BREEAM versus LEED

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BREEAM versus LEED
White Paper first published February 2010
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
Page | 1
About this White Paper
Inbuilt leads the way in technical and consulting excellence for the design, delivery and
development of sustainability in the built environment.
Inbuilt works closely with clients‟ design teams, providing expert advice on built environment
sustainability, environmental design and environmental assessment including lifecycle
assessment and cost analysis. As integral members of the design team, Inbuilt‟s BREEAM
team schedules activities, sets priorities and negotiates the tradeoffs required to achieve the
highest BREEAM ratings. They also have additional expertise in building services and the
specification of renewable energy technologies, and can therefore ensure that BREEAM
criteria requirements are integrated into the building design.
BREEAM and LEED are the two most widely recognised environmental assessment
methodologies used globally in the construction industry today. Each has different strengths
and weaknesses, with differing philosophies and business models. Generally it is not
straightforward to compare the two. What might be applicable in one assessment method
might not be relevant in another.
Historically BREEAM has been the leading methodology in the UK, but increasingly clients
are asking the question – is BREEAM best or is LEED better?
How can a project team in the UK determine which methodology is most appropriate for their
project?
This White Paper aims to give you the necessary background and help you make an
informed decision about your project.
For further information on Inbuilt's BREEAM and LEED assessment services, please contact
Melanie Starrs on tel. +44 (0)1923 277087 or email: [email protected]
Melanie Starrs and Victoria Kate Burrows at Inbuilt are among the first wave of experts in the
country to achieve the new BREEAM Accredited Professionals (BREEAM AP) qualification.
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
Page | 2
Introduction
Accreditation systems for measuring the environmental performance of buildings have been
around for at least 20 years. They have been instrumental at driving innovation regarding
sustainability issues within the construction industry. By using a single „rating‟, certification
encompasses an umbrella of issues which might otherwise be individually dropped or
missed.
As any innovation matures and moves through from the early adopters to the early majority,
the price of implementing it falls, in turn stimulating more growth.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0f/Diffusionofideas.PNG
Accreditation schemes need to push the legislative boundaries, keeping ahead of the mass
market in order to drive innovation. This is one reason why requiring accreditation as a
legislative minimum may be a bad idea. In order for any scheme to retain value, it should be
hard to achieve. At the very least there should be exemplar levels to aspire to attain.
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
Page | 3
Source: BRE
BREEAM and LEED are the two most widely recognised environmental assessment
methodologies used globally in the construction industry today.
This report looks at:





The history, facts and features of BREEAM and LEED
An overview of BREEAM 2008, credits and weightings
An overview of LEED 2009, credits and weightings
A detailed credit comparison between the two schemes
The overlaps, and the conclusions about each scheme‟s benefits in a UK context
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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BREEAM
History
BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) was
conceived by BRE and was first used in 1990.
Facts and Figures
The number of buildings certified is quoted as 116,000 buildings and 714,000 buildings
registered, but the breakdown as to which scheme (building type and year) is not publicized.
Drivers
There are a number of drivers for BREEAM in the UK:

Legislation & Planning –some local planning authorities require BREEAM preassessments and, increasingly, accreditation (including Section 106 agreements)

Private sector companies –some developers have set voluntary minimum
BREEAM rating for all new buildings (i.e. British Land, Land Securities,
Hammerson, etc)

Public Sector –a minimum BREEAM rating for all new buildings and
refurbishments has been in place since 2006 (OGC, HCA, DCSF, Department of
Health, etc)
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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LEED
History
The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System,
developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), provides a suite of standards for
environmentally sustainable construction.
The characteristics of the USGBC, compared to the BRE are an important predictor in some
of the differences between the two schemes. Whilst the BRE was a government funded
research body when BREEAM was conceived, USGBC is a national nonprofit membership
body, with 19,957 member organizations including corporations, governmental agencies,
nonprofits and others from throughout the industry. LEED is consensus-driven with
committee-based development.
LEED is a registered trade mark and a brand name. It‟s part of a keen commercial mindset
at USGBC, who have attracted over 6,500 paying members bringing in over $24 million a
year.
The hallmark of LEED is that it is an open and transparent process where the technical
criteria proposed by the LEED committees are publicly reviewed for approval by the more
than 10,000 membership organizations that currently constitute the USGBC.
The transparency extends to publishing collated data on which credits are achieved,
resulting in a kind of league table of more common and rare credits. For instance credit ID2
(having a LEED-AP) is always achieved, whereas credit MR1.3 (Re-use of shell and 50% of
interior) has never been achieved.
There are also differences in the way LEED calculates credits. They are generally linked to
the US Dollar (especially the energy credits), which means that if the exchange rate is
unfavourable, then the building‟s rating could suffer.
Third-party certification through the independent Green Building Certification Institute
(GBCI.org) assures that LEED buildings are constructed as intended. GBCI includes a
network of ISO-compliant international certifying bodies, ensuring the consistency, capacity
and integrity of the LEED certification process.
Facts and Figures
Typical costs: $750-3750 on registration + $1500-7500 doc submission + $10-30k AP doc
gathering fee. Design team prior experience is an important factor in allowing for costs.
Documentation costs at $30,000 to $60,000 for teams working on their first LEED project,
and as low as $10,000 for experienced teams. (USGBC)
Roughly 400 buildings are LEED-certified, with another 3,500 seeking certification.
Every business day, $464 million worth of construction registers with LEED.
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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There are LEED projects in all 50 US states and 91 countries.
Drivers
San Francisco, Portland and Austin, Texas, all require new municipal construction to earn
LEED “silver” certification, the second of the four levels. In 2003, the Los Angeles City
Council voted to require that all new public buildings meet the first level, and more recently,
the council voted to expedite the approval process for developers willing to step up to silver.
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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BREEAM 2008
Overview
Buildings have been assessed under BREEAM 2008 from 1 August 2008. BREEAM 2008
replaced BREEAM 2006.
A new rating was been added for scores over 85% of „Outstanding‟. In order to get the
rating, not only does the building need to gain 85%, but there are minimum requirements in
several individual criteria PLUS information on the building HAS to be published as a case
study (written by BRE Global).
BREEAM rating
% score
Unclassified
<30
Pass
≥30
Good
≥45
Very Good
≥55
Excellent
≥70
Outstanding
≥85
The other main change was the introduction of Innovation credits. Now there is a route to
get accreditation for innovations which BREEAM does not cover. For each innovation for
which accreditation is sought and approved, 1% is added to the overall score.
Mandatory credits
Minimum levels have been set at ALL ratings for some criteria, the onus of which increases
as the rating rises. You still need to gain the minimum percent for each rating band.
To gain a Pass (30%) credits:
 Man 1 - Commissioning
 Hea 4 - High frequency lighting and
 Hea 12 - Microbial contamination are compulsory
 To get a Good (45%), add the following:
 Wat 1 - Water consumption and
 Wat 2 - Water meter
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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Very Good (55%) adds:
 Ene 2 - Sub-metering of substantial energy uses and
 LE 4 - Mitigating ecological impact
For Excellent (70%):
 Man 2 - Considerate Constructors,
 Man 4 - Building user guide,
 Ene 5 - Low or zero carbon technologies and
 Wst 3 - Storage of recyclable waste are added
 plus in Ene 1 - Reduction of CO2 emissions (i.e. an EPC of 40 of less for a new build
office) a minimum of 6 points must be awarded.
To get the new rating of Outstanding, in addition to all of the above (plus scoring 85% of
more):
 Man 1 – Commissioning needs 2 points,
 Man 2 - Considerate Constructors and
 Wat 1 - Water consumption (total available in Wat 1 is 3), plus
 Ene 1 - Reduction of CO2 emissions - a minimum of 10 points must be awarded (i.e.
an EPC of 25 of less for a new build office).
In addition, the building now has to have a Post Construction Review (before these were not
mandatory unless the client required them). A BREEAM assessment made at stage D is now
known as a DS (design stage) assessment and is an interim stage towards final certification
as building completion. It will not be possible to value engineer out the BREEAM features
between design and completion without getting penalised (or put another way, caught).
Weightings
The weightings changed in 2008. The baseline BREEAM scheme used for comparison is
Offices. There are slight differences between schemes. Energy now accounts for 19% of the
total (an increase) and water now accounts for a slightly larger slice of the pie.
Waste is a new section meaning when added to Materials, there is a much greater focus on
embodied energy, with Management, Land Use and Ecology and Pollution now accounting
for relatively less of the overall score.
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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2008
Weighting
Credits
% per credit
Management
12
10
1.20
Health & Wellbeing
15
13
1.15
Energy
19
24
0.79
Transport
8
10
0.80
Water
6
6
1.00
Materials
12.5
13
0.96
Waste
7.5
7
1.07
Land Use & Ecology
10
10
1.00
Pollution
10
12
0.83
100
105
0.95
It has never been possible to gain 100% in BREEAM (mainly due to the recycled facade and
structure credits (not available to new build for obvious reasons) - by reusing a building it is
highly unlikely that the fabric would perform as well as new build in energy terms, even if the
embodied energy is less).
And as for the 1% innovation credit number? This makes sense when you look at what
credits are now worth. The spread between points has narrowed. The mean percentage
value of one credit is 0.95%, top value is 1.20% and bottom 0.79%. This is more evenly
distributed than BREEAM 2006 (1.08%, 1.5% and 0.81%).
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
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LEED 2009
Overview
LEED 2009 replaced LEED 2.0 from 27 April 2009. All discussion which follows refers to
LEED-NC (new construction). There are small differences for the other schemes.
Unlike BREEAM, LEED is a points rather than percentage system. There are 100 base
points, 6 possible Innovation in Design and 4 Regional Priority points.
LEED rating
Points
Certified
40-49
Silver
50-59
Gold
60-79
Platinum
80 points and above
Prerequisites
LEED introduced prerequisites before BREEAM‟s mandatory credits. Prerequisites are
mandatory for all ratings.
Sustainable Sites
 SSP1 – Construction Activity Pollution Prevention
Water Efficiency
 WE1 – Water Use Reduction
Energy and Atmosphere
 EAP1 – Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems
 EAP2 – Minimum Energy Performance
 EAP3 – Fundamental Refrigerant Management
Materials and Resources
 MRP1 – Storage and Collection of Recyclables
Indoor Environmental Quality
 EQP1 – Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance
 EQP2 – Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control
Weightings
Whilst LEED does not convert points into a percentage in the same way that BREEAM does,
there was a considerable change in allocation of points per credit between LEED 2.0 and
LEED 2009 which means there is now an implicit weighting.
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Detailed Credit Comparison
The narrative below picks up the main differences and significant similarities in LEED 2009
from BREEAM 2008. Credit details and breakdowns of scores can be found in the
appendices.
Sustainable Sites
 SS1 forbids development on farmland, wetlands and within 50 feet of a water body.
BREEAM has no equivalent (but these may be covered elsewhere within UK
legislation).
 SS2 requires development density calculations which BREEAM does not. There are
similarities in the types of services (bank, shops, post office, etc) which the
development is rewarded for being near.
 SS3 (brownfield development) is considerably easier to achieve than LE2
(contaminated land).
 The transport credits in LEED are considerably less onerous than the BREEAM
equivalents. For example, a 300,00ft² office building would require 95 cycle spaces
under BREEAM, but only 36 under LEED. LEED rewards specific parking for LEV
and FEV or for an LEV sharing scheme. There is no current equivalent under
BREEAM, but there is the opportunity to propose this as an innovation credit.
 SS5.2 promotes a high proportion of open space to encourage biodiversity. There is
no BREEAM equivalent.
 SS7.1 and 7.2 refer to heat island effect which BREEAM does not cover, although
green roofs are rewarded (for different reasons) under LE 4, LE 5, LE 6 and Pol 5.
Water Efficiency
 WEP1 looks at water use reduction against a baseline, rather than setting an
absolute target like BREEAM.
 WE1 looks at irrigation which is included as Wat 6 in some BREEAM schemes, but
not currently in BREEAM Offices 2008.
 WE2 relates to BREEAM credit Wat 5, recycling, which is again not included in
BREEAM Offices 2008.
 In BREEAM there are 3 credits which reward specific design solutions or
technologies, namely water meters, sanitary supply shut-off and major leak detection.
LEED tends not to dictate design solutions, focussing instead on the intention (i.e.
water use reduction).
Energy & Atmosphere
 EAP2 requires the building to be designed to ASHRAE 90.1. This is more onerous
than designing to CIBSE standards and UK Building Regulations, and there is no
BREEAM equivalent. However, by designing to this standard, there is no need to
specifically require technologies or design solutions, in the same way that BREEAM
does. It gives designers more discretion.
 EAP3 relates to refrigeration and is covered in the EU by legislation.
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




EA1 is roughly equivalent to Ene 1. However there are 2 key differences – it is stated
in terms of improvement over a baseline in energy, rather than a target carbon
amount, and is also stated in terms of COST of energy. This is also the case for EA2
which looks at renewable and is roughly equivalent to Ene 5.
There is a total of 11.85% available for BREEAM Offices Ene 1 for a zero carbon
building (which relates to Building Regulation Part L calculations). The maximum
number of points available under LEED is 19 for a 48% improvement on energy
performance calculated from Appendix G baseline from ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Points
are very roughly equivalent to 0.9%, so a maximum 17% in LEED for a very good low
energy building versus almost 12% for a zero carbon building seems better value!
The calculations are more onerous for ASHRAE than for Part L.
The other main difference in LEED is that Green Power is rewarded, whereas in
BREEAM contracts with green energy suppliers is not rewarded.
EAc1 –Software Requirements - LEED energy modelling is based around the
Performance Rating Method which in turn is based on the calculation procedure
outlined in ASHRAE 90.1. While some software requirements are laid out in
Appendix G of ASHRAE 90.1, there is no direct software accreditation for LEED
energy modelling.
LEED metric ($) is an effective marketing tool but arguably not the most relevant
metric for environmental impact assessment.
Materials & Resources
 MRP1 relates to storage for recyclable waste. This is similar to BREEAM but the
areas required are much greater – almost double at smaller floor areas and 1.5 times
as large at higher floor areas.
 LEED generally deals in percentage improvements rather than absolute values. This
applies to the reuse of materials too. There are a number of additional credits to
BREEAM where items such as rapidly renewable materials, local materials and reuse
of interior elements are rewarded.
 Rather than focus on an accreditation scheme and chain of paperwork (which Mat 5
in BREEAM now uses), the intentions are stated and it is up to the assessor and
design teams discretion to ensure compliance is met.
 There is still a focus in both schemes for rewarded recycling rather than reducing
waste in the first place.
Indoor Environmental Quality
 IEQP1 relates to ASHRAE 62.1. There is no BREEAM equivalent as minimum
ventilation rates are covered by Building Regulations.
 IEQ1, IEQ2, IEQ3 and IEQ5 are quite sophisticated and beyond any current UK
requirements. BREEAM does not reward well designed mechanically ventilated
systems. If a building requires mech vent, LEED may well be the better accreditation
to go for.
 IEQ7.1 requires ability to measure post-occupancy thermal comfort. This is far and
beyond BREEAM or CIBSE, but is picked up in BSRIA‟s soft landing framework.
 IEQ8 covers daylight and is similar in scope but uses a different methodology to
BREEAM.
BREEAM versus LEED
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Comparing the two schemes within a UK context
There is a considerable amount of overlap between the two schemes.
If a building has scored well under LEED, it is likely that it will score well under BREEAM.
The converse relationship does not hold quite as well.
Where there are prescriptive credits in LEED, these are generally less onerous than
BREEAM. The targets set in BREEAM are often linked to specific technologies or solutions
whereas in LEED it is more common to state the intention and leave it up to designers
discretion as how best to comply.
In general LEED is less prescriptive than BREEAM. Designers have more freedom to meet
the required standards using their discretion and there is less of a tickbox mentality. This
means the calculation methods used are more rigorous, and consequently there is more
work to be done to prove accreditation.
LEED is strong on occupant comfort, internal pollution issues (off-gassing etc), heat island
effects and is geared towards climates which use mechanical ventilation and air conditioning
and where existing infrastructure promotes the use of cars. It also covers some ground not
found in BREEAM where UK legislation takes over, for example environmental tobacco
smoke control.
BREEAM versus LEED
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BREEAM is strong on pedestrian and cyclist safety, with much higher targets for cyclist
spaces. It is also stronger than LEED on water and acoustics.
LEED now has a requirement for the USGBC to have access to Whole-Building Energy and
Water Usage Data. The rating will not be tied to the information provided, and the owner
does not have to "actively supply USGBC with information, but simply authorize the USGBC
to access the information".
BREEAM Outstanding has a mandatory requirement for a BREEAM In Use certification
within the first 3 years of operation.
BREEAM versus LEED
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Conclusions
So is the dynamic tension between two competing systems desirable? The competition
between the two schemes (and indeed with other pretenders to the throne) has proved to be
of benefit to the global industry. The competition between the two schemes has promoted
innovation, both in the schemes and in delivered buildings. For instance, demand for both
BREEAM and LEED has undoubtedly stimulated research into building sciences which might
not otherwise have happened.
Transparency can also encourage innovation. This is one area where LEED has had clear
advantage over BREEAM, with IES software for one developing tools which integrate the
design process with LEED accreditation.
Whilst the transparency of LEED is appealing there are some aspects which are harder to
digest. Some have accused the building council‟s “consensus-based approach” of catering
to manufacturers rather than basing credits on scientific research, factoring in the life cycles
of construction materials and climate variations. There is an element of independence which
is missing.
In BREEAM‟s favour is a more scientific basis for the research behind some credits, and a
broader remit covering more of the social aspects of sustainability. However, BREEAM
suffers from a lack of transparency. For instance, data on the number of buildings certified in
each category and what ratings they have achieved is hard to come by, mainly due to the
fact that historically it was seen as a barrier to adoption if this information was made public.
However, we live in more accountable times and if BREEAM is to retain its current UK crown
in building accreditation schemes, this may need to be addressed.
The key „philosophical‟ difference between the two methods is the process of certification.
BREEAM has licenced assessors who assess the evidence against the credit criteria and
report it to the BRE, who QA the assessment and issue the certificate.
For LEED evidence is collated by the design team (sometimes co-ordinated by a LEED-AP)
then submitted to the US-GBC which does the assessment and issues the certificate.
As a result of this the business model for each scheme is very different. BREEAM is funded
from the licence fees for the assessor organisations (on a scheme by scheme basis) and
also the project licence fees. LEED is funded in part by the licence fees (which tend to be
higher than BREEAM) but also through USGBC memberships.
No environmental assessment scheme is perfect. Context is important.
If you have a highly innovative solution, no accreditation scheme is likely to give due
recognition. Both BREEAM and LEED are constrained, especially when calculating carbon
and energy savings, by the methodologies which they use to award credits. SBEM and
ASHRAE 90.1 have limited scope to recognize ultra-innovative solutions. Also, EPBD and
ASHRAE 90.1 baselines are different both in terms of methods and metrics. It is not possible
BREEAM versus LEED
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to assume that energy cost saving in LEED can be equivalently translated to carbon saving
in BREEAM.
LEED is a measurement tool and not a design tool. The same goes for BREEAM.
Both systems continue to learn from each other‟s mistakes and as time goes on
convergence on some matters is inevitable.
While BREEAM is generally more relevant in the UK as it uses UK policies, LEED can sit
alongside as part of a global corporate policy.
BREEAM versus LEED
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Appendices
BREEAM 2008 credit descriptions
The BREEAM Offices 2008 credits have been used. Innovation credits have not been
included in the list below. Due to rounding errors the total is slightly less than 100. These
numbers are for comparison with LEED only.
Credit
BREEAM 2008 credit description
Man 1
Commissioning
2.4
Man 2
Considerate Constructors
2.4
Man 3
Construction Site Impacts
4.8
Man 4
Building User Guide
1.2
Man 8
Security
1.2
Hea 1
Daylighting
1.15
Hea 2
View out
1.15
Hea 3
Glare control
1.15
Hea 4
High frequency lighting
1.15
Hea 5
Internal and external lighting levels
1.15
Hea 6
Lighting zones & control
1.15
Hea 7
Potential for natural ventilation
1.15
Hea 8
Indoor air quality
1.15
Hea 9
Volatile organic compounds
1.15
Hea 10
Thermal comfort
1.15
Hea 11
Thermal zoning
1.15
Hea 12
Microbial contamination
1.15
Hea 13
Acoustic performance
1.15
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
% available
per credit
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Ene 1
Reduction of CO2 emissions
11.7
Ene 2
Sub-metering of substantial energy uses
0.78
Ene 3
Sub metering of high energy load areas and tenancy
0.78
Ene 4
External lighting
0.78
Ene 5
Low or zero carbon technologies
2.34
Ene 8
Lifts
1.56
Ene 9
Escalators
0.79
Tra 1
Provision of public transport
2.4
Tra 2
Proximity to amenities
0.8
Tra 3
Cyclist facilities
1.6
Tra 4
Pedestrian and cycle safety
0.8
Tra 5
Travel plan
0.8
Tra 6
Maximum car parking capacity
1.6
Wat 1
Water consumption
3
Wat 2
Water meter
1
Wat 3
Major leak detection
1
Wat 4
Sanitary supply shut off
1
Mat 1
Materials specification (major building elements)
3.84
Mat 2
Hard landscaping and boundary protection
0.96
Mat 3
Re-use of building façade
0.96
Mat 4
Re-use of building structure
0.96
Mat 5
Responsible sourcing of materials
2.88
Mat 6
Insulation
1.92
Mat 7
Designing for robustness
0.96
Wst 1
Construction site waste management
4.28
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Wst 2
Recycled aggregates
1.07
Wst 3
Storage of recyclable waste
1.07
Wst 6
Floor finishes
1.07
LE 1
Re use of land
1
LE 2
Contaminated land
1
LE 3
Ecological value of site AND Protection of ecological
features
1
LE 4
Mitigating ecological impact
2
LE 5
Enhancing site ecology
3
LE 6
Long term impact on biodiversity
2
Pol 1
Refrigerant GWP - Building services
0.83
Pol 2
Preventing refrigerant leaks
1.66
Pol 4
NOx emissions from heating source
2.49
Pol 5
Flood risk
2.49
Pol 6
Minimising watercourse pollution
0.83
Pol 7
Reduction of night time light pollution
0.83
Pol 8
Noise attenuation
0.83
58 credits in total (excluding innovation credits)
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LEED 2009 credit descriptions
Credit
LEED 2009 credit description
Points per
credit
SSP1
Construction Activity Pollution Prevention
1
SS1
Site Selection
1
SS2
Development Density and Community Connectivity
5
SS3
Brownfield Redevelopment
1
SS4.1
Alternative Transport – Public Transportation Access
6
SS4.2
Alternative Transport – Bicycle Storage and Changing
Rooms
1
SS4.3
Alternative Transportation – Low-emitting and Fuel-efficient
Vehicles
3
SS4.4
Alternative Transportation – Parking Capacity
2
SS5.1
Site Development – Protect or restore habitat
1
SS5.2
Site Development – Maximise Open Space
1
SS6.1
Stormwater Design – Quantity Control
1
SS6.2
Stormwater Design – Quality Control
1
SS7.1
Heat Island Effect – nonroof
1
SS7.2
Heat Island Effect – Roof
1
SS8
Light Pollution Reduction
1
WEP1
Water Use Reduction
1
WE1
Water Efficient Landscaping
4
WE2
Innovative Wastewater Technologies
2
WE3
Water Use Reduction
4
BREEAM versus LEED
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EAP1
Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems
1
EAP2
Minimum Energy Performance
1
EAP3
Fundamental Refrigerant Management
1
EA1
Optimise Energy Performance
19
EA2
On-site Renewable Energy
7
EA3
Enhanced Commissioning
2
EA4
Enhanced Refrigerant Management
2
EA5
Measurement and Verification
3
EA6
Green Power
2
MRP1
Storage and Collection of Recyclables
1
MR1.1
Building Reuse – Maintain Existing Walls, Floors and Roof
3
MR1.2
Building Reuse – Maintain Existing Interior Nonstructural
Elements
1
MR2
Construction Waste Management
2
MR3
Materials Reuse
2
MR4
Recycled Content
2
MR5
Regional Materials
2
MR6
Rapidly Renewable Materials
1
MR7
Certified Wood
1
IEQP1
Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance
1
IEQP2
Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control
1
IEQ1
Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring
1
IEQ2
Increased Ventilation
1
IEQ3.1
Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan – During
Construction
BREEAM versus LEED
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IEQ3.2
Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan – Before
Occupancy
1
IEQ4.1
Low-emitting Materials – Adhesives and Sealants
1
IEQ4.2
Low-emitting Materials – Paints and Coatings
1
IEQ4.3
Low-emitting Materials – Flooring Systems
1
IEQ4.4
Low-emitting Materials – Composite Wood and Agrifiber
Products
1
IEQ5
Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control
1
IEQ6.1
Controllability of Systems – Lighting
1
IEQ6.2
Controllability of Systems – Thermal Comfort
1
IEQ7.1
Thermal Comfort - Design
1
IEQ7.2
Thermal Comfort –Verification
1
IEQ8.1
Daylight and Views – Daylight
1
IEQ8.2
Daylight and Views - Views
1
ID1
Innovation in Design
5
ID2
LEED Accredited Professional
1
RP
Regional Priority
4
58 credits in total
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
Page | 23
LEED 2.0 vs. LEED 2009
Comparing the weightings per credits for LEED 2.0 vs. LEED 2009
Credit
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
LEED 2.0
Points
LEED 2009
Points
SSP1
1
1
SS1
1
1
SS2
1
5
SS3
1
1
SS4.1
1
6
SS4.2
1
1
SS4.3
1
3
SS4.4
1
2
SS5.1
1
1
SS5.2
1
1
SS6.1
1
1
SS6.2
1
1
SS7.1
1
1
SS7.2
1
1
SS8
1
1
WEP1
(WE3.1) 1
1
WE1
(WE1.1-2) 2
2-4
WE2
1
2
WE3
(WE3.2) 1
2-4
EAP1
1
1
Page | 24
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
EAP2
1
1
EAP3
1
1
EA1
8
1-19
EA2
3
1-7
EA3
1
2
EA4
1
2
EA5
1
3
EA6
1
2
MRP1
1
1
MR1.1
(MR1.1-2) 2
1-3
MR1.2
(MR1.3)1
1
MR2
(MR2.1-2) 2
1-2
MR3
(MR3.1-2) 2
1-2
MR4
(MR4.1-2) 2
1-2
MR5
(MR5.1-2) 2
1-2
MR6
1
1
MR7
1
1
IEQP1
1
1
IEQP2
1
1
IEQ1
1
1
IEQ2
1
1
IEQ3.1
1
1
IEQ3.2
1
1
IEQ4.1
1
1
IEQ4.2
1
1
Page | 25
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
IEQ4.3
1
1
IEQ4.4
1
1
IEQ5
1
1
IEQ6.1
1
1
IEQ6.2
1
1
IEQ7.1
1
1
IEQ7.2
1
1
IEQ8.1
1
1
IEQ8.2
1
1
ID1
4
1-5
ID2
1
1
RP
n/a
1-4
69
110
Page | 26
Inbuilt Ltd
Enterprise House
Home Park
Kings Langley
WD4 8LZ
T: +44 (0)1923 277000
F: +44 (0)1923 277099
E: [email protected]
W: www.inbuilt.co.uk
BREEAM versus LEED
© Inbuilt Ltd 2010
Page | 27

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