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Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission
Reports of Governing and Major Subsidiary Bodies
IOC Sub-Commission
for the Western Pacific
Ninth Session
Busan, Republic of Korea
9–12 May 2012
UNESCO
Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission
Reports of Governing and Major Subsidiary Bodies
IOC Sub-Commission
for the Western Pacific
Ninth Session
Busan, Republic of Korea
9–12 May 2012
UNESCO 2013
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Paris, 10 December 2013
English only
--------------------------------- An executive summary of this report in English is available online
referenced IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3s.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page (i)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
page
1.
OPENING
1
2.
ADMINISTRATION
2
2.1
ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA .......................................................................................... 2
2.2
DESIGNATION OF RAPPORTEUR FOR THE SESSION ................................................. 3
2.3
CONDUCT OF THE SESSION.......................................................................................... 3
3.
REPORT ON INTERSESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
3.1
REPORT ON INTERSESSIONAL ACTIVITIES ................................................................. 4
4
3.1.1
Statement of the Chairperson .............................................................................. 4
3.1.2
Report by the Regional Office on Intersessional Activities
and Budget Overview .......................................................................................... 4
3.1.3
Operation of the IOC Regional Office for WESTPAC ........................................... 6
3.2
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN IOC/UNESCO,
AND ITS RELEVANCE TO WESTPAC ............................................................................. 7
4.
POLICY ISSUES
4.1
PERSPECTIVES OF IOC ON THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
OF THE SUB-COMMISSION ............................................................................................ 8
4.2
WESTPAC OCEAN RESEARCH PRIORITY PLAN .......................................................... 8
4.3
THE EIGHTH WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM IN 2011,
REPUBLIC OF KOREA, WITH FOCUS ON LESSON LEARNT ........................................ 9
4.4
THE PREPARATIONS FOR THE NINTH WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL
SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM, VIETNAM 2014 ..................................................................... 9
4.5
CELEBRATING THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF WESTPAC ......................... 10
5.
REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF REGIONAL PROGRAMMES,
PROJECTS AND WORKING GROUPS FOR MAY 2010–MAY 2012
5.1
8
11
MARINE SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS ...................................................................... 11
5.1.1
Harmful Algal Blooms ........................................................................................ 11
5.1.2
Ocean Remote Sensing ..................................................................................... 11
5.1.3
Response of Marine Hazards to Climate Change .............................................. 11
5.1.4
South China Sea Fluvial Sediments and Environment Changes ........................ 12
5.1.5
Marine and Coastal Biodiversity and its Management ........................................ 12
5.1.6
Coral Reef under Climate and Anthropogenic Perturbations .............................. 13
5.1.7
Toxic Marine Organisms .................................................................................... 13
5.1.8
DNA Taxonomy and Recruitment Monitoring
of the Coral Reef Marine Organisms .................................................................. 14
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page (ii)
page
5.2
5.3
5.4
OCEAN OBSERVATIONS AND SERVICES ................................................................... 14
5.2.1
North East Asian Regional-GOOS ..................................................................... 14
5.2.2
South East Asian Regional-GOOS, including Monsoon Onset
Monitoring and its Social and Ecosystem Impacts,
Ocean Forecasting Demonstration System ........................................................ 14
5.2.3
Marine Hazards Forecasting and Mitigation in the Western Pacific .................... 15
5.2.4
International Bathymetric Chart of the Western Pacific ...................................... 16
5.2.5
Ocean Data & Information Network for the Western Pacific ............................... 16
CAPACITY BUILDING AND PUBLIC AWARENESS ....................................................... 17
5.3.1
UNESCO/IOC Regional Network of Training
and Research Centers on Marine Science in the Western Pacific ...................... 17
5.3.2
IOC Regional Training and Research Center
on Ocean Dynamics and Climate ....................................................................... 17
5.3.3
IOC-WMO Regional Marine Instrument Center for the Asia and Pacific ............. 18
WESTPAC WORKING GROUPS .................................................................................... 19
5.4.1
Working Group on Asian Dust and its Impact on Ocean Ecosystem .................. 19
5.4.2
Working Group on Regular Process for Global Reporting
and Assessment of the State of the Marine Environment ................................... 19
5.5
REVIEW OF ON-GOING PROJECTS AND WORKING GROUPS
BY THE WESTPAC ADVISORY GROUP........................................................................ 20
6.
REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NEW PROJECT
AND WORKING GROUP PROPOSALS
20
6.1
AIR-SEA INTERACTION IN THE KUROSHIO EXTENSION
AND ITS CLIMATE IMPACT ........................................................................................... 20
6.2
MAPPING THE HARMFUL JELLYFISHES
IN THE TROPICAL WESTERN PACIFIC ........................................................................ 21
6.3
MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT
IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC ........................................................................................... 21
7.
CO-OPERATION WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
22
8.
WESTPAC PROGRAMME AND BUDGET FOR MAY 2012–MAY 2014
23
9.
OTHER MATTERS
23
10.
ELECTIONS
23
11.
DATE AND PLACE OF THE NEXT SESSION
24
12.
ADOPTION OF SUMMARY REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS
24
13.
CLOSURE
24
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page (iii)
ANNEXES
I.
AGENDA
II.
LIST OF ADOPTED RECOMMENDATIONS
III.
OPENING REMARKS
IV.
LIST OF DOCUMENTS
V.
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
VI.
LIST OF ACRONYMS
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
1.
OPENING
1
The Ninth Intergovernmental Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western
Pacific (WESTPAC-IX) was convened at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, 9 May 2012 at the
Paradise Hotel, Busan, Republic of Korea. The Session was organized by the IOC Regional
Office for WESTPAC (WESTPAC Office), and hosted by the Ministry of Land, Transport and
Maritime Affairs (MLTM) and the Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute (KORDI) of
the Republic of Korea.
2
At the opening ceremony, on behalf of the National Organizing Committee for
WESTPAC-IX and Dr Jung-Keuk Kang, President of KORDI, Dr Weong-Seo Kim, VicePresident of KORDI, welcomed all delegates and representatives from the Member States,
international organizations and programmes to the Session. Dr Kim confirmed KORDI’s
commitment to WESTPAC with its efforts to be invested on the improvement of the regional
capability in marine forecasting and prediction, and the study of marine genetics. These efforts
will allow the region to better prepare for and respond to natural disasters, as well as provide
further information on the connectivity between physical and biological functions in the marine
ecosystem. As the Western Pacific region is an area of high marine productivity, it is hoped that
WESTPAC will initiate a regional scale programme encompassing physical, biological,
geological and chemical oceanography that will be beneficial to all Member States.
3
Mr Sung-Ho Joo, Vice-Minister of MLTM, welcomed all participants to Busan. He
congratulated WESTPAC for contributing to enhancing the capabilities of ocean observation,
exchange and sharing of observed data and information, and ecosystem research. He noted
that the oceans provide a considerable amount of resources on which humans depend and
these resources are being threatened by pollution, climate change, and other changes to the
ocean ecosystem. Mr Joo confirmed the Republic of Korea’s dedication to pursuing continued
research in marine sciences, particularly biodiversity, genetics, ocean observation, and impacts
of climate change. He encouraged all participants to visit the Expo 2012 Yeosu which is serving
as a platform to showcase and present current findings on the status of marine ecosysteMs In
closing, Mr Joo thanked KORDI, WESTPAC Office and the City of Busan for their efforts in
organizing the meeting, and wished the meeting full success.
4
Dr Wendy Watson-Wright, IOC Executive Secretary, speaking on behalf of the
Commission and Director-General of UNESCO, congratulated WESTPAC for exceeding her
expectations and fully demonstrating its indispensable role in delivering and expanding the
service of IOC to Member States in the region due to the joint efforts of Member States and
WESTPAC Office. She noted that WESTPAC has made a number of exemplary contributions
through a variety of regionally-specific activities in support of IOC’s global efforts. These include:
supporting the 50th anniversary celebration of IOC, the Regular Process for Global Reporting
and Assessment of the State of Marine Environment (Regular Process), the development of the
Global Ocean Observing system (GOOS) and IOC self-driven capacity building. Dr WatsonWright highlighted the unique regional capacity building initiative, titled “IOC Regional Network
of Training and Research Centers on Marine Science,” which was initiated for the first time in
IOC, representing the strong commitment of the Member States in the region to promote NorthSouth and South-South cooperation, and providing valuable experience to be shared with other
regions.
5
Dr Watson-Wright pointed out some opportunities which IOC has remained engaged in,
including: the Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development where oceans were given a high
profile allowing IOC and Member States to participate in forthcoming work on improving the
sustainability of human relationships with the ocean; the Expo 2012 Yeosu where IOC
partnering with ICES, PICES, and WMO will convene the Second ICES-PICES-IOC
International Symposium on the "Effect of Climate Change on the World's Oceans" (15–19 May
2012), and the Fourth Session of the Joint WMO-IOC Technical Commission for Oceanography
and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM-IV, 23–31 May 2012). Dr Watson-Wright also mentioned that
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 2
UNESCO and IOC are facing severe financial challenges that may result in IOC risking losing its
recognized global leadership in ocean sciences, observations, data management, and services.
To this end, it is critically important that WESTPAC, a regional arm of IOC, assists IOC by
working very closely with Member States in the region to overcome the difficulties IOC faces
and strengthen the presence of IOC in the region. While noting with appreciation the ever rising
spirit of cooperation reflected in and considerable contribution from Member States to
WESTPAC, she expected these efforts will continue into the future to the greatest extent
possible. In closing, she thanked the Republic of Korea and the Organizing Committee for the
exceptional hospitality and hosting the Session in Busan.
6
On behalf of Dr Zhanhai Zhang, Chairperson of WESTPAC, Dr Yasuwo Fukuyo, First
Vice-Chair of WESTPAC, welcomed all participants and thanked the government of Republic of
Korea for hosting the Session. He congratulated WESTPAC for its achievements during the
past two decades, particularly since 2008 with the development of the new strategy and
programme structure that has resulted in the formulation of new initiatives. The influence and
visibility of WESTPAC has been raised considerably and is now one of the most active
programmes in the region. Dr Fukuyo expressed appreciation to the Member States for their inkind and in-cash contributions to WESTPAC, to WESTPAC Office for its creative and hard work,
and IOC of UNESCO for its continuing support. In closing, Dr Fukuyo mentioned that the year
2012 is special for the ocean with the convening of various large international events such as
Expo 2012 Yeosu. Such events offer further opportunities for IOC and WESTPAC to enhance
their roles and functions in contributing knowledge and capacity building to the international
marine science community.
7
The Vice-Mayor of Busan City, Mr Young-Hwal Lee expressed his appreciation to
MLTM, KORDI, and the WESTPAC Office for once again holding an important WESTPAC event
in Busan. He welcomed representatives of MLTM, IOC, WESTPAC, and all delegates to
Busan. Busan is an important port city as well as the host of the annual World Ocean Forum
which facilitates exchange and cooperation among global ocean industry professionals. Mr Lee
confirmed Busan’s commitment to active participation in developing ocean science and
technology. As with other speakers, Mr Lee congratulated WESTPAC on its achievements in
global observation, and expected WESTPAC to further promote international cooperation for a
healthier and wealthier ocean ecosystem.
8
The complete statements made at the opening ceremony are provided as Annex III.
2.
ADMINISTRATION
2.1
ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA
9
Dr Fukuyo began the agenda by regretfully informing the meeting that due to health
reasons, Dr Zhanhai Zhang, WESTPAC Chairperson, was unable to chair the Session. Instead,
as the First Vice-Chair, he would take on the task, serving as acting Chairperson for the
Session.
10
Mr Wenxi Zhu, Technical Secretary for the Session, introduced the Provisional Agenda
(Document IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/2 prov.) and the Provisional Annotated Agenda (Document
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3 prov.) for consideration by the participants. He explained that the
Session would be conducted on 9–11 May with 12 May 2012 scheduled for the field trip to the
Expo 2012 Yeosu Korea: the Living Ocean and Coast, providing an opportunity for participants
to view the achievements of and future models for the promotion of the state-of-the-art marine
science, technology and marine industries. In this case, there would probably not have
adequate time for the WESTPAC Office to prepare the full text of the Session Summary Report
as has been the past practice. He thus invited the Sub-Commission to consider approving
action points and recommendations at this Session, leaving the full text of the full report to be
approved by correspondence after the Session.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 3
11
A suggestion was made by the delegation of Japan to include one item concerning the
celebration of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of WESTPAC. This event should take stock of the
advances and chart the future in marine sciences and related international cooperation in the
Western Pacific. It would also promote the value and importance of the Sub-Commission's
achievements. It was suggested to include this as an additional agenda item, namely 4.5 and to
establish a sessional working group to address the issue and report back to the plenary on the
last day of the meeting.
12
The suggestion was accepted by the Session. The Sub-Commission adopted the
Agenda with the suggested change, which is attached as Annex I to this report.
2.2
DESIGNATION OF RAPPORTEUR FOR THE SESSION
13
Dr Fukuyo invited the Sub-Commission to designate the Rapporteur for the Session to
assist acting Chairperson and the WESTPAC Office in the preparation of the Session Summary
Report. China proposed Thailand to serve as Rapporteur which was seconded by Japan.
14
The Sub-Commission accepted the proposal and welcomed
Khokiattiwong from the delegation of Thailand to serve as the Rapporteur.
2.3
Dr Somkiat
CONDUCT OF THE SESSION
15
Mr Zhu introduced the Provisional Timetable (Document IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/2 add.
prov.) and the Provisional List of Documents (Document IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/1 prov.), and
pointed out that the meeting would be organized in plenary as much as possible with sessional
working groups to be formed to deal with specific items arising from the discussions. These
include two Sessional Working Groups, respectively for the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of
WESTPAC, and the Ninth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium to be held in Vietnam
in 2014. He also reminded all delegations that the final deadline for the submission of
nominations for the elections of the WESTPAC Officers was Thursday, 10 May 2012 at 12:00
p.m., and the deadline for the submission of draft recommendations was Friday, 11 May 2012 at
10:40 a.m.
16
The acting Chairperson invited the Session to establish the two statutory sessional
committees: 1) Nomination Committee; and 2) Recommendation Committee.
17
The delegation of Vietnam proposed China to chair the Nomination Committee, which
was seconded by Malaysia and duly accepted by China. Russia nominated Japan to Chair the
Recommendation Committee. This was seconded by Malaysia and accepted by Japan.
18
Japan nominated Malaysia to chair the Sessional Working Group on the Twenty-fifth
Anniversary of WESTPAC to come up with a preliminary list of commemorative activities. This
was supported by numerous delegations and accepted by Malaysia. The Republic of Korea
and Indonesia proposed Vietnam, as the host of the next Scientific Symposium, to Chair the
Sessional Working Group for this event which was accepted by Vietnam.
19
The Sub-Commission noted the working modality of the Session and the allotted time
for each agenda item. The Sub-Commission also noted the deadlines for the submission of
nominations and draft Recommendations.
20
The List of Documents, List of Participants and List of Acronyms are attached as
Annexes IV, V and VI, respectively.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 4
3.
REPORT ON INTERSESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
3.1
REPORT ON INTERSESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
3.1.1
Statement of the Chairperson
21
As the acting Chairperson, Dr Fukuyo delivered the Chairperson’s statement (Document
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/5), speaking about the recent developments of the Sub-Commission and
the outlook for the coming years.
22
He congratulated WESTPAC for its recent extensive work in the region and having
become one of the most active subsidiary bodies of IOC. The following efforts have allowed
WESTPAC to achieve its current success: 1) a reformed programme structure and the initiation
of many new regional cooperative activities in ocean research, capacity building, and
information exchange; 2) effective and efficient communication means between Member States
and the WESTPAC Office, with Member States providing additional in-cash and in-kind support
to WESTPAC activities; 3) development of the regional specific capacity building initiative “IOC
Regional Network of Training and Research Centers on Marine Science” with the establishment
of the first regional research and training centre in Qingdao, China, and more regional centers
to be set up throughout the region; 4) increased participation in and contribution by WESTPAC
to international and regional events such as GOOS, Regular Process, and Expo 2012 Yeosu
(Republic of Korea).
23
With respect to the future work, Dr Fukuyo further encouraged WESTPAC and its
mother organization, IOC, to make further efforts to increase its influence and visibility at the
international level. He called on IOC and Member States to address the understaffed situation
of the WESTPAC office by adding more regular posts and upgrading the rank of staff of the
Office. With the continued support of Member States, he was confident that WESTPAC’s
programmes will continue to prosper.
3.1.2
Report by the Regional Office on Intersessional Activities and Budget Overview
24
Mr Zhu reported on the progress during the last intersessional period, particularly on the
implementation of the Sub-Commission's adopted recommendations and Programme and
Budget for May 2010–May 2012, since the last session of the WESTPAC in Bali, Indonesia
(Documents IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/6). He presented the great changes of WESTPAC as seen
today as a result of joint revitalization efforts, including:

a systematic framework and collaborative process for concerting the efforts of Member
States through the development, establishment, implementation and completion of
regionally-specific country driven programs/projects;

an advisory mechanism in operation to provide scientific and technical advice on the
development, planning and implementation of WESTPAC activities;

a complementary implementing mechanism in place to WESTPAC programmes/projects
to ensure the timely response of WESTPAC to marine-related emerging regional/
international issues;

a self-driven and sustainable capacity building initiative “IOC Regional Network of
Training and Research Centres on Marine Science” under implementation to enhance
national and regional capacities by utilizing the current and explore potential capacity in
the region;
25
Mr Zhu further explained that with the strategic planning and collaborative processes,
WESTPAC has been taking on a new look to the regional and global science community. This is
evidenced through the large participation in her activities. An estimated 1,400 marine scientists,
officials and managers took part directly in WESTPAC activities during the last intersessional
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 5
period mainly through: one WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium, four Joint Cruises,
11 Trainings/Summer Schools, and 27 Regional Workshops/Consultative Meetings.
26
While briefing the meeting that all five recommendations adopted by the SubCommission at its last session were fully implemented, Mr Zhu highlighted the major
accomplishments achieved over the last intersessional period, which include:

The organization of the Eighth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium entitled
“Ocean Climate and Marine Ecosystems in the Western Pacific,” 28–31 March 2011,
Busan, Republic of Korea, with the kind host of the Government of Republic of Korea.
The symposium featured eleven concurrent sessions and eight workshops with the
participation of around 500 participants. Five prestigious scientists and one national
agency were awarded the IOC Fiftieth Anniversary Certificate. The WESTPAC Young
Scientist Award was established for the first time with four young scientists selected for
their exemplary oral or poster presentations, and each awarded a free round trip ticket
for their participation in the next WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium;

The materialization of the self-driven, regionally specific capacity building initiative “IOC
Regional Network of Training and Research Centres on Marine Sciences” with the
establishment and operation of the first IOC Regional Training and Research Centre on
Ocean Dynamics and Climate (ODC Centre) and several other regional training and
research centres under development with Member States who have expressed their
willingness and positive response. The ODC Centre has started to provided regular
trainings with the its first one on ocean models, 10–16June 2011 with 69 trainees from
10 countries, and the second training course on ocean dynamics scheduled for 16–21
July 2012;

The development of the South East Asian-Global Ocean Observing System (SEAGOOS)
with two pilot projects initiated and implemented, respectively on “Monsoon Onset
Monitoring and its Social & Ecosystem Impact (MOMSEI) ” and “Ocean Forecasting
Demonstration System (OFDS)” with joint cruises conducted, summer schools organized
and the website for the Ocean Forecasting Demonstration System in operation;

Strengthened capacity building efforts with a series of trainings, besides the regular
training provided from the IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centres,
developed and conducted by respective programmes with focus on the rapid
assessment survey methodologies for detecting marine non-Indigenous species,
MOMSEI Summer School, impact of sediment and water quality on coral reef, taxonomy
and ecology of diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and Immunological method for detection of
domoic acid in plankton and shellfish;

Enhanced cooperation with global and other regional programmes within and outside
IOC. For instance, the joint organization of the trainings on the rapid assessment survey
methodologies for detecting marine non-indigenous species with the North Pacific
Marine Science Organization (PICES) and the UNEP Northwest Pacific Action Plan
(UNEP-NOWPAP), the joint development with the Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry
and Ecosystem Research (IMBER) of the capacity building proposal on the Integrated
Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research for the Asia and Pacific; the joint
organization with the FAO/GEF Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem Project
(BOBLME) of the second MOMSEI Summer School, the provision of assistance in the
development of the procedures and guidelines for IOC-WMO Regional Marine
Instrument Centers (RMICs) and in the organization of the JCOMM marine
instrumentation Workshop for the Asia and Pacific; and the co-sponsoring and coorganization, on behalf of IOC, of the Eastern and South-Eastern Asian Seas Workshop
of the Regular Process for Global Reporting and Assessment of the State of the Marine
Environment, including Socio-Economic Aspects (Regular Process).
27
Mr Zhu then provided an overview of the Sub-Commission’s budget (Document IOC/SCWESTPAC-IX/7). Given the limited funding provided by IOC, most activities were implemented
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 6
through extrabudgetary support, both in-cash and in-kind from Member States. It can be seen
that WESTPAC achievements do yield positive results with the extrabudgetary support
increased over the last four years. He highlighted the joint responsibility between Member
States and the WESTPAC Office in exploring any possible means to support WESTPAC in
order to fulfill the requirements of the Sub-Commission in activity implementation.
28
Despite the substantial progress made over the intersessional period, Mr Zhu alerted the
session of his concern over the shortage of human and financial resources in the WESTPAC
Office against the ever-increasing demands from IOC and Member States in the region for the
WESTPAC Office to deliver a wide and growing range of activities. He further encouraged each
Member State to maintain close interactions with other national agencies, particularly UNESCO
National Commission and funding agency to ensure their support to IOC could be clearly voiced
at the governing bodies of UNESCO and possible funding could be allotted in support of marine
scientific programmes; to coordinate the participation of their scientists and institutes nationwide
into IOC and its WESTPAC programmes; to identify their suitable national experts who are
capable and have willingness to promote regional cooperation, and help them develop their
leadership in the international/regional programmes in the areas of disaster mitigation, climate
change, ocean acidification and coastal erosion.
29
He also requested IOC to take better advantage of the strength of its regional subsidiary
bodies to enhance the presence and competitiveness of IOC globally, regionally and nationally;
and to provide more human resource support to the WESTPAC Office whenever possible.
30
The Sub-Commission congratulated the WESTPAC Officers and the WESTPAC
Office on the substantial achievement made, particularly over recent years within the constraints
of financial and human resources, and called on all Member States to continuously provide and
elevate their contribution in support of WESTPAC activities, either in cash or in kind.
31
The Sub-commission expressed its appreciation to:
The Government of Thailand for the provision of office space and facilities for the
WESTPAC Office, and the secondment of additional full-time administrative assistants to
the WESTPAC Office;
The Government of Republic of Korea for hosting the 8th WESTPAC International
Scientific Symposium in Busan, March 2011, and also for hosting the 9th Session;
Member States, in particular, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam for
their continued in-cash and in-kind contributions, such as secondments, provision of
research vessels and facilities, and hosting of WESTPAC workshops and training
courses.



32
The Sub-Commission endorsed the Chairperson’s statement and the Technical
Secretary’s report on WESTPAC’s intersessional activities and budget overview.
3.1.3
Operation of the IOC Regional Office for WESTPAC
33
Mr Zhu provided some background information on the operation of the WESTPAC
Office. Since its establishment in November 1994, WESTPAC Office has been hosted by the
Royal Thai Government. He expressed appreciation for the in-cash and administrative support
provided by Thailand for the smooth operation of the Office.
34
The sole IOC Regular Staff in the WESTPAC Office remains the same as before with
Mr Wenxi Zhu appointed as Head of the Office in 19 December 2008. Ms Nachapa Saransuth
has been working as the Administrative and Programme Assistant since November 2002
through the Service Contract with UNESCO with funding allotted from IOC for WESTPAC
activities. In addition, there are three junior administrative staff seconded by the host
government.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 7
35
Through the kind support of the East China Normal University, Dr Junhong Li was
loaned to the WESTPAC Office for three months last year to assist in the preparations of the
Eighth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium. Following the offer of the Government of
China made at the last session, another scientist is expected to be seconded to the WESTPAC
Office from the middle of 2012 to assist in the implementation of WESTPAC activities.
36
Mr Zhu emphasized that the seconded staff provided valuable assistance in
implementing WESTPAC’s activities. He then expressed his concern over the long-term
increasing work load and programme expansion, and reiterated that secondment of technical
staff and/or associate experts by Member States continues to be highly encouraged.
37
The lack of human resources within the WESTPAC Office generated strong concern
from Member States. One clarification was made on the ideal staffing situation of the
WESTPAC Office. According to the Agreement signed in 1994 between UNESCO and the
Government of Thailand concerning the establishment of the WESTPAC Office, the WESTPAC
Office should be staffed with four professionals and 5-6 local support staff. The acting
Chairperson encouraged all project leaders and team members to visit the WESTPAC Office to
develop project ideas, discuss progress and the way forward, while Dr Watson-Wright asked the
Member States to continue their support to the WESTPAC Office through in-kind, in-cash, and
secondments.
38
While appreciating the remarkable efforts made and the pivotal role the WESTPAC
Office has been playing in the development of WESTPAC, the Sub-Commission noted with
concern the understaffed situation in the WESTPAC Office and its requirement on the types of
expertise, and further encouraged Member States to explore the possibilities, to the greatest
extent, of loaning their experts to the WESTPAC Office.
3.2
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN IOC/UNESCO,
AND ITS RELEVANCE TO WESTPAC
39
Dr Watson-Wright was invited to brief the session on the key programmes of IOC and
also the current financial situation of UNESCO and IOC that might impact the programmes.
First, she gave a brief overview of the various programmes dealing with ocean observation,
monitoring, and data collection. Following the General Conference vote admitting Palestine as
a Member State of UNESCO, the United States of America and Israel have withheld their
assessed contributions (22.38% of UNESCO totals), resulting in a Regular Programme budget
deficit of US$ 7.3 million. This has also affected IOC staff positions funded by USA with some
staff being transferred out of IOC. There is also a risk that programmes will be affected and IOC
may lose its recognized leadership in ocean sciences, observations, data management, and
services. At the regional level, this will negatively impact on WESTPAC for 2012–2013.
40
Dr Watson-Wright provided additional information on the Rio+20 Conference, including
the background and structure. She informed the Session that IOC will play an advocating role
for oceans at RIO+20, working with other UN agencies. IOC has prepared an interagency
report, a blueprint for ocean and coastal sustainability. The blueprint was launched at the 36th
Conference General of UNESCO, submitted to the United Nations Commission on Sustainable
Development (UNCSD), and promoted at various international conferences.
41
Rio+20 aims to raise awareness worldwide on the importance of oceans, and IOC will
showcase ocean areas where UNESCO plays a role, e.g. through the Man and Biosphere and
International Hydrological Programmes, climate change impacts, hypoxia, ocean acidification,
and ocean warming. Other initiatives to be brought to the conference include: (i) the Ocean
Compact to protect people and health of oceans, protect the recovery and sustainable ocean
health and services; (ii) Science Initiative to strengthen ocean knowledge and management of
oceans through science-based knowledge. Proposals have been prepared for the advisory
committee to finalize. Unfortunately no Member States have been involved in this process;
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
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however, should Member States have any issues they wish the Conference to address, they
may submit these via their UNESCO National Commission to the country delegation based in
New York. Dr Watson-Wright also alerted the Session about the Rio+20 Dialogues that the
countries may join to make their voices heard. (iii) The Convention on Biological Diversity
(CBD)’s Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice is preparing a
review of ocean acidification impacts on biodiversity and ocean ecosystem functioning.
42
The Sub-commission took note with concern of the financial challenges and
encouraged Member States to consider exploring other ways to support IOC programmes
either in-cash or in-kind. The Sub-Commission expressed their appreciation for the IOC’
efforts in bringing ocean issues to the Rio+20, and encouraged all Member States to take an
active part in these events.
4.
POLICY ISSUES
4.1
PERSPECTIVES OF IOC ON THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF SUB-COMMISSION
43
Dr Watson-Wright was invited to offer suggestions on the future development of the SubCommission. She reiterated that WESTPAC has been a very strong programme and could
provide other Sub-Commissions with lessons learned and best practices. Other aspects for
WESTPAC to consider in the near future include: sharing experiences on how to get Member
State’s strong support and how to go forward; involvement of small island States, and
interacting with other organizations, particularly those located in the Pacific, such as the
Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP); development of some
metrics to monitor the results and impacts of the programme; and improving communication
between IOC global programmes and WESTPAC programmes, perhaps through the positioning
of regional liaison officers in IOC headquarters.
44
Following on from the concerns in the previous agenda, it was suggested that strategies
need to be developed to attract support for IOC and WESTPAC. Member States and the
Secretariat could consider tapping the private sector and foundations for funds. Another option
would be to utilize the technical capacity in the region and establish institutes that focus on
selected topics.
45
The Sub-commission thanked the Executive Secretary of IOC for her insight into the
importance of WESTPAC and its contribution to the whole IOC, and decided to continuously
look for ways to improve the operation and enhance the visibility of WESTPAC.
4.2
WESTPAC OCEAN RESEARCH PRIORITY PLAN
46
Dr Fukuyo, Chair of the WESTPAC Advisory Group, presented the progress of the
preparation of the WESTPAC Regional Ocean Research Priority Plan (RORP) and identified the
challenges faced during the last intersessional period. This activity was initiated by WESTPAC
Officers at its first meeting on 28–29 October 2008, aiming to identify the most compelling
regional issues in the key areas of interaction between society and the ocean, present possible
research priorities together with pilot projects, and provide a framework for research
investments in ocean sciences for the future. Once finalized, the plan could serve as a blueprint
for WESTPAC to mobilize the efforts of its Member States to address the identified issues.
47
Dr Fukuyo informed the Session that no meetings had been convened over last
intersessional period due to the difficulties in the identification of suitable experts with crossdisciplinary scientific background. Despite this, the Advisory Group recommends to establish
four thematic drafting groups as early as possible to work on four identified regional societal
themes (subject to further modification if needed): (i) Role of ocean in climate change and
variability; (ii) Resilience and vulnerability; (iii) Health of ocean ecosystem; and (iv) Sustainability
of marine and coastal resources, and energies. The Plan will serve as one long-term strategy
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 9
for WESTPAC to concert joint efforts of Member States to provide scientific inputs towards the
sustainable development.
48
The presentation generated wide discussions with regard to the significance, identified
societal themes and draft methodology. Salient points for WESTPAC to consider include:
Incorporation into the development of RORP of the concept of sustainability science which
addresses the relationships among environment, economic and social issues; establishment of
a pool of experts to draw upon when the relevant expertise is required; and the provision of an
online forum accessible to Member States to track the development of the Plan.
49
Following the above suggestions, The Sub-Commission decided to form four thematic
drafting groups, and requested all IOC National Coordinating Bodies to assist in the
identification of the most suitable experts in their countries, and facilitate their participation in
this regional effort.
4.3
THE EIGHTH WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM IN 2011,
REPUBLIC OF KOREA, WITH FOCUS ON LESSON LEARNT
50
Dr Dosoo Jang, Chair of the Local Organizing Committee of the Eighth WESTPAC
International Scientific Symposium, presented the outcomes and lessons learned from the event
that was organized on 28–31 March 2011, Busan. The objective of the Symposium, entitled
“Ocean Climate and Marine Ecosystems in the Western Pacific”, was to provide an
interdisciplinary platform for marine scientists, managers from the region to assess and prioritize
emerging issues requiring scientific research, and catalyze international and cross-disciplinary
collaboration towards the improvement in management practices and decision-making
processes for the sustainable development of ocean and coastal resources.
51
More than 500 enthusiastic marine scientists, policy makers and public figures
participated in the event. The symposium featured 11 concurrent sessions and eight workshops,
identified knowledge gaps and shared information on the latest development in marine scientific
research, ocean observation, and numerical models in order to address such ocean-related
hotspot issues as the ocean’s regulating role in climate change, ocean acidification, coral
bleaching, marine invasive species, sea level rise, coastal erosion, harmful algae bloom.
Moreover, Young Scientist Travel Fund was initiated in support of the travel expenditure of
these selected young scientists, and WESTPAC Best Young Scientist Award was established
for the first time with 4 young scientists selected for their exemplary oral or poster presentations.
52
Dr Jang identified some lessons learned to facilitate the organization of the next
symposium, which included that: session chairs should be identified early and seek their
confirmation; organizers will have to put in extra work to follow up with participants to confirm
their attendance and any change in schedules; printed symposium proceedings are a good
media to show the presentations that will be given; and travel funds should be sought for more
young scientists to attend the event and WESTPAC Best Young Scientist Award shall continue
as customary.
53
The Sub-commission congratulated Dr Jang and the National Organizing Committee,
the International Scientific Steering Committee and WESTPAC Office on the successful
organization of the Eighth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium, Busan 2011; and
expressed its sincere appreciation to the Government of Korea for hosting and tremendous
support provided for this symposium.
4.4
54
THE PREPARATIONS FOR THE NINTH WESTPAC
INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM, VIETNAM 2014
Dr Bui Hong Long, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam, informed the meeting of the
preparatory efforts made thus far for the Ninth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium
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2014, Nha Trang, Vietnam, 9–12 April 2014. Numerous national meetings have been held in
Vietnam among relevant institutes, academies and ministries with Official approval for hosting
the event obtained recently.
55
The main theme was proposed as: Ocean and Coastal Biodiversity Resources in the
Western Pacific and sustainable development in a changing world, with 7 sub-themes including
impacts of climate change and human dimensions. A tentative agenda was presented which will
be further modified based on the final topics to be included in the symposium.
56
The meeting suggested that the Symposium be listed as one of commemorative events
for the Twenty-fifth WESTPAC Anniversary with special key note speeches and exhibitions
arranged, and an award presented to young and other outstanding scientists. It was also
suggested that the scope of the proposed themes be expanded to accommodate other marine
disciplines.
57
The Sessional Working Group on the Ninth WESTPAC International Scientific
Symposium was formed to consider the suggestions provided from the Session, and further
develop the conference structure.
58
The Sub-Commission thanked the Government of Vietnam for the kind offer to host the
Ninth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium in 2014, and the preparations made thus
far. The Sub-Commission further suggested the International Scientific Steering Committee
be established with the composition of lead scientists recommended from Member States,
develop and finalize, with reference to the recommendation of the Sessional Working Group,
the theme, sub-themes and programme as early as possible.
59
The Sub-Commission reviewed and adopted Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.1
pertaining to the Ninth WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium.
4.5
CELEBRATING THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF WESTPAC
60
Professor Dr Nor Aieni Binti Hj Mokhtar, as chairperson of the Sessional Working Group
on the 25th Anniversary of WESTPAC, reported the discussions to the plenary by stressing the
need for WESTPAC to take this opportunity to maintain the current momentum and enhance the
awareness of various stakeholders on the importance of marine science and observations, and
the value of the Sub-Commission.
61
She further suggested a series of commemorative activities in 2013–2014, including the
development of the logo and other commemorative items for the WESTPAC’s 25th Anniversary;
the inclusion of the logo into all WESTPAC-related meetings, cruises, symposium, trainings,
publications, reports, brochures and outreach materials. It was also suggested that Member
States develop their own ideas to showcase WESTPAC relevant activities at domestic level.
The Sessional Working Group considered the Ninth WESTPAC International Scientific
Symposium, Vietnam 2014 as one of the optimal events celebrating the 25th Anniversary, and
proposed several special commemorative activities be arranged throughout the Symposium.
These include one keynote speech on the history and achievement of WESTPAC; a special
exhibition with posters presented from countries on their involvement in and benefit from
WESTPAC; and the continuation of the WESTPAC Young Scientist Award etc.
62
The Sub-Commission recognized the significance of celebrating the 25th Anniversary
of WESTPAC to enhance the level of public awareness on the importance of collaboration and
involvement in ocean science, take stock of advances and chart the future in marine science at
the regional and national level, thus demonstrating the value of the Sub-Commission’s
achievements in promoting marine sciences.
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63
The Sub-Commission decided to start the preparation, with reference to the suggested
actions from the Sessional Working Group, of a series of commemorative activities to be
conducted in late 2013 and 2014.
64
The Sub-Commission adopted Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.2 regarding the
Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific.
5.
65
66
REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF REGIONAL PROGRAMMES, PROJECTS
AND WORKING GROUPS FOR MAY 2010–MAY 2012
Dr Fukuyo provided a brief overview of WESTPAC programmes, projects and working
groups, and called on each programme/project leader and working group chairperson to provide
an in-depth assessment of their progress.
5.1
MARINE SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS
5.1.1
Harmful Algal Blooms
Dr Mitsunori Iwataki, Yamagata University, Japan, presented the project objectives and
achievements. Two strategic planning workshops (29 March 2011; 15–17 March 2012) and two
capacity building workshops (20–24 March 2011; 19–22 March 2012) were held. The
workshops allowed for information exchange on HABs in the region. There is an increasing
number of HAB researchers in the region, and the workshops helped to promote collaboration
among WESTPAC-HAB group and expand research on HAB. The training courses will continue
over the next two years at regional and local levels. Outreach materials will be produced, aiming
to educate children about HABs. Additional support is requested from the current donors Japan Funds in Trust, Asian Natural Environmental Science Centre, University of Tokyo.
5.1.2
Ocean Remote Sensing
67
Dr Teruhisa Komatsu from the University of Tokyo, Japan, informed the meeting of the
progress of the Ocean Remote Sensing for Coastal Habitat Mapping which was approved at the
last session (WESTPAC-VIII, Bali, Indonesia, 10–13 May 2010). He showed the different
coastal biome coverage throughout the world, the services they provide, and the threats to
coastal ecosysteMs Therefore, it is necessary to map coastal habitats in order to monitor the
health of these important ecosystems for policy making and set marine protected areas to meet
the Aichi Biodiversity targets under the Convention on Biological Diversity.
68
A kick-off meeting was convened in Busan in March 2011 to review the current status of
habitat mapping in the region. The meeting decided that the project would focus on seagrass
bed mapping using ALOS AVNIR2 images of Japanese Satellite. A second workshop was
organized at the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia in November 2011. After reviewing the existing
seagrass bed maps including databases and temporal changes in seagrass distribution and
human impacts, relation between seagrass beds and fish resources, and methods of image
analysis and ground-truthing. The project agreed on the standardized methods to use for image
analysis and ground truthing. Additional efforts have been made to promote the project at
relevant occasions, including the presentation at the biennial conference of Indonesian Society
of Remote Sensing in Bogor in August 2010 and the joint organization of the
NOWPAP/PICES/WESTPAC Training Course on Remote Sensing Data Analysis held in
Vladivostok in October 2011.
5.1.3
69
Response of Marine Hazards to Climate Change
Dr Fangli Qiao, First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration (SOA),
China, briefed the meeting on this project with emphasis on the importance of the platform the
project established to bring together scientists to share and advance their scientific knowledge,
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
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by means of field observation, model development, capacity building and process study on the
variability of marine hazards in relation to climate change. He reported three cruises were
conducted in the typhoon generation area-South China Sea, and three workshops were
convened to review the implementation and plan its future activities. The most recent cruise
carried out from October to November 2011 were participated by scientists from Thailand,
Malaysia and China. Project progress also includes the development of one operational regional
ocean forecast systems that is continuing, and plans for a joint cruise in the Western Pacific and
a workshop later this year.
5.1.4
South China Sea Fluvial Sediments and Environment Changes
70
Dr Shouting Tuo, presenting on behalf of Professor Zhifei Liu, Tongji University, China,
highlighted the achievements from the last four years since project inception. The project
investigates fluvial sediments surrounding the South China Sea, in order to further understand
how human activities affect the sediment discharge recently and finally to predict future
changes. He briefed the Session on a variety of activities conducted during May 2010 to May
2012 in the form of international workshops, fieldwork and research cooperation, bilateral
scientific visits, and young scientist and graduate student training. Two regular international
workshops on the Fluvial Sediment Supply to the South China Sea were successfully held in
Quezon City (Philippines), 17–18 November 2010 and Bangkok (Thailand), 14–16 December
2011. Six fieldwork sessions were carried out in Thailand, Philippines, and China to collect
sediments from major rivers for the measurement of clay mineralogy and elemental
geochemistry. Six bilateral visits and related collaborations were conducted, and seven young
scientists from Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, and DPR Korea visited Tongji
University for graduate research or short-term laboratory analysis training. Additionally, some
results were already published or are under review by international journals such as Marine
Geology, Chemical Geology, and Journal of Asian Earth Sciences. Dr Tuo also highlighted the
spirit of close cooperation reflected from all participating members and suggested that the
project be continued with the research focusing on fluvial sediment’s source-to-sink process
along the continental shelf and in the deep basin of the South China Sea.
71
Responding to one inquiry on the sharing of data collected from WESTPAC projects,
clarification was made that, following common practice, data has been shared among
participating members. As regards when these data could be available to the public, the
meeting suggested that the appropriate arrangements be further explored with full consideration
of intellectual property rights. One suggestion was made that ODINWESTPAC may provide a
suitable platform to discuss these issues.
5.1.5
Marine and Coastal Biodiversity and its Management
72
Dr Suchana Chavanich, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, reported that the project
had been working on marine invasive species amongst other biodiversity conservation related
issues over the last four years. A series of activities implemented over the last two years
include: the convening of four training workshops, in collaboration with PICES and other
regional partners on the Rapid Assessment Survey Techniques for the Detection of Marine Nonindigenous Species, 20–21 September 2010 and 6–9 December 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand;
19–21 July 2011 in Phuket, Thailand, and 8–9 February 2012 in Nagasaki, Japan; the
publication and dissemination of the regional status of marine non-indigenous species to
provide baseline information; one poster available in English and Thai languages for enhancing
public awareness; disseminating results of the project at various international scientific events.
73
Considering the 2010 coral bleaching event in the region, Dr Chavanich proposed a
workshop later this year to focus on coral reef restoration techniques with objectives to
summarize all coral restoration methods available within and outside the Western Pacific and
promote the best practices for coral restoration.
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5.1.6
Coral Reef under Climate and Anthropogenic Perturbations
74
Dr Xuelei Zhang, First Institute of Oceanography (SOA), China, briefed the Session on
behalf of Professor Jing Zhang on the key activities conducted over the last two years. The
project aims to improve the understanding of biogeochemical and ecological nature of coral
reefs in WESTPAC region under different geographic, physical and environmental settings
through the organization of a series of workshops and training activities, which includes the
conduct of the 2nd and 3rd regional workshops on the Coral Reef under Climate and
Anthropogenic Perturbations, respectively in Phuket, Thailand, 22–24 June 2010 and in Busan,
Korea, 29–31 March 2011. In addition to exchanging information on coral reef research, two
training courses were organized with emphasis on the “Impact of Sedimentary Dynamics and
Biogeochemistry on Coral Reefs” at Koh Samui, Thailand, 15–18 June 2010, and “Water
Quality and Impact on Coral Reefs”, in Sanya, China on 8–11 June 2011.
75
He touched upon the future activities to be conducted, which included continuous
preparation of manuscripts for peer-reviewed journals; collaboration with SCOR/IGBP-IMBER in
the conduct of one capacity building workshop on integrated marine biogeochemistry
ecosystem research in Asia-Pacific region; and the organization of the fourth regional workshop
to plan the future of the project focusing on synthesizing existing knowledge on coral reef
studies within the scope of the project.
76
Broad interests have been aroused from Member States in terms of the importance that
most of countries in the region accord to their coral reefs. The Sub-Commission suggested
that the partnership be established with other regional coral reef initiatives, particularly the Coral
Triangle initiative (CTI), with a view to enhancing the visibility of the project in the region and
transmitting scientific knowledge to wider communities.
5.1.7
Toxic Marine Organisms
77
Dr Dao Viet Ha, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam, reported to the meeting that
concrete actions have been undertaken since the project’s establishment at the WESTPAC-VIII,
to achieve the objectives of improving the awareness of local communities on the natural
biotoxins found in marine organisms and its risks to human health through the identification of
toxic marine organisms and dissemination of relevant scientific information to the public. Two
regional workshops have been organized on 13–15 December 2010 and 4–6 November 2011,
Nha Trang, Vietnam with a regional network established and public awareness materials
produced. Following the identified capacity building needs, two regional training courses were
developed and conducted in collaboration with WESTPAC-Harmful Algae Bloom project on
“Taxonomy and Ecology of the diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia”, 20–23 March 2011, Sarawak,
Malaysia, and on “Immunological method for detection of domoic acid in plankton and shellfish”,
19–22 March 2012, Nha Trang, Vietnam.
78
Future activities were also briefed, including: the 3rd workshop to be held in conjunction
with the 15th International Conference on Harmful Algae, 29 Oct–2 Nov 2012, Changwon,
Republic of Korea; the 4th workshop to be held in collaboration with the National University of
Singapore to finalize the project webpage; finalization and printing of more public awareness
materials.
79
In response to her concern over the shortage of financial resources, it was suggested
that she may apply for funding from the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). One
clarification was sought with regard to the composition of the project steering group. Dr Dao
explained that all members were identified in a time efficient manner either through the
nominations from IOC National Focal Points or through the scientific network of the project
leader in case of no nomination received from IOC National Focal Points. Furthermore, the
Sub-Commission encouraged all national focal points to assist the WESTPAC Office, and
project leader in the identification of suitable experts to be actively involved in the project.
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5.1.8
DNA Taxonomy and Recruitment Monitoring of the Coral Reef Marine Organisms
80
The acting Chairperson informed the Session that, despite great efforts made, the
project failed to obtain funding to implement its planned activities. However, in view of the
strong interests expressed from scientists in the region and the need for this project to
investigate the extent of marine biodiversity and its dynamics with a genetic tool called DNA
barcoding, the Advisory Group and project leader further requested the Sub-Commission to
consider suspending this project until funding is sought.
81
Constructive suggestions were made on the continuation of this project. For instance,
communication could be established first, despite the lack of funding at this moment, among the
interested scientists to advance information exchange. The Sub-Commission took note of the
situation, decided to suspend the project, and further encourage the project leader and
WESTPAC Office to continuously seek funding sources during the next intersessional period.
5.2
OCEAN OBSERVATIONS AND SERVICES
5.2.1
North East Asian Regional-GOOS
82
Dr Heedong Jeong, Chair of the WESTPAC Coordinating Committee for the North East
Asian Regional-GOOS (NEAR-GOOS), presented the implementation of NEAR-GOOS over the
past two years and the efforts made by each of the participating countries in terms of the
amount and types of data transmitted in both real-time and delayed modes, data network
development, data products produced, the related services provided, and the amount of users
that have benefitted from the services provided by the NEAR-GOOS. National observing
systems and operational oceanographic systems have been developed in four participating
countries and will continue its contribution to the NEAR-GOOS. One pilot project “NEAR-GOOS
Cross-basin Climate Monitoring Section" has conducted the first synchronized observation on
3–6 November 2011.
83
Dr Jeong briefed the meeting of the outcomes from the recent Fourteenth Session of the
Coordinating Committee in achieving the objectives for the second Phase of NEAR-GOOS:
developing a comprehensive and sustained ocean observing network and an operational
forecasting system in the region; continuing the management of the data exchange
mechanisms developed in the first phase by increasing data parameters and the space of
coverage, and timely generating more data products in order to improve the services and
demonstrate the value of NEAR-GOOS in the region. He also mentioned the establishment of
the Yellow Sea and East China Sea Operational Observing System, and presented the future
activities covering: the efficiency and visibility of NEAR-GOOS; possible inclusion of nonphysical data; cooperation on data product development; establishment of the NEAR-GOOS
working group on product while retaining the working group on data management; and
cooperation with other regional projects such as SEAGOOS, PICES, NOWPAP remote sensing
training course, ODINWESTPAC.
5.2.2
84
South East Asian Regional-GOOS, including Monsoon Onset Monitoring and its
Social and Ecosystem Impacts, Ocean Forecasting Demonstration System
Dr Somkiat Khokiattiwong, Coordinator for the South East Asian Regional-GOOS
(SEAGOOS), Phuket Marine Biological Center, presented the background and implementation
progress of SEAGOOS with emphasis on the development of two pilot projects, “Monsoon
Onset Monitoring over Andaman Sea and its Social & Ecosystem Impacts” (MOMSEI) and
“Ocean Forecast Demonstration System” (OFDS) to demonstrate the value of observation for
ecosystem and societal benefit. Following the three expert workshops conducted in 2009,
MOMSEI carried out a series of concrete actions in 2010 and 2011, including three multidisciplinary joint cruises conducted on 20–23 October 2011, 11–17 March 2011, and 20 April–
12 May 2012, covering the vast area from Andaman Sea to tropical Indian Ocean, capturing
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
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the monsoon onset process in tropical eastern Indian; two MOMSEI Summer Schools were held
on 25–30 July 2010 and 15–18 August 2011 to build the capacity of young scientists on
monsoon dynamics, coral biology and ecosystem, and ocean observations. A new partnership
was formed with the FAO/GEF Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem Project through the joint
organization of the 2nd MOMSEI Summer School.
85
Dr Fredolin Tangang, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, was then invited to report on the
progress of the pilot project “Ocean Forecast Demonstration System” (OFDS). This pilot project
was initially developed based on existing cooperation among Malaysia, Thailand and China, but
could be expanded to accommodate more countries in the future. This project aims to
demonstrate the value of ocean forecasting system initially on Peninsular Malaysia’s eastern
shelf and Gulf of Thailand through the development of wave-tide-circulation coupled numerical
model for the two sub-regions. Key activities conducted include two technical workshops
organized in October 2010, Phuket, Thailand and May 2011, Qingdao, China with objectives to
share the knowledge on the development of ocean forecasting systems in the region, and
identify cooperative opportunities for model validation and cruises towards the development of
one ocean forecast system in the selected demonstration areas. Two cruises were conducted
in the South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand (Thai and Malaysian waters) from July-September
2011. Meanwhile, recognizing the importance of capacity building in the development of ocean
forecast system, one training course on Ocean Models was provided at the IOC Regional
Training and Research Center on Ocean Dynamics and Climate (ODC Center), Qingdao, China
on 10–16 June 2011, to assist a group of scientists in the project further study and exchange
the outcomes of their study. The project’s product, Ocean Forecast Demonstration System in
the Southeast Asian Seas of WESTPAC, is accessible through the project’s website.
86
Dr Tangang highlighted the contribution of this project to the society in that there does
not exist any real-time forecasting in the southern part of the South China Sea, and these
crucial forecast information, such as ocean circulation, sea surface temperature, wave height,
generated from the demonstration system could serve the needs of a variety of human activities
related to marine hazards mitigation, oil and gas exploration, fisheries, navigation, marine parks
management and coastal recreational activities. The project aims to publish more papers and
produce more real-time forecast online.
87
A ceremony was held subsequently to launch the “Ocean Forecasting Demonstration
System in the Southeast Asian Seas of WESTPAC” which was developed by the SEAGOOS
pilot project on OFDS. As the only publicly accessible marine forecasting system available in
the region, the website provides marine forecasts for up to three days ahead, e.g. current,
temperature, wave height, circulation, by depth and time. While congratulating the project
leader and members on their teamwork to make this website and collaboration possible, and the
WESTPAC Office on its leadership and coordination role to realize this project, she highlighted
the benefits the project generated, and expected the efforts shall be continuously made, not just
to improve the system, but also attract more countries’ involvement in the future.
88
The recent developments of SEAGOOS aroused wide interests from the meeting in
terms of its linkage with societal and ecosystem benefits. The Sub-Commission noted with
appreciation the substantial progress, and further suggested involving more countries in the
region to maximize the benefit. The Sub-Commission thanked the Government of Myanmar
for the kind offer, subject to the final approval of relevant authorities, to host the sixth MOMSEI
expert workshop in late 2012, and urged the WESTPAC Office to start the organization of the
workshop as early as possible, in order to meet the approval procedures of the Government of
Myanmar.
5.2.3
89
Marine Hazards Forecasting and Mitigation in the Western Pacific
Dr Fujiang Yu, Deputy Director General, National Marine Environment Forecasting
Center (NMEFC), China, presented the project achievements by briefing the Session on project
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objectives and the efforts made for their realization. The project aims to: (i) develop new
technology of marine hazards forecast, especially coastal numerical inundation forecast model;
(ii) improve the capability of WESTPAC Member States for marine hazards warning and
mitigation; (iii) exchange and share the experience of marine hazards forecast, and enhance the
cooperation of WESTPAC Member States on marine hazards warning and mitigation
technology. He also recalled the recent cooperation of his institute with the Korea Ocean
Research and Development Institute in the development of a marine environment forecasting
system in the Yellow Sea, and informed the meeting that one regional training workshop on
tsunami model development will be organized in October 2012; and one workshop on ocean
wave and storm surge forecasting workshop is being planned for 2013.
90
The Sub-Commission noted the regional training on tsunami model development will
be jointly organized under the auspices of WESTPAC and ICG/PTWS with detailed programme
under further refinement. In view of the increasing need for improving the regional capability for
marine hazard forecast and mitigation, the Sub-Commission expressed its concern over the
late submission of the progress report and delay in the implementation of planned activities, and
further emphasized the timeline for report submission be respected, and proposed activities be
carried out as planned in order to achieve the expected objectives.
5.2.4
International Bathymetric Chart of the Western Pacific
91
Dr Sihai Li, National Marine Data and Information Service, China, spoke on behalf of
Professor Hou Wenfeng, Chief Editor for the IBCWP Editorial Board. Dr Li presented the
progress made in the IBCWP programme involving China, Japan, Philippines, Republic of
Korea, Russian Federation, and Vietnam. The project has thus far compiled most of the data
map sheets for three sub-regions out of the six which the project intends to cover. Dr Li
expressed concern that the Fifth Session of IBCWP has not yet taken place after its fourth
session in 2004 despite some progress still under way in the participating countries. While
stressing the need for a regional platform to improve the bathymetric mapping technology, he
suggested replacing the IBCWP project with one working group mandated to exchange
technical experience on the compilation of bathymetric charts, and promote the application of
marine geospatial technologies in risk assessment. To this end, Dr Li expressed the offer of his
institute to host the first technical meeting of the working group.
92
Some Member States expressed interests to join the project implementation, and
requested future information be shared with its relevant national agencies. Concerns were
voiced over the lack of progress due to the retirement of the Chief Editor. The SubCommission took note of the difficulties in the project implementation, stressed the need for a
regional platform among interested Member States to exchange their bathymetric mapping
techniques, and further suggested an appropriate mechanism be sought to continuously
promote the regional cooperation in this field.
5.2.5
93
Ocean Data & Information Network for the Western Pacific
Dr Jixiang Chen, reported on the project progress, on behalf of Dr Shaohua Lin,
Regional Coordinator for ODINWESTPAC. Dr Chen informed the Session on the establishment
of a Project Coordinating Group, identification of focal points for data and information
management, cooperation with NEAR-GOOS, SEAGOOS, and IODE/ODP, acquisition of
hardware and software for constructing and operating a marine information website at NMDIS,
and development of a preliminary structure of the website. Future activities include the
continuous collection of data and information, the organization of a training course to assist
countries in the implementation of ODINWESTPAC Project, the development of
ODINWESTPAC Visualization system for integrating, managing and displaying all of the marine
data and information that exchanged among WESTPAC Member States, and from other
regional and international programs/projects; the collection of cruise summary reports in the
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 17
region from IODE histories ROSCOP report and Member States, and the updating and
enrichment of the directory of marine libraries and ocean publications
94
The Sub-Commission urged the project to accelerate its implementation as it is an
important regional activity to provide data services to the region. The project was also asked to
enhance communication between ODINWESTPAC and ODIN in other regions, particularly in
Africa in order to exchange experiences and lessons learned. The Sub-Commission further
encouraged Member States to assist in the identification of their suitable national experts and
to facilitate their active participation in the project implementation.
5.3
CAPACITY BUILDING AND PUBLIC AWARENESS
5.3.1
UNESCO/IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centres
on Marine Science in the Western Pacific
95
Mr Zhu briefed the session on the implementation of the self-driven, regionally-specific
capacity building initiative, “UNESCO/IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centres
on Marine Science in the Western Pacific” by referring to the establishment of one Regional
Training and Research Centre on Ocean Dynamics and Climate. He further informed the
meeting the regional training and research center on Ocean Dynamics and Climate has been
put into operation immediately following the inauguration ceremony on 9 June 2011 with the first
regional training course on ocean models conducted on 10–16 June 2011. Meanwhile, effort
has been made with other countries, institutes, universities interested to explore the potential for
the establishment of regional training and research centers within their domains of focus.
Positive responses have been received from several countries in the region.
96
Extensive support was voiced to the implementation of this initiative with strong
willingness expressed from Indonesia to establish a regional training and research center on
tropical marine biodiversity in support of CTI, from Thailand to establish one regional training
and research center on marine ecological conservation and climate change; and from Malaysia
to host one regional training and research center by building upon its universities’ Centers of
Excellence. Meanwhile, Republic of Korea has been positively exploring the possibility of the
establishment of one regional training and research center, and Japan has also been
considering appropriate ways to contribute to the Network.
97
The delegation of China offered to share experiences and provide any necessary
assistance in the establishment and operation of future centres. Discussions are under way to
establish a fund to provide scholarships for students from the region wishing to major in marine
science.
98
The Sub-Commission highly appreciated the WESTPAC Office for the efforts made in
the establishment and implementation of this regional capacity building initiative, invited
Member States to engage their national oceanographic institutes and universities in the
Regional Network; and further requested the Executive Secretary of IOC to take necessary
actions to promote this regional capacity building activity.
99
The Sub-Commission accepted Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.3 on the
UNESCO/IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centres on Marine Science.
5.3.2
100
IOC Regional Training and Research Center on Ocean Dynamics and Climate
Dr Fangli Qiao, Director of the IOC Regional Training and Research Centre on Ocean
Dynamics and Climate, presented the major activities of the Center since its establishment
through the Agreement signed by IOC and the host institute, the First Institute of
Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, China, at the last Session on 11 May 2010. He
informed the meeting that immediately after the inauguration ceremony of the Center on 9 June
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 18
2011, the first regional training course on ocean models was subsequently organized in the
ODC centre during 10–16 June 2011 with tremendous interests received from and outside the
region to join the training. Ultimately, 10 world leading scientists on ocean numerical modeling
and 69 trainees were selected from 10 countries with 20 students’ travel funded by the Centre.
He further informed the meeting that according to its five year plan, the second training course
on ocean dynamics is being planned and scheduled for 16–22 July 2012. Website and email
lists have been developed to share the teaching materials and facilitate the post-training
scientific discussions.
101
Information was provided on the operation of the Regional Training and Research
Center, and financial implication for the regular trainings. Following the presentation, a
Certificate of Appointment was presented by Dr Wendy Watson-Wright on behalf of the
Commission to Dr Qiao in recognition of his appointment from 2011–2015 as the Centre
Director.
102
The Sub-Commission expressed its high appreciation to Dr Fangli Qiao, his institute
and the Government of China for their great contribution made to improve the regional capacity
in the research of ocean dynamics, air-sea interaction, climate change, and numerical modeling,
and further encouraged all Member States to nominate their qualified trainees to take part in
the regular training courses.
5.3.3
IOC-WMO Regional Marine Instrument Center for the Asia and Pacific
103
Dr Jun Sui from the National Centre of Ocean Standards and Metrology, China, briefed
on the IOC-WMO Regional Marine Instrument Centre for the Asia and Pacific (RMIC) which was
established through IOC Resolution XXVI-9 and WMO Resolution 3.1.4/3 in July 2011 with a
view to facilitating the adherence of observational data, metadata, and processed observational
products to the higher level standards for instruments and methods of observation, by providing:
(i) facilities for the calibration and maintenance of marine instruments and the monitoring of
instrument performance; and (ii) assistance for instrument inter-comparisons, as well as
appropriate training facilities complementing what the manufacturers provide. One training
workshop on marine instrumentation for countries in the Asia-Pacific region was organized at
the Centre, 11–13 July 2011 to help develop the capacity of the Asia-Pacific countries involved
in ocean observations with a view to addressing the requirements of IOC and WMO
applications.
104
Dr Sui expressed the willingness of the Centre to join the IOC Regional Network of
Training and Research Centres on Marine Science, and further outlined the future activities to
be conducted in the next two years, which include the establishment of a coordinating group to
liaise with countries requiring instrument calibration and measurement services; the conduct of
one survey to map the specific needs of Member States for instrument calibration; the provision
of instrument calibration service on seawater conductivity/salinity, seawater temperature,
seawater depth, tide, wave (wave height, wave period), and the provision of technical support in
the development of marine observation standards and instrument calibration specifications. He
finally informed that one CTD calibration workshop and one calibration workshop for float-type
tide gauge and wave buoy will be organized respectively in October 2012, and in September
2013.
105
The Sub-Commission welcomed the IOC-WMO Regional Marine Instrument Centre
for the Asia and Pacific to join the IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centres on
Marine Science, and further encouraged all Member States to actively participate in the
activities of the RMIC, and communicate with the Centre their suggestions on and requirements
for, if any, the marine instrument calibration and measurement services.
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5.4
106
Dr Fukuyo introduced this agenda item, explaining that two WESTPAC Working Groups
were formed in accordance with adopted Guideline for the Establishment of WESTPAC Working
Groups, respectively on Asian Dust and its Impact on Ocean Ecosystem (ADOES) with a
lifetime of four years, and on the UN Regular Process for Global Reporting and Assessment of
the State of the Marine Environment, including Socio-Economic aspects (Regular Process) with
a lifetime of two years.
5.4.1
107
WESTPAC WORKING GROUPS
Working Group on Asian Dust and its Impact on Ocean Ecosystem
Speaking for Dr Huiwang Gao and Dr Mitsuo Uematsu, Co-Chairs of this Working
Group, Dr Xiaopei Lin from Ocean University of China reported on the progress made while
stressing the need to promote the study on Asian dust and its impact on ocean ecosystem in
the Western Pacific. Key activities of the working group include the organization of one
workshop on Asian Dust and Ocean Ecosystem (ADOES) on 30 March 2011, Busan, Republic
of Korea, and the co-organization of the 5th International Workshop on ADOES on 29 Nov.–2
Dec. 2010 in Nagasaki, Japan, the 6th Workshop on ADOES on 5–9 October 2011, Qingdao,
China; and several cruises conducted in the Yellow and East China Seas and Western North
Pacific with the scientific results published.
5.4.2
Working Group on Regular Process for Global Reporting
and Assessment of the State of the Marine Environment
108
Dr Juying Wang, National Marine Environmental Monitoring Centre, China, presented
the history, background and rationale of the Regular Process and informed the session on the
activities that the Working Group has carried out. The Working Group has been involved in
following up the progress, providing information to Member States and inputs to the global
process. A regional workshop of the Regular Process for Eastern and Southeastern Asian
Seas was convened in Sanya, China, in February 2012 under the auspices of the United
Nations. The workshop brought together representatives from countries in the region as well as
from international organizations that were updated on the progress of the Regular Process, and
provided an opportunity to identify their capacity building needs for the first cycle of the
integrated assessments in the Regular Process. A website (http://regular.process.mem.gov.cn/eng)
has been established that contains information on the objectives, terms of reference, and
activities carried out by the Working Group. The website also contains information and links to
the global activities of the Regular Process. She further suggested the lifespan of the Working
Group be extended from its originally proposed two years to at least four years in the light of the
current progress of the Regular Process at the global level.
109
Clarification was sought in respect of the composition of the Working Group. Ms Wang
explained that the Working Group members have not been finalized as it was difficult to identify
suitable expertise before the Group of Experts, established by the UNGA for the Regular
Process, could come up with clear scientific and technical guidelines for the conduct of the
integrated marine assessment. However, considering some substantial progress has been
made by the Group of Experts in 2011, it maybe timely in 2012 to officially finalize the members
of the Working Group with assistance provided by Member States. One Working Group meeting
will be convened to define a course of actions for WESTPAC in support of the Regular Process,
and one training course will be organized to help build the capacity of Member States on the
methodology of the integrated marine assessment.
110
With consideration of the fact that the progress of this Working Group largely depends
on the progress of the Regular Process at global level, the Sub-Commission decided to
extend the lifespan of this Working Group to four years, further encouraged the Working
Group to follow closely the progress of the Regular Process, and conduct their activities at the
appropriate time. Moreover, in view of the pressing need in the region for the integrated marine
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 20
assessment in the Regular Process, the Sub-Commission encouraged the Working Group to
explore any possibilities to help Member States build their capacity.
5.5
REVIEW OF ON-GOING PROJECTS AND WORKING GROUPS
BY THE WESTPAC ADVISORY GROUP
111
After reviewing the on-going projects and working groups, Dr Fukuyo, Chair of the
Advisory Group, reported to the Session the outcome of the work undertaken by the group. The
group recognized that as a whole, tremendous achievements were made over the last
intersessional period, and tabled the following recommendations that:

All the on-going projects and Working Groups be continued, and the WESTPAC Officers
and WESTPAC Office, and project leaders’ national focal points assist in any way
possible for the implementation of these projects. However, following projects need to
be alerted in terms of their implementation status and deliverables.

“DNA taxonomy and Recruitment Monitoring of the Coral Reef Marine Organisms” be
suspended until necessary funding is obtained;

“Marine Hazards Forecasting and Mitigation in the Western Pacific” conduct its work as
soon as possible, in particular, to establish its steering group and hold the regional
training on tsunami models;

“Ocean data & Information Network for the Western Pacific” (ODINWESTPAC) conduct
its work as soon as possible in accordance with the workplan approved at the last
session;

“International Bathymetric Chart for the Western Pacific” (IBCWP), with consideration of
the suggestion made on reforming this project as one WESTPAC Working Group with
emphasis on the technical exchange on the marine cartography and the applications of
bathymetric chart in marine and coastal area integrated management, establish the
network, develop a complete working group proposal via correspondence and technical
workshops, and submit the proposal to the next session for approval.
112
The Sub-Commission recognized the fact that challenges do arise for all projects and
Working Groups, thus the evaluation process is a means to encourage all projects and Working
Groups to implement their planned activities in a timely manner in order to attain the expected
objectives.
113
The Sub-Commission expressed its appreciation to the Advisory Group and further
endorsed the recommendations made by the Group.
6.
114
Dr Fukuyo briefed the meeting on the review process of the WESTPAC Advisory Group
on one new project proposal and two new Working Groups proposals received in accordance
with the framework established in the WESTPAC Strategy and Programme Structure and the
Guideline for the Establishment of WESTPAC Working Groups. He further suggested that the
Sub-Commission consider adopting the one project and two working groups after hearing the
proposals. The proponents were invited to brief the Session on their proposals.
6.1
115
REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NEW PROJECT
AND WORKING GROUP PROPOSALS
AIR-SEA INTERACTION IN THE KUROSHIO EXTENSION AND ITS CLIMATE IMPACT
Dr Xiaopei Lin introduced the proposal on “Air-sea Interaction in the Kuroshio Extension
and its Climate Impact” with a lifetime of three years. The reasons for embarking on this project
are the need to study global climate change, a need for more observations in this hotspot area,
and a need for better models to simulate these phenomena in view of the crucial role of the
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 21
Kuroshio Extension region in the North Pacific climate system. The project objectives are to: (i)
investigate feedback mechanisms between the sharp thermal front and storm track activity; (ii)
develop models and observation networks; (iii) improve understanding of ocean and climate
prediction in the region. Some expected outcomes include: high resolution regional coupled
model system, published papers, and the establishment of a platform for scientific
communication. Dr Lin showed some preliminary results and wished for collaboration between
Japan and China to undertake these observations. A workplan containing a workshop, model
development and information dissemination was shown.
116
Support was expressed for this project proposal in terms of the need for more
observations and model development to study on the air-sea interaction in the Kuroshio
Extension region, a key region for intense heat release, large CO 2 storage and complex
variability.
6.2
MAPPING THE HARMFUL JELLYFISHES IN THE TROPICAL WESTERN PACIFIC
117
Dr Xuelei Zhang stressed the need to map the harmful jellyfishes in the tropical Western
Pacific in view of its increasing social and ecosystem impacts and the lack of information in the
region on this emerging issue. The objectives to be achieved through the conduct of three
workshops within next two years are to review available data and define knowledge gaps for the
analysis of the pattern and trend of the distribution and/or source of harmful jellyfishes in the
tropical Western Pacific.
118
This proposal was welcomed and the interest of participation was voiced as jellyfish
blooms have been an emerging regional issue and the expected outcomes would help establish
the scientific basis for addressing the concern. It was suggested that more interested countries
be involved into this Working Group, and consultations with local community may need to be
conducted due to lack of historical data and information.
6.3
MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT
IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC
119
Professor Nor Aieni introduced the proposal for a new Working Group on Marine
Renewable Energy Technology Development in the Western Pacific (MRET) by referring to the
outcomes of the 1st WESTPAC workshop convened in February 2012 in Melaka, Malaysia on
“the Status on the Marine Renewable Energy Technology Development in the Western Pacific”.
Professor Nor Aieni explained the objectives of this Working Group are to facilitate, monitor and
provide technical advice on the development of MRET in the Western Pacific. Expected
outcomes include one proposed WESTPAC regional MRET Strategy for short, medium and long
term, including objectives and associated activities; regular reports on the regional status on
MRET in order to provide baseline information, identity the challenges and share practices
among Member States; and regional pilot project proposal(s) on MRET that will serve as
learning and collaboration platform and provide mutual benefits to all WG member countries
and WESTPAC region.
120
This proposal aroused wide interests and was well received at the session in terms of
the significant potential of marine renewable energy to contribute to the future sustainable
energy supply, reduction of carbon emission, and the low capacity of Member States in the
Western Pacific, particularly Southeast Asian Countries and Pacific Island Countries, for the
research and development of marine renewable energy technology.
121
The Sub-Commission decided to adopt the Project on “Air-sea Interaction in the
Kuroshio Extension and its Climate Impact”, and establish two Working Groups respectively on
“Mapping the Harmful Jellyfishes in the Western Pacific” with a lifetime of two years, and
“Marine Renewable Energy Technology Development in the Western Pacific” with four years’
lifespan.
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7.
122
CO-OPERATION WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
Mr Zhu reiterated that cooperation with other organizations have been instrumental in
revitalizing WESTPAC activities, building partnerships, and sharing resources to achieve all
parties’ common goals for better directed marine research. Possibilities to co-sponsor the
Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) Pacific Panel with CLIVAR, and joint efforts with
IMBER to develop a proposal for capacity building in the Asia-Pacific region on integrated
marine biogeochemistry and ecosystem research were given as examples. While continuing its
cooperation with current partners, such as PICES, NOWPAP, PEMSEA, and COBSEA,
cooperation needs to be strengthened with other international programmes.
IOC Sub-Commission for Africa and Adjacent Island States (IOCAFRICA)
123
Dr Adote Blim Blivi, Vice-Chair of IOC, was invited to speak on the establishment of the
IOC Sub-Commission for Africa and Adjacent Island States (IOCAFRICA). He informed the
meeting that the first intergovernmental meeting for IOC-Africa was held last month. The SubCommission will embark on cooperating with regional entities such as UNEP, Nairobi and
Abidjan Conventions. The Sub-commission is in the process of preparing workplans, defining
programs, initiating cooperation with relevant institutes and agencies, and cooperating with
other subsidiary bodies of IOC that share common interests. Some relevant existing projects to
explore partnerships with include ODINAFRICA, GOOS-AFRICA, SCOR, and LME projects.
124
Dr Blivi congratulated WESTPAC on the remarkable achievement made over past five
years, and hoped that WESTPAC can serve as a model for IOCAFRICA. In closing Dr Blivi
expected to continue the collaboration with and draw upon experience of WESTPAC particularly
in involving governments and garnering their support.
UNEP Northwest Pacific Action Plan
125
Dr Alexander Tkalin, Coordinator for the UNEP Northwest Pacific Action Plan
(NOWPAP), informed the Session of the NOWPAP’s cooperative activities with WESTPAC on
the development of regional capacity for remote-sensing data analysis, identification of marine
alien species by highlighting the importance to strengthen closer links among international
organizations. It was suggested more representatives from other international organizations be
invited to attend WESTPAC Sessions, as they could certainly benefit from cooperating with
relevant WESTPAC activities.
126
In order to avoid any possible duplication of activities, clarification was sought with
regard to one training course to be organized late 2012, or early 2013 in China on the
methodology for the integrated marine assessment of the Regular Process. Ms Wang,
Chairperson of the Working Group on Regular Process explained that this training will mainly
target those young experts, and help them build capacity on the methodology of the integrated
marine assessment through sharing information on and common approaches to assessment
methodologies.
127
Dr Fangli Qiao emphasized the need to cooperate with the Scientific Committee on
Oceanic Research (SCOR) by informing the meeting of one SOCR Working Group Proposal he
submitted on Surface Waves in Ocean Circulation and Climate System, and suggesting the
cooperation with other leading international marine scientific programmes be of great help to
improve the regional scientific capacity.
128
The Sub-Commission noted with appreciation the efforts made by the WESTPAC
Office, projects and working groups to establish and/or strengthen its cooperation with other
international organizations and programmes, and further encouraged more concrete
cooperation to be established.
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page 23
8.
WESTPAC PROGRAMME AND BUDGET FOR MAY 2012–MAY 2014
129
Mr Zhu presented the Draft WESTPAC Programme and Budget for May 2012–May
2014, referring to Document IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/16. This draft was prepared based on the
discussions pertaining to the respective agenda items at the present session and the inputs
from projects and working groups, serving as a guidance on activities that the Sub-Commission
would like to jointly promote, and seek funding from various sources as a result of continuously
unsecured financial situation of IOC.
130
WESTPAC is implementing a large number of important projects, and the workplan and
budget seems like a daunting task to fulfill given the serious financial situation. Some concerns
have been voiced that the inadequate resources may prevent the completion of the workplan.
131
The Sub-Commission noted with appreciation the efforts made by the WESTPAC
Office particularly in resource mobilization since the last session of the Sub-Commission and
the preparation of the draft programme and budget for May 2012–May 2014. The SubCommission requested all Member States to provide and elevate their support in all possible
ways.
132
The Sub-Commission adopted Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.4 concerning
WESTPAC Programme and Budget for May 2012–May 2014.
9.
OTHER MATTERS
133
Dr Dosoo Jang introduced the “Yeosu Declaration,” as a legacy of Expo2012 Yeosu
Korea, which is intended not only to enhance the awareness of dangers faced by the sea but
also to promote the necessity of international cooperation for turning these challenges into
hopes for the future. The Yeosu Declaration covers key contents on the importance of ocean:
coasts and islands; maritime culture; interconnectedness; green economy; marine ecosystem;
mitigation of the impact and adaptation to climate change; efforts of governments and civil
society and actions. He also informed that the Yeosu Declaration Forum will take place on 12
August 2012 with participation of high-level representatives from ocean-related international
organizations, and objective to define measures to translate the spirit of the Yeosu Declaration
into concrete actions.
134
The Sub-Commission noted the information provided by Dr Jang, and believed the
experience of developing the Declaration will be of great help for WESTPAC to develop its
Regional Ocean Research Priority Plan. The Sub-Commission expressed appreciation to the
Republic of Korea for incorporating the importance of marine science into this Declaration.
10.
ELECTIONS
135
Dr Fangli Qiao, Chair of the Nomination Committee, presented the recommendations of
the Committee. Nominations were put forth for the Chairperson, the First and Second ViceChairs, in that order, noting that officers can serve for two terMs
136
Dr Somkiat Khokiattiwong from Thailand was nominated for the post of Chairperson. The
nomination was seconded by the delegates from China and ROK. Dr Youn-Ho Lee was
nominated as the First Vice-chair, seconded by Thailand and Indonesia, with primary
responsibility to oversee the Advisory Group. Dr Vo Si Tuan was nominated to serve as the
Second Vice-chair, with primary responsibility for the organization of the next Scientific
Symposium. The nomination was seconded by Japan and ROK.
137
The proposed nominations were unanimously supported by the Sub-Commission, and
the three new officers were duly elected by acclamation.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 24
138
Dr Khokiattiwong thanked the delegates for their trust and support placed on him to take
on the honorable position. He assured the Sub-commission that he would continue to work
closely with the Vice-Chairs and WESTPAC Office for securing further success of the SubCommission and would put in all efforts to ensure that WESTPAC continues its leading role in
marine science research. Dr Lee expressed that he was honored to be given the opportunity to
serve as First Vice-Chair. He confirmed that he would continue to forge ahead with WESTPAC’s
activities, collaborating with relevant entities to promote and expand research in marine
sciences. Dr Vo echoed the sentiments expressed by the new Chairperson and First Vice-Chair,
and expressed his commitment and readiness to do his best. He thanked all delegates for their
confidence and support to Vietnam in hosting the next Scientific Symposium.
11.
DATE AND PLACE OF THE NEXT SESSION
139
The Delegation of Thailand offered to host the next session with Phuket proposed as the
venue, subject to formal confirmation by the Government of Thailand. However, the session is
scheduled to occur in the same year as the 9th Scientific Symposium in Vietnam. Considering
the need for the cycle of WESTPAC sessions to be in phase with the IOC reporting cycle, there
was a suggestion to consider holding the next session no later than early 2015 before the
Twenty-eighth Session of the IOC Assembly in the same year.
140
An inquiry was made if any appropriate mechanism could be explored to discuss and
adopt WESTPAC activities for the period from the May 2014 to early 2015 as the SubCommission just approved at the present Session its Programme and Budget for the period May
2012- May 2014. Mr Zhu explained that one joint meeting of WESTPAC officers and WESTPAC
Advisory Group, serving as one executive meeting, in the mid-2014 could possibly serve the
needs as one interim arrangement.
141
The Sub-Commission accepted with appreciation the offer by the Government of
Thailand to host the Tenth Session in early 2015, subject to the final endorsement by the
relevant authorities.
142
In view of the above, the Sub-Commission adopted the Recommendation SCWESTPAC-IX.5 on the date and place of the next session.
12.
ADOPTION OF SUMMARY REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS
143
Dr Yutaka Michida, Chairperson of the Recommendation Committee, reported to the
plenary that the Committee convened two meetings on May 10 and 11 with active participation
of eight Member States, China, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Russian
Federation, Thailand, and Vietnam, and decided to submit five draft recommendations for
consideration by the Sub-Commission.
144
Dr Fukuyo called on the delegates to review the draft recommendations paragraph by
paragraph, and the draft summary report section by section, taking into account the substantial
comments made during the session.
145
The Sub-Commission adopted the Summary Report and the recommendations
contained therein, which incorporated the amendments accepted by the Sub-Commission.
13.
146
CLOSURE
The Sub-Commission expressed thanks once again to the Local Organizing
Committee for its excellent arrangements and hospitality, and to all delegates and participants
for their cooperation and efforts to make the meeting a success. The Sub-Commission
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
page 25
extended its high appreciation to all outgoing WESTPAC Officers, WESTPAC Advisory
Group for their valuable guidance provided over past four years, particularly to Dr Fukuyo for
taking on the role of acting Chair for this session at short notice.
147
The Sub-Commission highlighted the recent remarkable achievement made by
WESTPAC in the development, coordination and promotion of marine scientific research,
observations and capacity building with a view to assisting Member States to address issues
affecting sustainable development of marine and coastal resources. It was recognized that the
implementation of the WESTPAC revitalization strategy generated positive impacts, which was
demonstrated not only by the established WESTPAC framework and collaborative process, but
also by the ever-growing number of substantial activities and increasing support, either in cash
or in kind, from Member States. The increased commitments of Member States and the
dynamic efforts of the WESTPAC Office for resources mobilization, programme development
and their passion to serve WESTPAC’s interests are considered among key factors behind
WESTPAC’s recent achievement.
148
While congratulating Dr Khokiattiwong, Dr Lee and Dr Vo on their elections as the new
WESTPAC Officers for the term from now until the closure of the next session, the SubCommission expected that the momentum of WESTPAC should be long kept; the cordial
atmosphere and effective working relationship between the present WESTPAC Office and
Member States should be maintained; and the quality service provided by the WESTPAC Office
should be reinforced.
149
Dr Fukuyo, acting Chairperson, declared the Session closed at 18:20 on 11 May 2012.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex I
ANNEX I
AGENDA
1.
OPENING
2.
ADMINISTRATION
2.1
2.2
2.3
3.
ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA
DESIGNATION OF RAPPORTEUR FOR THE SESSION
CONDUCT OF THE SESSION
REPORT ON INTERSESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
3.1
REPORT ON INTERSESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.2
4.
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN IOC/UNESCO, AND ITS RELEVANCE TO
WESTPAC
POLICY ISSUES
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
5.
Statement of the Chairperson
Report by the Regional Office on Intersessional Activities and Budget
Overview
Operation of the IOC Regional Office for WESTPAC
PERSPECTIVES OF IOC ON THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF SUBCOMMISSION
WESTPAC OCEAN RESEARCH PRIORITY PLAN
THE EIGHTH WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM IN 2011,
REPUBLIC OF KOREA, WITH FOCUS ON LESSONS LEARNT
THE PREPARATIONS FOR THE NINTH WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC
SYMPOSIUM, VIETNAM 2014
CELEBRATING THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF WESTPAC
REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF REGIONAL PROGRAMMES, PROJECTS AND
WORKING GROUPS FOR MAY 2010 - MAY 2012
5.1
MARINE SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
5.1.4
5.1.5
5.1.6
5.1.7
5.1.8
5.2
Harmful Algal Blooms
Ocean Remote Sensing
Response of Marine Hazards to Climate Change
South China Sea Fluvial Sediments and Environment Changes
Marine and Coastal Biodiversity and its Management
Coral Reef under Climate and Anthropogenic Perturbations
Toxic Marine Organisms
DNA Taxonomy and Recruitment Monitoring of the Coral Reef Marine
Organisms
OCEAN OBSERVATIONS AND SERVICES
5.2.1
North East Asian Regional-GOOS
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex I – page 2
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5
5.3
CAPACITY BUILDING AND PUBLIC AWARENESS
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.4
6.
UNESCO/IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centres on
Marine Science in the Western Pacific
IOC Regional Training and Research Centre on Ocean Dynamics and
Climate
IOC-WMO Regional Marine Instrument Centre for the Asia and Pacific
WESTPAC WORKING GROUPS
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.5
South East Asian Regional-GOOS , including Monsoon Onset Monitoring
and its Social and Ecosystem Impacts, Ocean Forecasting Demonstration
System
Marine Hazards Forecasting and Mitigation in the Western Pacific
International Bathymetric Chart of the Western Pacific
Ocean Data & Information Network for the Western Pacific
Working Group on Asian Dust and its Impact on Ocean Ecosystem
Working Group on Regular Process for Global Reporting and Assessment
of the State of the Marine Environment
REVIEW OF ON-GOING PROJECTS AND WORKING GROUPS BY THE
WESTPAC ADVISORY GROUP
REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NEW PROJECT AND WORKING GROUP PROPOSALS
6.1
6.2
6.3
AIR-SEA INTERACTION IN THE KUROSHIO EXTENSION AND ITS CLIMATE
IMPACT
MAPPING THE HARMFUL JELLYFISHES IN THE TROPICAL WESTERN PACIFIC
MARINE RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE
WESTERN PACIFIC
7.
COOPERATION WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
8.
WESTPAC PROGRAMME AND BUDGET FOR MAY 2012–MAY 2014
9.
OTHER MATTERS
10.
ELECTIONS
11.
DATE AND PLACE OF THE NEXT SESSION
12.
ADOPTION OF SUMMARY REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS
13.
CLOSURE
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II
ANNEX II
LIST OF ADOPTED RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.1
WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC
SYMPOSIUM
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.2
TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE
IOC SUB-COMMISSION FOR THE
WESTERN PACIFIC
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.3
UNESCO/IOC REGIONAL NETWORK OF
TRAINING AND RESEARCH CENTERS ON
MARINE SCIENCE IN THE WESTERN
PACIFIC
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.4
WESTPAC PROGRAMME AND BUDGET
FOR MAY 2012–MAY 2014
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.5
DATE AND PLACE OF THE NEXT
SESSION
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 2
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.1
WESTPAC INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM
The IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific,
Recalling the decision of its First Session in 1990 that a major multi-disciplinary symposium
should become a principal intersessional activity of the Sub-Commission,
Further recalling that WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium is the only scientific
series to enhance exchange of marine scientific knowledge in the region,
Having reviewed the outputs and results of the previous symposia, particularly the Eighth
WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium on the Ocean Climate and Marine
Ecosystems in the Western Pacific, held in Busan, Republic of Korea, 28–31 March 2011,
Expressing its great appreciation to the Government of the Republic of Korea, through its
Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs, and Korea Ocean Research and
Development Institute for having hosted the Symposium,
Having formulated WESTPAC Programme and Budget for May 2012–May 2014,
Bearing in mind the need for presentation and exchange of scientific results in an
interdisciplinary forum,
Appreciates the generous offer of the Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to
host the ninth Symposium in 2014, Vietnam;
Decides to establish an international scientific steering committee to provide guidance in the
formulation of the Symposium Themes, Sub-Themes, Programme, including the scope,
contents and structure, under the chairpersonship of the second vice chairperson of the SubCommission, Dr Vo Si Tuan;
Recommends that pertinent regional and international organizations be invited to support
and participate in the Symposium; and
Encourages all Member States and related international organizations for active
participation and contribution to ensure the success of the Symposium.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 3
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.2
THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF
THE IOC SUB-COMMISSION FOR THE WESTERN PACIFIC
The IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific,
Noting that the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Sub-Commission will occur in 2014,
Recognizing the instrumental role of WESTPAC since its inception in 1989 and its
achievements made in the development, promotion and coordination of regional
programmes in the Western Pacific on marine scientific research, observations, services and
capacity building in order to learn more about the nature and resources of the ocean and
coastal areas, and apply that knowledge for the improvement of management, sustainable
development, the protection of the marine environment, and the decision-making processes
of its Member States,
Recognizing also the ever-increasing need, given the fact that the sustainable development
of the region heavily relies on the ocean but the knowledge on oceans still remains low, for
an intergovernmental presence in the region to improve knowledge exchange between
marine scientific community and governmental agencies,
Decides that a series of commemorative activities be planned and organized in 2013–2014
to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Sub-Commission, with objectives to (i) take
stock of advances in marines sciences and related international cooperation in the Western
Pacific; (ii) promote and demonstrate, to governments and to the public, the value and
importance of the Sub-Commission's achievements; and (iii) plan for its future directions in
marine science, and related sciences and services;
Appreciates the preliminary list of commemorative activities prepared by the Sessional
Working Group and considered at the Ninth Intergovernmental Session of the IOC SubCommission for the Western Pacific (WESTPAC-IX, Busan, Republic of Korea, 9–12 May
2012);
Urges Member States to consider national and/or regional initiatives and suggestions to be
communicated to the Executive Secretary of IOC for inclusion in the preliminary plan; and
Encourages Member States to provide in- cash or in-kind contribution to the implementation
of these commemorative activities.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 4
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.3
UNESCO/IOC REGIONAL NETWORK OF
TRAINING AND RESEARCH CENTERS ON MARINE SCIENCE
IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC
The IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific,
Recognizing the urgent need of Member States for high quality training in specialized fields
of marine science in the WESTPAC region,
Bearing in mind the IOC Principles and Strategy for Capacity Building adopted at the
Twenty-third Session of IOC Assembly in 2005,
Recalling that the self-driving and sustainable regional capacity building initiative, titled
“UNESCO/IOC Regional Network of Training and Research Centers on Marine Science”,
together with corresponding Guideline and Procedure was adopted by the Sub-Commission
at its Seventh Intergovernmental Session (WESTPAC-VII, Sabah, Malaysia, 26–29 May
2008) and subsequently endorsed by the IOC at the Forty-first Session of its Executive
Council (IOC/EC-XLI, Paris, France, 24 June-1 July 2008), and that the regional network will
be formed through the establishment of regional training and research centres within the
national oceanographic institutes or universities which are willing to provide regular training
and research opportunities to the trainees from all WESTPAC Member States on a free-ofcharge basis,
Noting with appreciation the great efforts of WESTPAC Office in the promotion of the
initiative, and the establishment of the Regional Training and Research Centre on Ocean
Dynamics and Climate in the First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration
of China, which hosted the first regional training course on ocean models from 10–16 June
2011 in accordance with the approved Guideline and Procedures, and Agreement,
Further noting with appreciation the willingness expressed by and positive response
received from Indonesia, Malaysia, Republic of Korea and Thailand to contribute to the
network through the establishment of IOC Regional Training and Research Centres on the
domain of their focus,
Invites Member States to encourage their respective national oceanographic institutes, and
universities to actively participate in the Regional Network; and
Requests the Executive Secretary of IOC to follow-up those Member States’ initiatives and
take necessary actions to further promote this regional capacity building activity.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 5
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.4
WESTPAC PROGRAMME AND BUDGET FOR MAY 2012–MAY 2014
The IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific,
Noting the reports of the Technical Secretary for IOC Sub-Commission for the Western
Pacific on intersessional activities and the WESTPAC Programme and Budget May 2012–
May 2014, contained in documents IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/6, 7 and 16,
Expressing its appreciation to the Royal Thai Government’s continuing support for the IOC
Regional Office for WESTPAC (WESTPAC Office), and these Member States for their incash and in-kind contribution in support of the implementation of WESTPAC Programme and
Budget for May 2010–May 2012,
Acknowledging the importance of the WESTPAC Office for the success of the programme
implementation,
Noting IOC Resolution XXVI-12 adopted at the Twenty-sixth Session of IOC Assembly (IOCXXVI, Paris, 22 June–5 July 2011) on IOC Biennial Priorities and Implementation Strategy
and Draft Programme and Budget for 2012–2013, in which 74.2K USD was allotted to the
WESTPAC for its activities over 2012–2013,
Further noting with great concern, however, the recent dramatic reduction of 44.2K USD in
the allotment for WESTPAC activities over 2012–2013 as a result of the current financial
crisis experienced by the UNESCO and IOC due to the withholding of the United States of
America and Israel’s assessed contributions to the UNESCO following the General
Conference vote admitting Palestine as a Member State of UNESCO,
Recognizing the negative impact of the reduction on the implementation of WESTPAC
programmes over 2012–2013,
Decides that the WESTPAC Programme and Budget for May 2012–May 2014 shall be
aligned with the High-Level Objectives of the WESTPAC Strategy and the priority areas
detailed within the Strategy;
Adopts the Draft WESTPAC Programme and Budget for May 2012–May 2014 given in the
Annex to this Recommendation;
Urges Member States to continue and increase their support to WESTPAC and its Office
through direct and in-kind contributions; and
Requests the Executive Secretary of IOC and other organizations co-operating with the
Sub-Commission to allocate necessary resources and assist in obtaining extrabudgetary
funds from governmental and donor agencies.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 6
Project/Programme
Regional Ocean
Research Priority Plan
9th WESTPAC
International Scientific
Symposium
Executive meetings
(WESTPAC Officers,
Advisory Group)
Operation of
WESTPAC Office
WG001: Asian Dust
and its Impact on
Ocean Ecosystem
(WG-ADOES)
Activities
1. Separate Thematic
Groups meetings
2. Organization of RORP
drafting group
1. International Scientific
Steering Committee
WG003: Mapping the
harmful jellyfishes
Draft of each theme
Expected outputs
POLICY AND COORDINATION
First draft of the RORP
Consolidated draft of the RORP
2. Organization of the 9th
Symposium
Finalization of RORP outline;
Assignment of thematic groups
 identify main themes and key
sub-themes
 finalize the programme
th
Successful organization of the 9
Symposium
Organization of mid-term
joint meetings
key issues addressed during the
intersessional period
Development, coordination
and implementation, and
resources mobilization of
WESTPAC activities;
Efficient and effective operation of
the Sub-Commission and
implementation of workplan
activities reviewed, problems
addressed, and guidance
provided
New activities developed,
workplan implemented and
quality service provided
th
1. 7 workshop of ADOES
1. Development of the
WESTPAC regional
GRAME Strategy
WG002: Regular
Process for Global
Reporting and
Assessment of the
State of the Marine
Environment
(WG-Regular
Process)
Objectives
2. Co-organization of the
Regional S& T Capacity
Building workshop; and
conduct of WG meeting
3. conduct of a training
course
1. 1st Workshop (Kick-off)
Symposium Programme
Proceedings and/or new
proposals for WESTPAC
WESTPAC WORKING GROUPS
Exchange ideas of methodology,
Proceedings
data analyzing and discussion
related to this project.
Facilitate the implementation of the
Regular Process, improve the
communication of member states,
and identify regional capacity
building needs
strengthen and promote the
regional cooperation ; assist, as an
initial attempt, in capacity building
for the integrated assessments
Impel the capacity building in
carrying out integrated
assessments in the region, make
the participants better understand
and contribute to the RP.
Review the regional concerns on
and identify the project
WESTPAC regional GRAME
Strategy (2012-2015)
Summary Report
Summary report
project requirement identified
and information collection table
formatted
Date and
place
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
Late 2012 or
early 2013
2013 and
2014
Late 2012
and 2013
\
20 K
20 K
(host)
20 K
(host)
10 K
(host)
\
20 K
\
10 K
2014
Vietnam
\
10 K
Late
2012,and
Mid of 2014
May 2012May 2014
Thailand
6K
10 K
24 K
90 K
To be
determined
\
8K
8K
(China)
Jun 2013
\
8K
10 K
(China)
Sep 2012
Bangkok
NOWPAP,
COBSEA
2013
Dalian
China
\
8K
\
15 K
Jul-Sep 2012
Thailand or
China
\
6K
40 K
(Vietnam and
others )
10 K
(host and
others)
20 K
(Thailand and
others)
15 K
(China)
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 7
Project/Programme
WG003: Mapping the
harmful jellyfishes
WG004: Marine
Renewable Energy
Technology
Development (MRET)
Activities
Toxic Marine
Organisms and their
toxins
(WESTPAC-TMO)
Expected outputs
2. Data Collection
3. 2nd Workshop
4. Data Analysis
Collect available data
Review the data collected
History and trend study of harmful
jellyfish in the region
5. 3rd Workshop
Review and discuss study results
Preliminary dataset distributed
Finalized regional dataset
History and trend; knowledge
gaps;future study;
publications/recommendation
Draft publications/new proposal
6. Reporting
Report to the IOC Sub-Commission
Report submitted
1. Development of the
WESTPAC regional
MRET Strategy
2. Organize regional pilot
projects on MRET
Preparation of the Regional Status
on MRE
Annual reports on the progress
of regional status on MRE
1. Strategic meeting
Harmful Algae Bloom
(WESTPAC-HAB)
Objectives
Facilitation of information exchange
and dissemination
Facilitation of enrollment of
scientists
Regional and local training courses
5. Development of
HABSEA Portal
6. Interaction with other
HAB projects
7. Production of outreach
material
8. Preparation of textbook
Information dissemination to
scientists and public
Information exchange and
collaboration of activities
Information dissemination
1. The 3rd workshop
Public outreach materials; and
translation of materials in local
languages
Increase effectiveness of training
2013
Sep 2013
Aug 2013Mar 2014
Apr-May,
2014
Before 31
May 2014
Late 2012
Malaysia
\
8K
\
\
\
15 K
2014
\
5K
2012
Korea (with
the 15th
IHAB
conference)
2012-2014
\
15 K
\
\
Information distribution
Feb 2013
\
\
Trained scientists and
technicians
Increased awareness of HAB
science
Enhance effectiveness of
activities
Better understanding on HAB
problems
Increased skill of HAB
monitoring
 Presentations in the
workshop section and the
conference
 Local electronic versions of
book
2012-2014
\
20 K
2012-2014
\
\
2012-2014
\
\
2012-2014
\
\
2013
\
\
Oct 2012
Korea
\
\
Creation of learning and
Pilot project initiated
collaboration platform of MRET
MARINE SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS
Discussion on future activities,
 list of training courses
especially on capacity building and
 drafts of outreach material
formation of outreach materials
2. Establishment of
regional network
3. Coordination for
GEOHAB Asia
4. Capacity building
Date and
place
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
\
\
6K
\
\
networking
10 K
(Malaysia)
3K
(Univ. of Tokyo)
25 K
(Univ of Tokyo)
Jointly with
WESTPACHAB
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 8
Project/Programme
Toxic Marine
Organisms and their
toxins
(WESTPAC-TMO)
Activities
Final version of Webpage
2013,
Singapore
3. Printing cost
Public awareness

Feb 2013
4. TMO webpage design
rd
1. 3 Workshop
Project information
Analyze initial mapping results of
seagrass beds
2. 4 Workshop
Analyze spatio-temporal change of
seagrass beds
3. Publication of pamphlet
Publish English pamphlet
th
1. Fourth Joint Cruise in the
Western Pacific
Air-sea Interaction in
the Kuroshio
Extension and its
Climate Impact
Date and
place
Confirmation of the final version of
webpage
4. 5 Workshop
Response of Marine
Hazards to Climate
Change
(WESTPAC-ROSE)
Expected outputs
2. The 4th workshop
th
Ocean Remote
Sensing Programme
(WESTPAC-ORSP)
Objectives
Analyze spatio-temporal change of
seagrass beds
Improve regional database on the
marine hazards variability
2. Fourth International
Workshop on Response
of Marine Hazards to
Climate Change in the
Western Pacific: From
science to service
1. Workshop
Discuss the next step of ROSE
project, discuss the establishment
of reanalysis data distribution
system for the regional ocean
forecast system
2. Model works
Develop proper modeling approach
to explore the air-sea interaction in
the KER
the international cooperation in the
KER observation
3. International Cruise and
observation in the KER
Discuss the studies in the Western
Boundary Regions
1000 color copies of flyer
A4
 500 color copies of poster
A1
Webpage finalized and operaion
Suitable mapping methods for
seagrass beds discussed.
Manual of seagrass mapping
prepared.
Better understanding on spatiotemporal change of seagrass
beds
Pamphlet prepared
Pamphlet for Illuminating local
people and stake holders
Submission of manuscripts to a
scientific journal
Comprehensive in-situ
observations are obtained in
pre- and post-typhoon seasons
The joint-action to establish the
reanalysis data distribution
system
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
10 K
10 K
(NUS,
Singapore)
\
5K
Feb 2014
Oct 2012
Kyoto
\
2K
15 K
2013
\
15 K
5K
(JSPS)
2013-2014
\
5K
2014
\
10 K
Western
Pacific
\
\
5K
(JSPS)
5K
(JSPS)
500 K
\
\
20 K
10 K
(JSPS)
Gain the basic scientific
hypothesis of air-sea interaction
in the KER
Provide a high resolution
regional coupled model system
05/2012
Qingdao,
China
08/201203/2015
\
5K
20 K
(China)
\
\
100 K
(China)
Cooperation in the KER
observation established; data
collected
09/201306/2014
KER
\
\
1.5 M
(China, Japan)
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 9
Project/Programme
Air-sea Interaction in
the Kuroshio
Extension and its
Climate Impact
South China Sea
Fluvial Sediments and
Environmental
Changes
(WESTPAC-FluSed)
Marine and Coastal
Biodiversity and its
Management
(WESTPAC-MCBM)
Activities
Objectives
Expected outputs
Date and
place
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
10 K
30 K(China)
4. International Meeting
Summarize
Scientific knowledge shared,
and scientific paper prepared
and workplan finalized
05/2015
Qingdao,
China
1. Research cruise
Sediment cores and data collection
May 2012
Gulf of
Tonkin
\
\
50 K (China)
2. Bilateral workshop in
Vietnam
Exchange of scientific results
Sept. 2012,
Hanoi
\
\
15 K (China)
5 K (Vietnam)
3. 5th FluSed workshop
Exchange of scientific results
Nov. 2012,
HoChiMinh
City
\
4K
15 K (China)
5K
(local host)
4. Research cruise
Seismic data and sediments
collection
Aug. 2013,
Sunda Shelf
\
\
60 K (China)
60 K (others)
5. 6th FluSed workshop
Exchange of scientific results
Nov. 2013,
Indonesia or
Singapore
\
4K
1. Workshop: Coral
restoration techniques in
the WESTPAC region
Share and summarize all coral
restoration methods available
within WESTPAC
Case study of shelf in NW South
China Sea: shallow seismic
dataset, surface and suspended
sediments; sediment gravity
cores, and hydrological data.
Strengthen bilateral
collaboration: joint master and
undergraduate programs,
proceedings, field excursion in
Vietnam.
Strengthen collaboration: joint
writing manuscripts, data
comparison, further cooperation
discussion.
Case study of the Sunda Shelf:
shallow seismic dataset, surface
and suspended sediments, and
sediment gravity cores,.
Strengthen collaboration: joint
writing manuscripts, data
comparison, further cooperation
discussion.
Report/
scientific papers
Sep 2012
Thailand
\
13 K
15 K
(China)
5K
(local host)
3 K (DMCR,
Thailand and
Chulalongkorn
University)
2. development of poster,
and pamphlet related to
coral conservation and
restoration
3. Workshop: coral/ reef
organism taxonomy
promote and increase public
knowledge and awareness on coral
reef restoration and conservation
Report/
poster/
pamphlet
Dec 2012
Thailand
\
4K
Strengthen knowledge on marine
biodiversity conservation among
WESTPAC countries; promote
capacity building and outreach
Summary Report
2013
\
9K
3 K (DMCR,
Thailand and
Chulalongkorn
University)
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 10
Project/Programme
Marine and Coastal
Biodiversity and its
Management
(WESTPAC-MCBM)
Coral Reef under
Climate and
Anthropogenic
Perturbations
(WESTPACCorReCAP)
DNA Taxonomy and
Recruitment
Monitoring of the
Coral Reef Marine
Organisms
(DRMREEF)
Activities
Expected outputs
Date and
place
4. Workshop: use of
molecular technique for
identification and
conservation of marine
biodiversity
1. 4th workshop
Strengthen knowledge on marine
biodiversity conservation among
WESTPAC countries; promote
capacity building and outreach
Summary Report
Evaluate the research progress,
seek joint research proposals on
coral reef study
Summary report and if possible,
draft proposal for funding
Second half of
2012, place to
be decided
\
5K
2. Training activity
Promote the capacity development
on coral reef studies
Summary report
First part of
2013, and topic
to be decided
\
10 K
3. 5th workshop
Assess research progress on hot
spots in relation to coral reefs
Summary report, and if possible,
a joint publication
Second half of
2012 or first
part of 2014
\
5K
\
\
\
\
Pending until
funding is
available
Oct 2012
Inchon, Korea
\
2K
8K
During the
intersessional
period
\
\
2013
\
2K
8K
2013
\
\
8K
\
1. 15th NEAR-GOOS CC
meeting
North East Asian
Regional-GOOS
(NEAR-GOOS)
Objectives
2. Communications with
member states in the
region for their
involvement in the
project
3. WG on new NEARGOOS products
4. WG on Data
Management
\
OCEAN OBSERVATIONS AND SERVICES
Review the implementations of
Action plans and
action points agreed upon at the
recommendations on new
previous sessions and decide work
activities
plan and budget for the next
session
Establish the NEAR-GOOS
Working Group on Products and reconstruct the NEAR-GOOS
Working group on Data
Management and etc.
Improve oceanographic data
Recommendation on new
products and services in the region products
Operate NEAR-GOOS databases
Improvement of databases
efficiently and effectively
operating
2013
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
9K
3 K (DMCR,
Thailand and
Chulalongkorn
University)
10 K
(e.g. China)
and/or host
organizat’ns
10 K (e.g.
China) and
international
resources (e.g.
APN)
10 K (e.g.
China) and/or
host
organizat’ns
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 11
Project/Programme
Activities
5. 16th NEAR-GOOS CC
meeting
North East Asian
Regional-GOOS
(NEAR-GOOS)
6. 17th NEAR-GOOS CC
meeting
1.
2.
South East Asian
Regional-GOOS
(SEAGOOS)
3.
4.
5.
6.
1.
Objectives
Review the implementations of
action points agreed upon at the
previous sessions and decide work
plan and budget for the next
session
Same as the above
Expected outputs
Action plans and
recommendations on new
activities
Date and
place
2013
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
2K
8K
Action plans and
2014
\
recommendations on new
activities
Monsoon Onset Monitoring over Andaman Sea and its Social and ecosystem impacts (MOMSEI)
4th Cruise
Monsoon onset observation
Data and cruise report
Apr 2013
\
Andaman
Sea, Bay of
Bengal,
tropical
eastern
Indian Ocean
5th Cruise
Monsoon onset observation
Data and cruise report
Apr 2014
\
Andaman
Sea, Bay of
Bengal,
tropical
eastern
Indian Ocean
6th MOMSEI Expert
Annual progress review and
Report
Oct 2012
\
Workshop
coordination
Myanmar
7th MOMSEI Expert
Annual progress review and
Report
Oct 2013
\
Workshop
coordination
China
3rd MOMSEI Summer
Capacity building
Report
Sep 2012
\
School
China
4th MOMSEI Summer
Capacity building
Report
Sep 2013
\
School
Indonesia
Ocean Forecast Demonstration System in the Southeast Asian Seas
Joint UKM-UMT-FIO
To gather and observe various
Oceanographic data and
Jun 2012
\
Cruises for Peninsular
aspect of the region ocean in the
enhanced understanding of
Malaysia Eastern’s Shelf region of interest for ocean
regional oceanographic
Nov 2012
(PMES),
forecasting system validation
processes
(Jun, Jul &
Nov 2013)
PMES
2K
8K
\
100 K
(China,
Indonesia,
Thailand)
\
120 K
(China,
Indonesia,
Thailand)
2K
20 K
10 K
\
15 K
\
15 K
\
200 K (UKM,
UMT, Malaysia
and FIO, China)
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 12
Project/Programme
South East Asian
Regional-GOOS
(SEAGOOS)
Ocean Data &
Information Network
for the Western
Pacific
(ODINWESTPAC)
Activities
Objectives
Expected outputs
Date and
place
2. Jojnt PMBC-FIO Cruise
for Gulf of Thailand in
summer 2012, one
cruise.
3. Development of High
Regional Ocean
Forecasting System for
PMES
4. Development of High
Regional Ocean
Forecasting System for
GoT
5. Regional Workshop /
Training
To gather oceanographic data by
CTD (including oxygen, chlorophyll,
and turbidity etc.) and ADCP for
validation of model.
To develop a high resolution (1 km)
regional ocean forecasting system
for PME
Understanding of
oceanographic aspects and
processes of GoT
Jul-Aug 2012
High resolution regional ocean
model for PMES
UKM & UMT
To develop a high resolution (1 km)
regional ocean forecasting system
for PMBC (Department of Marine
and Coastal Resources; DMCR)
Regional workshop for discussing
modeling results
High resolution of GoT for
PMBC
6. Writing and publishing
research findings
To write and publish scientific
papers especially related to the
understanding of regional
oceanographic processes within
PMES and GoT
7. Outreach activities
(creation posters, flyers,
organizing talks ,
launching of the
forecasting system)
1. Second Working Group
meeting of
ODINWESTPAC.
To promote and increase visibility
of the project
Several scientific papers
including
1. Mechanism of meso-scale
eddy during winter (under
review in OD)
2. GoT circulation and
exchanges with SCS
(manuscript expected in June
2012)
3. Various factors in influencing
MLD in Sunda Shelf (manuscript
expected in June 2012)
Increased visibility of the project
Continue to collect the Needs for
Capacity Building and develop the
strategy and working plan for the
project.
Understanding and comparison
between modeling results
between PMES and GoT
Identification of Capacity build
requirement
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
\
100 K
(PMBC,
Thailand and
FIO, China)
\
\
100 K
(UKM and UMT,
Malaysia)
PMBC and
FIO
\
\
100 K
(PMBC,
Thailand and
FIO, China
10 K
(UKM, UMT,
Malaysia, and
PMBC,
Thailand)
1 in Malaysia
(either UMT
or UKM)
early 2013 &
1 in Thailand
in early 2014
(Malaysia
(UKM &
UMT), FIO, &
Thailand
\
10 K
\
\
Research
grants from
respective
groups
Malaysia &
Thailand
\
3K
Late 2012 or
early 2013,
Tianjin China
\
10 K
5K
Research
Funding from
respective
groups
15 K
(NMDIS, China)
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 13
Project/Programme
Activities
2. Training course
Ocean Data &
Information Network
for the Western
Pacific
(ODINWESTPAC)
3. Collection of cruise
summary reports in the
region.
4. Development of the
ODINWESTPAC
Visualization System
(OVS)
5. Improvement of the
directory of ocean and
coastal observations,
research and
management
6. Update of the directory
of marine libraries and
Ocean publications,
7. Collection of marine data
and information
8. Maintenance of the
ODINWESTPC Website
9. Provision of Data
Management Guides
10. Third Working Group
meeting of
ODINWESTPAC
1. Establishment of a
technical network
International
Bathymetric Chart of
the Western Pacific
(IBCWP)
2. Organization of the first
technical session
3. Preparations of one
proposal on WESTPAC
Working Group
Objectives
Build the capacity on
oceanographic Data and
Information collecting, processing ,
QC/QA
Provide the information services of
the ROSCOP
Expected outputs
Date and
place
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
\
20 K
15 K
(NMDIS, China)
Capacity improved
Late 2012 or
early 2013,
Tianjin China
Cruise summary reports
collected
Metadata based developed
OSV system, first version
Start from
May 2012
and Continue
Start from
May 2012
and Continue
\
\
Member States
IODE
\
\
Member States
IODE
Directory prepared
Continue
\
\
Member States
Provide the directory and all
information services
Directories prepared
Continue
\
\
Member States
Promote cooperation on data and
information and provide good
services
Provide good services in the region
Relevant information collected
Continue
\
\
Member States
Well maintained website
Continue
\
\
20 K
(NMDIS, China)
Provide guidance on the Data
Management
Review the activities, and agree on
workplan for next intersessional
period
exchange bathymetric mapping
techniques and its application in
risk assessment
To exchange bathymetric mapping
techniques, promote the regional
cooperation in this field
To develop a complete proposal
Guidelines provided
End of 2013
\
\
Joint activities identified
2014
\
10 K
15 K
(NMDIS, China)
A expert correspondence
network
ASAP
\
\
5K
(NMDIS, China)
Knowledge sharing among
member states
End of 2013
\
\
15 K
(NMDIS, China)
A complete proposal to be
submitted to the next Session
for approval.
First half of
2014
\
\
3K
(NMDIS, China)
Integrate, manage and display all
marine data and information
exchanged ; facilitate the easy
access
Provide the information of the
cooperation projects of
international and regional to the
users in the region.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 14
Project/Programme
Activities
1. Second training course
2. Third training course
3. Fourth training course
IOC Regional Network
of Training and
Research Centers on
Marine Science
1. Workshop on CTD
calibration
2. Calibration workshop for
float-type tide gauge and
wave buoy
3. Cooperation on Marine
standard
4. Provision of calibration
services
Sub-total
Total
Objectives
Expected outputs
Date and
place
Funding Required, US$
IOC (in-cash)
Other in-kind
sources
Extra
(national or
Regular
budget
internat’l)
CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLIC AWARENESS
IOC Regional Training and Research Center on Ocean Dynamics and Climate
Ocean dynamics
Improved understanding on the
July 2012,
\
basic ocean processes and its
Qingdao,
dynamics
China
Air-sea interaction
Improved understanding on the
Summer of
\
air-sea interaction and its effects
2013,
on the climate system.
Qingdao,
China
Climate models
Improved understanding of the
Summer of
\
wave-circulation coupled theory
2014,
and practices on climate
Qingdao,
models.
China
IOC-WMO Regional Marine Instrument Center for the Asia and Pacific (Asia-Pac RMIC)
Increase the level of CTD
Training on theory and on-site
Nov. 2012
\
calibration of the member states
experiment of CTD calibration,
Tianjin, China
and data processing
Increase the level of tide gauge
Training on theory and on-site
Sept. 2013
\
and wave buoy calibration
experiment of CTD calibration,
Tianjin, China
and data processing
promote cooperation on Marine
China’s observation standards
2012-2014
\
Standards
and marine instrument
calibration specifications into
English for
Increase calibration ability of
Provide calibration services on
2012-2014
\
member states, ensure observation Water Conductivity(salinity)/
Tianjin, China
data can be traced back to SI
temperature/ pressure/tide/wave
30 K
4,261 K
2K
2K
30 K
(ODC Center,
China)
30 K
(ODC Center,
China)
2K
30 K
(ODC Center)
\
10 K
Asia-Pac RMIC
\
10 K
Asia-Pac RMIC
\
30 K
Asia-Pac RMIC
\
20 K
Asia-Pac RMIC
493 K
3,738 K
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex II – page 15
Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-IX.5
DATE AND PLACE OF THE NEXT SESSION
The IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific,
Bearing in mind the need for a sufficient period of time between sessions of the SubCommission to allow a reasonable implementation of its activities,
Recalling Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-I.3 in 1990 to have a three-yearly time span
between its regular sessions,
Further recalling the Recommendation SC-WESTPAC-VII.6, adopted at the Seventh Session
of the Sub-Commission (WESTPAC-VII, Sabah, Malaysia, 26–29 May 2008), which decides to
reschedule the period between sessions from three years to two years beginning with the close
of WESTPAC-VII, to be in phase with IOC planning cycles. Further, WESTPAC sessions will be
scheduled for the first quarter of the year so its decisions, recommendations, and reports can be
forwarded to the IOC Executive Secretary in time for review and consideration by the Assembly,
Appreciates the Government of the Republic of Korea for hosting the Ninth Intergovernmental
Session on 9–12 May 2012, Busan, Republic of Korea and excellent arrangements made for the
session; and
Accepts with appreciation the offer by the Government of Thailand to host the Tenth
Intergovernmental Session no later than early 2015, subject to the final endorsement of the
relevant authorities.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III
ANNEX III
OPENING REMARKS
Opening Remarks of Dr Weong-Seo Kim, Vice-President of KORDI
I am honored to take this opportunity to deliver this opening remarks on behalf of the
President of KORDI. Unfortunately, President Kang could not make to this event at the final
minute, because he is indicated to attend another meeting that is being held and exactly
overlapped with this meeting.
He has to give a presentation on KORDI’s marine plant projects to the national President
of Korea, Lee Myung-bak, who is visiting Busan this morning.
Honorable Mr Sung-Ho Joo, Vice-Minister of the Ministry of Land, Transport and
Maritime Affairs;
Honorable Dr Young Hwal Lee, Vice-Mayor of Busan Metropolitan City;
Dr Sangkyung Byun, Chair of IOC;
Dr Wendy Watson-Wright, Executive Secretary of IOC;
Distinguished Delegates of Member States;
Distinguished Representatives of International Organizations, and
Gentlemen,
Ladies and
I have the honor of opening this 9th Intergovernmental Session of IOC-WESTPAC in
Busan, the Korea’s largest coastal city vibrant with marine industry and activities.
It must be true that I have met many of you in Busan about a year ago when we hosted
the 8th WESTPAC International Scientific Symposium just at this place. Time flies quite fast.
WETSPAC! Welcome back to Busan again.
I visited Washington DC, United States of America, in the middle of last April. It was a
coincidence that both Dr Watson-Wright and I were in the same town, although we did not have
a chance to meet each other.
I guessed that Dr Watson-Wright must be in DC to try to find out the most suitable
solution for overcoming the recent financial difficulty facing UNESCO. I wish that this financial
crisis would be overcome so smoothly that IOC could continue its mission in schedule.
Largely, Korea has two major interests towards WESTPAC. The first interest is to try to
spread out over the WESTPAC Region technical skills and knowledge about how to increase
capabilities of marine forecasting and prediction by using a tool of operational oceanography.
I have no doubts that the improvement of marine forecasting capabilities can contribute
to the reduction of the loss of property and life from natural disasters, more efficient and rapid
response to oil spills, and more accurate search and rescue at sea.
Another interest is to study about marine genetic and biological information in need for
wise and smart management of marine resources in a sustainable manner, particularly, a study
on interdependence and interconnectedness between physical oceanographic data and
biological information. No matter whatsoever, the ultimate goal of marine science in general is to
understand the phenomena of biological changes in the ocean.
The Western Pacific Region is regarded as one of the most productive areas in terms of
marine life. In this regard, I hope that the leaders of the WESTPAC could have a chance to
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III – page 2
bring about an idea of initiating at least one big landmark regional project including physical,
biological, and chemical oceanography that can be beneficial for all member states.
In closing, I wish this 9th WESTPAC Meeting a great success, and wish you a luck while
staying in Busan.
Thank you!
Opening Remarks of Mr Sung-Ho Joo
Vice-Minister of Ministry of Land, Transportation and Maritime Affairs, Republic of Korea
Dr Sangkyung Byun, Chair of IOC;
Dr Wendy Watson-Wright, Executive Secretary of IOC;
Dr Yasuwo Fukuyo, First Vice-Chair of WESTPAC;
And Distinguished National Delegates to IOC/WESTPAC
Warmly welcome to the Republic of Korea.
Dr Young Hwal Lee, Vice Mayor of Busan Metropolitan City;
Dr Weong-Seo Kim, Vice-President of KORDI;
And Distinguished Guests
Thank you all for joining us despite your busy schedule.
On behalf of the host country, I truly congratulate to you all to convene the 9th
Intergovernmental Session of the IOC Sub-commission for the Western Pacific.
We are more than happy with you come across from 11 countries. Also we are very
pleased to host this Meeting at a beautiful coastal city Busan, which is one of the most vital
coastal cities of Asia.
Since the WESTPAC was established in 1989, we believe that it has contributed to the
improvement of the capabilities of ocean observation, exchange and sharing of observed data
and information, and ecosystem research.
Especially, many scientists are interested or involve in studying on marine biodiversity
bountiful in the Western Pacific Region. Korea also has funded continuously to study on marine
biodiversity and its genetics. Forwards, Korea will continue such research for better
understanding of the marine ecosystem.
Ladies and gentlemen,
In a situation where land–based resources are becoming scarce, our ocean becomes
more in attention as a treasury essential for the continued survival and prosperity of humankind.
However, our ocean and coastal areas have been threatened by marine pollutants and
debris, ocean acidification, tsunami, sea-level rise, and so on.
Of course, our world society is making efforts to find the answers for coastal problems
impacted by human induced influences and to expand the systems for observing and monitoring
our ocean and coasts.
The Korea Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs is leading our national
attempts to expand ocean and coastal observation systems, and invest gradually more and
more on research on climate change
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III – page 3
I do hope that this 9th WESTPAC Meeting will be an excellent venue capable for the
exchange of knowledge and expertise among the participating member states.
Before closing, I beg your permission to introduce to the Expo 2012 Yeosu Korea which
will be held from May 12 to August 12, 2012 under the main theme of “Living Ocean and Coast”.
If you go there, you will see many events and activities related to our ocean and coasts.
Korea has considered deeply, through this Expo, as to what to show to the people; how the
humankind could find resolutions for our ocean related issues; and how much the world could
reduce the level of CO2 by investing on the development of ocean renewable energy.
The Expo are also trying to present the importance of international concerted efforts for
strengthening the capabilities of developing countries including small island states for
addressing their own issues related to the ocean and coasts.
I know that you all will travel to Yeosu Expo coming Saturday. If you will visit there, I
commend you to enjoy the best of the view of Rias coast and exhibition of Yeosu EXPO.
In closing, I would like to thank KORDI, WESTPAC Secretariat, and Busan Metropolitan
City for their thorough organization, preparation, or sponsorship.
I look forward to this meeting fruitful and wish you all healthy and enjoy your time while
staying in Busan.
Thank you.
Opening Remarks of Dr Wendy Watson-Wright
Executive Secretary of IOC
Your Excellency, Mr Sung-Ho Joo, Vice-Minister of Ministry of Land, Transportation and
Maritime Affairs, Republic of Korea;
Dr Sangkyung Byun, Chair of IOC;
Dr Yasuwo Fukuyo, First Vice-Chair of WESTPAC;
Dr Weong-Seo Kim, Vice-President of KORDI;
Dr Young-Hwal Lee, Vice-Mayor of Busan City;
Distinguished delegates;
Ladies and Gentlemen,
Good Morning! It gives me great pleasure to meet with you, and it is an honour to deliver
opening remarks at this 9th Intergovernmental Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the
Western Pacific. On behalf of the IOC and Director-General of UNESCO, I would like to thank
the Government of the Republic of Korea for hosting this session and for all the excellent
arrangement made for us here in the beautiful coastal city of Busan.
I still remember that two years ago at last session of WESTPAC in Bali, I highlighted the
great changes taking place for this Sub-Commission over recent years and I said that I
expected the momentum of WESTPAC would continue. Two years later, I will say here with
confidence that the work of the Sub-Commission has not only met my expectations, but also
been brought to a new high.
As a result of continuous efforts of member states and the WESTPAC Office, this IOC
Sub-Commission has been fully demonstrating its indispensable role in delivering and
expanding the service of IOC to member states in the region, by promoting regional cooperation
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III – page 4
on marine scientific research, observations and capacity building in order to assist member
states in the study and management of their coasts and ocean resources. We gladly note that
great contributions have been made from WESTPAC via a variety of region-specific activities in
support of IOC global efforts, for instance, the 50th anniversary of IOC, the Regular Process for
Global Reporting and Assessment of the state of Marine Environment (GRAME), the
development of the Global Ocean Observing system (GOOS) and IOC Self-driven capacity
building. I would particularly highlight its unique regional Capacity Building initiative titled “IOC
Regional Network of Training and Research Centers on Marine Science” which was initiated for
the first time in IOC. This is testament to the strong commitment of the Member States in this
region to promote North-South and South-South cooperation, while providing valuable
experience that can be shared with other regions.
While being encouraged by the achievements in the region, I would like to share with
you some opportunities provided for as well as pressing challenges faced by IOC.
On the opportunities side, first is Rio + 20. Based on the resolution approved by the last
session of the IOC Assembly, IOC has worked hard to raise the profile of the ocean in the
preparations for the Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development, and we have
successfully done so through the recent launch of the report and summary for decision makers,
A Blueprint for Ocean and Coastal Sustainability and through engagement in the Rio
preparatory process.
It is important for IOC to remain engaged in this extraordinary event, and position itself to
carry forward work with Member States in the coming decades to improve the sustainability of
the human relationship with the ocean. A number of key objectives for the ocean at Rio+20 are
being defined, from the Regular Process, to ocean acidification, from marine protected areas to
capacity building. We now need to work with UN Member States in order to get support for
these objectives and reach consensus that will, we hope, translate in the outcome document.
Among future activities are the organization of: participation in the ICSU Forum on
Science, Technology for Sustainable Development (June); the Ocean Day at Rio+20 (16 June),
an EU side event on ocean acidification, and an IOC-led side event entitled Healthy Ocean,
Healthy People: Knowing our Ocean, Protecting our Marine Treasures, Empowering Ocean
Citizens.
Second is Expo 2012 Yeosu Korea with the theme “The Living Ocean and Coast:
Diversity of Resources and Sustainable Activities” from May 12 to Aug. 12, 2012. The IOC has
been involved with consultations with the Expo 2012 Yeosu Korea since 2009 and is
participating in the Yeosu Expo in several modes. Two major events are being co-organized by
the IOC at the Expo: the 2nd ICES-PICES-IOC International Symposium on the "Effect of
Climate Change on the World's Oceans" (15-19 May 2012), and the Fourth Session of the Joint
WMO-IOC Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (23-31 May 2012).
In terms of challenges, of course foremost is the financial challenge experienced by
UNESCO and its IOC. Following the UNESCO General Conference vote admitting Palestine as
a Member State of UNESCO, the United States of America and Israel have withheld their
assessed contributions (22,38% of UNESCO totals), resulting in Regular Programme budget
deficit of US$ 72 million for 2011 and a projected budget shortfall of US$ 146 million for 2012–
2013. For the IOC this is a cut of US$ 3.2 million for 2012–2013. Even with utilizing what little
flexibility there is in staff allocation, the reduction translates into a 77% cut to resources for
activities. At this level of cut, the IOC risks losing its recognized leadership in ocean science,
observations, data management, and services.
Ladies and Gentlemen,
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III – page 5
IOC is facing a new and challenging situation that is not easy, that calls for the best from
each of us. This is a time for unity, a time for all countries to pull together with IOC, to ensure
the continued delivery of its competence and its global leadership in marine scientific research,
observations and service, as well as capacity building.
To this end, I will look to WESTPAC, a regional arm of IOC, to assist the IOC, by
working very closely with our Member States in the region to overcome the difficulties we face
and strengthen the presence of IOC in the region. We have gladly noted the rising spirit of
cooperation among member states, ever-increasing extrabudgetary support to WESTPAC, and
unprecedented numbers of participants and activities conducted over recent years.
As such I wish to express my sincere appreciation to those member states in the region
for your great efforts and considerable contributions made in developing and implementing IOC
programmes. I sincerely hope these efforts will continue into the future to the greatest extent
possible.
I would like to conclude my short remarks by expressing my sincere thanks once again
to the Government of the Republic of Korea for providing us with such friendly and generous
hospitality here, and more specifically to the Ministry of Land, Transportation and Maritime
Affairs, Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute for your very efficient organization of
this session. Thank you very much!
Opening Remarks of Dr Yasuwo Fukuyo, First Vice-Chair of WESTPAC
Your Excellency, Mr Sung-Ho Joo, Vice-Minister of Ministry of Land, Transportation and
Maritime Affairs, Republic of Korea;
Dr Weong-Seo Kim, Vice-President of KORDI;
Dr Young-Hwal Lee, Vice-Mayor of Busan City;
Dr Sangkyung Byun, Chair of IOC;
Dr Wendy Watson-Wright, Executive Secretary of IOC;
Distinguished delegates;
Ladies and Gentlemen,
Good morning!
It is my honor to attend and address to the opening ceremony of the Ninth
Intergovernmental Session of the IOC Sub-commission for the West Pacific. First, please allow
me, on behalf of officers of IOC/WESTPAC, to express my congratulation to the opening of the
meeting and extend my warm welcome to all delegates and guests. Also, I would like to express
my sincere gratitude to the government of Republic of Korea for kindly hosting this meeting in
such a nice hotel.
IOC/WESTPAC was established in 1989. As a major subsidiary body of IOC in the West
Pacific region, WESTPAC devotes itself to develop, coordinate and implement regionally
specific marine scientific research, ocean observations and services based on priority interests
of the Member States and to implement the IOC global programmes and activities at regional
level. During the past two decades, IOC/WESTPAC has made great contributions in promoting
international marine cooperation and communication in the West Pacific region. In the year of
2008, IOC/WESTPAC developed and adopted its new Strategy and Programme Structure. And
since then, we conducted a series of activities to reform the framework and mechanisms of
WESTPAC. Many new cooperative projects were initiated and implemented by Member States,
which highly boosted visibility and influence of WESTPAC. Currently, we could proudly say that
IOC/WESTPAC has become one of the most active and energetic international organizations in
this region.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III – page 6
The development of IOC/WESTPAC relies on the support of all Member States. Since its
establishment, the IOC/WESTPAC has been receiving continuous assistance from many
countries. Among others, the Thai government provided offices, facilities and personnel support
to WESTPAC secretariat for long time; China, Japan, Republic of Korea, and Thailand made
sustainable financial donation; while many countries provided considerable in-kind support to
the implementation of WESTPAC activities. Besides, support from the headquarters of IOC as
well as other international and regional organizations and programmes were also of great
significance for WESTAPC in performing its duties. Taking this opportunity, I would like to
extend my heartfelt thanks to all Member States, IOC and WESTPAC secretariat, and relevant
international organizations for your continuous support and contributions to IOC/WESTPAC.
Ladies and Gentlemen,
2012 is a special year for ocean. Many important ocean events will occur this year. It is
the 30th anniversary of the opening for signature of the United Nations Convention on the Law
of the Sea. Expo 2012 Yeosu with the theme of the Living Ocean and Coast as well as several
international ocean meetings, including the East Asian Seas Congress and Global Forum on
Oceans, Coasts and Island, will be organized in the Republic of Korea. All these occasions will
further promote the international society’s understanding on the importance of the seas. In this
kind of context, we have every reason to enhance the role and function of IOC and WESTPAC.
And I am confident that IOC and WESTPAC will achieve more successes in the future.
I wish the meeting a full success.
Opening Remarks of Mr Young-Hwal Lee, Vice-Mayor of Busan City,
Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
It is my great pleasure to be here at the opening of the 9th Intergovernmental Session of
the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific in Busan.
Let me extend my warmest welcome to Dr Wendy Watson-Wright, IOC Executive
Secretary, Dr Yasuwo Fukuyo, First Vice-Chair of WESTPAC and all the other WESTPAC
members to Busan. It is very nice to meet you all.
I'd also like to thank Vice-Minister Joo, Sung-ho of the Ministry of Land, Transport and
Maritime Affairs and President Kang, Jung-Keuk of Korea Ocean Research and Development
Institute for all your hard work organizing this event.
Since its establishment in 1989, the IOC/WESPAC has greatly contributed to the
development of ocean science and the oceanic environment, not only in the Western Pacific
Region but right around the world, conducting international R&D projects, expanding the use of
the Global Ocean Observing System in the Western Pacific and ensuring the efficient and
widespread sharing of ocean data, knowledge and information obtained from research and
monitoring.
It is particularly meaningful that Busan is playing host to an important IOC/WESTPAC
event for the second time, following on so soon after the 8th IOC/WESTPAC International
Scientific Symposium last year.
As Korea's maritime capital and international trading port city, Busan is the proud host of
the annual World Ocean Forum, Korea's largest ocean conference, facilitating exchange and
cooperation among global ocean industry professionals.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex III – page 7
As a responsible member of the international community, Busan pledges to actively
participate in developing ocean science and technology as well as in addressing the
environmental crisis facing our oceans due to global climate change.
I look forward to this intergovernmental session further promoting international
cooperation in ocean science and technology development, and a healthier marine ecosystem,
as well as greater prosperity and a brighter future for mankind.
I wish the IOC/WESTPAC and each of you every success in all your ventures. Thank
you.
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex IV
ANNEX IV
LIST OF DOCUMENTS
Document Code
Title
Agenda Items
Working Documents
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/1.prov.
Provisional List of Documents
All
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/2.prov.
Provisional Agenda
2.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/2.add.prov.
Provisional Timetable
2.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3.prov.
Provisional Annotated Agenda
All
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/4
Draft Summary Report
--
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/5
Statement of the Chairperson
3.1.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/6
Report by the Regional Office on
Intersessional Activities
3.1.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/7
Report by the Regional Office on
Budget Overview
3.1.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/8
Recent Developments within
IOC/UNESCO and its Relevance to
WESTPAC
3.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/9
Progress on the WESTPAC Ocean
Research Priority Plan
4.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/10
Report on the Eighth WESTPAC
International Scientific Symposium in
2011, Busan, Republic of Korea, with
Focus on Lessons Learnt
4.3
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/11
Progress on the preparations for the
Ninth WESTPAC International
Scientific Symposium in 2014, Vietnam
4.4
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12
Review and Evaluation of Regional
Programmes, Projects and Working
Groups for May 2010 – May 2012
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.1
Progress Report on Harmful Algal
Blooms
5.1.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.2
Progress Report on Ocean Remote
Sensing
5.1.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.3
Progress Report on Response of
Marine Hazards to Climate Change
5.1.3
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.4
Progress Report on Fluvial Sediments
to the South China Sea
5.1.4
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.5
Progress Report on Marine and
Coastal Biodiversity and its
Management
5.1.5
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.6
Progress Report on Coral Reef under
Climate and Anthropogenic
Perturbations
5.1.6
5
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex IV – page 2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.7
Progress Report on Toxic Marine
Organisms
5.1.7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.8
Progress Report on DNA Taxonomy
and Recruitment Monitoring of the
Coral Reef Marine Organisms
5.1.8
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.9
Progress Report on North East Asian
Regional-GOOS (NEAR-GOOS)
5.2.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.10
Progress Report on South East Asian
Regional-GOOS (SEAGOOS),
including Ocean Forecasting
Demonstration (OFD), and Monsoon
Onset Monitoring and its Social and
Ecosystem Impacts (MOMSEI)
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.10.1
Progress Report on SEAGOOS Monsoon Onset Monitoring and its
Social and Ecosystem Impacts
(MOMSEI)
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.10.2
Progress Report on SEAGOOS Ocean Forecasting Demonstration
(OFD)
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.11
Progress Report on Marine Hazards
Forecasting and Mitigation in the
Western Pacific
5.2.3
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.12
Progress Report on International
Bathymetric Chart of the Western
Pacific (IBCWP)
5.2.4
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.13
Progress Report on Ocean Data &
Information Network for the Western
Pacific (ODINWESTPAC)
5.2.5
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.14
Progress Report on UNESCO/IOC
Regional Network of Training and
Research Center on Oceanography in
the Western Pacific”
5.3.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.15
Progress Report on IOC Regional
Training and Research Center on
Ocean Dynamics and Climate
5.3.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.16
Progress Report of “IOC-WMO
Regional Marine Instrument Center for
the Asia and Pacific”
5.3.3
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.17
Progress Report on WESTPAC
Working Group on Asian Dust and its
Impact on Ocean Ecosystem
5.4.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/12.18
Progress Report on WESTPAC
Working Group on Regular Process for
Global Reporting and Assessment of
the State of the Marine Environment
5.4.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex IV – page 3
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/13
New Project Proposals
6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/13.1
Air-Sea Interaction in the Kuroshio
Extension and its Climate Impact
6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/13.2
Mapping the Harmful Jellyfishes in the
Tropical West Pacific Waters
6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/14
New proposals on WESTPAC Working
Groups
7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/14.1
Marine Renewable Energy Technology
Development in the Western Pacific
(MRET)
7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/15
Cooperation with Other Organizations
8
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/15.1
Statement of UNEP/Northwest Pacific
Action Plan (NOWPAP) on the
Cooperation with IOC/WESTPAC
8
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/16
Draft WESTPAC Workplan and Budget
for May 2012 – May 2014
9
Information Documents
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.1
Information on Services Available
--
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.2
Provisional List of Participants
--
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.3.1
Summary Report of the Eighth
Intergovernmental Session of the IOC
Sub-Commission for the Western
Pacific (WESTPAC-VIII), Bali,
Indonesia, 10-13 May 2010
All
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.3.2
Executive Summary of the Eighth
Intergovernmental Session of the IOC
Sub-Commission for the Western
Pacific (WESTPAC-VIII), Bali,
Indonesia, 10-13 May 2010
All
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.4.1
Summary Report of the Seventh
Intergovernmental Session of the IOC
Sub-Commission for the Western
Pacific (WESTPAC-VII), Sabah,
Malaysia, 26-29 May 2008
All
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.4.2
Executive Summary of the Seventh
Intergovernmental Session of the IOC
Sub-Commission for the Western
Pacific (WESTPAC-VII), Sabah,
Malaysia, 26-29 May 2008
All
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.5
Harmful Algal Blooms
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on Harmful
Algal Blooms (WESTPAC-HABs)
“Charting the Future for the Research
on Harmful Algal Blooms in the
Western Pacific”, Nha Trang, Vietnam,
15-17 March 2012
5.1.1
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex IV – page 4
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.8
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.9
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.10
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.11
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Training Course on
Taxonomy and Ecology of Diatom
Pseudo-nitzschia, Sarawak, Malaysia,
20-23 March 2011
Ocean Remote Sensing
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on “Remote
Sensing for Coastal Habitat Mapping”
(WESTPAC-ORSP-II), Johor, Malaysia,
28-30 November 2011
Summary Report of the
NOWPAP/PICES/WESTPAC Joint
Training Course on Remote Sensing
Data Analysis, Vladivostok, Russia, 812 October 2011
Fluvial Sediments to the South China
Sea
Summary Report of the Fourth
IOC/WESTPAC International
Workshop on the Fluvial Sediment
Supply to the South China Sea
(WESTPAC-FluSed-IV), Bangkok,
Thailand, 14-16 December 2011
Summary Report of the Third
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on the
Fluvial Sediment Supply to the South
China Sea (WESTPAC-FluSed-III),
Manila, Philippines, 17-18 November
2010
Marine and Coastal Biodiversity and its
Management
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC-PICES Joint Workshop
on Rapid Assessment Survey
Methodologies for Detecting Marine
Non-Indigenous Species (WESTPACRAS-III), Phuket, Thailand, 19-21 July
2011
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.2
5.1.4
5.1.4
5.1.5
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.12
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on Rapid
Assessment Survey of Marine
Biodiversity and Non-Indigenous
Species in the Western Pacific Region
(WESTPAC-RAS-II), Bangkok,
Thailand, 6-9 December 2010
5.1.5
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.13
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on Rapid
Assessment Survey of Marine
Biodiversity and Non-Indigenous
Species in the Western Pacific Region
(WESTPAC-RAS-I), Bangkok,
5.1.5
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex IV – page 5
Thailand, 20-21 September 2010
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.14
Coral Reef under Climate and
Anthropogenic Perturbations
Summary Report of the Second
IOC/WESTPAC Training Course on
“Water Quality and its Impact on Coral
Reefs” (WESTPAC-CorReCAP-T.II),
Sanya, China, 8-11 June 2011
5.1.6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.15
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Training Course on
“Impact of Sedimentary Dynamics and
Biogeochemistry on Coral Reefs”
(WESTPAC-CorReCAP-T.I), Koh
Samui, Thailand, 15-18 June 2010
5.1.6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.16
Summary Report of the Second
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on the Coral
Reef under Climate and Anthropogenic
Perturbations (WESTPAC-CorReCAPII), Phuket, Thailand, 22-24 June 2010
5.1.6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.17
Toxic Marine Organisms
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Training Course on
“Immunological Method for Detection
of Domoic Acid in Plankton and
Shellfish”, Nha Trang, Vietnam, 19-22
March 2012
5.1.7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.18
Summary Report of the Second
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on “Toxic
Marine Organisms” (WESTPAC-TMOII), Nha Trang, Vietnam, 4-6 November
2011
5.1.7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.19
Summary Report of the
IOC/WESTPAC Workshop on
"Enhance the Awareness on Toxic
Marine Organisms"(WESTPAC-TMOI), Nha Trang, Vietnam, 13-15
December 2010
5.1.7
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.20
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.21
North East Asian Regional-GOOS
(NEAR-GOOS)
Summary Report of the Fourteenth
Session of IOC/WESTPAC
Coordinating Committee for NEARGOOS (WESTPAC-NEARGOOS-XIV),
Tianjin, China, 8-9 September 2011
South East Asian Regional-GOOS
(SEAGOOS)
Summary Report of the Second
Workshop of IOC/WESTPAC on its
SEAGOOS Pilot Project on Ocean
Forecasting Demonstration
(WESTPAC/SEAGOOS-OFD-II),
Qingdao, China, 14 December 2011
5.2.1
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex IV – page 6
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.22
Summary Report of the First Workshop
of IOC/WESTPAC on its SEAGOOS
Pilot Project on Ocean Forecasting
Demonstration
(WESTPAC/SEAGOOS-OFD-I),
Phuket, Thailand, 30 September – 1
October 2010
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.23
Summary Report of the Fifth
IOC/WESTPAC Expert Workshop on
the Pilot Project of SEAGOOS on the
Monsoon Onset Monitoring and its
Social and Ecosystem Impacts
(WESTPAC/SEAGOOS-MOMSEI-V),
Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 28-30
September 2011
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/inf.24
Summary Report of the Fourth
IOC/WESTPAC Expert Workshop on
the Pilot Project of SEAGOOS on the
Monsoon Onset Monitoring and its
Social and Ecosystem Impacts
(WESTPAC/SEAGOOS-MOMSEI-IV),
Melaka, Malaysia, 27-29 December
2010
5.2.2
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V
ANNEX V
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
WESTPAC OFFICERS
Chair (excused)
Dr Zhang Zhanhai (Chair)
Director-General
Department of International Cooperation
State Oceanic Administration of China
1 Fuxingmenwai Avenue, Beijing 100860
China
First Vice-Chair
Mr Yasuwo Fukuyo
Professor
Division of Bio-Environmental Assessment
Asian Natural Environmental Science Center
University of Tokyo –Japan
Email: [email protected]
(Also Acting Chairman of the Ninth Session
of WESTPAC)
Second Vice-Chair
Prof. Dr Nor Aieni Haji Mokhtar
Director, National Oceanography Directorate
(NOD)
Ministry of Science, Technology and
Innovation (MOSTI)
Level 6, Block C4, Complex C
Federal Government Administrative Centre
62662 Putrajaya – Malaysia
Tel: 60 3 8885 8201
Fax: 60 3 8889 3008
Email: [email protected]
MEMBER STATES
CHINA
Mr Fan Jiang
Engineer
National Center of Ocean Standards and
Metrology of SOA
No.219 Jieyuanxidao Nankai District
TianJin
Tel:
+86-135-12437411
Fax:
+86-022-27532971
Email: [email protected]
Mr Fangli Qiao
Deputy Director
The First Institute of Oceanography
State Oceanic Administration of China
6 Xian-Xia-Ling Road
Qingdao Shandong
Tel:
+86-137-06340389
Fax:
+86-532-88967400
Email: [email protected]
Mr Fujiang Yu
Full research professor
National Marine Environmental Forecasting
Center
State Oceanic Administration of China
No.8 Dahuisi Road Haidian District
Beijing 100081
Tel:
+86-10-62105732
Fax:
+86-10-62173620
Email: [email protected]
Dr Guimei Liu
Full research professor
National Marine Environmental Forecasting
Center
State Oceanic Administration of China
No.8 Dahuisi Road Haidian District
Beijing 100081
Tel:
+86-10-62105849
Fax:
+86-10-62173620
Email: [email protected]
Mr Jian Yu
Division chief
Department of Marine Forecast and Disaster
Mitigation
State Oceanic Administration of China
No.1 Fuxingmenwai Street
Beijing
Tel:
+86-10-68048049
Fax:
+86-10-68048049
Email: [email protected]
Mr Jun Sui
Deputy Director
National Center of Ocean Standards and
Metrology
State Oceanic Administration of China
No.219 Jieyuanxidao Nankai District
TianJin
Tel:
+86-130-02211966
Fax:
+86-022-27532971
Email: [email protected]
Dr Juying Wang
Chief Scientist
National Marine Environmental Monitoring
Center
State Oceanic Administration of China
Linghe Street 42
Dalian
Tel:
+86-411-84782526
Fax:
+86-411-84782586
Email: [email protected]
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V – page 2
Dr Shouting Tuo
Lecturer
State Key Laboratory of Marine Geology
Tongji University
1239 Siping Road
Shanghai
Tel:
+86-136-01872997
Fax:
+86-21-65988808
Email: [email protected]
Mr Suixiang Shi
Vice-Director
National Marine Data & Information Service
93 Liuwei Road Hedong District
Tianjin
Tel:
+86-022-24010668
Fax:
+86-022-24010926
Email: [email protected]
Mr Xianyao Chen
Researcher
The First Institute of Oceanography
State Oceanic Administration of China
6 Xian-Xia-Ling Road
Qingdao Shandong
Tel:
+86-137-91919150
Fax:
+86-532-88967691
Email: [email protected]
Dr Xiaopei Lin
Associate Director
Physical Oceanography Laboratory
Ocean University of China
No.238 Songling Rd
College of Physical and Environmental
Oceanography
Tel:
+86-137-80624166
Fax:
+86-66-781827
Email: [email protected]
Dr Xuelei Zhang
Professor
The First Institute of Oceanography
State Oceanic Administration of China
6 Xian-Xia-Ling Road Laoshan District
Qingdao 266061
Tel:
+86-532-88967476
Fax:
+86-532-88963909
Email: [email protected]
Mr Yafeng Yang
Programme Officer
State Oceanic Administration of China
No.1 Fuxingmenwai Ave
Beijing
Tel:
+86-10-68048051
Fax:
+86-10-68048051
Email: [email protected]
Dr Zexun Wei
Research Professor
The First Institute of Oceanography
State Oceanic Administration of China
6 Xian-Xia-Ling Road
Hi-Tech Industry Park
Qingdao Shandong 266071
Tel:
+86-532-88966225
Fax:
+86-532-88966225
Email: [email protected]
INDONESIA
Dr Iskandar Zulkarnain
Deputy Chairman for Earth Sciences
Indonesian Institute of Sciences
Sasana Widya Sarwono 3rd floor
Jl. Gatot Subroto No. 10
Jakarta 12710
Tel:
+62-21-5251850
Fax:
+62-21-5260804
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Dr Tri Padmasari
Director of Centre for Marine Base Mapping
National Coordinating Agency for Surveys and
Mapping
Jl. Raya Bogor km 46
Cibinong-Bogor
Tel:
+62-21-8752062-3
Fax:
+62-21-8752062-3
Email: [email protected]
Dr Zainal Arifin
Director
Research Center for Oceanography
Indonesian Institute of Sciences
Jl. Pasir Putih I Ancol Timur
Jakarta 14430
Tel:
+62-21-64713850
Fax:
+62-21-64712287
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Dr Augy Syahailatua
Head
Technical Implementing Unit for Marine Life
Conservation
Indonesian Institute of Sciences
Jl.Y Syaranamual Poka
Ambon 97233
Tel:
+62-911-322-677/556
Fax:
+62-911-322-700
Email: [email protected]
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V – page 3
JAPAN
Mr Yasuwo Fukuyo
Professor
Division of Bio-Environmental Assessment
Asian Natural Environmental Science Center
University of Tokyo
Email: [email protected]
Dr Yutaka Michida
Professor
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute
University of Tokyo
Kashiwanoha 5-1-5
Kashiwa 277-8564
Email: [email protected]
Dr Shuhei Nishida
Professor
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute
University of Tokyo
Kashiwanoha 5-1-5
Kashiwa 277-8564
Tel:
+81-4-7136-6360
Fax:
+81-4-7136-6360
Email: [email protected]
Dr Teruhisa Komatsu
Associate Professor
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute
University of Tokyo
Kashiwanoha 5-1-5
Kashiwa 277-8564
Tel:
+81-4-7136-6222
Fax:
+81-4-7136-6223
Email: [email protected]
Dr Mitsinori Iwataki
Associate Professor
Faculty of Science
Yamagata University
1-4-12 Kojirakawa
Yamagata 990-8560
Tel:
+81-23-628-4612
Fax:
+81-23-628-4625
Email: [email protected]
Dr Kazuhiro Kitazawa
Advisor to Director
Planning Department
Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and
Technology (JAMSTEC)
Tel:
+81-468-9191
Fax:
+81-468-9195
Email: kita[email protected]
Dr Takeshi Kawano
Programme Director of the Ocean Climate
Change Research Program
Research Institute for Global Change (RIGC)
Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and
Technology (JAMSTEC)
Tel:
+81-468-9471
Fax:
+81-468-9455
Email: [email protected]
Mr Kyohei Kaneko
Special Staff
Ocean and Earth Division
Research and Development Bureau
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science
and Technology (MEXT)
3-2-2 Kasumigaseki
Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8959
Tel:
+81-3-6734-4146
Fax:
+81-3-6734-4147
Email: [email protected]
Mr Akihiro Seta
Oceanographic Data and Information Officer
Japan Oceanographic Data Center
Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department
Japan Coast Guard
2-5-18 Aomi
Koto-ku Tokyo 135-0064
Tel:
+81-3-5500-7131
Fax:
+81-3-550-7156
Email: [email protected]
Mr Kazuki Ito
Scientific Officer
Office of International Affairs, Planning
Division
Administration Department
Japan Meteorological Agency
1-3-4 Otemachi
Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8122
Tel:
+81-3-3211-4966
Fax:
+81-3-3211-2032
Email: [email protected]
Ms Taka Horio
Senior Specialist for Cooperation with
UNESCO
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science
and Technology
3-2-2 Kasumigaseki
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959
Tel:
+81-3-6734-2585
Fax:
+81-3-36734-3679
Email: [email protected]
KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
Mr Hyun Taek LIM
Director, Marine Development for New Growth
Division
Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime
Affairs
88 Gwanmun-ro, Gwacheon-city,
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V – page 4
Gyeongggi-do, 427-712
Tel: +82 2 2110 8452
Fax: +82 2 502 0341
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr Gi Dong YEO
Deputy Director, Marine Development for New
Growth Division
Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime
Affairs
88 Gwanmun-ro, Gwacheon-city,
Gyeongggi-do, 427-712
Tel: +82 2 2110 8456
Fax: +82 2 502 0341
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Eunil LEE
Head, Ocean Research Division
Korea Hydrographic and Oceanographic
Administration
365, Seohaedae-Ro, Jung-Gu, Incheon
Tel: +82 32 880 0408
Fax: +82 32 891 3773
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Changkyu LEE
Senior scientist
National Fisheries Research & Development
Institute
361 Youngun-ri, Sanyang-eup Tongyoung city,
Geongnam
Tel: +82 55 640 4770
Fax: +82 55 641 2036
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr WeolAe LIM
Researcher, Fishery & Ocean Information
Division
National Fisheries Research & Development
Institute
Haean-ro 152-1, Gijang-eup, Gijang-gun,
Busan, 619-705
Tel: +82 51 720 2223
Fax: +82 51 720 2225
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Sang Woo KIM
East Sea Fisheries Research Institute
National Fisheries Research & Development
Institute
1194, Haean-ro, Yeongok-myeon,
Gangneung-City, Gangwondo, 210-861 Korea
Tel: +82 33 660 8535
Fax: +82 33 661 3923
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Joon-Soo LEE
Senior researcher, Korea Oceanographic Data
Center, Fishery and Ocean Information
Division
National Fisheries Research & Development
Institute
408-1, Sirang-ri, Gijang-eup, Gijang-gun,
Busan, 619-705, Korea
Tel: +82 51 720 2241
Fax: +82 51 720 2225
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Youn-Ho Lee
Vice President, Research Strategy
Korea Ocean Research & Development
Institute
Ansan, P.O. Box 29, 425-600 Seoul
Tel: +82 31 400 6428
Fax: +82 31 400 6587
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Dosoo Jang
Director, Center for International Cooperative
Programs
Korea Ocean Research & Development
Institute
Ansan, P.O. Box 29, 425-600 Seoul
Tel: +82 31 400 6441
Fax: +82 31 401 6925
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr Hyun Yeong KIM
Director, IOC Chairman’s Office
Korea Ocean Research & Development
Institute
Ansan, P.O. Box 29, 425-600 Seoul
Tel: +82 31 400 6412
Fax: +82 31 408 5829
E-mail: [email protected]
Mr Ungyul YI
Team Leader, International Organization Team
Korea Ocean Research & Development
Institute
Ansan, P.O. Box 29, 425-600 Seoul
Tel: +82 31 400 7750
Fax: +82 31 401 6925
E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Sang-Kyung BYUN
Research Counselor
Korea Ocean Research & Development
Institute
Ansan, P.O. Box 29, 425-600 Seoul
Tel: +82 31 400 6127
Fax: +82 31 408 5829
E-mail: [email protected]
(Also IOC Chairperson)
Dr Hee-Dong JEONG
Senior scientist
East Sea Fisheries Research Institute
National Fisheries Research & Development
Institute
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V – page 5
482, Sacheonnhaean-Ro, Yeongok-Myeon,
Gangneung, Gangwon-Do, 210-861 Korea
Tel: +82 33 660 8530
Fax: +82 33 661 3923
E-mail: [email protected]
(Also Chair of NEAR-GOOS)
MALAYSIA
Prof. Dr Nor Aieni Haji Mokhtar
Director, National Oceanography Directorate
(NOD)
Ministry of Science, Technology and
Innovation (MOSTI)
Level 6, Block C4, Complex C
Federal Government Administrative Centre
62662 Putrajaya
Tel: 60 3 8885 8201
Fax: 60 3 8889 3008
Email: [email protected]
Dr Ahmad Khairi Abd Wahab
Director
Coastal and Offshore Engineering Institute
Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Kuala Lumpur,
Jalan Semarak
54100 Kuala Lumpur
Tel:
+60 03 2615 4370
Fax:
+60 03 2691 8109
Email: [email protected]
Dr Fredolin Tangang
Professor and Head
Research Centre for Tropical Climate Change
System (IKLIM)
Faculty of Science and Technology
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
(The National University of Malaysia)
43600 Bangi Selangor
Tel:
+603-89213826 / +6019-2718986
Fax:
+603-89253357
Email: [email protected]
RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Dr Vyacheslav Lobanov
Deputy Director
V.I.Il’ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute (POI)
Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of
Sciences
43 Baltiyskaya Street, 690041 Vladivostok,
Tel: +7 4232 312 377
Fax: +7 4232 312 573
Email: [email protected]
THAILAND
Dr Somkiat Khokiattiwong
Head of Oceanography and Marine
Environment
Phuket Marine Biological Center
Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
51 Sakdhidej Rd.
Muang District, Phuket 83000
Tel:
+66 76 391128
Fax:
+66 76 391127
Email: [email protected]
Ms Vararin Vongpanich
Marine Biologist
Phuket Marine Biological Center
Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
51 Sakdhidej Rd.
Muang District, Phuket 83000
Tel:
+66 76 391128
Fax:
+66 76 391127
Email: [email protected]
Ms Narumol Kornkanitnan
Marine Biologist
Marine and Coastal Resources Research
Center
Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
120/1 Bangyaprak, Muang
Samut Sakhon 74000
Tel:
+66 34 497 074
Fax:
+66 34 497 074 press 3
Email: [email protected]
Ms Ornuma Janyapiyaphong
Foreign Affairs Group
Department of Marine and Coastal Resources
Ministry of Natural Resources and
Environment
5th Fl.,Building B, Cheangwattana Rd., Laksi,
Bangkok 10210
Tel:
+66 2 141 1284
Fax:
+66 2 143 9244
Email: [email protected]
Dr Maitree Duangsawasdi
23/81 Moo Ban Sermmitr Soi 17
Nawamin Rd., Buengkum
Bangkok 10240
Tel:
+66 2 510 0783
Mobile: +66 85 143 7755
Fax:
+66 2 510 1046
Email: [email protected]
Dr Suchana Chavanich
Associate Professor
Department of Marine Science
Faculty of Science
Chulalongkorn University
Bangkok 10330
Tel:
+66 2 218 5394
Fax:
+66 2 255 0780
Email: [email protected]
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V – page 6
VIETNAM
Dr Bui Hong Long
Professor and Director
Institute of Oceanography
01 Cau Da - Nha Trang
Tel:
+84 58 3590032
Fax:
+84 58 3590034
Email: [email protected]
Fax:
Dr Vo Si Tuan
Professor and Vice-Director
Institute of Oceanography
01 Cau Da - Nha Trang
Tel:
+84 58 3590033
Fax:
+84 58 3590034
Email: [email protected]
IOCAFRICA
Professor Adoté Blim BLIVI
B.P. 1515
Lomé 06
Togo
Tel:
228 22 21 68 17
Email: [email protected],
[email protected]
Dr Dao Viet Ha
Principal Researcher
Head of Department of Biochemistry
Institute of Oceanography
01 Cau Da - Nha Trang
Tel:
+84 58 3590218
Fax:
+84 58 3590034
Email: [email protected];
[email protected]
OBSERVERS
CAMBODIA (not member of IOC)
Dr SREY Sunleang
Director
Department of Wetlands and Coastal Zones
Ministry of Environment
Tel:
+855 77-333-456
E-mail: [email protected]
MYANMAR (IOC Member State)
Ms Khin Cho Cho Shien
Deputy Director
Department of Meteorology & Hydrology
Ministry of Transport
Office No(5) Nay Pyi Taw
Ministry of Transport
Tel:
+95-067-411446
+95-067-411031
Fax:
+95-067-411449
+95-01-665704
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Ms May Khin Chaw
Assistant Director
Department of Meteorology & Hydrology
Ministry of Transport
Office No(5) Nay Pyi Taw
Ministry of Transport
Tel:
+95-067-411446
+95-067-411031
+95-067-411449
+95-01-665704
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
REPRESENTATIVES & OBSERVERS
OF ORGANIZATIONS
UNEP/Northwest Pacific Action Plan
(NOWPAP)
Dr Alexander Tkalin
Coordinator
Northwest Pacific Action Plan (NOWPAP) of
UNEP
NOWPAP RCU, 152-1 Haean-ro, Gijang-up,
Gijang-gun, Busan 619-705
Republic of Korea
Tel:
+82-51-720-3001
Fax:
+82-51-720-3009
E-mail: [email protected]
RESOURCE PERSONS
Ms Connie Chiang
Consultant
Kissimmee, Florida
USA
Email: [email protected]
IOC SECRETARIAT
Dr Wendy Watson-Wright
Executive Secretary
Intergovernmental Oceanographic
Commission of UNESCO
1, rue Miollis
75732 Paris CEDEX 15
France
Tel: +33 1 45 68 39 83
Fax: +33 1 45 68 58 10
Email: [email protected]
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex V – page 7
Mr Wenxi Zhu
Head
IOC Regional Office for the Western Pacific
)CAPTSEW)
c/o Department of Marine and Coastal
Resources
120 Moo3, Chaengwattana Rd., Lak Si
Bangkok 10210
Thailand
Tel:
+66 2 141 1287
Fax:
+66 2 143 9245
Email: [email protected]
Ms Nachapa Saransuth
Programme Assistant
IOC Regional Office for the Western Pacific
)CAPTSEW)
c/o Department of Marine and Coastal
Resources
120 Moo3, Chaengwattana Rd., Lak Si
Bangkok 10210
Thailand
Tel:
+66 2 141 1288
Fax:
+66 2 143 9245
Email: [email protected]
IOC/SC-WESTPAC-IX/3
Annex VI
ANNEX VI
LIST OF ACRONYMS
ADOES
CLIVAR
COBSEA
FAO
GEF
GOOS
GRAME
HAB
IBCWP
ICES
ICG/PTWS
IGBP
IMBER
IOC
IODE
KOICA
KORDI
LME
MLTM
MOMSEI
MRET
NEARGOOS
NMDIS
NMEFC
NOWPAP
OCD
ODIN
ODINWESTPAC
ODP
OFD
OFDS
PICES
RMIC
RORP
ROSCOP
SCOR
SEAGOOS
SOA
SPREP
UNDP
UNEP
UNESCO
WESTPAC
WMO
Asian Dust and its Impact on Ocean Ecosystem
Climate Variability and Predictability
Coordinating Body on the Sea of East Asia
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Global Environment Facility
Global Ocean Observing System
Global Reporting and Assessment of the State of the Marine
Environment
Harmful Algal Blooms
International Bathymetric Chart of the Western Pacific
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea
Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami
Warning and Mitigation System
International Geosphere - Biosphere Programme
Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research
Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission
International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange
Korea International Cooperation Agency
Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute
Large Marine Ecosystem
Ministry of Land, Transportation and Marine Affairs
Monsoon Onset Monitoring over Andaman Sea and its Social and
Ecosystem Impacts
Marine Renewable Energy Technology Development
North East Asian Regional GOOS
National Marine Data and Information Service, China
National Marine Environment Forecasting Centre
North-West Pacific Action Plan
Ocean Dynamics and Climate
Ocean Data and Information Network
Ocean Data and Information Network for the Western Pacific Region
Ocean Data Portal
Ocean Forecasting Demonstration
Ocean Forecasting Demonstration System
North Pacific Marine Science Organization
Regional Marine Instrument Centre
Regional Ocean Research Priority Plan
Report of Observations/Samples Collected by Oceanographic
Programmes
Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research
South East Asian Global Observing System
State Ocean Administration, China
Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme
United Nations Development Programme
United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific (WESTPAC)
World Meteorological Organization
In this Series
Languages
Reports of Governing and Major Subsidiary Bodies, which was initiated at the beginning of 1984,
the reports of the following meetings have already been issued:
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Eleventh Session of the Working Committee on international Oceanographic Data Exchange
Seventeenth Session of the Executive Council
Fourth Session of the Working Committee for Training, Education and Mutual Assistance
Fifth Session of the Working Committee for the Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine Environment
First Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions
Third Session of the ad hoc Task team to Study the Implications, for the Commission, of the UN Convention on the Law
of the Sea and the New Ocean Regime
First Session of the Programme Group on Ocean Processes and Climate
Eighteenth Session of the Executive Council
Thirteenth Session of the Assembly
Tenth Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific
Nineteenth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1986
Sixth Session of the IOC Scientific Committee for the Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine Environment
Twelfth Session of the IOC Working Committee on International Oceanographic Data Exchange
Second Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions, Havana, 1986
First Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Eastern Atlantic, Praia, 1987
Second Session of the IOC Programme Group on Ocean Processes and Climate
Twentieth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1987
Fourteenth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1987
Fifth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Southern Ocean
Eleventh Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Beijing, 1987
Second Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Co-operative Investigation in the North and Central Western
Indian Ocean, Arusha, 1987
Fourth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Western Pacific, Bangkok, 1987
Twenty-first Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1988
Twenty-second Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1989
Fifteenth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1989
Third Session of the IOC Committee on Ocean Processes and Climate, Paris, 1989
Twelfth Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Novosibirski,
1989
Third Session of the Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions, Caracas, 1989
First Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific, Hangzhou, 1990
Fifth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Western Pacific, Hangzhou, 1990
Twenty-third Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1990
Thirteenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, New York,
1990
Seventh Session of the IOC Committee for the Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine Environment, Paris, 1991
Fifth Session of the IOC Committee for Training, Education and Mutual Assistance in Marine Sciences, Paris, 1991
Fourth Session of the IOC Committee on Ocean Processes and Climate, Paris, 1991
Twenty-fourth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1991
Sixteenth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1991
Thirteenth Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Baja
California, 1991
Second Session of the IOC-WMO Intergovernmental WOCE Panel, Paris, 1992
Twenty-fifth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1992
Fifth Session of the IOC Committee on Ocean Processes and Climate, Paris, 1992
Second Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Eastern Atlantic, Lagos, 1990
First Session of the Joint IOC-UNEP Intergovernmental Panel for the Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine
Environment, Paris, 1992
First Session of the IOC-FAO Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, 1992
Fourteenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, Paris, 1992
Third Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Co-operative Investigation in the North and Central Western Indian
Ocean, Vascoas, 1992
Second Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific, Bangkok, 1993
Fourth Session of the IOC Sub-Cornmission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions, Veracruz, 1992
Third Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Eastern Atlantic, Dakar, 1993
First Session of the IOC Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 1993
Twenty-sixth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1993
Seventeenth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1993
Fourteenth Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Tokyo,
1993
Second Session of the IOC-FAO Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, 1993
Twenty-seventh Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1994
First Planning Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Melbourne, 1994
Eighth Session of the IOC-UNEP-IMO Committee for the Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine Environment,
San José, Costa Rica, 1994
Twenty-eighth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1995
Eighteenth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1995
Second Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 1995
E, F, S, R
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Third Session of the IOC-WMO Intergovernmental WOCE Panel, Paris, 1995
Fifteenth Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Papetee,
1995
Third Session of the IOC-FAO Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, 1995
Fifteenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange
Second Planning Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 1995
Third Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific, Tokyo, 1996
Fifth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions, Christ Church, 1995
Intergovernmental Meeting on the IOC Black Sea Regional Programme in Marine Sciences and Services
Fourth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Eastern Atlantic, Las Palmas, 1995
Twenty-ninth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1996
Sixth Session for the IOC Regional Committee for the Southern Ocean and the First Southern Ocean Forum,
Bremerhaven, 1996
IOC Black Sea Regional Committee, First Session, Varna, 1996
IOC Regional Committee for the Co-operative Investigation in the North and Central Western Indian Ocean, Fourth
Session, Mombasa, 1997
Nineteenth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1997
Third Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 1997
Thirtieth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1997
Second Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Indian Ocean, Goa, 1996
Sixteenth Session of the International Co-ordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Lima, 1997
Thirty-first Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1998
Thirty-second Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1999
Second Session of the IOC Black Sea Regional Committee, Istanbul, 1999
Twentieth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 1999
Fourth Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 1999
Seventeenth Session of the International Coordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Seoul,
1999
Fourth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific, Seoul, 1999
Thirty-third Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 2000
Thirty-fourth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 2001
Extraordinary Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 2001
Sixth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions, San José, 1999
Twenty-first Session of the Assembly, Paris, 2001
Thirty-fifth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 2002
Sixteenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, Lisbon,
2000
Eighteenth Session of the International Coordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Cartagena,
2001
Fifth Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 2001
Seventh Session of the IOC Sub-commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (IOCARIBE), Mexico, 2002
Fifth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific, Australia, 2002
Thirty-sixth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 2003
Twenty-second Session of the Assembly, Paris, 2003
Fifth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Co-operative Investigation in the North and Central Western Indian
Ocean, Kenya, 2002 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Sixth Session of the IOC Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, St. Petersburg (USA), 2002
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Seventeenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, Paris,
2003 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Sixth Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 2003
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Nineteenth Session of the International Coordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific, Wellington,
New Zealand, 2003 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Third Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Indian Ocean, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran,
21-23 February 2000
Thirty-seventh Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 2004
Seventh Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, 2005
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R); and Extraordinary Session, Paris, 20 June 2005
First Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System (ICG/IOTWS), Perth, Australia, 3–5 August 2005
Twentieth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific,
Viña del Mar, Chile, 3–7 October 2005 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-Third Session of the Assembly, Paris, 21–30 June 2005
First Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in the
North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas (ICG/NEAMTWS), Rome, Italy,
21–22 November 2005
Eighth Session of the IOC Sub-commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (IOCARIBE), Recife, Brazil,
14–17 April 2004 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
First Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE-EWS), Bridgetown, Barbados,
10–12 January 2006
Ninth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (IOCARIBE),
Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, 19–22 April 2006 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
E only
E, F, S, R
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E only
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CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
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Second Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System (ICG/IOTWS), Hyderabad, India, 14–16 December 2005
Second Session of the WMO-IOC Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology,
Halifax, Canada, 19–27 September 2005 (Abridged final report with resolutions and recommendations)
Sixth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Western Indian Ocean (IOCWIO), Maputo, Mozambique,
2–4 November 2005 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Fourth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central Indian Ocean, Colombo, Sri Lanka
8–10 December 2005 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Thirty-eighth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 20 June 2005 (Electronic copy only)
Thirty-ninth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 21–28 June 2006
Third Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System (ICG/IOTWS), Bali, Indonesia, 31 July–2 August 2006 (*Executive Summary available separately in E,F,S & R)
Second Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in
the North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas (ICG/NEAMTWS), Nice, France, 22–24 May 2006
Seventh Session of the IOC Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, France, 16–18 March 2005
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Fourth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System (ICG/IOTWS-IV), Mombasa, Kenya, 30 February-2 March 2007 (* Executive Summary available separately in
E, F, S & R)
Nineteenth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, Trieste,
Italy, 12–16 March 2007 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Third Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in
the North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas, Bonn, Germany, 7–9 February 2007 (* Executive
Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Second Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions, Cumaná, Venezuela, 15–19 January 2007 (* Executive
Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-first Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System, Melbourne, Australia, 3–5 May 2006 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-fourth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 19–28 June 2007
Fourth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System
in the North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas, Lisbon, Portugal, 21–23 November 2007
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-second Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 17–21 September 2007 (* Executive Summary available in E, F, S & R included)
Forty-first Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 24 June–1 July 2008
Third Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions, Panama City, Panama, 12–14 March 2008 (* Executive
Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Eighth Session of the IOC Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, France, 17–20 April 2007
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-third Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System, Apia, Samoa, 16–18 February 2009 (*Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twentieth Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, Beijing,
China, 4–8 May 2009 (*Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Tenth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (IOCARIBE), Puerto La Cruz,
Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, 22–25 October 2008 (*Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Seventh Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific (WESTPAC-VII), Sabah, Malaysia, 26–29 May
2008 (*Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Ninth Session of the IOC-WMO-UNEP Committee for the Global Ocean Observing System, Paris, France, 10–12 June
2009 (* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R);
Fifth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System
in the North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas, Athens, Greece, 3–5 November 2008
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Fourth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions, Fort-de-France, Martinique, France, 2–4 June 2009
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-fifth Session of the Assembly, Paris, 16–25 June 2009
Third Session of the Joint WMO-IOC Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology, Marrakesh,
Morocco, 4–11 November 2009
Ninth Session of the IOC Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, France, 22–24 April 2009
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Fifth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions, Managua, Nicaragua, 15–17 March 2010
(* Executive Summary available in E, F, S & R)
Sixth Session of the IOC Regional Committee for the Central and Eastern Atlantic Ocean, Accra, Ghana,
28–30 March 2010 (* Executive Summary available in E, F, S & R)
Forty-second Session of the Executive Council; Paris, 15, 19 & 20 June 2009
Forty-third Session of the Executive Council; Paris, 8–16 June 2010
Sixth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System
in the North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas, Istanbul, Turkey, 11–13 November 2009
(* Executive Summary available separately in Ar, E, F, S & R)
Seventh Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System
in the North Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas, Paris, France, 23–25 November 2010
(* Executive Summary available separately in Ar, E, F, S & R)
Sixth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, 26–29 April 2011
(* Executive Summary available in E, F, S & R)
E only
E, F, R, S
E*
E*
E, F, R, S
E, F, R, S
E*
E only
E*
E*
E*
E*
E*
E*
E, F, S, R
E*
E*
E, F, R, S
E*
E*
E*
E*
E, S*
E*
E*
E*
E*
E, F, R, S
E, F, R, S
E*
E*
E*
E, F, R, S
E, F, R, S
E*
E*
E*
151.
152.
153.
154.
155.
156.
157.
158.
159.
160.
161.
162.
163.
Twenty-fourth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System, Beijing, China, 24–27 May 2011 (*Executive Summary in E, F, S & R included)
Twenty-first Session of the IOC Committee on International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, Liège,
Belgium, 23–26 March 2011 (*Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Eighth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific (WESTPAC-VIII), Bali, Indonesia, 10–13 May 2010
(*Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
E*
Tenth IOC Intergovernmental Panel on Harmful Algal Blooms, Paris, France, 12–14 April 2011
(* Executive Summary available separately in E, F, S & R)
Forty-fifth Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 26–28 June 2012 (* Decisions available in E, F, S & R)
Seventh Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions, Willemstad, Curacao, 2–4 April 2012
(*Executive Summary available in E, F, S & R)
Eleventh Session of the IOC Sub-Commission for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (IOCARIBE), Miami, USA,
17–20 May 2011 (*Executive Summary available separately in E & S)
E*
Eight Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE EWS-VIII), Trinidad & Tobago, 29 April–1 May 2013
(*Executive Summary available in E, F, S & R)
Twenty-seventh Session of the Assembly, Paris, 26 June–5 July 2013 and Forty-sixth Session of the Executive
Council, Paris, 25 June 2013
Twenty-fifth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation
System (ICG/PTWS), Vladivostok, Russian Federation, 9–11 September 2013 (*Executive Summary in E, F & R)
Ninth Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning
System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions, US Virgin Islands, 13-15 May 2014 (*Executive Summary available in
E, F, S & R)
Forty-seventh Session of the Executive Council, Paris, 1–4 July 2014 (* Decisions available in E, F, S & R)
Ninth Session of the IOC Sub-Commission of the Western Pacific (WESTPAC-IX), Busan, Republic of Korea,
9–12 May 2012
E*
E*
E*
E*
E*
E, S*
E, F, R, S
E*
E*
E*
E

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