Coding Companion for Cardiology/Cardiothoracic/ Vascular Surgery

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A TCR.book Page 1 M onday,N ovem ber21,2011 2:11 PM
Coding Companion for
Cardiology/Cardiothoracic/
Vascular Surgery
A comprehensive illustrated guide to coding and reimbursement
2013
A TCR.book Page i M onday,N ovem ber21,2011 2:11 PM
Contents
Getting Started with Coding Companion .............................i
Breast ..................................................................................1
General Musculoskeletal ......................................................2
Neck and Thorax .................................................................4
Larynx ...............................................................................24
Trachea and Bronchi ..........................................................28
Lungs and Pleura ...............................................................58
Heart and Pericardium .....................................................132
Arteries and Veins ............................................................288
Lymph Nodes ..................................................................567
Mediastinum ...................................................................570
CPT only © 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
Coding Companion for Cardiology/Cardiothoracic/Vascular Surgery
Diaphragm ......................................................................574
Esophagus .......................................................................577
Abdomen ........................................................................624
Thyroid Gland .................................................................629
Parathyroid......................................................................630
Nervous System...............................................................633
Medicine .........................................................................640
Appendix.........................................................................702
Evaluation and Management ...........................................757
Index...............................................................................777
© 2011 Optum
Contents
33750
33750 Shunt; subclavian to pulmonary artery
(Blalock-Taussig type operation)
(Potts-Smith type operation), for flow to one
lung (classical Glenn procedure), see 33766.
For superior vena cava to pulmonary artery
for flow to both lungs (bidirectional Glenn
procedure), see 33767.
ICD-9-CM Procedural
39.0
Systemic to pulmonary artery shunt
39.61 Extracorporeal circulation auxiliary to
open heart surgery
Anesthesia
33750 00560
ICD-9-CM Diagnostic
424.3 Pulmonary valve disorders
745.2 Tetralogy of Fallot
746.01 Congenital atresia of pulmonary valve
746.02 Congenital stenosis of pulmonary
valve
746.09 Other congenital anomalies of
pulmonary valve
746.1 Congenital tricuspid atresia and
stenosis
746.2 Ebstein's anomaly
In its unmodified form, this operation involves
dividing the left subclavian artery, tying off
the end of the artery going to the arm, and
creating a connection between the end of this
artery coming from the heart and the side of
the pulmonary artery. The difficulty with this
operation is making the connection to the
pulmonary artery exactly the right size to
supply adequate, but not excessive blood flow
to the lungs. Instead, a modified version of
the operation is usually performed. The artery
to the arm is not divided. Instead, one end of
a 3 mm to 5 mm diameter tube of Gortex is
sewn to the side of the artery to the arm and
the other end is sewn to the side of the
pulmonary artery. The size of the tube
determines the amount of blood flow to the
lungs. Cardiopulmonary bypass is not
required. The ductus arteriosus (a connection
between the aorta and pulmonary artery that
has been supplying blood to the lungs, but
usually closes at birth) is tied off.
Coding Tips
This procedure is sometimes performed in
conjunction with 33684. When ligation and
takedown of systemic-to-pulmonary artery
shunt is performed in conjunction with this
procedure, it should be reported separately;
see 33924. Do not append modifier 63 to
33750 as the description or nature of the
procedure includes infants up to 4 kg. For
shunt, ascending aorta to pulmonary artery
(Waterston type operation), see 33755. For
descending aorta to pulmonary artery
746.9 Unspecified congenital anomaly of
heart
Terms To Know
atresia. Congenital closure or absence of a
tubular organ or an opening to the body
surface.
Blalock-Taussig procedure. Anastomosis
of the left subclavian artery to the left
pulmonary artery or the right subclavian artery
to the right pulmonary artery in order to shunt
some of the blood flow from the systemic to
the pulmonary circulation.
cardiopulmonary bypass. Venous blood
is diverted to a heart-lung machine, which
mechanically pumps and oxygenates the
blood temporarily so the heart can be
bypassed while an open procedure on the
heart or coronary arteries is performed. During
bypass, the lungs are deflated and immobile.
tetralogy of Fallot. Specific combination
of congenital cardiac defects: obstruction of
the right ventricular outflow tract with
pulmonary stenosis, interventricular septal
defect, malposition of the aorta, overriding
the interventricular septum and receiving
blood from both the venous and arterial
systems, and enlargement of the right
ventricle.
tricuspid atresia. Congenital absence of
the valve that may occur with other defects,
such as atrial septal defect, pulmonary atresia,
and transposition of great vessels.
Waterston procedure. Type of
aortopulmonary shunting done to increase
pulmonary blood flow where the ascending
aorta is anastomosed to the right pulmonary
artery.
CCI Version 17.3
0213T, 0216T, 0228T, 0230T, 32100, 32422,
32551, 33140-33141, 33210-33211,
33254-33256, 33310-33315, 36000,
36400-36410, 36420-36430, 36440, 36600,
36640, 37202, 39000-39010, 43752,
51701-51703, 62310-62319, 64400-64435,
64445-64450, 64479, 64483, 64490, 64493,
64505-64530, 69990, 93000-93010,
93040-93042, 93318, 94002, 94200, 94250,
94680-94690, 94770, 95812-95816, 95819,
95822, 95829, 95955, 96360, 96365, 96372,
96374-96376, 99148-99149, 99150
Note: These CCI edits are used for Medicare.
Other payers may reimburse on codes listed
above.
Medicare Edits
33750
Fac Non-Fac
RVU
RVU
FUD
41.7
41.7
90
MUE
Modifiers
1
51 N/A 62*
33750
* with documentation
Medicare References: None
Status
A
80
congenital. Present at birth, occurring
through heredity or an influence during
gestation up to the moment of birth.
Potts-Smith-Gibson procedure.
Side-to-side anastomosis of the aorta and left
pulmonary artery creating a shunt that
enlarges as the child grows.
shunt. Surgically created passage between
blood vessels or other natural passages, such
as an arteriovenous anastomosis, to divert or
bypass blood flow from the normal channel.
CPT only © 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
Coding Companion for Cardiology/Cardiothoracic Surgery/Vascular Surgery
© 2011 Optum
Heart and Pericardium — 239
Heart and Pericardium
Explanation
stenosis. Narrowing or constriction of a
passage.
36400
36400 Venipuncture, younger than age 3 years,
necessitating physician's skill, not to be
used for routine venipuncture; femoral or
jugular vein
Explanation
A needle is inserted through the skin to puncture
the femoral or jugular vein of a child younger than
age 3. The needle is inserted into the vein and used
for the withdrawal of blood for diagnostic study or
for the therapeutic infusion of intravenous
medication. A soft flexible catheter may be placed
for prolonged therapy. Once the procedure is
complete, the needle or catheter is withdrawn and
pressure is applied over the puncture site to control
bleeding. Use this code for venipuncture
necessitating a physician's skill, not when routine
venipuncture is performed.
36405-36406
36405 Venipuncture, younger than age 3 years,
necessitating physician's skill, not to be
used for routine venipuncture; scalp vein
36406
other vein
Explanation
A needle is inserted through the skin to puncture a
vein of a child younger than age 3. In 36405, the
scalp vein is punctured and in 36406, a vein other
than the femoral, jugular, or scalp vein is used. The
needle is inserted into the vein and used for the
withdrawal of blood or for the therapeutic infusion
of intravenous medication. A soft flexible catheter
may be placed for prolonged therapy. Once the
procedure is complete, the needle or catheter is
withdrawn and pressure is applied over the puncture
site to control bleeding. Use this code for
venipuncture necessitating a physician's skill, not
when routine venipuncture is performed.
36410
Appendix
36410 Venipuncture, age 3 years or older,
necessitating physician's skill (separate
procedure), for diagnostic or therapeutic
purposes (not to be used for routine
venipuncture)
Explanation
A needle is inserted through the skin to puncture a
vein of a person 3 years of age or older. The needle
is inserted into the vein and used for the withdrawal
of blood for diagnostic study or for the therapeutic
infusion of intravenous medication. A soft flexible
catheter may be placed for prolonged therapy. Once
the procedure is complete, the needle or catheter
is withdrawn and pressure is applied over the
puncture site to control bleeding. Use this code for
venipuncture necessitating a physician's skill, not
when routine venipuncture is performed.
© 2011 Optum
702 — Appendix
maintain blood pressure. Report 36455 if the child
is other than a newborn.
36415-36416
36415 Collection of venous blood by
venipuncture
36416 Collection of capillary blood specimen (eg,
finger, heel, ear stick)
36510
Explanation
Explanation
A needle is inserted into the skin over a vein to
puncture the blood vessel and withdraw blood for
venous collection in 36415. In 36416, a prick is
made into the finger, heel, or ear and capillary blood
that pools at the puncture site is collected in a
pipette. In either case, the blood is used for
diagnostic study and no catheter is placed.
The physician catheterizes the umbilical vein for
diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. The physician
cleanses the umbilical cord stump and locates the
umbilical vein. A catheter is inserted in the vein for
reasons including blood sampling or administering
medication.
36420-36425
36660 Catheterization, umbilical artery, newborn,
for diagnosis or therapy
36420 Venipuncture, cutdown; younger than age
1 year
36425
age 1 or over
Explanation
The physician makes an incision in the skin directly
over the vessel and dissects the area surrounding
the vein. A needle is passed into the vein for the
withdrawal of blood or for the infusion of
intravenous medication of a patient under 12
months of age (in 36420) or over 12 months of age
(in 36425). A catheter may be left behind. Once
the procedure is complete, the incision is repaired
with a layered closure.
36430
36510 Catheterization of umbilical vein for
diagnosis or therapy, newborn
36660
Explanation
The physician catheterizes an umbilical artery in a
newborn for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
The physician prepares the umbilical artery and
passes a catheter sheath inside the lumen for arterial
access. The catheter is attached to a pressure line
that maintains patency of the arterial lumen. The
access is used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes,
allowing the drawing of blood for tests or instillation
of medication.
70373
70373 Laryngography, contrast, radiological
supervision and interpretation
36430 Transfusion, blood or blood components
Explanation
Explanation
A radiographic contrast study is performed of the
larynx, or organ of voice. Iodized oil is given in
conjunction with the examination via tubing, which
allows oil to drip down the patient's throat at the
radiologists discretion. The radiologist, via x-ray
fluoroscopy, simultaneously watches the image
amplified and displayed on a TV monitor. Rapid film
sequencing must be used to record the image,
which may then be studied and interpreted by the
radiologist.
The physician transfuses blood or blood components
to a patient. The physician establishes venous access
with a needle and catheter and transfuses the blood
products.
36440
36440 Push transfusion, blood, 2 years or younger
Explanation
The physician performs a push transfusion on a child
2 years old and under. The physician calculates the
amount of blood to be transfused and slowly injects
it into the patient using a needle or existing
catheter.
70496-70498
36450 Exchange transfusion, blood; newborn
36455
other than newborn
70496 Computed tomographic angiography,
head, with contrast material(s), including
noncontrast images, if performed, and
image postprocessing
70498 Computed tomographic angiography,
neck, with contrast material(s), including
noncontrast images, if performed, and
image postprocessing
Explanation
Explanation
36450-36455
The physician performs an exchange transfusion on
a newborn. The physician calculates the blood
volume to be transfused. A needle is placed in an
artery or in an existing arterial catheter. The patient's
blood is removed and replaced simultaneously to
Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a
procedure used for the imaging of vessels to detect
aneurysms, blood clots, and other vascular
irregularities. Contrast medium is rapidly infused
intravenously, at intervals, usually with an automatic
CPT only © 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
Coding Companion for Cardiology/Cardiothoracic Surgery/Vascular Surgery
A TCR.book Page 757 M onday,N ovem ber21,2011 2:11 PM
Evaluation and Management
Although some of the most commonly used codes by physicians of
all specialties, the E/M service codes are among the least
understood. These codes, introduced in the 1992 CPT® manual,
were designed to increase accuracy and consistency of use in the
reporting of levels of non-procedural encounters. This was
accomplished by defining the E/M codes based on the degree that
certain common elements are addressed or performed and reflected
in the medical documentation.
The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) Work Plan for physicians
consistently lists these codes as an area of continued investigative
review. This is primarily because Medicare payments for these
services total approximately $32 billion per year and are responsible
for close to half of Medicare payments for physician services.
The levels of E/M services define the wide variations in skill, effort,
and time and are required for preventing and/or diagnosing and
treating illness or injury, and promoting optimal health. These codes
are intended to represent physician work, and because much of this
work involves the amount of training, experience, expertise, and
knowledge that a provider may bring to bear on a given patient
presentation, the true indications of the level of this work may be
difficult to recognize without some explanation.
At first glance, selecting an E/M code may appear to be difficult, but
the system of coding clinical visits may be mastered once the
requirements for code selection are learned and used.
Types of E/M Services
When approaching E/M, the first choice that a provider must make
is what type of code to use. The following tables outline the E/M
codes for different levels of care for:
• Office or other outpatient services—new patient
• Office or other outpatient services—established patient
• Hospital observation services—initial care, subsequent, and
discharge
• Hospital inpatient services—initial care, subsequent, and
discharge
• Observation or inpatient care (including admission and discharge
services)
The specifics of the code components that determine code selection
are listed in the table and discussed in the next section. Before a
level of service is decided upon, the correct type of service is
identified.
Office or other outpatient services are E/M services provided in the
physician’s office, the outpatient area, or other ambulatory facility.
Until the patient is admitted to a health care facility, he/she is
considered to be an outpatient.
A new patient is a patient who has not received any face-to-face
professional services from the physician within the past three years.
An established patient is a patient who has received face-to-face
professional services from the physician within the past three years.
In the case of group practices, if a physician of the exact same
specialty or subspecialty has seen the patient within three years, the
patient is considered established.
If a physician is on call or covering for another physician, the
patient’s encounter is classified as it would have been by the
physician who is not available. Thus, a locum tenens physician who
sees a patient on behalf of the patient’s attending physician may not
bill a new patient code unless the attending physician has not seen
the patient for any problem within three years.
Hospital observation services are E/M services provided to patients
who are designated or admitted as “observation status” in a
hospital.
Codes 99218-99220 are used to indicate initial observation care.
These codes include the initiation of the observation status,
supervision of patient care including writing orders, and the
performance of periodic reassessments. These codes are used only
by the physician “admitting” the patient for observation.
Codes 99234-99236 are used to indicate evaluation and
management services to a patient who is admitted to and
discharged from observation status or hospital inpatient on the
same day. If the patient is admitted as an inpatient from observation
on the same day, use the appropriate level of Initial Hospital Care
(99221-99223).
Code 99217 indicates discharge from observation status. It includes
the final physical examination of the patient, instructions, and
preparation of the discharge records. It should not be used when
admission and discharge are on the same date of service. As
mentioned above, report codes 99234-99236 to appropriately
describe same day observation services.
If a patient is in observation longer than one day, subsequent
observation care codes 99224-99226 should be reported. If the
patient is discharged on the second day, observation discharge code
99217 should be reported. If the patient status is changed to
inpatient on a subsequent date, the appropriate inpatient code,
99221-99233, should be reported.
• Consultations—office or other outpatient
• Consultations—inpatient
CPT only © 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
Coding Companion for Cardiology/Cardiothoracic/Vascular Surgery
Initial hospital care is defined as E/M services provided during the
first hospital inpatient encounter with the patient by the admitting
physician. (If a physician other than the admitting physician
© 2011 Optum
Evaluation and Management — 757
Evaluation and Management
This section provides an overview of evaluation and management
(E/M) services, tables that identify the documentation elements
associated with each code, and the federal documentation
guidelines with emphasis on the 1997 exam guidelines. This set of
guidelines represent the most complete discussion of the elements
of the currently accepted versions. The 1997 version identifies both
general multi-system physical examinations and single-system
examinations, but providers may also use the original 1995 version
of the E/M guidelines; both are currently supported by the Centers
for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for audit purposes.
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