Full Text of the ‘Woznicki Fix’ (2003 Wisconsin Act 47)

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2003 Assembly Bill 196
Date of enactment: August 11, 2003
Date of publication*: August 25, 2003
2003 WISCONSIN ACT 47
AN ACT to renumber and amend 230.13 (3); to amend 19.34 (1), 19.36 (3), 19.36 (7) (a), 59.20 (3) (a), 61.25 (5),
62.09 (11) (f), 230.13 (1) (intro.) and 233.13 (intro.); and to create 19.32 (1bg), (1de), (1dm), (2g) and (4), 19.345,
19.356, 19.36 (10) to (12), 196.135, 230.13 (3) (b) and 808.04 (1m) of the statutes; relating to: access to public
records and granting rule−making authority.
The people of the state of Wisconsin, represented in
senate and assembly, do enact as follows:
JOINT LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL PREFATORY NOTE: This bill
is recommended by the Joint Legislative Council’s Special
Committee on Review of the Open Records Law. The special
committee was directed to review the Wisconsin Supreme
Court decisions in Woznicki v. Erickson and Milwaukee
Teachers’ Educational Association v. Milwaukee Board of
School Directors and recommend legislation implementing
the procedures anticipated in the opinions, amending the
holdings of the opinions, or overturning the opinions. In addition, the special committee was directed to recommend
changes in the open records law to accommodate electronic
communications and to consider the sufficiency of an open
records request and the scope of exemptions to the open
records law.
In Woznicki v. Erickson, 202 Wis. 2d 178, 549 N.W.2d
699 (1996), the Wisconsin Supreme Court held that there is no
blanket statutory or common law exception under the open
records law that will prevent public access to public employee
disciplinary or personnel records. The court stated that these
records are subject to the balancing test under which the custodian of the records determines whether permitting inspection
would result in harm to the public interest outweighing the
legislative policy recognizing the public interest in record
inspection. Because the privacy and reputational interests of
the school district employee in this case were implicated by
the potential release of records, the court held that the
employee had the right to judicial review of the decision to
release the records. This conclusion necessitated the holding
that the record custodian could not release the records without
notifying the employee of the pending release and allowing a
reasonable amount of time for the employee to appeal the
decision to release the records. In Milwaukee Teachers’
Education Association v. Milwaukee Board of School Directors, 227 Wis. 2d 779, 596 N.W.2d 403 (1999), the court formally extended to any public employee the right to notice
about, and judicial review of, a custodian’s decision to release
information implicating the privacy or reputational interests
of the individual public employee. However, in these cases,
the court did not establish any criteria for determining when
privacy or reputational interests are affected or for providing
notice to affected parties. Further, the logical extension of
these opinions is that the right to notice and the right to judicial
review may extend to any record subject, regardless of
whether the record subject is a public employee.
This bill partially codifies Woznicki and Milwaukee
Teachers’. In general, the bill applies the rights afforded by
Woznicki and Milwaukee Teachers’ only to a defined set of
records pertaining to employees residing in Wisconsin. As an
overall construct, records relating to employees under the bill
can be placed in the following 3 categories:
1. Employee−related records that may be released under
the general balancing test without providing a right of notice
or judicial review to the employee record subject.
2. Employee−related records that may be released under
the balancing test only after a notice of impending release and
the right of judicial review have been provided to the
employee record subject.
3. Employee−related records that are absolutely closed
to public access under the open records law.
* Section 991.11, WISCONSIN STATUTES 2001−02 : Effective date of acts. “Every act and every portion of an act enacted by the legislature over
the governor’s partial veto which does not expressly prescribe the time when it takes effect shall take effect on the day after its date of publication
as designated” by the secretary of state [the date of publication may not be more than 10 working days after the date of enactment].
2003 Wisconsin Act 47
SECTION 1. 19.32 (1bg), (1de), (1dm), (2g) and (4) of
the statutes are created to read:
19.32 (1bg) “Employee” means any individual who
is employed by an authority, other than an individual
holding local public office or a state public office, or any
individual who is employed by an employer other than an
authority.
(1de) “Local governmental unit” has the meaning
given in s. 19.42 (7u).
(1dm) “Local public office” has the meaning given
in s. 19.42 (7w), and also includes any appointive office
or position of a local governmental unit in which an individual serves as the head of a department, agency, or division of the local governmental unit, but does not include
any office or position filled by a municipal employee, as
defined in s. 111.70 (1) (i).
(2g) “Record subject” means an individual about
whom personally identifiable information is contained in
a record.
(4) “State public office” has the meaning given in s.
19.42 (13), but does not include a position identified in
s. 20.923 (6) (f) to (gm).
NOTE: This SECTION:
1. Creates a definition of the term “employee” to mean
any public sector or private sector employee, other than an
individual holding a local public office or a state public office.
2. Creates a definition of the term “local public office”
that incorporates the definition of the term “local public
office” contained in s. 19.42 (7w), stats. The latter statutory
provision states that a “local public office” means any of the
following offices:
a. An elective office of a local governmental unit.
b. A county administrator or administrative coordinator
or a city or village manager.
c. An appointive office or position of a local governmental unit in which an individual serves for a specified term,
except a position limited to the exercise of ministerial action
or a position filled by an independent contractor.
d. The position of member of the board of directors of a
local exposition district not serving for a specified term.
e. An appointive office or position of a local government
which is filled by the governing body of the local government
or the executive or administrative head of the local government and in which the incumbent serves at the pleasure of the
appointing authority, except a clerical position, a position limited to the exercise of ministerial action, or a position filled by
an independent contractor.
Section 19.42 (7w), stats., and s. 19.32 (1dm), stats., as
created in this bill, specifically refer to certain appointive
offices or positions of a local governmental unit. The obvious
purpose is to provide that an individual who holds an upper
level governmental office or position and who has broad discretionary authority may not seek judicial review in order to
prevent the release of records that name that individual. The
description of an appointive office or position of a local governmental unit contained in s. 19.32 (1dm), stats., is broader
than the description contained in s. 19.42 (7w), stats. For
example, unlike the definition contained in s. 19.42 (7w),
stats., the definition in the proposed statute includes the
offices of police chief and fire chief, positions whose incumbents do not serve for a statutorily specified term, may be
removed only for cause, and are not appointed by the governing body of a local government. Section 111.70 (1) (i), stats.,
defines the term “municipal employee” to mean an individual
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2003 Assembly Bill 196
employed by a municipal employer other than an independent
contractor, supervisor, or confidential, managerial, or executive employee.
3. Creates a definition of the term “record subject” to
mean an individual about whom personally identifiable information is contained in a record.
4. Creates a definition of the term “state public office” to
mean the numerous agency positions listed in ss. 19.42 (13)
and 20.923, stats. However, the provision specifically
excludes from the definition a position in the Legislative
Council staff, the Legislative Fiscal Bureau, and the Legislative Reference Bureau. Thus, a person in one of these positions may have a right of judicial review before a record in
which the person is named may be released.
SECTION 2. 19.34 (1) of the statutes is amended to
read:
19.34 (1) Each authority shall adopt, prominently
display and make available for inspection and copying at
its offices, for the guidance of the public, a notice containing a description of its organization and the established times and places at which, the legal custodian
under s. 19.33 from whom, and the methods whereby, the
public may obtain information and access to records in its
custody, make requests for records, or obtain copies of
records, and the costs thereof. The notice shall also separately identify each position of the authority that constitutes a local public office or a state public office. This
subsection does not apply to members of the legislature
or to members of any local governmental body.
NOTE: Generally, under current law, an authority having
custody of a public record must adopt, prominently display,
and make available for inspection and display at its offices a
notice containing a description of its organization and the
established times and places at which the public may obtain
information and access to records in the custody of the authority. The notice must also identify the legal custodian of the
records and the costs of obtaining copies of the records. Such
notice, obviously, is for the guidance of members of the public
who may wish to request copies of open records.
This SECTION additionally requires the notice to separately identify each position of the authority that in its opinion
constitutes a local public office or a state public office as
defined in s. 19.32 (1dm) and (4), stats. [See SECTION 1 of the
bill.]
SECTION 3. 19.345 of the statutes is created to read:
19.345 Time computation. In ss. 19.33 to 19.39,
when a time period is provided for performing an act,
whether the period is expressed in hours or days, the
whole of Saturday, Sunday, and any legal holiday, from
midnight to midnight, shall be excluded in computing the
period.
NOTE: This SECTION provides that Saturday, Sunday, and
any legal holiday will be excluded in measuring time periods
under the open records law.
SECTION 4. 19.356 of the statutes is created to read:
19.356 Notice to record subject; right of action.
(1) Except as authorized in this section or as otherwise
provided by statute, no authority is required to notify a
record subject prior to providing to a requester access to
a record containing information pertaining to that record
subject, and no person is entitled to judicial review of the
2003 Assembly Bill 196
decision of an authority to provide a requester with
access to a record.
(2) (a) Except as provided in pars. (b) and (c) and as
otherwise authorized or required by statute, if an authority decides under s. 19.35 to permit access to a record specified in this paragraph, the authority shall, before permitting access and within 3 days after making the
decision to permit access, serve written notice of that
decision on any record subject to whom the record pertains, either by certified mail or by personally serving the
notice on the record subject. The notice shall briefly
describe the requested record and include a description of
the rights of the record subject under subs. (3) and (4).
This paragraph applies only to the following records:
1. A record containing information relating to an
employee that is created or kept by the authority and that
is the result of an investigation into a disciplinary matter
involving the employee or possible employment−related
violation by the employee of a statute, ordinance, rule,
regulation, or policy of the employee’s employer.
2. A record obtained by the authority through a subpoena or search warrant.
3. A record prepared by an employer other than an
authority, if that record contains information relating to
an employee of that employer, unless the employee
authorizes the authority to provide access to that information.
(b) Paragraph (a) does not apply to an authority who
provides access to a record pertaining to an employee to
the employee who is the subject of the record or to his or
her representative to the extent required under s. 103.13
or to a recognized or certified collective bargaining representative to the extent required to fulfill a duty to bargain or pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement
under ch. 111.
(c) Paragraph (a) does not apply to access to a record
produced in relation to a function specified in s. 106.54
or 230.45 or subch. II of ch. 111 if the record is provided
by an authority having responsibility for that function.
(3) Within 5 days after receipt of a notice under sub.
(2) (a), a record subject may provide written notification
to the authority of his or her intent to seek a court order
restraining the authority from providing access to the
requested record.
(4) Within 10 days after receipt of a notice under sub.
(2) (a), a record subject may commence an action seeking
a court order to restrain the authority from providing
access to the requested record. If a record subject commences such an action, the record subject shall name the
authority as a defendant. Notwithstanding s. 803.09, the
requester may intervene in the action as a matter of right.
If the requester does not intervene in the action, the
authority shall notify the requester of the results of the
proceedings under this subsection and sub. (5).
(5) An authority shall not provide access to a
requested record within 12 days of sending a notice per-
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taining to that record under sub. (2) (a). In addition, if the
record subject commences an action under sub. (4), the
authority shall not provide access to the requested record
during pendency of the action. If the record subject
appeals or petitions for review of a decision of the court
or the time for appeal or petition for review of a decision
adverse to the record subject has not expired, the authority shall not provide access to the requested record until
any appeal is decided, until the period for appealing or
petitioning for review expires, until a petition for review
is denied, or until the authority receives written notice
from the record subject that an appeal or petition for
review will not be filed, whichever occurs first.
(6) The court, in an action commenced under sub. (4),
may restrain the authority from providing access to the
requested record. The court shall apply substantive common law principles construing the right to inspect, copy,
or receive copies of records in making its decision.
(7) The court, in an action commenced under sub. (4),
shall issue a decision within 10 days after the filing of the
summons and complaint and proof of service of the summons and complaint upon the defendant, unless a party
demonstrates cause for extension of this period. In any
event, the court shall issue a decision within 30 days after
those filings are complete.
(8) If a party appeals a decision of the court under
sub. (7), the court of appeals shall grant precedence to the
appeal over all other matters not accorded similar precedence by law. An appeal shall be taken within the time
period specified in s. 808.04 (1m).
(9) (a) Except as otherwise authorized or required by
statute, if an authority decides under s. 19.35 to permit
access to a record containing information relating to a
record subject who is an officer or employee of the
authority holding a local public office or a state public
office, the authority shall, before permitting access and
within 3 days after making the decision to permit access,
serve written notice of that decision on the record subject,
either by certified mail or by personally serving the
notice on the record subject. The notice shall briefly
describe the requested record and include a description of
the rights of the record subject under par. (b).
(b) Within 5 days after receipt of a notice under par.
(a), a record subject may augment the record to be
released with written comments and documentation
selected by the record subject. Except as otherwise
authorized or required by statute, the authority under par.
(a) shall release the record as augmented by the record
subject.
NOTE: This SECTION:
1. Creates s. 19.356 (1), stats., to limit Woznicki by stating
that, except as otherwise provided, no person is entitled to
notice or judicial review of a decision of an authority to provide a requester with access to a record.
2. Creates s. 19 356 (2), stats., to provide that if an authority decides to permit access to certain records, the authority
must, before permitting access and within 3 days after making
2003 Wisconsin Act 47
the decision to permit access, serve written notice (personally
or by certified mail) of that decision on any record subject to
whom the records pertain. The reference to s. 19.35, stats.,
indicates that the authority must continue to apply the open
records law balancing test before deciding to release the
record. The records to which this notice applies includes only:
(a) any record containing information relating to an employee
that is created or kept by the authority as the result of an investigation into a disciplinary matter involving the employee or
possible employment−related violation by the employee of a
statute, ordinance, rule, regulation, or policy of the employee’s employer; (b) any record obtained by the authority
through a subpoena or search warrant; or (c) any record prepared by an employer other than an authority, if that record
contains information relating to an employee of that
employer, unless the employee authorizes the authority to
provide access to that information. The notice requirement is
not applicable in the following circumstances:
a. An authority provides access to a record, pertaining to
an employee, to the employee who is the subject of the record,
to his or her representative, or to his or her bargaining representative.
b. An authority releases a record produced for equal
rights, discrimination, or fair employment law compliance
purposes.
3. Creates s. 19.356 (3) to (8), stats., to provide that
within 5 days after receipt of a notice of the impending release
of a record, the record subject may provide written notification to the authority of the record subject’s intent to seek a
court order restraining release of the record. The legal action
must be commenced within 10 days after the record subject
receives notice of release of the record. During this time, the
authority is prohibited from providing access to the record and
must not provide access until any legal action is final. The
court must issue its decision within 10 days after the legal
action has been commenced, unless a party demonstrates
cause for extension of this period. However, the court must
issue a decision within 30 days after commencement of the
proceedings. Also, a court of appeals must grant precedence
to an appeal of a circuit court decision over all other matters
not accorded similar precedence by law. An appeal must be
taken within 20 days after entry of the judgment or order
appealed from. [See SECTION 14.]
4. Creates s. 19.356 (4), stats., to provide that a requester
may intervene in the action as a matter of right.
5. Creates s. 19.356 (6), stats., to provide that a court may
prevent release of a record by applying substantive common
law principles construing the right to inspect, copy, or receive
copies of records. In general, this standard often requires a
balancing of public harm and public benefit in the release of
a record, rather than balancing private harm against public
benefit.
6. Creates s. 19 365 (9), stats., to provide that an authority
must notify a record subject who holds a local public office or
a state public office of the impending release of a record containing information relating to the employment of the record
subject. The record subject, within 5 days of the receipt of the
notice, may augment the record to be released with written
comments and documentation selected by the record subject.
The authority shall release the augmented record, except as
otherwise authorized or required by statute.
SECTION 5. 19.36 (3) of the statutes is amended to
read:
19.36 (3) CONTRACTORS’ RECORDS. Each Subject to
sub. (12), each authority shall make available for inspection and copying under s. 19.35 (1) any record produced
or collected under a contract entered into by the authority
with a person other than an authority to the same extent
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2003 Assembly Bill 196
as if the record were maintained by the authority. This
subsection does not apply to the inspection or copying of
a record under s. 19.35 (1) (am).
NOTE: See the note to SECTION 7.
SECTION 6. 19.36 (7) (a) of the statutes is amended
to read:
19.36 (7) (a) In this section, “final candidate” means
each applicant for a position who is seriously considered
for appointment or whose name is certified for appointment and whose name is submitted for final consideration to an authority for appointment to any state position, except a position in the classified service, or to any
local public office, as defined in s. 19.42 (7w). “Final
candidate” includes, whenever there are at least 5 candidates for an office or position, each of the 5 candidates
who are considered most qualified for the office or position by an authority, and whenever there are less than 5
candidates for an office or position, each such candidate.
Whenever an appointment is to be made from a group of
more than 5 candidates, “final candidate” also includes
each candidate in the group.
NOTE: Section 19.36 (7), stats., generally provides that,
if an applicant for a position indicates in writing a desire for
confidentiality, an authority may not provide access to any
record relating to the application that may reveal the applicant’s identity. This general provision does not apply to a final
candidate for any local public office “as defined in s. 19.42
(7w)”. Because the bill expands the definition of the term
“local public office” in s. 19.32 (1dm), stats , as created in this
bill, this SECTION applies the expanded definition to the issue
of confidential applications for purposes of consistency. [For
a discussion of the term “local public office” see the note to
SECTION 1 of the bill.]
SECTION 7. 19.36 (10) to (12) of the statutes are
created to read:
19.36 (10) EMPLOYEE PERSONNEL RECORDS. Unless
access is specifically authorized or required by statute, an
authority shall not provide access under s. 19.35 (1) to
records containing the following information, except to
an employee or the employee’s representative to the
extent required under s. 103.13 or to a recognized or certified collective bargaining representative to the extent
required to fulfill a duty to bargain under ch. 111 or pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement under ch. 111:
(a) Information maintained, prepared, or provided by
an employer concerning the home address, home electronic mail address, home telephone number, or social
security number of an employee, unless the employee
authorizes the authority to provide access to such information.
(b) Information relating to the current investigation
of a possible criminal offense or possible misconduct
connected with employment by an employee prior to disposition of the investigation.
(c) Information pertaining to an employee’s employment examination, except an examination score if access
to that score is not otherwise prohibited.
2003 Assembly Bill 196
(d) Information relating to one or more specific
employees that is used by an authority or by the employer
of the employees for staff management planning, including performance evaluations, judgments, or recommendations concerning future salary adjustments or other
wage treatments, management bonus plans, promotions,
job assignments, letters of reference, or other comments
or ratings relating to employees.
(11) RECORDS OF AN INDIVIDUAL HOLDING A LOCAL
PUBLIC OFFICE OR A STATE PUBLIC OFFICE. Unless access is
specifically authorized or required by statute, an authority shall not provide access under s. 19.35 (1) to records,
except to an individual to the extent required under s.
103.13, containing information maintained, prepared, or
provided by an employer concerning the home address,
home electronic mail address, home telephone number,
or social security number of an individual who holds a
local public office or a state public office, unless the individual authorizes the authority to provide access to such
information. This subsection does not apply to the home
address of an individual who holds an elective public
office or to the home address of an individual who, as a
condition of employment, is required to reside in a specified location.
(12) INFORMATION RELATING TO CERTAIN EMPLOYEES.
Unless access is specifically authorized or required by
statute, an authority shall not provide access to a record
prepared or provided by an employer performing work
on a project to which s. 66.0903, 103.49, or 103.50
applies, or on which the employer is otherwise required
to pay prevailing wages, if that record contains the name
or other personally identifiable information relating to an
employee of that employer, unless the employee authorizes the authority to provide access to that information.
In this subsection, “personally identifiable information”
does not include an employee’s work classification,
hours of work, or wage or benefit payments received for
work on such a project.
NOTE: This SECTION creates s. 19.36 (10) to (12), stats.,
to provide that an authority may not provide access to any of
the following:
1. Information prepared or provided by an employer concerning the home address, home email address, home telephone number, or social security number of an employee,
unless the employee authorizes the authority to provide access
to the information.
2. Information relating to the current investigation of a
possible criminal offense or possible misconduct connected
with employment by an employee prior to disposition of the
investigation.
3. Information pertaining to an employee’s employment
examination, except an examination score if access to that
score is not otherwise prohibited.
4. Information relating to one or more specific employees that is used by an authority or by the employer of the
employees for staff management planning, including performance evaluations, judgments, or recommendations concerning future salary adjustments or other wage treatments,
management bonus plans, promotions, job assignments, let-
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2003 Wisconsin Act 47
ters of reference, or other comments or ratings relating to
employees.
5. Information maintained, prepared, or provided by an
employer concerning the home address, home email address,
home telephone number, or social security number of an individual who holds an elective public office or a state public
office, unless the individual authorizes the authority to provide access to such information. This provision does not
apply to the home address of an individual who has been
elected or to the home address of an individual who, as a condition of employment, is required to reside in a specified location.
6. A record prepared or provided by an employer, performing under a contract requiring the payment of prevailing
wages, that contains personally identifiable information relating to an employee of that employer, unless the employee
authorizes the authority to provide access to that information.
The term “personally identifiable information” does not
include information relating to an employee’s work classification, hours of work, or wage or benefit payments received for
work on such projects.
SECTION 8. 59.20 (3) (a) of the statutes is amended
to read:
59.20 (3) (a) Every sheriff, clerk of the circuit court,
register of deeds, treasurer, register of probate, clerk and
county surveyor shall keep his or her office at the county
seat in the offices provided by the county or by special
provision of law; or if there is none, then at such place as
the board directs. The board may also require any elective or appointive county official to keep his or her office
at the county seat in an office to be provided by the
county. All such officers shall keep their offices open
during the usual business hours of any day except
Sunday, as the board directs. With proper care, the officers shall open to the examination of any person all books
and papers required to be kept in his or her office and permit any person so examining to take notes and copies of
such books, records, papers or minutes therefrom except
as authorized in par. (c) and s. ss. 19.36 (10) to (12) and
19.59 (3) (d) or under ch. 69.
NOTE: Section 59.20 (3) (a), stats., provides that certain
county officers must open to the examination of any person all
books and papers required to be kept in his or her office and
permit any person examining the records to take notes and
copies of the books, records, papers, or minutes except as
otherwise provided. The officers to which this requirement
applies are every sheriff, clerk of the circuit court, register of
deeds, treasurer, register of probate, clerk, and county surveyor. This provision has been interpreted by Wisconsin’s
courts to mean that a requester has the absolute right to inspect
records required to be kept by law by these officers unless: (a)
there is a statutory exception to this right; (b) there is a constitutional provision preventing release of the record; or (c) a
court, exercising its inherent authority over judicial records,
prevents access to a record when the administration of justice
so requires. [See State ex rel. Journal Co. v. County Court for
Racine County, 43 Wis. 2d 297, 168 N.W.2d 836 (1969); State
ex rel. Bilder v. Township of Delavan, 112 Wis. 2d 539, 334
N.W.2d 252 (1983); and State ex rel. Schultz v. Bruendl, 168
Wis. 2d 101, 483 N.W.2d 238 (Ct. App. 1992).]
In order to take into account the treatment of employee−
related records in this bill, this SECTION amends s. 59.20 (3)
(a), stats., to provide that county officers must, to the extent
2003 Wisconsin Act 47
provided by current statutes, keep their records open to
inspection, except as provided under proposed s. 19.36 (10)
to (12), stats.
SECTION 9. 61.25 (5) of the statutes is amended to
read:
61.25 (5) To be the custodian of the corporate seal,
and to file as required by law and to safely keep all
records, books, papers or property belonging to, filed or
deposited in the clerk’s office, and deliver the same to the
clerk’s successor when qualified; to permit, subject to
subch. II of ch. 19, any person with proper care to
examine and copy any of the same, and to make and certify a copy of any thereof when required, on payment of
the same fees allowed town clerks therefor.
NOTE: This SECTION amends s. 61.25 (5), stats., to clarify
that a village clerk must comply with all aspects of the open
records law, including the provisions of the bill relating to
employee−related records.
SECTION 10. 62.09 (11) (f) of the statutes is amended
to read:
62.09 (11) (f) The clerk shall keep all papers and
records in the clerk’s office open to inspection at all reasonable hours subject to subch. II of ch. 19.
NOTE: This SECTION amends s. 62.09 (11) (f), stats., to
clarify that a city clerk must comply with all aspects of the
open records law, including the provisions of the bill relating
to employee−related records.
SECTION 10m. 196.135 of the statutes is created to
read:
196.135 Confidential handling of records. (1)
DEFINITION. In this section, “record” has the meaning
given in s. 19.32 (2).
(2) RULES. The commission shall promulgate rules
establishing requirements and procedures for the confidential handling of records filed with the commission.
(3) NOTICE. If the commission decides to allow public access under s. 19.35 to a record filed with the commission, the commission shall, before allowing access
and within 3 working days after making the decision to
allow access, serve written notice of that decision by certified mail or personal service on the person who filed the
record, if any of the following applies:
(a) The commission granted the record confidential
handling status under the rules promulgated under sub.
(2).
(b) The person who filed the record requested confidential handling status under the rules promulgated
under sub. (2) and the commission has not yet acted on
the request.
(c) The commission denied a request for confidential
handling under the rules promulgated under sub. (2); the
person whose request was denied filed a petition for
review of the commission’s decision to deny the request;
and the petition is pending before a court.
(4) LIMIT ON ACCESS; RIGHT OF ACTION. (a) The commission shall not provide access to a record that is the
subject of a notice under sub. (3) within 12 days of the
date of service of the notice.
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2003 Assembly Bill 196
(b) A person who is entitled to a notice under sub. (3)
may bring an action for judicial review of a decision by
the commission to allow public access under s. 19.35 to
a record. Section 19.356 (3) to (8) applies to such an
action, except that “record subject” means the person
who is entitled to notice under sub. (3), “authority”
means the commission, “notice under s. 19.356 (2) (a)”
means the notice under sub. (3), and “action commenced
under s. 19.356 (4)” means the action under this paragraph.
SECTION 11. 230.13 (1) (intro.) of the statutes is
amended to read:
230.13 (1) (intro.) Except as provided in sub. (3) and
s. ss. 19.36 (10) to (12) and 103.13, the secretary and the
administrator may keep records of the following personnel matters closed to the public:
NOTE: See the note to SECTION 13.
SECTION 12. 230.13 (3) of the statutes is renumbered
230.13 (3) (a) and amended to read.
230.13 (3) (a) The secretary and the administrator
shall provide to the department of workforce development or a county child support agency under s. 59.53 (5)
information requested under s. 49.22 (2m) that would
otherwise be closed to the public under this section.
Information provided under this subsection paragraph
may only include an individual’s name and address, an
individual’s employer and financial information related
to an individual.
NOTE: See the note to SECTION 13.
SECTION 13. 230.13 (3) (b) of the statutes is created
to read:
230.13 (3) (b) The secretary and the administrator
may provide any agency with personnel information
relating to the hiring and recruitment process, including
specifically the examination scores and ranks and other
evaluations of applicants.
NOTE: Section 230.13, stats., in general provides that the
secretary of the Department of Employment Relations and the
administrator of the Division of Merit Recruitment and Selection may keep records of the following personnel matters
closed to the public:
1. Examination scores and ranks and other evaluations of
applicants.
2. Dismissals, demotions, and other disciplinary actions.
3. Pay survey data obtained from identifiable, nonpublic
employers.
4. Names of nonpublic employers contributing any pay
survey data.
This SECTION and SECTIONS 11 and 12 amend the statutes
to specify that regardless of the discretionary authority to keep
certain personnel matters closed to the public, the secretary
and the administrator must keep from public access that information listed in s. 19.36 (10) to (12), stats., as created in this
bill. However, this SECTION also specifies that the secretary
and the administrator may provide any agency with personnel
information relating to the hiring and recruitment process,
including specifically the examination scores and ranks and
other evaluations of applicants.
SECTION 14.
amended to read:
233.13 (intro.) of the statutes is
2003 Assembly Bill 196
233.13 Closed records. (intro.) Except as provided
in s. ss. 19.36 (10) to (12) and 103.13, the authority may
keep records of the following personnel matters closed to
the public:
NOTE: Section 233.13, stats., provides that the University
of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics authority may keep
records of certain personnel matters closed to the public.
These personnel matters include all of those matters specified
in the comment to SECTION 13 and include the addresses and
home telephone numbers of authority employees.
This SECTION amends the statutes to provide that the
authority must keep closed to public access the information
listed in s. 19.36 (10) to (12), stats., as created in this bill.
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2003 Wisconsin Act 47
SECTION 15. 808.04 (1m) of the statutes is created to
read:
808.04 (1m) An appeal by a record subject under s.
19.356 shall be initiated within 20 days after the date of
entry of the judgment or order appealed from.
NOTE: Generally, s. 808.04, stats., provides that an appeal
to the court of appeals must be initiated within 45 days after
entry of a judgment or an order. This SECTION creates s.
808.04 (1m), stats., to provide that an appeal by a record subject under s. 19.356, stats., as created in this bill, must be initiated within 20 days after the date of entry of the judgment or
order appealed from.

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