors credits in each of the four core areas (English, Math,
Science and Social Studies) and;
4. successfully complete and earn a minimum of 4 honors Carnegie credits in each of the four core areas from
honors courses, AP courses, and non-remedial college level courses taken as a dual enrollment course.
Honor graduates will be recognized at the graduation ceremony according to the following grade point averages:
Summa Cum Laude
3.90—4.00
Magna Cum Laude
3.70—3.899
Cum Laude
3.50—3.699
System Academic Excellence Medal: awarded to an honor grad with min. 4.0 gpa, 21 non-remedial college hours,
and a diploma endorsement.
Superintendent Medal of Honor: awarded to an honor grad with and ACT score of 30.
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Page 12 of 34
Electives
Arts and Humanities
SJP Career and Tech Center
Physical Fitness
Art I, II, III, IV
Band
Black Studies
Education for Careers
Freshman Composition
Gifted and Talented Art
Journey to Careers
Publications – Newspaper
Publications – Yearbook
Senior Project
Spanish I, II
Speech I
Video & Media Production I and II
Yearbook
ABC Pipefitting
ABC Welding
Agriscience I, II, III, IV
Allied Health I, II
First Responder
Food Service I, II
Industrial Maintenance
Medical Terminology
Process Technology I, II
Prostart I, II
ROTC I, II, III, IV
Sports Medicine I, II (½ unit each)
Sports Medicine III (1 unit)
Weightlifting
Business
Accounting I and II
Computer Apps. I/Computer Apps. II
Word Processing
Keyboarding/Keyboarding Apps.
Health and Family
Adult Responsibilities/Housing
Child Development
Family and Consumer Science I & II
Foods and Nutrition
Dual Enrollment Classes
Adv. Chemistry/Chem 1010 &Chem 1010L
Advanced Math/Math 1100
American History/Hist 2020
Biology II/Biology 1010
Biology Elective/Biology 1020
Calculus/Math 165
Chemistry II/Chem 1020 &Chem 1020L
English IV/English 1010
English Elective/English 1020
English Elective II/English 2110
English Elective II/English 255
Fine Arts Survey/Arts 1010
Government/Government 101
History/History 150
Physical Science II/Phsc 1010
Psychology/Psychology 101
Social Studies I/Geography 103
Social Studies II/Geography 104
Sociology/Sociology 151
Trigonometry (Elec)/Math 1110
Western Civilization I/History 101
Western Civilization II/History 102
Students may enroll in courses that receive credit from various post-secondary institutions St. James
Parish Public Schools has articulation agreements with for dual credit. Students are expected to follow the
dates for withdrawal and should be aware of the exam dates listed for the institution in which they are
enrolled. The latest dates for each institution may be found at the school’s website.
River Parishes Community College
Nicholls University
South Central Lousiana Technical College
Acadiana Technical College
Capital Area Technical College
Page 13 of 34
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Carnegie Credit Courses
The following courses are possible offerings for the upcoming school year. Each school reserves
the right to delete a course from the schedule if there are not enough requests to create a class.
Students should choose alternates they are willing to take in case their first-choice courses can
not be offerred.
Course Coding
Course
Title
Credits
Course #
Site location
for course
Dual
Enrollment
TOPS
eligible
End-of-Course
test
Grading
Policy
1
Legend for Course Offerings
Career and
Technology Center
Science and Math
Academy
Nicholls State
UniversityThibodaux
DE
Louisiana Virtual
School courses are
taken via computer.
This course counts
toward completing
TOPS or TOPS
Tech requirements.
Students in this
course receive
both high school
and college
credits.
River Parish
Community
College –
Sorrento
Campus
South Central Louisiana
Technical College –
Reserve Campus
GiP
This course
posts Grades in
Progress
instead of
traditional
grades on the
report card.
Freshmen in 2010-2011
and beyond will be
required to pass an
End-of-Course exam in
this course. The EOC
exam counts as 20% of
the final grade and is part
of the graduation
requirement.
Students must earn a final grade of A or B or have teacher recommendation to schedule the next core Honors course.
Page 14 of 34
ENGLISH
The course is a concentrated study of grammar and practice in applying those
skills. Students formulate thesis statements, develop ideas in logical order and
compose multi-paragraph compositions. Genres such as short stories, mythology, biographies, autobiographies,
novels and poetry are studied. Honors-level students move at a faster pace, perform more outside-the-classroom
assignments and develop a more independent and exploratory approach to learning. Summer reading assignments are
required. Students must earn a final grade of A or B or have teacher recommendation to schedule the next Honors
English course.
English I
1
H-1211
T-1212
HS
This course provides practice of English Language Arts standards and
benchmarks required to successfully complete the End-of-Course Exam.
Students learn grammatical concepts and applications, as well as writing for a variety of purposes. A diverse selection
of literature (short story, novel, poetry, and drama) is explored.
English II
1
H-1221
T-1222
HS
This is a survey course of American Literature from Native American
writings to present-day authors. There is one required novel and a
selection list for the student’s second novel used for an independent project. Students must successfully complete an
End-of-Course exam. Honors students will take English III/College Prep that includes more writing to prepare students
for English IV/1010. Students must earn a final grade of A or B or have teacher recommendation, AND score an ACT
or PLAN composite of 18 and English subscore of 18 to schedule the next Honors English course (English IV/English
1010).
English III
1
H-1231
T-1232
HS
Students develop a knowledge of British literary history and genres,
analyze elements for their contribution to meaning in texts, and develop a
range of strategies and skills for comprehending texts. Students write for various purposes and audiences using a
recursive writing process. Students write to learn and to make personal connections to literature. Students develop
mastery of the conventions of grammar, usage, mechanics, and style, and apply these in their writing. Students
develop and apply proficiency with skills of oral communication and visual literacy. Within the context of literature
study, students develop skills of problem solving, decision-making, and collaboration. They also perform a variety of
real-world reading and writing tasks.
English IV
College Prep
1
T-1240
HS
DE
Honors students will take English IV/English Composition I but
must have an ACT or PLAN Composite score of 18 and an English
H-1281
subscore of 18. The dual enrollment course concentrates on
writing to meet the requirements and rigor of a college composition course. British Literature will be infused in the
writings and readings assigned. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of credit through RPCC or Nicholls.
English IV
Engl 101
H-1270
LHS
1
DE
GiP
Students must earn a C or better in English IV/English Composition I to
register for this course, which is a further development of expository
H-1282
writing and critical thinking, with an introduction to research and the
literary genres. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
English
Elective I
Engl Comp
H-1271
LHS
1
DE GiP
Prerequisite: C or better in English 1020 (or equivalent). General
introduction to study and appreciation of the short story and novel. (Not for
credit toward a major or minor in English.) Spring semester only. Students
must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
English
Elective II
Engl 2010
DE GiP
1 H-1268
This course provides students with in-depth instruction in writing to prepare them for the
demands in upper-level English courses. The course focuses on the mastery of
grammatical applications and writing an effective 5-paragrah essay through narrative, descriptive, compare/contrast,
persuasive, and poetic analysis writing.
Freshman
Composition
1 1250
HS
Reading I
1 1200
HS
This course is designed to increase the student’s reading comprehension levels to
improve academic performance in courses across all of the curriculums.
Page 15 of 34
MATH
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. This course provides a brief
review of solving quadratic, rational, and algebraic equations. Students are
involved in an in-depth study of functions, including radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, circular
trigonometric functions, and right triangle trigonometry. This course is designed for students who plan to attend a
university and who plan to take Calculus.
Advanced
Math
1
H-1630
T-1631
HS
This course is for honors students who want to earn university credit for
College Algebra. Students should have earned credit in Algebra I H,
H-1673
College Algebra
Algebra II H, and Geometry H. Students must also have an ACT or
PLAN Composite score of 18 and a math subscore of 21. This course provides an in-depth study of linear equations
and inequalities, linear applications, systems of linear equations, quadratic equations and inequalities, absolute value
equations and inequalities, radical equations, functions and graphs and polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic
functions. Part of the coursework must be completed online, and students must take a comprehensive final exam
developed by the university. Students must earn a C or better to schedule Trigonometry/College Trigonometry (Math
1110). Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Advanced
Math
H-1670
LHS
1
DE
Students will be able to perform operations with real numbers and algebraic
expressions, identify the solution set of linear and quadratic equations and
1
inequalities, perform operations with polynomials, solve word problems, graph
H-1625
linear equations in two variables, and solve systems of equations. Students
must earn a final grade of A or B or have teacher recommendation to schedule the next Honors math course. Both
courses are required for graduation. Students in grades 7-8 may only take this course at the SMA.
Algebra I
Part 1
H-1615
T-1617
HS
Algebra I
Part 2
H-1616
T-1618
HS
1
Students will be able to perform operations with real numbers and
algebraic expressions, identify the solution set of linear and quadratic
equations and inequalities, perform operations with polynomials, solve
word problems, graph linear equations in two variables, and solve
H-1627
systems of equations.
Prerequisite: Algebra I. This course briefly reviews major Algebra I topics then
focuses on linear systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, rational
numbers, imaginary and complex numbers, and quadratic equations. Students
H-1637
must earn a final grade of A or B or have teacher recommendation AND have
an ACT or PLAN Composite score of 18 and math subscore of 21 to schedule the next honors course (Advanced
Math Pre-calculus/College Algebra).
Algebra II
1
Calculus
H-1611
T-1612
HS
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and Advanced
Math—Pre-Calculus. This course covers limits, derivatives and integrals. It also
1 H-1644
looks at real-world applications.
Prerequisites: C or better in College Trigonometry. Students must
attend the SMA for the entire school year to schedule this
course. It covers limits, derivatives and integrals. It looks at real-world applications. Upon completion, students receive
5 hours of university credit through Nicholls.
Calculus
Math 165
1 H-1645
DE
GiP
This course focuses on concepts and applications needed for the design
and management of personal/business finances. It serves as a
Tech
foundation for making decisions as consumers, employees, and/or
entrepreneurs.This course extends students' knowledge of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents as well
as basic statistics and probability, algebra, geometry, and data analysis in the context of relevant real life
problem-solving situations.Emphasis is placed on math processes that include manual or electronic calculations of
payroll, income tax preparations, interest computation, consumer information, managing income, buying insurance,
selling and buying, making sound credit and investment decisions for personal and business transactions.
Financial
Math
1
470
HS
DE
Prerequisites: Algebra I. This course covers concepts ranging from
basic material (points, lines, and planes) to special properties of right
1
triangles, along with formulas for area, perimeter, circumference,
H-1635
surface area, and volume. The course should be taken in conjunction
with Algebra II-H ONLY if the student plans to take calculus in his/her senior year. Students must earn an A or B or
have teacher recommendation to schedule the next honors level course.
Geometry
H-1621
T-1622
HS
Page 16 of 34
Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry. This course covers ratio and
proportions, probability, statistics, topics in geometry, linear functions,
Tech
step-functions, piecewise functions, absolute value functions, quadratic
functions and other math topics. This course is designed as a bridge for students who performed below average in
Algebra I and Geometry. This course should be scheduled either after completion of Geometry in preparation for
Algebra II or after completing Algebra II in preparation for Advanced Math or graduation.
Math
Essentials
1 T-1660
HS
Prerequisite: C or better in Advanced Math—College Algebra. This is an
elective math credit for students to earn credit for College Trig and prepare
H-1674
for Calculus. Studies include trigonometric ratios, circular functions and
graphs, solutions of triangles, and identities and equations. Students are required to take a comprehensive final exam
developed by the university. It is a prerequisite to Calculus/MATH 165 on Nicholls campus. Upon completion, students
receive 3 hours of college credit.
Trigonometry
H-1671
LHS
1
College Trig
DE
SCIENCE
A study in the history of astronomy; motion of the stars, planets, and moons; the birth,
lives, and deaths of stars; and the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy. Topics include
cosmology, astrobiology, and the search for extraterrestrial life.
Astronomy
1
Biology
H-
H-1521
T-1522
1
This course covers the basic concepts necessary for a student who
plans on majoring in any one of the various science or medical fields.
Lab fees may be required.
HS
H-1546
Prerequisites: Biology I. This course is designed for students who are
self-motivated and willing to do independent study. This course covers the
H-1528
concepts of Biology with emphasis on microbiology, water quality testing,
anatomy, and physiology. Students planning to enter a medical profession or major in biology will benefit.
Biology II
H-1541
HS
1
Prerequisites: Biology I and an ACT or PLAN composite score of 18.
This course covers the concepts of Biology with emphasis on
microbiology, water quality testing, anatomy, and physiology. Students planning to enter a medical profession or major
in biology will benefit from this class. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit for the lecture and 1
hour of college credit for the lab (pending approval).
Biology II
College Biology
1 H-1518
DE
Prerequisites: Basic Biology I – Principles of Biology. Eligibility for
College English Composition I or higher. A survey of the
principles and concepts of biology including biochemistry, cell biology, metabolism (photosynthesis and respiration),
cell reproduction, genetics, plant tissues and nutrition and transport, plant and animal reproduction and development,
and evolution. Designed for students only needing one year of biology. Students must attend the SMA to schedule
this course. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Biology II
Biology 105
1 H-1542
GiP
DE
Prerequisite: BIOL 105 or equivalent. A survey of the structure, function,
origin, evolution, and relationships of living things including viruses,
Biology 106
bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals; ecology; and organ
systems of the human body. Designed for students needing only one year of biology. Students must attend the SMA
to schedule this course. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Biology
Elective
1
H-
DE
GiP
Consists of studies in solutions, reactions, Stoichiometry, states of matter, gas
laws, bonding, molarity, modality, and thermo chemistry. Honors curriculum
1
moves at a faster pace and covers more material. Labs help students use
H-1533
critical thinking skills to apply in different situations. Students interested in the
class should have successfully completed Algebra I or enrolled in Algebra II. Lab fees may be required.
Chemistry
H-1531
T-1532
HS
Prerequisite: Chemistry I. This course provides an advanced study of
chemistry concepts. Major topics include thermodynamics, kinetics,
equilibrium, solubility, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry.
Adv. Chem I
College Chem.
Adv. Chem II
College Chem.
1 H-1536
DE
1 H-1538
DE
Prerequisite: Earn a C or better in Advanced Chemistry I. This course
provides an advanced study of chemistry concepts. Major topics include
Page 17 of 34
thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, solubility, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. There
will be a lab component. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit for Introductory Chemistry I and 1
hour of college credit for Chemistry Lab.
Environmental
Science
1
H-1511
T-1512
Students investigate how the environment is affected by industry, the
community, and individuals. Through these investigations, students discover
how they can improve and protect the world around them. Lab fees may be
required.
HS
H-1514
A descriptive presentation of the structure and function of the organ systems of
the human body covering cells, tissues, bones, muscles, nervous system and
endocrine system.The lab will use specimens, models and instruments to investigate the structure and function of the
human body.
Human
Anatomy
1 H-1550
This course emphasizes the skills necessary to understand the basics of other
college preparatory courses such as chemistry and physics. Chemistry-related
1
topics include scientists and their contributions, scientific method of
H-1504
investigation, metric computation, composition of matter, structure of matter,
atomic structure, chemistry of elements and compounds, solutions, suspensions, emulsions, acids, bases and salts,
as well as organic chemistry. Physics topics include forms and types of energy, forces in motion, work, as well as
nuclear energy and its application. Lab fees may be required.
Physical
Science
H-1501
T-1502
HS
Prerequisite: Completion of Physical Science and an ACT or PLAN composite
of 18. This class introduces basic principles of physics, including motion,
force, work, energy, power, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism,
and radioactivity. Upon completion of this course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Physical
Science II
1 H-1510
College Phy. Sci
DE
Consists of studies in mechanics, dynamics, waves, light, states of matter,
and electricity. This course combines a mathematical approach to science
through physical aspects. Labs are part of the course followed by a detailed
lab report. It challenges students through hands-on applications and critical thinking. Students interested in the class
should be enrolled in or have taken Advanced Math.
Physics
H-1551
1
LHS
H-1552
SOCIAL STUDIES
African-Am
Studies
1
2240
HS
This course discusses the African-American experience. It covers the beginning of
the story that took place on the continent of Africa through the travels to America.
This course involves instruction in the function and structure of local, state, and
national government under the Constitution. Emphasis is on the development
of an appreciation of our democracy’s privileges and an awareness of the obligations students have as citizens.
Patriotism, civic mindedness, loyalty, and respect for the law are also emphasized. Issues important to good
citizenship and current affairs will be stressed. Students are encouraged and may be required to do social studies
projects.
Civics
H-2201
T-2202
1
HS
This is a one-semester course that is a fundamental study of business and
economics. Topics of study include careers, economic cycles, the Industrial
Revolution, banking, labor unions, the stock market, advertising, etc. Students will be expected to follow events that
are published in the business section of the newspaper. (Only required for Class of 2013 and 2014)
Free
Enterprise
1/2
2204
HS
Students will study the surfaces of the Earth and its physical and human
features. By using maps, graphs, charts, diagrams, and technology, students
will be more aware of their surroundings and planet.
Geography
H-2231
T-2230
1
HS
American National Government. The principles, structure, and functions of the
national government of the United States. (Spring semester only). Students
must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this course,
students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Government
DE
1 H-2261
S.S. Elective
Govt
101
DE
1
H-
History
150
Political, intellectual, social, and economic developments in world history from
the ancient world to 1500. Degree credit will not be given for both History 150
Page 18 of 34
and 160. (Spring semester only). Students must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this
course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Prerequisite: Eligibility for enrollment in English 101 or higher. An introduction
to the science and profession of psychology. (Spring semester only). Students
must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this
course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Psychology
DE
1 H-1569
Psych
101
The course covers the period of time from the first Americans to the
present with emphasis on the period after the civil war. Students actively
participate in taking notes, class discussion, timeline creations, map comparisons, video clips that put you in history,
and other projects and activities.
U.S.
History
H-2211
T-2212
1
HS
Prerequisite: Students must have an ACT or PLAN composite
score of 18. American history covers the period of time from the
first Americans to the present with emphasis placed on the period from after the civil war. Students will actively
participate in taking notes, class discussion, timeline creations, map comparisons, video clips that put you in history,
and other projects and activities. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
U.S. History
College Am. History
1 2229 LHS
DE
Physical processes and world patterns of weather, climate, soil,
vegetation, landform, and ocean phenomena. (Spring semester only).
Students must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion
of this course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Social
Studies I
1
H-
Geography
103
Social
Studies II
1
H-
Geography
104
DE
DE
Sociology
DE
1 H-9902
Sociology
151
Human ecology; a survey of man’s cultural environment. (Spring semester
only). Students must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon
completion of this course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Theories and trends of society and social action with particular reference to
life in the United States today. (Spring semester only). Students must attend
the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this course, students
receive 3 hours of college credit.
Intellectual, economic, social, and political developments as foundations
and beginnings of the modern world from the ancient world to the mid
History 101
seventeenth century. Degree credit will not be given for both HIST 101 and
HIST 105. (Spring semester only). Students must attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this
course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Western
Civilization
1 H-6093
DE
Social
Studies III
1
DE
Western Civ. II
History 102
H-
Political, intellectual, social and economic developments in the western world
from the mid seventeenth century to the present. Degree credit will not be given
for both HIST 102 and HIST 106. (Spring semester only). Students must attend
the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this course, students
receive 3 hours of college credit.
World history covers the period of time from the caveman to the 1800s. The
class will discuss cultures, religions, and beliefs of people around the world.
Students actively participate in taking notes, class discussion, timeline creations, map comparisons, video clips, and
other projects and activities.
World
History
1
H-2222
T-2224
HS
Page 19 of 34
HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION
This is a one-semester course that will cover such topics as first aid; drugs and alcohol;
sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS; nutrition (eating disorders, diet, fasting);
violence (gangs); mental health (mental disorders, suicide, dealing with death).
Health
1/2
2000 HS
Activities in this course will include daily exercises and stretching; physical fitness
testing; team sports (basketball, flag football, whiffle ball, softball, volleyball); track and
field; lifetime sports (badminton, bowling, tennis); recreational games (volley tennis, shuffleboard, table tennis, horse
shoes). Emphasis will be placed on sportsmanship and teamwork; basic skills and rules will be taught and tested.
Regulation uniforms (shorts and shirts) are required and should have the student’s name marked in indelible ink.
PE I
PE-Sports
1/2
1
1900
HS
1901
1
1991
1992
HS
1993
1994
This course is available to all athletes in grades 9-12
ELECTIVES
R
This course introduces basic accounting theory and procedures along with
current applications of computer technology in accounting. Emphasis is placed
on mastery of basic accounting concepts and procedures, critical thinking, problem solving, decision-making,
technology and team building skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive 3 hours of credit
through LTC.
Accounting I
1
411
HS
DE
This course reinforces skills learned in basic accounting theory. Instruction is
given in journalizing, posting, preparation of payroll, taxes and business
forecasting. Emphasis is placed on the incorporation of an advanced, automated accounting software system and a
computer-based simulation, critical thinking, problem solving, decision-making, technology and team building skills.
Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive 3 hours of credit through LTC.
1
Accounting II
ACT Prep
412
1 1600
HS
DE
Students practice the skills needed to improve their performance on the American
College Test.
HS
(Each course earns ½ credit) This course makes students aware of all aspects
of adult life. Topics include career preparation, apartment living, financial
obligations, consumerism, insurance and related areas, and the need for
communication and interpersonal skills. The Housing semester traces the housing patterns of mankind from early
times to present day and deals with the maintenance and financial aspects of home ownership. Students learn the
basics of structural design and interior decoration.
Adult
Responsibilities
& Housing
1
1017
1019
HS
This program prepares students to install, diagnose, repair, and
maintain the operating condition of domestic, residential, and
Tech commercial heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems. Upon
completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit. This course is only offered during the morning session.
Air
Conditioning & 2
Refrigeration
DE
Art I incorporates all aspects of drawing. Students begin by using pencil as a
medium, working their way into charcoal drawing. After exploring black and
white expression, students add color into their drawings, first with colored pencils and then with chalks. Students
conclude the year of drawing skills with pen and ink. $20 course fee.
Art I
1
201
HS
Art II
1
202
HS
Prerequisite: Art I. A focus on advanced drawing techniques, painting, and
3-dimensional sculpture. $20 course fee.
Art III
1
203
HS
Prerequisite: Art I and II. Advanced painting is combined with large scaled
sculptures. $20 course fee.
Art IV
1
204
HS
Prerequisite: Art I, II, and III. Independent study course focuses on individual
interests. $20 course fee. Student purchases additional supplies.
Page 20 of 34
Forms, functions, and the vocabulary of art illustrated with examples from the
visual arts. Emphasis on understanding and appreciation. Illustrated lectures
with slides, video and class discussion. (Spring semester only). Students must
attend the SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Art
Appreciation 1
DE
H-
Art
110
Business
Computer
Applications I & II
423
442
Hands-on shop
experience and
Tech classroom instruction prepares students to diagnose engine
malfunctions, disassemble engines to examine defective parts, repair fuel systems, oil pumps, and transmissions.
Students also learn to use equipment to diagnose and test automotive systems. Upon completion, students receive 3
hours of college credit. This course is only offered during the afternoon session.
Automotive
Technology
Band I
2
1
DE
323
1
HS
DE
HS
A performing class for students entering their first year of high school band. A
course designed for students who have never played a wind instrument before or have not played a wind instrument in
two or more years and who desire to take up the study of a wind instrument again. Instruction will be provided in flute,
clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, baritone, tuba and melodic percussion (bells, timpani, etc.). Due to the limited
instrument inventory, students should be prepared to provide their own music supplies such as reeds, valve oil, and
music workbook.
A performing class for students entering their second year of high school
Band II
1
324
HS
band.
A performing class for students who have successfully completed two or more years
of school band or who have successfully completed the Beginner’s Band class with a
“C” average or better. Marching band will be the primary focus during the first
semester and concert band during the second semester. All students enrolled are expected to perform at all football
games, parades and concerts. Band rehearsals begin two weeks prior to the start of the school year. Students will be
expected to attend all summer rehearsals prior to the start of school. Up to 5 credits of Advanced Band can be used
toward graduation.
Band III
1
325
HS
Prepares students to complete a 2-year technical college program
designed to provide the skills required for performance in the drafting
Tech field. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of college credit. This
course is only offered during the morning session.
Drafting &
Design
Technology
2
DE
Business
Education
Elective I
1
KYBD
1110
Business
Education
Elective II
1
KYBD
1110
DE
This course continues the development and application of introductory to
intermediate keyboarding techniques combined with basic word
processing documentation. Emphasis is also placed on an increase in
speed, accuracy, and correct keyboarding techniques. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of credit through
LTC. This course offering begins in 2012-2013.
DE
This course covers principles and techniques used to solve business
problems on the electronic calculator. Upon completion, students receive 3
hours of credit through LTC. This course offering begins in 2012-2013.
(Each course earns ½ credit) Prerequisite: Keyboarding and Keyboarding Applications or IBCA. This course
acquaints students with the basic principles associated with information processing. Students study fundamental
computer concepts, software applications and computer systems. Focus is
Business
DE
1 442
Computer App
placed on skill development in using technology to perform basic
information processing. Studies include computer concepts, word
processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software applications, which will increase in difficulty in the
second semester. Keyboarding, decision-making, technology and critical thinking skills are reinforced through
business application projects.
(Each course earns ½ credit) Students study the physical, intellectual,
social, and emotional growth and development of children from birth
through early childhood. Topics include prenatal development, preparation
for birth and the birth process, impacts of heredity, environment, and family on the development of the child, and
meeting children’s needs for food, clothing, shelter, and care. Emphasis is on helping students create an environment
for children that promotes optimum development. This course also reviews age-related behavior patterns, child
guidance practices and their consequences, techniques and procedures for successful classroom management of
young children. Upon completion, students receive 5 hours of credit through LTC. $5 course fee.
Child
Development &
Adv. Child Dev.
1
1010
1011
HS
DE
Page 21 of 34
Education
for Careers
1
Choir
1
HS
Tech
301
Sight reading ability not required but singers must have inherent vocal ability
and pitch recognition. May be repeated for four credits.
HS
This course includes basic concepts in creating documents containing graphics
and text. Current version of popular word processing/graphics software is
incorporated. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of credit through LTC. This course offering begins in
2012-2013.
Desktop
Publishing
1
4547
HS
DE
Students use digital content, such as images or video, to create multimedia
projects. Both two-dimensional and three dimensional animation will be
addressed, as well as topics such as lighting, texturing, motion control
systems, rotoscoping, etc. The media used will be developed, manipulated, and edited by the students and convey
content-rich information. Final products reflect use of multimedia elements, knowledge of design theory, and
competency with productivity tools.
Digital
Graphics &
Animation
1/2
Drama
1 4005
4543
DE
Open to all students interested in working on the production of plays each
semester. Experience in staging, sound, lighting, makeup, and other elements
LHS
of play production.
Prequisite: Child Development/Advanced Child Development and
Nutrition and Food/Advanced Nutrition and Food. A study of the
cognitive, physical, social, and emotional developmental needs of the
preschool-age child. This course also introduces the care and
development of young children along with the study of theory, models, contemporary issues, professionalism, career
opportunities, observing and recording, technology,and developmentally appropriate practices (DAP). Upon
completion, students receive 8 hours of credit through LTC. This course offering begins in 2013-2014.
Early Childhood
Education I
1
DE
CDYC 1110
CDYC 1120
CDYC 1333
Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education I. This course involves
observations, documentation, and supervised participation of practical
experiences and situations with preschool children and an early
childhood environment. Practicum hours (270 hrs.) are implemented in this course. Upon completion, students receive
6 hours of credit through LTC. This course offering begins in 2013-2014.
Early Childhood
1
Education II
DE
CDYC 1151
CDYC 1341
This course prepares students for lifelong learning and the 21st century workplace as students investigate options
available after high school graduation, develop an understanding of financial concerns related to their future, and learn
to utilize resources that will provide them with employment opportunities. This course will engage students in
investigating careers using resources available to them and develop documents required for applying for a job within a
personal print or web-based portfolio as they enhance the soft skills required for success in the workplace. Senior
Project is also incorporated in this class. $3 course fee.
The FACS curriculum is broad and comprehensive, enabling individuals to
function effectively as consumers, homemakers, parents, and employees or
employers and to balance these roles successfully. Focus is on the study of the
dynamics of family cycles, interpersonal relationships and application of principles of child and family development to
relationships among young children, their families and teachers/communities. It empowers individuals and families
across their life spans to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. The unique focus is
on families, work and their interrelationships. $10 course fee. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of credit
through LTC.
Family &
Consumer
Sciences I
1
Family &
Consumer
Sciences II
1 1002 HS
HS
1001
DE
Prerequisite: FACS I. This course provides more in-depth study of life skills such as
relationships, money management, housing, and advanced cooking and sewing. $15
course fee.
Lecture and discussion on the forms, functions, and vocabulary of the visual arts.
Emphasis will be placed on the different methods of visual expression in our
society and how and why works are created. All major forms of drawing, painting, printing, sculpture and design will be
explored in basic terms. $15 course fee.
Fine Arts
Survey
1
205
SJH
Page 22 of 34
Nutrition/Food
& Adv.
Nutrition/Food
1
1012
1013
HS
DE
Students learn the importance of food and its relationship to good health. The basics of nutrition and the food pyramid
are also stressed. The advanced course also includes basic, as well as, advanced food preparation skills. Lab fees
may be required. Each course will receive ½ unit credit. This course can substitute as a Science Elective in
Hospitality and Tourism—Culinary Arts Career Diploma Pathway. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of
credit through LTC. $15 course fee.
Intro. to
Business
Computer
Apps
This course is the first of two courses designed to provide students with mastery of
the touch method of operating the computer keyboard.The students gain skill in
1 619
HS
applying the correct techniques in preparing simple personal and business
documents.Emphasis is placed on skill development in mastering basic keyboarding
techniques with speed and control for formatting simple documents.Communication skills are reinforced in this course
as students format and proofread. Students should schedule this course if they were not successful in middle school
Keyboarding or if they have never taken Keyboarding.
This course is designed to prepare students for related post-secondary
education and for employment in the petrochemical industry. Students
Tech receive dual credit from their high school and the La. Technical
College River Parishes Campus in pursuit of an Associate Degree. Students will be involved in job shadowing
programs in conjunction with participating plants to obtain real-life experiences as plant operators. Students obtain
OSHA certification as a prerequisite to job shadowing. $20 course fee.
Process
Technology I 2 4516
DE
PTEC
1010
This is a continuation toward the obtainment of an Associate
Degree in Process Technology. Students will receive dual credit,
Tech
both high school and college credit, as in PT I. Students will receive
certification in CPR and forklift training as a supplement toward their degree.
Process
Technology II
DE
2
Publications
Yearbook
1
4517
502
PTEC
2030
HS
Students take photos, write stories, and prepare layouts in order to produce the
school’s yearbook.
This program prepares students for leadership roles while making them aware of their
rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. It is a stimulus for
promoting graduation from high school by providing rewarding opportunities that benefit the student, community, and
nation.
ROTC I
1 8022
HS
This course continues to prepare students for leadership roles while making them
aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. It is a
stimulus for promoting graduation from high school by providing rewarding opportunities that will benefit the student,
community, and nation.
ROTC II
1 8023
HS
This course continues to prepare students for leadership roles while making them
aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. It is a
stimulus for promoting graduation from high school by providing rewarding opportunities that will benefit the student,
community, and nation.
ROTC III
1 8024
HS
This course continues to prepare students for leadership roles while making them
aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. It is a
stimulus for promoting graduation from high school by providing rewarding opportunities that will benefit the student,
community, and nation.
ROTC IV
1 8025
HS
This course requires career and college research, weekly reading, a review of ACT
core content, and testing strategies designed to help scores improve along with the
completion and presentation of a Senior portfolio. Successful completion earns the student a diploma endorsement.
Senior
Project
1
4100
HS
Students exchange simple spoken and written information in Spanish. They will
present orally and in writing information in Spanish that contains a variety of
vocabulary, phrases, and structural patterns. The students will use verbal and non-verbal cues to understand simple
spoken and written messages in Spanish. They will demonstrate skills to sustain brief oral and written exchanges in
Spanish using familiar phrases and sentences. The students develop an awareness of perspectives, practices and
products of Spanish cultures. The students demonstrate an understanding of the significance of culture through
comparisons between francophone cultures and the cultures of the United States. $10 course fee.
Spanish I
1
1290
HS
Page 23 of 34
Spanish II
1
1291
Prerequisite: Spanish I. Continuation of Spanish I with strong emphasis on
grammar, reading, and writing. $10 course fee.
HS
Students participate in a variety of activities that will help to prepare them for
real-life communication situations. Students will learn skills in interviewing for a
job, public speaking, and dealing with the public. This course explores other forms of communicating through radio
and TV broadcasting, newspapers, magazines, photography, and theatre.
Speech I
1
512
HS
Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 or higher. The delivery of carefully
prepared speeches; audience analysis, outlining, and adapting
researched subject to common speaking situations; production of voice, articulation, pronunciation, and body activity.
Students are screened for possible speech and hearing problems. (Spring semester only). Students must attend the
SMA to schedule this course. Upon completion of this course, students receive 3 hours of college credit.
Speech
Elective
1
505
DE
The first half of this course is designed to provide an overview of the field of sports
medicine as well as expose students to fundamental skills involved in a sports
medicine healthcare setting. Students learn about the study of medicine and how the field of sports medicine is unique
in its focus and delivery of health care. The second half of this course provides students with an overview of the
pathology of sports injuries and basic management skills. Students learn about the body’s response to an injury and
how to apply basic emergency action principles and skills. An emphasis is placed on an athlete’s psychological and
sociological response to an injury and basic coping strategies utilized by healthcare professions to assist them to
recovery. Each course will receive ½ unit credit.
Sports
1
Medicine I & II
1935/
1936
HS
The course provides a knowledge base on the management techniques of athletic
injuries and illnesses used by professional healthcare providers. It also allows
students the opportunity to select their own sports medicine topics for study.
Sports
Medicine III
1
HS
Only students enrolled in the special education program are eligible for this course
that provides assistance with studying, test-taking strategies, organization,
completion of class assignments, and academic coaching. Individual student needs determine daily class activities.
Student must be responsible in bringing to class all necessary materials to complete class assignments and any
additional materials as instructed by study skills teacher.
Study
Skills
1 5037
HS
This course is an introduction to the concepts, procedures, and applications of a word
processing program. Emphasis is placed on skill development and efficient operation
of the program in creating, storing, retrieving, editing, printing, and manipulating documents.Skills in keyboarding and
critical thinking are reinforced as students format, create, and proofread brochures, programs, newsletters, power
point presentations, and manuscripts.
Word
Processing
1
443
HS
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER
This program focuses on skills needed by employers in industry,
construction and agricultural mechanics related fields. Units in this program
Tech include: Safety, Welding, Pipefitting, Metal Fabrication, Millwright,
Machinist, Mechanics, and Electricity. The students will be introduced to construction math, hand tools, power tools,
blueprints, basic rigging, and job seeking skills. Lab fee required. Upon completion of this course, students receive 6
hours of credit through LTC. $15 course fee.
NCCER
Pipfitting
2
4514
DE
Prerequisite: ABC Pipefitting. Students continue to develop skills needed in
industrial, construction and agricultural mechanics-related careers. Units
Tech include advanced safety, welding, metal fabrication, pipefitting, mechanics,
electricity, millwright and machinist work. Lab fee required. Upon completion of this course, students receive 11 hours
of credit through LTC. $15 course fee.
NCCER
Welding
Tech
Advanced
Welding
2
4509
DE
2
1134
DE
Tech
Prerequisites: ABC Pipefitting and ABC Welding. Advanced Welding I
allows seniors to develop advanced skills needed in local industry,
Page 24 of 34
construction, and agricultural mechanics- related careers. Units include safety, shielded metal arc welding-groove
welds, plate and pipe joint fit-up and alignment, gas metal arc welding, flux-core arc welding, and gas tungsten arc
welding. Students may earn technical college credits through dual enrollment, and continue developing their
leadership skills through participation in FFA activities. $15 course fee. Upon completion of this course, students
receive 3 hours of credit through LTC.
(Dual Enrollment) 2 units
Prerequisites: ABC Pipefitting in Agriscience, ABC Welding in Agriscience,
Tech and Advanced Welding I Advanced Welding II allows seniors to develop
advanced skills needed in local industry, construction, and agricultural mechanics-related careers. Units in this
program include safety, advanced shielded metal arc welding-groove welds, advanced plate and pipe joint fit-up and
alignment, advanced gas metal arc welding, advanced flux-core arc welding, and advanced gas tungsten arc welding.
Students have the opportunity to earn technical college credits through dual enrollment, and continue developing their
leadership skills through participation in FFA activities. Lab fee $15.00. Upon successful completion of this course,
students will receive 4 hours of credit through LTC.
ADVANCED
WELDING II
2
DE
(Both courses scheduled consecutively)Ag I provides students with basic
knowledge of agriculture and science applications in agriculture. Units
Tech include animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural mechanics,
food science technology, and agricultural leadership. Mathematics, Science, English, Biology, and Human Relations
skills will be reinforced in the course. Supervised agricultural experience programs and the FFA leadership activities
are integral components of the course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional
competencies. Horticulture provides students with an overview of the industry. Topics include an orientation to the
horticulture industry in Louisiana, types of growing media, basic plant science, plant propogation, vegetable
production, and fruit production. Scientific, mathematical, economic, and technical principals are reinforced in this
course, as are communication and critical thinking skills. Work-based learning strategies for both courses are field
trips and activities in the school greenhouse or lab facility. $15 course fee.
Agriscience I
&
2
Horticulture
101
105
DE
(Both courses scheduled consecutively)Prerequisite: Agriscience I. This
course provides basic knowledge of agriculture and science applications in
DE
Tech agriculture. Units include animal science, soil science, plant science,
agricultural mechanics, and agricultural leadership. Mathematics, Science,
English, Biology, and Human Resources skills will be reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies
appropriate for this course are school-based enterprises, field trips, and internships. Supervised agricultural
experience (SAE) programs and the FFA leadership activities are integral components of the course and provide
many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies. This course can count for one unit of
Science credit for graduation. Ag. Construction Tech provides students with basic skills needed in the construction of
buildings commonly used in agricultural occupations. Emphasis is on skill development in blueprint reading, carpentry,
plumbing, concrete work, and electrical wiring. Mathematical and communication skills are reinforced. Students can
work toward industry certification through the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER).
$15 course fee.
Agriscience II
& Ag.
Construction
Tech
102
2
119
(Both courses scheduled consecutively)Prerequisite: Agriscience II. This is
an advanced study in Agriscience based upon the local agricultural
Tech workforce and economic needs of the community. The major areas of study
include personal development skills, animal systems, plant systems, environment issues, and mechanical skills. The
Ag. Elective provides opportunities to utilize skills learned in a hands-on laboratory environment. Students work under
the guidance of the instructor to gain practical hands-on experience in all areas of Agriscience. Emphasis placed upon
safety and the development of work ethics along with attainment of proficiency in all areas. $15 course fee.
Agriscience III
103
& Ag. Elective 2
114
DE
(Both courses scheduled consecutively)Prerequisite: Biology. Students
must be 16 years old by the completion of this course in order to
HMDT
1170
Tech schedule this course. This is the first of two courses designed to prepare
students with the entry-level skills and knowledge common to health
care. The course provides clinical skills, such as vital signs, height and weight, lifting, positioning, and ambulating of
patients as well as employable skills. This course includes an overview of health care professions, body mechanics,
standard precautions, and legal responsibilities. Oral and written skills are reinforced through in-school lab activities
designed to develop clinical skills. Medical Terminology enables students to identify terms by analyzing their
components. The course is designed to study anatomy and physiology of the body systems. Work based learning
strategies include job shadowing to appropriate health care facilities. Students will purchase assigned scrubs to be
worn in clinical setting. Upon completion of this course, students receive 5 hours of college credit through.
Allied Health I
4571
& Medical
2
4559
Terminology
DE
Page 25 of 34
(Both courses scheduled consecutively)Prerequisite: Allied Health I. This
is the second of two courses designed to provide specific entry-level skills
Tech and knowledge that prepares the student to work in health care. The
focus is on skill development, both oral and written, of the language
utilized in the health care professions. Additional emphasis is on interpersonal skill development, work ethics, and
application of health care skills. Work-based strategies include internships that allow hands-on experiences to
observe and participate in the daily activities of health care professionals of interest to the individual student and to
perform certain job tasks in the clinical setting. Students will be under the supervision of a designated mentor at the
facility in the absence of the instructor. First Responder provides the knowledge and skills to take appropriate action
as the first to an emergency situation. It provides instruction in systems and structures of surface anatomy and key
principals of physiology. Students perform an assessment of a patient’s vital functions. Upon completion of this
course, certification in CPR for Healthcare Providers and First Responder is available for students who meet EMS
course requirements and successfully pass the required written and skills test. To receive certifications, student
must have 2.0 GPA the semester prior to this course. Lab Fee: $20.00
Allied Health II
& First
Responder
2
4572
4557
DE
MAST
1110
This course is the first 225 clocked hours of the 1500 hr. curriculum
required by theLouisiana State Board of Cosmetology for licensure
Tech as a Cosmetologist. Students will be introduced to the basics of
Cosmetology with Theory instructions reinforced with hands-on
practical and technical procedures. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the meaning, origin and
significance of Cosmetology in society. Students will also be aware of the Career Opportunities as a licensed
professional. $10 registration fee and $20 course fee. Prerequisite: Students must be 16 years old to schedule this
course. This course is designed to prepare students to successfully challenge the state and national, written and
practical exams, administered by Louisiana State Board of Cosmetology for licensure. Procedural theory instruction is
reinforced with practical procedure practice mandated by the curriculum adopted to model the expectation of
Louisiana State Board of Cosmetology. Real life activities are designed to prepare our students for the demands of a
rewarding career in the profession. Upon successful completion of this course—1A & 1B, students will receive 20
hours of credit through LTC.
Cosmetology I
DE
2 4590
COSM 1110
COSM 1121
COSM 1130
COSM 1211
Cosmetology I is a pre-requisite to Cosmetology II. This course is the
second 225 clocked hours of the 1500 hr. curriculum required by the
Tech Louisiana State Board of Cosmetology for licensure as a Cosmetologist.
Students will begin to understand more about the Properties of Hair, Infection Control, Basic Haircutting, Shampooing
& Conditioning, Anatomy/physiology, and some Salon Management. This course of study will aid the student in
developing skills which will enhance their individual creative talents.
Cosmetology II
2 4591
DE
(Both courses are scheduled) Prerequisite: Nutrition and
Food/Advanced Nutrition and Food and students must be 16
Tech
years old and a junior to schedule this course. The first of two
courses focused on preparing students for careers in foodservice/hospitality industry. Emphasis is on obtaining skills
for the industry-based certification and preparation for internships in the industry. Topics include skills necessary for
careers in the hospitality industry, organization and management, professionalism, use of commercial equipment,
proper sanitation ad safety standards for industry and essential math. Upon completion, students receive 8 hours of
credit through LTC. $30 course fee.
ProStart I
& Food Service I 2
4524
4526
DE
CULN 1140
CULN 1120
(Both courses are scheduled) Prerequisite: Prostart I. The
second of two courses prepares students for careers in the food
Tech
serve/hospitality industry. Emphasis is on obtaining skills for the
industry-based certification and preparing for internships in the industry. Topics include career preparation, history of
the industry, lodging, and tourism, the art of service, marketing, purchasing and inventory control, as well as advanced
planning and food preparation techniques. Upon completion, students receive 3 hours of credit through LTC. $20
course fee.
ProStart II
4525
& Food Service II 2
4527
DE
CULN 1130
CULN 1220
Page 26 of 34
Appendix A
Forms
Page 27 of 34
Louisiana Department of Education
Individual Graduation Plan
Incoming Freshmen 2008-2009 and beyond – College and Career Diploma
Ninth Grade Entry Date:_________________
Name: _____________________________________ Area of Concentration:_____________________
Originating Middle School:___________________ High School Attending:___________________
NOTE: Students may complete an Academic Area of Concentration by completing the LA Core 4 curriculum.
Career Cluster (for Career/Technical Area of Concentration only):
___ Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
___ Education and Training
___ Human Services
___ Arts, A/V Technology & Communication
___ Finance
___ Information Technology
___ Architecture and Construction
___ Health Science
___ Law, Public Safety and Security
___ Business, Management and Administration
___ Hospitality and Tourism
___ Manufacturing
Diploma Endorsements:
Postsecondary Plans:
(Check College Catalogs for
specific entrance requirements)
9th Grade
EOC Test Results(circle one)
___ Government and Public
Administration
___ Marketing, Sales and
Services
___ Science, Technology,
Engineering & Math
___ Transportation, Distribution,
and Logistics

College and Career Diploma – no endorsements
Curriculum:
Academic Endorsement
LA Core 4
Career and Technical Endorsement TOPS Tech Option 1
LA Basic Core
Career and Technical Endorsement TOPS Tech Option 2
Other ______________________________________
Technical College
Technical Training
Four Year College
Community College
Employment
University
Military
Other _________________________

10th Grade
GEE Results: (circle one)
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond) Y N Approaching Basic or above: English
Y N Algebra I EOC test –Fair or above Y N Approaching Basic or above: Math
EOC Test Results(circle one)
11th Grade
GEE Results: (circle one)
Y
N Approaching Basic or above: Science
OR
Y
N Approaching Basic or above: Social
Studies
12th Grade
GEE Results: (circle one)
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: English
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: Mathematics
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: Science OR
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: Social Studies
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
EOC Test Results(circle one)
Y
N
English II EOC test–Fair or above EOC Test Results(circle one)
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
Y
N
Geometry EOC test–Fair or above (Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
Y
N
Fair or above on one math EOC
Y
N
Biology EOC test–Fair or above Y
N English III EOC test–Fair or above
N
Fair or above on one English EOC
Y
N American History EOC test–Fair or above Y
Y
N
Fair or above on one science or social studies EOC
(Remember to consider TOPS/
TOPS Tech Core Curriculum)
English I
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
PE/Health/ROTC:
____________________
(Remember to consider TOPS/
TOPS Tech Core Curriculum)
English II
(Remember to consider TOPS/
TOPS Tech Core Curriculum)
English III
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
PE/Health/ROTC:
____________________
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
PE/Health/ROTC:
____________________
(Remember to consider TOPS/
TOPS Tech Core Curriculum):
English:
___________________
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
PE/Health/ROTC:
____________________
General Electives General Electives
General Electives
General Electives
_____________________
______________________
______________________
_________________________
_____________________
______________________
______________________
_________________________
Electives: Career TechArea of
Electives: Career TechArea of
Concentration (4 units comprised of Concentration (4 units comprised of a
Concentration (4 units comprised of a
(4 units comprised of a sequence of related specialty
courses).
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_____________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
Signatures:
_____________________
Student
Date
_____________________
Parent
Date
_____________________
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Initials:
______________________
Student
Date
______________________
Parent
Date
______________________
Counselor/Advisor
Date
sequence of related specialty courses).
Electives: Career TechArea of Concentration
a sequence of related specialty
courses).
_____________________
sequence of related specialty courses).
Electives: Career TechArea of
Initials:
______________________
Student
Date
______________________
Parent
Date
______________________
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Page 28 of 34
Initials:
_________________________
Student
Date
_________________________
Parent
Date
_________________________
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Individual Graduation Plan Requirements
Act 257 of the 2009 Louisiana Legislature
By the end of the eighth grade, each student shall develop, with the input of his/her family, an Individual Graduation
Plan (IGP). The purposes of the IGP document and related activities are as follows:
 Explore educational and career possibilities
 Make appropriate secondary/postsecondary decisions as part of an overall career plan
 Plan based on the student’s talents and interests
 Consider graduation requirements relevant to the student’s chosen area of concentration and postsecondary
entrance requirements.
The Individual Graduation Plan Instructions:












Beginning in the eighth grade, The IGP is to be completely filled in for every high school student and signatures
completed in the 9th Grade column.
The Ninth Grade Entry Date shall reflect the date the student enters high school.
Fill in the student’s name in the Name blank,
The Area of Concentration blank shall indicate an Academic Area of Concentration or the student’s
concentration of elective courses if the student is choosing a Career/technical Area of Concentration.
Fill in the student’s Originating Middle School and the High School the student plans to attend.
Place a check mark next to the Career Cluster related to the student’s Area of Concentration if the student is
choosing a career/technical Area of Concentration.
Place a check mark next to the student’s Diploma Endorsements selection(s).
Place a check mark next to the student’s Postsecondary Plans.
Circle the appropriateiLEAP, GEE, and EOC score where indicated: Y=yes
and
N=no
Annually the student, parents, and advisor are to review the plan and initial the respective grade level regardless
of changes.
If a signature cannot be obtained, it is the school’s responsibility to maintain evidence of the efforts made to
obtain signatures.
Original signatures or evidence are to be kept on file at the school in the student’s portfolio or with the student’s
cumulative records.
Notice to students and parents:
Acts 257 of the 2009 Louisiana Legislature, §2925 A.
§2925. Individual Graduation Plans
A. (2) Each student, with the assistance of his parent or other legal guardian and school guidance personnel, shall be allowed to
choose the high school curriculum framework and related graduation requirements that best meets his postsecondary goals. Each
student's individual graduation plan shall include the recommended sequence of courses for successful completion of his chosen
major that aligns with postsecondary education, training, and the workforce and shall be reviewed annually and updated or
revised as needed.
(3) Individual graduation plans shall be sufficiently flexible to allow students to change their program of study, yet be
sufficiently structured to ensure that a student will meet the high school graduation requirements for his chosen major and be
qualified for admission to a postsecondary education institution or to enter the workforce.
(4) Each student's individual graduation plan shall be signed by the student and his parent or other legal guardian.
I have read and understand the graduation diploma requirements, and diploma endorsements as well as the TOPS/TOPS Tech requirements
listed in this pamphlet.
____________________________________________
Student
_______________________________________
Date
____________________________________________
Parent/Guardian
_______________________________________
Date
Louisiana Department of Education
Individual Graduation
_______________________________________
Plan
____________________________________________
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Page
29 of 34
Career Diploma
Ninth Grade Entry Date:
Name: _______________________________Area of Concentration: ___________________________
Originating Middle School:___________________ High School Attending:______________________
Career Cluster:
___ Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
___ Education and Training
___ Human Services
___ Arts, A/V Technology & Communication
___ Finance
___ Information Technology
___ Architecture and Construction
___ Health Science
___ Law, Public Safety and Security
___ Business, Management and Administration
___ Hospitality and Tourism
___ Manufacturing
___ Government and Public
Administration
___ Marketing, Sales and
Services
___ Science, Technology,
Engineering & Math
___ Transportation, Distribution,
Logistics
Technical College
Technical Training
Community College
Employment

Military 

Other ________________________
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
Postsecondary Plans:

9th Grade
iLEAP Results: (circle one)
Y N
Y N
Y N
Scored in upper quartile
Scored in middle quartile
Scored in lower quartile
EOC Test Results(circle one)
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
Y N Algebra I EOC test –Fair or above
GEE/LAA2 Results: (circle one)
Y
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: English
Language Arts
N Approaching Basic or above: Mathematics
EOC Test Results(circle one)
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
Y
N
English II EOC test–Fair or above
Y
N
Geometry EOC test–Fair or above
Y
N
Biology EOC test–Fair or above
GEE/LAA2 Results: (circle one)
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: English
Language Arts
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above:
Y
Mathematics
EOC Test Results(circle one)
Y
N
Approaching Basic or above: Science
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
OR
Y N English III EOC test–Fair or above
N
Approaching Basic or above: Social
Y N American History EOC test–Fair or above Y
Studies
GEE/LAA2 Results: (circle one)
Y
N Approaching Basic or above: Science
OR
N Approaching Basic or above: Social Studies
EOC Test Results(circle one)
(Entering 9th graders 2010 and beyond)
Y
N
Fair or above on one math EOC
Y
N
Fair or above on one English EOC
Y
N
Fair or above on one science or social
studies EOC
English I
____________________
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
PE/Health/ROTC:
____________________
Electives
English II
____________________
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
PE/Health/ROTC:
____________________
Electives
English
___________________
Mathematics:
____________________
Science:
____________________
Social Studies:
____________________
English
___________________
Mathematics:
____________________
Electives
Career/Technical Area of Concentration
(4 units comprised of a sequence of related
specialty courses)
Electives
Career/Technical Area of
Career/Technical Area of Concentration (4 Career/Technical Area of Concentration
Concentration (4 units comprised of a units comprised of a sequence of related
(4 units comprised of a sequence of related
specialty courses).
sequence of related specialty courses).
Signatures:
specialty courses).
Initials:
Initials:
Initials:
_____________________
______________________
______________________
_________________________
_____________________
______________________
______________________
_________________________
_____________________
______________________
______________________
_________________________
Student
Parent
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Date
Date
Student
Parent
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Date
Date
Student
Parent
Counselor/Advisor
Page 30 of 34
Date
Date
Date
Student
Parent
Counselor/Advisor
Date
Date
Date
Louisiana Career Diploma Requirements
English - 4 units
 English I, II
 The remaining units shall come from the following:
 Technical Reading and Writing
 Business English
 Business Communications
 Using Research in Careers (1/2 credit)
 American Literature (1/2 credit)
 Film in America (1/2 credit)
 English III
 English IV
 Senior Applications in English
 A course developed by the LEA and approved by BESE
Math – 4 units
 One of the following:
 Algebra I (1 unit) or
 Algebra I-Pt. 1 and Algebra I-Pt. 2 (2 units) or
 Applied Algebra I (1 unit)
 The remaining unit/s shall come from the following:
Geometry or Applied Geometry, Technical Math, Medical Math, Applications in Statistics and
Probability, Financial Math, Math Essentials, Algebra II, Advanced Math—Pre-Calculus, Discrete
Mathematics, or course(s) developed by the LEA and approved by BESE
Science – 3 units
 Biology
 1 unit from the following physical science cluster:
Physical Science, Integrated Science, Chemistry I, ChemCom, Physics I, or Physics of
Technology I
 The remaining unit shall come from the following:
Food Science, Forensic Science, Allied Health Science, Basic Body Structure and Function, Basic
Physics with Applications, Aerospace Science, Earth Science, Agriscience II, Physics of
Technology II, Environmental Science, Anatomy and Physiology, Animal Science, Biotechnology
in Agriculture
Environmental Studies in Agriculture, Health Science II, EMT – Basic, an additional course from
the physical science cluster, or course(s) developed by the LEA and approved by BESE
Social Studies – 3 units
½ unit of Civics
½ unit of Free Enterprise.
American History
1 unit from the following: Child Psychology and Parenthood Education, Law Studies, Psychology,
Sociology, World History, World Geography, Western Civilization, Economics, American
Government, African American Studies, Course developed by the LEA and approved by BESE
Health – ½ Unit
Physical Education – 1½ units
Career and Technical Education – 7 units


Education for Careers or Journey to Careers
6 credits required for a career Area of Concentration
Total – 23 units
Page 31 of 34
Return to top
Individual Graduation Plan Requirements
Act 257 of the 2009 Louisiana Legislature
By the end of the eighth grade, each student shall develop, with the input of his/her family, an Individual Graduation
Plan (IGP). The purposes of the IGP document and related activities are as follows:
 Explore educational and career possibilities
 Make appropriate secondary/postsecondary decisions as part of an overall career plan
 Plan based on the student’s talents and interests
 Consider graduation requirements relevant to the student’s chosen area of concentration and postsecondary
entrance requirements.
The Individual Graduation Plan Instructions:











Beginning in the eighth grade, The IGP is to be completely filled in for every high school student and signatures
completed in the 9th Grade column.
The Ninth Grade Entry Date shall reflect the date the student enters high school.
Fill in the student’s name in the Name blank,
The Area of Concentration blank shall indicate an Academic Area of Concentration or the student’s
concentration of elective courses if the student is choosing a Career/technical Area of Concentration.
Fill in the student’s Originating Middle School and the High School the student plans to attend.
Place a check mark next to the Career Cluster related to the student’s Area of Concentration if the student is
choosing a career/technical Area of Concentration.
Place a check mark next to the student’s Postsecondary Plans.
Circle the appropriateiLEAP/GEE 21 score where indicated: Y=yes
and
N=no
Annually the student, parents, and advisor are to review the plan and initial the respective grade level regardless
of changes.
If a signature cannot be obtained, it is the school’s responsibility to maintain evidence of the efforts made to
obtain signatures.
Original signatures or evidence are to be kept on file at the school in the student’s portfolio or with the student’s
cumulative records.
Notice to students and parents:
Acts 257 of the 2009 Louisiana Legislature, §2925 A.
§2925. Individual Graduation Plans
A. (2) Each student, with the assistance of his parent or other legal guardian and school guidance personnel, shall be allowed to
choose the high school curriculum framework and related graduation requirements that best meets his postsecondary goals. Each
student's individual graduation plan shall include the recommended sequence of courses for successful completion of his chosen
major that aligns with postsecondary education, training, and the workforce and shall be reviewed annually and updated or
revised as needed.
(3) Individual graduation plans shall be sufficiently flexible to allow students to change their program of study, yet be
sufficiently structured to ensure that a student will meet the high school graduation requirements for his chosen major and be
qualified for admission to a postsecondary education institution or to enter the workforce.
(4) Each student's individual graduation plan shall be signed by the student and his parent or other legal guardian.
I have read and understand the graduation diploma requirements, and diploma endorsements as well as the TOPS/TOPS Tech requirements listed in
this pamphlet.
____________________________________________
Student
_______________________________________
Date
____________________________________________
Parent/Guardian
_______________________________________
Date
____________________________________________
Counselor/Advisor
_______________________________________
Date
Page 32 of 34
Page 33 of 34
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