2016-17 TUSD CURRICULUM MAP

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2016-17 TUSD CURRICULUM MAP-World History
World History: Grade 10, Quarter 1
* Themes:
Topic: Beginnings of Society, Civilization, and Culture
Interaction with Environment
• Systematic agriculture brought huge economic, cultural, political, and social changes for early humans.
Politics
 The impact of empires and peoples that were not Greek and Roman, i.e. Persian, Mayan, Egyptian, Olmec, Nubian, Carthage.
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China developed unique philosophies, political theories, and products that would influence and shape the world.
Culture

Culture unifies states through laws, language, literature, religion, myths, and monumental art/architecture
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Foundations and development of religions in Africa, Asia, Americas and Europe.
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Impact of world religions on history and current events.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
ANTI-BIAS FRAMEWORK ANCHOR STANDARDS:
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JU.9-12.11 - I relate to all people as individuals rather than representatives of groups
and can identify stereotypes when I see or hear them.
JU.9-12.12 - I can recognize, describe and distinguish unfairness and injustice at
different levels of society.
AC.9-12.16 – I express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because of
their identities and concern when I personally experience bias.

Is geography the most pivotal factor in human development? Why or why not?
What forces shaped the migratory patterns of early people out of Africa?
How did human migration affect the spread of culture and ideas?
How do belief systems define a people, culture or time?
How have developments in early culture, philosophy, government, society, and
religion impacted history?
How did Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam interact with, provide justification for,
and conflict with various states and empires in Afro-Eurasia?
Content Standards
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Literacy Skills
Reading Standards for Literacy
RHST. 5 analyze how a text uses structure
RI. 2 Determine a central idea of a text, analyze its development, produce an objective summary
RHST. 1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources
RI. 1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis
RHST. 2 determine the central ideas or information and provide accurate summary of how
events developed
RHST 6 Compare the point of view of 2 or more authors for how they treat the same or similar
topics
Strand 2 Concept 1: PO1-PO7
PO 1. Interpret historical data displayed in maps, graphs, tables, charts, and geologic time
scales.
PO 2. Distinguish among dating methods that yield calendar ages (e.g., dendrochronology),
numerical ages (e.g., radiocarbon), correlated ages (e.g., volcanic ash), and relative ages
(e.g., geologic time).
PO 3. Formulate questions that can be answered by historical study and research.
PO 4. Construct graphs, tables, timelines, charts, and narratives to interpret historical data.
PO 5. Evaluate primary and secondary sources for:
authors’ main points/purpose and perspective/facts vs. opinions
different points of view on the same historical event (e.g., Geography Concept 6 –
Writing Standards for Literacy
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2016-17 TUSD CURRICULUM MAP-World History
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geographical perspective can be different from economic perspective)
credibility and validity
PO 6. Apply the skills of historical analysis to current social, political, geographic, and
economic issues facing the world.
PO 7. Compare present events with past events:
cause and effect/change over time/different points of view
Strand 2 Concept 2: PO 1. Describe the development of early prehistoric people, their
agriculture, and settlements.
Strand 2 Concept 2- PO3 Analyze the enduring Greek and Roman contributions and their
impact on later civilization.
Strand 2 Concept 2- PO2 Analyze the development and historical significance of Hinduism,
Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam.
Strand 2 Concept 2 PO 4 Analyze the enduring Chinese contributions and their impact on
other civilizations.
10-12.WHST.2 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical
events.
10-12.WHST. 4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and
style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
10-12.WHST.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.
10-12.WHST. 1 write arguments to support claims in an analysis using sufficient evidence
Possible Activities and Readings
Possible Performance Assessments
Activities:
 Early peoples migration map from Africa to Eurasia.
 Comparative Essay on the culture and societies of Early River Civilizations.
 Create a commercial/ad campaign focusing on the culture, and contributions of
the Mayans, Persians, and Egyptians.
 Poster recruiting people for Roman Citizenship in the Middle East or Northern
Africa.
 Engineering an Empire- Persia, Egypt, Rome, The Ancient Greeks, Carthage,
Alexander the Great
 Crash Course World History: The Agricultural Revolution, Indus River Valley
Civilization, Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, The Persians and the Greeks, Alexander
the Great and the Situation, The Roman Empire or Republic?, The Silk Road and
Ancient Trade,
 BBC “Planet of the Caveman”
 Roman Emperor Election Pamphlet: students research a Roman Emperor, create a
pamphlet advertising their campaign platform, and then have to convince the class
to vote for their emperor.
 Causes and Effects Poster on the Neolithic Revolution
 Comparative Chart on World Religions
 Global Map of locations of world religions.
 Illustrate vocabulary activity:
Neolithic revolution
Cuneiform/Hieroglyphics/ Sanskrit
Code of Hammurabi
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Cause and Effect Essay: on the Agricultural Revolution/Neolithic Revolution.
Expository Essay: How does culture unify a people?
Research essay: Where of all the locations of the unit do you want to live and
why? What would your daily life be like?
Research Project and power point presentation on a major world religion.
Discuss contributions of the ancient Chinese civilizations to other civilizations
versus the enduring Greek and roman contributions to Western Civilization
including those in government, science, art, architecture, mathematics,
literature, drama, and philosophy.
* Summative Assessment:
Students will take their research essay on their chosen location and create a persuasive
power point presentation convincing the members of the class to move to their
civilizations. Presentation will feature society, politics, interaction with environment,
culture and economics of that particular civilization. Will also heavily feature daily life
for that civilization.
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Mesopotamia
Polis
Nubian
Readings:
Hammurabi’s Code
Gilgamesh
Oedipus Rex
5 Pillars of Islam
Ashoka “Rock Edicts”
10 Commandments
Analects of Confucius
GlenCoe World History Book pages 214-233
LIRC artifacts – Islam, Judaism, Christianity
www.religioustolerance.org
* Priority Standard
** Anti-Bias Framework http://perspectives.tolerance.org/?q=node/494
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World History: Grade 10, Quarter 2
Topic: World in Transition
* Themes:
Culture
 In northern Europe, Christian humanists sought to reform the Catholic
Church, and Protestantism emerged resulting in religious conflicts.
Interaction with Environment

How Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange changed human
interactions and cultures.
Politics
 Early Mesoamerican and South American civilizations flourished with fully
developed cultural, political, religious, and social structures
 New Indian, African empires and Ottomans grew rich through trade and left a
lasting legacy of accomplishments.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
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The collapse of central authority in Europe led to the rise of new empires and
allowed different cultures to flourish.
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Between 1350 and 1550, Italian intellectuals believed they had entered a new
age of human achievement, as humanism became an important movement of
the Renaissance.
ANTI-BIAS FRAMEWORK ANCHOR STANDARDS:
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How did the new empires bring political and cultural change to their peoples?
Compare the ways did the Silk Road represents cultural diffusion and the
cultural exchanges that took place during the crusades?
How did trade in goods, exchange of people, technology, religious beliefs,
food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens develop and change
across far-flung networks of communication and exchange?
What were the short term and long-term effects of Martin Luther?
Did the Renaissance bring meaningful change to Europe?
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JU.9-12.11 - I relate to all people as individuals rather than representatives of
groups and can identify stereotypes when I see or hear them.
JU.9-12.12 - I can recognize, describe and distinguish unfairness and injustice at
different levels of society.
JU.9-12.13 – I can explain the short and long-term impact of biased words and
behaviors and unjust practices, laws and institutions that limit the rights and
freedoms of people based on their identity groups.
AC.9-12.16- I express empathy when people are excluded or mistreated because
of their identities and concern when I personally experience bias.
AC.9-12.17 - I take responsibility for standing up to exclusion, prejudice and
injustice.
AC.9-12.18 - I have the courage to speak up to people when their words, actions
or views are biased and hurtful, and I will communicate with respect even when
we disagree.
Content Standards
Literacy Skills
Strand 2 Concept 1- PO1-P07
Reading Standards for Literacy
10-12. RH1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and
secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an
understanding of the text as a whole.
10-12. RH.2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary
source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the
key details and ideas.
10-12.RH.5 Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including
how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the
Strand 2 Concept 3 PO 3: Compare the development of empires (e.g., Roman, Han,
Mali, Incan/Incan, and Ottoman) throughout the world.
Strand 2 Concept 3 PO 1: Contrast the fall of Rome with the development of the
Byzantine and Arab Empires (e.g., religion, culture, language, governmental structure).
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Strand 2 Concept 3 PO 2: Compare feudalism in Europe and Japan and its connection
with religious and cultural institutions.
whole.
10-12.RH.6. Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or
issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
10-12.RH.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in
diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to
address a question or solve a problem.
Writing Standards for Literacy
10-12.WHST.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content:
a) Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s),
distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization
that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
10-12.WHST. 4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
10-12.WHST.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
Strand 2 Concept 3 PO 4: Describe the interaction of European and Asian civilizations
from the 12th - 16th centuries :(a) Crusades, (b) commerce and the Silk Road, (c)
impact on culture, (d) plague.
Strand 2 Concept 4 PO 1: Analyze the results of Renaissance thoughts and theories
Strand 2 Concept 4 PO 2: Explain how the ideas of the Protestant Reformation and the
Catholic Reformation (e.g., secular authority, individualism, migration, literacy and
vernacular, the arts) affected society
Possible Activities and Readings
Possible Performance Assessments

Silk Road Trader Research Project: Students will research one of the major Silk
Road stops and research what they mainly traded in, their culture, their languages,
and politics and create business pamphlet advertising to other traders.
 Protestant Reformation DBQ
 Time Period Flow Chart: the social, political, cultural, economic events of this time
period.
 Cause and effect: chart the rise of Ottoman Empire
 Map of the Silk Road, and the Mongol Empires.
 Japanese Wood Block Web Quest.
 Compare and contrast chart of Japan and European Feudalism
Readings:
 Bushido Code
 Procopius- Secret History
 Stanford Silk Road Project
http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/ps/japan/tokugawa_edicts_foreigners.pdf
 Travels of Ibn Battuta/Travels of Marco Polo
 Reading Like a Historian Protestant Reformation
 Janson and Janson, “History of Art”
 Protestant Reformation Wood Block Art/95 Thesis of Martin Luther
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Ibn Battuta: A Sales Pitch. Students will become representatives of an African
Empire and put together a persuasive presentation trying to convince Battuta to
visit.
People of Q2 Speed Dating: Students will be assigned a key person from the unit,
they will fill out a dating profile based on their key figures information and then go
on a “date” looking for their best ideological match (2 day activity: Day 1: research
to fill out dating profile, Day 2: dates).
Trial of Chingis Khan: Chingis Khan is put on trial for crimes against humanity.
Events of Q2 newspaper.
* Summative Assessment: Autopsy of Empire: An empire has died and students must
complete an autopsy analyzing the causes of death. Groups will be assigned a different
empire and then each group will have to present their autopsy report to the class.
Empires: Tokugawa Japan, Ottoman, Mongol, Byzantine, Mali, Mughal, Inca, Aztec.
* Priority Standard ** Anti-Bias Framework http://perspectives.tolerance.org/?q=node/494
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2016-17 TUSD CURRICULUM MAP-World History
World History: Grade 10, Quarter 3
* Themes:
Topic: Global Connections and Consequences
Interaction with Environment
 The Slave Trade led to an African Diaspora.
 The cultural, social, demographic effects of the Columbian Exchange had on
the Native populations in the Americas.
 How the Industrial Revolution leads to Imperialism.
Culture
Politics
 The effects of Revolutions (eg. French, Latin, Haitian, and American) changed
Europe politically and socially.
 The affect of Imperialism on Asia and Africa.
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How the Industrial Revolution leads to Imperialism.
• Cultural, social, technological changes of the Industrial Revolution
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
ANTI-BIAS FRAMEWORK ANCHOR STANDARDS:

JU.9-12.11 - I relate to all people as individuals rather than representatives of groups
and can identify stereotypes when I see or hear them.
JU.9-12.12 - I can recognize, describe and distinguish unfairness and injustice at
different levels of society.
AC.9-12.17 - I take responsibility for standing up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice.
AC.9-12.18 - I have the courage to speak up to people when their words, actions or
views are biased and hurtful, and I will communicate with respect even when we
disagree.
AC.9-12.19 - I stand up to exclusion, prejudice and discrimination, even when it’s not
popular or easy or when no one else does.
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• The Scientific Revolution gave Europeans a new way to view humankind’s place in
the universe while Enlightenment beliefs and thoughts impacted the politics, art,
music, and literature of Europe in the 18th century.
• How the Industrial Revolution leads to Imperialism.
How did European expansion and the slave trade affect the people of Africa
culturally, socially, politically, economically?
How did the Europeans change Mesoamerica culturally, politically, socially,
economically?
How did Enlightenment effect European government?
How did revolutions change Europe and the world?
How did the Industrial Revolution change humanity?
What is the relationship between imperialism and oppression?
Content Standards
Literacy Skills
Reading Standards for Literacy
10-12. RH1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and
secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an
understanding of the text as a whole.
10-12. RH.2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary
source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the
key details and ideas.
10-12.RH.5 Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including
how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the
whole.
Strand 2 Concept 1: PO1-PO7
Strand 2 Concept 5 PO1: Describe the religious, economic, social, and political
interactions among civilizations that resulted from early exploration.
Strand 2 Concept 6 PO2: Explain how new ideas (i.e., Heliocentric, Scientific Method,
Newton’s Laws) changed the way people understood the world.
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Strand 2 Concept 6 PO3: Explain how Enlightenment ideas influenced political thought
and social change.
10-12.RH.6. Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or
issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
10-12.RH.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in
diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to
address a question or solve a problem.
Writing Standards for Literacy
10-12.WHST.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content:
a) Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s),
distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization
that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
10-12.WHST. 4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
10-12.WHST.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
Speaking and Listening Standards for Literacy
10-12.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one
on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics,
texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study;
explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other
research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of
ideas.
b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set
clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning
and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify,
verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative
perspectives.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and
evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and
determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the
investigation or complete the task.
Strand 2 Concept 6 PO4: Analyze the developments of the French Revolution and rule
of Napoleon.
Strand 2 Concept 6 PO5: Explain the revolutionary and independence movements in
Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Haiti, South America).
Strand 2 Concept 7 PO1: Explain the rationale (e.g., need for raw materials, domination
of markets, advent of national competition, spread of European culture/religion) for
imperialism.
Strand 2 Concept 6 PO6: Analyze the social, political, and economic development and
impact of the Industrial Revolution
Strand 2 Concept 7 PO2: Trace the development of the British Empire around the
world (e.g., America, Southeast Asia, South Pacific, India, Africa, the Suez).
Strand 2 Concept 7 PO3: Describe the division of the world into empires and spheres of
influence during the 18th and 19th centuries (e.g., British, French, Dutch, Spanish,
American, and Belgian).
Strand 2 Concept 7 PO4: Analyze the effects of European and American colonialism on
their colonies (e.g., artificially drawn boundaries, one-crop economies, creation of
economic dependence, population relocation, cultural suppression).
Strand 2 Concept 7 PO5: Analyze the responses to imperialism (e.g., Boxer Rebellion,
Sepoy Rebellion, Opium Wars, and Zulu Wars) by people under colonial rule at the end
of the 19th century.
Possible Activities and Readings
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Possible Performance Assessments
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Before and After Columbian Exchange: Empire Profile. Inca, Aztecs, Kingdom
of Kongo, Benin.
Multimedia project on the African Diaspora: art, music, poetry.
Harkness Discussion: Pro’s and Cons of the Columbian Exchange.
Explorer Project – Research an explorer, put together a presentation for
funding for their expedition.
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Tourist Pamphlet advertising life in one of the empires during this time
period.
 Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution Speed Dating.
 Primary Source Analysis: Women of the Scientific Revolution and
Enlightenment.
 Primary Source Analysis: Simon Bolivar “Jamaica Letter”, Declaration of the
Rights of Man and Citizen, Declaration of Independence.
 Flow Chart of the time period. Which events led to or were caused by other
events?
 Before and After the Revolutions: what really changed?
 Urban Game – Simulation of change brought on by Industrial Revolution
 Poster advertising women’s suffrage.
 “How to Imperialize for Dummies” Children’s Book Project
 Primary Source Analysis: Maps of Africa, before and after European
Imperialism.
 Congo: A case study. Congo before and during Belgian rule.
 Primary source analysis: African Responses to Imperialism.
 India: A case study. India before and during British rule.
Readings:
 Columbus’ Journals
 Journals from Slave Ships:
 http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/routes/from-africa-to-america/shipjournals/
 Visual Record of Slave Trade and Slave life:
http://hitchcock.itc.virginia.edu/Slavery/index.php
 Simon Bolivar “Jamaica Letter”
 U.S. Declaration of Independence
 Declaration of Rights of Man and Citizen
 English translations of Olympe DeGouges works on feminism:
http://www.olympedegouges.eu/
 Mary Wollstonecraft, “Vindication of the Rights of Women”
http://www.bartleby.com/144/
 Adam Hochschild, King Leopold’s Ghost
 Primary Sources, maps of Africa: http://library.stanford.edu/collections/mapsafrica
 Rudyard Kipling, “White Man’s Burden”
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Medical autopsy on the Gunpowder Empires reviewing the internal and
external causes of decline
Essay: Students will pick from the Haitian, American, French and Latin
American Revolutions and analyze its success and failures in an essay.
Harkness Discussion: Goals and Outcomes of the American, French, Haitian
and Latin American Revolutions.
Recipe for a Revolution (students in groups create a “recipe” for one of the
revolutions).
Essay: Compare/Contrast the political and cultural changes brought to China
and Japan by Westerners
* Summative Assessment: Essay: Analyze the connections between the
Enlightenment, Revolutions, Industrial Revolution and Imperialism.
* Priority Standard
** Anti-Bias Framework http://perspectives.tolerance.org/?q=node/49
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World History: Grade 10, Quarter 4
*Themes:
Topic: Global Conflict and Modernization
Interaction with Environment:
 The Industrial Revolution and rapidly advancing technology affected WWI and
WWII.
 Decolonization in Asia, Middle East and Africa and its consequences.
Culture
 Cultural and social changes brought to the world by the end of WW1
 Post WWII brings new conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society and
Culture.
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Decolonization in Asia, Middle East and Africa and its consequences.
Politics:
 Militarism, Nationalism, and a crisis in the Balkans led to World War I.
 After 1929, a global economic depression weakens the Western democracies,
which led to the rise of dictators formed quick responses to the global
depression.
 Decolonization in Asia, Middle East and Africa and its consequences.
 As the Cold War developed, most world nations were forced to support one of
the two major powers , having a long lasting impact on global relations
 Conversion from a socialist to a free-market economy has created many
problems in the former Soviet states.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
ANTI-BIAS FRAMEWORK ANCHOR STANDARDS:
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

JU.9-12.12 - I can recognize, describe and distinguish unfairness and injustice at
different levels of society.
JU.9-12.13- I can explain the short and long-term impact of biased words and
behaviors and unjust practices, laws and institutions that limit the rights and freedoms
of people based on their identity groups.
AC.9-12.17 I take responsibility for standing up to exclusion, prejudice and injustice.
AC.9-12.19 - I stand up to exclusion, prejudice and discrimination, even when it’s not
popular or easy or when no one else does.
AC.9-12.20 – I will join with diverse people to plan and carry out collective action
against exclusion, prejudice and discrimination, and we will be thoughtful and creative
in our actions in order to achieve our goals.
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In what ways did the system of European nation-states help to lead to WWI?
How was World War One a world war?
How did WWI create a change in the role of women and the women’s rights
movement?
What was the global impact of the Great Depression?
How did culture and society change after WWI?
How did culture, society, and the economy change after WWII?
What was decolonization and what are its consequences?
What was the global response to the spread of Communism?
Content Standards
Literacy Skills
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO3: Explain the end of World War I and its aftermath.
Strand 2 Concept 7 PO1: Explain the rationale (e.g., need for raw materials, domination
of markets, advent of national competition, and spread of European culture/religion)
for imperialism.
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO1: Examine the causes of World War I.
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO2: Analyze the impact of the changing nature of warfare in
Reading Standards for Literacy
10-12. RH1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and
secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an
understanding of the text as a whole.
10-12. RH.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the
course of a text.
Strand 2 Concept 1 PO1-PO7
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World War I.
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO4: Examine the period between World War I and World War II
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO6: Examine genocide as a manifestation of extreme nationalism
in the 20th century (e.g., Armenia, Holocaust, Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo and
Sudan).
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO7: Analyze the political, economic and cultural impact of the
Cold War
Strand 2 Concept 8 PO 8: Compare independence movements of emerging nations
(e.g., Africa, Asia, Middle East, and Latin America).
Strand 2 Concept 9 PO 1: Explain the fall of the Soviet Union and its impact on the
world.
Strand 2 Concept 9 PO 3: Describe the development of political and economic
interdependence during the second half of the twentieth century.
Strand 2 Concept 9 PO 2
Explain the roots of terrorism.
Strand 2 Concept 9 PO 4: Examine environmental issues from a global perspective
(e.g., pollution, population pressures, global warming, and scarcity of resources).
10-12.RH.5 Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including
how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the
whole.
10-12.RH.6. Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or
issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
Writing Standards for Literacy
10-12.WHST.1 Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content:
a) Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s),
distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization
that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
10-12.WHST. 4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
10-12.WHST.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
Possible Activities and Readings
Performance Assessments
Rock, Paper, Scissors, Communism.
Berlin Wall Graffiti: East versus West.
Current Events Discussions.
Research and presentations: Decolonization in Africa, Middle East and Asia. Goals
and Outcomes of independence.
Primary Sources: Relationship between cricket and politics in South Asia.
9/11 and the roots of modern terrorism.
Terrorism and political goals: IRA.
Compare various countries in Africa, Latin America, Asia and their responses to
environmental issues.
Essay: The challenges of African Decolonization
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Versailles Simulation and response essay to “negotiations”.
Genocide and Human Rights Research project: Burma, Rwanda, Tibet, Cambodia,
Bosnia.
Students will get a key event from 1990-now and analyze its causes and how it is
affecting today’s world.
* Summative Performance Assessment: Research project and presentation:
Students are assigned a country and have to research its Society, Politics, Culture
and Economy from 1950-1989.
TUSD Office of Curriculum Development 3.0
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2016-17 TUSD CURRICULUM MAP-World History
http://exhibitions.nypl.org/africanaage/essay-challenge-of-decolonizationafrica.html
Environmental History Resources: http://www.eh-resources.org/index.html
A Long to Water: a novel: based on a true story by Linda Sue Park
Out of Shadows by Jason Wallace
The Bright Continent: breaking rules and making changes in modern Africa by
Dayo Olopade
Readings:
Primary sources: Issues of Nationalism in North Africa and South Asia.
Cambodian Genocide: http://worldwithoutgenocide.org/genocides-andconflicts/cambodian-genocide
Cambodian Genocide: http://www.ppu.org.uk/genocide/g_cambodia.html
Rwandan Genocide:
http://www.unitedhumanrights.org/Genocide/genocide_in_rwanda.htm
Primary Sources, Soviet Union:
http://chnm.gmu.edu/1989/items/browse/?tags=Soviet+Union
Primary Sources, Ho Chi Minh:
http://spartacuseducational.com/VNhochiminh.htm
Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys
Keeping Corner by Kashmira Sheth
I remember Beirut by Zeina Dewey
* Priority Standard
** Anti-Bias Framework http://perspectives.tolerance.org/?q=node/494
TUSD Office of Curriculum Development 3.0
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