Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs

Document technical information

Format pdf
Size 1.6 MB
First found May 22, 2018

Document content analysis

Category Also themed
Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts
no text concepts found

Persons

Robert Gates
Robert Gates

wikipedia, lookup

Organizations

Places

Transcript

Using E911 to Meet
Military Base Security Needs
R
E
D
S
K
Y
W
H
I
T
E
P A
P
E
R
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
Table of Contents
Overview..............................................................................................................................................................................3
The Independent Report ....................................................................................................................................................3
The Need for E911 ..............................................................................................................................................................3
Key Components for E911 . ................................................................................................................................................4
Automated Location Data Management ...........................................................................................................................5
What an Automated E911 System Can Do for You . ..........................................................................................................6
Methods of Location Tracking ...........................................................................................................................................6
On-Base and Off-Base Emergency Response Strategies and E911 Integration .............................................................8
E911 and IP Telephony .....................................................................................................................................................10
Emergency On-Site Notification of 9-1-1 Calls . .............................................................................................................11
Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................................................11
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 2 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
Overview
Over the past three years, there have been a number of high profile incidents on military bases that have called for rapid emergency response. In the
aftermath of the Ft. Hood incident, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates authorized an Independent Review to document the incident and a follow-on
review to make recommendations for security enhancements. Within the report lies a directive to develop a policy for implementing a 9-1-1 capability
within DoD installations as well as a directive for the Services to implement E911 services on base by 2014. This document provides an overview of
the report’s recommendations regarding E911, introduces the reader to the fundamentals of E911, and presents how automated E911 software solutions can meet the directives to improve base security.
The Independent Report
Following the Ft. Hood incident, Secretary Gates authorized an Independent Review and a subsequent follow-on review to identify specific security
and policy gaps. The Independent Review has responded with its report and Secretary Gates has directed that the Department take appropriate actions to implement the specific recommendations.
Importantly, Recommendation 4.2 of the Independent Review’s report is the directive to Implement Enhanced 9-1-1 Services. According to the report,
“The Independent Review found that there is no DoD policy implementing public law requiring a 9-1-1 capability on DoD installations (Public Law
108-494, Enhanced 9-1-1 Services). The Independent Review recommended the Department develop policies that provide implementation guidance
for Enhanced 9-1-1 (E911) Services.” Further, the report identified that “The two benefits of E911 are that it automatically notifies dispatchers of a
caller’s location, including cell phones, and that it has the capability to broadcast emergency notifications out to designated geographic locations.”
As a call to action to implement Enhanced 911, the report continues, “The Follow-On Review determined military personnel should receive the same
emergency response services as their civilian counterparts. A DoD E911 capability must be funded to meet Full Operational Capability (FOC), as
outlined in DoD 6055.17 (DoD Installation Emergency Management (IEM) Program), as soon as possible and no later than 2014. To meet FOC, E911
systems should be commensurate with and supportable by E911 systems in the surrounding local communities (or by comparable emergency notification systems in communities outside of North America). The Secretary places a high priority on this IEM program and directs the Services to work
with Cost Analysis and Program Evaluation during the FY 2012-2016 Integrated Program Budget Review to develop funding options to achieve FOC no
later than 2014.”
Knowing the “who, what, where” during an incident can be critical to providing rapid security response to an incident. E911 systems software can
provide precise location information to emergency responders during an incident, improving response time even in the most complex building and
base environments. E911 software helps emergency responders react quickly to a wide variety of life-threatening situations including heart attacks,
strokes, fires and terrorist incidents. When integrated with on-base and off-base emergency response systems, E911 software provides an elevated
layer of security that all military bases should have.
This document reviews the key functionality of E911 systems software and how it can be integrated with on-base and off-base emergency response
systems to provide automated, integrated emergency response. Additionally, this paper highlights the key planning and implementation issues to
consider when integrating an automated E911 system with an on-base 9-1-1 emergency response center.
When properly integrated with your telecommunications platform, E911 becomes a transparent, automated process that provides behind the scenes
protection throughout the base. RedSky Technologies provides JITC-certified software solutions for automated, integrated and reliable E911 for military installations.
The Need for E911
Military bases can be a world unto themselves, having developed telecommunications systems and processes over many cycles of changing priorities. Bases may have hundreds of buildings and may require the movement of large numbers of personnel in short periods of time. Bases also have
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 3 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
different strategies for emergency response. Some bases rely upon on-base personnel for both medical and police emergency response. Others rely
on emergency medical response from off-base emergency teams while utilizing on-base police. Layered on top of emergency response variations is
the physical layout of the base, the number of buildings and the locations of buildings. Given these complexities, the base can be a difficult environment for emergency responders to do their job. Seconds count in an emergency and being able to know the exact location of a 9-1-1 caller can spell
the difference between life and death.
Military bases also require secure communications and networks and the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JTIC) tests communications platforms
and software applications to ensure they meet the DoD’s requirements for security and interoperability. RedSky’s E911 Manager™ is JTIC-certified to
meet the security demands of military networks.
E911 software facilitates getting the right people to a 9-1-1 caller quickly and efficiently by tracking the precise location of every telephone in the
enterprise and ensuring that this location information is kept up-to-date in the databases of the emergency responder. When a 9-1-1 call comes in,
the location record for that caller is automatically presented to emergency responders.
Key Components for E911
There are five key components that enable the E911 process. They are described in this section and referred to in Figure 1 (pg. 5).
PBX/Call Server: The PBX/Call Server must be a highly reliable system that will always complete a 9-1-1 call and the PBX/Call Server must be able
to out-pulse a unique seven- or ten-digit telephone number, the Automatic Number Identification (ANI), used to identify the caller. PBX/Call Servers are
up to 99.999% reliable and comply with the seven- or ten-digit emergency routing capabilities. Older PBX and key systems may not be capable of
out-pulsing the ANI number. Check with your PBX representative on these older systems.
9-1-1 Call Routing: Traditionally, ISDN PRI or CAMA trunks connected to the PBX carried the emergency seven- or ten-digit ANI to the Central Office
switching facility. CAMA trunks require a seven-digit number while ISDN uses a ten-digit number. The Central Office identifies a 9-1-1 call by the
trunk it came in on or by the string of digits. At the Central Office, the 9-1-1 call is sent to a tandem router, which sends the call to the Public Safety
Answering Point (PSAP or 9-1-1 Center) geographically responsible for the call. With the voice call connected, the ANI provides a call-back number to
the PSAP dispatcher and is associated with the Automatic Location Identification (ALI) of the caller. This ALI data record has been previously populated
in the PSAP database by an automated E911 system, such as RedSky’s E911 Manager™, or manually through a PS-ALI account.
On-Base Emergency Communications and Dispatch Equipment: If on-base personnel answer a 9-1-1 call, they usually do so using emergency
communications and dispatch equipment, the same equipment typically installed in a PSAP such as a municipal police dispatch center. In the case
of on-base PSAPs, the ANI is sent by the PBX over a dedicated trunk. The on-base PSAP connects the call to an emergency operator and pulls up the
location record associated with the incoming ANI number from the PSAP ALI database.
Automatic Location Identification (ALI): ALI is a 20-character field that defines the location of a 9-1-1 caller. This 20-character data string typically
describes the building name, floor and room location of a telephone station or, in the case of IP or SIP telephones, the ALI can describe an Emergency
Response Location (ERL), which is a description of a geographically logical part of the Ethernet network (i.e. a network region that describes the
building, floor and quadrant of the region). Each phone that can dial 9-1-1 should have an ALI record associated with it at the regional ALI database
or your on-base PSAP ALI database. Accuracy is critical. Updating and maintaining ALI information at the regional ALI database or in your on-base
PSAP database requires either a strict adherence to telecommunications management processes or the implementation of automated E911 management software that automates the ALI updating process. Without an updated database, the wrong location information can be provided to emergency
responders and precious time may be lost.
Emergency Response: There are many ways in which a military facility responds to emergencies. Many bases rely on their own response teams
to handle police, fire and medical emergencies. Others rely on their own resources for police or security issues, but leverage off-base resources for
medical or fire. The response hierarchy within your facility will determine your equipment, trunking and software requirements for 9-1-1 call routing
and ALI database updating.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 4 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
FIGURE 1: Key Components for E911
ANI
Chicago Office
925 W. Chicago Ave
Floor 22,
NW Quadrant
5
312-555-1111
3
Central Office
Phone
x 1111
4
E911 Selective Router
PSAP
Call Server/PBX
6
1
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
2
Internet
LEC Gateway
312-555-1111
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
RedSky
E911 ManagerTM
LEC
ALI Database
ALI
Step 1:
Step 2:
Step 3:
Step 4:
Step 5:
Step 6:
Location data is retrieved from the PBX/Call Server and ALI records created
ALI record is sent to the ALI database hosted by the LEC or on-base PSAP
A phone dials 9-1-1
PBX/Call Server sends out the ANI over ISDN PRI or CAMA trunks
ANI arrives at the PSAP
PSAP equipment retrieves the ALI record from the ALI database
Automated Location Data Management
For large, complex bases that perform thousands of telephone moves, adds and changes (MACs) over the course of a year, it is important to have
E911 software integrated with your PBX/Call Server to keep your ALI database synchronized and populated with the most current location records
for all telephone stations on base. An automated E911 software system fits seamlessly into your existing MAC process and picks up any new or
changed location data records made in the PBX and forwards them to on-base and off-base ALI databases. Telecom administration only needs to
input MACs one time in the PBX and the automated E911 software will retrieve this data, format it as a NENA-standard ALI record and send it to the
appropriate databases.
As bases move to IP-based communications (H.323 or SIP), phones can easily be moved anywhere on the network. As device and user mobility
increases, so too does the need for an automated system to track the location of phones as they move.
While you can attempt to maintain this location information manually, experience has shown that a manual process quickly breaks down and location
data become stale and inaccurate. It has been shown that telecom administration can spend hundreds of man-hours per year to manually update
database records, putting unnecessary stress and responsibility on telecommunications administration personnel.
The key to E911 is an accurate database. RedSky offers an automated solution that enables you to implement a fail-safe E911 system and allows
telecom administration to focus on more important tasks. Without an accurate database, emergency responders may be misdirected to someone in
need and precious time is lost.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 5 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
What an Automated E911 System Can Do for You
An automated E911 system can provide these key benefits:
• Automatically track the location of IP and SIP phones as they move about on the Network
• Automatically retrieve location data from the PBX/Call Server when a Move, Add or Change is made on digital or analog sets
• Update internal and external location databases as phones move
• Monitor the PBX/Call Server for 9-1-1 calls and create and send 9-1-1 call notifications to on-base personnel
Methods of Location Tracking
Digital and Analog Phones
Tracking digital and analog phones starts with telecom administration. Most PBXs contain fields in the station screens (Figure 2) that can be used to
designate the user name, extension and building, room and floor location of every phone. Updating these fields as a regular part of the Move, Add and
Change process is the foundation for an automated ALI process.
FIGURE 2: Station Screen
Once the Building, Room and Floor fields are populated and kept up to date in the PBX, RedSky’s E911 Manager™ software automatically retrieves
the field data from the PBX, translates the data into the required NENA-2 format and transfers the ALI data to the regional database provider or the
on-base PSAP (Figure 3, pg. 7).
E911 Manager™ is certified to interface with all major PBX/Call Servers including Avaya, Cisco, Nortel and Siemens and can interface with more
than 50 PBXs from a single server. If your PBXs are located in different geographic areas, E911 Manager™ will download ALI records from each PBX,
format the data and upload the data to the appropriate ALI database that would respond regionally to an emergency. All of these tasks are scheduled
to occur automatically in the software, so telecom resources can be saved for other key initiatives.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 6 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
FIGURE 3: ALI Data Management
Chicago Office
925 W. Chicago Ave
312-555-1111
Central Office
E911 Selective Router
PSAP
Call Server/PBX
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
Internet
LEC Gateway
RedSky
E911 ManagerTM
312-555-1111
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
LEC
ALI Database
IP Phone Tracking
There are two primary methods of automatically tracking IP (H.323) phones and SIP phones:
A) Network Regions/IP Ranges
B) Layer 2/Port level Network Discovery
Network Regions/IP Ranges
In this method, specific Network Regions (subnets) are established that use a dedicated block of IP addresses associated with the region at the DHCP
server. Each Network Region has a physical location (ex. Building Name, Building Address, Floor) and an ELIN assigned to it. Every time a phone registers with the call server, E911 Manager™ reviews the IP address of the phone to determine if its IP address falls into one of the IP address ranges set
aside for the region. If E911 Manager™ determines that a phone is in a Network Region, it will provide the ELIN to the call server.
FIGURE 4: Network Regions
1
Floor 20 Region 1
IP Phone
DHCP CONFIGURATION
Region
1
2
3
IP Range
192.168.1.1-254
192.168.2.1-126
192.168.2.127-254
NETWORK REGION/ELIN/ERL TABLE INSIDE E911 MANAGER TM
Region IP Range
ELIN
ERL
1
192.168.1.1-254
312-555-5555 925 W Chicago Ave, Flr 20
2
192.168.2.1-126
312-666-6666 925 W Chicago Ave, Flr 19
3
192.168.2.127-254 312-777-7777 925 W Chicago Ave, Flr 18
Floor 19 Region 2
Floor 18 Region 3
3
2
IP Phone
DHCP Server
312-555-5555
Call Server
RedSky
E911 Manager
TM
ISDN Prime
or CAMA Trunk
Step 1: Geographically logical Network Regions (subnets) are
5
4
defined (in this case, each floor is a separate Network Region)
Step 2: The DHCP server is configured so a block of unique IP
Regional
LEC Gateway
addresses is set aside for each Network Region
ALI Database
PSAP
Step 3: In E911 Manager™ each Network Region is assigned a
925 W Chicago
Ave, Flr 20
physical location and an ELIN
Step 4: E911 Manager™ creates a location record (ALI) for each Network Region and sends to the ALI database
Step 5: 9-1-1 call is sent to the PSAP which retrieves the ALI record from the ALI database
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 7 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
Layer 2/Port Level Network Discovery
In this method, E911 Manager™ uses SNMP v1.0 to interrogate voice switches in the network to find a phone. A detailed wiremap stored in E911
Manager™ contains the IP addresses of every voice switch, the location of the switch and a location for every port on the switch. Every time a phone
registers with the call server, E911 Manager™ captures the IP address and MAC address of the phone and uses SNMP to interrogate the MIB tables
of the voice switches to find the port the phone is on. When the port is determined, E911 Manager™ consults its database to retrieve the ELIN associated with the port and writes it to the call server.
FIGURE 5: Layer 2/Port Level Network Discovery
ELIN/ERL Wiremap inside E911 Manager TM
ERL
22FLNWRM101
22FLNWRM102
22FLNWRM103
22FLNWRM104
Floor 22,
NW Quadrant
IP Phone
x 1111; Port 1
Address
925 W. Halsted
925 W. Halsted
925 W. Halsted
925 W. Halsted
ELIN
Network Switch
312-555-5555
S-001
312-555-5556
S-001
312-555-5557
S-001
312-555-5558
S-001
Port
1
2
3
4
MAC Address
00-01-03-85-2E-45
00-01-04-85-2E-35
00-01-04-85-2E-22
00-01-04-85-2E-13
Ext.
1111
1112
1113
1114
Step 1 - Registration
Step 3 – Layer 2 Discovery
Network Switch/
Router S-001
Step 2 – IP and MAC
Step 4 – Write ELIN
IP Phone
x 1112; Port 2
Call Server
RedSky
E911 Manager
TM
On-Base and Off-Base Emergency Response Strategies and E911 Integration
As previously mentioned, there are many variations on how a military facility responds to emergencies. Many bases rely on their own response teams
to handle police, fire and medical emergencies. Other bases rely on their police or security issues, but leverage off-base resources for medical or fire.
In this section, we outline an example of the equipment, network and software requirements for several common response scenarios.
Scenario 1: On-Base PSAP as the Primary Call Taker
All 9-1-1 calls from the base terminate at an on-base PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point). This is the primary call taker for on-base emergencies.
The on-base PSAP has the same functionality of a municipal 9-1-1 dispatch center including the ability to transfer E911 calls and data to other agencies, both on-base and off-base. Figure 6 (pg. 9) shows the PBX/Call Server and RedSky’s E911 Manager™ interfacing with the PSAP equipment.
E911 Manager™ works with the PBX/Call Server to track the location of all phones and automatically update location records in the on-base PSAP
ALI database over the LAN, so when a 9-1-1 call arrives at the PSAP, the correct location of the caller is displayed on the dispatcher’s screen.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 8 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
FIGURE 6: On-Base PSAP with On-Base PBX
Chicago Office
925 W. Chicago Ave
On-Base PSAP
Floor 22,
NW Quadrant
Phone
x 1111
ANI
312-555-1111
PSAP ALI
Database
Call Server/PBX
312-555-1111
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
ALI
LAN
RedSky
E911 ManagerTM
When an emergency call is made, the PBX sends the ANI to the PSAP over local trunks. When the ANI arrives at the PSAP, the ALI record is retrieved
and displayed.
Scenario 2: On-Base PSAP as the Primary Call Taker with Off-Base PSAP Support
All 9-1-1 calls from the base terminate to an on-base PSAP. In Figure 7 below, the on-base PSAP is the primary call taker, but can transfer calls to offbase PSAPs depending on the services required.
FIGURE 7: On-Base PSAP Can Transfer to Off-Base PSAP
Off-Base PSAP
ANI
Chicago Office
925 W. Chicago Ave
On-Base PSAP
Floor 22,
NW Quadrant
Phone
x 1111
LEC ALI
Database
ANI
312-555-1111
PSAP ALI
Database
Call Server/PBX
ALI
312-555-1111
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
LAN
Internet
RedSky
E911 ManagerTM
ALI
In this scenario, E911 Manager™ synchronizes ALI records at both the on-base PSAP database and the LEC ALI database that feeds the off-base
PSAP. When the on-base PSAP receives a 9-1-1 call, the location record appears on the call taker’s screen. If the on-base PSAP transfers the call by
sending the ANI to the off-base PSAP, the off-base PSAP will retrieve the ALI record from the local LEC ALI database and the dispatcher will see the
location of the 9-1-1 caller on his or her screen.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 9 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
Scenario 3: Off-Base PSAP as the Primary Call Taker with On-Base PSAP Support
In this scenario, all on-base 9-1-1 calls are first sent to the off-base PSAP that can respond to the emergency and also forwarded to the base to notify
on-base security. Public EMS and/or fire respond to the designated security gate at the base and are escorted to the emergency by on-base personnel.
FIGURE 8: Off-Base PSAP Can Transfer Back to On-Base PSAP
Chicago Office
925 W. Chicago Ave
Floor 22,
NW Quadrant
Phone
x 1111
Off-Base PSAP
ANI
LEC ALI
Database
312-555-1111
Call Server/PBX
ANI
On-Base PSAP
PSAP ALI
Database
ALI
312-555-1111
925 W. Chicago
FL22NW
LAN
Internet
RedSky
E911 ManagerTM
ALI
E911 and IP Telephony
IP telephony presents new challenges with regards to E911. IP phones can be moved anywhere on the voice network. These moves need to be
tracked automatically and new locations updated for the moved phones. All IP call server platforms from Avaya, Cisco, Nortel and others have the
ability to send 9-1-1 calls with their ANI like digital PBXs. These platforms vary in terms of how they construct the outgoing ANI of the 9-1-1 call,
often substituting an Emergency Line Information Number (ELIN) for the native telephone number or extension of the phone. The IP call server also
manages “9-1-1 call back.” This is the situation in which a 9-1-1 call is sent to the PSAP but the call drops and the PSAP agent calls back using the
ANI number that was delivered. These IP call servers typically cache the telephone number or extension of the phone that dialed 9-1-1, so if the agent
calls back on the ANI or ELIN that was provided, the IP call server can route the call back to the phone that actually dialed 9-1-1.
RedSky’s E911 Manager™ is certified to integrate with IP call server platforms from Avaya, Cisco, Nortel, Alcatel and others and receives an event including the IP address and the MAC address of the phone every time a phone moves. Once an event is received, E911 Manager™ performs network
discovery to determine the location of the phone and then sends the correct ELIN back to IP call server for use in the event of a 9-1-1 call.
Automatically tracking the location of SIP phones requires even more intelligence because they do not register with the IP call server like H.323
phones. When a SIP phone moves, E911 Manager™ will get a registration event from a SIP proxy, which typically serves as the registrar for these
phones. E911 Manager™ then performs network discovery to determine the location of the phone.
Whether using H.323 phones or SIP phones, E911 Manager™ maintains accurate, “real-time” location information for all phones on the network so
this data can be leveraged for notifications to on-base personnel in the event of a 9-1-1 call.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 10 of 11
Using E911 to Meet Military Base Security Needs
Emergency On-Site Notification of 9-1-1 Calls
It has been proven in hundreds of E911 installations that “real-time” notifications of 9-1-1 calls can save 2-3 minutes in emergency response time.
E911 Manager™, using its optional EON module, monitors the PBX/Call Server for 9-1-1 calls and sends “screen pops” to internal security computers
on the LAN as soon as a 9-1-1 call is dialed. These screen pops include the same location data that internal and external emergency responders see
at the PSAP. Additionally, SMS and email messages can be sent to emergency response personnel and to base security administration as soon as a
9-1-1 call is made.
FIGURE 9: EON Saves 2-3 Minutes in On-Site Emergency Response
Floor 22,
NW Quadrant
Phone
x 1111
911 Call is sent via ISDN
PRI or CAMA trunks
Call Server
On-Base PSAP
LAN
EON notifies client
computers via LAN
Security Desk
Computer
RedSky
E911 ManagerTM
Port 80 Packets
through Firewall
RedSky
Web Services
Email or SMS
Message to anyone
in the Enterprise
Conclusion
As a result of the Ft. Hood incident, the directive from Secretary Gates is clear. The DoD shall develop a policy to address E911 within all DoD facilities
and implement E911 by 2014. Because DoD facilities and bases use a combination of on-base and off-base emergency response resources, E911
system design and planning is important. RedSky’s E911 Manager™ is a scalable, JITC-certified, E911 software application that integrates with all
major voice platforms, on-base PSAP equipment and external PS-ALI databases. RedSky has the experience and the resources to provide both the
systems design and the solution set to meet the Secretary’s directive for E911.
About RedSky
RedSky is the leading provider of E911 solutions to the enterprise market with more customers, more technology, and more experience than any other
provider. More than a million workers, students, guests and visitors rely on RedSky for E911 protection. RedSky delivers a full suite of on-premise and
cloud-based software solutions and services for virtually any telephony platform to help large and small organizations of all types capture, manage
and deliver the detailed location information necessary to provide effective 9-1-1 emergency response, comply with state E911 regulations and meet
business requirements for safety, risk management and efficiency.
RedSky Technologies, Inc.
925 West Chicago Avenue, Suite 300
Chicago, Illinois 60642
877-REDSKY1
www.redskyE911.com
Any Business Partner, Systems Integrator or Prime Contractor can purchase RedSky products and services from our distribution partner,
Westcon Group North America, Inc., and their GSA Schedule at http://gsa.westcon.com. Or, contact Brenda Reynolds, director-Government
Programs, at [email protected] or 703-345-5229.
© 2010 RedSky Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
www.redskyE911.com
Page 11 of 11

Similar documents

×

Report this document