2012-13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics

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California
English
Language
Development
Test
2012–13 EDITION CELDT
SCORING RUBRICS
Prepared by:
15850 CONCORD CIRCLE, SUITE A
MORGAN HILL CA 95037
408-776-7646
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Scoring Rationale for Speaking—Speech Functions
Score
Scoring Rationale
0
•
•
•
1
2
•
•
•
•
Student does not perform the language function required.
No response [NR].
Response is entirely in another language [AL].
Student performs the language function required.
Errors in grammar, vocabulary, and/or pronunciation are significant
enough to interfere with communication.
Student performs the language function required.
Speech is accurate enough not to interfere with communication (i.e.,
minor grammatical, vocabulary, and/or pronunciation errors may occur,
but they do not affect communication).
1
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Scoring Rationale for Speaking—Choose and Give Reasons
Score
Scoring Rationale
0
•
•
•
1
•
•
2
•
•
Student does not make choice or does not support choice with a
relevant reason.
No response [NR].
Response is entirely in another language [AL].
Student makes choice and supports choice with at least one relevant
reason.
Errors in grammar, vocabulary, and/or pronunciation are significant
enough to interfere with communication.
Student makes choice and supports it with at least two relevant reasons.
Speech is generally accurate (i.e., minor grammatical, vocabulary,
and/or pronunciation errors may occur, but they do not affect
communication).
2
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Speaking—4-Picture Narrative
Scoring Rubric
Score
• No response [NR].
0
• Spoken in another language [AL].
• Unintelligible.
• Response consists of a single word or a few words that may or may not be related to the prompt.
1
2
1
• Student attempts to tell a story based on one or more pictures, but does not construct a coherent narrative.
• Response displays a very limited range of vocabulary. The student’s speech is often halting or impeded.
• Response includes numerous grammatical1 errors that interfere with communication.
• Student’s speech is generally difficult to understand. Pronunciation often interferes with communication.
2
• Story is based on pictures, but does not clearly explain one or more pictures.
• Response displays some of the necessary vocabulary, but the student often cannot find the right word.
• Response shows control of basic grammatical structures, but includes numerous errors, some of which
interfere with communication.
• Student’s speech is sometimes difficult to understand. Pronunciation sometimes interferes with
communication.
3
• Story is coherent and includes explanation of all four pictures, but does not provide much elaboration
(e.g., explanation of details and context).
• Vocabulary resources are generally adequate to perform the task. The student sometimes cannot find the
right word.
• Response is generally adequate grammatically. Errors rarely interfere with communication.
• Student may have an accent and/or make some errors in pronunciation, but pronunciation is generally
accurate and does not interfere with communication.
4
• Story is coherent and effective, including explanation of all four pictures, with appropriate elaboration
(e.g., explanation of details and context). Contains more complex sentence structure.
• Vocabulary resources are well developed. The student can almost always find the appropriate word. Uses
precise word choice.
• Response displays few grammatical errors and contains varied grammatical and syntactical 2 structures. Any
errors are minor (e.g., difficulty with articles or prepositions) and do not interfere with communication.
• Student may have an accent, but both pronunciation and intonation are generally accurate and do not
interfere with communication.
Grammatical, as the term is used in this guide, refers to using forms of words that reflect concepts such as plural, possessive, subject-verb agreement,
verb tense, and comparative and superlative adjectives.
Syntactical, as used in this guide, refers to rules for combining words in order to form phrases, clauses, and sentences.
Note: It is expected that in any given response, all four of the bulleted characteristics (content, vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation) listed for a point
level (1, 2, 3, or 4) are present. Assign the score that most closely describes the student’s overall performance noting where the student needs to
improve. If there is a notable discrepancy between a student’s pronunciation and his or her ability to articulate ideas, give less weight to pronunciation.
3
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Scoring Rationale for Grades K–1
Writing—Copying Letters
This rubric is to be applied to all written responses in a consistent and reliable manner. When scoring this section, choose the score for which the response meets the minimum requirement and that best corresponds to the characteristics of the overall response, although the response may
reflect some traits of the other score levels. 0—Draws illegible lines or does not copy the letter as it appears.
1—Copies letter legibly. Letter reversals are not acceptable.
Note: For the purpose of this test, the term “letter reversals” means b for d, d for b, or any backwards letter that is discernable. Scoring Rationale for Grades K–1
Writing—Copying Words This rubric is to be applied to all written responses in a consistent and reliable manner. When scoring this section, choose the score that best corresponds to the characteristics of the overall
response although the response may reflect some traits of the other score levels. 0—Draws illegible lines or unacceptable response.
1—Copies part of the word. Must include correct initial letter in the initial position and one other correct
letter. Letter reversals are acceptable. 2—Copies the word legibly. Must include correct initial letter in the initial position. All letters are in the
correct letter order. Letter reversals are not acceptable. Note: For the purpose of this test, the term “letter reversals” means b for d, d for b, or any backwards letter that is discernable. Scoring Rationale for Grades K–1
Writing—Write the Word (Picture Prompt) This rubric is to be applied to all written responses in a consistent and reliable manner. When scoring this section, choose the score that best corresponds to the characteristics of the overall
response although the response may reflect some traits of the other score levels.
Item specific lists of example acceptable responses are provided in the Student Book.
0—Draws illegible lines or unacceptable response.
1—Writes part of the stated word. Must include the correct initial letter in the initial position or correct
phonemic sound. Letter reversals are acceptable.
2—Writes an acceptable response to the prompt legibly. Must include correct initial letter in the initial
position or correct phonemic sound. Letter reversals are acceptable.
Note: For the purpose of this test, the term “letter reversals” means b for d, d for b, or any backwards
letter that is discernable. Scoring Rationale for Grades K–1
Writing—Write a Word (Story Prompt) This rubric is to be applied to all written responses in a consistent and reliable manner. When scoring this section, choose the score that best corresponds to the characteristics of the overall
response although the response may reflect some traits of the other score levels.
Item specific lists of example acceptable responses are provided in the Student Book.
0—Draws illegible lines or unacceptable response.
1—Writes part of an acceptable response to the prompt. Must include correct initial letter in the initial
position or correct phonemic sound. Letter reversals are acceptable.
2—Writes an acceptable response to the prompt legibly. Must include correct initial letter in the initial
position or correct phonemic sound. Letter reversals are acceptable.
Note: For the purpose of this test, the term “letter reversals” means b for d, d for b, or any backwards
letter that is discernable.
4
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Writing—Sentences
NONSCORABLE A score of 0 should be assigned to ANY of the following: • No response; blank. • Response is unintelligible.
• Response is illegible. • Response is written entirely in another language. • Response is identical to a previous response.
• Response merely copies the prompt.
Score
0
1
Scoring Rubric
No Communication
Subject or predicate is missing. The following characteristics may be seen as well.
• Content is not related to the prompt.
• Response consists of single words or simple phrases and is not meaningful.
• Grammar and syntax distort meaning.
• Articles, possessives, prepositions, or plural endings are missing or incorrect.
• Vocabulary is severely limited (random words with no indication of comprehension).
• Spelling errors interfere with comprehensibility.
• Punctuation and capitalization errors distort meaning.
Emerging Communication
Simple subject and a simple predicate are evident and in the correct word order. The following characteristics may
be seen as well.
• Content is reasonably related to the prompt.
• Response contains awkward clauses and/or non-standard wording that affect meaning.
• Grammar and syntax contain errors that may interfere with meaning (errors in subject-verb agreement, incorrect
verb form or tense, use of present participle without an auxiliary verb, word order).
• Articles, possessives, prepositions, or plural endings are often missing or incorrect.
• Vocabulary is limited, imprecise, or does not adequately address the prompt.
• Spelling errors make response difficult to comprehend, but at least one word is correctly spelled (other than “a,” “I,”
or “the”).
• Punctuation and/or capitalization errors may interfere with meaning.
5
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Score
2
Scoring Rubric
Basic Communication
Subject and predicate are in the correct word order. The following characteristics may be seen as well.
• Content is clear and appropriate to the prompt.
• Response is communicative but simple.
• Grammar and syntax contain minor errors that do not interfere with meaning, but response is not written in
Standard English (errors in subject-verb agreement, incorrect verb form or tense, word order).
• Articles, possessives, prepositions, or plural endings may be missing or incorrect.
• Vocabulary adequately addresses the prompt.
• Spelling errors do not interfere with meaning.
• Punctuation and/or capitalization have few errors that do not interfere with meaning.
A compound or complex sentence may receive a score of 2 if an independent clause contains no errors or only errors
that do not interfere with meaning.
3
Fully Competent Communication
Subject and predicate have some syntactical complexity (defined as multiple subjects or objects, multiple verbs, use
of an infinitive or gerund as an object or subject, compound or complex sentence structure, prepositional phrase or
phrasal verb, or relative clause). The following characteristics may be seen as well.
• Content is clear and appropriate to the prompt.
• Response is written in Standard English.
• Grammar and syntax contain no errors.
• Articles, possessives, prepositions, and plural endings are correct.
• Vocabulary adequately addresses the prompt with some specificity.
• Spelling contains no errors.
• Punctuation and/or capitalization may contain only one error in either capitalization at the beginning of the
sentence or punctuation at the end of the sentence. The sentence may also contain the following minor mechanical
errors: missing periods after abbreviations, capitalization errors in the middle of the sentence, extraneous or missing
commas.
6
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Writing—Short Compositions
NONSCORABLE: A score of 0 should be assigned to ANY of the following: • No response; blank. • Response is
unintelligible. • Response is illegible. • Response is written entirely in another language. • Response is identical to a
previous response. • Response merely copies the prompt.
Score
0
Scoring Rubric
No Communication
• Content may or may not be related to the prompt.
• Response consists of a few isolated words with no comprehensible phrases.
• Subject and predicate may or may not be present.
• Grammar and syntax contain errors that distort meaning.
• Vocabulary is severely limited (student uses random words).
• Spelling and mechanics errors interfere with comprehensibility.
1
Emerging Communication
• Content is somewhat related to the prompt.
• Response is mostly incomprehensible with some recognizable phrases.
• Subject or predicate may be recognizable.
• Grammar and syntax often interfere with meaning.
• Vocabulary is limited (in early stages of development; mostly basic).
• Spelling and mechanics errors make response difficult to comprehend, but at least one word is spelled correctly
(other than “a,” “I,” or “the”).
2
Developing Communication
• Content is related to the prompt.
• Response is mostly comprehensible.
• Subject and predicate are in correct word order in at least one complete or run-on sentence.
The response may also contain other complete, attempted, or run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
• Grammar and syntax contain numerous errors, sometimes interfering with meaning.
• Vocabulary is general, imprecise, and/or repetitive.
• Spelling and mechanics errors often interfere with meaning.
7
2012–13 Edition CELDT Scoring Rubrics
Score
3
4
Scoring Rubric
Competent Communication
• Content reasonably addresses the prompt.
• Response is mostly comprehensible and recognizable as a paragraph; contains logical sequencing.
• For grades 2–5, subject and predicate are in correct word order in at least three complete, attempted, or runon sentences.
For grade 2, at least one of these is a complete sentence. The other two may be attempted or run-on
sentences.
For grades 3–5, at least two of these are complete sentences. The other one may be an attempted or a runon sentence.
The response may also contain other complete, attempted, or run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
• For grades 6–12, subject and predicate are in correct word order in at least three complete sentences.
The response may also contain other complete, attempted, or run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
• Grammar and syntax contain few errors that occasionally interfere with meaning.
• Vocabulary adequately addresses the prompt.
• Spelling and mechanics errors occasionally interfere with meaning.
Fully Competent Communication
• Content fully addresses the prompt.
• Response is in paragraph form with sentences that support the topic sentence and may contain a concluding
sentence. Response is written in Standard English and contains well-organized events or ideas as well as a
few effective details and transitional devices.
• Subject and predicate are in correct word order in at least three complete sentences.
One or more of the complete sentences must be syntactically complex (defined as multiple subjects or objects,
multiple verbs, use of an infinitive or gerund as an object or subject, compound or complex sentence
structure, prepositional phrase or phrasal verb, or relative clause).
The response may also contain other complete sentences or attempted sentences; the response may not
contain run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
• Grammar and syntax contain minimal errors that do not interfere with meaning.
• Vocabulary is precise and may include idioms or figurative language.
• Spelling and mechanics errors are minimal and do not interfere with meaning.
8
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