Query Processing, Resource Management and Approximate in a

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First found May 22, 2018

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Jacob Riis
Jacob Riis

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Transcript

The Age
of
Infinite Storage
has begun
Many of us have enough money in our pockets right now
to buy all the storage we will be able to fill for the next 5 years.
So having the storage capacity is no longer a problem.
Managing it is a problem (especially when the volume gets large).
How much data is there?
Googi 10100
Tera Bytes (TBs) are Here
 1 TB costs  1k$ to buy
 1 TB costs ~300k$/year to own
 Management and curation are the expensive part
 Searching 1 TB takes hours
 I’m Terrified by TeraBytes
 I’m Petrified by PetaBytes
 I’ll soon be Exafied by ExaBytes
We are here
...
Yotta
1024
Zetta
1021
Exa
1018
Peta
1015
Tera
1012
Giga
109
Mega
106
 I’m too old to ever be Zettafied by ZettaBytes
Kilo
But you may be in your lifetime
You may even be Yottafied by YottaBytes
You may never be Googified by GoogiBytes
But the next generation may be?
103
How much information is there?
 Soon everything can be
recorded and indexed.
Everything
!
Recorded
All Books
MultiMedia
 Most of it will never be
seen by humans.
 Data summarization,
trend detection,
anomaly detection,
data mining,
are key technologies
All books
(words)
.Movi
e
A Photo
A Book
10-24
Yocto,
10-21
zepto,
10-18
atto,
10-15
femto,
10-12
pico,
10-9
nano,
10-6
micro,
10-3
milli
Yotta
Zetta
Exa
Peta
Tera
Giga
Mega
Kilo
First Disk, in 1956
 IBM 305 RAMAC
 4 MB
 50 24” disks
 1200 rpm
 100
(revolutions per minute)
milli-seconds (ms) access time
 35k$/year to rent
 Included computer &
accounting software
(tubes not transistors)
1.6 meters
10 years later
30 MB
Memex
As We May Think, Vannevar Bush, 1945
“A memex is a device in which an
individual stores all his books, records,
and communications, and which is
mechanized so that it may be consulted
with exceeding speed and flexibility”
“yet if the user inserted 5000 pages of
material a day it would take him
hundreds of years to fill the repository,
so that he can enter material freely”
Can you fill a terabyte in a
year?
Item
Items/TB
Items/day
a 300 KB JPEG image
3M
9,800
a 1 MB Document
1M
2,900
a 1 hour, 256 kb/s MP3
audio file
9K
26
a 1 hour 1 MPEG video
290
0.8
On a Personal Terabyte,
How Will We Find Anything?
 Need Queries, Indexing, Data Mining,
Scalability, Replication…
 If you don’t use a DBMS, you will
implement one of your own!
 Need for Data Mining, Machine Learning is
more important then ever!
Of the digital data in existence today,
 80% is personal/individual
 20% is Corporate/Governmental
DBMS
We’re awash with data!

Network data:


10 exabytes by 2010
~ 1019 Bytes
10 zettabytes by 2015
~ 1022 Bytes
WWW (and other text collections)


~ 1016 Bytes
Sensor data from sensors (including Micro & Nano -sensor networks)


15 petabytes by 2007
National Virtual Observatory (aggregated astronomical data)


~ 1013 Bytes
US EROS Data Center archives Earth Observing System (near Soiux Falls SD)
Remotely Sensed satellite and aerial imagery data


10 terabytes by 2004
10 yottabytes by 2020
~ 1025 Bytes
Genomic/Proteomic/Metabolomic data (microarrays, genechips, genome sequences)

10 gazillabytes by 2030
~ 1028 Bytes?
I made up these Name! Projected data sizes are
overrunning our ability to name their orders of magnitude!

Stock Market prediction data (prices + all the above?)

10 supragazillabytes by 2040 ~ 1031 Bytes?
Useful information must be teased out of these large volumes of raw data.
AND these are some of the 1/5th of "Corporate" or "Governmental" data collections. The other 4/5ths
of data sets are personnel!
 Parkinson’s Law (for data)
 Data expands to fill available storage
 Disk-storage version of Moore’s Law
 Available storage doubles every 9 months!
 How do we get the information we need
from the massive volumes of data we will
have?
 Querying (for the information we know is there)
 Data mining (for the answers to questions we
don't know to ask precisely).
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