Social Studies Curriculum Map

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Social Studies Standards Grade 4
Strand
Sub-Strand
Standard
Understand that...
Benchmark
Taught
Citizenship
&
Government
Civic Skills
1. Democratic government
depends on informed and
engaged citizens who exhibit
civic skills and values, practice
civic discourse, vote and
participate in elections, apply
inquiry and analysis skills and
take action to solve problems
and shape public policy.
Describe how people take
action to influence a decision
on a specific issue; explain
how local, state, national or
tribal governments have
addressed that issue. For
example: Ways people take
action—write a letter, make
phone calls, create an
advertisement or web page,
attend a meeting.
Chapter 5 p148-155
Rosa Parks video
Chapter 11 p308
(Election Years)
Citizenship
&
Government
Governmental
Institutions &
Political
Processes
6. The United States
government has specific
functions that are determined
by the way that power is
delegated and controlled
among various bodies: the
three levels (federal, state,
local) and the three branches
(legislative, executive, judicial)
of government.
Describe tribal government
and some of the services it
provides; distinguish between
United States and tribal forms
of government. For example:
Services provided by tribal
governments—schools,
hunting and fishing regulations.
Chapter 4 p116-119
Chapter 11 p308-311
Hooked on Fishing
3 Branches of Government Slideshow
Citizenship
&
Government
Governmental
Institutions &
Political
Processes
6. The United States
government has specific
functions that are determined
by the way that power is
delegated and controlled
among various bodies: the
Identify the major roles and
Chapter 4 p116-119
responsibilities of elected and
Chapter 11 p308-311
appointed leaders in the
3 Branches of Government Slideshow
community, state and nation;
name some current leaders
who function in these roles and
three levels (federal, state,
local) and the three branches
(legislative, executive, judicial)
of government.
how they are selected. For
example: Mayor, city council
member, state senator,
governor.
1. People make informed
economic choices by
identifying their goals,
interpreting and applying data,
considering the short- and
long-run costs and benefits of
alternative choices and revising
their goals based on their
analysis.
Apply a reasoned decisionmaking process to make a
choice. For example:
Processes—a decision tree or
PACED decision-making
process (Problem, Alternative,
Criteria, Evaluation, Decision).
A choice—evaluating the
benefits and costs of buying a
new game.
Chapter 5 p145-147
Making Choices Activity using poster
Economics
Economics
Reasoning
Skills
Economics
Fundamental
Concepts
3. Because of scarcity
individuals, organizations and
governments must evaluate
trade-offs, make choices and
incur opportunity costs.
Define the productivity of a
resource and describe ways to
increase it. For example:
Productivity equals the amount
of output divided by the
amount of input (resource).
Things that can increase
productivity—division of labor,
specialization, improvements
in technology (the way things
are made). The productivity of
a corn farmer (resource) has
been improved by the use of
specialized equipment,
development of new varieties
of seeds and fertilizers and
improved farming techniques.
Chapter 5 p145-153
Making Choices Activity
Chapter 7 p208 (Assembly Line)
Guest Speaker: The Great Depression
and changes in farming technology
Economics
Microeconomic
Concepts
5. Individuals, businesses and
governments interact and
Describe a market as any
place or manner in which
Chapter 3 p78-83
Chapter 7 p198-199
exchange goods, services and
resources in different ways and
for different reasons;
interactions between buyers
and sellers in a market
determines the price and
quantity exchanged of a good,
service or resource.
buyers and sellers interact to
make exchanges; describe
prices as payments of money
for items exchanged in
markets. For example:
Markets—mall stores, online
shopping, mail orders, garage
sales, employment center.
Prices—$40 for a video game,
$15 for one hour of a worker’s
labor.
Chapter 12 p352-353
Geography
Geospatial
Skills
1. People use geographic
representations and geospatial
technologies to acquire,
process and report information
within a spatial context.
Create and use various kinds
of maps, including overlaying
thematic maps, of places in the
United States, and also
Canada or Mexico; incorporate
the “TODALS” map basics, as
well as points, lines and
colored areas to display spatial
information. For example:
“TODALS” map basics—title,
orientation, date, author,
legend/key, and scale. Spatial
information—cities, roads,
boundaries, bodies of water,
regions.
Chapter 1 p14-15 (Map Skills & Vocab)
Chapter 1 p22-23 (Make a Map)
Chapter 7 p202-203 (Special Purpose
Map)
Room Map and State Map
Geography
Geospatial
Skills
1. People use geographic
representations and geospatial
technologies to acquire,
process and report information
within a spatial context.
Use latitude and longitude on
maps and globes to locate
places in the United States,
and also Canada or Mexico.
Chapter 1 p10
Chapter 2 p50-51
Website & Game
Geography
Geospatial
Skills
2. Geographic inquiry is a
process in which people ask
Choose the most appropriate
data from maps, charts, and
Chapter 1 p 6-11
(thematic maps & atlas webiste)
Geography
Geospatial
Skills
Geography
Places &
Regions
geographic questions and
gather, organize and analyze
information to solve problems
and plan for the future.
graphs in an atlas to answer
specific questions about
geographic issues in the
United States, and also
Canada or Mexico. For
example: How has human
activity had an impact on the
environment? Which region
has the largest population?
Where are the manufacturing
centers of a country? Which
languages are spoken in
different places? Other
questions might relate to
environmental concerns,
transportation issues, flood
control.
2. Geographic inquiry is a
process in which people ask
geographic questions and
gather, organize and analyze
information to solve problems
and plan for the future.
Use photographs or satelliteproduced images to interpret
spatial information about the
United States, and also
Canada or Mexico.
Google Earth
3. Places have physical
characteristics (such as
climate, topography vegetation)
and human characteristics
(such as culture, population,
political and economic
systems).
Locate and identify the
physical and human
characteristics of places in the
United States, and also
Canada or Mexico. For
example: Physical
characteristics—landforms
(Rocky Mountains),
ecosystems (forest), bodies of
water (Mississippi River,
Hudson Bay), soil, vegetation,
Maps US Political Map pR66
US Physical Map pR68
US Maps pR70-71
Major Human Characteristics Activity
weather and climate. Human
characteristics— structures
(Statue of Liberty), bridges
(Golden Gate Bridge), canals
(Erie Canal), cities, political
boundaries, population
distribution, settlement
patterns, language, ethnicity,
nationality, religious beliefs.
Geography
Places &
Regions
4. People construct regions to
identify, organize and interpret
areas of the Earth’s surface,
which simplifies the earth’s
complexity.
1 Name and locate states and
territories, major cities and
state capitals in the United
States.
Chapter 3 p73 The East
Chapter 5 p133 The South
Chapter 7 p191 The Midwest
Chapter 9 p247 The West
Geography
Places &
Regions
4. People construct regions to
identify, organize and interpret
areas of the Earth’s surface,
which simplifies the earth’s
complexity.
Name and locate countries
neighboring the United States
and their major cities. For
example: Countries
neighboring the United
States—Canada, Mexico,
Cuba, Russia; Major cities—
Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg,
Vancouver, Mexico City,
Havana.
North America Map and Test
Geography
Human
Systems
5. The characteristics,
distribution and migration of
human populations on the
earth’s surface influence
human systems (cultural,
economic and political
systems).
Use data to analyze and
explain the changing
distribution of population in the
United States and Canada
over the last century.
pR71 US & website
Geography
Human
6. Geographic factors influence
Explain how geographic
Discussion included with each region
Systems
the distribution, functions,
growth and patterns of cities
and human settlements.
factors affect population
distribution and the growth of
cities in the United States and
Canada. For example:
Geographic factors—climate,
landforms, availability of
natural resources.
Geography
Human
Environment
Interaction
9. The environment influences
human actions; and humans
both adapt to and change, the
environment.
Explain how humans adapt to
and/or modify the physical
environment and how they are
in turn affected by these
adaptations and modifications.
For example: Humans cut
down a forest to clear land for
farming, which leads to soil
erosion. Consequently,
humans have to use more
fertilizer to supplement the
nutrients in the soil.
Dust Bowl Video
Leah’s Pony Story in Reading
Geography
Human
Environment
Interaction
10. The meaning, use,
distribution and importance of
resources changes over time.
Describe how the location of
resources and the distribution
of people and their various
economic activities has
created different regions in the
United States and Canada.
Discussion included with each region
Geography
Human
Environment
Interaction
10. The meaning, use,
distribution and importance of
resources changes over time.
Analyze the impact of
geographic factors on the
development of modern
agricultural regions in
Minnesota and the United
States. For example:
Agricultural regions—"Corn
Belt," "Dairy Belt," crop
Discussion included with each region
regions.
History
Historical
Thinking Skills
2. Historical inquiry is a
process in which multiple
sources and different kinds of
historical evidence are
analyzed to draw conclusions
about how and why things
happened in the past.
Use maps to compare and
pR71 US & website
contrast a particular region in
the United States, and also
Canada or Mexico, at different
points in time. For example:
The United States, Canada, or
Mexico in 1800 versus 1900;
population centers over time;
natural resource use over time.
History
Peoples,
Cultures, &
Change Over
Time
4. The differences and
similarities of cultures around
the world are attributable to
their diverse origins and
histories, and interactions with
other cultures throughout time.
Identify and locate on a map or
globe the origins of peoples in
the local community and state;
create a timeline of when
different groups arrived;
describe why and how they
came.
Shade and label on a world map the
countries that your family originated from
Create a Timeline of when groups arrived
in Minnesota
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