Millipede Activities Vocabulary Labeling

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Millipede Activities
Vocabulary and Labeling
Vocabulary
Fill in the blanks.
arthropod - an invertebrate animal with an outer skeleton, body segments, and legs
with joints. Examples include spiders, crabs, butterflies, and millipedes.
exoskeleton - an outer skeleton that supports and protects the body.
segment - a repeated unit; in millipedes, most segments have two pairs of legs.
terrarium - a glass or plastic container for growing plants or animals.
pesticides - chemicals that are applied to plants to remove insects.
decomposer - an organism that feeds on rotting leaves and vegetation.
nymph - immature form of insect or arthropod; resembles adult in structure.
Labeling
Can you label the body
parts on the millipede? Fill
in the blanks below with the
words in the word bank.
1
2
segment
exoskeleton
4
5
antenna
end segment
exoskeleton
head
legs
mouth
oceli (eye)
segment
head
oceli (eye)
antenna
6
mouth
7
legs
3
end segment
Illustrated by Veronica Zoeckler
© 2015 Ward’s Science
Contact the Ward’s Science Plus Us team [email protected] Phone: 866-260-0501
8
Millipede Activities
Observe and Research
Observe
How many legs does a millipede have? Use math to count segments and legs. Find out
how many legs your millipede has. They add segments as they grow, and each new
segment adds legs.
My Millipede
segments =
legs =
(4 legs per segment)
Research
How are millipedes and centipedes different? Research both animals by reading and looking
at pictures. Write facts you discover about each below.
Millipedes
vs.
Centipedes
rounded body
flat body
slow walkers
fast runners
detritivores, decomposers
carnivores
do not sting
have modified legs with venom
2 pairs of legs on most segments
1 pair of legs per segment
legs attached to bottom of body
legs attached to sides of body
burrowers
live in cracks, crevices, under logs
Illustrated by Veronica Zoeckler
© 2015 Ward’s Science
Contact the Ward’s Science Plus Us team [email protected] Phone: 866-260-0501
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