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CAMPUS EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS
On-Campus Emergency Numbers
24-Hour Coverage: Campus Police.............................................................. x2490
Emergency .................................................................................................... x800
Health Services ............................................................................................ x2800
Counseling Services ………………………………………………………. x2840
Facilities Management ................................................................................. x2400
.........................................................................
after business hours…….x800
Area Coordinator on-call (M-F after 4:30 p.m. and all weekend)
Contact Campus Police (x2490) They will call the AC on duty.
Becky Shaw, Associate Dean of Students and Director of Residence Life x4940
Hannah Durrant, Associate Director of Residence Life ............................ x4940
Erica Banz, Assistant Director of Residence Life ..................................... x4927
Kia Brown, Upper Elm Area Coordinator. ................................................. x6970
Annie Cohen, Lower Elm Area Coordinator .............................................. x2237
Stacey Steinbach, West Quad Area Coordinator ........................................ x4374
Brandon Buehring, East Quad Area Coordinator ……………………..….x4934
Dana Olivo, Center Campus Area Coordinator........................................... x2234
Romina Pacheco, Green Street Area Coordinator ...................................... x2236
Julianne Ohotnicky, Dean of Students....................................................... x4940
Marge Litchford, Assistant Dean of Student ............................................. x4940
L’Tanya Richmond, Director of Multicultural Affairs .............................. x4940
Tamra Bates, Director of OSE and the Campus Center... .......................... x2639
Sara Mcguire, Assistant Director of Work and Leadership, OSE. ............. x2639
Matthew Gawron, Assistant Director of Facilities, OSE .......................... .x2639
Sharon Fagon, SGA Office Manager ........................................................ x4950
Donna Gingras, Office Manager, OSE ...................................................... .x2639
Caitlin Szymkowicz, Associate Dean of International Students ................. x4943
Emily Nagoski, Director of Wellness Education ........................................ x4940
Anna Goelke, Program Coordinator, Student Affairs ................................. x4940
Jan Morris, Administrative Assistant ......................................................... x4940
Ashavan Doyon, Administrative Assistant ................................................. x4940
Chapel .......................................................................................................... x2750
Class Deans
Jane Stangl, First Year Class................................................................ x4910
Margaret Bruzelius, Dean of the Senior Class ..................................... x4920
Calvin McFadden, Dean of the Sophomore Class and Ada Comstock x4930
Frazer Ward, Dean of the Junior Class ................................................ x4930
Information and Technology Services ......................................................... x4487
Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity................................................ .x2141
Office of Disability Services ........................................................................ x2071
Dining Services ............................................................................................ x2300
Student Government Association................................................................. x4950
Table of Contents
CAMPUS EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS ................................................................................................... 3
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................................... 5
SPECIAL COLLEGE DAYS AND TRADITIONS .............................................................................................. 6
HOUSE PRESIDENTS ASSOCIATION (HPA) .................................................................................................. 7
CONSTITUTION OF THE HPA ................................................................................................................................... 7
HOUSE PRESIDENTS ASSOCIATION MISSION STATEMENT ................................................................................... 12
EXECUTIVE OFFICES FOR HPA ............................................................................................................................. 13
Chair of HPA ................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
Vice-Chair ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 13
Peer Advisor .................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
HOUSE PRESIDENT POSITION DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................................... 14
WHO’S WHO IN MY HOUSE ............................................................................................................................ 16
Athletic Association Representative ................................................................................................................................................ 16
Class Representatives....................................................................................................................................................................... 16
Social Justice and Equity Representative ......................................................................................................................................... 17
Sustainability Representatives ......................................................................................................................................................... 17
Fire and Safety Captain .................................................................................................................................................................... 18
Head of New Students ..................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Historian........................................................................................................................................................................................... 22
House Fellows Liaison ..................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Secretary .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 23
House Social Events Coordinator .................................................................................................................................................... 24
CSO Representative ......................................................................................................................................................................... 25
Student Academic Advisers ............................................................................................................................................................. 26
Treasurer .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
Vice-President .................................................................................................................................................................................. 27
House Programming Coordinator .....................................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
GENERAL HOUSE MANAGEMENT .......................................................................................................................... 28
Conflicts and Policy Violations ....................................................................................................................................................... 29
Damages to College Residences, Building Service ......................................................................................................................... 30
Damages to College Residences, Facilities Management ................................................................................................................ 34
Hazing .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 35
House Bans .......................................................................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
Goal Setting With House Council .................................................................................................................................................... 36
Ground Rules For Effective Groups ................................................................................................................................................ 37
Conducting Successful House Council Meetings ............................................................................................................................ 38
Community Reports ......................................................................................................................................................................... 39
House TV’s and other Electronics ................................................................................................................................................... 40
Spring Officer Exchange .................................................................................................................................................................. 41
Trunk Room Cleanouts .................................................................................................................................................................... 42
BUDGETS AND FUNDING ......................................................................................................................................... 43
House Social Dues ........................................................................................................................................................................... 43
House Dues ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 43
Treasurer Support Services .............................................................................................................................................................. 43
Newspaper Subscriptions & Funding............................................................................................................................................... 44
Check Requests ................................................................................................................................................................................ 44
Check request voucher instructions ................................................................................................................................................. 44
Social System and Campus Pool Funds ........................................................................................................................................... 44
College Initiative for Diversity Awareness Funds (CIDA) .............................................................................................................. 44
Fine Arts Council Funds .................................................................................................................................................................. 45
Sawyer Fund .................................................................................................................................................................................... 45
Student Lecture Funds ..................................................................................................................................................................... 46
Campus Pool Funding Request .........................................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
Campus Pool Guidelines .................................................................................................................................................................. 46
Fundraising ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 47
General House Fundraising Guidelines ........................................................................................................................................... 48
Budget Development and House Accounts ...................................................................................................................................... 49
CONTRACTS ....................................................................................................................................................... 50
Guidelines for Using Contracts ........................................................................................................................................................ 50
INTRODUCTION
As you assume your responsibilities, this manual is provided to help you further understand the goals and functions of
house councils and to give you information about how to carry out your duties. Being a House President will probably be
the most exciting and rewarding experience of your college career, but it will take time, effort, motivation, commitment,
and most of all, hard work.
As the Chair of your House Council, it is your leadership that will guide and motivate your House Council to successfully
serve your house community. It is House Council’s purpose to provide a healthy atmosphere in your house for
housemates to be supported in their academic and personal endeavors. House Council members have been elected to
serve the house community and the individual members within it. In each of their positions, they have been chosen to
represent the voice, interests and needs of the members of the house –both within the house community and to the various
departments and organizations across campus associated with their position.
As a House President, you have many demanding roles to fulfill. At the same time, however, you may be a student or
working or both. It is important for you to remember to devote time to your own personal growth and to achieve academic
excellence. Throughout the year, you and your fellow HPs will work closely together under the guidance, support, and
encouragement of your Area Coordinator (AC), who is your primary advisor and the Associate Director of Residence
Life, who is the advisor to the House President’s Association (HPA). But others too are eager and willing to help and
lend their support. The Student Affairs staff, Building Services, Dining Services, Campus Police, The Dean of the
College’s office as well as faculty and other Smith employees are available and should be used to create a support system
for you.
This manual has been compiled over several years and contains the original and borrowed work of many professionals in
the field of Student Affairs in Higher Education as well as the work of many HP’s whom have come before you. Please
utilize this manual knowing that it is meant as a resource and does not contain every answer. Best wishes for a successful
year.
SPECIAL COLLEGE DAYS AND TRADITIONS
All-Campus Scream: Starting at 10 pm the night before final exams, Smith students across the campus scream in unison to release
stress and tension.
Celebration: Celebration is an annual event held in November celebrating sexual diversity across campus. Many houses plan some
sort of presentation for a candlelit procession through campus. In 2003, the name changed from Celebration of Sisterhood to
Celebration in efforts to be more inclusive of transgender students.
Convocation: A festive all-campus event held to signal the beginning of the school year. A similar but somewhat scaled-down event
is held before the start of second semester.
Illumination Night: During Senior Week, the night when the campus is lit with lanterns and different performance groups entertain
the senior class, their families, and the citizens of Northampton.
Ivy Day: An important tradition during Senior Week when the graduating class precedes through a laurel chain along with the
members of the reunion classes.
January Term or J-Term: A month students can opt to spend on-campus or off. It can be spent as a vacation, at an internship,
working, or taking a special class.
Junior Ushers: The group of juniors who assist with Commencement activities and hold the chain on Ivy Day.
Mountain Day: On a fall day with nice weather, the president declares a surprise holiday from classes by ringing the college bells.
The dining rooms provide bag lunches and students are encouraged to take advantage of the natural surroundings.
Otelia Cromwell Day: In honor of Otelia Cromwell, the first African-American to graduate from Smith, the campus features a
special day full of multi-cultural programming.
Quad Riot: When Smithies demand Mountain Day be the next day, students on the Quad “riot.” General pandemonium - all in fun.
Rally Day: Instead of Presidents’ Day, Smith offers Rally Day. Classes are canceled for a rally, the awarding of the Smith College
Medal to distinguished alumnae, the awarding of teaching awards to distinguished professors, a show of skits from each class, and a
party at Davis.
Senior Week: The week between finals and commencement, filled with activities for the graduating class.
Sophomore PUSH: The group of sophomores who assist with Commencement activities and sing to the seniors on Illumination
Night, “pushing” them off the Neilson steps into the real world.
Winter and Spring Weekends: Each semester, these weekends are filled with parties and social events intended to relieve stress
before the end of classes and exams.
HOUSE PRESIDENTS ASSOCIATION (HPA)
Constitution of the HPA
ARTICLE 1
NAME
The name of this organization will be the House President’s Association of Smith College (hereafter referred as HPA).
ARTICLE 2
PURPOSES
The purposes of this organization shall be to include but not be limited to:
 Develop and maintain inter-house relations at a high level of accomplishment
 Promote the best possible residential experience for Smith College students by encouraging a better
community environment in which to live and learn
 Maintain a political voice on campus that encourages discussion on issues that affect Smith College
residents
 Represent the resident students of Smith College to the administration
 Communicate and collaborate with the Office of Student Affairs
 Receive the reports of the individual house councils regarding the establishment or change of any
regulation or policy
 Communicate with the Smith College Student Government Association (referred to as SGA)
ARTICLE 3
GENERAL STUCTURE
Section 1:
HPA shall be a student-run organization representing all of the residents of Smith College and
shall be composed of House Councils elected by each residence house with one house president serving as a
representative to the HPA.
Section 2:
The following houses shall be represented in HPA and act as full members: Albright, Baldwin,
Capen, Chapin, Chase, Comstock, Conway, Cushing, Cutter, Dawes, Duckett, Emerson, Gardiner, Gillett, Haven/Wesley,
Hubbard, Jordan, King, Lamont, Lawrence, Morris, Morrow, Northrop, Park, Parsons, Scales, Sessions, Talbot, Tyler,
Washburn, Wilder, Wilson, Ziskind, and 150 Elm
ARTICLE 4
FINANCIAL STRUCTURE
Section 1:
HPA’s primary means of financial support is through funding allocated to HPA from the SGA
budget. Additional funding requests can be made to the Campus Social Dues Pool Committee, SGA and various offices.
Various fundraisers may be planned throughout the year to support HPA endeavors.
Section 2:
Each semester the executive board will prepare an itemized budget for approval by the HPA
membership.
ARTICLE 5
MEMBERSHIP
Section 1:
Voting rights are voted/appointed to the duly elected house president from each of the House Councils; or
appointed designee.
Section 2:
In the case of resignation or impeachment of a House President, the house council officer immediately
below the said officer in the Order of Ascension shall assume the duties and responsibilities of said office (in addition to
their own duties) until an election can be had within the house.
Section 3:
The HPA Advisor shall be appointed by the Associate Dean of Residence Life.
The purpose of the advisor is to assist the HPA, provide information on the college resources, policies and on the Office
of Residence Life program; to make recommendations to the Executive board and the general HPA membership, when
appropriate, regarding HPA activities and procedures.
The duties of said Advisor shall include but not be limited to the following:
A. Attending a minimum of 80% of all HPA meetings;
B. Overseeing all HPA activities;
C. Advising the HPA officers, and helping them in carrying out their duties;
D. Any other duties deemed necessary by the Associate Dean of Residential Life, the Head of HPA, or the
advisor themselves.
ARTICLE 6: OFFICERS AND ELECTIONS
Section 1:
Peer Advisor.
The HPA Executive Board membership and order of ascension shall be: a Chair, Vice Chair and
Section 2:
The executive officers shall be elected by plurality vote in a manner prescribed by the bylaws of
the of the HPA constitution.
Section 3:
Elections will be held at the end of HP training prior to the fall semester
Section 4:
Opposing candidates cannot be in the room while speeches and questions are being made. The
HPA may discuss candidates after all speeches have been made, with the candidates not present. Voting is cast with a
heads down vote. The advisor will count the votes.
Section 5:
All Executive board members will be elected to a one-year term, with terms ending at the close of
the following year’s elections. Newly elected Executive board members shall assume full responsibility for their
positions at the close of the meeting in which they were elected. The retiring executive board members and committee
chairs shall remain as advisors to the newly elected Executive board and committee chairs until the close of the semester.
Section 6:
of interest.
Executive board members must not hold a campus position that could be perceived as a conflict
Section 7:
If an office becomes vacant, an election will be announced via email and an election will be held
at the next HPA meeting. The remaining executive board member will assume the duties of the other until the position is
filled.
ARTICLE 7: DUTIES OF OFFICERS
Section 1:
The Chair shall have overall responsibility for the operation of the HPA, shall call and preside at
all special and regular meetings of the HPA, shall uphold the HPA constitution, and shall represent the HPA of Smith
College to various administrative office on campus and on all occasions deemed necessary. The Chair shall also
coordinate any special assignments that may come about. The Chair carries out the policies and actions of the HPA,
maintains and up-to-date Chair’s file, oversees the formation of a budget, and meets with the HPA advisor weekly. The
Chair serves as an SGA liaison and attends weekly SGA Cabinet meetings on Thursday nights at 7:00pm. In addition, the
Chair shall be responsible for direct communication SGA as a delegate at SGA Senate and will act as the voice of HPA to
this governing body.
Section 2:
The Vice Chair will be responsible for the planning and execution of HPA programs, shall uphold
the HPA constitution and shall keep accurate minutes and attendance records for all HPA meetings. Minutes must be
distributed prior to each HPA meeting to the Advisor, Chair, House Presidents, and any other interested parties. The ViceChair shall also keep an accurate file of the minutes of each HPA on campus. The Vice Chair shall also serve as the
Constitutional Advisor and Parliamentarian, insuring adherence to the Constitution and Robert’s Rules of Order, as
needed. The Vice-Chair reviews and approves the validity of the house constitutions and assists House Presidents with
amending and ratifying them as necessary. The Vice Chair shall assume the duties of the Chair in the absence of the
Chair at any function, meeting or conference.
Section 3:
The Peer Advisor will have served as member of HPA in the previous academic year. The Peer
Advisor will be a member of the HPA Executive Board and serve in an advisory capacity at assist the Board.
ARTICLE 8: APPOINTMENTS
Section 1:
The HPA Executive Board shall appoint in the spring a member of the current HPA who shall
serve as the Peer Advisor during the following academic year.
Section 2:
The HPA Executive Board shall appoint members of HPA to serve as chairs of committees at the
Board’s discretion. If at any time the HPA Executive Board feels that a committee chair is not performing assigned duties
to the benefit of HPA, they can ask the committee chair for their resignation as chair of said committee.
ARTICLE 9: IMPEACHMENT OF EXECUTIVE BOARD OFFICERS
Section 1:
Impeachment proceedings may be initiated against any elected or appointed Officer by presenting
formal, written charges to the HPA Advisor. A petition containing three-fourths of the signatures of HPA membership
must be presented at a regularly scheduled meeting. The Officers(s) in question shall be presented with the charges in
writing no fewer than one week prior to the convening of the next HPA meeting.
Section 2:
At the following meeting, the petitioned officer will answer all questions that were presented in
the petition and from the HPA membership. At the end of this meeting, a vote of confidence will be taken and for the
officer to remain in the office, a simple majority must be received. If the officer fails to receive this majority, the officer
is asked to step down from the executive board position. An election will take place at the next meeting to fill the
vacancy. IF the chair is petitioned, the vice-chair assumes those duties during the impeachment process.
A formal inquiry shall proceed as follows:
A. The person who submitted the petition presents the petition to HPA. The petition is read aloud.
B. The Voting delegates of HPA may ask questions of the petitioner –may call upon other members to present first
hand information if appropriate and necessary.
C. The defending Executive Board Officer of the petition presents a response to the petition –may call upon other
members to present first hand information if appropriate and necessary.
D. The voting delegates of HPA may ask questions of the petitioner –may call upon other members to present first
hand information if appropriate and necessary.
E. Any final comments, rebuttals, explanations is presented by the petitioner
F. Any final comments, rebuttals, explanations are presented by the defending executive board member.
G. The voting delegates of HPA ask any further questions before they are asked to leave the room.
H. The voting delegates discuss the petition and all information presented before a vote is called.
I. Voting delegates vote on the impeachment question. Impeachment shall require a 3/4 (three fourths) affirmative
vote of all voting members
Section 3:
Impeachment of a house council leader shall be done with the procedure outlined in the house
constitution. In the absence of an impeachment policy, the above policy will be used for the impeachment of a house
council leader with the house council, as defined by the house constitution, serving as the voting delegation.
Section 4:
If at any time the HPA and its Advisor feels that a member of the Executive Board is not
performing assigned duties to the benefit of HPA, they can ask executive board member for their resignation. The HPA
Advisor reserves the right, at any time, to remove an Executive Board member from their board position.
ARTICLE 10: STANDING COMMITTEES
Section 1:
Standing committees as are necessary to carry out the work of the HPA are provided for in the
Bylaws of the HPA. Chairs of the Standing Committees shall be appointed by the executive board and serve during the
tenure of office of the board that appoints them.
Section 2:
The HPA shall have as its standing committees:
 Programming & Recognition: chaired by the Chair or designate chairperson
 Training & Publications: chaired by Vice Chair or designate chairperson
Section 3:
The goals of these standing committees shall be outlined by the HPA at the beginning of each
semester. Select committees may be set up, if needed, by order of the Chair of HPA. The Chair may request special
reports from these committees. A representative from each area of campus is encouraged to be a part of each committee.
ARTICLE 11: MEETINGS
Section 1:
The first HPA meeting will be held within the first two weeks of each semester and will end one
week prior to final exams. No meetings will be held during official closings of the college such as breaks.
Section 2:
Regular meetings of the HPA shall be held every Tuesday at 7 pm during the academic year; at a
time, place and day established at the first meeting of each semester with the consent of the membership of HPA.
Section 3:
The order of the meeting is as follows:
 Call to Order by the Chair
 Call for correction in the Minutes report by the Vice-Chair
 Guest speakers (if any)
 Committee Reports





Old Business
New Business
Advisors Information
Check-in and Announcements
Adjournment by Presiding Officer
Section 4:
The HPA Executive Board shall meet at least once between each regular HPA meeting with the
HPA advisor; other committees shall meet as deemed necessary by their chairs.
Section 5:
A special meeting of the HPA may be called at the discretion and/or request of the Executive
Board and/or Advisor with the approval of the Executive Board. All members must be notified three days prior to the
meeting unless the meeting is being called for an urgent matter of business or emergency.
Section 6: HPA may act on business via campus or electronic mail. This action may be initiated by any member,
but is only valid when all members have responded.
ARTICLE 12: ATTENDANCE
Section 1:
All House Councils are expected to have one voting representative at each HPA meeting. If an
absence of a house president is anticipated, they may send an alternative delegate in their place. All members must attend
all HPA meetings and other required functions as defined by the Chair, unless excused by the Vice-Chair.
Section 2:
Two (2) unexcused absences will be allowed where no voting representatives are present at a
HPA meeting during the course of a semester. Petitions for excused absences must be submitted in writing via mail to the
Vice-Chair at least twenty-four hours before scheduled meeting times. If a member acquires a third unexcused absence,
they will be issued a letter of warning and given a chance to explain their absences. If there is a reasonable excuse, then
an appeal will be heard by the Executive Board. After any four absences, a letter of warning will be issued and the
member will be given a chance to explain their absences; If there is a reasonable excuse, then an appeal will be heard by
the Executive Board; if there is not a reasonable excuse a vote of the members present at HPA will be taken and a twothirds majority will be needed to remove the member from HPA. After any five absences, the member shall be
immediately removed.
Section 3:
To remove a member from HPA for any reason other than those above, a petition signed by
twenty-five percent of voting members shall be brought to HPA, which clearly outlines why the member should be
removed. A two-thirds majority vote of the members present is needed.
Section 4:
All members have the right to due process before removal is final.
ARTICLE 13: QUORUM AND VOTING
Section 1:
Quorum shall be defined as one half of the total of voting delegates of HPA plus one voting
delegate of the HPA must be represented at the HPA regular business meeting. Exceptions shall be in case of an Election
Meeting and for the Constitutional revisions, at which at least two thirds of the House Councils must be represented by at
least one voting delegate.
Section 2:
Attendance for voting purposes is defined as the Voting Representative being present from the
Call to Order by the Presiding Officer until the adjournment of the meeting, also by the Presiding Officer.
Section 3:
If quorum is lost during the course of the meeting, matters requiring a vote may not be voted on,
and must be tabled until the next meeting.
Section 4:
Whenever a proportion of a vote is referred to in this constitution, it shall mean a proportion of
voting delegates who vote either in the affirmative or in the negative, unless otherwise specified. A vote to abstain shall
be treated as if the HPA voting member were not present.
Section 5:
Delegates shall have one vote per house. All votes are majority votes with the exception of
Constitutional Amendments, Ratifications and Impeachments.
Section 6:
The Peer Advisor shall serve as a non-voting member of HPA. The Chair of HPA will cast a vote
only in the case of a tie.
Section 7:
Absentee Ballots will be accepted for representatives with excused absences up until twenty-four
hours prior to the scheduled meeting time. Ballots will be sent to the Vice-Chair in writing via email or campus mail.
ARTICLE 14: STATEMENT OF PRECEDENCE
Section 1: This constitution shall serve as the supreme laws of HPA, subject to the guidelines and regulations of
Smith College. All other rules, resolutions, or orders passed by, governing documents (including but not limited to the
House Council Constitutions, the Bylaws of HPA and Executive Board policies) maintained by, or actions undertaken by
this organization shall be in accordance and wholly consistent with this constitution.
Section 2: Should there be any conflicts between this Constitution and any other document, the following order
of precedence shall prevail:
1. Smith College Policy and Procedures
2. Smith College Housing Contract
3. Smith College Handbook
4. Smith College HPA Constitution
5. Anything not bound by these constraints shall be bound by common sense.
ARTICLE 15:
AMENDMENTS
Section 1:
Proposed amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws may be submitted in writing by any
member to HPA to both Executive Board Members.
Section 2:
Amendments to this Constitution shall be presented and considered at an HPA meeting one
meeting prior to a meeting where a vote will be held on the proposed amendment. A written copy of the proposed
amendment shall be given to all HPA members a week before voting to share with their house councils and discuss.
ARTICLE 16: RATIFICATION
Section 1:
A two thirds (2/3) affirmative vote of all voting members is required to ratify this Constitution.
Section 2:
In the event a voting delegate cannot attend the Ratification meeting, they must submit an
absentee vote in person to an HPA Executive Board Member or the Advisor, no later than twenty-four (24) hours before
the aforementioned meeting.
Section 3:
This ratification process shall be two weeks in length. The first week will be the handing out of
this copy to HPA voting delegates, and a brief question and answer period at a regularly scheduled HPA meeting. The
second week will be an open debate of this Constitution followed by a vote of ALL members on this Constitution at a
regularly scheduled HPA meeting.
Section 4
This Constitution and By-Laws shall be effective and shall supersede all previous Constitutions
and By-Laws immediately upon approval by a two-thirds majority vote of the voting members present. The Constitution
must be approved by the HPA Advisor to ensure that it complies with the statement of precedence and the procedures
outlined for ratification.
Section 5: The official custody of this constitution and all the governing documents of the HPA shall be
maintained by the Vice Chair of HPA.
Section 6: The official copy of this constitution and all other rules, restrictions, orders or governing documents of
HPA shall bear the witness of the president serving during its adoption or amendment and the date of passage and date of
witness.
House Presidents Association
Mission Statement
MISSION
The House Presidents Association (HPA) at Smith College is dedicated to the
development of strong house communities. The HPA provides a supportive space
for House Presidents to problem solve and to develop creative ideas as they lead
their houses. House Presidents act as liaisons between their individual Smith
Houses, where they have a presence and a developed mission, and the larger Smith
community (including campus organizations). The HPA is a voice for the student
residential community within the Student Government Association, and so will
actively and responsively represent students.
GOALS
 The HPA will invite guests to its weekly meetings whose information
supports the development of house communities.
 There will be time at each HPA meeting for House Presidents to reflect and
share experiences as house leaders.
 When presented with the opportunity, the HPA will work with the
administration to represent house’s opinions on campus issues.
 The HPA will provide leadership development opportunities for House
Presidents.
 The HPA will promote social justice learning within house communities and
the larger campus community.
Revised May 2015
Executive Offices for HPA
CHAIR OF HPA
1. Plan and run the House Presidents Association meetings collaboratively with the Vice Chair of HPA
and with the Associate Director of Residence Life. These meetings occur every other week on
Tuesday evenings.
2. Meet with the Associate Director of Residence Life and the Vice-Chair to the House Presidents to
establish the agendas for upcoming meetings as well as any other future plans, activities and
programs.
3. Sit on the SGA Cabinet, which meets every Wednesday evening. The length of the Cabinet
meetings varies according to the weekly agenda. Therefore, it is essential that the Head of HPA plan
to keep all of Wednesday night free (no classes or other conflicts), as the meetings can sometimes
run LATE.
4. Be the connection between SGA and the houses. Inform SGA Cabinet about HPA and vise versa.
5. Be the voice of the House Presidents in SGA Cabinet.
6. Act as a resource to fellow House Presidents when necessary.
7. Oversee the Annual House Competition.
8. Sit on and help organize the various committees that may form as needs arise.
VICE-CHAIR
1. Assist in the planning the House Presidents Association meetings, which occur every Tuesday, in
meetings the Chair of House Presidents Association, the Peer Advisor and the Associate Director of
Residence Life.
2. Record attendance and take minutes at every House Presidents Association meeting.
3. Prepare and distribute the minutes after every House Presidents Association meeting.
4. Oversee the House Presidents Association Committees and hold these committees accountable.
Report on these committees progress regularity to the Chair of the House Presidents Association
PEER ADVISOR
1. The HPA Peer Advisor must be a past House President, who has not been elected a House President
the following year but is still an enrolled student at Smith College.
2. To be an advisor to the House President’s Association.
3. To provide support and encourage to the leadership of HPA and its members.
House President Position Description
PRIMARY ADVISOR: AREA COORDINATORS
Advisor to HPA: the Associate Director of Residence Life
The House President has the primary responsibility and obligation to oversee the operation of the house council.
Each house must have a working constitution that defines the president’s role as it specifically relates to the operation of
the house. When posting this information for the spring elections, please include the job description from your house’s
constitution. Included here, however, are the general role responsibilities for the president. The following are some
specific expectations of House Presidents:
Within your house:
1.
2.
3.
Make an effort to get to know all members of your house and that you will treat everybody equally throughout the year. We expect that
you will maintain a fair, non-biased, ethical and professional relationship with all members of your house at all times. Therefore, we
expect that you recognize that entering into exclusive relationships with house members will compromise your ability and effectiveness
to develop community in your house.
Regularly eat meals with your house.
Regularly make announcements in your house that are asked of you to make, regardless of your own bias about the content.
Your administrative responsibilities:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Read and follow procedure outlines in your house constitution.
Read everything that is sent to you by the Office of Residence Life. You are responsible for the information.
Check your email regularly and respond to messages from the Office of Residence Life and its representatives promptly.
Manage your house’s page on the Smith Social Network. The Smith Social Network will be a conduit for many processes you will be
involved in.
Your role within House Council:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Meet regularly with your house council.
Support your house council and follow constitution guidelines.
Support the members in their individual positions.
Hold members accountable to their duties for their elected roles.
Fill vacant positions quickly.
Your role with Community Development:
1.
2.
Work with your house council to provide social programs throughout the year to support community development.
Support the programming efforts of your Head Resident and House Community Advisor.
Meetings:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Be an active member of the HPA. Attendance will be taken at these meetings.
Be on time. All meetings begin and end promptly.
Be present. All HPA meetings are mandatory. An excused absence from a meeting must be approved by the Vice-Chair of HPA by
email or by speaking with them directly. (PhoneMail messages will not suffice). In case of absence, you are responsible for
sending your VP or representative to the meeting.
Have your first house meeting within the first two weeks of school. Review agenda with your HR/HCA. Discuss each of your roles
within the meeting.
Have house meetings often enough so that members of your house feel informed of house and campus issues. Review agenda with
your HR/HCA. Discuss each of your roles within the meeting.
Communication with Residence Life Staff:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Work collaboratively with the members of the staff in your house. Inform them about situations of concern in your house.
Meet weekly with your house staff members (HR/HC and HCA)
Meet monthly with your Area Coordinator for an Area HP meeting, and one-on-one as needed.
Talk to your Area Coordinator about what is going on in your house, both through emails, individual meetings and area meetings.
Ask for help and support when you need it.
Be very clear when something is an emergency and you need immediate assistance.
Be very clear with what you want from your Area Coordinator and the Assistant Director of Residence Life who serves as advisor to the
HPA.
Confidentiality demands that you:
1.
Maintain it appropriately!
2.
3.
4.
Never assure it to a student in your house. You never want to be in a position to compromise a promise that you made if it is in the
student’s best interest that you tell somebody else something that the student has told you.
Do not share the specifics of incidents in your house with anyone other than who is appropriate. Please note that this includes not sharing
information with other House Presidents. House Presidents are obligated to share all pertinent information, e.g. student welfare, with
their House Staff members or the Area Coordinator.
Be careful at all times about what you are saying. You never know who else is listening.
Role Modeling Community Standards:
Know and follow all college and house policies not limited to but including:
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Guest policy
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Alcohol and Other Substance Policies
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Smoking policy
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Candles
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Microwaves
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Pets
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Hazing
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Use of Keys
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Taking food or dishes out of the dining room.
All policies can be found in the College Handbook.
Integrity:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Be honest at all times, including when you cannot do something.
Do not use your position as an excuse for failure to complete other work. You are a student first!
Do not use your position as a way to get things for yourself from other departments on campus.
As the person who oversees the house council, ensure that members adhere to college guidelines when planning, executing and paying
for college events. Dishonesty and manipulation breech the integrity of our self-governance system.
WHO’S WHO IN MY HOUSE
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVE
Contact person: Theresa Collins, Facilities & Recreation Manager, Athletics Department, x2710
The AA Reps are the primary means of communication between the Athletic Association and your house. They are
instrumental in getting information about intramural events, club sports and intercollegiate games to the rest of the student
body. AA Reps are the house/campus “voice” regarding Athletic Association programs and events. Attendance at the
Athletic Association meetings is a requirement. If an AA Rep has two unexcused absences, she will be asked to resign by
the Intramural VP.
Each house will elect ONE Athletic Association Representative in the spring who will serve for the following year.
Responsibilities:
1. MUST attend all AA Rep meetings (usually about once a month) or send a substitute if unable to attend. The
purpose of these meetings to find out what’s going on, pick up flyers/other publicity, help plan events, discuss
ideas/problems/suggestions and socialize with fellow reps.
2. Help organize Athletic Association sponsored events throughout the year (Float Night, Midnight Madness,
Triathlon, Midday Madness, etc.) and serve on committees as needed.
3. Announce and post on house AA bulletin boards information about intramural and intercollegiate events.
4. Recruit housemates to participate in intramural events. Recruit housemates to come and cheer at home
intercollegiate events. Help create a positive feeling about participating and watching Smith athletes.
5. While the AA Rep is not required to captain all of the house teams, she is responsible for finding a captain for
intramural events that the house has expressed interest in, and for turning in the sign up sheet to the Athletic
Association Office by the appropriate deadline.
6. Be/become familiar with the Athletic Association and Athletic Department so as to be able to provide information
about athletic facilities and events to other house members.
CLASS REPRESENTATIVES
Contact the Class President for your Class (www.smith.edu/sga/meet.php)
While most class representatives share similar duties, you should refer to your own house’s constitution for more specific
tasks and responsibilities.
Possible duties:
 At least one student from each year (including Ada Comstock)
 Elected for the duration of one academic year
 Serves as a liaison between the class and the house by presiding over one house class meeting per semester
 Organization of house functions for respective class (i.e. Senior wine and cheese, Junior milk and cookies,
Sophomore chips and dip, first year popcorn and a movie).
 Sit on house council
 Attends class rep meetings (about once a month) and help with the class care packages
 Implements house traditions
 Keeps on-going line of communication with House President and House Council
SOCIAL JUSTICE AND EQUITY REPRESENTATIVE
Contact Person: SGA Diversity Committee Chair (www.smith.edu/sga/meet.php),
Jennifer Walters, Associate Dean of the College and Dean of Religious and Spiritual Life
X2797
Social Justice & Equity Committee (SJEComm) Reps are the primary means of communication between the SGA Social
Justice & Equity Committee and your house, as well as the entire campus. They work with and act as liaisons between the
Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity, the SGA Social Justice & Equity Committee and individual houses. SJEReps
are elected in April, trained in the fall and throughout the year, and apply their training to act as educators, allies, and
advocates for social justice and diversity issues in their house communities.
SJEReps pay particular attention to how race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, religion, and national origin impact the
house's programming/activities, social climate, and individual students' experiences. They will strategize with other house
leadership members about how the house can strive towards an anti-oppressive culture, and act as allies to marginalized
students. SJEReps will also work to educate fellow students about issues related to privilege, oppression and identity
through programming and dialogue. Through this work, it is the hope that SJEReps will help to build a social justice
consciousness within house communities, and provide some resources for student discussion and organizing around these
issues.
Social Justice & Equity Reps are expected to:
 Attend the mandatory social justice and diversity training in the fall, unless you have a valid excuse. Otherwise,
you will compromise your position as a Rep.
 Attend all SJECommittee meetings as called by the Committee Chair (minimum one hour per week, on the
weekend, with a high possibility of utilizing time outside of meetings to work), with a maximum of three
absences with a valid reason.
 Publicize social justice and diversity-related events on campus to the house via your house bulletin board, email,
Facebook group, etc.
 Plan at least two events per semester in your house that addresses social justice and diversity. This could mean
inviting a relevant student organization to present during tea, or inviting a trained facilitator to host a dialogue
or a workshop. The Office of Institutional Diversity has resources, funding, and information available to
support SJE Reps in organizing such events. Collaboration with other house leadership members, or with other
houses, is encouraged.
 Meet regularly with House Council and House Residence Life members to discuss how diversity issues are
affecting the house and the Smith community, and ways of addressing it.
 Act as allies - with the support of other house leadership - when issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability,
religion, and national origin play a role in interpersonal conflicts, or students' marginalization in the house or at
Smith
 Be knowledgeable about resources on and off campus (eg. sources of funding, counseling and health services,
student organizations, local organizations, staff and faculty allies/advocates) and disseminate the information to
the house community
ECO REPRESENTATIVES
Contact Person: SGA Sustainability Chair (http://www.smith.edu/sga/)
Emma Kerr, Campus Sustainability Coordinator x3571
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Elected in March by the house.
Attend a turnover meeting in April where the Sustainability Chair will be elected from body of both current and
past reps. (modeled after HPA)
Attend a mandatory training in the Fall.
Sit on House Council as an active voice of sustainability as it pertains to house community.
Organize and facilitate Sustainability Committee meetings within the houses. These meetings can run at each
Rep's discretion and will consist of interested house members from a variety for class years and backgrounds. The
goal of these meetings to creatively promote awareness and actions within the houses.
Attend a monthly Sustainability Council meeting, run and organized by a Sustainability Chair. (These meetings
can also occur more frequently at the Chair's discretion.) The goal of these meetings is to connect the houses in

campus-wide sustainability initiatives. These meetings are to be a place of support, but most importantly
productivity. It is imperative that the Council unifies the houses. This unification can occur competitively and/or
collaboratively, but should always be positive.
Sustainability Representatives are also encouraged, but not required to attend bi-monthly Green Team meetings.
FIRE AND SAFETY CAPTAIN
Contact person: Rich Korzeniowski, Health and Safety Coordinator x 2458
And
Campus Police x2490
Along with college staff, the House Fire and Safety Captain is responsible for assisting with the educational efforts and
enforcement of all fire regulations and safety concerns within their house. Fire and Safety Captains will attend a training
meeting with Rich Korzeniowski and Campus Police. The fire regulations are contained in the Smith Handbook. In a very
real sense, the Fire and Safety Captain is the house's representative on all matters that bear on fire safety and other safety
issues. Included among such duties are the following:
Campus Police Liaison responsibilities
 Attend designated Fire and Safety Captain meetings sponsored by Campus Police
 Help communicate information from Campus Police about house and campus safety
 Sponsor house programs involving Campus Police (i.e. a tea)
 Be the liaison for the house “adopt a Campus Police officer” program
Becoming familiar with all Fire Regulations
 Be prepared to ask any member of the house to comply with fire regulations, even if it means working with your
house staff to initiate disciplinary action for habitual violators.
 Be particularly concerned about these conditions:
 corridors blocked or obstructed
 candles being burned in the house
 charcoal or any type of gas grills used inside buildings
 decorations hung from sprinkler pipes
 storage of flammable liquids in the house
 improper disposal of cigarette butts
 excessive or improper use of extension cords
 use of illegal appliances such as halogen light fixtures, hot pots or quartz heaters etc. with open heating elements
Making certain that all components of the fire protection systems are in working order
 Check with residents to be sure that fire alarm bells or horns can be heard in all areas of the house (after fire
drills)
 Explain the difference between the 110v. smoke detectors in the rooms, and the system smoke or heat detectors in
the common areas
 All fire sprinkler equipment and sprinkler heads must be have unobstructed access at all times. Furniture or stored
items should be at least 18”under the sprinkler head plane
 Fire doors must be kept closed at all times, unless held open by a magnetic device. Remove door wedges, props,
etc. when noted
 All fire extinguishers should be in good working order. Notify physical plant if they need
repair/replacement/refilling
 Do all house residents know how to sound an alarm and to report a fire?
 Communicate escape routes and evacuation plan to all house residents
Decorations for Holidays and/or Mixers
 Make certain that house decorations for parties and other house events do not constitute a fire hazard.
Fire Drills - At least one drill per semester will be conducted on a random basis, without notice.
 There must be one successful drill per semester.
 The Fire Captain will be notified of the date when the fire drill will be conducted.

The nighttime fire drill will be conducted between the hours of 7-10 p.m. (If there is inclement weather, the fire
drills could be canceled without notice).
FIRE DRILL PROCEDURES
1. Everyone, guests included, should be out of the house in about two minutes for a successful drill to be completed
in a large house, less than two minutes in a small house.
2. Everyone must exit the house during a drill. Failure to evacuate during a fire drill is cause for disciplinary action.
(Evacuation during a fire drill is State Law.)
Procedure for Fire and Safety Captain to follow:
1. While the fire and safety captain is outside checking on house residents, the college staff personnel will shut off
the alarm after two to five minutes.
2. A drill is successful only if everyone is outside the house. If any of these procedures are not carried through, the
drill could be re done.
HEAD OF NEW STUDENTS
Advisor: Marge Litchford, Assistant Dean of Students
x4940
HONS are responsible for assisting with the transition of all new students to Smith College. Although numerous duties
fall within the college Orientation Program, the responsibilities of the role continue throughout the year with the
integration of new students to the house community. The term of service is one full academic year. Here is a general
outline of some of the most important HONS commitments:
Summer
 Send a well planned welcome letter to each new student
 Include in the welcome letter a discussion of house traditions and prepare to communicate those traditions to new
students at the beginning of the new school year.
 Make yourself available as a contact and resource to the entering students by giving them a means to contact you.
 Keep a few extra copies of the letter for housing changes.
 Budget carefully and save receipts
During Training
 Attend and participate in every training session
 Communicate with your HR/HC, HP, and HCA about your expectations of them and their expectations of you as
a HONS and a member of house council. Coordinate plans for meetings with the entering students
 Work closely with your co-HONS to plan and create house banners. Post and hang door tags and banners before
the new students arrive.
 Plan with co-HONS, RL staff and HP a structured first-night meeting/get together.
 Consider a small welcome gift or outing for the entering students.
During Fall Orientation
 Wear your HONS shirts!
 Carry lots of boxes. Welcome families to Smith.
 Try to get to know each new student individually in your house.
 Be on the lookout for homesickness, roommate tensions, other potential problems
 Be sensitive to the different needs of transfer and visiting students.
 Encourage attendance at Orientation events. Expect that you may have to help with a few events.
 Be a visible and friendly presence on campus for confused and/or lost parents and entering students.
 Be prepared to answer questions about phone mail and e-mail.
 Coordinate and run an informational and fun meeting for the new students -- work closely with your house Res.
Life staff
 Check in with Orientation leaders to better offer support to new students.
 With SAAs, present information to new students about final exams, honor code, pre-registration


Offer a tour of the house for new students (point out where House Council and Res. Life people live, soda
machine, laundry machine, reading area, recycling area, etc.).
Plan at least one group activity to familiarize students with Northampton (i.e. going to Herrell's).
First Semester
 Attend all monthly HONS meetings.
 Talk to your co-HONS about how to stay available to your new students after school starts
 When returning students arrive, be sensitive to the change in house atmosphere that comes with returning
students; make sure new students don't feel forgotten.
 Hold group activities for new students often!
 Hold an in-house roommate game! Prepare and build enthusiasm for area and all-campus games.
 Keep in touch with new students (i.e. visit rooms, sit with them at meals)--communicate with them!
 Be aware of what new students are going through at various points in the semester and what you can do to help
them (balancing a checkbook, anxiety about going home at holidays, concern over not fitting in or finding friends,
academic stress, financial concerns, being disappointed in overall Smith experience, etc.).
 Be a responsible member of House Council, and advocate for new student’s needs and house community.
During January Orientation
 Be available, if your schedule permits, to welcome entering new transfer, visiting and exchange students to the
house. If you can’t be at Smith for January Orientation, make extra efforts when you do return for second
semester.
 Familiarize new students to the house, its traditions and members.
 Be aware of returning students who are new house residents, and try to make them feel welcome.
Second Semester
 Keep going to HONS monthly meetings and maintain communication with the ho-HONS and steering committee.
 Maintain an active presence and good contact with house council and your house Res Life staff.
 Continue to hold events for the new students as a group, but also maintain your efforts to stay in close
communication with individual new students.
 Talk with students about their plans for the next year.
 Hold a meeting to explain the process of room draw and housing lottery. * With SAAs, consider presenting a
forum for discussion about questions about transferring, acceleration, declaring majors, JYA options.
 Talk about summer storage, shipping, and other end-of-the-year matters.
 Before the end-of-the-year house meeting, encourage new students to run for house leadership positions. Talk
about the responsibilities of being a HONS with students who are interested in running for the position.
QUALITIES: Important qualities for the student undertaking of this position include:
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creativity
flexibility
patience
reliability
time
high energy
commitment to living in a diverse community
sensitivity to others, especially in hearing the concerns voiced by new students
willingness to be available to those who need support
familiarity with the college, its policies and regulations, and willingness to uphold them
strong communication skills, including an ability to speak before groups of peers
APPOINMENT:
Houses elect two HONS during the spring semester for service throughout the following academic year. Houses
anticipated to have 25 or more new students are permitted to elect three HONS.
Houses that most likely will be permitted three HONS include:
Baldwin
Emerson
Talbot
Cushing
Morrow
Wilder
Capen
Chapin
Northrop
Lamont
Wilson
“Swing houses” that should elect an alternate third HONS include:
Comstock
Jordan
Scales
Gardiner
King
Cutter and Ziskind may each elect up to four HONS.
HISTORIAN
Contact Person: Nanci Young, College Archivist, ext. 2976
Goal: To preserve the history and memories of the women and events in each house.
1. Take photographs of house events and post for present viewing
2. Maintain house scrapbooks, including but not limited to: photos, flyers for events, memorabilia, paraphernalia
from events, information from bulletin boards.
3. Maintain a written record of events.
4. Encourage house participation in collecting for archives.
5. Document the culture and people of the house.
6. Maintain a house face board
7. Maintain house archives, including alumnae addresses.
8. Pass on books on to new historians.
9. Submit extra house T-shirt to archives.
10. Call Smith College Archives at x2976 with any questions or concerns.
Special Note: Archives Staff is always willing to join your house for tea to discuss your house’s history or other
interesting stories about Smith College.
HOUSE FELLOWS LIAISON
Contact Person: Becky Shaw, Associate Dean of Student and Director of Residence Life
X4940
The house fellows program was established to create stronger faculty and intellectual connections with the houses. In
order to do this effectively, the House Fellow Liaison becomes the link between the House Fellow and the House. The
House Fellow Liaison will:
1. Insure early contact with house fellows and maintain contact throughout the year.
2. Insure integration into the house by making introductions at house meetings; greeting house fellows at house
gatherings and dinners; and taking responsibility for making house fellows feel welcome.
3. Help cultivate involvement of house fellows with the house by organizing activities such as a house fellow/house
resident exchange of personal information and interests.
4. Negotiate the house fellows’ role in the house (i.e. attendance at house events, activities organized by the house
fellows) and help cultivate interest and involvement in the house and in activities organized by house fellows.
5. Negotiate the social/intellectual focus of the relationship.
6. Keep house fellows informed of house events and desires of residents for house fellow involvement.
7. Organize events/talks with house fellows.
8. Meet regularly with house fellows to check in and keep them in touch with house “moods” and trends.
9. Evaluate the relationship at the end of the year.
Rough guideline of contact between house fellow and house fellow liaison:
1. Meet with house fellow in spring to discuss plans for following academic year.
2. Maintain contact with house fellow weekly for the first few months of the academic year, continue contact of at
least 2–3 times per month after the first few months.
SECRETARY
Contact person: none needed
The Secretary holds the responsibility of informing the community what is happening with house council. This role in the
group is to make certain selections from what is said is recorded and to organized for use by the work groups and for
communication to the community. In addition, the secretary is responsible for the following:
1. Takes the roll call at house meetings.
2. Takes detailed minutes of meeting: reads previous week’s minutes; types and posts or otherwise makes minutes
available.
3. Compiles birthday list.
4. Compiles and post names, extensions, and room numbers for house residents. Post list by the door watch area.
5. Responsible for house records.
6. Keep bulletin boards up to date.
7. With HP, plans agenda for house meeting.
8. Prints and posts newsletters/Calendar of events.
Recording Minutes
Keeping track of such points as the following:
1. Points on which the group agreed, or on which formal action was taken.
2. Points on which there was difference of opinion amongst group members.
3. Points mentioned but not discussed, which the members may wish to consider later.
4. Report to the group what was discussed and concluded rather than merely what the discussion was about.
5. Ask the members to amend your reports if needed and invite suggestions on how you can make your reports more
useful to them.
6. You need not report every point made by every member’s contribution. In fact, it is probably best not to try to
attach names to what is said.
7. In each house council meeting you should be called upon to make a report of the activities from the previous
meeting - accuracy of your report is very important.
Keeping the House Community Informed
1. All one’s efforts toward keeping good, accurate minutes of what happens in house council meetings really won’t
mean much if one doesn’t go one step further to let the house know what is happening. One obvious way for this
to happen is to post a copy of the minutes for the meeting. Immediately following the meeting the secretary
should type up the minutes - highlighting the most important decisions, upcoming decisions to be made,
upcoming events, etc. They should then be electronically shared with the house community.
2. One may also want to consider having a newsletter, bi-weekly or monthly. This could be done in conjunction with
the residence life staff so as to allow staff to do some communication as well. This is a great way to publicize
events, give recent decisions, advertise for help and give residents a chance to communicate through a section
devoted to their announcements and postings (i.e. “ I am going hiking on Saturday and I have extra room in my
car.).
3. The Secretary has the responsibility of helping other house council members keep the community members
informed of what is happening. Attendance at house council meetings is crucial for on going communication
between house council and the members of the house. Taking attendance and setting a limit to the number of
meetings missed is one good way of holding community members accountable.
HOUSE SOCIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR
Contact Person: your Area Coordinator
Also, you may contact the Coordinator of House Events or Associate Director of Residence Life
House Social Event Coordinators are elected members of their house council or organization. Each house must have at
least 2 house event coordinators, of which only one maybe a first year. The responsibility of the House Social Event
Coordinator is to generate ideas for social life and to organize the details of social events. This position focuses purely on
events that must be registered through the house Social System. House Social Event Coordinators require the full support
of the officers of their house or organization for their work in the role of a House Social Event Coordinator. While the
House Social Event Coordinator is responsible for the actual organizational details of an event, the members of the house
or organization share responsibility for the planning and outcome of social activities. The house social coordinator does
not stand alone in putting together a social event.
General duties of House Social Event Coordinators:
1. Read, understand, and abide by all the information in The Guide for House Event Planning, and the Smith College
Handbook. Ensure that your plans are consistent with these policies and that you carry out your duties and
responsibilities as published in The Guide for House Event Planning. A House Social Event Coordinator is
expected to follow the standard of conduct in executing her responsibilities and duties in her daily life as outlined
in the Smith College Handbook.
2. The House Social Event Coordinator will understand and adhere to the Alcohol Policy at the College and report
infractions to the residence life staff. If a House Social Event Coordinator violates the Smith College Alcohol
Policy or any policy or procedure outlined in the Smith College Handbook, it may result in a suspension of the
House Social Event Coordinator or the house’s ability to register events. Further actions mandated by the Student
Conduct Board may include the required resignation of the position.
3. Attend all House Social Event Coordinator Meetings and communicate information to students in the house or
organization. Attendance at the House Social Event Coordinator meeting is mandatory. Failure to attend these
meetings will result in a loss of either a House Social Event Coordinator’s individual privileges or the party
privileges for your house. If you have extenuating circumstances, contact the Coordinator of House Events before
the meeting.
4. With your Treasurer and HP, create a budget for the semester’s events. House members should also vote on the
proposed budget prior to the first party of the semester. Each House has $10/per student (based on potential
occupancy) per semester for house events and social activities.
Duties of House Social Event Coordinators in planning house events:
1. Clear the date of an event with your HR, HCA, and HP well in advance, as they must all be present at the social
event.
2. Once the date has been agreed upon, the House Social Event Coordinators must complete a Social Event
Registration Form, which includes obtaining the HR, HCA, and HP signatures, hiring 2 ID Checkers, finding 2
trained bartenders to work for the entire event. Bartender and I.D. Checker shifts cannot be split. The shift is for
the duration of the full event.
3. Only those who have been trained by the Office of Student Affairs and are over 21 may work as bartenders.
4. After the form is complete, the house social coordinator must meet with their Area Coordinator to go over the
party, and obtain their approval/signature.
5. Following your meeting with your Area Coordinator, register the party with the CHE one full week prior to your
event. Remember to complete a contract for any outside performers (D.J.’s, etc) at
http://www.smith.edu/campuscenter/contracts.php. The registration form must include your ID Checkers and
Bartenders names. The CHE will make available a list of all trained I.D. checkers and bartenders.
6. House Social Event Coordinators must hold a house meeting after the party has been approved to inform the
house of party plans, go over party jobs and responsibilities and have people sign up for shifts. This meeting
helps the house to work as a team in hosting a well-run party.
7. Make clear individual students’ responsibilities during social events (duties for door watch, bartender, etc.).
Complete the Party-Job Sign-up sheet by Thursday before the event.
8. You must meet with your AC, HR, HCA, & HP before each party for a walk-thru meeting to review of your
house set-up, go over plans and to decide how to respond to problems during the party. House Social Event
Coordinators are also responsible for organizing the pre-party check-in with the student residence life staff, HP,
CSO officer, bar tenders and I.D. checkers.
9. Go through the house with the housekeeper to identify any damaged or broken furniture before the party. The
house or organization will be billed for any party-related damages or extra cleanup costs.
10. During the party, House Social Event Coordinators must remain sober and alert (do not consume alcohol or drugs
before or during the event).
11. House Social Event Coordinators must be visible and identifiable by the party staff t-shirt provided to them at the
beginning of the year.
12. House Social Event Coordinators oversee that people are working their shifts. House Social Event Coordinators
are responsible for making sure everyone follows proper procedures and work with house staff to manage
conflicts, sick students, or other safety and security concerns.
13. House Social Event Coordinators supervise other students working the front-door shift. Take turns at the frontdoor watch as guests start arriving. A one-hour shift starting a half-hour (½) hour before the party begins.
CSO REPRESENTATIVE
Community Service Office
Contact Person: Tiertza-Leah Schwartz, Director of Voluntary Services, Wright Hall x2758
House Reps have many duties to fulfill that are essential to the continued success of CSO The position is extremely
rewarding not only because House Reps become involved with other students interested in the community, but also
because they encourage other Smith students to participate in service work. We at CSO greatly value and appreciate the
House Reps’ efforts and dedication, which contribute directly to the success of many community agencies and CSO itself.
The impact of CSO on the Smith College campus depends heavily upon the enthusiasm and commitment of the house
representatives. Given this, the House Rep has a responsibility to be an active and informed source of knowledge about
not only events sponsored by CSO, but also about the philosophy and goals of the organization as a whole. The duties of a
House Rep include the following:
PARTICIPATE
 Attend a mandatory intensive training session
 Attend ½ hour meetings twice monthly (Thursdays at 7pm); except for specialized CSO Fund Drive training – 2
hours
 Involvement as a volunteer in a local community service agency or in an on campus volunteer position
PUBLICIZE
 Keep your housemates informed about CSO events by making announcements at meal-times and updating
bulletin boards, by distributing publicity for special events, and by making personal, face-to-face contact with
house members
 Participate in the CSO volunteer recruitment fair at which students can talk to agency representatives about
volunteer opportunities
RECRUIT
 Act as an in-house recruiter of volunteers for community service
ORGANIZE
 Plan in-house activities involving volunteerism
 Mobilize housemates for the Annual CSO Fund Drive and solicit funds for the drive
STUDENT ACADEMIC ADVISERS
Contact Person: Jane Stangl, Dean of the First Year Class, x4910
Student Academic Advisers are students who are interested in helping first-year students with their transition into college
academic life. They should be rising sophomores, juniors, or seniors in good academic standing. They should also be
enthusiastic about working with first-years and about assisting faculty LAA (Liberal Arts Advising) advisers during
orientation and registration. SAAs are expected to provide advice and guidance on academic matters, to assist with
registration procedures, to understand and support the guidelines of the class dean’s and registrar’s office, and to be aware
of the campus resources available to better counsel first-year students with academic concerns. SAA’s are also expected
to assist with central check-in procedures, and in the distribution of Aspects forms and books, as well as make or post
announcements about deadlines and policies. SAAs receive training by the dean of the first-year class and the SAA
steering committee, and need to return to campus a few days before the beginning of orientation. Each house should elect
one or two SAAs.
Responsibilities
 Attend before school training
 Aid first-year students in the registration process.
 Help LAA advisers during the orientation/advising period.
 Serve as a resource to all house members regarding academic issues, deadlines, policies, the Academic Honor
Code, etc.
 Act as a liaison between your house and the administration and library (including making announcements and
handling Catalogue updates).
 Serve as a link between your house and the SGA curriculum committee.
 Any and all-additional house responsibilities traditionally held by academic representatives (faculty teas, etc.).
 The term of office is the full academic year.
TREASURER
Contact Person: Donna Gingras, Office of Student Engagement Office Manager x2639
The treasurer’s primary responsibility and obligation is to oversee the recording of all house council activities involving
money and to let the community know of any budgetary concerns - including intake as well as expenditures. Each house
should have a working constitution, which very well may define the treasurer’s role as it specifically relates to the
operation of your house. Included here, however, is a very general list of role responsibilities for your consideration.
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Attend treasurer training in the fall and all training sessions provided by the College.
Collect dues from house members and deposit in your College House account in a timely manner.
Complete the house budget according to the Smith College Handbook.
Post budget in public area of your house.
Attend weekly House Council meetings.
Report all weekly transactions and outstanding bills and balance at all House Council meetings.
Keep account deposits and withdrawals.
Reconcile your records to the College’s monthly reports.
Pay all house bills.
Keep track of funds allocated for special projects or events.
Keep accurate records of all money taken in and all expenditures.
Distributes house funds in accordance with budget.
Coordinates house apparel in the fall semester.
Order newspapers and other publications.
Share account records with house president.
Pass on to the next treasurer an accurate, organized and complete accounting of your organization from your term
as treasurer.
VICE-PRESIDENT
The House Vice-President has the primary responsibility and obligation to oversee the operation of the house council
when the House President is unable to do so. The Vice-President assumes the duties of the President should a vacancy
occur in the position during the year or when the house constitution dictates.
Each house must have a working constitution that defines the vice-president’s role as it specifically relates to the
operation of the house. When posting this information for the spring elections, please include the job description from
your house’s constitution. Included here, however, are the general role responsibilities for the President. The following
are some very general expectations of House Vice-Presidents:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Attend weekly house council meetings and stay in contact with the other executive members of house council.
Help facilitate weekly house council meetings - encourage interaction and discussion among group members
Assist in developing an agenda for each meeting
Assign tasks and follow-up
Follow up with committee - chairpersons to be sure tasks are being carried out and to lend aid and support
Oversee programs and activities
Coordinates house trunk room clean-out
Represent the house to any other campus organizations as requested
9. Serve as spokesperson in representing house council to other members of the house and to the campus community
when the House President is unable to do so. This includes representing your house at HPA when an alternate
delegate is needed.
General House Management
CONFLICTS AND POLICY VIOLATIONS
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The college's general expectations for everyone in residence are defined in the Smith College Handbook which
can be found at http://www.smith.edu/sao/handbook/index.php. The basic challenge for residents is how to
balance the greatest possible freedom for each individual with a sensitivity to and respect for the rights of others.
Familiarize yourself with the Smith College Handbook, especially the sections on social life, residential life, and
the SGA constitution.
Beyond the basic college expectations, it is left to each house to define additional expectations in accordance with
the house constitution.
The House President’s Association and the SGA Constitution specifies that house council is responsible for
enforcing the house's conventions and the regulations. The Head Resident and House Community Advisor will
support and advise members of the House Council on matters of internal governance.
All students are encouraged to assume responsibility and learn how to do things for themselves, rather than have
things done for them.
In situations where an individual or group repeatedly disrespects the rights of others or fails to abide by the college's
expectations or the regulations established by the house, the following channels can be used:
Trying to work things through:
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The student who feels their rights or the house or college regulations are being violated is encouraged to directly,
clearly, and respectfully, make the other individual aware of the specific behavior and its effect. They should do
so in a constructive and reasonable way (willing to compromise if appropriate). Sometimes people are uneasy
about how to approach a person/situation. A Head Resident, House Community Advisor, or House President can
help them explore ways to do so and explain the next steps, if necessary. The Head Resident, House Community
Advisor and House President or other members of House Council may be the one(s) to remind individuals about
violations of house rules.
If the situation cannot be resolved between the individuals involved, your Head Resident or House Community
Advisor can serve as an arbitrator (addressing policy violations) or as a mediator to assist individuals with
resolving conflicts.
If the situation cannot be resolved in-house, the next person to consult is your Area Coordinator.
If the Area Coordinator cannot resolve the situation, the Associate Director or Director of Residence Life should
be contacted. They may speak with those involved, offer to mediate, encourage the person to use the college
judicial system, or refer the person to Student Conduct Board, among other possibilities.
NOTE: Sometimes people "jump steps", perhaps because the situation is perceived as a very serious one or
perhaps because the student is uninformed about where to go first or uncomfortable with the early steps. Where
at all possible, people should be encouraged to work through the channels as outlined above.
DAMAGES TO COLLEGE RESIDENCES, BUILDING SERVICE
(Revised by Building Services, July 2010)
This guide serves to inform students of residential policies. Students are held accountable for damage to college property
that the college discovers has occurred outside of its definition of “normal wear and tear.” This booklet outlines the
potential costs that may be assessed as a result of certain kinds of damage. Damage that is malicious or puts others at risk
for injury may also subject the responsible party to disciplinary action by the College.
By location:
Corridors, stairwells
Common rooms
Student rooms
Kitchenettes
Recycling area
Trunk room/storage areas
Laundry rooms
Damages during social events
Damage is considered to be anything that occurs to college property that requires repair, replacement or additional
cleaning as a consequence of students’ actions. Missing equipment or furniture is treated as damage as well as violations
to fire and safety regulations.
It is the responsibility of each student to submit work orders to report minor repair needs both for her own room or that
found in the common areas. Most of these repairs are due to normal wear and tear. When an individual has caused
significant damage to college property, she or her guest is expected to acknowledge responsibility. In the event that no
one comes forward, the house will incur the cost of repair and each resident shares the cost.
A damage incident report will be prepared by college personnel and submitted to the Office of Student Affairs and other
departments involved in the assessment process. There will be a two week investigation period to determine the
responsible parties. A copy of a completed damage incident report will be forwarded to the Office of Student Financial
Services. The student house account will be charged on the next billing cycle.
All charges are subject to change according to each incident and may be mitigated by the information provided by the
room inspection form.
Corridors and Stairwells
In accordance with city and state fire and safety regulations, house corridors and all egress areas must be kept clear.
Personal items include but are not limited to: boxes, dishes, shoes, doormats, recycling containers, clothes, racks, etc.
Items left in these areas will be discarded. The College assumes no responsibility to replace or compensate for the loss of
personal items abandoned in corridors or stairwells.
Bicycles must not be left on first floors, chained to handrails, furniture or accessibility ramps. They must be stored in bike
racks or in designated areas of basements. If they are discovered chained to egress areas, Campus Police is contacted in
order to mechanically cut the lock and remove the bicycle.
Fire doors may not be propped open in corridors.
Violations of fire and safety building codes are subject to disciplinary action due to the hazards they pose for injury and
the potential loss of life.
Fine of $10.00 per article left in egress area
$50.00 per bicycle
$25.00 propped fire door
Common Rooms
First floor common rooms have been inventoried at the beginning of each semester. These inventories will be used to
determine missing items and charges, if necessary. Students must not remove any item of furniture from common areas or
basement areas. Missing furniture and public room items will be charged at the following rates:
Sofas, chairs, tables will be charged according to replacement value. Costs could vary from $200.00 and upward
depending on item(s) value.
Lamps (table)
$300.00
Lamps (floor)
$400.00
Lampshades
$30.00
Furniture repairs will be charged a $100.00 minimum for removal, minor repair, and return of item.
Antique rugs, furniture, and paintings may require an outside appraisal to assess loss.
Draperies:
If drapes/curtains are removed from student rooms or public areas, a cleaning fee will be charged.
Cost per window (plus installation)
$75.00
If drapes are lost or damaged (minimum replacement values per window) $400.00
Miscellaneous Equipment
Student Vacuum:
Repairs on machine up to $50.00 – then machine will be replaced
Replacement cost:
$150.00
House Vacuum:
Repairs on machine up to $150.00 – then machine will be replaced
Replacement cost:
$400.00
Other items – Mops, buckets, shovels, brooms, etc. will be charged cost of replacement of item.
Student Rooms
Building Services has a Bed/Furniture Removal Form that must be completed before furniture can be removed from a
student’s room. Students should contact their housekeeper about having their bed removed. There is a charge of $75 to
remove a bed prior to September 1st and after September 1st the fee becomes $100.
For students returning to campus for the Spring Semester, a fee of $50.00 will be charged to students requesting bed
removals for the Spring Semester. (Sample form attached to this booklet).
When furniture is damaged or missing, the following fees will be charged to the student’s account.
Student Room Furniture:
Desk
$400.00
Pedestal (filing cabinet)
$300.00
Bookcase
$275.00
Mirror (cost does not include installation charge)
$75.00
Desk Chair
$175.00
Mattress
$200.00
Frame
$175.00
Recycling Bin
$15.00
Waste Basket
$15.00
Evidence of pets
$400.00
(including disciplinary action)
In the event the replacement cost increase the student will be responsible for the current cost.
Kitchenette Policy
Kitchenettes are located in most houses on campus. It is the responsibility of the students to keep this area neat and clean.
All kitchens must be thoroughly cleaned at the end of each semester. Two weeks before closing of the semesters,
Housekeeping staff will check these areas to see if additional cleaning is necessary. If it is determined that Housekeeping
staff has to clean these areas, a charge of $50.00 will be billed to the house account. Cleaning of the kitchen includes:
emptying and cleaning refrigerator and freezer, wiping down stove and cleaning microwave interior. If kitchenettes are
not maintained in a sanitary or safe manner, the College may need to close them. Fires due to inattention to items left on
range tops or infestation of insects/rodents due to lack of routine care will close the kitchenette for the remainder of the
semester.
Replacement cost for microwave oven
$150.00
College china must be returned to kitchens. Inventories of Dining Services china will occur throughout the year and
houses could be charge for missing items.
Campus Recycling Program
Smith College supports city and state recycling efforts. Located on 1st floors, laundry rooms, or basements are areas
designated for recycling. There you will find blue toters clearly marked “Bottles/Cans” or “Papers” and cardboard. These
toters are scheduled to be picked up twice weekly. Questions can be directed to the Facilities Management at x2400. It is
our hope that students will adhere to these guidelines and support the recycling program.
Trunk Rooms/Storage Areas
Smith College is not responsible for items stored in these locations. This includes items lost, stolen, or damaged. The
College warns students that these areas are not secure and are most likely to suffer water damage from floods or broken
pipes. All items should be labeled. Each student is permitted 5 stickers. Stickers will be distributed by the house staff
when items are brought to the trunk room to be stored. It is the responsibility of the house to do a yearly clean-up of these
areas. All items must be stored inside these designated areas. They cannot be left outside trunk rooms or other storage
areas. Any item left outside these areas is subject to disposal. For more information visit:
http://www.smith.edu/reslife/break_storage.php
Laundry Rooms
At the end of the academic year, any clothes or supplies left in the laundry rooms are discarded.
Social Event General Information
House communities that register house events or need additional equipment must use the 25 LIVE reservation
system to submit requests. Only house members can use common spaces in houses but in order to request
additional equipment the house must reserve the space and enter their equipment needs into the reservation
request. To access the 25 LIVE system go to: https://25live.collegenet.com/smith/#home_calendar[0]. If you
have questions about this process contact the Associate Director of Residence Life.
Social Event Clean-Up Information
Students are expected to clean up after an event. House social coordinators should meet with the Housekeeper to do a
walk-through of the house before the event to check the “pre-event” condition of the house. You should note any
concerns on the “Party Inventory Form”, i.e. broken furniture, soiled spots on carpets or upholstered furniture. At this
meeting, also please discuss with your Housekeeper items needed for the clean up and where they should be located.
Social event clean up should be completed by 2:00 p.m. the following day for a weekend event. An agreed upon time for
clean up must be made with the Dining Services Manager if the party takes place in a dining room scheduled to open for
meals during the weekend.
If the event occurs during the week, clean up should take place immediately following the event.
If carpets and/or upholstered furniture have been soiled, the following fees will be assessed:
For shampooing carpets and/or furniture, a minimum of $100.00 fee will be assessed – if additional time is needed, it is
charged at $40.00 per additional hour.
If additional cleaning needs to take place, the house will be charged a minimum of 3 hours at $25.00 per hour.
Bio-Hazard Clean-up Policy and Fees
A bio-hazard incident is defined in this instance as any bodily fluid, spill, or contamination, i.e. vomit, urine, etc. (This
does not include blood incident, see below). If a bio-hazard incident occurs, notify the HR, as they have a bio-hazard kit
located in their suite. If the individual responsible for the spill cleans it up the cost incurred would be for a replacement
bio-hazard kit and any additional clean up that must be handled by our Building Services staff. The cost of a replacement
kit is $20.00.
If the incident is party-related and no one takes responsibility for the clean up, the following applies:
1. Notify Campus Police of incident
2. Block off area to be cleaned
3. Staff will be called in to complete clean up as soon as possible. The charge to house will be $125.00. If carpets
or furniture need to be cleaned, additional fees will be added to the bill.
In the event that there is a blood spill, notify Campus Police immediately at x2490. Any incident of this nature
must be documented and clean up professionally handled.
DAMAGES TO COLLEGE RESIDENCES, FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
Facilities Management charges:
Item:
Broken window
Torn window screen, replacement
Damaged window shade
Towing for snow removal
Lawn damage (if a vehicle has been driven across,
for example)
Curtain rod and bracket replacement/repair
Wall mirror
Social Event clean-up - minimum 3 hour charge
Cost to repair*:
$50 each for small single-glazed pane
$100 each for double glazed units
$150 per square foot for leaded or stained glass
$50 each for residence rooms
$125 each for large dining and living rooms
(typically Quad houses)
$40 each
Rate set by contracted towing company
$50 per foot of damage
$20 each
$50 each
Electrician:
Plumber:
Carpenter:
Painters:
Custodians:
$72 per hour
$70 per hour
$75.50 per hour
$65 per hour
$36 per hour
*Costs listed are for standard damages. Many damages are different, and thus, additional costs may be incurred due to
unique conditions or situations.
HAZING
Hazing includes any activity in which students feel social pressure to participate, whether this pressure is stated or
implied. Examples of hazing include initiation rituals, forced participation in programs because of class year or entrance
status, and pranks among other things. Common examples at Smith are scavenger hunts, senior breakfasts, and middle of
the night trips to diners.
The Law for Massachusetts
G.L. Chapter 269, Sec. 17-19
An Act Increasing the Penalties for Hazing, Amended December 1987
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same,
as follows: Chapter 269 of the General Laws is hereby amended by striking out sections 17 to 19, inclusive, and inserting
in place the following three sections:
Sections 17: Whoever is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of hazing, as defined herein, shall be punished
by a fine of not more than $3,000 or by imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than one year, or both such
fine and imprisonment.
The term “hazing,” as used in this section and in sections 18 and 19, shall mean any conduct or method of initiation into
any student organization, whether public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or
mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics,
exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance or any other brutal
treatment or forced physical activity that is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such student or
other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of
sleep or rest and extended isolation.
Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section to the contrary, consent shall not be available as a defense to any
prosecution under this action.
Section 18: Whoever knows that another person is the victim of hazing as defined in section 17 and is at the scene of
such crime shall, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, report such crime to
an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonable practicable. Whoever fails to report such crime shall be
punished by a fine of not more than $1,000.
Section 19: Each institution of secondary education and each public and private institution of post secondary education
shall issue to every student group, student team or student organization which is part of such institution or is recognized
by the institution or permitted by the institution to use its name or facilities or is known by the institution to exist as an
unaffiliated student group, student team or student organization, a copy of this section and sections 17 and 18; provided,
however, that an institution’s compliance with this section’s requirements that an institution issue copies of this section
and sections 17 and 18 to unaffiliated student groups, teams or organizations shall not constitute evidence of the
institution’s recognition or evidence of any unaffiliated student groups, teams or organizations.
Each such group, team or organization shall distribute a copy of this section and sections 17 and 18 to each of its
members, plebes, pledges or applicants for membership. It shall be the duty of each such group, team or organization,
acting through its designated officer, to deliver annually to the institution as attested acknowledgment stating that such
group, team or organization has received a copy of this section and said sections 17 and 18, that each of its members,
plebes, pledges or applicants has received a copy of sections 17 and 18, and that such group, team or organization
understands and agrees to comply with the provisions of this section and sections 17 and 18.
Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of post-secondary education shall, at least
annually, before or at the start of enrollment, deliver to each person who enrolls as a full-time student in such institution a
copy of this section and sections 17 and 18.
Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of post secondary education shall file, at
least annually, a report with the regents of higher education and in the case of secondary institutions, the board of
education, certifying that such institution has complied with its responsibility to inform student groups, teams or
organizations and to notify each full-time student enrolled by it of the provisions of this section and sections 17 and 18
and also certifying that said institution has adopted a disciplinary policy with regard to the organizers and participants of
hazing, and that such policy has been set forth with appropriate emphasis in the student handbook or similar means of
communicating the institution’s policies to its students. The board of regents and, in the case of secondary institutions,
the board of education shall promulgate regulations governing the content and frequency of such reports, and shall
forthwith report to the attorney general any such institution, which fails to make such report.
GOAL SETTING WITH HOUSE COUNCIL
It is critical for all members to have clearly defined goals and objectives, (means by which you achieve goals). The entire
group membership should be actively involved in establishing these goals. This helps to build a feeling of “group”
identity. In addition, specific means of actions should be developed to insure that the goals are implemented. The
following is a list of guidelines to follow in assuring that the house council is working with clearly defined goals.
1.
Have group members individually brainstorm their goals for the year on paper.
2.
Form small groups to allow members to share their goals. Have each person read her goal statements and encourage open
discussion about the statements.
3.
Following small group sharing, open the discussion to the entire group. Ask individuals to propose specific goals for the
group. Record all goals.
4.
After the entire group list has been developed, open the discussion and attempt to lead the group towards consensus on
goals they feel are most important to the house council.
5.
Begin work on means or action for implementation. Goals should be general in nature and the means should be the
specific actions that will be taken in order to reach the goals.
6.
After specific goals and means have been developed, assist the group in specific plans for implementing the means.
7.
Goals and means should be printed and distributed to all members of the house council.
8. Goals and means should be regularly reviewed by the group as part of the evaluation process. Modification should be
made when necessary.
GROUND RULES FOR EFFECTIVE GROUPS
It is helpful to group development if the House President facilitates a discussion on “ground rules and expectations for the
group” as you start each year or semester.
As the group facilitator
 Ask the group for their expectations of you as their leader
 Share you expectations of the group
 Test assumptions and inferences.
 Make statements, invite questions and comments.
 Jointly design ways of testing disagreements and solutions.
Some Examples of group expectations of each other could be:
 Share all relevant information, and Exchange relevant information with non-group members.
 Be specific. Use examples when possible. Avoid generalized statements.
 Explain the reasons behind statements, questions, and actions.
 Disagree openly and respectfully with group members.
 Keep discussions focused.
 Eliminate cheap shots (zapping) and other distractions.
 Expect all group members to participate in all phases of the process.
 Make decisions by consensus.
 Conduct self-critiques at the ends of meeting regarding the effectiveness of the meetings to improve upon in
future meetings.
 Maintain confidentiality within the team.
 Don’t gossip with other members of the team.
 Go directly to the person you have an issue with.
 Clarify tasks, priorities and pitch-in during a pinch.
 Put the past behind and look at things with fresh eyes.
 Learn from past experiences that were both positive and negative.
 Be sensitive to others’ time limits; communicate clearly you limits.
 Begin and end meetings on time.
 Set agenda and stick to it.
 If you need help ask for it.
 Respect each other’s strengths, limitations and personal style.
 Confront issues/concerns early.
 Hear both side of an issue/situations.
 Praise people for their work and efforts.
 Be considerate and kind.
 Have fun and a sense of humor.
CONDUCTING SUCCESSFUL HOUSE COUNCIL MEETINGS
The manner in which a house council conducts its meetings can often determine the success of the organization. Few
people relish having to sit through long and drawn out meetings where little is accomplished. A good leader should strive
to facilities maximum participation in order to keep members interested in the organization. The following are some tried
and proven factors which lead to successful meetings.
Planning the Agenda
 Planning an effective agenda is the best way to insure that meetings are expedient, yet thorough. It is a good
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idea for each member to have a copy of the agenda to refer to during the meeting.
The agenda is normally developed by the officers and other members of the executive council and should be
done at least one day before the meeting in order to allow time to obtain any materials, information or
resources needed.
In planning an agenda for a meeting, consider what has to be accomplished and also what should be done in
light of the group’s goals.
The most commonly used format for an agenda is as follows (use what works for your group).
Agenda/Order of Business
1. Call meeting to order
2. Roll call
3. Minutes
4. Reports: President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, Senator.
5. Standing committee reports
6. Special committee reports
7. Old business
8. New business
9. Adjournment
Pre-Meeting Planning
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The work of most house councils is actually accomplished between meetings not in them. Meetings are
generally for planning, reporting and decision-making. Encourage anyone scheduled to be involved in the
meeting to plan her presentation.
Check again on the agenda for the meeting and with those members or guests who are scheduled to give
reports to insure their attendance.
Follow-Up
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After the meeting, discuss with the officers and your house staff members any problems encountered during
the meeting. If necessary try to resolve specific issues and or problems quickly.
Try to hold a member accountable for following through on any assignments made at the meeting in a
supportive manner. Offer them your assistance in initiating the task or hurdling any stumbling blocks they
may encounter.
Be sure to express your appreciation for the participation of any invited guests at your meeting.
List possible agenda for the next scheduled meeting
COMMUNITY REPORTS
As a resident, you may be asked to write a witness statement for community reports or attend a judicial hearing as a
witness.
GUIDELINES FOR WRITING REPORTS:
1. Be certain to include every useful detail: full names with class years (not nicknames), dates, times, specific locations,
etc.
2. Include names of any witnesses, staff members present, contact made with Campus Police or other members of the
college community.
3. Give a full and objective account of all observations in sequence of the events.
4. The incident should be recounted in first-person (Example: “I observed…” or “Campus Police informed that…”) and
should be free from personal opinions and feelings.
5. Information which is factual or observed should be stated clearly. Information which is circumstantial, hearsay,
rumor, or second-hand may be included in certain situations, but should be presented as such. In some instances, staff
members may be aware of background information that may be useful to the hearing office or board in the
disciplinary counseling process. When potentially helpful to the disciplinary counseling process, such information
may be attached.
6. Community reports generally are reviewed by many individuals (Student Conduct Board, Area Coordinators, Dean of
the Students, etc.) and should be written legibly and in a professional manner.
7. Reports should be as specific as possible.
8. When appropriate, Community Reports should indicate the manner in which the student(s) responded to the each
other and/or staff members. (Example: “Alice Jones was very cooperative, but her roommate, Mary Johnson, was
difficult and verbally abusive.”)
9. Community report link: http://www.smith.edu/sao/communityreport.html
HOUSE TV’S AND OTHER ELECTRONICS
Purchasing
Beginning in the Summer of 2011 Smith College Campus Pool began purchasing a standard size flat screen TV for all
houses (excluding apartments). By the Fall of 2015 all houses will have a College purchased TVs which will be securely
mounted in each house. If the TV is damaged due to misuse or neglect the house is responsible for replacement of the TV.
Questions or concerns about the standard house TV should be directed to the associate director of residence life.
House communities that do not yet have a college standard house TV are responsible for purchasing and maintaining their
own TVs. If their current TV is not functioning properly house leaders should contact the associate director of residence
life about potentially expediting the installment of a new college standard house TV.
Cable TV
If you house living room TV is not accessing cable TV, try to problem solve the issue. Try disconnecting and then reconnecting the coax cable. See if a resident has a TV they can connect to the cable to see if it is a problem with the house
TV. Once you have identified that it is a problem with the cable and not the TV, contact ITS.
SPRING OFFICER EXCHANGE
What is it?
Officer exchange gives outgoing and incoming officers the chance to meet and exchange information (manuals, logs,
treasury books, etc. . . .) and celebrate their transition.
What is my responsibility?
Out-going officer:
You must bring with you all the materials that you used to fulfill your position (manuals, logs, or anything else the
house uses to keep information.) You should also be prepared to share information about specific issues that were a
continual problem or concern for you during the time you were in office. Be sure to include:
 A hard copy and disc copy of your constitution.
 A copy of the house council roster
 A copy of the current house budget to use for developing the next year’s budget.
In-coming officer:
You must be ready to receive all the written materials that the office requires, such as manuals, logs, and house
budget. You will also receive practical advice and experiences form the outgoing officer. Write down any questions,
concerns, or comments about the position and bring them with you to ask the out-going officer. It is recommended
that you bring a notebook and pen to take down any pertinent information.
What is the purpose of Officer Exchange?
This is an opportunity for incoming and outgoing officers to meet and exchange information. It is a good time to reassess
the progress or regress of the impact of your office in the house. It is also a time to set new goals as leaders on campus
(individually and as an organized group).
The Office of Student Affairs is interested in knowing what training and support we can offer. It is important that every
officer be willing to give input on their needs. Information obtained during officer exchange will help develop support
training in the fall.
What is the time commitment?
2 hour commitment
The purpose of this meeting is to recognize both the current and in-coming house presidents. Much of the time will be
setting the tone for the year to come. The agenda varies year to year but is generally a fun and interesting evening.
When will this happen?
Spring Semester. House Presidents must be elected before Room Draw.
TRUNK ROOM CLEANOUTS
It is not uncommon for your house’s trunk room to become disorganized and crowded with labeled and unlabeled, recent
and older items. Therefore, trunk room clean outs should happen fairly regularly (once a year). As House President, you
are in charge of organizing clean out with the help of your house council.
At the beginning of the academic year building services, grounds and House Presidents will work together to develop a
trunk room clean out schedule. Grounds and Building Services will be working with an outside contractor to remove
recyclable items from your houses. Each house will be given about a 9 day span to clean out the trunk room. At the end of
the 9 days the contracted company will remove the recyclable items. All non-recyclable items should be placed in the
trash by house members cleaning out the trunk rooms. More information will come about this process in the Fall
Semester.
The college assumes no liability for loss of or damage to personal possession of students and/or their guests on college
property, including loss by fire, water, theft or any other cause. Students should insure their personal property either
through their parent’s homeowners or renter’s policy or a student’s personal property policy.
Items that are not stored in accordance with trunk room policies (which can be found at:
http://www.smith.edu/sao/reslife/trunkroom.php) will be disposed of.
We strongly encourage students to contract with local, commercial storage companies to store and insure their belongings.
Budgets and Funding
***There are two (2) House Accounts: House Dues Accounts and Social Dues Accounts. They are separate accounts with
different organization numbers. ***
There are also other sources of funding, which are outlined in this manual as well as in the Guide to House Event Planning.
HOUSE SOCIAL DUES
This account is for funding that comes directly from the College. Houses will receive $10 per resident at the beginning of each
semester. The money in this account rolls over between fall and spring semesters but does NOT roll over between academic years. As
of June 30th, any funds left in the house social dues account will be removed. With that said, if there is a negative balance in the house
social dues account that will carry over and the house is responsible for resolving the negative balance. Money in the House Social
Dues accounts are to be used for all house events such as: house parties, house programs, house field trips etc. It cannot be used for
class specific events, purchasing of equipment etc.
HOUSE DUES
This account is used to deposit the money collected from house members. House dues amounts vary from house to house. Typically it
is the house treasurer’s responsibility to collect house dues from house members. House dues are NOT mandatory for residents to pay.
The treasurer cannot publicize publically who has or has not paid their house dues. Houses have much greater autonomy in how they
can spend the funds in this account.
Residence Life staff members (Head Residents, House Coordinators, House Community Advisors) are not considered voting members
of a house and therefore are not expected to contribute house funds. (The only possible exception to this rule is for houses whose staffs
are selected from within the house and have a vote (150 Elm, Tenney House, and Hopkins House.)
All house dues collected must be deposited into treasure support services within two weeks. All checks should be made out to Smith
College – with the house name. In addition, stamp all checks with deposit stamp of house account.
House balances will be rolled-over after each fiscal year, July 1st-June 30th.
Newspaper/Subscription Funds. The college has an endowed fund that will contribute per resident per year for the purchase of
educational newspapers, magazines, books and periodicals that will enhance the house library.
Newspaper funds may not be used to purchase other items outside of the use it was established.
House accounts will rollover year-to-year, except Newspaper/Subscription Funds. They do not carry over.
All Treasurers and HPs will be held accountable for up-to-date and accurate record keeping.
House Treasurers’ must be transitioned from one treasurer to the next. The current House President should assist to confirm this
transition happens smoothly.
All transactions should be completed before final exams, please plan accordingly. Receipts and left over money from cash advances
or requests for reimbursement must be completed by reading period in May. Any exceptions must be approved by the Controller’s
Office.
TREASURER SUPPORT SERVICES
Treasure Support Services used to be known as the Student Bank. In the fall of 2012 the name was changed to better reflect the
functions of the office. Treasurer Support Services is located in the Office of Student Engagement located in Campus Center.
Treasurers and presidents should utilize the services as often as they need to. Here are some of the services found at Treasure Support
Services:
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Inquiries about house social dues and house accounts
Depositing house dues moneys
Submitting reimbursement forms and AP vouchers
General questions about any student organization or house transaction
The Associate Director of Residence Life can also be a resource in regard to house social dues accounts and house accounts.
NEWSPAPER SUBSCRIPTIONS & FUNDING
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The funds can be used for newspapers and for educational magazines such as Time Magazine, Newsweek, Business
Week or a Cultural magazine such as Latina, A, Essence or Black Enterprise
The subsidy is about $20 per person. House occupancy is based on the numbers provided by Residence Life regarding
the standard number of beds in the house.
Each house’s share of the funds will be credited to their house account in the student bank. At the end of the year, any
funds not used for newspapers or educational periodical material will be returned to the endowment. (It does not roll
over for the house to use on something else.)
Information about ordering newspapers and magazines will be distributed in the fall. For questions contact the program
coordinator in Clark Hall at x4940
CHECK REQUESTS
In general take about 2 weeks to process from the time the request is submitted to the Treasurer Support Services in the Office of
Student Engagement.
Please note that during the Thanksgiving and Winter Breaks, there may be a change in check availability. Please call ahead and plan
accordingly.
Payment requests for vendors with contracts must have a copy of the Smith College Contract attached to the request.
Smith College Policy states that we DO NOT reimburse anyone for alcohol expenses, parking violations, or speeding tickets.
CHECK REQUEST VOUCHER INSTRUCTIONS
Payee’s complete name, address and taxpayer identification number MUST be provided. Reason for request, account coding and
authorized signature are also required. Please write legibly.
The original invoice must be attached. If an attachment is to be mailed with the check, please include it with the request. IF the
attachment is also justification for the check request, paper clip a copy to this request. A separate voucher must be submitted for each
request.
This paperwork must be submitted to the Treasurer Support Services in the Office of Student Engagement.
SOCIAL SYSTEM AND CAMPUS POOL FUNDS
Each undergraduate Smith Student is a member of the social system and is welcome to participate in all social events taking place on
campus and in residential houses. Campus social dues are now part of the SAF (Student Activities Fee). This year the dues are
$12.00 per person per semester. Of this, $10.00 will be placed in the social budget of the house. (Off-campus traditional students will
receive the money in the Hampshire House budget, and Ada Comstock Scholars will receive the money in the Ada class social
budget.) The ending balance of the house's social dues for the fall semester rolls over into social dues funds available to the house for
the spring semester. Any funding remaining at the end of the year in the house social budget will roll into the campus pool funds for
the next year.
The remaining $2.00 per semester is placed in a “campus pool”. This money is to be used for the operating needs of the system, such
as booklets, bracelets, student leader training and by houses planning additional events that might exceed the allotted house social
budget.
Houses may request money from the “campus pool” fund by completing the form found here:
https://smith.collegiatelink.net/organization/reslife/availableforms . A student committee, consisting of student representatives from
each of the 6 areas on campus, reviews these requests. The Assistant Director of Residence Life oversees the social system and
advises this committee. This committee meets bi-monthly, meeting times will be announced at the first House Social Event
Coordinator meeting of each semester. Please, allow a substantial lead time for requests for funds to allow the committee time to
meet, contact you with their decision and to transfer funds. The CHE will be responsible for transferring any funds for proposals
approved by the committee.
COLLEGE INITIATIVE FOR DIVERSITY AWARENESS FUNDS (CIDA)

The Office of Institutional Diversity manages the CIDA Funds. These funds are available to House Community Advisors as
well as students and student organizations for diversity programming.
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Requests should be submitted to the Office of Institutional Diversity at least six class days before the event. (Please note:
Checks are issued on Fridays; so, the request must be brought to the Controller’s Office by the Friday, a week before
needed.)
For each funds request, you must provide corresponding receipts.
Events should be appropriately advertised.
All on-site services performed on campus such as dance lessons, speakers, workshops, etc., must be handled in the form of a
paycheck request. These services will not be covered in the form of a reimbursement or advance to a student, house or
organization. You and the person rendering the service must complete a Smith College Contract Request. The check is to be
made payable directly to the service provider(s).
Workshops led by a student who requires payment must be paid out of the diversity funds, through student payroll. If the
student is not already on work-study, they must fill out the necessary tax forms and a student payroll voucher.
Students may receive reimbursement for tickets by offering limited spaces, only partial reimbursement, or getting a group
discount. Tickets for events sponsored by unity organizations can be reimbursed by diversity funds.
Requests for money will be made in the form of a check from the Accounts Payable Department. Students must bring all
receipts and unused funds back to the Controller’s Office immediately following the events. You are responsible for the
submission of receipts and/or unused money.
For more information visit: http://www.smith.edu/diversity/docs/CIDA.pdf
Conferences (BSA, ASA); Cultural Dance lessons; Cultural Dinners; Guest speakers; Museums; Exhibits; Trips to other states;
Canada trips; Supplies for quilts, posters, videos etc.
FINE ARTS COUNCIL FUNDS
1.
An application can be picked up in the Organizational Development Office in the Campus Center 203.
2.
Applications must be submitted to the Assistant Director of the Office of Student Engagement 10 days before the deadline.
3.
All decisions are final.
4.
You may NOT charge admission to participate in the activity if any amount of money is granted through Fine Arts Council.
5.
Fine Arts Council must be recognized when advertising for an activity for which it has contributed money.
Examples of past programs that received funding:
Museum trips; Art exhibits; Dance concerts; Theatre performances; Musical concerts, etc.
SAWYER FUND
1.
Any Individual or organization in the Smith Community may apply.
2.
The event must be at Smith.
3.
The event should be open and available to all Smith students.
4.
Applications are available in the SGA Office and also on-line at http://www.smith.edu/sga/funding.php
STUDENT LECTURE FUNDS
1.
Any SGA chartered organization can apply.
2.
The fund will provide up to 50% of speaker fees, transportation, and accommodations.
3.
The event must be held on the Smith campus.
4.
Occasionally this fund may be used at events where admission is charged or funds solicited. In these rare cases, permission
must be specifically granted by the SGA Cabinet.
5.
Signed contracts with invited speakers should be filed in the Campus Center Administrative Office.
6.
In order to receive payment from the SLF, contracts must be submitted to the Treasurer Support Services however, it is
highly encouraged to submit proposals before contracts are solidified so that you receive the appropriate level of funding.
7.
Once your request has been approved, a member of the Office of Student Engagement Staff can advise you on the managing
of the logistics of your event, from locating the space to planning refreshments.
8. For more information visit: http://www.smith.edu/sga/funding.php
Q. My house would like to sponsor a lecture, but don’t know of any speakers!
A. The Assistant Director of the Office of Student Engagement has extensive information on various lecturers. Drop by during the
office and they will be happy to help you find an appropriate speaker.
Campus Pool Guidelines
 To ensure the most accurate decision can be made, please include any COPIES of
receipts or price verification along with your request. All retroactive requests should
include copies of receipts and exact numbers of participants
 An attendance list and the actual cost of each ticket is required for all field trips and
events requiring ticket purchase.
 For all field trips: a maximum of ½ of the total cost will be covered by campus pool
(costs not to exceed $20.00 per person).
 All requests for gas costs must include accurate mileage documentation (e.g., directions
from mapquest or google maps.) or a gas station receipt.
 Campus pool (typically) will NOT fund house equipment and supplies (e.g., electronics,
kitchen supplies).
 Campus pool (typically) will consider funding events surrounding said equipment or
supplies. Campus pool also will fund events that the house no longer can afford due to
the purchase of aforementioned equipment and supplies.
Any questions or concerns please contact your Coordinator of House Events at
[email protected] or xtn. 4958.
FUNDRAISING
Q. What exactly is fundraising?
A. Fundraising is defined as any endeavor involving monetary transactions that raise funds for the house, e.g., selling candygrams or flower-grams, selling T-shirts or charging admission to a social event. Any event or transaction through which a house plans
to receive money and potentially make a profit as a plan of that event or transaction, must be approved first by the house council and
then by the Executive Board of the House President’s Association to ensure that it meets the guidelines, policies and procedures set
forth for fundraising.
Q. Who oversees fundraising for houses and house councils?
A. Fundraising for House Councils falls under the jurisdiction of the House President’s Association. Since, houses differ from
student organizations in that SGA does not mandate houses to fund raise a significant portion of their yearly budgets. Therefore,
petitions do not go through SFC, they go through the HPA Executive Board.
Q. How does the HPA collaborate with the SGA to ensure that house efforts correspond with the campus community’s
guidelines and expectations and the efforts of organizations across campus?
A. Since there are limited ways and places in which money may be raised on campus, the House Presidents Association
works collaboratively with the SGA Cabinet to develop policies and procedures that encourage students, house councils and
organizations to meet their goals.
Q. How does my house council submit an application for fundraising?
A. Complete the on-line form which can be found at: https://smith.collegiatelink.net/. Go to your house page click on events in the left
hand tool bar. Then click on the “create event” button. The type of event will be a fundraising request. All applications must be
submitted a minimum of 14 days in advance of the event or fundraiser.
Second, you must fill in the form describing the specifics of the project in detail. If you are planning a film showing, specify the name. If
you are planning to sell T-shirts, remember to e-mail a copy of the design to the Associate Director of Residence Life.
The application with be submitted to the Chair of HPA via the Associate Director of Residence Life.
As mentioned before, fundraising applications must be submitted a minimum of 14 days in advance of the date of the event so that
the chair of HPA has ample time to present the request to the HPA Executive Board. Failing to submit an application by the deadline
may result in the chair of HPA not being able to process the request on time; since, the request must be presented to a the executive
board who meets every two weeks.
If there are questions or special conditions, the chair of the HPA will arrange for a representative of the house to be present at the
meeting to discuss them.
Finally, the HPA Executive Board must approve the application before the house can hold its fundraising event.
Students are encouraged to seek the advice of the Associate Director of Residence Life and the Assistant Director of the Office of
Student Engagement when planning fundraising projects as they have information and ideas about possible fundraising events (names
of companies and vendors with possible products, etc.). They can also help you with any problems you may have with the application
process.
GENERAL HOUSE FUNDRAISING GUIDELINES
1.
Fundraising (money transactions) includes conferences, ticket sales, parties, trips, sponsorship of vendors, tournaments
(athletic also), faculty tea, etc. All endeavors involving monetary transactions by the house must be approved first by the
House Council then presented for approval of the Executive Board of the House President’s Association (HPA). Applications
to fundraise must be submitted to the HPA 14 days in advance of the event, but not including the day of the event. Application
can be found at: https://smith.collegiatelink.net/. Go to your house page click on events in the left hand tool bar. Then click on
the “create event” button. The type of event will be a fundraising request.
An organization failing to submit a fundraising application two weeks in advance may consider the following two options:
cancellation or postponement (both with the group’s approval). A house that fails to gain the proper approval for fundraising
will be fined by the HPA, with an option to appeal.
2.
Once a fundraising application is approved, it does not need to be re-submitted if the exact same type of endeavor will be
repeated within the current academic year. For example, selling T-shirts for profit of the same design in the fall and in the
spring.
3.
No business activity may cause an unusual burden to students or interfere with normal college operations. The regulations of
the trustees provide that no college building may be used for commercial purposes. Therefore, commercial activities in college
houses and other college buildings are prohibited, except in designated buildings (e.g., the Gamut, the Campus Center, etc.)
and in those cases where applications have been made to and approved.
4.
All business is to be conducted on campus.
5.
Any proposal by a house for raising money from off-campus including alumnae, parents of students, or the general public must
be approved by the Associate Director of Residence Life in addition to the HPA. This includes care packages, class t-shirts,
etc.
6.
Admission may not be charged nor funds solicited at any event supported in any way by the Student Activities Events funds
or a subsidy of any sort from the College.
7.
There are limited areas on campus where admission may be charged. These include the Davis Ballroom, Wright Hall
Auditorium, John M. Greene Hal, the Carroll room in the Campus Center, and Scott Gymnasium.
8.
Houses may not use any of their funds to purchase and distribute alcohol. Houses are allowed to hold social events in The
Campus Center where alcohol may be sold by Dining Services under the College's Beer and Wine License.
BUDGET DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSE ACCOUNTS
What a budget accomplishes
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It helps to clarify goals.
It reminds members to use funds efficiently.
It is useful in decision making.
It is important information to analyze, adjust and evaluate activities.
It can be used as a guideline for future planning.
Know your organization’s priorities, objectives and goals.
As you prepare your budget, also consider:
What time frame will your budget cover? (semester, year)
What does your organization most want to complete?
What will be involved to accomplish this?
How much will it cost?
Where will you get the money to pay for this?
Preparing the budget
Prepare an outline of the organization’s planned activities
Determine and record available funds (including carryover balance from the previous year).
Estimate and record expected income. Also, record when these funds will be available.
Determine, define and record needed expenses (flyers, supplies, etc.)
Be sure that the budget can cover unexpected expenses that may have been overlooked.
Review, revise and prepare the final budget.
Have the members approve the budget.
Managing the budget
Set and maintain a minimum balance.
Develop policies and procedures needed to stay within the budget. For instance, “All expenditures must be approved
before they occur.”
Maintain accurate records of all financial transactions, including both income and expenses.
From time to time, compare the budget to the actual expenditure records.
CONTRACTS
There are two major types of contracts: verbal and written. The College expects written contracts! A written contract is a legally
binding agreement between two or more parties that sets forth all conditions of the service to be rendered, the amount and method of
payment, and all the other particulars. The purposes of a written contract is to provide information as to how much will be charged —
the who, what, where, time of the service, and whether other stipulations are to be met and by whom. Completed written contracts can
eliminate the frequent misunderstandings of verbal agreements.
Although most students are familiar with written contracts, it is possible to enter a verbal contract without realizing it. For instance, you
may be discussing the conditions to be covered in a written contract and use language that leads the other party to believe you have an
agreement/contract. The best way to avoid this problem is to preface any discussion of program, cost, payment, date, etc., by stating
that you are just exploring the idea and options. Reiterate this again at the conclusion of the discussion. In this way you are making it
clear that you are not agreeing to any service or payment. Many agents/performers may try to encourage a verbal agreement with you.
Therefore it is important to state that you are just exploring your options or your organization may unknowingly end up with an extra
event on your calendar and an extra charge to your organization.
College contracts protect the organization and houses. It is important to have the contract with you during the event. Should any
problems arise concerning fees, performing time, etc., having the contract, signed by both parties, available for reference, can help an
organization avoid hassles with the provider.
Q. How do I obtain a contract?
A. If you are planning an event that involves entertainment (including Smith students), you need to have a contract. A standard
Smith College Contract has been prepared to facilitate the most common types of contractual relationships. Contracts are available by
through the Smith Social Network site at: https://smith.collegiatelink.net/ and completing the event form for your house. Within this form
is the contract request form. Once this is received the contract will be written and sent to the artist for signature. It is essential that
you have a proper contact mailing address and e-mail address for the artist. The artist will need to return the signed contract to
the Office of Residence Life, Clark Hall 101. Once the signed contract is returned, a copy will be made and filed and the original will be
forwarded to the event sponsor provided in the contract request. Your treasurer will then need to take the signed contract to the
student bank for a check request to be submitted. Students are prohibited from signing any contracts as it makes them
personally liable for fulfilling the terms of the contract should a problem arise.
Guidelines for Using Contracts
1.
One of the most important steps in preparing a contract is the negotiation that precedes the signing. House Social Events
Coordinators are encouraged to consult the Associate Director of Residence Life, the Coordinator of House Events, and/or the
Student Activities Office for information prior to entering negotiations. They can provide you with information regarding the
range of charges, if a performer has been at Smith before, whether any extra equipment is required, how well they lived up to
the conditions of any previous contract, and the like. With this in mind, the organization will be in a better negotiating position.
2.
If the contract is for $10,000 or more, in addition to the signature of the Associate Director of Residence Life, the contract will
also need to be signed by the Controller’s office.
3.
The signed contract should be submitted with the check request form at the student bank. Remind your treasurer to keep a
copy in your house files.
4.
Organizations must have adequate funds in their account to cover the charges set forth in the contract. The College cannot
assume financial liability for the contract. Thus, the organization must be able to demonstrate that they are able to pay for the
services and the charges included in the contract.

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