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U.S. Department of Justice
Alan Vinegrad
Office Of The Attorney General
Eliot Spitzer
UNITED STATES ATTORNEY
Eastern District of New York
ATTORN EY GEN ERAL
STATE OF NEW YORK
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 4, 2002
Contacts:
Peggy Long
U.S. Attorney’s Office
(718) 254-6267
Thomas DeMaria
Waterfront Commission of
New York Harbor
(212) 905-9203
Juanita Scarlett
New York State Attorney General
(212) 416-8060
James Margolin
Federal Bureau of Investigation
(212) 384-2720
Joseph McGowan
U. S. Department of Labor
(202) 693-5216
Monica Brown
District Attorney’s Office, Richmond County
(718) 556-7150
Michael O’Looney
New York City Police Department
(646) 610-6700
PRESS RELEASE
17 MEMBERS AND ASSOCIATES OF THE GAMBINO CRIME
FAMILY INDICTED FOR CORRUPTION ON THE NEW YORK
WATE RFRON T -- INCLUDIN G GAM BINO FA MILY BOSS
PETER GOTTI, CAPTAINS ANTHONY “SONNY” CICCONE AND
RICH ARD V. GO TTI, A ND A SSOCI ATE FRA NK “R ED” SC OLL O,
VIC E PR ESID ENT OF I NTE RNA TIO NAL LON GSH ORE ME N’S
ASSOCIAT ION, AFL -CIO, AND P RESIDEN T OF ITS L OCAL 1814
ALAN VINEGRAD, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New
York, ELIOT SPITZER, Attorney General of the State of New York, KEVIN P. DONOVAN,
Assistant Director-in-Charge of the New York Office of the Federal Bureau of Invest igation,
2
MICHAEL C. AXELROD, Commissioner, Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor,
GORDON HEDDELL, Inspector General, United States Department of Labor, WILLIAM L.
MURPHY, District Attorney, Richmond County, New York, and RAYMOND W. KELLY,
Commissioner of the New York City Police Department, today announced the unsealing of an
indictment charging 17 members and associates of the Gambino Organized Crime Family of La
Cosa Nostra with various crimes, including racketeering, racketeering conspiracy, extortion, wirefraud, loan-sharking, operat ing illegal gambling businesses, money laundering, witness tampering
and related crimes.1 The 68-count indictment focuses on the Gambino family’s corrupt influence,
through extortion and wire-fraud, over the International Longshoremen’s Association, AFL-CIO
(the “ILA”), the ILA’s national health plan, known as MILA, the Local 1814 and Local 1
chapters of the ILA, and businesses on the waterfront. The indictment also alleges, among other
crimes, extortions of individual waterfront employees and their relatives, several business owners
and an individual in the film industry, as well as extortionate debt collection, the operation of two
large scale illegal gambling businesses, a scheme to launder the proceeds of the criminal activity,
and witness tampering.
This case represents the latest in a series of assaults on organized crime’s
corruption of the labor unions on the New York/New Jersey waterfronts through control of the
ILA. 2 In January 2002, a federal grand jury in Brooklyn returned an indictment charging eight
1
The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and
until proven guilty. The charges against each defendant are listed in the attached summary.
2
In 1979 Anthony Scotto, then President of the ILA Local 1814 and General Organizer of
the ILA, and Anthony Anastasio, then Executive Vice-President of Local 1814 and a Vice
President of the ILA, both of whom were Gambino family members, were convicted of
racketeering arising out of union corruption, and sentenced to five years imprisonment. See
United States v. Scotto et al., 641 F.2d 47 (2d Cir. 1980). In 1990, the United States Attorney’s
Office for the Southern District of New York brought a civil racketeering action against
ANTHONY CICCONE, FRANK SCOLLO, Local 1814 and others, which resulted in a 1991
Consent Decree that, among other things, prohibit ed CICCONE and SCOLLO from knowingly
3
members of the Genovese family, including its boss, Vincent Gigante, with, among other crimes,
extortion of the ILA. United States v. Bellomo et al., 02 Cr 140 (ILG). That case dealt primarily
with the Genovese family’s control of the ILA and ILA Locals operating on the waterfront in the
New York metropolitan area, northern New Jersey, and Miami, Florida. With the indictment
announced today, law enforcement seeks to dismantle the Gambino family’s corrupt influence and
control of the ILA and ILA Locals 1814 and 1 on the Brooklyn and Staten Island waterfront.
The case announced today also represents the third time in a decade that law enforcement has
prosecuted the leadership of the Gambino family, a criminal group that goes to extreme lengths to
operate in secrecy. 3
Each of the 17 defendants charged today are members or associates of the
Gambino organized crime family of La Cosa Nostra (“the Gambino family”), including the boss
(PETER GOTTI), two captains (ANTHONY CICCONE, also known as “Sonny” and RICHARD
V. GOTTI), four soldiers ( RICHARD G. GOTTI, PRIMO CASSARINO, JEROME
BRANCATO, also known as “Jerry,” and PETER PIACENTI, also known as “Pete 17") and 10
associates, including the Local 1814 President and ILA Vice President (FRANK SCOLLO, also
known as “Red” and “the little guy”), an owner and operator of a company named GPP/VIP,
which provides prescription pharmaceutical services (VINCENT NASSO, also known as “Dr.
Nasso”), and eight other associates (JULIUS R. NASSO, RICHARD BONDI, SALVATORE
CANNATA, THOMAS LISI, CARMINE MALARA, ANNA EYLENKRIG, ANTHONY
and improperly associating with organized crime figures, and prohibited CICCONE from
participat ing in the affairs o f any entity doing business on the Port of New York and New Jersey.
3
In 1992, John J. Gotti, the former boss of the Gambino family, was convicted of
racketeering in the U. S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York. In 1999, Gotti’s
son, John A. Gott i, then acting boss of the Gambino family, was convicted of racket eering
pursuant to a plea agreement with the U. S. Attorneys’ Offices in the Southern and Eastern
Districts of New York.
4
PANSINI and JEROME ORSINO, JR.).
The three-year investigation, jointly conducted by the federal government and the
New York State Organized Crime Task Force, included the use of court-authorized wiretaps and
eavesdropping devices, and revealed that following the 1999 federal racketeering conviction of
Gambino family acting boss John A. Gotti, his uncle, PETER GOTTI, became the acting boss and
later the boss of the Gambino family. The investigation further revealed that despite the 1991
civil consent decree which prohibited CICCONE from participating in ILA and waterfront affairs,
he continued to oversee the Gambino family’s criminal interests in the ILA (including Local 1814
and Local 1), and the Brooklyn and Staten Island waterfronts. 4 Those criminal interests extended
to job assignments on the waterfront, selection of high level ILA officials, and receipt of
kickbacks from the ILA national health plan.
The crimes charged in the indictment, and detailed in a detention letter filed by the
government in court today, include:
1.
Extortion of the ILA
The indictment alleges that the Gambino and Genovese families divided organized
crime’s control over the New York and New Jersey waterfronts, with Brooklyn and Staten Island
under t he Gambino family, and Manhattan and New Jersey under the Genovese family. The
government’s investigation revealed that the Gambino and the Genovese families coordinated
efforts to control selection of ILA officials at the highest level. Between April 2000 and August
2000, CICCONE, CASSARINO, SCOLLO and BRANCATO, together with members of the
Genovese family, intimidated various ILA officials into placing a Genovese family associate in an
4
In 1994, CICCONE was found to have violated the 1991 consent decree based on his
improper association with organized crime figures, and that finding was affirmed in 1996. See
United States v. Local 1804-1 et al., No. 90 Civ. 0963, (S.D.N.Y. Jan. 30, 1996) (Martin, J.) In
May 1998, CICCONE was convicted of criminal contempt for that prohibited association, and
sentenced to three months imprisonment.
5
executive position on the ILA’s Executive Council, as part of a scheme to elevate him to the
presidency of the ILA during a year when the election would be closed to the ILA’s general
membership. As part of the scheme, CICCONE expected control of the Executive Council
position to revert back to the Gambino family once the Genovese associate became president. In
one court-authorized intercept, CICCONE explained the scheme to CASSARINO, stating that he
was “accommodating them to help them get the guy to the top spot . . . we gonna accommodate
them and let them have it just for a period of time until he moves to the top spot.”
Consistent with the Gambino and the Genovese families sharing control of the ILA,
CASSARINO conveyed the details of the scheme to BRANCATO, who confirmed them with unindicted co-conspirator Alan Longo, a captain in the Genovese family.
2.
Extortion of MILA
The government’s investigat ion revealed additional cooperat ion between the
Gambino and Genovese families in a kick-back scheme involving MILA, the ILA’s national health
plan. In 1998, CICCONE, CASSARINO, VINCENT NASSO, and SCOLLO, together with
members and associates of the Genovese family, intimidated certain MILA trustees into awarding
a prescription pharmaceuticals service contract to GPP/VIP, a company owned in part by
VINCENT NASSO. The Gambino and Genovese families then split a kick-back of approximately
$400,000 from VINCENT NASSO in exchange for the awarding of the contract. When it
appeared that GPP/VIP’s contract was not going to be extended for an additional three years, in
November 2001, CICCONE, through CASSARINO, directed ILA vice president SCOLLO, who
by then had also become a MILA trustee, to “look into what happened with Vinny Nasso, why he
lost that thing” and to “do whatever you gotta do.”
3.
Extortion of ILA Local 1814
The investigation disclosed that between April 2000 and August 2001,
6
CICCONE, CASSARINO, SCOLLO, and PANSINI engaged in a scheme to force out a Local
1814 delegate and replace him with a handpicked candidate of CICCONE and his crew.
CASSARINO and Local 1814 president SCOLLO met surreptitiously on numerous occasions in
SCOLLO’s car to discuss the details of the scheme. According to the government’s detention
letter, many of those conversations were intercepted in a court-authorized eavesdropping device
placed in SCOLLO’s car.
4.
Extortion of ILA Local 1
The investigation revealed that between June 2000 and August 2001, CICCONE,
CASSARINO, BONDI, SCOLLO, and others, schemed to coerce Local 1 officials into following
CICCONE’s directives regarding the management of the Local, including the placement of
members in particular jobs. CICCONE enforced his rule on the waterfront by sending warnings
to t he Local 1 officers through SCOLLO, CASSARINO and others, on one occasion sending
CASSARINO and BONDI to a Local official’s personal residence to deliver his message.
5.
Extortions of Businessmen
The indictment, as detailed in the government’s detention letter, alleges that
CICCONE and several co-defendants extorted owners of waterfront businesses, including
Howland Hook Container Terminal and a trucking company, both in Staten Island, as well as a
business in Brooklyn. SCOLLO is charged with personally collecting thousands of dollars in
extortion money from an owner of Howland Hook Container Terminal on a monthly basis
between April 2000 and August 2001. CICCONE is charged with personally collecting thousands
of dollars in extortion money from the Staten Island trucking company owner on a bi-monthly
basis, beginning in 1999 and continuing through May 2002. According to the go vernment’s
detention letter, when the Brooklyn business owner balked at storing illegal gambling devices at
his business, CASSARINO was intercepted over wire-taps stating, “when I tell you to do
7
something ... you ... do what I tell you to do. You hear me? If you don’t like it let me know
now, I’ll come there and throw you through the ... window.”
The indictment also charges that beginning in September 2000 and continuing
through May 2002, CICCONE, CASSARINO, VINCENT NASSO and JULIUS NASSO
attempted to extort an individual in the film industry. According to the government’s detention
letter, the defendants attempted to use CICCONE’s position as a captain in the Gambino
organized crime family to pressure the victim either to pay them money, or in the alternative, to
include JULIUS NASSO in the victim’s film projects. At one point, CICCONE instructed
JULIUS NASSO to direct the victim to pay CICCONE $150,000 for each film he made. When
CICCONE learned that JULIUS NASSO had promised to share part of the anticipated extortion
proceeds with others without CICCONE’s prior approval, CICCONE excoriated NASSO,
“don't you ever, ever, bring somebody in for ... nothing, on something I'm ... doing ... without
telling me first.... If they ... think ... that I'm gonna go threaten this dirty ... and they're gonna ride
it on my ... ass.... What are you, ... kidding me?”
6.
Extortion of Longshoremen and Their Relatives
The indictment charges that between October 2000 and January 2001, CICCONE,
CASSARINO, and SCOLLO extorted thousands of dollars from a relative of an individual
seeking employment on the waterfront, in exchange for a waterfront job. In anot her count, the
indictment charges that during the summer of 2001, using CASSARINO and SCOLLO,
CICCONE attempted to force an employee of Howland Hook Container Terminal to step down
from his job so that a relative of Gambino family member Anthony Anast asio could be installed in
his place. In a third count, the indictment alleges that CICCONE and CASSARINO demanded
that an injured longshoreman pay them a portion of the monetary settlement he received as a
result of a work-related injury.
8
7.
Extortion of Debtors
The indictment alleges several counts involving the use of extortionate means to
collect debts from various individuals, including a loan-shark victim, a gambler and a businessman.
According to the government’s detention letter, in June 2001, CASSARINO threatened a
borrower who was late with a payment, “listen to me, listen to me ... if I don’t see you today, you
got a big ... problem, you hear me? You’re gonna see what’s gonna happen.” When a gambler
avoided paying a debt, CASSARINO warned, “You think you can outsmart me, you see what the
... is going to happen to you .... I went to your restaurant last night .... I’m gonna grab your
mother today.”
8.
Illegal Gambling and Bookmaking
The indictment alleges that from March 2000 to the present, various defendants
operated two illegal gambling businesses. One, supervised by CICCONE and run by
CASSARINO, BONDI, ORSINO, PIACENTI, and EYLENKRIG, involved illegal
“joker/poker” style arcade machines which the defendants placed in approximately 20 different
locations in the New York City metropolitan area, and from which they collected hundreds of
dollars in cash per week from each location. The second gambling business was an illegal sportsbetting operation supervised by CICCONE and run by CASSARINO, BONDI, BRANCATO,
ORSINO, LISI, MALARA, and CARADONNA. The defendants allegedly used off-shore wirerooms in Costa Rica to place tens of thousands of dollars in sports bets per week for
approximately 30 bettors.
9.
Money Laundering
The indictment charges that proceeds from the crimes of CICCONE’s crew were
secretly delivered to PETER GOTTI on a monthly basis. SCOLLO regularly collected extortion
proceeds on behalf of the crew and delivered them to CASSARINO for delivery to CICCONE.
9
BRANCATO, in turn, delivered a portion of the proceeds from the crew’s criminal activity to
PETER GOTTI during meetings on the streets of Howard Beach, Queens. After BRANCATO’s
arrest in April 2001, the cash deliveries were made by CASSARINO to defendants RICHARD G.
GOTTI and RICHARD V. GOTTI. On November 29, 2001, federal and state agents executed a
search warrant on RICHARD G. GOTTI after one of CASSARINO’s deliveries and seized
approximately $12,000 in cash from GOTTI’s pockets.
10.
Witness Tampering
The indictment alleges that in February 2002, CICCONE and CASSARINO
directed a witness who had been subpoenaed to testify before a federal grand jury sitting in
Brooklyn to refuse to answer questions because, according to intercepted statements by
CICCONE, the witness’s answers would open a “Pandora’s box” for CICCONE and his crew.
In announcing the unsealing of the indictment and the defendants’ arrests, United
States Attorney ALAN VINEGRAD stated: “Today’s charges, together with our prosecution of
the Genovese family leadership, present an historic opportunity to deliver perhaps the most
powerful blow yet to o rganized crime’s control over the New York waterfront . I am proud o f the
fact that so many of us in law enforcement - the FBI, the New York State Attorney General, the
Waterfront Commission, the Department of Labor, the Staten Isand DA’s office, and the NYPD have joined together in this effort. The Genovese and Gambino families have worked together for
years to control the waterfront. We in law enforcement are going to work together to stop it.”
New York State Attorney General ELIOT SPITZER stated: “This case is a major
step in our efforts to clean up the wide-spread corruption of a vital segment of New York’s
economy - - our waterfronts, and as important, to dismantle the Gambino crime family’s
influence. Working men and women who make their living moving commerce through our ports
and the labor unions representing them were victimized by the illicit activities of this powerful
10
criminal organization.”
FBI Assistant Director-in-Charge KEVIN P. DONOVAN stated: “By controlling
the union, its locals, its national health plan and various businesses on the waterfront , the
Gambino organized crime family and its associates vict imized rank and file union members and t he
consuming public. Free enterprise was a rare commodity on the docks of New York. Eliminating
the influence of organized crime will not be achieved by one investigation, one indictment or one
successful prosecution but, rather, by maintaining law enforcement pressure on the mob’s
organization, it leadership and its sources of income.”
Waterfront Commissioner MICHAEL C. AXELROD stated: “This successful
joint-investigation by the Waterfront Commission of New York Harbor in conjunction with other
federal and state agencies, which led to this indictment, signifies the most recent and everconstant effort of the Commission to eradicate the malignant influence of criminal and corrupt
predators from the waterfront in the Port of New York/New Jersey. The Waterfront Commission
has a long history of collaborating with law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies and providing
invaluable investigative assistance leading to the successful federal criminal prosecution of various
Gambino-associated former Local 1814 ILA and ILA International officials and to the successful
resolution of the 1990 federal RICO case referred to earlier in this Press Release. The effort by
the Waterfront Commission which resulted in today’s indictment and other successful probes by
the Commission, fulfills the agency’s mandate to ‘investigate, deter, combat and remedy criminal
activity and influence’ on both sides of the Hudson River.”
DOL Inspector General GORDON HEDDELL, stated: “This investigation
uncovered a well-disciplined, conspiratorial organization that had utilized a climate of fear and
intimidation to exploit the ILA. The U. S. Department of Labor, Office of Inspector General, has
participated in this multi-agency investigat ion to ensure that union workplaces are free from the
11
influence of organized crime and to ensure that worker health plans are protected.”
Richmond County District At torney WILLIAM L. MURPHY stated: “Law
enforcement has known for a long time that Staten Island is ripe for organized crime activity.
Today’s indictment shows that awareness, followed by action, can have an impact. When it
comes to such serious violations as revealed today, Staten Island is no longer a ‘forgotten
borough’ - - by either the bad guys or the good guys.”
Police Commissioner RAYMOND W. KELLY stated: “Over the last two and a
half years, our team of six investigators amassed highly incriminating evidence o f illegal gambling
operations run by the Gambino crime family. We’ve caught them in the act again. With so much
evidence of widespread criminal activity, this indictment will go a long way to eliminating the
Gambino crime family’s corrupt influence on the waterfront.”
The charges in the indictments carry a range of maximum terms of incarceration.
The racketeering, racketeering conspiracy, extortion conspiracy, extortion, attempted extortion,
use of extortionate means to collect a debt, money laundering conspiracy and money laundering
charges carry maximum terms of imprisonment of 20 years for each count of convict ion. The
witness tampering charge carries a 10 year maximum term of imprisonment. The conspiracy to
commit wire-fraud, wire-fraud and gambling offenses carry maximum terms of 5 years
imprisonment for each count of conviction. For each count of conviction, the maximum fine is
$250,000, or twice the gross gain or gross loss caused by the offense.
Several of the counts carry forfeiture penalties. As to counts 1 and 2
(racketeering), the indictment seeks forfeiture of in the amount of $3,871,000. As to counts 28
through 45 (conspiracy to launder money and money laundering), the indictment seeks forfeiture
in the amount of $252,000.
The defendants arrested this morning in New York will be arraigned this afternoon
12
by United States Magistrate Judge Cheryl L. Pollak at the United States Courthouse 225 Cadman
Plaza East, Brooklyn, New York. The case has been assigned to United States District Judge I.
Leo Glasser.
The government’s case will be prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys
Andrew M. Genser, Katya Jestin and Arthur Hui, and Special Assistant United States Attorney
Rick Whelan, an Assistant Deputy New York State Attorney General.
13
Summary of the Charges
Description of Charges
Defendants
Racketeering and Racketeering Conspiracy
PETER GOTTI, ANTHONY CICCONE,
RICHARD V. GOTTI, PRIMO
CASSARINO, JEROME BRANCATO,
RICHARD G. GOTTI, RICHARD BONDI,
FRANK SCOLLO and VINCENT NASSO
Extortion and Wire-fraud of the ILA
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, JEROME BRANCATO,
FRANK SCOLLO
Extortion and Wire-fraud of MILA
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, FRANK SCOLLO and
VINCENT NASSO
Extortion and Wire-fraud of Local 1
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, RICHARD BONDI and
FRANK SCOLLO
Wire-fraud of Local 1814
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, FRANK SCOLLO and
ANTHONY PANSINI
Extortion of an Owner of Howland Hook
Container Terminal
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO and FRANK SCOLLO
Extortion of an Owner of
A Trucking Company
ANTHONY CICCONE and PRIMO
CASSARINO
Money Laundering Conspiracy and Money
Laundering
PETER GOTTI, ANTHONY CICCONE,
RICHARD V. GOTTI, PRIMO
CASSARINO, JEROME BRANCATO,
RICHARD G. GOTTI and FRANK SCOLLO
Extortion of Relatives of
A Prospective Waterfront Employee
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO and FRANK SCOLLO
Attempted Extortion of
An Employee of Howland Hook
Container Terminal (John Doe 1)
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO and FRANK SCOLLO
Conspiracy to Extort a Longsho reman (John
Doe 2)
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO and FRANK SCOLLO
Extortion of an Injured
Longshoreman (John Doe 3)
ANTHONY CICCONE and PRIMO
CASSARINO
Extortion of a Business Owner (John Doe 4)
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, RICHARD BONDI and
ANNA EYLENKRIG
14
Description of Charges
Defendants
Extortion of an Individual in the Film Industry
(John Doe 5)
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, VINCENT NASSO and
JULIUS R. NASSO
Use of Extortion to a Debt from a Borrower
(John Doe 6)
PRIMO CASSARINO and SALVATORE
CANNATA
Use of Extortion to Co llect a Debt from a
Gambling Debtor (John Doe 7)
PRIMO CASSARINO, JEROME
BRANCATO and RICHARD BONDI
Use of Extortion to Co llect a Debt from a
Businessman (John Doe 8)
ANTHONY CICCONE and PRIMO
CASSARINO
Illegal Gambling Business
(Joker/poker)
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, PETER PIACENTI,
RICHARD BONDI, ANNA EYLENKRIG
and JEROME ORSINO, JR.
Illegal Gambling Business
(Sports Betting)
ANTHONY CICCONE, PRIMO
CASSARINO, JEROME BRANCATO,
RICHARD BONDI, THOMAS LISI,
CARMINE MALARA and JEROME
ORSINO, JR.
Witness Tampering
ANTHONY CICCONE and PRIMO
CASSARINO
15
The Defendants:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Peter Gotti
156-41 89th Street
Howard Beach, New York
11/15/39
Name:
Address:
Anthony Ciccone
47 Narrowbrook Court
Manalapan, New Jersey
7/19/34
Name:
Address:
Richard V. Gotti
154-35 84th Street, Apt. 2n
Howard Beach, New York
08/10/42
Name:
Address:
Primo Cassarino
8009 11th Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
4/26/56
Name:
Address:
Jerome Brancato
162 Amsterdam Avenue
Staten Island, New York
1/30/29
Name:
Address:
DOB:
DOB:
DOB:
DOB:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Richard G. Gotti
44 Guenther Avenue
Valley Stream, New York
11/30/67
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Richard Bondi
194 Holten Avenue
Staten Island, New York
4/2/59
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Frank Scollo
28 Providence Street
Staten Island, New York
7/3/26
Vincent Nasso
40 Woods Avenue
Malverne, New York
8/15/58
Name:
Address:
DOB:
Julius R. Nasso
16 Wakefield Road
Staten Island, New York
10/19/52
Peter Piacenti
266 Bay 10th Street
Brooklyn, New York
8/28/21
Anthony Pansini
4 Beauridge Terrace
Holmdel, New Jersey
10/22/50
Salvatore Cannata
64 Marne Avenue
Staten Island, New York
2/29/56
Anna Eylenkrig
2940 Ocean Parkway, Apt.
21r
Brooklyn, New York
2/13/72
Thomas Lisi
2168 Legion Street
Bellmore, New York
10/01/63
Carmine Malara
197 Chelsea Street
Staten Island, New York
5/10/48
Jerome Orsino, Jr.
90 North Railroad Avenue
Staten Island, New York
10304
4/05/75

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