BTEC SPORT UNIT 1: Fitness for Sport and Exercise Emerging

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BTEC SPORT UNIT 1: Fitness for Sport and Exercise Emerging Learner Know Learning Aim A: Know about the components of fitness and the principles of training A.1 Components of physical fitness A.2 Components of skill related fitness A.3 Why fitness components are important for successful participation in given sports in terms of…. A.4 Exercise intensity and how it can be determined Aerobic Endurance, Muscular Endurance, Flexibility, Speed, Muscular Strength Body Composition Agility Balance Co‐Ordination Power Reaction Time Developing Learner Evolving Learner Know Define/Describe Secure Proficient Learner Learner Explain Expert Learner Apply Knows a limited number of components of physical fitness Knows and is able to describe all the components of physical fitness
Can explain all the components of physical fitness Can apply the components of physical fitness to given sporting situations Knows a limited number of components of skill related fitness Knows and is able to describe all the components of skill related fitness
Can explain all the components of skill related fitness Can apply the components of skill related fitness to given sporting situations Being able to perform efficiently Being able to successfully meet the physical demands of the sport in order to reach optimal performance Being able to successfully meet the skill related demands of the sport in order to reach optimal performance Intensity – be able to measure HR and apply HR intensity to fitness training methods Know about target zones and training thresholds; be able to calculate training zones and apply HR max to training Be able to calculate 60 – 85% of HR Max and know that this is the recommended training zone for CV Health and Fitness Know that the Borg (6‐20) RPE can be used as a measure of exercise intensity. Frequency – Know that frequency is the number of training sessions completed over a period of time Intensity – Know that intensity is how hard an individual will train Time – Know that Time is how long an individual will train for Type – Know that Type is how an individual will train Giving due consideration to the type of event / position played Intensity Target Zones Max HR Borg (6‐20) RPE Relationships between Max HR and RPE Application of FITT Principles Intensity – be able to measure HR Know about target zones and training thresholds A.5 The basic principles of training (FITT) Frequency Intensity Time Type Knows the FITT stands for Frequency, Intensity, Time and Type A.6 Additional principles of training Progressive Overload Specificity Individual Differences Adaptation Reversibility Variation Knows a limited number of additional principles of training Knows and is able to describe all the additional principles of training
Can explain the relationships between Maximum HR and RPE by selecting a training method to improve a specific component of fitness Can explain all the additional principles of training Application of FITT Principles to training methods, regimes and given exercise situations Application of FITT Principles to training methods, regimes and given exercise situations Application of the principles of training to training methods, regimes and given exercise settings Rest and Recovery Application of principles Emerging Know Learning Aim B: Explore different fitness training methods Developing Evolving Know Define/Describe Secure Proficient
Explain B.1 Requirements for each of the following fitness training methods Equipment Technique Warm up / Cool Down Application of FITT Making links Safe, correct use of equipment Safe, correct use training technique (With supervision) Safe, correct use of equipment
Safe, correct use training technique (Independently) Requirements for undertaking the fitness training method, including warm up and cool down B.2 Additional requirements for each of the fitness training methods Advantages / Disadvantages Application Know some advantages and disadvantages for each fitness training method Know advantages and disadvantages for each of the fitness training methods Know how to apply exercise intensity to fitness training methods Know how to apply the principles of training to fitness training methods B.3 Fitness training methods for… Flexibility Strength, muscular endurance and power Aerobic endurance Speed Appropriate application of a fitness training methods for a given situations Appropriate application of a fitness training methods to a given clients’ needs / goals / aims / objectives Flexibility:
Can explain static, ballistic and PNF stretching and the requirements for these methods of training Strength, muscular endurance and power: Can explain circuit training, free weights and plyometric and the requirements for these methods of training Aerobic Endurance: Can explain continuous training, fartlek, interval and circuit training and the requirements for these methods of training Speed: Can explain hollow sprints, accelerated sprints and interval training and the requirements for these methods of training Flexibility:
Know about static, ballistic and PNF stretching Strength, muscular endurance and power: Know about circuit training, free weights, plyometric Aerobic Endurance: Know about continuous training, fartlek, interval, circuit training Speed: Know about hollow sprints, accelerated sprints and interval training Expert Apply Application of basic principles of training (FITT) for each fitness training method Linking each fitness training method to the associated health related / skill related components of fitness. Appropriate application of fitness training methods for given situations Appropriate application of fitness training methods to given clients’ needs / goals / aims / objectives Flexibility: Can select the most appropriate type of flexibility stretching for a given situation Strength, muscular endurance and power: Can select the most appropriate type of training for a given situation Aerobic Endurance: Can select the most appropriate type of training for a given situation Speed: Can select the most appropriate type of training for a given situation BTEC SPORT UNIT 2: Practical Sports Performance Learning Aim A Understand the rules, regulations and scoring systems for selected sports A.1 Rules (or laws)
A.2 Regulations
A.3 Scoring Systems
A.4 Application of the rules / laws of sports in different situations A.5 Sports A.6 Roles of officials
A.7 Responsibilities of officials As regulated by national or international governing body for the sport Relating to players and participants, equipment, playing surface facilities, health and safety, time and officials Method of scoring goals or points, method and / or requirements of victory E.g. when a goal is scored when a player is offside, LBW in cricket, charging in the lead up to scoring to basketball, forward pass resulting in a try in rugby E.g. cricket, hockey, netball, rounders, volleyball, wheelchair basketball trampolining etc Roles of umpires, referees, judges, timekeepers, starters, table officials, third umpire, fourth official Appearance, equipment, fitness, qualifications, interpretation, and application of the rules, control of players, accountability to spectators, health and safety, fair play, use of technology, effective communication Emerging Learner Developing Learner Evolving Learner 1A.1
Describe the rules, regulations and scoring systems of a selected sport 2A.P1 Describe the rules, regulations and scoring systems of 2 selected sports 1A.2
Apply the rules or a selected sport in 2 given situations 2A.P2
Apply the rules of a selected sport in four specific situations 1A.3
Describe the roles of officials from a selected sport 2A.P3
Describe the roles and responsibilities of officials from 2 selected sports Secure Learner Proficient Learner Expert Learner 2A.M1
For each of the selected sports, explain the role and responsibilities of officials and the application of rules, regulations and scoring systems 2A.D1
Compare and contrast the roles and responsibilities of officials from 2 selected sports, suggesting valid recommendations for improvement to the application of rules, regulations and scoring systems for each sport Learning Aim B Practically demonstrate skills, techniques and tactics in selected sports B.1 Technical demands
B.2 Tactical demands
B.3 Safe and appropriate participation B.4 Relevant skills and techniques B.5 Relevant tactics
B.6 Effective use of skills and techniques, and the correct application of each component B.7 Effective use of skills, techniques and tactics B.8 Isolated practises
B.9 Conditioned practises
B.10 Competitive situations Continuous skills, serial skills, discrete skills, movement, use of equipment, communication, other demands specific to the sport Decision making, defending and attacking, choice and use of shots or strokes, variation, conditions, use of space, other demands specific to sport Demonstration of skills, techniques and tactics within a controlled environment: no competition, drills, set plays Relevant to the selected sport and practise
Relevant to the selected sport and practise / situation E.g. Rugby conversion, including head position, body position, placement of non‐
kicking foot, placement of kicking foot, connection with the ball The use of skills and techniques within conditioned and competitive situations, and effective decision making and selection of skills, techniques, and tactics when under pressure from opponents Demonstrated independently without any pressure or external forces, completed successfully and without fault Small sided games, a limited number of touches, a set number of defenders or attackers Full sided games, appropriate opposition, match officials Emerging Learner Developing Learner Evolving Learner 1B.4
Describe the technical demands of 2 selected sports 2B.P4
Describe the technical and tactical demands of 2 selected sports 1B.5 Use relevant skills and techniques effectively, in 2 selected sports, in ISOLATED practises 2B.P5
Use relevant skills, techniques and tactics effectively, in 2 selected sports, in CONDITIONED practises Secure Learner Proficient Learner 2B.M2
Use relevant skills, techniques and tactics, in 2 selected sports, in COMPETITIVE SITUATIONS Expert Learner Emerging Developing Learner Evolving Learner Learning Aim C: Be able to review sports performance C.1 Observation checklist Using video analysis: Technical demands of sport (skills and techniques), Production of a checklist suitable for self‐analysis of performance in selected sports, Tactical demands of sport C.2 Reviewing performance Strengths and areas for improvement: skills and techniques, specific to the sport, and non‐specific Self‐analysis: completion of observation checklist, e.g. use of video Strengths and areas for improvement: tactics, the effectiveness of decision making Activities to improve performance (short and long term goals) 1C.6
Produce, with guidance, an observation checklist that can be used effectively to review own performance in 2 selected sports 1C.7
Review own performance in 2 selected sports, identifying strengths and areas for improvement Secure Learner Proficient Learner Expert Learner 2C.P6
Independently produce an observation checklist that can be used effectively to review own performance in 2 selected sports 2C.P7
Review own performance in 2 selected sports, describing strengths and areas for improvement 2C.M3
Explain strengths and areas for improvement in 2 selected sports, recommending activities to improve own performance 2C.D2 Analyse strengths and areas for improvement, in 2 selected sports, justifying recommended activities to improve own performance BTEC SPORT UNIT 4: The Sports Performer in Action Learning Aim A: Know about the short term responses and long term adaptations of the body systems to exercise A.1 Short term effects of exercise on the musculoskeletal system Increased production of synovial fluid Increased joint range of motion Micro tears in muscle fibres New bone formations Increased metabolic activity A.2 Short term effects of exercise on the cardiorespiratory system Increased heart rate Increased breathing rate Increased blood flow Sweat production and skin reddening Vasoconstriction / vasodilation Increased build‐up of lactic acid Increased cardiac output Increased blood pressure Muscular activity increases Hypertrophy Increased bone density Stronger connective tissues Increased stability of joints Thicker hyaline cartilage Skeletal muscles adapt to using more oxygen Increased number of mitochondria Decreased risk of osteoporosis Improved posture Decreased resting heart rate
Increase in heart size and strength Increase in stroke volume Bradycardia Decreased risk of hypertension Increased vital capacity Increased efficiency to deliver oxygen and remove waste products Increased lung efficiency Increased VO2Max A.3 Long term adaptations of the musculoskeletal system A.4 Long term adaptations of the cardiorespiratory system Emerging Learner Developing Learner Evolving Learner Secure Learner Proficient Learner Expert Learner 1A.1
Outline 2 ways in which the musculoskeletal system responds to short term exercise 1A.2
Outline 2 ways in which the cardiorespiratory system responds to short term exercise 2A.P1
Describe ways in which the musculoskeletal system responds to short term exercise 2A.M1
Explain responses of the musculoskeletal system to short term exercise 2A.P2
Describe ways in which the cardiorespiratory system responds to short term exercise 2A.M2
Explain responses of the cardiorespiratory system to short term exercise 1A.3
Summarise 2 long term adaptations of the musculoskeletal system resulting from exercise 2A.P3
Summarise, using relevant examples, long term adaptations of the musculoskeletal system to exercise 2A.M3
Explain long term adaptations of the musculoskeletal system to exercise 1A.4
Summarise 2 long term adaptations of the cardiorespiratory system resulting from exercise 2A.P4
Summarise, using relevant examples, long term adaptations of the cardiorespiratory system to exercise 2A.M4
Explain long term adaptations of the cardiorespiratory system to exercise 2A.D1
Using 3 different sports activities compare and contrast how the musculoskeletal and respiratory systems respond and adapt to exercise Emerging Learner Developing Learner Evolving Learner Secure Learner Proficient Learner Expert Learner Learning Aim B: Know about the different energy systems used during sports performance B.1 The anaerobic energy system – not using oxygen B.2 ATP‐PC / alactic acid anaerobic system B.3 Glycolysis / lactic acid anaerobic system B.4 The aerobic system –
using oxygen Sports that use this system to provide energy are very high intensity and explosive Reliance on stored ATP, energy supplied by ATP Another stored molecule PC helps to restore ATP PC is restored aerobically Energy is supplied by ATP and PC When this system runs out of ATP‐PC stores, glycolysis takes places ATP is made from glucose stored in liver and muscles Energy is supplied by ATP, PC and muscle glycogen Energy is supplied by muscle glycogen Waste product is lactic acid When system can no longer maintain energy requirements, the aerobic system starts to produce energy Sports that sue this systems are moderate to high intensity Sports that use this system provide energy used for sustain activity are long distance events 1B.5
Describe the 2 main energy systems, including examples of sports that use each system 2B.P5
Describe the function of the 3 energy systems in the production and release of energy for sports performance 2B.M5
Using 2 selected sports, explain how the body uses both the anaerobic and aerobic energy systems 2B.D2
Compare and contrast how the energy systems are used in sports with different demands 
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