The Lamorinda Woman Behind Champion Dogs

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Wednesday, January 28, 2015 • Vol. 8 Issue 24
26,000 copies
delivered bi-weekly
to Lamorinda homes
& businesses
Independent, locally
owned and operated!
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
FREE
The Lamorinda Woman Behind Champion Dogs
Moraga dog trainer Judie Howard works with Ryder, preparing for obedience trial competition.
J
By Sophie Braccini
udie Howard is a legend in the world of obedience training for dogs in the United States. People come from all
over the country to spend time with the Bollinger
Canyon trainer who can make the meekest dog of any breed a
champion. For more than 25 years she has managed one of the
largest obedience schools in the country, with more than 70
American Kennel Club obedience titles to her credit. She now
trains one-on-one in her own facility with dogs and their owners who want to compete.
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While small in stature, Howard emanates a purposefulness and determination. But she says she’s not an alpha female: “We are far removed from wolves,” she says with a
smile. She does acknowledge, however, that dogs immediately recognize that she is in charge. The real secret to her
success is she loves them to pieces. For her, each dog she
trains is unique. She thinks something can be learned from
each breed. If they are understood, she says, they give their
best with joy.
Val Brings Value
Valerie Durantini
925.253.4657
www.valeriedurantini.com
CalBRE# 01376796
Two Lafayette
Elementary
School
student artist
winners –
page B3.
Coming Soon
Sweet Berkeley 1940’s fixer
steps from Tilden Park
Call for details.
Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer Announces
Run for California Senate
“I
Life in Lamorinda
The Moraga resident started dog training at age 9. “It was
a neighbor's dog and I taught him to sit,” she remembers. Her
family could not have dogs, so she got her first German Sheppard and trained it after she got married. “Dogs love coming
here to be trained,” she says. “Owners tell me that their dogs
start barking as soon as the car enters Bollinger Canyon Road.
They pull them up my stairs and when they get in the arena
they start running circles around me.”
... continued on page A10
©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304
please...
...thanks
Photo Andy Scheck
'm in. Voters deserve an opportunity to elect a fiscally
conservative, independently minded,
bi-partisan problem solver.” With
that simple tweet, Orinda Mayor
Steve Glazer announced his 2015
B1-B10
Sports
run for the California Senate.
Stating via Facebook that he expects to see “more bricks flying my
way from entrenched and powerful
interests,” he explained his rationale
for filing papers late in the day Jan.
23. “The issues I previously campaigned about remain urgent priorities: a compassionate state
government that lives within its financial means; banning BART
strikes; reining in our unfunded public pensions; greater support for education but with reforms in teacher
discipline and seniority; affordable
higher education, independence
from special interests, and protecting
our environment.” He added that he
Basketball
Mid-Season
Reports –
page C2.
will remain focused “on problem
solving over partisanship.”
In response, Orinda City Council
Member Dean Orr tweeted, “Best
news item of the week. All in!”
Orinda Union School District Board
of Trustees Member Julie Rossiter
also tweeted her support.
Glazer, a former political advisor to Gov. Jerry Brown, managed
Brown’s successful 2010 gubernatorial campaign, and has also
counseled CalChamberPAC, the
California Chamber of Commerce’s
political action committee. He is
also now in his fourth year of an
eight-year term as a Brown-appointed member of the California
C1-C3
Our Homes
Helpful hues
for good
feng shui –
page D6.
State University Board of Trustees.
The District 7 seat was vacated by
Mark DeSaulnier, who was elected to
represent Lamorinda in Congress following George Miller’s retirement.
Glazer will run against three other
Democrats, including Joan Buchanan
of Alamo, who termed out in December as the California Assembly member representing Lamorinda and other
District 16 communities. Other candidates include Assembly Member
Susan Bonilla (Concord) and Terry
Kremin.
The primary election will be
held March 17; the special election
scheduled by Brown will be May
19. L. Snyder
D1-D12
Page: A2
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
STILL #1 FOR A REASON
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
2008 THROUGH 2014
Lafayette’s Best
Realtor
Public Meetings
City Council
Monday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m.
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Planning Commission
Monday, Feb. 2, 7 p.m.
Lafayette Library & Learning Center,
Community Hall, 3491 Mt. Diablo Blvd.
Design Review
Monday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m.
Lafayette Library & Learning Center,
Arts & Science Discovery Center,
3491 Mt. Diablo Blvd.
School Board Meetings
Wednesday, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m.
AUHSD Board Room
1212 Pleasant Hill Road, Lafayette
www.acalanes.k12.ca.us
Acalanes Union High School District
Wednesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m.
Regular Board Meeting
Stanley Middle School Library
3477 School St., Lafayette
www.lafsd.k12.ca.us
Check online for agendas, meeting
notes and announcements
Lafayette School District
City of Lafayette:
www.ci.lafayette.ca.us
Phone: (925) 284-1968
Chamber of Commerce:
www.lafayettechamber.org
DanaGreenTeam.com | 925.339.1918
License # 01482454
Learning What Police Officers Really Do
I
By Cathy Tyson
t was a full house in the conference room of the Lafayette city offices for the second of six meetings of
the Citizen’s Police Academy. A
cross section of a dozen eager residents representing the Rotary, the
Chamber of Commerce, City Council, Oakwood Athletic Club and more
came looking for a better understanding of the police department and the
particulars of local law enforcement.
Police Chief Eric Christensen
spearheaded the program, which was
developed by members of the police
department and the Crime Prevention
Commission. This is the first roll out
of the series of classes, which will be
fine tuned and presumably offered
Oakwood Athletic Club
10 block Rancho Diablo Rd
3300 block Springhill Rd
800 block Paradise Ct
3200 block Glenside Dr
30 block Lafayette Cr
3300 block Victoria Av
Lafayette Police
1000 block Windsor Dr
Department Incident
30 block Lafayette Cr
10 block Greenvalley Dr (2)
Summary Report
3600 block Mt Diablo
Jan. 4-17:
3200 block Sharon Ct
Abandoned Vehicle
3400 block Moraga Bl
School/1st St
Juvenile Disturbance
Silver Dell/Reliez Valley Rd
School St/Moraga Rd
Alarms
64
Moraga Rd/Moraga Bl
911 calls
7
3400 block Mt Diablo Bl
Burglary, Auto
Pleasant Hill Rd/Park Ln
500 block Silverado Dr
Missing Adult
300 block E. Lowell Ln
900 block Stow Ln
3400 block Black Hawk Rd (2)
Promiscuous Shooting
3900 block Franke Ln
10 block Gilmore Ct
Acalanes High School
500 block St Mary’s Rd
1000 block Timothy Ln
200 block Camelia Ln
Oakwood Athletic Club
Public Nuisance
10 block Green Place
Solana Dr/St Mary’s Rd
10 block Ruth Ct
900 block S. Thompson Rd
3500 block Herman Dr
Safeway (2)
600 block Augustine Ln
700 block Solana Dr
Burglary, Residential
Mt Diablo Bl/Happy Valley Rd
3200 block Los Arabis Dr
3500 block Mt Diablo Bl (2)
100 block Lafayette Cr
800 block Topper Ln
Burglary, Commercial
800 block Moraga Rd
3200 block Stanley Bl (2)
1000 block Oak Hill Rd
100 block Lafayette Cr
Moraga Bl/4th St
Battery
Reckless Driving
Hwy 24/1st St
Burton Valley Elementary
Civil Disturbance
500 block Silverado Dr
1st St/Mt Diablo Bl
Oak Hill Rd/Hwy 24
1700 block Toyon Rd
Mt Diablo Bl/Dewing Av
Mt Diablo Bl/Oak Hill Rd
1600 block Springbrook
900 block S Thompson Rd
Moraga Rd/St Mary’s Rd
3400 block Golden Gate Wy
Shoplifting
3300 block Mt Diablo Bl
Safeway
10 block Gilmore Ct
900 block Moraga Rd
Drunk in Public
Suspicious Circum.
8
Lafayette Park Hotel
Suspicious Vehicle
24
DUI
Suspicious Subject
25
Condit/Pleasant Hill Rds
Threats
Fire/EMS Response
3300 block Mt Diablo Bl
Pleasant Hill/Springhill Rds
Traffic Stops
129
4000 block Happy Valley Rd
Trespass
Mt Diablo/Village Center
3300 block Sweet Dr
1000 block Via Media
Vandalism
Found Adult
3500 block Mt Diablo Bl
Hidden Valley/AcalanesRds
1200 block Pleasant Hill Rd
Hit & Run
900 block Hough Av
Safeway
3500 block Springhill Rd
3200 block Rohrer Dr
3200 block Mt Diablo Bl
Trader Joe’s
Vehicle Theft
Indecent Exposure
3400 block Moraga Bl
4200 block El Nido Ranch Rd
200 block Lafayette Cr
Stanley Middle School
Violation Restrain
Petty Theft
30 block Circle Creek Ct
500 block Silverado Dr
Warrant Service
500 block St Mary’s Rd
1400 block Sunset Lp
ALL LAFAYETTE RESIDENTS
Got Traffic? Can you say “gridlock”?
All tied up and somewhere to go?
THEN PLEASE SAVE THIS DATE:
APRIL 23, 2015 TOWN HALL MEETING 7 P.M.
COMMUNITY HALL- LAFAYETTE LIBRARY & LEARNING CENTER
WATCH THIS SPACE FOR DETAILS TO FOLLOW
SPONSORED BY LAFAYETTE HOMEOWNERS COUNCIL
again later this year. So far, it seems
to be working; attendees were engaged and had lots of opportunities to
question, comment and learn.
It’s a significant time commitment. Students are required to have a
background check, then attend each
three-hour session and complete a
two-hour ride along with an officer in
a patrol car. The initial session was
an overview of the criminal justice
system, followed up with last week’s
traffic and patrol operations session.
In the coming weeks there are classes
on police investigations, use of force,
crime lab overview and tour, and a jail
visit, culminating with an optional
session at a firearms range along with
a barbecue lunch. Graduation will
occur at a council meeting.
With 23 full- and part-time personnel, which includes 17 sworn officers who are contracted through the
Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Office,
available 24/7 every day of the year,
it’s nice to know that these brave men
and women take the job seriously, but
still have a sense of humor.
Kicking off the traffic meeting was
a video of a very irate driver being ticketed, with a fair amount of “bleeped”
bad language. Professional and con-
genial Sergeant Dan Nugent, main instructor for the evening, called it just
another day at the office. His overarching theme: “Traffic enforcement
lessens traffic accidents. Our goal is to
make people safe – that’s it.” He continued, “A ticket is a reminder to
change behavior with a kicker – a fine.”
Officer Neil Black, the citation
king of the department with a whopping 1,100 citations for 2014, talked
about what it’s like to be a motorcycle
cop and what the strategies are. Fellow officer Jerry Shaman also helped
out with the class, describing his experiences on the job.
The class touched on a number of
traffic-related topics including directing traffic, bicyclists and bike lanes,
along with bad biker behavior, pedestrian right of way, and the risk/reward
calculation that goes into authorizing
a high speed chase. To illustrate that
point, a video from the dashboard
camera of a police cruiser was shown
in hot pursuit on Highway 24 and
along Happy Valley Road, sirens and
lights blazing at 4 a.m. As suspected,
it did not end well for the driver of a
stolen truck who was on drugs.
After hearing complaints from
students about less than courteous bi-
cyclists, Nugent – who referred to
them as “Spandex warriors” – clarified that they are supposed to ride single file, not two and three abreast. He
said the department wants them to
obey the law, encouraging their compliance by writing up tickets that can
cost $500 for running a red light or
“impeding traffic.”
The night shift sees all kinds of
colorful behavior. “After 10 p.m.
booze is usually involved somehow,”
explained Nugent, citing bar fights,
DUIs, domestic violence – even
teenagers stealing alcohol from grocery stores.
The highlight of the evening was
riding in squad cars down Mt. Diablo
Boulevard, learning the nuances of a
traffic stop and ways police try to protect themselves, and even how to light
flares. “Very interesting!” said Robin
Fox.
Council Member Traci Reilly is
also a student; she was formerly on
the Crime Prevention Commission
and wanted a better understanding of
the department. It’s the biggest
budget item the city pays for, so she
was eager to participate. .
She describes the classes as “very
impressive so far.”
Do you have a person in mind for the City of
Lafayette to honor as 2015 Citizen of the Year?
Criteria are as follows:
• Must NOT be a current elected or paid member of any city council, school board or commission;
• Must be a current Lafayette resident;
• Must be someone who has given of their time, money or energy to help make Lafayette a
healthy community, where people will want to live, work and shop;
• Must be someone who models excellence in everything they do;
• Must be someone who brings this community together and/or makes us proud to be a
member of the community.
A celebration dinner will be held on Friday, March 27 at the Lafayette Park Hotel & Spa
to honor the winner! The deadline for submitting nominations is Friday, Feb. 13.
The 2015 Lafayette Citizen of the Year Award is co-sponsored by the Lafayette Chamber of Commerce
and Lamorinda Weekly.
Please send your nomination to Lafayette
Mail: Lafayette Chamber of Commerce
Chamber of Commerce Executive Director
Attn: Lafayette Citizen of Year nomination
Jay Lifson
100 Lafayette Circle #103
Lafayette, CA 94549
Email: [email protected]
e Lafayette City Council is
soliciting applicants to fill the
following volunteer vacancies:
ere are currently openings on the following Commissions and Committees:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee
Community Center Foundation
Capital Projects Assessments Committee (CPAC)
Circulation Commission
Creeks Committee
Crime Prevention Commission
Design Review Commission
Downtown Street Improvement Implementation Committee - DSIMPIC
Emergency Preparedness Commission
Environmental Task Force
Parks, Trails & Recreation Commission
Planning Commission
Public Art Committee
Senior Services Commission
Youth Services Commission
Lafayette Representative to the Contra Costa County Advisory Council on Aging
For additional information visit the city’s website:
www.ci.lafayette.ca.us/city-hall/commissions-committees
Or call Joanne Robbins, City Clerk 925-284-1968. Application deadline March 31,
2015. Positions open until filled.
Three Shellies for Town Hall Spring Market in Lamorinda!
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
925-377-0977
New
Listing!
162 Selborne Way, Moraga
H
From left: Caitlin Evenson, Carolyn Day, Ethan Bartley, Mayor Brandt Andersson, Fiona Warburton, Ginny Wehrmeister and Adrian Altaffer
Photo provided
onored with three Shellie
Awards, including one for
Best Play, it was a big night for
Lafayette’s Town Hall Theatre recently. Contra Costa County’s version of the Tony Awards, the Shellies
honor outstanding achievement in
the performing arts.
The extravagant affair held at the
Lesher Center in Walnut Creek featured thoroughly dolled up guests
along with a sumptuous wine and
dessert reception for the honorees.
Presenting the Best Play Award,
Lafayette Mayor Brandt Andersson
quipped, “Lafayette may not have a
town hall, but it does have a Town
Hall Theatre.”
Town Hall won awards for Best
Play, Best Supporting Actor, and
Best Lighting Design for its production of “The Rainmaker,” a romantic
comedy. Henry Perkins received the
Shellie for Best Supporting Actor in
the play and Michael Resnick
snagged a Shellie for Lighting Design.
“It’s very gratifying to see Town
Hall recognized by other theater professionals for the high quality of its
productions,” said Betsy Streeter,
who has served as president of the
Town Hall board of directors for the
past five years.
In winning the Best Play award,
Town Hall beat out productions by
six other Contra Costa theater companies, including Center REPertory
Company’s “Clybourne Park,” Butterfield 8 Theatre Company’s “The
Maltese Falcon,” and other entries
from the San Ramon and Pittsburg
community theaters.
Operating continuously for 75
years, Town Hall has won numerous Shellie awards in the past, including an award in 2014 for Best
Play for “The Farnsworth Invention.” Look for the new award trophies on display in the theater’s
lobby, possibly while attending their
next production, “Angels in America: Millennium Approaches,” the
first part of Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer
Prize winning masterpiece, which
opens Feb. 7. C. Tyson
Page: A3
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
New
Listing!
15 Brandt Drive, Moraga
Lovely single level 4Br, 2Ba 1837
sqft home on a cul-de-sac with a
large backyard including patio, lawn & gardens.
Spacious 4075 sqft 4Br, 3 Ba, office
and large bonus room in Sanders
Ranch. Great yard with pool, spa and koi pond.
$1,025,000
$1,975,000
www.162SelborneWay.com
Coming
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Very
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37 Parkway Court, Orinda
56 Wandel Drive, Moraga
Wonderful updated home on a
cul-de-sac, expanded kitchen with
island and great room. Nice level backyard.
Gorgeous gated estate adjoining
Lafayette Reservoir. Custom built in
2010 with highest finishes. 2 adjacent lots available.
Call for price
$3,900,000
www.56WandelDr.com
www.37ParkwayCt.com
925 254-3030 www.Orinda.com
Lafayette • Moraga • Orinda
Cal BRE 1221247
©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office
is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT
LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.
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Page: A4
www.lamorindaweekly.com
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Local Knowledge of Lamorinda & Extraordinary Results
If you are considering selling your home,
give us a call for assistance.
Public Meetings
Wednesday, Jan. 28, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m.
Joaquin Moraga Intermediate School,
1010 Camino Pablo
Planning Commission
Monday, Feb. 2, 7 p.m.
Moraga Library, 1500 St. Mary’s Rd.
Design Review
Monday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m.
Moraga Library, 1500 St. Mary’s Rd.
School Board Meeting
Gary Bernie
Ken Ryerson
Moraga School District
Barely battery, 1/18/15 Four patrons
watching a movie at the Rheem Theatre were causing a disturbance.
Management and other patrons asked
the vocal group to be quiet. They
kept up the ruckus, but one suspect
changed seats and sat next to the “victim.” The suspect patted the victim’s
leg, which was apparently unwanted
physical contact, so the victim requested an assault investigation. Police contacted the involved parties at
the scene. The district attorney is
now reviewing the matter.
Smashed windshield, 1/17/15 While
parked on Ascot Drive, a car had its
front window shattered during the
night while parked on the street in front
of its owner’s condominium. No suspects or leads at this time.
DUI 1/18/15 Although there were no
ticketed DUIs over the New Year’s
holiday, three occurred this week in
Moraga. At 1:30 a.m. a black Honda
Accord was traveling southbound on
Moraga Road with a flat right front tire.
When police contacted the 18-year-old
driver, they noticed the distinct smell
of alcohol. The driver had a blood alcohol level more than twice the legal
limit, that is, if he was of drinking age.
The teenager also was cited for having
two fake California driver’s licenses.
His car was towed away.
DUI 1/17/15 The tipoff was blowing
through a stop sign on Camino Pablo
at Hodges Drive at 35 mph after midnight. An 18-year-old Pleasant Hill
resident was driving with a blood alcohol level of 0.10 percent, just over
the limit of 0.08 percent. The subject
was released to a friend on his signed
Promise to Appear; two male passengers and the driver’s dog were released at the scene without incident.
Seems like walking would have been
the better option for all involved from
the get go.
925.878.9685 Ken
CalBRE#00686144
CalBRE#01418309
[email protected]
pacificunion.com | A Member of Real Living
Gary Bernie & Ken Ryerson
Historical Designation in Moraga Will Not Require
Owner’s Consent
T
By Sophie Braccini
o the dismay of several large
property owners, the Moraga
Town Council adopted the first reading of the historic preservation ordinance Jan. 15 that will allow the town
to declare a building or natural feature
of historic significance, even if its
owner does not agree.
Check online for agendas, meeting
Dave Bowie, the attorney for
notes and announcements
New Rheem Theatre owner Mahesh
Town of Moraga:
Puri, made the case to leave the ultiwww.moraga.ca.us
mate
decision to the owner. “We unPhone: (925) 888-7022
derstand
the need for a historic
Chamber of Commerce:
preservation
ordinance, but we think
www.moragachamber.org
it
is
critical
that
there be a condition
Moraga Citizens’ Network:
requiring
the
owner’s
consent,” he
www.moragacitizensnetwork.org
said. He noted that the Planning Commission had been sensitive to the
owner’s concerns and had asked in
their recommendation to the council
that the owner’s approval be required.
He argued that the requirement of the
owner’s consent will ensure a collegial and harmonious process.
David and Joan Bruzzone who
Moraga Police
own properties in Moraga such as
Moraga Ranch, one of several buildDepartment
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 7:30 p.m.
Joaquin Moraga Intermediate
School Auditorium
1010 Camino Pablo, Moraga
www.moraga.k12.ca.us
See also AUHSD meeting page A2
925.200.2222 Gary
[email protected]
Town Council
DUI 1/15/15 Officer #173 was hard
at work on the night shift again, this
time on Moraga Road at Buckingham
Drive, when a black Lexus was found
to be speeding at 59 mph in a 35 mph
zone. The middle aged resident was
arrested for DUI and was just over the
legal blood alcohol limit. The subject
was released to his girlfriend on his
signed Promise to Appear.
Stolen car, 1/14/15 A red Honda Civic
was stolen during the night from a
Courter Lane driveway.
Identity theft, two incidents –
12/31/14 (on Donald Drive) and
1/05/15 (on Baltusrol) The Donald
Drive New Year’s Eve incident involved an unknown suspect attempting to open 10 credit/charge cards.
The reporting person said she was notified of the applications and immediately reported the fraud. Only one
Visa card was obtained from US
Bank for the victim on Baltusrol. The
bank canceled the card before it could
be used.
The following incidents also occurred
between Jan. 6-18:
Non-Functional Firearms to be
Destroyed – Rheem Boulevard
Driving on a Restricted License –
Rheem Boulevard
Violation of Court Order – Ascot
Traffic Incident – Moraga Road
False Alarm – Moraga Valley Lane,
San Pablo Court
Small Dumpster Fire – Camino
Peral
Package Swiped – Draeger Drive
Stolen Bicycle – Donald Drive
Annoying Phone Calls – North
Sandringham
Magazine Sales – Campolindo Drive
Tree Down – Corliss Road
ings the Planning Commission cited as
historically significant, voiced their opposition to a text that would not require
a property owner’s consent. Saint
Mary’s College Director of Community and Government Relations Tim
Farley voiced opposition as well.
Councilmember Dave Trotter led
the argument to remove all reference
to owner’s consent. “It is appropriate
to give the town that tool,” he said.
“Whether we choose to exercise that
power in the future depends on how
the future plays out. But I’d rather
have that tool in the town tool kit than
not have it.” Trotter added that if the
property owner has veto power, there
would not be any dialogue within the
community about the best way to protect historical character.
Councilmember Phillip Arth opposed this idea. “If the town designates a property a historical landmark,
(the property owner) loses some of his
rights,” he said. Arth also mentioned
the potential economic risks included
in a historic designation. “You should
not try to force a designation down
the throat of anybody, because if the
project is not viable as a historic asset,
it’s not going to be maintained,”
Bowie said. Arth added that the advantages that come with the historic
designation, such as Mills Act property tax relief or flexibility in Americans with Disabilities Act
requirements, should be offered to
owners, not forced on them.
Per the new ordinance, a town
councilmember, the Planning Commission, the Design Review Board,
the Moraga Historical Society or the
property owner can nominate a building or feature for consideration of historical status. Considerations for a
proposed historical landmark include:
the structure must be over 50 years
old; it must have characteristics that
are linked to the heritage or cultural
characteristic of the town; it is in an
area, place or site of historical significance; or it is identified to be the
work of a master architect or builder.
After nomination, all applications will
be referred to the Moraga Historical
Society for comment. Then the council will conduct a public hearing and
provide a reasonable opportunity for
all interested parties to be heard before making a final decision.
Orinda’s historic preservation
code requires that the city solicit the
cooperation and participation of the
property owner in the designation
process – the owner’s approval is not
required. In Lafayette, the nomination
can be made by either the owner or by
the historical society, especially when
there is community interest in acquiring the property or otherwise arranging for its permanent preservation –
in that case, the owner’s consent is not
required.
Mayor Roger Wykle supported
Trotter’s position, as well as Councilmember Teresa Onoda who asked
that pear orchards be added to the list
of natural features that could be designated as historic. In the absence of
Vice-Mayor Mike Metcalf, the motion passed 3 to 1.
ducted, staff recommended a plan that
would create a multi-use bike and
pedestrian path along the entire road,
adding bike lanes and potentially reducing the number of lanes from four
to three between Corliss and Draeger
drives.
Residents living on Moraga Road
asked for even further lane reductions
and increased safety. After being reminded about the speed bumps that
were built on Camino Pablo years ago
without much outreach, resulting in
months of heated public debate, council members decided to get more
feedback from the community.
The traffic study was also of concern to the council members. It
showed that with the number of developments currently on the town’s
drawing board, a reduction in the
number of lanes between Corliss and
Draeger drives could lead to heavy
congestion on Moraga Road, especially if no traffic light is installed.
The council asked planning director Ellen Clark to develop a proposal
for a town-wide survey. No specific
date was given for when this will be
completed.
Moraga Livable Road Plan Stopped In Its Tracks
T
By Sophie Braccini
he Moraga Town Council decided Jan. 14 that the different
options to improve connectivity,
pedestrian safety and traffic flow
along Moraga Road needed to be
weighed by the entire community before a decision is made. Staff was
asked to come back with what it
would cost to set up a mail-in or an
online survey.
It's been more than a year since
the planning department started working on a vision for the arterial between
Campolindo High School and St.
Mary's Road. After multiple public
and committee meetings were con-
Moraga Town Center Homes Project Appeal to
be Considered Jan. 28
At tonight’s meeting, Moraga Town Council members will consider the appeal of the Planning Commission approval of the Conceptual Development Plan (CDP) for the 36-unit Moraga Town Center Homes
project located adjacent to Moraga-Orinda Fire District Station 41 on Moraga Way. The meeting will start
at 7 p.m. in the Joaquin Moraga Intermediate School auditorium. The Planning Commission's decision to
approve the conceptual plan of the development located next to the fire station on Moraga Way was appealed by a group of residents. The basis for the appeal includes non-conformance of the project with the
General Plan, non-conformance with the town’s Scenic Corridor requirements, failure to properly analyze
the traffic impacts and safety issues. The Moraga Country Club board of directors sent a letter to the town
Jan. 15, expressing concerns about serious traffic and safety issues on the segment of Country Club Drive
that adjoins homes in the MCC and is across from City Ventures' proposed project. Additionally, at the Jan.
21 Moraga-Orinda Fire District board meeting, board members declared that a “purely residential development is incompatible with the MOFD training center.” Chief Stephen Healy was instructed to attend
tonight’s council meeting to express the board’s position. Recent communications from MOFD had stated
concerns; this latest strongest statement is not part of the staff report. S. Braccini
Our people make the difference
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61 Moraga Way, Suite 9
Orinda, CA 94563
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
925-377-0977
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Page: A5
Town of Moraga Mayor’s Welcome
& Volunteer Appreciation Night
Tue, Feb. 10, 6 pm, Country Club
RSVP: (925) 888-7021
MORAGA PARKS & RECREATION
925-888-7045 • www.moraga.ca.us
Moraga Citizens Network Celebrates 10 Years
Building participatory democracy
By Sophie Braccini
MARY H. SMITH, D.D.S.ï CECELIA THOMAS, D.D.S.
A Professional Corporation
96 Davis Road, #5 - Orinda, CA 94563
925.254.0824
ATING 10 YEA
LEBR
RS
CE
moraga
itizens
network
T
en years ago, a small group of need to inform the people of Moraga
friends passionate about the and get them more involved in their
democratic process felt there was a local government. The group that
Fron left: Ellen Beans, Marcia Farrar and Judy Helder
Photo provided
started with 22 people in January of
2005 is now over 1,400 members
strong. Members receive a bi-weekly
e-newsletter about everything Moraga, put together by Ellen Beans.
In 2005 there were only two
places to find the town’s meeting
agendas: the library and the town office, says Edy Schwartz.
... continued on page A9
Plan for New Canyon Bridge Takes Shape
A
By Sophie Braccini
fter CalTrans declared the
Canyon Bridge unsafe and
planned to finance its replacement,
Moraga Public Works Director Edric
Kwan – who has conducted two community outreach sessions with his
team – is determined to answer questions from the Moraga and Canyon
communities about the project. At the
last outreach session on Jan. 20, plans
for the new bridge were presented,
along with the building strategy developed to avoid interruption of tran... continued on page A8
Image courtesy Town of Moraga Canyon Bridge Project Staff Report sit.
3607 Powell Dr., Lafayette
ON
NG SO
CO M I
CalBRE 01029160
14 Las Palomas Road, Orinda
CalBRE#01313819
There is a new endocrinologist in Lafayette
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3466 Mt. Diablo Blvd. C100
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925-298-5220
3128 Chestnut Street, Oakland
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www.5523AlaskaDr.com Call Jim Colhoun
CO M I
925.200.2795 for further
information.
ON
NG SO
Meurer at 510.915.0092 for more
information.
CalBRE#01909766
CalBRE 01029160
2 Green Acres Court, Lafayette
SOLD
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Resort living in Orinda Country Club. Completely
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925.788.5449.
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NG SO
Desirable Woodlands
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February 15. Call Jim Colhoun at
Orinda Classic Ranch Home.
3BR/2.5 BA with large yard and
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Call Jim Colhoun at 925.200.2795 for
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Taking care of all your dental needs for you and your
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HAPPY NEW YEAR!
This 4 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom Burton Valley
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the quiet neighborhood and is known for its
friendly neighbors and excellent schools.
Sold off market by Adam Hamalian
925.708.5630 and Dana Fillinger
925.5886409 for $1,150,000
We are starting off with a bang and expecting a busy
year in real estate! The recent FHA mortgage premium
reduction, coupled with continued low interest rates
and safeguards in the lending industry, will encourage
first-time buyers enter the market. This segment is at a
25-year low point and will give move-up buyers the
ability to shop for new homes as well. We are glad to
see sellers list their homes early in the year and
expect to see prices continue to appreciate slowly!
CalBRE#01917597/CalBRE# 01731662
Meet our Featured Agents ...
Dana Fillinger
925.588.6409
dana.fi[email protected]
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510.409.6266
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Jim Colhoun
925.200.2795
[email protected]
find all Agents at www.bhghome.com/Orinda
CalBRE#01029160
Tania DeGroot
510.367.1422
[email protected]
CalBRE # 01094898
Maureen Caldwell-Meurer
510.915.0092
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CalBRE#01908929
89 Davis Road Suite 100, Orinda
925.254.0440
www.bhghome.com/Orinda
Our Orinda office is uniquely positioned as a gateway for sellers and buyers around the Bay Area;
a central hub for our 30 Better Homes and Gardens offices.
Page: A6
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Rare 5 bedroom, lovely home in a quiet cul-de-sac with hill views has a spacious
living room, an eat-in kitchen, lots of windows for light and a family/great room with
access to a sunny, flat patio and back yard.
Public Meetings
City Council
Tuesday, Feb. 3, 7 p.m.
Auditorium, Orinda Library,
26 Orinda Way
Planning Commission
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 7 p.m.
Auditorium, Orinda Library,
26 Orinda Way
Citizens' Infrastructure
Oversight Commission
Wednesday, Feb. 11, 6:30 p.m.
Sarge Littlehale Community Room,
22 Orinda Way
Top 1% of NRT Agents Worldwide
Top 50 Coldwell Banker San Francisco Bay Area 2014
Our transactions in 2014 ranged from $850,000-$5,600,000
Peter & Darlene
Hattersley
925.360.9588
925.708.9515
By Laurie Snyder
School Board Meeting
Orinda Union School District
Monday, Feb. 9, 6 p.m.
OUSD Office, 8 Altarinda Road,
www.orindaschools.org
See also AUHSD meeting page A2
Check online for agendas, meeting
notes and announcements
City of Orinda:
www.cityoforinda.org
Phone (925) 253-4200
Chamber of Commerce:
www.orindachamber.org
The Orinda Association:
www.orindaassociation.org
Orinda Police
Department Incident
Summary Report
Jan. 4-17:
Abandoned Vehicle
Altarinda Rd/Orindawoods
Alarms
46
Animal Cruelty
10 block Theatre Square
Burglary
20 block South Trail
50 block Via Floreado
Burglary, Auto
Wilder Bl/Hwy 24
100 block Goodfellow Dr
Burglary, Residential
10 block Wanda Ln
911 calls
9
Computer Fraud
10 block Altarinda Rd
Disturbance
Valley View/Lost Valley
10 block Tappan Wy
Moraga Wy/Casa Vieja
Orinda Country Club
10 block Lost Valley Dr
Elder Abuse
20 block Ramona Dr
Fire/Ambulance Call
40 block Stanton Av
Harassment
10 block Cielo Ct
Hit & Run
Orinda Wy/Camino Sobrante
Shell Station
Loud Party
20 block Lavina Ct (2)
10 block Ivy Dr
Theft, Petty
200 block El Toyonal (2)
500 block Tahos Rd
10 block Camino Sobrante
Theft, Grand
10 block Glorietta Ct
10 block Irving Ln
Public Nuisance
Aspinwall Ct/Eastwood Dr
10 block Overhill Rd
Southwood Ct/Southwood
10 block Fallen Leaf Ter
Reckless Driving
Camino Pablo/Bear Cr Rd
San Pablo Dam/Bear Cr Rds
Lombardy Ln/Van Ripper
Camino Pablo/Monte Vista
Camino Pablo/Hwy 24
Restraining Order Violation
10 block Orinda Wy
Shoplifting
Safeway (2)
Suspicious Circum.
8
Suspicious Subject
20
Suspicious Vehicle
21
Terrorist Threats
Brookwood Rd/Moraga Wy
Traffic Stops
179
Vehicle Theft
Moraga Wy/Brookwood Rd
Vandalism
30 block Acacia Dr
Warrant Service
70 block La Cuesta Rd
200 block Moraga Wy
www.TheHattersleys.com
©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company.
Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304
Orinda City Council Delays Crime Cam Decision Again
CalBRE# r00445794, CalBRE# 01181995
One example of a fixed-mount Automated License Plate Reader (ALPR) system
Photo public domain
“The city can only do so much to protect us. We need to protect ourselves.”
– Vince Maiorana
iting the old adage that “God
helps those who help themselves,” Vince Maiorana urged
Orinda City Council members at their
Jan. 13 meeting not to bow to pressure from residents pushing them to
install security cameras across
Orinda.
As reported in the Dec. 3 edition
of this newspaper, crime is actually
down in Orinda. The city had 76 residential burglaries in 2013, but by
mid-November 2014, that statistic
was halved to 36 – in a city with
roughly 6,800 residential units. From
Dec. 21, 2014 to Jan. 3, one instance
each of residential, auto and commercial burglary, grand theft, and vehicle
theft were committed.
“People leave their cars open, and
they get burglarized. And what seems
to me, when I walk the streets and talk
to people about burglaries in their
area, invariably they do not have an
alarm system,” said Maiorana.
Sounding like the retired Contra
Costa College football coach he is, he
C
exhorted Orindans to install and then
keep burglar alarm systems in good
working order. “I’ve also been burglarized. That burglary happened
about 35 years ago, and nothing has
ever touched our house again because
we have an alarm system.”
Conversely, council also heard
from frightened residents who have
arrived home after work to find windows smashed or doors kicked in.
“When I went up to get my mail and
saw the guy in a red pickup truck, putting his arm in and taking my mail out
and into his truck, I was so shocked
that I failed to get the license plate,”
said Janet Reeves. “He turned and
looked at me; he was a Caucasian guy
with a round face and sandy hair, and
he glared at me and I glared at him.”
She said police told her they might
have caught the suspect had a camera
been installed nearby.
“The first time we talked about
these cameras after we had a rash of
burglaries and the helicopters flying
overhead last year, we – at the end of
the first meeting – had enough money
to buy a camera and one person
specifically donated enough money to
put a camera on St. Stephens,” said
Karl Richtenberg. “And we were
willing to buy a camera and gift it to
the police department – at no cost to
you guys. So, I don’t think money
should be a major concern. If people
want to buy cameras for their neighborhoods, I don’t see why you
shouldn’t allow it to happen.”
If approved by council, such cameras might be permanently mounted
on trees or signposts on public property, or installed initially in one police
car or as part of a grouping of cameras
that could be moved from one higher
crime area to another. License plate
photos would then be checked against
“hot lists” – databases of felony arrest
warrants, registered sex offenders,
stolen vehicles or vehicles used during the commission of crimes.
In his report, available on the
city’s website, Orinda Police Chief
Mark Nagel cited several benefits:
improved stolen vehicle recovery, accident investigation, clarification of
fuzzy witness data and officer safety.
The chief also advised council that
Lafayette, Piedmont and other cities
using this technology are reporting
improved arrest and conviction rates.
But a number of Orindans remain
concerned about privacy, and a 2013
report by the American Civil Liberties
Union may give credence to their
fears. In “You Are Being Tracked:
How License Plate Readers Are
Being Used to Record Americans’
Movements,” the ACLU cautions that
“more and more cameras, longer retention periods, and widespread sharing allow law enforcement agents to
assemble the individual puzzle pieces
of where we have been over time into
a single, high-resolution image of our
lives. The knowledge that one is subject to constant monitoring can chill
the exercise of our cherished rights to
free speech and association.”
Reminding readers of the 20th
century’s illegal targeting by federal
agencies of civil rights and anti-war
activists, the report also states that
many police departments nationwide
are planning to substantially increase
the number of cameras they operate.
And it expresses the view that most
government agencies are poorly controlling access to and deleting the data
of innocent citizens. In comparison to
the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s
Department (CCSD) one-year data
retention policy, the Ohio State Highway Patrol immediately deletes all
non-hit captures. The city of Tiburon
deletes “all license plate data after 30
days or less.”
After probing Nagel, his CCSD
boss and City Attorney Osa Wolff
about how the cameras would be
maintained and by whom, city indemnification policies and the likely impact of Freedom of Information Act
requests on data access, council decided to continue the matter to a third
public meeting.
Three Reconyx motion-activated cameras
similar to the one pictured here have
been operating on the private roads of
the Orinda Downs neighborhood since
early 2014. According to Orinda Police
Chief Mark Nagel, “The only time their
association provides photos to the
Police Department is when there has
been a crime or suspicious activity.”
Photo provided
Orinda Action Day Volunteers Needed
Volunteers are needed to join the planning committee for Orinda Action Day, scheduled for April 18, or for the NorCal Kids Triathlon scheduled for Aug. 29. Contact Sue Severson for more details at [email protected] or (925) 254-1679.
Theater View
Veterinary Clinic
WATER
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your yard ready for spring tim
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is excited to
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“Dr. Laurie” Langford
Phone: (925) 317-3187
Fax: (925) 334-7017
Email: [email protected]
www.theaterviewvetclinic.com
1 Bates Blvd., Suite 200, Orinda
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www.lamorindaweekly.com
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
925-377-0977
Page: A7
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Two Masters in Real Estate Providing World Class Service
A Brand New Year
Time to embrace change and enjoy the opportunities this New Year will bring.
2015 promises to be another amazing year for real estate.
We want to help you take advantage of the exciting market.
Give us a call for a free market analysis.
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Luxury Property Specialists
Motion to Bring Housing Element Special Election to Voters Fails
CalBRE#01335916/0885925 ©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304.
A
By Laurie Snyder
t the close of every Orinda
City Council meeting, council members are asked if they want
to initiate new matters. While
sometimes policy-related, these actions often recognize worthy citizens or social causes. On Dec. 15,
newly elected Orinda City Council
Member Eve Phillips used her
powers to have council consider
whether or not to put Orinda’s General Plan Housing Element up for
public vote. On Jan. 20, with Council Member Amy Worth excused
due to illness, council debated the
idea at length, analyzing everything
from fiscal prudence to the legal
consequences of a failed vote.
City Manager Janet Keeter presented information from Contra
Costa Elections staff that the city
would be charged a rate of $2.50 to
$4.25 per voter for administering
such an election – plus $91,000 to
print the lengthy Housing Element
for the voter information packet.
City Planning Director Emmanuel Ursu explained the available ballot options. In response to
continued assertions by members
of the activist group Orinda Watch
that the city has not received
enough input on the Housing Element, Ursu also illustrated how and
MORAGA
$1,975,000
Elena Hood
CalBRE#01221247
MORAGA
$1,125,000
4/3. Spacious Sanders Ranch! 4075 sqft, +
office + bonus room, great floor plan, 1/3
acre lot w/pool & spa.
when the city has reached out to
educate and receive feedback. (See
the Lamorinda Weekly’s 2013-14
archives for coverage.)
The vote could have occurred
in one of three ways: a councilsponsored initiative; a voter-sponsored referendum requiring the
measure to be placed on a ballot –
if supporters could collect valid
signatures from 10 percent of
Orinda’s roughly 12,000 registered
voters; or a council-sponsored advisory vote.
Staff noted in its report that all
three were problematic. The results of the advisory format would
not have even been binding on the
council, and it would have taken
council members several meetings
to draft ballot language. When
combined with requirements that
the election be held 88 days or
later from the order of election, the
city might not have been able to
adopt its Housing Element by
May 31, as required under California law. Furthermore, the costs
seemed prohibitive in light of
Orinda’s road repair woes – woes
that could worsen if the city were
to lose the hundreds of thousands
of dollars it receives annually in
outside agency transportation
funding because voters torpedoed
the Housing Element.
Orindans could also be risking
fines and lawsuits. The City of
Pleasanton has forked over about
$5 million – the amount of
Orinda’s current reserve – for
Housing Element problems. “And
that does not even take into account
the more immediate impact on our
residents,” said Council Member
Victoria Smith. Many settlements
prevented cities from doing busi-
• County Elections Department Cost Per Voter:
• Voter Information Printing – Housing Element:
• Resulting Roads and Drains Funding Loss (potential):
ORINDA
CalBRE# 01390784
* Printing costs eliminated if materials posted online. If Housing Element voted down, possible loss or delay in infrastructure funding by outside agencies (Contra Costa Transportation Agency, et. al.).
Other Orinda projects in the pipeline:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Battery Backup-Traffic Signal Controls (2015-16):
Oak Park-Donald Drive Pavement Rehabilitation:
Pavement Management (small pothole patches):
St. Stephens Trail and Drainage Improvements:
Seismic Retrofit-Bear Creek Road Bridge:
Seismic Work-Miner Road Bridge (Right of Way expenses):
Urgent Repairs (big potholes, failed road segments):
G
DIN
PEN
The Beaubelle Group
$2,595,900
MORAGA
CalBRE#00678426
Elena Hood
PLEASANT HILL
$445,000
2/2. Sun Valley Vineyards beauty. Updated
featuring 2 Master Suites. Private patio.
Move in NOW!
Nancy Stryker
LD
SO
PLEASANT HILL
CalBRE#01290021
Kathy McCann
G
DIN
PEN
$1,595,000
CalBRE#00678426
LAFAYETTE
CalBRE#00946092
Julie Millard
$1,025,000 ORINDA
CalBRE#01221247
CalBRE#00921338
$3,900,000
ORINDA
$1,950,900
The Beaubelle Group
G
DIN
N
E
P
MORAGA
CalBRE#00678426
G
DIN
PEN
CalBRE#01221247
$2,790,000 ORINDA
$1,095,000
Chad Morrison
Bo Sullivan
CalBRE#00954395
LD
SO
$2,295,900 ORINDA
$1,089,000
CalBRE#01905614
LD
SO
5/4.5. New Construction! Newly
5/2. Adorable rancher on a spectacular
constructed estate offers all the bells and
flat lot. Magical backyard. Unique floor
whistles one could imagine. Orindaoaks.com plan.
The Beaubelle Group
CalBRE#00678426
5 Moraga Way | Orinda | 925.253.4600
2 Theatre Square, Suite 211 | Orinda | 925.253.6300
Laura Abrams
CalBRE# 01272382
$2,045,000
4/3. Delight in a classic Orinda setting
w/ panoramic views of Mt. Diablo all
on 1.43 acres.
David Pierce
CalBRE# 00964185
ORINDA
$1,350,000
Walter Nelson
CalBRE#01268536
$1,029,000
CalBRE#01388020/01341390
ORINDA
$2,285,900
4/4. New Construction.Visit
OrindaOaks.com! Lot 3 -Beautiful split
level. Close to town & transportation!
The Beaubelle Group
CalBRE#00678426
$775,000
3/2.5. BEAUTIFUL well appointed
townhome in Summit Ridge. 3 bdrm +
4th potential bdrm/office.
G
DIN
PEN
MORAGA
LD
SO
G
DIN
PEN
CalBRE#01461463 The Beaubelle Group
G
DIN
PEN
Rick & Nancy Booth
Maureen Wilbur
$849,000 WALNUT CREEK
4/4.2. Rare opportunity to buy newer
3/2. Park like setting. Steps to Mulholland
estate plus two adjacent lots. Gated, wine Open Space & Donald Rheem School.
cellar, gorgeous grounds w/pool & more! Fully fenced yard w/lawn.
Elena Hood
ORINDA
4/4. New Construction, Lot 7! Visit
4/4.5. Coming Soon! Cape Cod style
OrindaOaks.com. Buyer may select finishes. updated with old world charm. Close to
Front landscaping and fencing included.
downtown Orinda Village.
4/3.5. Breathtaking views! Custom home 4/2.5. Nestled among the oaks in OCC. 4/2.5. Gorgeous contemporary.
sits on 4.6 acres w/infinity edge pool, hot Vaulted ceilings, hdw floors, walls of
Spacious rooms. Back yard oasis with
tub,pool house,wine rm. Its a 10!!
windows.Views!
pool.Valley view.
$585,000 ORINDA
3/2.5. Highly Upgraded Former Model
Home is just steps to the most desirable
area of downtown.
$20,000
$180,000**
$75,000/yr (roughly)
$80,000***
$720,000**
$35,000
$100,000 per year (roughly)
**Estimated cost. Project currently unfunded and not scheduled.
***Estimated cost. Project delayed until 2018 due to lack of funds.
Source: The Orinda Capital Improvement Plan 2014-2018 and other city sources.
$2,695,900 ALAMO
5/5.1. New Construction! Stunning custom 4/2. Great Single level home. 1837 sqft,
home on 3.5 acre premium lot w/gourmet .27 acre lot, cul-de-sac, close to K-8 top
kit w/island.Visit OrindaOaks.com.
schools.
The Beaubelle Group
$31,800 - $54,000
$91,000*
$330,000+*
The Lamorinda Real Estate Firm people trust
ORINDA
leaders and disapprove of how they
have conducted Orinda’s Housing
Element updates. Phillips suggested later on that ballot language
should ask voters “whether you
would prefer that document [the
fifth cycle Housing Element draft]
or one that would be written by a
citizen committee.”
But others said those accusations were unfair and a special
election is unwarranted.
... continued on page A9
Potential Costs of a Special Election
4/2.5. Coming Soon. Impeccable quality 5/4.1. New Construction! Beautiful 2 story 4/3. Located near Roundhill Country
Moraga Charmer close to Rheem
Club Entry & Clubhouse this large
on 2.3 acre premium lot w/sweeping
Valley shopping center and schools.
home has gorgeous views.
views.Visit OrindaOaks.com.
Vlatka Bathgate
ness. “We could have people out on
Ivy Drive or any other street in
Orinda who couldn’t even replace
their water heater because they
couldn’t get a building permit because the city didn’t comply with
state law.”
Council members also heard
again from residents pro and con.
A handful of current and former
Orinda Watch members echoed
Phillips’ assertions that the majority of Orinda residents distrust city
CalBRE#00678426
LAFAYETTE
$1,799,000
6/4. Spacious Custom Home! 5112 sqft on
.31 acre lot on a cul-de-sac, large bonus
room, gourmet kitchen.
Elena Hood
LD
SO
CalBRE#01221247
ORINDA
$995,000
4/2. Opportunity in Orinda! 2463 sqft on
1.43 acre lot, also included is adjacent
1.22 acre lot.
Elena Hood
CalBRE#01221247
californiamoves.com
©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Cal BRE License # 01908304
Page: A8
www.lamorindaweekly.com
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Moraga-Orinda Fire
District Board of Directors
1547-A Palos Verdes Mall, Walnut Creek
Wednesday, Feb. 4, 7 p.m.
Moraga Library Community Room
1500 Saint Mary’s Road
Moraga, CA 94556
For meeting times and agendas,
visit www.mofd.org
Lafayette Task Force Imposes Its Will
(In Lunardi's Center, behind UPS Store)
S
By Nick Marnell
ervice on a government task
force often goes unnoticed and
ConFire Board of Directors
unrewarded. But a task force created
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 1:30 p.m.
by the city of Lafayette exacted its
Board Chamber room 107,
own notice at the county governing
Administration Building,
level, and the residents of Contra
Costa County may soon be rewarded
651 Pine St., Martinez
because of its efforts.
For meeting times and agendas,
When the Board of Supervisors
visit http://alturl.com/5p9pu.
closed Lafayette’s station 16 of the
Contra Costa County Fire Protection
Emergency response information
District,
the city formed an Emerand training:
gency
Services
Task Force to investiLamorinda Community
Emergency Response Team (CERT) gate alternative delivery of fire and
emergency medical service to its reswww.lamorindacert.org.
idents. After months of deliberation,
the task force agreed to support staShare your thoughts, insights and tion 46, a joint venture at the
opinions with your community. Lafayette-Orinda border between
Send a letter to
ConFire and the Moraga-Orinda Fire
the editor: [email protected]
District. During a discussion of the
lamorindaweekly.com
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Lafayette ambulance service that
would be provided out of the new station – to be staffed by MOFD personnel – the complexities of ambulance
exclusive operating areas arose.
In 2013 ConFire captain Gil Caravantes responded to an emergency
medical call in Lafayette, and based
on his analysis at the scene, Caravantes requested mutual aid from
MOFD to transport the patient to the
hospital. His action violated the contract between Contra Costa County
and its ambulance provider, American
Medical Response, in part because
AMR holds the exclusive right to provide ambulance service in Lafayette.
Task force member Jim Cunha
spoke of the need to change that section of the county ambulance contract, portions of which are available
for competitive bid this year. “Station
46 should be able to be dispatched to
medical calls in Lafayette,” he said.
“Include in the (request for proposal)
the ability of the new ambulance vendor to be allowed to cross district
boundaries.”
The task force agreed, notified the
county EMS director in October and
submitted to the Board of Supervisors
the following revised paragraph for
the county ambulance RFP draft: “In
the interest of getting the quickest ambulance to the patient, (the Local
Emergency Medical Services
Agency) requires the Contractor to
make a good faith effort to execute a
satisfactory mutual aid agreement
with the agencies responding from a
neighboring jurisdiction. LEMSA
will approve an appropriately structured agreement to use the closer ambulances.”
“(The Caravantes) situation is the
very scenario that this paragraph is attempting to address,” said Ben Smith,
ConFire battalion chief, EMS division.
Co-chair Brandt Andersson further explained the rationale behind the
task force action. “I think that it is just
common sense and something that
public safety agencies do as a matter
of course,” he said. “We wanted to be
sure that if the contract is won by a
for-profit entity, that they would be
held to the same standard of safety
first, profit second.”
“It is our contention that patients’
lives are more important than invisible borders that separate fire districts,”
added co-chair Traci Reilly.
The supervisors unanimously ap-
proved the RFP, including the task
force changes, on Jan. 13. The RFP
went to the California EMS Authority
for approval, and unless it determines
the need for substantive changes in
the document, bidding for the available portions of the county ambulance
contract is expected to begin by April.
The contract will be awarded by
the Board of Supervisors, which is
also the governing body of ConFire,
a likely bidder for that contract.
Sharon Anderson, county counsel, issued a report which states that the
board is not precluded from considering the district’s bid just because it
serves as the governing body of both
entities.
“We are cognizant of the risks as
to being both boards,” said Supervisor
Candace Andersen. “That is why
we’ve requested an independent financial analysis of each bid as well as
the hiring of two independent observers. We are committed to providing the highest level of emergency
medical service at the best price.”
And as implored by the Lafayette
task force, to provide emergency
medical service that embodies a standard of public safety over profit.
ConFire Academy Graduates 15
Hopefully not coming to a neighborhood near you
T
ConFire’s Denise Cannon administers the oath to the graduating class of Academy 47.
he Contra Costa County Fire
Protection District held its
graduation ceremony for the 15 firefighters of Academy 47 on Jan. 15 in
Concord near the district training facility. While the event bore a formal,
almost militaristic air early on, the
tone relaxed as the new firefighters
satirized actions of their superiors,
and family members pinned their heroes at the conclusion of the festivities.
Retired De La Salle High School
football coach Bob Ladouceur, subject of the 2014 hit movie “When the
Moraga
Photo Nick Marnell
Game Stands Tall,” delivered the
keynote address. He talked about the
similarities between football and firefighting, stressing the necessity for
teamwork and how critical it is to
watch each others’ backs at all times.
He also said that he applied to become
a firefighter many years ago, “but I
failed the written test,” he confessed.
His daughter learned from his mistake, though, as she works as a firefighter with the Berkeley Fire
Department.
“These firefighters should be
proud that they have passed all the
tests and rigors of our hiring and recruit processes, and they are now on
the street serving the citizens of the
Contra Costa County Fire Protection
District,” said Fire Chief Jeff Carman.
“I am confident that our academy
staff has prepared them to pass their
probationary period and we welcome
these new firefighters to the district.”
Probationary firefighters Peter
Doppe and Natividad Porras are assigned to Lafayette stations 15 and 17,
respectively. N. Marnell
as well as East Bay Municipal
Utility District water discharge
volume. In order to create a
smooth transition onto the higher
bridge, the road on both sides will
be reconstructed.
One resident voiced concern
about having a wide bridge with
bike lanes that dump down onto a
very narrow two-lane road.
“That’s very hazardous,” he said.
Moraga Chief of Police Bob
Priebe noted that as far as he
knows there has been only one
collision on the bridge involving
a horse trailer. He added that his
concern is for bicyclists heading
south, especially when they reach
the narrow turn bearing right on
Canyon Road. “I would like to
see us have advisory signs moving bicyclists from Canyon Road
to the (Lafayette-Moraga) trail
that comes back down (onto
Canyon) where there is better
clearance.”
The construction, which will
be staggered to keep one traffic
lane open at all times, is scheduled to begin in 2016. Traffic will
be regulated by a traffic light.
More information is available on
the
town's
website
at
moraga.ca.us/canyonbridge. A
comprehensive Q&A is available
on the bridge project page.
Plan for New Canyon Bridge Takes Shape
... continued from page A5
The total cost of the bridge is
estimated at $3.4 million. The
town secured a federal grant for
88.5 percent of the total cost, and
is required to fund $400,000.
Kwan added that the Contra Costa
Transportation Authority (CCTA)
might help with matching funds.
The new bridge will continue
to have two car lanes, with added
bicycle lanes on both sides and a
raised pedestrian walkway on the
side where Canyon Road meets
the Lafayette-Moraga Regional
Trail.
The new bridge will be significantly higher than the current one
to incorporate 100-year flood data
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
925-377-0977
UPSCALE WOMEN’S CONSIGNMENT
Share your thoughts with our community! Opinions in Letters to the Editor are the express views of the writer and
not necessarily those of the Lamorinda Weekly. All published letters will include the writer's name and city/town of
residence -- we will only accept letters from those who live in, or own a business in, the communities comprising Lamorinda (please give
us your phone number for verification purposes only). Letters should be 350 words or less; letters of up to 500 words will be accepted on a
space-available basis. email: [email protected]; Regular mail: Lamorinda Weekly, P.O.Box 6133, Moraga, CA 94570
Editor:
The supporters of a revitalized downtown overlook the
many side effects and collateral damage that would be
involved in demolishing and rebuilding Orinda Village,
and also overlook the drawbacks of a “revitalized” Village. How would Orinda obtain a revitalized downtown? Property would have to be acquired over time
from the many owners. While that is happening, existing businesses would close and new businesses would
not open. Our local, friendly, family-owned businesses
would be forced to close. There would be years of construction noise, dust, and interference with traffic flow
to the remaining businesses. What would the end result
be? Instead of family-owned businesses paying affordable rents and charging affordable prices, we would end
up with more expensive chain stores. We would have
more traffic on the only street through the village, and
parking problems, which already exist in the downtown
around the Orinda theater. Parking meters would be in
our future. Look at “revitalized” Lafayette. The costs
of the new construction, including underground parking, will be enormous. The developer will have to
charge high rents to make a profit. Only chain or specialty high end stores charging us high prices will be
able to afford those rents. It is ironic for the pro-development forces to point to the empty Phairs building,
when it was their efforts that helped scuttle the proposed
Montessori school, which the community desired. And
before we add more housing, let’s first wait and see the
effect of all of the recently-constructed housing on our
quality of life – on parking, traffic, schools and shopping. I prefer the current village, which serves the community and which will evolve slowly. There is easy
access to our community park. I can conveniently park
my car when I need to pick up a prescription at Rite
Aid, eat lunch at Geppetto’s, or obtain take out from the
Szechwan Chinese Restaurant. We can always drive the
short distance to Lafayette or Walnut Creek for an expensive meal or a high end retail product. Let’s not destroy Orinda’s village character in the guise of
revitalizing it.
mobiles. Orinda does not need or want low income or
high density housing. Housing prices should be set by
supply and demand, left to the individual discretion of
the individual owners of that land. All proposed or finished high density housing in Orinda does not have adequate parking for the residents to park their cars. This
is not an accident. Central "planners" want people out
of their cars so they are dependent on public transportation. Mr. Towbridge is resistant to change as well as
progress. The freedom of the automobile is the future
and is imperative of a free people. If you fly over the
U.S. you will see this country is empty. We do not need
to huddle together like medieval peasants. Democrats
are seeking to impose this on us simply so they can control us.
Henry R. Pinney
Orinda
Editor:
As a long-time resident of Orinda, I totally understand
why the City of Lafayette supports the plan to replace
Orinda’s Honey Hill Fire Station with a new station on
El Nido Ranch Road at Lorinda Lane in Lafayette. The
county closed their station in NW Lafayette nearly three
years ago. Since then, the residents of that area have depended on our Honey Hill Fire Station to provide emergency services. If the new (very expensive) station is
built, response times to NW Lafayette will be reduced
by several minutes – at no cost to Lafayette residents.
It’s a great deal – for Lafayette!
However, the real "costs" will be borne by the taxpayers
of the MOFD (especially parts of North Orinda) who
will have their already sub-standard response times increased by two minutes. The MOFD Board hopes to
save money on operations with this plan, but what is
the real cost? What is the value of a life lost while waiting for help to arrive or the value of a house that burns
down because MOFD couldn’t get there within its own
6-minute response time goal?
I understand why Lafayette would support this move.
What I don’t understand is why any resident of the
Nick Waranoff
MOFD would do the same. I, personally, have no deOrinda
sire to fund a station that will be located in Lafayette
and will primarily benefit Lafayette at the expense of
Editor:
the residents of Orinda and Moraga. For more information visit the following web site: www.savehoneyIn his letter of 1-14-15, Tom Trowbridge said: "Housing hillfirestation.com
has been well established as an appropriate use of real
estate in villages for centuries." Tom overlooks or ig- John Robertson
nores that this "establishment" was formed in medieval Orinda
times. We now have the wonderful freedom of auto-
Orinda
Motion to Bring Housing Element
Special Election to Voters Fails
... continued from page A7
“I have been here several times suggesting that, as I participated in the
fourth cycle, we came up with a good
document. Everybody agreed with
it,” said Dan DeBusschere, who
added that the fifth cycle should have
been “a slam dunk” after the amount
of work already done. “I urge you to
move on from this issue,” said Valerie
Sloven. “You’ve bent over backwards
to gather input.” Exchanges between
council and Orinda Watch members,
working line by line to edit drafts, are
audible on public meeting recordings.
“I think that the development and
submittal of a Housing Element is a
clear example of the purpose of representative government,” observed
Judd Hammond. “By virtue of the
election process, our city council
members have been delegated the responsibility of and the authority to act
on behalf of the citizens of Orinda in
precisely this sort of activity. Developing a complex plan such as the
Housing Element update requires
gathering and assessing large
amounts of information, including
input and feedback from citizens of
the city, identifying and evaluating
various alternatives and plans of action and, finally, deciding on a plan
N OW
O P E N!
Page: A9
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
that’s expected to best meet the needs
of the city as a whole while also
meeting external constraints, such as
state and county mandates and regulations. This type of back and forth
activity, often with several iterations,
cannot realistically be accomplished
through an election.”
Too long to reprint here, the deliberation can be heard online at
www.cityoforinda.org. Smith and Orr
spoke of opportunities lost as the city
has repeatedly back burnered key issues to address the Housing Element.
Phillips’ motion died without a second.
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Saturday: 10 AM -4 PM
Moraga
Moraga Citizens Network
... continued from page A5
To see a staff report about an issue,
residents had to make an appointment with staff to take a look in person, and only summaries of the
meeting minutes were available on
the town’s website, months after the
meetings.
Schwartz called a meeting with
a few friends, including Beans, and
they started discussing what they
thought was needed in town. Moraga Citizens Network (MCN) was
born, with the simple objective of
“promoting participatory democracy in Moraga.”
Schwartz presented the project
to the town council and received a
cold reception from then mayor
Mike Majchrzak, but this didn’t
stop the group. They began attending all the meetings and spreading
information through their email
newsletter. “In 2007, during his
State of the Town address, Mike
(Majchrzak) said in front of everybody that he wanted to apologize to
Edy Schwartz, that he did not believe me and thought the group had
an agenda, and that he was wrong
and hoped everyone would support
them,” says Schwartz.
“Our first big information campaign came with the 2006 election,”
remembers Beans.
“We printed and sent our first
mailing to all voters with a Q&A
answered by all the candidates.”
The mailing was funded privately
by MCN members. MCN also organized its first candidates’ night in
partnership with the League of
Women Voters. Schwartz, Beans
and a few friends advertized the
forum by going door-to-door to
every retailer in both shopping centers and asking to put flyers in their
windows.
MCN members continued to
participate in meetings, listen and
sometimes comment, especially
when issues dealt with freedom of
speech or information for the public. In 2007 the website Moragacitizensnetwork.org was up and
running and by 2008, MCN had 500
members. “We always had a table
at the Pear Festival, at the Fourth of
July, and spread the word that way
about our activities,” says Beans.
Then in 2008 there was a heated
battle in Moraga, not only between
council member candidates, but
also about ballot measures that
would affect land use. Knowing that
the stakes were high, some people
in town started questioning the neutrality of MCN. Beans welcomed
them to participate in the draft of the
questions that were going to be
asked at the Open Space Initiative
forum that MCN organized at Saint
Mary's College with proponents of
each measure. It was also the year
the Moraga Center Specific Plan's
report was produced. The group
videotaped the report and made
DVD copies that were available in
the library and other public places.
Lamorinda Weekly began taping the
candidates’ nights and making them
available online.
Now whenever the public needs
to be informed about an upcoming
meeting, initiative or workshop,
staff sends the information to Beans
for publication in the newsletter,
MCN Link. In recent years, information about Saint Mary’s College
and service group activities were
added to the newsletter. “MCN provides such a critical service to the
community since citizens can rely
on it for providing unbiased and
transparent information,” says
Town Manager Jill Keimach. “Ellen
(Beans) is one of the first people we
call when we need to get the word
out about something quickly.” She
adds that MCN’s candidate forum
provides all residents the opportunity to get to know and hear from
candidates, again in a manner that is
“non-political and unbiased.”
The group’s objective for the
next decade? Reach the next generation of Moragans.
Beans and Schwartz acknowledge that a lot of progress has been
made to provide information in
town. Agendas, staff reports and
minutes (including audio and, soon,
video) are available online and the
town publishes “About Town,”
which succinctly explains what
happened from a civic perspective.
“But it is hard to get information to
the people on complex issues,” says
Schwartz, whose current objective
is to get younger generations informed and involved in the land use
questions the town will debate this
year.
The Moraga Town Council will
honor MCN tonight with a proclamation thanking the group for all it
has done to expand participatory
democracy in Moraga. The current
MCN board includes Ellen Beans,
Larry Beans, Mike Bernhardt, Tory
Courtney, Denise Duff, Janet Forman, John Haffner and Tom Marnane. To sign up for the MCN
newsletter, go to moragacitizensnetwork.org.
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12/23/14 11:18 AM
Page: A10
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
The Transformation of Star Pilates
Business
By Sophie Braccini
S
tar Pilates and Fitness in Moraga
is undergoing a complete transformation under the new leadership of
Andrea Ruotsi. The young mother
lives in Moraga with her 5-year-old
son, Oliver, and has the energy, training and business sense to make the
studio a big success. She is adding
classes and services that cater to a
clientele who are looking for fun and
stimulation in a casual atmosphere.
Definitely not your average suburbanite, Ruotsi also has an interior design
practice.
Ruotsi’s business goals for Star
Pilates are lofty: adding barre, yoga,
TRX and spin classes, while providing morning childcare, making sure
that the relaxed atmosphere is preserved, and the existing clients who
come for Reformer or Pilates Mat
classes don’t feel pushed out of the
way.
“I bought the studio last November,” she says with a big smile. “I
thought that this place had a lot of potential for development.” Ruotsi was
raised in Alamo and has lived in many
different places in the United States
including Reno, where she got her interior design degree, as well as New
York and Los Angeles where she
worked in the design industry. She
came back to the Bay Area when she
decided to start a family. Throughout
her life, Ruotsi was athletic, participating in soccer, track and a lot of skiing. She started teaching fitness
classes in high school as an extension
of her summer job as a lifeguard at
Livorna pool in Alamo. She’s continued teaching fitness in tandem with
her interior design career, steadily
building her body of knowledge and
experience.
“I loved teaching so much that I
always knew someday I would have
my own place,” Ruotsi says. “I love
barre classes but I didn’t want to own
a barre franchise, with someone limiting what I can do. I think that the
healthiest thing for everyone’s body
Andrea Ruotsi teaches a barre class.
is to mix different exercises.” She
started teaching barre over 10 years
ago, first in Marin County, then San
Francisco, before coming back to the
East Bay two and a half years ago. “If
someone comes to my class regularly
three times a week, I guarantee that
person will transform their body
within three months,” she says.
The expansion of classes and
services started at Star Pilates are all
with the goal to better serve the needs
of her clientele, such as opening the
morning daycare that runs during the
week or selling a selection of sports
attire.
On the business side, she has partnered with her family. Her father is
the behind-the-scenes finance officer
of the company. “He was an executive and is now retired. This business
endeavor is his way of fulfilling his
dream of having a business, vicariously through me, and we’ve become
very close in the process,” she says.
Ruotsi has always had a business acu-
Photo Sophie Braccini
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
business briefs
Carefree Moves Celebrated
(510) 336-2455 or (925) 330-1988
[email protected],
www.carefreemoves.net
men. Even when she was working
for Anthropology in Los Angeles creating displays, besides the esthetics,
she also had the drive to grow the
business. “I would walk my stock
room every morning and see what I
owned a lot of,” she remembers, “and
then I would create displays around
those units.”
With Star Pilates, her goal is to
make her space in the Moraga Center
more visible. One of her first changes
was the barre room that had no natural
Photo provided
light and felt like a storage area. She
removed the panels masking the very
Carefree Moves was recently recognized by Score (Service Corps of Retired
large windows, replaced the carpet Executives, an affiliate of the Small Business Administration) and nominated
with wood, and installed mirrors as for an honorable mention as Outstanding Small Business Owned by Women.
well as beautiful red oak bars with Since the two owners Dee Vance and Cynthia Nolan purchased the Lafayettecustom-made stainless steel brackets. based business in 2009, it has been growing steadily. They say word-of-mouth
Ruotsi’s goal is to offer between is the reason for their success. They remove all the stress from moving and tailor
five to eight different fitness classes a their service to their clients’ needs, from simple packing and unpacking help, to
day. She won't touch the main lobby hand-holding throughout the moving process. “We work with all kinds of
where the Reformer classes are lo- clients,” says Vance, “from busy families, to people downsizing.” Vance adds
cated and she is continuing to employ that their bigger assets are the 20 to 30 women they employ. “They are local
the master teachers who are the foun- women, professional organizers and packers who love to help people and be of
dation of Star Pilates. “I don't want to service,” says Vance. “They love to do a job that’s out of the corporate world
disrupt the existing classes; I don't and that’s project oriented.” Packing, transport, un-packing and setting up the
want to lose the intimacy of the busi- new home takes one to four days, depending on the size of the home. The preness, either,” she says. “I'm not look- packing is a different story: it can take much longer if people are moving to a
ing to pack the seams.”
much smaller space. “We help them choose what they want to keep, what will
Ruotsi now offers a Sunday yoga be donated or recycled, and we employ men with a truck to transport everyclass and is looking for more yoga in- thing,” says Vance. The team has many emotional stories to tell, such as the
structors to offer power yoga. She husband who took his family for a vacation before the move and secretly hired
also wants to add space to have a ded- Carefree Moves to do the job while they were gone. “When they came back
icated spin room and possibly locker and discovered their new place ready to live in, including the kids’ rooms, the
and shower rooms.
wife said that it was the best thing he had ever done for his family,” recalls
Ruotsi continues to run Flutter In- Vance. The ladies also love to work for the Warriors when they trade a player.
teriors, her design business. That, “In that case we do only the unpacking for them, but we completely set up their
coupled with raising her son, makes homes, including their closets, the kitchen, hanging the pictures, and we even
put fresh flowers on the table,” says Vance. Carefree Moves charges by the
for a very full and busy life indeed.
Information about classes is hour and Vance says that a complete move costs between $2,000 and $4,000.
available online at www.starpilate- Since 2009 they have moved hundreds of families in the Bay Area.
sandfitness.com.
News from the Three Chambers of Commerce
Star Pilates and Fitness
1460 Moraga Road, Ste. F, Moraga Lafayette
(925) 376-7500
Ribbon Cutting at 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29 at the new location of Bay Sotheby's
International Realty, 3725 Mt. Diablo Blvd.
Lamorinda Weekly business articles are intended
to inform the community about local business
activities, not to endorse a particular company,
product or service.
Orinda’s In Forma Integral
Fitness Celebrates 20 Years
Andrea Colombu started In Forma in 1995, starting with the idea of
blending Eastern and Western approaches to fitness. The Italian man,
who had been involved in semi-professional sports in his country,
moved to California in 1986. In 1988 he went back to college to study
anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, exercise science and nutrition. In
1990, he started his personal training career (AFAA & ACE certified),
earned a certification in massage therapy from the McKinnon Institute
and started his private practice. “We expanded the studio twice, doubling its size to offer all of our classes,” says Colombu. “We offer pilates,
barre, yoga, strength and cardio classes, nutrition and TRX.” Colombu’s
ambition is to offer tools and practices for both the body and the
mind. He went back to school in 2003 for a psychology degree and
has made his meditation practice a big part of his life. “I started teaching meditation in the yoga studio in 2014,” he says. Some of his clients
have been with him for the past 20 years and new ones come in all the
time, ranging in age from 13 to 93 years old. He says that he’s seen a
shift in what people demand over the last 20 years. “The awareness
has increased, people want to live healthy lives, and they also want a
meaningful lifestyle.” In Forma also holds a Parkinson's working
group (Colombu’s mom had Parkinson’s) with a specialized trainer. In
Forma is located at 23A Orinda Way, Orinda. For info, call (925) 2546877 or visit www.informaorinda.com.
The Marquis Business Person of the Year annual dinner honoring Leila Douglah
of Douglah Designs will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 30 at the Lafayette Park
Hotel and Spa. The evening also includes the introduction of the chamber’s
2015 board of directors, incoming president Debbie Cooper of Mechanics Bank,
and the “State of the City" address by Mayor Brandt Andersson. Reservations
can be made online at lafayettechamber.org or by calling (925) 284-7404.
Ribbon Cutting at 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 5 for Merrill Gardens at Lafayette,
1010 Second Street.
Moraga
Welcome breakfast for chamber members starting at 8 a.m. Friday, Feb. 6 at
Terzetto in the Moraga Shopping Center.
Save the date for the Business Person of the Year dinner honoring Moraga
Royale’s Dianne Wilson at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24 at the Moraga Country Club.
Tickets
are
$50;
reservations
required
by
contacting
[email protected]
Orinda
Save the date for the Chamber Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 20 at the
Orinda Country Club. The Orinda Chamber of Commerce will present annual
awards recognizing outstanding contributions to the chamber and the Orinda
business community.
Tickets are $30; contact Candy at
[email protected]
If you have a business brief to share, please contact
Sophie Braccini at [email protected]
from front page
The Lamorinda Woman Behind Champion Dogs
... continued from page A1
Judie Howard works with her dogs on differing commands. Photo Andy Scheck
After Howard won her first Utility title – an American Kennel Club
advanced obedience trial category –
with her first two dogs, she felt confident enough to start her own training
school in Moraga in 1974. “We first
used the tennis courts at Campolindo,
then the gym,” she remembers. She
trained at Acalanes High School, Del
Valle High School and Saint Mary's
College. Soon word spread about her
training. “At some point we trained
350 dogs a week,” she remembers.
She had Novice classes that she ran
with the help of one assistant for
every four dogs, and had as much as
45 dogs at a time. “Within 15 minutes
we could get every one of them to sit
and not bark,” she remembers.
Howard focuses on praise. “I'm
very consistent, I am lavish with
praise, and I set very clear boundaries,” she says. “I don't punish, and
when I raise the level of difficulty I
explain to the dogs why I do it.”
With the help of her husband,
Gary Howard, she built her own training site on her property 20 years ago.
“Training is very good for the dogs,
both physically and mentally,” says
Debbie Hughs of Moraga, who's been
working with Howard for two years.
She brings her Papillion Remy for
one-on-one training because he is
very shy. “He was afraid of the
wind,” she remembers, but she is sure
he will qualify at his first competition
scheduled at the end of this month.
Nia Surber has been training with
Howard for 10 years. “I trained with
a Shetland Sheepdog that was afraid
of everything,” she remembers. “It
took us a long time, but we went all
the way to Utility with him.” She is
now training Dexter, a vivaciously
small 2-year-old dog. During the session Dexter practices scent discrimination, as well as fetching a dumbbell
that his handler has touched, fetching
on command in spite of distraction,
responding to hand commands, jumping, walking side-by-side with his
owner without a leash, and sitting in
place when his handler goes away. “It
is so much fun, and Judie is the best;
she’s as good as it gets,” says Surber.
“She has the ability to come up with
at least five different ways to fix a
problem, and she knows every breed
of dog.” What’s different about her,
Surber adds, is that she is also very
good with people. “It's nice to be able
to have a good laugh sometimes,” she
says.
Howard says that over her career
she must have trained 60,000 dogs of
every breed one might think of, and
does not remember one failure.
Howard also trains her own dogs and
is now going for an unprecedented
14th AKC Obedience Trial Championship.
Levels of Competition in AKC Standard Obedience
According to the American Kennel Club, there are three levels of competition in Standard Obedience: Novice, Open and Utility. Novice is for the dog just getting started and includes exercises such
as heel on leash and figure eight, as well as standing for examination. The Open level includes more
complicated exercises, and Utility is the third and highest level of obedience competition, involving
more complicated tasks including scent discrimination and signal exercises. To achieve the Obedience Trial Champion title, dogs with UD titles must win 100 points and a first-place in Utility B and
Open B, plus a third first-place win in either class, under three different judges. For more information, visit http://www.apps.akc.org/classic/events/obedience/getting_started.cfm.
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Deficit Spending Continues for Local
High Schools
A
By Cathy Tyson
t a recent Acalanes Union High
School District governing
board meeting in Lafayette the budget
update for the 2015-16 school year included a “budget adjustment target of
(negative) $3,103,000 to maintain a
positive fiscal outlook and balanced
budget in the district.” What’s not immediately clear is that “budget adjustment target” is a euphemism for
anticipated deficit.
The total projected spending for
the next school year is slated to be
$62.783 million to provide an education for students at Acalanes, Campolindo, Miramonte and Las Lomas
high schools as well as the Acalanes
Center for Independent Study.
This will be the second year in a
row of red ink for the district, after
logging a $5.5 million deficit for the
2014-15 school year. To address the
current shortfall, the district has a hiring and spending freeze in place to reduce the size of the deficit.
Overall it’s been a rough transition to the Local Control Funding
Formula, or LCFF, which started with
the 2013-14 school year. LCFF is a
new statewide funding formula that
replaces the old system of general
purpose funding from the state based
on complex historical formulas. Districts receive more money for highneeds students based on counts of
low-income, English learner and foster youth students. The problem is
that the AUHSD has very few students who fall into those categories
and the base funding level is inadequate.
In this first step of many to craft a
budget for 2015-16, the district is actively looking at local and state revenue options to fill the gap, including
Parent Club and foundation resources,
community support, facility use fees
and adult education consortia. In addition, there’s an assumption that
LCFF revenue will grow due to pro-
jected increased tax revenue from the
state and projected enrollment
growth.
“This district is not going to be
fully funded by the LCFF,” said
AUHSD Superintendent John Nickerson. In March and in May of 2015
the district anticipates getting more
complete financial information to further refine the budget.
While noting the uptick in state
revenue due to a robust economy is a
“pleasant surprise,” according to the
superintendent, even with an anticipated bump in LCFF funding, that still
leaves a projected $3.1 million problem for the 2015-16 school year.
On the table for consideration to
address the shortfall is reduction in
maintenance and operations, possible
anticipated retirements, and potential
cuts or elimination of adult education
programs.
In addition, Associate Superintendent of Administrative Services
Kevin French was looking at master
scheduling options and outlined a
new framework for electives. Typically, students get their first choice of
elective; he proposed a shift in how
the master schedule is built so that
students may have to go with their
second choice elective. It is possible
there will be 10 fewer elective sections in 2015-16, said French.
He also said he thinks it’s possible
to make slight classified instructional
assistant reductions at each school site
for the next school year. There’s a
specific multi-step protocol, if need
be, to make reductions in certified
employees or teachers.
“We have to do everything we
can,” said board member Nancy
Kendzierski on the belt tightening.
“This is distressing for a lot of people,” said new board member Bob
Hockett, a former teacher. “I didn’t
think we’d be talking about this at my
second meeting.” The governing
board is legally required to adopt the
annual budget on or before July 1.
Complaints About Sex Ed Instruction
Although there’s usually an element of drama when discussing district
budgetary concerns, during the public comment portion of the AUHSD
board meeting quite a number of opponents and supporters came out
once again to share their opinions about the district using Planned Parenthood instructors to teach a comprehensive sex education course
that includes discussing HIV/AIDS prevention. The district has used
Planned Parenthood as a consultant for over a decade. Parents are
given notice of the course and can request their students opt-out.
A group of passionate citizens, including representatives from NOISE
(No to Irresponsible Sex Education) urged the school board to remove
Planned Parenthood as the provider of sex education instruction, claiming the organization “promotes certain behaviors and promiscuity.” Another person commented that “it comes down to prayer; sins exist in the
world, sins of the flesh.”
Another commented, “Religion has no place in school. Whatever happened to separation of church and state?” Citing a marked drop in teen
pregnancy, a parent of two teenagers called improvements in comprehensive sex education including contraceptive use “incredible news.”
The topic will be on the governing board’s agenda in April or May; in the
meantime, if the item is not on the agenda, governing board members
are prohibited from addressing the issue.
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Page: A11
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he Public Art Committee held a reception
on Jan. 26 to celebrate the abundant creativity of local photographers with their neigh• Orinda resident
bors, family and friends at the official unveiling
of works submitted to the Winter Solstice “A Day
• Owner operated
in the Life” photo contest. This is the contest’s
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Hall of the Lafayette Library and Learning Center for the next few months. The Public Art Committee had a difficult time choosing, since all the
entries were remarkable, said Juliet Hansen, City
of Lafayette Public Art Committee.
Juror’s Awards go to: Kim Crossley Overaa
for “Love at the Community Garden,” James
Meehan for “The River,” Laurel Palmer for “Eye
on the Sky,” Carol Reif for “Stargazer: Astronomer David DeBoer,” and Stu Selland for
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Page: A12
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WHEN MATH MAKES SENSE, YOU SUCCEED!
WHEN MATH MAKES SENSE, YOU SUCCEED!
Clean | Courteous | Conscientious
On-time | Trustworthy | Local References
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ister between noon and 2 p.m.
Wagner Ranch Elementary
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350 Camino Pablo
(925) 376-4435
(925) 258-0016
1111 Camino Pablo
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P040036 02/04
To print out and complete the majority of registration forms, please access the “Registration”
page and to identify the "home" elementary
school, please access the “Attendance Area” on
the district’s website, www.orindaschools.org.
Los Perales Elementary
(925) 631-0105
22 Wakefield Drive
State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company (Not in NJ), Bloomington, IL
Donald L. Rheem Elementary
(925) 376-4441
90 Laird Drive
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Distinctive Properties
New App Creates Smooth Ride for
Lamorinda Casual Carpoolers
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Page:
B1
By Sophie Braccini
S
Commuter Kevin Newby uses a new casual carpool service to get a ride into San Francisco as Alex Mooradian and
Zach Burghardt make sure everything is OK.
Photo Sophie Braccini
an Francisco commuters didn’t
mind standing in the cold for a
few minutes at the Holy Shepherd
Lutheran Church parking lot in
Orinda recently before hopping in
cars that were heading across the
bay. These Moraga and Orinda residents are pioneering a new service
through an app called Commutr that
guarantees riders and drivers they’ll
find matches in 10 minutes or less on
their morning commute to San Francisco. After a few hiccups in its first
week before the holidays, Commutr
is now up and running, and developers are already thinking of expanding
to new locations.
“This is better than BART,” says
Laurie Tennant from Orinda. “You
can’t get parking after 7:30 at BART,
the drop spot is closer to my office
(she works south of Market), and it’s
nice to have a guaranteed seat!”
Other commuters were equally enthusiastic about the service. Moraga
resident Jon Waide says it’s more
regular than the bus. Roberto
Castillo, also from Moraga, likes that
the evening shuttle that brings you
back to your car from BART is available every 10 minutes, compared to
the bus’s 40-minute intervals.
During this initial stage, commuters or drivers who have never
used the service before are greeted at
the pick-up location by Moraga resident Alex Mooradian or one of his
partners to set things up. Commuters
should already have downloaded the
app on their iPhones – the android
version should be available within a
month – on the website (www.getcommutr.com) or on iTunes, and registered for the time slots they need to
pick up commuters, if they are a
driver, or need to be picked up. “It is
critical that people register with the
app, so we can guarantee the pick-up
time,” says Mooradian.
A glitch happened the first week
when they had difficulty matching
drivers and passengers every 10
minutes. So to remedy this Commutr is now only taking a few drivers at a time and adding paid drivers
to pick up passengers. “We have a
waiting list of drivers,” explains
Mooradian. “As the number of people (using the service) grows, we’ll
retire the black cars (paid drivers
who can wait as needed) and add
more commuters.”
Commutr is a full-time business
for Mooradian and his partners
Sorin Neacsu, the CTO, Zach
Burghardt, the designer, software
engineer Ovi Roatis and Mooradian’s brother-in-law, John Slack.
“I had been using the casual carpool
in Orinda for two years and in the
back of my mind I kept thinking
there must be a better way of doing
this with the help of technology,”
says Mooradian.
The New Yorker moved to the
Bay Area eight years ago and became
an entrepreneur. He has already
started and sold two businesses and
after the last one, Ready Force, was
acquired by Looksharp, he decided to
tackle the Lamorinda commute with
former Ready Force colleagues.
“We have many requests to expand the service,” says the young
Moraga dad. They are considering
adding a pick-up site in Moraga, another one in Orinda, one in Lafayette,
Walnut Creek or Berkeley, as well as
a drop-off in Oakland. They are also
looking at expanding hours to 8:30
a.m. – the current window is from 7
to 8 a.m. The first two San Francisco
drop-off locations are at the corner of
Fremont and Howard streets, or the
corner of Front and Pine streets.
The cost for the service is $3 a
day. “It costs much less than BART
parking plus the ticket,” says Mooradian. Of the total cost, $2 per person
goes to the driver, and $1 to Commutr. “People have told us that we
should charge more because they
want us to stay in business,” Mooradian adds with a big smile.
“After a while there won’t need to
be anybody here to make sure that
people are getting into the right cars,”
adds Mooradian. “People will log in
their times in the app, their pick-up
and drop-off spots, and the program
will create the groups in 10 minute intervals.” The app is available on the
company’s website at www.getcommutr.com.
See a Doctor Today
At our Urgent Care clinic in Lafayette
Emergency
medicine
physicians
on-site 365
days a year
Pigeon Deaths in Lamorinda
Linked to Avian Parasite
L
By Cathy Dausman
ike a scene from a Hitchcock
movie, birds are dying in
Lamorinda. At least one flock of
approximately 30 band-tailed pigeons in Orinda has already been
devastated, says Dr. Guthrum
Purdin of Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek. “These
birds look sick,” he said. “It’s upsetting for people to see.”
The California native bird with
an already low reproduction rate –
single births happen only two or
three times a year – is experiencing an outbreak of Trichomonosis,
a disease caused by a single-celled
microscopic protozoan parasite,
Trichomonas gallinae.
“It was driving me crazy,”
said Orinda resident Leeann
Brady, who wondered if the
deaths of the pigeons were caused
by poisoning.
“It’s definitely in the Orinda
and Lafayette area,” agreed
Krysta Rogers of the California
Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Rogers is an environmental scientist and avian specialist who visited the affected area Jan. 16. She
says the band-tailed pigeons are
typically found in higher eleva-
tions in oak woods and conifer
forests. They feed on acorns, eating them whole. The disease
causes lesions near the mouth restricting their ability to feed and
they die of starvation or suffocation.
The disease spreads readily
when birds flock during winter
months and generally dissipates
as the pigeons pair off during
mating season. Rogers said the
disease Trichomonas gallinae is
strictly an avian parasite and will
not spread to humans or mammals. ... continued on page B4
Weekdays
8 AM - 8 PM
Weekends &
Holidays
9 AM - 5 PM
970 Dewing Ave, Lafayette
925-297-6397
www.statmed.com
Armando
Samaniego, MD.,
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U R G E N T
C A R E
For a limited time become a
Fitness Member of Itrim for
only *$49/month! (regularly $69)
* Some restrictions apply
Itrim Lafayette • 973 Moraga Road • Lafayette CA , 94549 •
www.itrim.us
Page: B2
jtÜx Wxá|zÇá
Campo Alum Paints, Sells Beautiful Artwork
www.lamorindaweekly.com
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Y|Çx ]xãxÄÜç á|Çvx DLJJ
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
By Diane Claytor
Expanding our
Services with
ree Goldsmiths &
a Graduate Gemologist
• Custom Designs
• Appraisals
• Expert Repairs
50% off
Watch
Battery
All your jewelry is insured with
Jeweler’s Block Insurance.
Now $5,
Reg $10
3645 Mt. Diablo Blvd., Lafayette between Trader Joes & the Post Office
283-2988 www.waredesigns.com Tuesday-Saturday 10-6
1 watch battery per person.
Exp. 2/28/15.
Usually installed while you wait.
W/coupon. Restrictions apply.
The Writing Studio Lamorinda Weekly 3.875 x 4 Fall 2013.pdf 1 9/26/2013 7:19:32 PM
()
Classes S
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Join THE WRITING STUDIO this fall as your children enter a world
of CREATIVE NARRATIVE AND ESSAY-BASED EXPOSITORY WRITING
PROJECTS. Through grade appropriate classes and one-on-one
THE WRITING STUDIO
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February 17 - May 1.
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TAXI BLEU
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• Transfer of Real Property into Trust
• Power of Attorney for Finance
• Community
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Including:
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• Power of Attorney for Health Care
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Transfer of Real Property into Trust
••• Guardianship
Power of Attorneyof
forMinor
FinanceChildren
Community
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Agreement
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Medical
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of
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forIncluding
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•• Transfer
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in Walnut Creek
Office(925)
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[email protected]
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COUNT
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I
Bridgette Thornton paints in her studio at California College of the Arts.
t’s unlikely that many up-andcoming artists sell their first paintings before they’re old enough to
toast their success with a glass of
champagne. Moraga’s Bridgette
Thornton did just that. But then,
Thornton’s incredible artistic talent is
complemented by both her entrepreneurial spirit and her moxie.
A recent graduate of California
College of the Arts (CCA), the 23year-old painter grew up in Moraga
and credits the local public schools for
both teaching her the art form and
supporting her passion for it.
“Camino Pablo was where I remember first being introduced to painting
and drawing,” Thornton said. “I was
able to develop my love of art just by
attending the public schools and taking the art classes they offered.” A
family trip to San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art solidified Thornton’s passion. “I was completely
taken in by the power of painting,”
she noted.
Art classes at Joaquin Moraga Intermediate School and Campolindo
High School helped perfect Thornton’s abilities. Pre-college summer
programs at CCA intensified her enthusiasm. Jill Langston, Campolindo’s visual arts teacher and a role
model for Thornton, strongly encouraged her. “Bridgette’s work was outstanding; she always had a lot of
initiative – she was open-minded with
her own unique style and personal vision,” Langston said.
Art is what kept the very personable Thornton calm, particularly in
high school. “Art is a great emotional
outlet,” she explained. “It’s so relaxing, so therapeutic – especially when
there are so many academic pressures
on high school kids.”
When it came time to apply to
colleges, Thornton was torn; she
couldn’t decide if she should attend a
state school where she’d get both a
good education and great social experience, or try for an art school to pursue the career she really wanted to
have. With the encouragement of her
parents and Langston, she chose CCA
where, she said, the “art programs
help you learn to apply these talents
to real world experiences.”
Academic classes at CCA are
“taught through an artistic lens,”
Thornton stated. She attended a New
York studio residency program where
she met with practicing artists, as well
as art collectors and art curators. The
grand finale at CCA is the senior art
exhibition where you “take over
gallery space, market your art, and invite people to attend.”
Thornton’s senior art exhibition
was in November and, by that time,
displaying her art for public viewing
was already old hat. “People in Moraga are so business savvy and I
learned from many of them that I
could turn my passion into a career if
I wanted to. And I always wanted to
be in charge of my own well-being,”
Thornton said. With this knowledge
and her entrepreneurial spirit, while
still in college, Thornton created a
website, showcasing her pieces. And
then, taking it a step further, she began
contacting small local restaurants to
see if they would exhibit her artwork.
“I wanted to work with an audience
that’s not part of the art world,” she
explained. “And sometimes it’s difficult selling a painting from a website
– people want to see what they’re
buying, want to see the scale and
quality of the piece.” Some restaurants said no, but two – Lafayette’s
Chow and Berkeley’s Rick and Ann’s
– both agreed. Thornton sold six
paintings – not bad for a college sophomore.
Thornton’s artistic focus is on floral works. “I love the organic shape
of the forms. Flowers are also great
vessels for expressing color – it allows me to play with color in an interesting way,” she said. Her most
recent paintings are of floral fields
where “flowers expand over the entire
canvas. Your eyes are led all over the
painting.” She also enjoys taking
photos of the various places she loves
to visit around the Bay Area and then
paints from these pictures. She admits, however, that painting from a
photo is very different than painting
from what you’re actually seeing.
“Your emotions in the moment can be
translated more when painting directly from what you’re seeing because there’s no filter blocking your
interaction with space,” she said.
With school behind her, Thornton
is now looking toward her future,
aware that there are many directions
in which she can go. She hopes to
continue showing her paintings in the
Bay Area and then perhaps expand to
other locales; she’d love to collaborate with an interior company that
would showcase her work or turn her
pieces into textiles or other sellable
goods. “It’s always good to set goals
for yourself,” she said. “It keeps me
going. Being a working artist is not
an easy thing to do so I need to have
goals to work towards.”
Don’t be surprised if, the next
time you’re enjoying a meal at a local
restaurant, you admire a beautiful
painting and see Bridgette Thornton’s
name attached to it.
One of Thornton’s "Field of Flowers" paintings.
UC Berkeley’s Academic Talent Development Program
offers challenging summer courses for highly motivated young scholars.
Photo provided
Image provided
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
Two Lafayette Students Are Showcase Winners
Page: B3
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
By Diane Claytor
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"Heal the World" by Rachel Zhang
I
f you were asked to complete this
sentence: “The World Would Be a
Better Place if…,” how would you respond? What if you were asked to illustrate your answer with a drawing,
photo, dance or music composition?
That’s exactly what thousands of
kindergartners through 12th graders
Rachel Zhang
nationwide focused on recently when
they participated in the National
PTA’s annual Reflections program.
This arts recognition and achievement
program, which began in 1969, is designed to encourage students to explore, participate in and be excited
about the arts.
More than 100 Lafayette Elementary School (LES) student entries
were submitted in the six categories
named by the PTA: visual arts, photography, literature, dance choreography, film production and music
composition. Ann Huchingson and
Karen Moe, co-chairs of the program
for LES, were very happy to see such
an enthusiastic response this year.
“What’s really great is seeing the kids
expressing themselves on their own
terms and in their own way,” Huchingson said.
Entries are judged by local residents who do not have children at
LES. This year, 30 entries were se-
"THE KNOT"
Photos provided
lected to move to the next level,
which is the Las Trampas Creek
Council (LTCC) Showcase, consisting of entries from eight local elementary schools. Two of these LES artists
were the winners in their respective
categories, moving them up to present
at the District Showcase from 1 to 3
p.m. Jan. 31 at Alhambra High School
in Martinez.
Rachel Zhang, a fifth grader at
LES, won the LTCC’s Visual Arts, Intermediate Category with her painting, “Heal the World.” As she
explained it, “The world is quite wonderful already, but we can make it better by protecting our animals,
donating to people in need, keeping
world peace, using more green energy, recycling, and planting more
trees to replace the ones we’ve cut
down.”
Eight-year old Arthur Tkachenko,
an LES second grader, won the Music
Composition, Primary Category, with
his original opus, “A Change of Life.”
Arthur, who has only been playing the
piano for about a year, said, “In my
piece, one person treats another person how he would like to be treated
himself, like a mirror.”
And now it’s time for Lamorinda
students to start planning for next year’s
theme: “Let Your Imagination Fly.”
Announcing
Open Houses
Lafayette
Walnut Creek
at 6:30 p.m.
at 6:30 p.m.
Open Houses
Open Houses
January 12
February 9th
January 27th
February 23th
th
Open Houses are for adults only
55 Eckley Lane
(925) 934-1507
984 Moraga Rd.
(925) 284-4321
Four New Exhibitions
Saint
Mary’s College
Museum of Art
Saint Mary’s College
Museum
of Art
New Fall Exhibitions:
Now Through March
October 6 – December 16, 2012
Christo and Jeanne-Claude:
The Tom Golden Collection
Through March 22
Cal Shakes Cleanup
Arthur Tkachenko playing his winning composition, "A Change of Life"
Missions of Will Sparks
Accredited by the American
Alliance ofare
Museums
The mission paintings of Will Sparks (1862-1937)
admired
for their rich color and air of mystery. This rare complete series
of the 37 Alta and Baja California missions once belonged to
Alma de Bretteville Spreckels. On loan from Trotter Galleries,
Carmel and Pacific Grove.
Through March 15
William Keith and
the Native American
An extraordinary
An overview of the many
forms and functions the
traveling
cross has taken over the centuries by such masters as Jacques Callot,
exhibition of a
Tiepolo, Èmile Bernard, Marc Chagall, Georges Rouault, Bernard Buffet,
unique collection
Otto Dix, Salvador Dali, as well as a 5th c. Constantinople coin, a 15th c.
allegorical Memento Mori woodcut, Orthodox icons, and an elaborate
of works of art by
silver and gilded Ethiopian Christian processional cross. The objects
renowned artists
have been selected from the collections of Christians in the Visual Arts
Christo and
(civa.org), based on the East Coast, and Saint Mary’s College.
Jeanne-Claude
Nyame Brown: John
will visit the Saint
Henry’s Adventures
Mary’s College
in a Post-Black World
Museum of Art.
Collection of the Sonoma County Museum
Inspired by bedtime stories told by the artist’s father, Brown weaves
The collection
the tales of folk hero John Henry into a series of fantastic paintings and
includes original drawings, sculptures, collages and
drawings. Brown is a member of the art faculty at Saint Mary’s College.
He holds an M.F.A. from Yale University and a B.F.A. from The School
photographs capturing the versatility, longevity and
of The Art Institute of Chicago.
international scope of the duo’s extensive career.
Collection of the Saint Mary’s College Museum of Art
The Art of the Cross
Wednesdays
- Sundays, 11 AM - 4:30 PM
PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT
GUMPERT:
Free admission for Museum members,
Through March 15
Call or check website for Saturday,
October 6 opening day events and
satellite parking directions due to the
College’s 150th anniversary events on
campus.
A
Photo Cheryl Miller, Diablo Fire Safe Council
team of workers from the East
Bay Municipal Utility District,
Cal Fire and the Moraga-Orinda
Fire District recently spent several
days thinning a eucalyptus grove
near the Cal Shakes Theater entrance in Orinda. MOFD Fire Marshal Kathy Leonard said the project
was funded by a grant from the Di-
ablo Fire Safe Council. “The project
goal is to keep fire from climbing up
into the eucalyptus trees, which
could cast burning embers for miles
igniting new fires,” said DFC Executive Coordinator Cheryl Miller.
Cal Fire’s Delta hand crew provided
labor and EBMUD supplied the
equipment. C. Dausman
Photograph by Robert Gumpert
“I need some deodorant. My skin’s getting
restless.” Psychiatric Emergency Services (PES)
Museum Hours:
youth through 12th grade.
Adult admission: $5.
Free Guide By Cell tours.
stmarys-ca.edu/museum, 925.631.4379
Photograph by Robert Gumpert
Take a Picture/Tell a Story
In this intimate body of work photographer Robert Gumpert documents California
criminal justice institutions and Psychiatric Emergency Services.
Public Hours: Wed – Sun, 11 am-4:30 pm. Museum Admission: Adults $5;
Members and K-12 graders Free; Parking Free
Phone: 925-631-4379 Website: stmarys-ca.edu/museum
Pigeon Deaths in Lamorinda
Linked to Avian Parasite
Page: B4
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
... continued from page B1
Band-tailed pigeons eating acorns. Photo Krysta Rogers
Other birds including mourning doves, crow, raptors and rock pigeons may contract the disease from
close contact with infected birds.
“Trichomonosis,” Purdin explains, “is a very,
very old disease” dating back to the time of Tyrannosaurus Rex. It is generally an environmentally
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
weak disease that survives only in warm and wet
environments. But birds seek feeders and bird baths
during drought conditions, and that makes it worse.
Purdin is also concerned that a new strain of Trichomonosis, caused by Trichomonas stableri may
be more virulent. Where gallinae generally attacks
pigeons already weakened by other health issues,
stableri takes hold even within the healthy bird population.
“We’re getting lots of animals coming in,” Purdin says. Normally they get 36 all year but this
month they’ve already had 31. The museum would
be overwhelmed if not for the disease’s high mortality rate. Pigeons either die en route to the museum or before they’ve been examined. The
remaining few have been euthanized.
“Identifying the species and strain of parasites is
one of the primary goals of our research,” Rogers
says. She encourages the public to report pigeon
deaths by calling (916) 358-2790, to take sick birds
to the Lindsay Wildlife Museum, and to remove bird
feeders and birdbaths from their yards.
If you must keep feeders, Rogers says to wash
them weekly, scrubbing first with soap and water,
then soaking 5 to 10 minutes in a weakened (1:10)
bleach/water solution. Drain and clean bird baths
similarly and rinse thoroughly.
To report pigeon deaths online, go to
https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/Wildlife-Investigations/Monitoring/Mortality-Report.
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Brother Fire Chief
By Cathy Dausman
C
A man of two cloths: Brother Chris Donnelly holds his Fire Chief uniform.
Photo Cathy Dausman
hristopher Donnelly moves a bit
closer to heaven each time he
reports to work at his second job.
During the academic school year
“Brother Chris,” a Christian Brother
assigned to Saint Mary’s College,
serves as project manager of facilities
services for the college. During summers, however, Brother Chris lives
and works in the High Sierras, both as
sub-director at Camp LaSalle and as
the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire
Department chief.
Huntington Lake is a recreation
area east of Fresno and south of
Yosemite within the boundaries of the
Sierra National Forest, elevation
7,000 feet. Winter residency is a mere
34 souls, but the population swells to
more than 14,000 in summer.
While scenic, the area is also remote. Fresno is two hours away by
car, response by ambulance from the
nearest station is at least 45 minutes,
and although there is a helipad near
the lake itself, weather and daylight
dictate whether medevac flights are
even possible.
HLVFD was established in 1993,
although it struggled to maintain its
apparatus, and field an adequate number of volunteers. Clovis fire captain
Tom Zinn was HLVFD’s first chief.
Its equipment was limited to a 1956
water tender fire truck “with four flats
and no brakes,” Donnelly recalls. In
1997 Donnelly and camp director
Brother Jack Henderson watched a
camp guest suffer a transient ischemic
attack or mini stroke. Two more backto-back medical issues – a Boy Scout
with a serious chest wound and a
rollover car accident extrication in
1998 – convinced Henderson to earn
an Emergency Medical Technician license. Henderson convinced Brother
Chris to do the same; two years later
he admits he was “hooked.”
With a background and interest in
heavy machinery – Donnelly holds a
general contractor’s license – he
learned to drive Huntington Lake’s
old tired fire truck.
HLVFD volunteers used to joke
they could only extinguish fires by
driving their truck over the flames,
Donnelly says. The engine’s control
lines were frozen and split and poured
water over the road when placed in
pump gear. Zinn spent four years
training the Brothers, then Donnelly
became chief.
Today, HLVFD has earned an Insurance Services Office rating, and is
regarded as one of the best volunteer
departments in the state. The current
staff of 13 operates newer equipment
in better condition – it owns everything from a 2006 Pierce Structure
1,000 gallon engine to a 4x4 and
snowmobile, and a Jaws of Life rescue tool. HLVFD cruises the seven
mile length of the lake in a converted
Navy harbor patrol boat it shares with
the local sheriff's department and the
U.S. Forest Service.
The department aims for a six
minute response time. Donnelly says
his fire work requires about six hours
a week in training, and on average
about an hour or so a day on actual
calls. His summer uniform consists
mostly of “T-shirts and Levis” and he
reserves his fire service uniform for
fundraising – a job for which he is obviously well suited.
HLVFD receives no funding from
state or county taxes, yet its operating
budget has grown from a $300 bank
account to approximately $110,000 –
thanks to gifts, donations and grants.
“Our balance sheet shows us worth
over $3 million in assets,” in cash,
buildings and apparatus, said Brother
Chris.
Bass Lake Ranger District Fire
Management Officer David Cooper
met Brother Chris in 2000, as Cooper
travelled through the Huntington
Lake area. He got to know him as
they worked together on small fires.
Cooper says Donnelly and
Brother Jack once worked a 24-hour
shift using their 1956 water tender to
fight a fire threatening local homes
after other equipment broke
down.“You can always depend on
Brother Chris. He’s there with a
smile,” Cooper says. “You can never
go by [Camp LaSalle] without [getting] a milkshake.”
Lamorinda’s Emergency Preparedness Manager Dennis Rein met
Donnelly during the Aspen fire in
2013. “I was working as the Liaison
Officer for the Incident Management
Team,” Rein says. “It didn’t take long
for me to meet up with the fire chief
from the Huntington Lake Volunteer
Fire Department.” As they exchanged
phone numbers, Rein inquired about
his Moraga prefix and learned Donnelly worked at Saint Mary’s.
“The relationship was instantaneous! We worked together for almost three weeks,” Rein says.
“Brother Chris even treated me to an
ice cream at [Camp LaSalle’s] Hofbrau.” When asked how long he intends to remain HLVFD chief,
Donnelly replies in a most down-toearth manner, “Well, there isn’t a long
list of candidates that want to do this
for nothing.”
Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire
Department is a 501 (c) 3 corporation. For details, visit www.hlvfd.org
online.
Fire Chief Chris Donnelly, left, patrols Huntington Lake in 2013 with Public
Information Officer Anne Grandy during the 2013 Aspen Fire, when the
HLVFD boat was used to provide security for the fire helicopter “dip site.”
Photo Dennis Rein
Even in Lamorinda’s Bucolic Towns, Stalking
Happens … and It’s a Crime
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
www.lamorindaweekly.com
By Laurie Snyder
“A
Image provided courtesy of the Stalking Resource Center of the National
Center for Victims of Crime.
nytime anyone is harassing and unwantedly giving you attention,” says Rachel
Piersig, “that’s a huge warning
sign.” Piersig would know. She
heads the Domestic Violence Unit
for the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office, and has
sent many, many stalkers and batterers to jail during her legal career.
“Stalking is a pattern of harassing behavior with a credible
threat toward a victim,” explains
Piersig. “The credible threat can
be outright – with the perpetrator
threatening to kill the victim or
trying to drag her off – or it can
be implied, making the victim
fearful.” In each case, police look
closely at what’s being said and
done. Unwanted gifts, nude drawings made by the stalker of his
victim, or poetry with unsettling
sexual content become evidence
because it makes women reasonably afraid that they’ll be raped
by the perpetrators.
The pattern can be short – two
or more incidents documented
under California law – but those
can occur in a single day. In ex-
tremely serious cases, it’s ongoing. “Stalkers are intelligent –
possibly more so than average individuals because they hunt their
prey and often use technology to
do so. Many have suffered some
type of loss – death or divorce.
And they’re very controlling.
Trying to attain this person who
doesn’t want to be with them is a
large act of control.”
“While we have had cases of
stalking here in Lafayette, most
of those have been relationship
based events – someone just cannot get over a part of their relationship,” observes Lafayette
Police Chief Eric Christensen.
But when cases do happen, he
says he and his officers take those
cases very seriously. “Today’s
stalker hacks your email, forwards your phone calls and GPS
tracks your car – that's why they
are so dangerous.” Orinda Police
Chief Mark Nagel agrees, observing that more and more people
appear to be using smartphones to
spy on their spouses. “There are
numerous apps that can reveal another person’s location, and the
victims aren’t even aware it’s
925-377-0977
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Page: B5
happening.”
her stomach. Pretending she was had restraining orders against the
According to “The Toll of dead until he finally left, she suspects.”
Piersig suspects the crime of
Stalking: The Relationship Be- somehow managed to grab her
tween Features of Stalking and small child and make it to a stalking may be underreported
Psychopathology of Victims,” neighbor’s home for help. Sur- because victims are either minithose receiving the unwanted and gery was required to repair the mizing the events or are afraid to
unprovoked attention frequently victim’s broken vertebrae.
tell anyone.
report increased anxiety, excesAccording to The National
“Domestic violence and stalksive tiredness or weakness, Center for Victims of Crime, one ing are not limited to the four
chronic sleep issues, headaches, in six women and one in 19 men walls of the houses where it’s
appetite disruption or persistent will become stalking victims in happening. It might not be occurnausea. In 1997, before re- their lifetimes. Jimmy Lee, ring in your relationship, but you
searchers had seriously begun spokesperson for the Contra might be there when someone
studying stalking’s impact, at Costa County Sheriff’s Office, re- comes hunting,” says Piersig,
least one quarter of victims said ports that seven county cases oc- who strongly urges victims, their
they had attempted or seriously curred in 2014 – six in the neighbors and family members to
considered suicide.
sheriff's office jurisdiction and seek help. “You don’t have to be
“The victims often do have a one in Oakley. “All of the reports in a stalking or domestic violence
real sense of danger and fear. had stated that at some time or an- relationship to be a domestic vioThey feel there’s no safe place be- other domestic violence was an lence or stalking victim. It spills
cause their stalkers are showing issue and that all of these victims out into the community.”
up, calling, texting – putting surveillance in their homes,” explains Piersig. Some use “teddy
bear cams” – cameras inserted in
a seemingly sweet gift to a child
– placed there by one parent
stalking another. “It’s the unpredictability – never being sure
when a stalker will show up.
Many victims are genuinely
afraid they’ll be killed.” Stalking
may start out benignly, but it can
escalate over time and cause such
trauma that many victims develop
post-traumatic stress disorder.
The difference with this form
of PTSD, though, is that the battlefield is located not on foreign
soil, but right next door. Arrested
for assaulting a woman, one Lamorindan returned to the crime
scene after being bailed out of
jail. He attacked his victim again,
this time pulling her head backwards by her hair – repeatedly –
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systems (GPS) or other technology to track where you go?
• Posting information or spreading rumors about you on the Internet, in a public place or by word
of mouth?
• Damaging your home, car or other property?
• Threatening to hurt you, your family, friends or pets?
• Committing other actions that control, track or frighten you?
If you are experiencing stalking or domestic violence, you are not to
blame. Get help by calling your local police department or the
confidential hotline at STAND! For Families Free of Violence: (888)
215-5555. Source: Stalking Resource Center, The National Center for
Victims of Crime: http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org/about.
Local Students Compete
at National Science Bowl
Submitted by Dirk Fillpot
S
tudents from Acalanes, Campolindo, and Miramonte high
schools participated in the National Finals of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of
Science’s National Science Bowl
Jan. 25 at Los Positas College in
Livermore. The Office of Science began this competition to interest today’s youth in pursuing
careers in science and math. The
winner of the regional competition received an all-expenses-paid
trip to Washington, D.C. to compete in the Office of Science’s
National Science Bowl in late
April. The winner of the national
competition will win prizes for
the team members and their
schools. More than 225,000 students have participated in the an-
nual event since it was created in
1991. During the competitions,
teams of four students faced off
against one another in a fastpaced, question and answer format. They were challenged to
solve mathematical problems and
were tested on their knowledge of
a wide range of disciplines including astronomy, biology, earth science and physics. Questions
included, “What planet has the
greatest variation in temperature
over a single one of its planetary
days?” and “What is the most common term in physics for the product of mass times velocity?” For
more information about the National Science Bowl, go to
http://science.energy.gov/wdts/nsb/.
Page: B6
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Community Service
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
“Ya Gotta Have Heart!”
Submitted by Betty Miller
B
eginning this week the Assistance League Way Side
Inn Thrift Shop in Lafayette will
virtually swim in various hues of
bold reds, precious pinks, luscious
lavenders, whimsical whites and
everything for Valentine’s Day including heart shaped boxes, small
gift bags, stuffed bears sporting
hearts, decorative pillows and assorted home décor. Sales from the
Assistance League Way Side Inn
Thrift Shop help fund nine philanthropic programs that improve the
lives of those in the community
who are in need and at-risk. To
learn about Assistance League of
Diablo and its recently awarded
GuideStar Exchange gold participation
level status, visit diablovalAssistant League member volunteer Susan Broderick feels
ley.assistanceleague.org or the
that no teddy bear should be alone on Valentine’s Day.
Photo provided GuideStar Exchange.
Girl Scouts Celebrate the
Holidays with Homeless Families
Submitted by Kim Jinnett
M
oraga Girl Scout Troop
30072, all Campolindo
sophomores, held a holiday party
Dec. 12 for homeless families at
Shelter Inc. in Pittsburg. The
Scouts decorated gingerbread
houses, cookies, ornaments and
other craft items with the children
and their parents. The Troop also
shared a meal with the families
and played with the “sugaramped tots” well into the
evening. Shelter Inc. tries to find
people to adopt all homeless families during the holidays to ensure
they feel cared for at that time of
year. After adopting all families
living at the shelter, the Scouts
enjoyed selecting and wrapping
gifts from a wish list the family
members provided. Seeing the
joy on the faces of the children
From left, front row: Kendall Schmidt, Kiera Crandall,
and thankfulness of the families
Maria Wong, and Kyra Merryman; back row: Clare
warmed their hearts. The Troop
Ahearn, Josie Rosso, Lola Takhirov, Kenna Sherman,
encourages others to adopt a
Jesse Rusk, and Juliet Arnswald
Photo provided
homeless family next year.
New Eagle Scouts Honored
Submitted by Louis Phillips
L
From left, back row: Parker Watson, Evan Wentzel and Jack Winther; front row: Charles Bush,
Evan Price and Tate Phillips
Photo provided
afayette’s Boy Scout Troop 219 conducted an Eagle Court of Honor Jan. 11
at St. Stephens Episcopal Church in Orinda.
Tyler Higgins led the ceremony and William
F. “Rick” Cronk, the past president of the Boy
Scouts, was the guest speaker for the ceremony. As part of earning their Eagle ranks, six
Scouts led the following service projects:
Charles Bush of Acalanes High School
landscaped and constructed a new walking
path along the garden memorial at St.
Stephen’s Episcopal Church. This involved
major demolition of an existing shed and concrete walkway. The project created an attractive walking path and a significantly nicer
environment for the memorial garden.
Parker Watson of Las Lomas High School
chose to improve the grounds and setting at
his former school, Parkmead Elementary. He
led a team of Scouts to plant a pistachio tree
and then construct an octagonal park bench
around the tree, creating a park-like setting for
students and guests to enjoy.
Will Price of Acalanes selected a project to
aid Lafayette United Methodist Church by renovating an outdoor area, power washing and
painting the area, designing and building a
planter box, designing and installing an irrigation system, and replacing the aging plants.
Acalanes student Evan Wentzel constructed 10 outdoor benches for the Lafayette
Community Garden and Outdoor Learning
Center, a place for community members to
grow a variety plants, and harvest plants, and
hold outdoor classes to teach the importance
of the environment and wildlife.
Tate Phillips of Acalanes constructed
eight solar ovens and then delivered them to
the Trust in Education organization for shipment to families in Afghanistan. A typical
Afghan family spends about 30 percent of
their income on wood for cooking and sterilizing water. The ovens offer a safe and
cost-effective solution for both.
Acalanes student Jack Winther organized
an effort to prepare and assemble first aid
emergency kits for less privileged families in
Contra Costa County. Once completed, he coordinated with the American Red Cross to
teach first aid for the recipient families. He
assisted the Red Cross in the classroom and
he took responsibility to teach the children.
George Wilson Hall II
Resident of Moraga
Nov. 25, 1944 – Jan. 21, 2015
George Wilson Hall II, 70, of Moraga,
passed away peacefully at home Jan.
21, 2015 with his family by his side.
George was born on Nov. 25, 1944 in
Malone, New York, and was a
computer consultant before retiring
and later becoming an esteemed office
manager for his wife’s business, the
Hall of Taxes. His quick wit and
generosity will be missed by everyone
who knew him.
George enjoyed weekly golf
outings (he recently posted his best
score of 66), 30 years of playing
softball with the St. Monica’s team, being active with the Lion’s Club, playing
his clarinet alongside his musically-inclined family, poker nights with the guys,
and had a passion for traveling and chatting with almost anyone willing to have
an opinion on something. He touched all those around him with his love, sincerity,
friendliness, humor, intelligence and incredible strength.
George is survived by his loving wife of 38 years, Peggy, children Julia (Kris)
and Stephen (Ida), grandchild Ansley, sister Cindy, and brothers Steve and Brian,
as well as numerous other loved ones.
Friends and family are invited to celebrate George’s life during a funeral
mass on Friday, Jan. 30 at 10:30 a.m. at Saint Monica’s Church in Moraga,
followed by a burial at Queen of Heavens in Lafayette. Afterwards, his family is
hosting a reception where everyone can remember and share stories about George.
We encourage you to view and leave comments on George Hall’s Memorial
website: www.georgewilsonhall.com.
For those who wish, memorial contributions in George’s name may be made
to the Moraga Lion’s Club at 17 El Camino Flores, Moraga, CA, 94556.
Shirley Price Callister
July 2, 1922 – Jan. 18, 2015
Shirley Price Callister, our mother,
grandmother, aunt and friend, passed away
peacefully with her family at her side on Jan.
18, 2015. Shirley was born at home on July 2,
1922 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the youngest of
five children of Julia Blanche Lauritzen and
Thomas Lawrence Price. As a child, Shirley
enjoyed dancing, spending time with her
friends and trips to the family’s ranch in
southern Utah. She graduated from East High
School in 1939 and then attended the
University of Utah. As a young woman, she
especially enjoyed her job as a roller-skating
Western Union telegram courier. In 1942
Shirley married the love of her life, Cyril Taft Callister MD, and they remained
inseparable for 61 years until Cy’s death in 2003.
Shirley enjoyed gardening, bridge, cooking, needlepoint, and traveling but
her family was the focus of her life. Her home of over 65 years in Lafayette was
her castle and she was the anchor and practical voice in a house full of lively
personalities. Her wit, humor, wisdom and love for life were contagious. From
her famous 4th of July parties to many family events, she was the consummate
hostess. Everyone was welcome. Even at 90 years old, “Mima’s House” was
always “home” for her extended family which over the years grew to include a
multitude of her grandchildren’s college classmates who all loved her dearly.
She is survived by her five children: Susan Price Callister, Barry Price
Callister (Cecilia), Ann Callister (Bruce Brennen), Cyril Bruce Callister (Deborah
Cox), and Thomas Brian Callister, MD (Rose Lorea) and eight grandchildren:
Devin Taft Callister, MD, Mathew Riordan Callister, Andrew Price Callister,
Coreen Denise Callister, Louis James Callister, Liam Joseph Callister, Erin
Susann Callister and Connor Taft Callister as well as many beloved nieces and
nephews and extended family. A celebration of life is planned for Saturday, Feb.
7, 2015 at 10 a.m. at the Lafayette Veterans Memorial Center, 3780 Mt. Diablo
Blvd., Lafayette, CA 94549. In lieu of flowers donations are welcome for
Hospice of East Bay, 3470 Buskirk Ave., Pleasant Hill, CA 94523.
Mark Quinn
Nov. 24, 1958 – Jan. 7, 2015
Mark Quinn passed away at his home on Wednesday
Jan. 7 at age 56.
Mark was born in Fort Lee, Virginia as the only
child of Lew and Char Quinn. He is survived by his
son, Brady, his ex-wife, Sherry, his father Lew, and his
Aunt Kathy. Mark grew up in rural, upstate New York,
attended college at WashU in St. Louis, and came to
California in the early 80’s. Mark was passionate about
dogs, sports, and coaching – especially basketball. He
coached hundreds of kids in the Lamorinda area over
the past 13 years, including his son, Brady. Mark,
Sherry and Brady carried on as a special, connected
family even through separation; Brady and Sherry will
always cherish the times they spent with Dad/Mark.
A celebration of his life was held on Sunday, Jan.
25 in the gym at Lafayette Elementary School.
Share Your Celebrations and Remembrances
If you would like to share an announcement about a special event or achievement,
such as a wedding, engagement, scholarship or graduation of a local resident, or
about a special person from Lamorinda who has passed, send a photo along with
your text (up to 250 words) to [email protected]com, and include
“Celebrations and Remembrances” in the subject line.
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
925-377-0977
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Page: B7
‘Take a Picture/Tell a Story’ Art Exhibit Opens at SMC Museum of Art
By Ryan McKinley
T
“Deodorant”
he phrase “every picture tells a
story” is given new meaning
by San Francisco-based photographer
Robert Gumpert in his first exhibitions in the United States, “Take a
Picture/Tell a Story” and “I need
some deodorant. My skin’s getting
restless,” which will be on display
through March 15 at the Saint Mary’s
College Museum of Art.
What sets Gumpert’s photography apart, aside from the intimacy of
the images, is the story. For every
Photo Robert Gumpert, courtesy Saint Mary’s College Museum of Art
photograph, Gumpert conducts extensive interviews. The exhibits are a
combination of the visual and the oral.
If the audience only examines one aspect, they are missing the experience.
“The shows are unlike anything we
have ever shown here,” said Kyla
Tynes, the exhibition’s manager. “We
want people to have a reaction and
take the time to read the work. These
are very deep societal stories.”
Gumpert became interested in
photography as a child in the 1950s.
He learned to develop film while still
in grade school so his mother would
buy him a camera.
He started his professional career
covering the United Mine Workers of
America strike in Harlan County, Ky.,
in 1974. He has continued to document social justice, labor movements
and working conditions for the past
four decades. “I have always related
to topics touching on issues of class,
race and power,” Gumpert said.
The Saint Mary’s exhibits feature
Gumpert’s black and white photographs unframed on the museum’s
grey walls. “We thought the images
were very raw and emotional, and we
didn’t want anything to detract from
that,” Tynes said.
For “I need some deodorant. My
skin’s getting restless,” the photos are
candid and almost voyeuristic. Sometimes looking around corners or
through doorways, they show the staff
of John George Psychiatric Emergency Services in Alameda County.
Interviews are presented as block
quotes on the walls and credited
anonymously (“Health Specialist 1”).
“For the psych ward project I
wanted to speak about what the work
and place are really like verses what
is depicted in popular culture,”
Gumpert said.
“Take a Picture/Tell a Story” focuses on documenting prison inmates. These photos are close-ups of
individuals looking directly into the
camera. A computer in one corner of
the gallery plays the audio interviews, the voices echoing off the
walls. When combining image and
audio together, it is as if the viewer
is sitting with the individuals. The intimacy of the images is very striking.
Audiences can look into the prisoner’s eyes and see the lines on their
faces.
“Take a Picture is intended to
confront people,” Gumpert said. “To
say those we lock up are just like us:
they have kids, hopes, issues, bills
and frustrations. With just a zig
rather than zag you too could be
where they are.”
Gumpert hopes his work will
show that “there is a need to appreciate and a need to correct. We, the
USA, use the tools of incarceration to
disappear our problems and ‘the others’ associated with them. For me the
way a society treats those with the
least of anything is a true barometer
of the health of that society. The USA
is getting sicker. But I see myself as
an optimist and believe change is possible.”
Tynes sees the exhibit as “an opportunity for Saint Mary’s and this
community to bring awareness to issues of human rights, prisons, prisoner rights, and start a dialogue that
had otherwise not been thought
about.”
For more of Gumpert’s work,
visit http://takeapicturetellastory.com.
Also on display are Christo and
Jeanne-Claude’s environmental textile art and William Keith’s paintings
of Native Americans. These other exhibits operate as counterpoint, with
their vast landscapes, to Gumpert’s
intimate photography.
For more information about the
SMC Museum of Art, visit
http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/saintmarys-college-museum-of-art or call
the gallery at (925) 631-4379 during
business hours.
movement because there are parts of
it that imitate rippling water or gurgling fountains. I also like that the
piece is more of a balanced collaboration between piano and the orchestra,” says Chen, who is a sophomore
at The College Preparatory School in
Oakland. Katherine began her piano
studies at age 3 in China. At age 11,
she began studying under two private studios and was actively participating in CCMA competitions and
festivals. She is currently studying
with Armando Pino. In fifth grade,
she took up violin as well, fulfilling
a childhood dream, and she became
the concertmaster of her middle
school orchestra in seventh grade.
She now plays in YPSO’s first violin
section, and this is her third year with
the orchestra.
Acalanes High School senior
Oliver Taylor will play the complete
Arutiunian Trumpet Concerto. “I
love how the energy changes
throughout this concerto. The excitement of the fast parts is contrasted by
the slower mini-movements, which
are very lyrical and beautiful. The
juxtaposition between the fast and
slow movements keeps it exciting
and fun to play but also difficult.
Navigating a piece like this is hard
not only for the soloist but the orchestra as well,” says Taylor. He
currently studies trumpet with Jay
Rizzeto and has played with the likes
of Wayne Wallace, Wynton Marsalis,
Erik Jekabson and Mic Gillette. During his four years in YPSO, Taylor has
visited Prague, Bratislava, and Vienna
on the 2012 Central Europe Tour and
played at Carnegie Hall, Central Park
and Harvard University during the
2014 East Coast Tour. In addition to
YPSO, he plays in the Acalanes High
School Wind and Jazz Ensembles and
in a private jazz combo. Taylor has
won many awards over the years for
jazz and classical music, including
YPSO’s 2013 Concerto Competition
where he played the Hummel Trumpet
Concerto. To watch Taylor’s performance of the Hummel go to
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1
3FA-gZtHZs.
Ellie Kanayama, a 15-year-old
freshman at Albany High School, will
play the first movement of the Wieniawski Violin Concerto No. 2.
The final work on the program,
which includes 103 young musicians
ages 12 to 18, will be Maurice Ravel’s
Rapsodie Espagnole. The Winter Concert will be held at 8 p.m. Jan. 31 at
Walnut Creek Presbyterian Church, and
at 3 p.m. Feb. 1 at Dean Lesher Center
for the Arts. For more information
about YPSO, visit www.ypsomusic.net,
email [email protected] or call
(510) 849-9776. For tickets and information, call (510) 849-YPSO (9776),
email at [email protected] or go
to www.ypsomusic.net.
Concert FeaturesThree Concerto Competition Winners, Two from Lafayette
Submitted by Keith Gleason
Y
From left: Ellie Kanayama, Katherine Chen, and Oliver Taylor
oung People’s Symphony Orchestra’s (YPSO) Winter Concert will feature three Concerto
Competition winners – two from
Lafayette, one from Albany – in a
program of Gershwin’s An American
in Paris, Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain with Katherine Chen
on piano, Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto No. 2 in D minor with Ellie
Kanayama on violin, Arutiunian’s
Trumpet Concerto with Oliver Tay-
lor on trumpet, and Ravel’s Rapsodie
Espagnole.
Each season, YPSO offers all
members who have been in the orchestra for at least one full season the
opportunity to enter the Concerto
Competition to compete for the opportunity to play one movement of a
concerto with the orchestra at a regular concert. This year’s judges were
music director/conductor David Ramadanoff, violist and conductor
Photo Vladimir Gurevich
Rem Djemilev, who is music director of Young People's Chamber Orchestra, and Monica Scott, who is a
cellist and cello teacher. This season’s concerto competition had 15
competitors. Seven winners were
selected in total.
Pianist Katherine Chen, of
Lafayette, will play the first movement of the Falla, En el Generalife,
which is about the jasmine gardens
around the Alhambra. “I love the first
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(1) Gold Ring, (1) Gold Coin
Please contact the Town of
Moraga Police Department at
(925) 888-7056 for further
information or to claim your property
House Cleaning & Organizing
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Painting Contractor
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supervised by owner/contractor.
on any interior/exterior paint job
Over 25 years in Lamorinda.
Full insured, Lic # 342005. Call 283-8621
Plumbing
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Tree Service
East Bay Tree Service.
377-8733. Fine pruning, large
tree removal, stump grinding
License #805794
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Construction
Jacob Spilsbury - General Contractor
American owned and operated
Renovation • Remodeling • Home Repair
Big & Small Jobs • Bonded & Insured
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Handyman
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Call Rusty- (925) 890-1581
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To be run in the December 31 issue
Page: B8
Holy
Shepherd Lutheran Churchwww.lamorindaweekly.com
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
433 Moraga Way, Orinda, 254-3422
Lamorinda’s
W
J
4
Religious Services
www.holyshepherd.org
ORSHIP
ANUARY
Single Service at 9:30 a.m.
Childcare available for ages 5 and younger
WORSHIP JANUARY 11
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:40 a.m. Education for all ages
10:45 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Coffee Fellowship at 9:30 and 11:45 a.m.
Childcare available for ages 5 and younger
To be run beginning January 14 and forward
Holy Shepherd Lutheran Church
433 Moraga Way, Orinda, 254-3422
www.holyshepherd.org
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:40 a.m. Education for all ages
10:45 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Coffee Fellowship at 9:30 and 11:45 a.m.
Childcare available for ages 5 and younger
The Orinda
Community Church
An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ
10 Irwin Way, Orinda | 925.254.4906 | www.orindachurch.org
“No matter who you are, wherever you are on life’s
journey, you are welcome here!”
Join us Sundays at 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m
St. Stephen’s Episcopal
Church
66 St. Stephen’s Drive, Orinda
254-3770. www.ststephensorinda.org
66 St. Stephen’s Drive, Orinda
254-3770. www.ststephensorinda.org
Sunday 8am, 10am
Sunday 8am &10am Rite II services.
Music at both service. Choir at 10am.
Sunday School & childcare at 10am.
St. Stephen’s Preschool
St. Anselm’s
Episcopal Church
254-3770 x19
A Loving Community
Sunday Services: 8 and 10 AM
In-church Youth Zone, 10 AM Nursery Childcare
682 Michael Lane, Lafayette, 284-7420, www.stanselms.ws
Lafayette United Methodist Church
955 Moraga Rd., Lafayette,
284-4765, offi[email protected]
Worship
Sunday 10 am
Children & Teen Faith Formation
Sunday 10 am
Teen Fellowship
Sunday 6 pm
Study Groups, Service Opportunities Various
Free Community Luncheon 4th Sunday of Month 11:30 am
X
X
X
!
"#$%
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!$
"(
LAFAYETTE-ORINDA PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
LOPC.org
ORINDA CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH
24 Orinda Way (next to the Library) - 254-4212
Sunday Service and Sunday School
10 - 11 am
Informal Wednesday Meeting
7:30 - 8:30 pm
Reading Room/Bookstore M - F 11 - 4; Sat 11 – 2
www.christianscienceorinda.org
Worship the Lord!
Sundays, 9 & 10:30am
Moraga Valley Presbyterian Church
10 Moraga Valley Lane, Moraga CA
XXXNWQDUPEBZPSHt
Willow Spring Community Church
Loving God Loving People
Come and Meet our New Pastor
Sundays: 9:15am Adult Sunday School Classes
10:15am Pre-Service Fellowship (Free Coffee & Bagels)
10:45am Contemporary Worship Service
Wednesdays: 10:00am
Community Bible Study
1689 School Street, Moraga (925) 376-3550
www.willowspringchurch.net
925-377-0977
Not to be missed
ART
Not to be missed
raderie” with Sharon Lee Kim, piano,
and Laura Scarlata, flute, with special
guest Rebecca D'Alessio, clarinet.
Works by Larson, Liebermann, Delibes and Martin, with the world premiere of a piece by Bay Area
composer Omid Zoufonoun. Free.
For more info, call (925) 283-3722 or
email [email protected]
The Bancroft Library Gallery
presents “California: Captured on
Canvas” – an exhibit of 43 remarkable paintings from the library’s collection highlighting the state’s history
and culture that have drawn people to
California. The exhibit runs from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. through March 6, UC
THEATER
Berkeley Campus, Doe Library
Annex.
Saint Mary’s College Performing
Arts Department presents “PinocJennifer Perlmutter Gallery pres- chio” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28
ents a solo exhibit with artist Julie and at 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29 at
Schumer. “Without Hesitation” fo- LeFevre Theatre, Saint Mary’s Colcuses on recent work in the artist’s lege, 1928 St. Mary’s Road, Moraga.
bold expressive style. Landscapes are Tickets: $8 for the general public; $5
constructed in an intuitive manner in for Saint Mary’s students, faculty and
the tradition of post-modern expres- staff.
www.stmarys-ca.edu/persionism. The show runs through Feb. formingarts or www.brownpa14. For more info, visit www.jen- pertickets.com. For more info, call
niferperlmuttergallery.com or call the Performing Arts office at (925)
(925) 284-1485.
631-4670.
Orinda Library Art Gallery Exhibitors 2015 - February: Carla
Gelbaum, paintings; Shirley Sanderson, photography; Whitchurch Glass
Designs; Joan Ibaroll, ceramics.
The Lafayette Art Gallery kicks off
the new year with the exhibition,
“Voyages,” which runs through Feb.
28. Artists show works depicting
their travels, as well as the journeys
they undertake to create their art. In
January, featured artists will be Dalia
Alekna and photographer Warren
Emmett Rice. In February, the featured artists will be Marsha Ramp
and Susan Erickson. The gallery will
also be hosting a special Jewelry exhibit, “A Jewelry Extravaganza!
Baubles and Bling!” Jan. 27 through
Valentine’s Day, with a reception
scheduled from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 6. For info, call (925) 284-2788
or visit www.lafayetteartgallery.com.
Valley Art Gallery features "New
Faces" through Feb. 28. Valley Art
Gallery, located at 1661 Botelho
Drive, Walnut Creek, offers over 300
original works of art in many mediums and styles. Open Tuesday - Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For info,
visit valleyartgallery.org.
Diablo Valley College presents
Anna Zusman, "Do You Think You
Can Tell if It's Heaven or Hell?"
through March 7 in the DVC library.
Town Hall Theatre in association
with the Lamorinda Arts Alliance is
proud to announce the opening of its
latest art exhibit, “Beyond the
Brush,” through March 7, with a reception from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb
8. “Beyond the Brush” is a collection
of works by East Bay women who
gather each month to critique, share
and support one another as they grow
as artists. Free.
Bedford Gallery’s next exhibition,
“The Object and the Void: West
Coast Metal Sculpture,” will run
from Feb. 17 to April 12, with an
artist reception on Feb. 19. This show
gathers works from renowned artists
Bella Feldman, Linda Fleming,
Yoshitomo Saito, and Clay Jensen.
The exhibition will feature both large
and small scale works, made using
techniques from cast bronze to cut
steel, demonstrating the artists’ masterful command of their media.
Lamorinda Arts Alliance presents
“Business Models for Artists” at
7:30 on Thursday, Feb. 5 at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 1035 Carol
Lane, Lafayette. Three LAA members who have very unique and interesting business models for their art
will be speaking. David Vander Jagt
and Olga Jusidman will talk about
how they have set up their own ceramic studio which is shared with
other ceramic artists. Magaret LucasHill will talk about her business
model for marketing her silk paintings. Free.
MUSIC
Flute, Clarinet and Piano Concert
at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 8, at Our
Savior's Lutheran Church, 1035
Carol Lane, Lafayette. The OSLC
Concert Series presents “Duo Cama-
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
KIDS, PARENTS & TEENS
Orinda Teen Advisory Council
(OTAC) - Teens are invited to join
OTAC anytime. The Orinda Teen
Advisory Council (grades 6 to 12)
meets at 4 p.m. the first Monday of
the month, from September to June,
at the Orinda Community Center, 28
Orinda Way. Work with other teens
and teen councils in the Lamorinda
area to provide input about programs
and events for area teens. For more
info, call (925) 254-2445 or email
[email protected]
om.
For girls 4 to 9 years old, bring
your mom (or other female role
model) to the Hacienda de las Flores
from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 7 to
celebrate the special relationship between mother and daughter in a
pleasant tea party setting. Enjoy a variety of teas and delectables while
sharing quality time with each other.
In addition, your daughter will be
able to create a wonderful craft to
take home and memorialize this special day. Cost: $50 per couple, $27
for each additional guest. Cost includes tea, assorted beverages, finger
sandwiches, pastries, fruit, sweet
treats, child's craft and memories to
last a lifetime. Pre-registration required at (925) 888-7045.
DVC Drama presents Shakespeare's classic comedy “The Taming of the Shrew,” directed by
Kathleen Normington from Jan. 30
to Feb. 15. Sweet tempered daddy’s
girl Bianca has her pick of suitors,
but not until her sister, the fierytongued Kate, is married off. Show
times are 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. For
tickets, call (925) 969-2358 or visit
www.dvcdrama.net. DVC Drama is
located at 321 Golf Club Rd, Pleas- The annual Poetry Out Loud comant Hill. Free parking for all per- petition, a national recital program
formances.
for high school students, is under
way, with the countywide finals
Diablo Ballet’s Enticing Beauty scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
Program features works by 7 at Las Lomas High School Theatre,
Christopher Wheeldon, George Bal- 1460 South Main, Walnut Creek.
anchine, Sonya Delwaide and This year, 14 high schools in Contra
Robert Dekkers, and will run Feb. Costa County are participating, in6-7 at Del Valle Theatre. The per- cluding a co-op of home-schooled
formances, which place the audi- students. Winners of school compeence within close proximity of the titions advance to a county-wide and
stage, feature live music and a then state competitions, and ultilively, interactive Q&A with the mately to the National Finals.
dancers, hosted by local celebrity
moderators. A dessert reception will Contra Costa Camp and School
give audience members an opportu- Fair – Third annual free event with
nity to get up close and personal booths for camps, schools, preschool,
with the artists. Playtimes are 8 p.m. daycare, sports, martial arts, gymnasFriday, Feb. 6 and 2 p.m. Saturday, tics, enrichment, performing arts,
Feb. 7 at the Del Valle Theatre, 1963 scouts and family vacations from 11
Tice Valley Boulevard, Walnut a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22 at
Creek. Purchase tickets online at Acalanes High School, 1200 Pleasant
www.LesherArtsCenter.org or by Hill Rd., Lafayette. Activities and excalling (925) 943-7469.
hibitions. Free. For info, visit
www.ContraCostaCampFair.com.
Role Players Ensemble presents
“The Ladies Man” by Charles Oakland Museum of California
Morey, from a farce by Georges presents Lunar New Year CelebraFeydeau Jan. 30 to Feb. 15, 8 p.m. tion and Other Asian Traditions: Year
Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays at the of the Sheep from noon to 4:30 p.m.
Village Theatre, 233 Front Street, Sunday, Feb. 22, at Oakland Museum
Danville. In Belle Époque Paris, the of California, 1000 Oak Street. Bring
newly married Dr. Molineaux tells the whole family to OMCA to wel“one tiny, little lie” to cover an in- come the Year of the Sheep. Enjoy a
nocent but embarrassing indiscre- daylong festival with dance, music,
tion. Tickets: $20-28; online at crafts, food, and more for all ages.
www.RolePlayersEnsemble.com; at Cost: $15 adults; $10 students and
Danville Community Center, 420 seniors with valid ID; $6 youth ages
Front St, Danville; or call (925) 9-17; free ages 8 and under. OMCA
314-3400 Free Sneak Peek: 7 p.m. Members always get in free. For
Thursday, Jan.21, Danville Library. more info see http://www.museumca.org or call (510) 318-8400.
LECTURE & LITERATURE
OTHER
The Lafayette Library and
Learning Center is sponsoring a Come to Miramonte High School's
Book-to-Action series featuring annual Public Speaking Showcase
“Dear Primo: Letters to our Peers.” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29 and FriMeet Author Duncan Tonatiuh from day, Jan. 30 in the Miramonte theater.
4 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 5 in the Enjoy listening to persuasive, theatriLafayette Library Community Hall, cal and inspiring performances by
with a free book giveaway of “Dear some of the brightest stars in the proPrimo” at the information desk. gram, followed by a reception in the
Decorate your letter in the style of beautiful Art Center filled with visual
the ancient art of the Mixtecs from art, tasty treats and great conversa3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11 in tion. Tickets: $5 available at the door
the Children's Area.
or at the Miramonte web store.
Many Faces of Leukemia, Lymphoma and Myeloma from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 11 at
Walnut Creek Library - Oak View
Room, 1644 N. Broadway. An event
focusing on the unique issues of patients with blood cancer, Diablo Valley Oncology/Hematology Medical
Group's specialists Robert Robles,
MD, and Kasra Karamlou, MD, will
discuss and share exciting new research, treatments and therapies recently announced at the American
Society of Hematology's annual
meeting. Q&A session to follow
presentation. Free. Space limited, to
register call (925) 677-5041.
Fall in love with a kitty! See the
friendly felines of Community Concern For Cats this weekend, Jan. 31Feb. 1 at Pet Food Express in
Lafayette, Pet Food Express Pleasant
Hill and Petco Walnut Creek. On Saturday, cats can be adopted from 12 to
3 p.m. at Lafayette and from 1 to 4
p.m. in Walnut Creek and Pleasant
Hill. On Sunday, the adoption hours
for all locations are 1 to 4 p.m. For
info, visit www.communityconcernforcats.org.
... continued on next page
Please submit events to:
[email protected]
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
HARDWOODS
CARPETS
RUGS
LINOLEUM
LVT
LAMINATE
FAMILY -OWNED
30 YEARS !
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Not to be missed
choices from a pre-selected list for
the Summer Movie series, a survey has been created and posted
online. To complete the survey,
visit the Parks and Recreation
webpage on the city’s website at
www.cityoforinda.org. The survey
will conclude on Feb. 9.
The Saint Mary’s College Guild
will celebrate its traditional “Fun
and Games Day” scholarship
fundraiser from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 19 at the Soda Center on campus, 1928 St. Mary’s
Road, Moraga. Everyone is invited
to attend this Bridge and Bunco
event; a buffet lunch will be
served. Call Shirley at (925) 3766588 for details.
Orinda Woman’s Club is accepting applications for the major
beneficiary awards of 2015. Accepted applicants will reach the
criteria: Serving youth and women
and children primarily in Contra
Costa and Alameda Counties, and
is a 501c-3 organization with an
income of no greater than $2 million annually. Application forms
can be acquired from Orinda
Woman’s Club, Beneficiary Chair,
OTHER ... continued
at (925) 254-1162 or [email protected] Applications are due
Oakland Museum of California by 7 p.m. March 2.
presents “Bees: Tiny Insect, Big
Impact” from Jan. 31 to Sept. 20,
SENIORS
1000 Oak Street, Oakland. A new
family-friendly exhibition on the Free Computer and eReader
intricate world of one of the most Help from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on
important creatures to human agri- Wednesdays for seniors and other
culture and the natural environ- adults ages 18 and up. Are you
ment. Cost: $15 adults; $10 new to computers? Do you need
students and seniors with valid ID; help setting up an email account?
$6 youth ages 9-17; free ages 8 Would you like to learn how to
and under. OMCA Members al- write a letter on the computer?
ways get in free. For more info, Would you like help downloading
specific days and hours, visit library ebooks and audio books
http://museumca.org/bees or call onto your eReader or mobile de(510) 318-8400.
vice? Visit the Information Desk at
Crab Feed and Dance from 6 to
11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 7 at the
Holy Trinity Cultural Center, 1700
School Street, Moraga. Bring your
appetites and dancing shoes. Dinner and Dance: $50; Dance only:
$15. For non-crab lovers, chicken
is available by special advance
order. Dinner tickets must be purchased in advance. For tickets and
reservations, call (925) 672-6799.
Vote for Summer Movies Now Enjoy the movie choices from last
summer? The City of Orinda will
be selecting the movie picks for
this year and would like the community to help. For those interested in ranking their top movie
the Orinda Library, 26 Orinda Way
to set up your appointment, or contact Melanie McCallum for information at (925) 254-2184.
Sons in Retirement Lamorinda
Branch 171 meets at 11 a.m. the
first Wednesday monthly at Holy
Trinity Culture Center 1700
School Street, Moraga. The afterlunch speaker on Feb. 4 will be
Thomas S. Marnane, president of
Targeted Solutions LLC and sr.
vice president of Steamguard
LLC. Marnane will address the energy challenges facing the United
States. He has had more than 30
years of firsthand experience in his
field and his discussion should be
925-377-0977
very informative. For attendance
and membership info, call Larry at
(925) 631-9528.
Cultivating Your Creativity - facilitated by Ted Fuller, Lafayette
author and editor. This 5-week
course will include exercises and
challenges that generate ideas, creations of innovative, even quirky,
individuals and problem-solving
guidelines. Field trip – a guest
speaker or two and myriad resources are all part of this innovative class. Limited to 15
participants. Please call Lafayette
Senior Services at (925) 284-5050
to sign up. Classes are held from
10:30 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays
from Feb. 25 to March 25 in the
Toyon Room, Lafayette Community Center. Members: free; nonmembers: $10 per meeting.
Page: B9
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Service Clubs
Announcements
SOROPTIMIST OF 24/680
Please join us for our next mee
WHEN: Wednesday 1/8/14
Social 5:30-6:00 p.m.
Meeting 6:00 – 8:00 p.m
WHERE: The Buttercup Grill
660 Ygnacio Valley Road,
Explore Lamorinda Rotary clubs The heart of
Rotary is our clubs- dedicated people who share
a passion for both community service and friendship. Learn about Lamorinda’s Rotary clubs.
January Speaker:
Sister Caritas Foster – “Modern Day S
“Improvingorganization
the lives of womenworking
and
toRegina
improve
A global volunteer
Englehart @925-876-9076
girls through programs leading to
women
and girls
through programs
the lives of social
or go to: soroptimist24-680.org
and economic
empowerment”
leading to social and economic empowerment.
For more information, contact:
Please join us at our new location
THE LAFAYETTE PARK HOTEL
on Friday mornings at 7am.
For more info, please email us at
[email protected]
January 30:
Rotary District 5160 Governor Pam
Gray will update us on Rotary
events and activities in the district.
February 6:
4 WAY SPEECH CONTEST. The best
students from Miramonte’s Public
Speaking class will give a talk developed
around Rotary’s 4 Way Test.
Please join us for a great speaker and breakfast!!
GARDEN
The Walnut Creek Garden Club
will hold its general meeting at
9:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 9 at the
Gardens at Heather Farm located
at 1540 Marchbanks Road in Walnut Creek. The topic of the program is The Mission Blue
Butterfly Project. Price Sheppy is
the Community Manager of
Golden Gate Park and he will
speak about the effort to protect
the endangered Mission Blue butterfly. For more info, visit [email protected]
The Lafayette Garden Club will
meet from 9:30 to noon on Thursday, Feb. 12 at Lafayette Veterans
Memorial Hall, 3780 Mt. Diablo
Blvd, featuring Rebecca Sweet,
who will discuss “Refresh Your
Garden Design with Color, Texture, and Form.” Sweet has been
featured in numerous publications
and shares her many secrets in her
popular blog, Gossip in the Garden. She is owner of design firm
Harmony in the Garden and author
of two wonderful garden books,
both of which will be available for
purchase. For info, email [email protected]
Montelindo Garden Club Meeting will meet at 9 a.m. Friday, Feb.
20 at St. Stephen's Episcopal
Church, 66 St. Stephens Drive,
Orinda. Visitors welcome. Speaker
Susan Morrison, a landscape designer, master gardener and co-author of Garden Up will discuss
Smart Space. For info, visit
www.montelindogarden.com.
SOROPTIMIST OF 24/680
Please join us for our next meeting:
February 4th
WHEN: Wednesday,
Wednesday 1/8/14
Social 5:30-6:00
p.m.
Social
5:30-6:00
p.m.
Meeting 6:00
p.m.
Meeting
6:00– –8:00
8:00
p.m.
WHERE: The Buttercup Grill
660 Ygnacio Valley Road, Walnut Creek.
January Speaker:
Sister Caritas Foster – “Modern Day Slavery/Trafficking”
“Improving the lives of women and
girls through programs leading to
social and economic empowerment”
For more information, contact:
Regina Englehart @925-876-9076
or go to: soroptimist24-680.org
Lafayette Rotary Club
Step in on a Thursday. If you are interested in joining
Rotary we welcome you to join one of our lunch meetings.
Thursday at noon Oakwood Athletic Club, 4000 Mt. Diablo Blvd., Lafayette.
February 5:
Mark Heptig, Director of Golf
Rossmoor Golf Course
February 12:
Four Way Speech
Contest
Golf in the old days and what it is today.
www. rotarylafayette.org
CARPET CLEANING
LAMORINDA'S FAVORITE
FAMILY OWNED BUSINESS
FOR OVER 36 YEARS
(925) 283-8744
www.siggyscarpetcleaning.com
3408 Mt. Diablo Blvd. Lafayette
I 5 OFF
WINTER SPECIAL
%
How's your hearing?
Ask an Audiologist
Dr. Erik M. Breitling, Au.D., CCC-A, FAAA
Please submit events to:
[email protected]
‘Strange Magic’
3744 Mt. Diablo Blvd., Suite 100, Lafayette
(925) 262-4242 www.LamorindaAudiology.com
By Derek Zemrak
Lamorinda Weekly
is an independent publication, produced by and for the residents of Lafayette, Moraga and Orinda, CA
26,600 printed copies; delivered to homes & businesses in Lamorinda.
Contact us:
Letters to the editor (max 350 words): [email protected]
Sport events/stories/pictures: [email protected]
Art, theater, community events: [email protected]
Business news or business press releases: [email protected]
School stories/events: [email protected]
General interest stories/Community Service: [email protected]
Publishers/Owners:
Andy and Wendy Scheck; [email protected], [email protected]
“S
Editor: Jennifer Wake; [email protected]
Sports Editor: Caitlin Mitchell; [email protected]
“Strange Magic” © & TM 2014 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
trange Magic” is a musical movie fairy tale
based on “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
by William Shakespeare – and created by master
moviemaker and storyteller George Lucas. It should
be noted that while George Lucas created the story,
three creditable screenplay writers – David Berenbaum (“Elf,” “Haunted Mansion”), Irene Mecchi
(“Brave,” “The Lion King”) and Sound Designer
Gary Rydstrom (“Finding Nemo,” “Saving Private
Ryan”) – wrote a skimpy screenplay.
“Strange Magic” is saved by the visually illustrated animation and voiceover talent in this mystical kingdom that is divided by good and evil. Of
course the “good” are beautiful creatures while the
“bad” are ugly, but cute. When Princess Marianne,
voiced by two-time Golden Globe nominee Evan
Rachel Wood (“Mildred Pierce,” “Thirteen”) is
Photo Lucasfilm/Disney
two-timed by her vain fiancé, she finds herself
falling in love with the ugly Bog King, voiced by
the multi-talented actor Alan Cumming (“Spy
Kids,” “X-Men 2”). Cumming recently received a
Golden Globe nomination for the role of Eli Gold
in the hit television series “The Good Wife.” The
message of “don’t judge anyone based on looks” is
delivered loud and clear, which is a positive message for everyone attending the movie.
The musical score will have you tapping your
feet with familiar songs from San Francisco native
Michael Franti and The Temptations. “Strange
Magic” is rated PG with a total running time (TRT)
of 99 minutes.
Check out the Bay Area’s new entertainment
show, Real to Reel, every Sunday at 2:30 p.m., hosted
by Derek Zemrak and Leonard Pirkle on KOFY TV20.
Advertising: 925-377-0977, Wendy Scheck; [email protected]
Staff Writers:
Sophie Braccini; [email protected], Cathy Tyson; [email protected];
Laurie Snyder; [email protected], Cathy Dausman; [email protected],
Nick Marnell; [email protected],
Digging Deep: Cynthia Brian; [email protected]
Food: Susie Iventosch; [email protected]
Contributing Writers: Conrad Bassett, Moya Stone, Michael Sakoda, Marissa Harnett,
Lou Fancher, Chris Lavin, Amanda Kuehn Carroll, Diane Claytor, Scott Wu, Lauren Kim, Uma Unni,
Spencer Silva, Karl Buscheck, Ryan McKinley, Barry Hunau (cartoonist), Derek Zemrak (Film Critic)
Calendar Editor: Jaya Griggs
Photos: Tod Fierner, Ohlen Alexander, Gint Federas
Layout/Graphics: Andy Scheck. Printed in CA.
Mailing address:
Lamorinda Weekly, P.O. Box 6133, Moraga, CA 94570-6133
Phone: 925-377-0977; Fax: 1-800-690-8136
email: [email protected]
website: www.lamorindaweekly.com
Page: B10
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
Bring on the Bacon … Just in Time for the Super Bowl
W
By Susie Iventosch
ith Super Bowl parties just
around the corner, it’s essential to be on top of your appetizer game! A friend brought these
tasty treats to our house for a party
over the holidays, and I had never
had them before. So, naturally, I inquired about the recipe, and she
said, “Oh, it’s just that old Ritz
cracker and bacon recipe!”
Apparently they were all the
rage in the ’70s and ’80s, but this is
one of the oldies I never knew
about. My mom, who seemed to
know every recipe floating around,
never served them in all of her entertaining years either, that I can remember.
If you like bacon … you’re
Photo Susie Iventosch going to love these!
Ritz-Bacon Crisps
You can find most of the recipes published in the Lamorinda Weekly
on our website. Click Food tab.
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Ritz-Bacon Crisps
(Makes 24)
INGREDIENTS
24 Ritz crackers, broken in half
12 pieces thin cut (uncooked) bacon strips, cut in half
¾ cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
DIRECTIONS
Heat the oven to 250 F. Lay crackers on a rack on top of a baking
sheet. (Stack two cracker halves on top of each other, using one
full cracker for each stack.) Sprinkle ½ teaspoon (or so) of
Parmesan on top of each cracker stack. Wrap the cracker and
cheese with ½ slice of bacon, making sure the ends are on the
bottom. Bacon should be wrapped snugly, but not too tightly.
Bake on the rack with cookie sheet underneath it for about 2
hours until bacon is cooked and crispy.
Can freeze and reheat!
Susie Iventosch is the author of Tax Bites and Tasty
Morsels, which can be found at Across the Way in
Moraga, www.amazon.com, and www.taxbites.net.
Susie can be reached at [email protected]
This recipe can be found on our website:
ww.lamorindaweekly.com. If you would like to share
your favorite recipe with Susie please contact her by
email or call our office at (925) 377-0977.
Can You Get a Job with That? Italian Thriller and Social Drama
I
By Elizabeth LaScala, PhD
n his presentation “Can You Get a Job with
That?” Stuart Nachbar, noted education
writer and college counselor states, “A good
school does good by its students.” And, Stuart
and I agree, if a school does a good job of what
it is in the business of doing – educating and
preparing students for life beyond college – you
will get a job with a degree from the college. A
good school is not necessarily the one that is
most highly ranked or the one with the most recognizable name, but one which is honest and direct in its dealings with students and families.
College representatives from these schools,
whether in admissions, financial aid, enrollment
management, student activities or career planning, are well-informed and can help a student
and family reach sound decisions about everything from managing student debt to identifying
faculty members in different academic departments who can help set a student on a secure academic path.
One of the most important questions to consider as you begin your college search is, “If you
could get paid to do anything you wanted to do,
what would that be?” “Good” colleges will be
the ones that support that path and help you decide on an academic direction that is focused
enough to support your present interests and
broad enough to let you change course if
needed. Those schools may be smaller liberal
arts and science colleges or larger research universities. Both settings can work as long as the
school provides supportive advising teams to
help students move in the right academic direction, and college career centers that offer opportunities to test that direction through
extracurricular activities, internships and capstone research projects. A good career development center interacts with students as early as
the freshman year and collaborates with others
both on and off campus to help students test a
chosen career path or discover different career
options (e.g. clinical assignments in health
fields, student teaching for education, internships for business).
As you search for schools that fit your goals,
remember that the best colleges for you are the
ones that can support your learning style as well
as your need for assistance with difficult subjects. For example, many students are interested
in business but have difficulty in math. Instead
of giving up your interest in business for fear of
doing poorly in statistics or calculus, your college search should include an honest appraisal
of the learning support network available to you
at the various colleges on your list. If you learn
best by talking to your instructors in high
school, access to professors will be critical. If
you experience success in difficult coursework
by systematic use of peer tutors (those students
who have taken the course you are struggling
Advertise
Reach 60,000+
in Lamorinda
Advertise in
Lamorinda Weekly
Call 925-377-0977
today
with and gotten an ‘A’), a similar program at the
college should work well for you.
Once you identify a preliminary list of colleges that meets your goals and interests, it is
important to consider costs. Some experts believe you should start your college search with
cost as the primary factor. Regardless of when
you take it into consideration, cost should be a
consideration as you develop your college application list. Be sure to consider costs beyond
the freshman year, especially indirect costs that
happen once the student is further into a degree
program – for example, a car, study abroad, or
housing during an internship or co-op assignment. Housing costs can be significant and are
more common in schools with cooperative
learning environments that intermix coursework
with applications in real work environments –
and those employment opportunities may be located far from campus.
As you refine your college search, it is smart
to go well beyond majors, campus size, location
and climate to assess the factors that will ultimately make the biggest difference in the value
of your undergraduate degree. I encourage students and their families to obtain ‘straight’ answers to their questions before entry to a
college. You should expect a college to address
your questions about affordability, academic advising, career center activities, housing and any
other areas that deserve careful consideration.
You generally have little time between when
you learn about acceptance to a college and the
enrollment deadline. Most of the important research should precede the college’s decision on
your application. In fact, I would maintain students should only apply to colleges that have
demonstrated that their representatives are
knowledgeable, honest and direct in their dealings with families. A “good” school does, indeed, do well by its students. And it does well
by its applicants too.
‘Human Capital’ Opens Jan. 30
By Sophie Braccini
T
Image provided
he International Film Showcase will present Italian director Paolo Virzí’s film
“Human Capital” for a one-week run beginning
Jan. 30 at the Orinda Theatre. The 2013 satiric
social drama was selected as the Italian entry for
Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy
Awards this year. Set in Northern Italy, the film
was inspired by a novel with the same title by
American writer Stephen Amidon.
Dino Ossola is a real estate dealmaker on
the verge of bankruptcy. The cunning middle
class businessman thinks he is going to strike it
big when he manages to endear himself to the
very wealthy Giovanni Bernaschi, the father of
his daughter Serena's boyfriend. Ossola persuades Bernaschi to let him in on a mysterious
and highly profitable hedge fund investment.
As his story unfolds, we also follow the lives of
other characters such as Ossola’s wife Carla,
who dreams of becoming an actress and is bored
and aimless until she finds her calling and decides to become a patron of the arts with her
husband's money. The family’s balance is
threatened after a car accident sends a cyclist to
the hospital in very serious condition, and an
economic downturn makes the mighty
Bernaschi vacillate. As their worlds face collapse, the characters react with desperation,
leaving the audience wondering who will make
it out alive.
Virzí approaches the story from three characters’ points of view: first Ossola, then Carla
and finally Serena. As the film progresses, different layers and perspectives are revealed and
different sides of the truth emerge. The film’s
clever construction adds to the suspense.
Social realism is nothing new to Italian cinema. Virzí presents a satire comprised of pathetic characters who are victims of their greed
and fear – nothing incredibly innovative, but the
film’s quality of acting and the overall beauty of
the imagery make it all worthwhile.
A large part of the movie’s success in Europe comes from Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, who
portrays Carla and was recognized as Best Actress at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival for her
moving performance of a poor little rich
woman’s quest for meaning. Fabrizio Bentivoglio as Ossola is painfully ridiculous until
he turns into one of the most despicable characters of the movie. Superb newcomer Matilde
Gioli plays Serena, the only angel of the movie.
She has strength and emotion, but she is crushed
like all the other youngsters in the film.
While a drama, the sarcastic overtone of the
film provides many opportunities to laugh and
smile. Hardly boring, this is a fast-paced movie.
Don’t leave before the last comment is displayed on the silver screen. It explains the
meaning behind the movie’s title.
The ‘Showcase’ in the Oscar Race
Efi Lubliner is proud to announce that the movie “Tangerines,” presented last November at the Orinda Theatre by the International Film Showcase, and “Timbuktu,”
which will be showing in March, were two of the five 2015 Academy Award nominees for Best Foreign Language Film.
Elizabeth LaScala, Ph.D. is an independent
college advisor who draws upon 25 years of
higher education experience to help guide and
support the college admissions process for
students and their families. Dr. LaScala is a
member of NACAC, WACAC and HECA. She can
be contacted at (925) 891-4491 or
[email protected] Visit
www.doingcollege.com for more information
about her services.
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Wednesday, January 28, 2015
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
925-377-0977
SMC Basketball Improving on Strong Start
By Michael Sakoda
Page: C1
This Program gives kids the opportunity to play
competitive tennis at their appropriate level, as a member
of a team, promoting sportsmanship, camaraderie and fun!
LOCAL LEAGUE DIVISIONS
-10 and under
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Learn the skills * Build
Confidence * Love the Game
Brad Waldow is central to the Gaels' success, averaging over 20 points per game.
T
he Saint Mary’s men’s basketball team (16-4, 8-1 WCC) is
off to an unexpectedly hot start this
year, despite some big changes in the
roster.
This past week, the team
bounced back from a 68-47 loss at
No. 3 Gonzaga on Jan. 21 by beating
Portland 74-64 on Jan. 23, notching
their eighth conference win of the
season.
“The reason we’re in this position
is our seniors have been great,” said
head coach Randy Bennett. “Garrett
Jackson’s turned himself into a player,
and then Brad (Waldow) and Kerry
(Carter) were ready to go.”
Rounding out this year’s starting
five are senior transfers Aaron Bright
(Stanford) and Desmond Simmons
(Washington).
“Aaron and Des had to get adjusted,” said Bennett. “But those five
have been able to give us the confidence, the toughness, the leadership,
the experience to be where we’re at.”
Saint Mary’s opened the season
winning five straight before losing to
Boise State on Dec. 6. They squeaked
by Creighton 71-67 in overtime and
then lost two straight to Northern Arizona and No. 20 St. John’s. The team
then rattled off nine straight wins before losing to Gonzaga.
No one’s as surprised by the
team’s success as Bennett.
“Going into the season, I just
didn’t know,” he said. “I knew we
had some good talent, but I didn’t
know how it was all going to fit together, and we’re not done yet.”
After being named to the AllWCC Pre-Season team, Brad Waldow has earned WCC Player of the
Week honors and emerged as one of
the front runners for the Lou Henson
Player of the Year Award, given to the
nation’s top player from a mid-major
school.
The 6-foot-10-inch 270-pound
forward is averaging 20.2 points per
game (second in the WCC) and 9.9
rebounds per game (first in the
WCC).
“What no one talks about is
[Brad’s] two and a half assists a
game,” said Bennett. “That’s where I
think he really stands out. The ball
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goes through his hands and he makes
a lot of decisions.”
But for all the good, there’s always room to improve, and Bennett
knows his team’s weaknesses as well
as he knows its strengths.
“Defense,” he said. “This team
needs to improve that. We’ve gotten
better, but we have another jump to
go. We’re a pretty good rebounding
team, pretty good scoring team, but
our shot selection is still something
we’re working through. The number
one thing is to get that field goal percentage defense number down.”
With nine games left in conference play, the Gaels sit in firm control
of the No. 2 spot in the WCC, but it’s
a tough conference and the tides can
turn at any moment.
“It will depend on these last
games,” said Bennett. “The big thing
is if we keep improving through January and February. If we do, we’re
going to be a good team. If we stay
the same, we’ll be okay, but this team
has room to improve.”
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ANNUAL CAR
DRAWING
There will be a celebration of Bob Wilson on
Jan. 28 from 7:30-8:30 p.m. in the Campolindo
High School big gym. Bob Wilson, longtime
Campolindo PE teacher, coach and athletic
director, passed away on Dec.17.
See related story at:
www.lamorindaweekly.com/archive/issue0822/
Longtime-Athletic-Director-Remembered.html
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WIN a
2015 Jeep Cherokee
OR $20,000 cash!
(winner responsible for registration,
license fee and taxes)
$1,000 cash, $500 cash & more
Proceeds benefit Saint Mary’s College Athletics
SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 21, 2015
4:30 p.m. Reception (full buffet and hosted bar)
6:15 p.m. Car Drawing
SODA CENTER, SAINT MARY’S COLLEGE
COST: $150
PER TICKET (LIMITED TO THE FIRST 550 TICKETS SOLD)
CALL (925) 631-IWON OR (925) 631-4966 TO BUY YOUR TICKETS
VISIT stmarys-ca.edu/cardrawing FOR MORE INFORMATION
Page: C2
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
SPORTS MEDICINE
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YOUNG ATHLETES
OAKLAND
510-428-3558
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Lamorinda Keeps Winning
Lamorinda Teams Set to
Square Off with Playoff
Hopes in the Balance
Girls’ Basketball Mid-Season Report
By Conrad Bassett
N
By Spencer Silva
T
Taylor Jones
Haley van Dyke
he three Lamorinda girls’ basketball teams have all
had success this year as they head into the second
half of the Diablo Foothill Athletic League season.
As expected, perennial frontrunner Miramonte started
the season strong. The 17-2 Mats are currently ranked
No. 12 in the United States with their only losses coming
to national No. 1 Mater Dei (Santa Ana) and Hawaii’s top
team, Konawaena.
Head coach Kelly Sopak noted that playing a tough
schedule has allowed the team to grow.
“We are a work in progress but are making strides in
the right direction and the scheduling was paramount for
us,” he said. “I knew going into the season that we needed
to play a national type schedule in order for us to reach
our potential.”
Sopak cited the development and improvement of
freshmen Clair Steele and Jordyn Bryant, sophomore Elle
Louie, and junior Keana Delos Santos as reasons for the
team’s continued improvement.
He also spoke highly of one of the nation’s top recruits, junior Sabrina Ionescu, saying he has not seen anyone better in his 10 years coaching in the DFAL
“I continue to push her, but more and more I am catching myself watching her in amazement. I am a much better
coach with her on the floor!” he joked.
In Lafayette, head coach Chad Wellon has already
won more games this year than all of last season as the
Acalanes Dons sit at 14-4. “We started winning early in
the year and I think the team just expects it now,” he said.
Wellon noted that he emphasizes hard work. “Our
goal going into every game is to play harder than the team
we play because I feel like that is something that is within
our control.”
Junior forward Taylor Jones has stepped into a lead-
Jordan Bryant Photos Gint Federas
ership role for the Dons, working hard to collect rebounds
and stop opponents through solid defense.
“She is asked to do all the dirty work and just recently
received the West Coast Jamboree MVP so her effort for
that type of scrappy play was noticed,” Wellon explained.
“What makes her great is she doesn't care about anything
except helping her team win.”
The Dons are also getting help from sophomore
Emma Godfrey, who is averaging nearly 10 rebounds a
game, and sophomore Brooke Panfili, a transfer from
Campo. In the first game where Panfili was eligible to
play, she hit four 3-pointers against her old team and led
the Dons with 15 points.
At Campolindo, head coach Art Thoms has seen the
team chemistry building on and off the court every week.
“I knew blending six seniors, a junior, and five freshmen
was going to be a challenge. The team has really come
together as the season has progressed.”
Freshman Haley Van Dyke has made a huge impact,
leading the team in points, rebounds, steals and blocks.
Senior captains Rachel Sniderman, Kaylyn Murray and
Ashley Dubrasich have stepped up as leaders as well.
“Rachel sets a great example of support and building team
chemistry, Kaylyn is a floor leader and Ashley is a vocal
leader,” Thoms explained. “All three have led to a positive
locker room and fun season.”
At 10-8, the Cougars have picked up some key victories, including a win against a strong Oakland Tech team
that handed Acalanes their only non-league loss. In the
win, Van Dyke had 16 points, 17 rebounds and six blocks.
As always, the DFAL is one of the premier leagues in
Northern California and Dublin at 17-2 joins Miramonte
and Acalanes as the first three in the DFAL standings.
Wrestling Teams Aim for NCS
By Karl Buscheck
I
Front row, from left: Jose Herrera, Zach Francis, Alex Jang and Max Hahn
t's crunch time in the DFAL
wrestling season.
The NCS Dual Meet Championships are looming on Feb. 14 and
all three Lamorinda high school
squads are battling to claim a spot in
the competition.
With seniors Alexander Jang and
Zachary Francis leading the way, Miramonte owns a 2-1 record in DFAL
action. As head coach Jose Herrera
explained, the team has also received
key contributions from an array of underclassmen.
“We've had these young guys step
up out of nowhere, put in the time and
now our team is mostly young, hungry
athletes,” said Herrera, who has grown
the program from eight wrestlers to 40
in the four years that he's been in
charge. “We have an extremely young
team where when we graduate our
seniors, we're not going to be down at
all. We might even be better.”
To open up the season, the Matadors beat Acalanes on Dec. 11 and
topped Dublin on Dec. 18. On Jan.
15, Miramonte lost its first league
meet to Dougherty Valley, the reigning DFAL champs. With three
matchups remaining on the schedule,
the team has one clear objective: to
finish in the top three at NCS.
“Our goal is to qualify for North
Coast Section Duals and bring back a
banner, a team banner,” said Herrera.
Campolindo is also trying to win a
banner of its own. With a 0-3 record in
DFAL competition, the Cougars have
plenty of work to do. So far, Campolindo has dropped meets to
Dougherty Valley on Dec. 18, Alham-
bra on Jan. 8 and Las Lomas on Jan. 15.
“We're not where I want to be
yet,” said head coach Bob McLaughlin. “We need to go 2-1 or 3-0 to make
it to NCS Duals, and I think we'll do
better as the season progresses. The
team's working hard. The kids are
doing well. Sometimes you eat the
bear, sometimes the bear eats you.”
Seniors Trevor Martinho, Eric
Monasevitch, and Jason Pollock have
been the Cougars most consistent
wrestlers, while sophomore Avery
Novick has also been impressive.
McLaughlin is confident that his team
will make the necessary adjustments
in the second half of the season to
earn a trip to NCS Duals.
“It's a process and I think the kids
are aware of where we need to get to,
and they're working hard to do that
and I think they will,” McLaughlin
added.
Acalanes is also in need of a
strong second-half showing if the
team is going to make an NCS appearance. The Dons have a record of
1-2 in DFAL after claiming their first
league win over Dublin on Jan. 8.
Acalanes began the season with
back-to-back losses to Miramonte on
Dec. 11 and to Alhambra on Dec. 18.
The Dons still have three meets on the
schedule including a rivalry matchup
against Campolindo on Feb. 5.
early three-quarters of the
high school basketball
season is in the books and the
playoff picture is coming into
focus. Campolindo (15-2) is putting the finishing touches on another brilliant season — they’re
regarded as one of the best teams
in the Bay Area. Acalanes (5-13)
and Miramonte (10-9) have less
certain paths. Both teams have
losing records against D-III
schools, and they’ll need a number of key wins against D-III opponents. Both teams need upset
wins over titan Campolindo.
Campo owns a 10-game win
streak and Miramonte’s recent defeat of second-place Dublin High
places Campo firmly in the
DFAL’s driver seat. Head coach
Matt Watson, however, believes
his team’s best basketball is yet to
Joey Hewitt
be played. “We have a couple of
football guys that are just getting
adjusted,” he explained. “We are
hoping to hit our stride in the middle of February.”
The Cougars will be tested
over the next few weeks with a
slate of games against secondplace Dublin, then Acalanes and
Miramonte. “In high school, any
team can win, especially in rivalry games,” Watson said of the
upcoming games. “Acalanes and
Miramonte are well coached,
play extremely hard and have
tremendous fan support, which
makes both of them difficult to
beat, especially on the road.”
In spite of the Dons losing
record, they can still qualify for
the NCS Division III playoffs by
closing the season with wins
over Campolindo, Miramonte
and Alhambra. The Dons have
played a tough schedule, and Chris Hansen
while it won’t be easy qualifying
for NCS, one of their five wins
came against a strong Liberty
High School team, helping their
case for an NCS bid.
The Acalanes Dons had a
crucial double-overtime win
over the Alhambra Bulldogs on
Jan. 23. The win was highlighted
by an impressive 37-point performance from senior guard Joey
Hewitt. Hewitt is the team’s offensive leader, averaging more
than 20 points per game.
If the name Casey Harrington sounds familiar, it’s probably
because he started as quarterback
for the Dons last fall. He didn’t
play basketball his junior season,
but he has used his raw athleticism to become one of the team’s
most valuable assets on the court.
It’s been a process getting all
the new faces on the same page, Jackson Wegener Photos Gint Federas
but the formula hasn’t changed
much, according to head coach Dave Goldman. “We’ve focused on defensive
intensity and running our offense,” he said. “We don’t score a lot of points, so
we like to slow the game down and try to keep (our opponents) in the 50s.”
Miramonte reached the NorCal semifinals for the first time in school history last winter, but they’re going to need good fortune to repeat. They have
two games left against league-leading Campolindo. If the rivalry weren’t in
and of itself enough, the Mats need to win at least one of those games to qualify
for the playoffs. Campo’s only league loss last season came at the hands of
the Mats, so it’s safe to say there will be no charity when the two teams meet.
Miramonte’s up-tempo offense has buoyed the team all season. Seniors
Jackson Wegener, Jake Linares and Moneer Mujaddidi engineer it. Head coach
Drew McDonald spoke of the three captains’ invaluable “experience and presence” on and off the court. He sees the underclassmen coming along too.
The Mats have struggled in league play, but their win over second-place
Dublin on Jan. 23 could be the boost they needed. “We’re struggling right
now,“ McDonald explained before Friday’s win. “We came into league play
with a winning record, and we’ve known that we have to get better as the season goes along.”
The Mats look to get back to their winning ways against Las Lomas before
taking on Campolindo on Jan. 31.
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
www.lamorindaweekly.com
State Champions Celebrated
C
925-377-0977
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
Page: C3
Lamorinda Rugby Season Starts Strong
Submitted by Steve Peterson
Varsity Wins at UCLA Tournament
Head coach Kevin Macy speaks to the crowd with Tyler Petite (8) and Nick Fadelli (20) both AllDFAL First Team selections. Petite and Fadelli were key to Campolindo's success this season.
Photos Gint Federas
ampolindo's 2014 football team was
honored for its historic accomplishments on Jan. 25. Under head coach Kevin
Macy, the team went 16-0 on its way to winning the CIF State Championship, the first in
the program's history. The team was greeted
by cheering fans from throughout the community. The celebration included food, special gear, and a showing of the championship
game.
L
With Jack Fouts (3), Parker Watson, T.J. Low and Camden Hoeser in support, Leon Martin fights
for possession.
Photo Geoff Martin
amorinda varsity rugby team faced at UCLA on Jan. 17-18. Lamorinda finished
some of the top high school programs the weekend 3-2, including a 40-5 victory
in the U.S. at the Dennis Storer tournament over rival North Bay.
JV Faces Rival
Cheer for the New Year
The team runs into meet a proud crowd.
Submitted by Mary Piscitelli
Nima Raie runs for a try.
Photo Tammi O’Neal
Lamorinda junior varsity rugby team put son opening scrimmage against Clayton Valdown multiple scoring plays in a strong sea- ley on Jan. 17.
Masters Swimmer Takes the Plunge
Submitted by Jon Wheeler
D
Dominique Gillis (center) poses with fellow cheerleaders, including Miramonte’s Julia Gomes
(left) and Jessie Musatchio (far right)
Photo provided
ominique Gillis, a junior at Acalanes the other All-Americans, Gillis traveled to
High School, was selected as an All- London to participate in the New Year’s Day
American Cheerleader for 2014. Along with parade.
Saint Mary’s Holds On for Win
Submitted by Tony Samaniego
Ranie Pearce “poolside” in Siberia Photo provided
A
Sophomore Dylan Audslie on his way to his first of two tries against Arizona State.
fter routing Arizona State 59-15 on Jan.
17, Saint Mary’s rugby took on Olympic
Club Jan. 24. SMC alum Michael Haley scored
first for Olympic Club. Led by great plays from
Kingsley McGowan, SMC took the lead 24-19
at halftime. The Gaels strengthened their defen-
sive efforts in the second half and held on to win
36-31. Saint Mary’s was led by Tommy Wallace, who had three tries and three conversions,
hooker Mike O’Neill, who notched two tries,
and Niki Schlobohm, back from injury, who had
one try.
A
longtime open water swimmer,
Ranie Pearce has tackled some
of the toughest open water swims in
the world. She started swimming in
1988 as way to get exercise, but once
she competed in the annual Lake
Berryessa swim, she was hooked on
open water swimming. Since 2008,
she has conquered a series of open
water swims across the globe including: The Straights of Gibraltar (10
miles), Catalina (20 miles), The English Channel (21 miles) and the
Manhattan Island Marathon (28.5
miles). In August of 2014, Pearce
travelled to Argentina to swim in the
International Winter Swimming Festival. The event is a series of swims
in increasingly colder water, culminating with a swim in a 37-degree
glacier lake in Patagonia. In December, Pearce travelled to Tyumen,
Siberia to swim in an ice pool. The
pool is constructed by cutting a hole
in the ice the size of a pool, then inserting lane lines. Despite the cold,
Pearce says she is happiest in the
water.
Submit stories to [email protected]
lamorindaweekly.com
(we prefer to receive your original photo file, minimum size:
200 dpi and 1200 pixels wide)
Page: C4
www.lamorindaweekly.com
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
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It’s Time! Owner Retiring
Store Liquidation
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35 - 60%
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Piano Lessons in Lafayette with
professional instructor MTAC member.
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• Lots and lots of fabulous yarn
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925-283-7601
La Fiesta Square
3540 Wilkinson
Lane #A
Cell: 925-323-8969
925-299-1317
1060 Sierra Vista Way, Lafayette
LaFiesta Square,
www.yarnboutique.us - 963-C Moraga Rd. - 925-283-7377
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D. Tran
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a
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OUR HOMES
Lamorinda Weekly Volume 08 Issue 24 Wednesday, January 28, 2015
The Real
Estate Ye
ar in
Review
...read on
page D1
0
Donít Let It All Come Tumbling Down
Chimney and structure safety is preventable
By Chris Lavin
Unseen water can get in between the cracks in the mortar, freeze, and loosen the bricks, making them unstable. Photo Chris Lavin
K
ids learn it when
they’re knee high
from the wolf in the
fable “The Three Little Pigs.”
The wolf huffs and he puffs and
he blows the first two houses
down with little effort, and
gobbles two little pigs right up.
So much for the inhabitants
protected by straw and wood.
But the third, the brick structure, the wolf cannot shake.
Ergo, brick is the best construction material if you want
to stay safe, right? The author
(who was British, sniff) obviously wasn’t living in earthquake country.
While brick is not a
prime building material here
any longer – it’s not even allowed any more for new chimney construction anywhere in
the state – brick chimneys are
ubiquitous among Lamorinda’s older homes, along with
their brick walls, fences and
other structures that could topple in a temblor.
... continued on page D4
Page: D2
OUR HOMES
Wed., January 28, 2015
Lamorinda Home Sales recorded
City
Last reported: LOWEST AMOUNT: HIGHEST AMOUNT:
LAFAYETTE
11
$700,000
$2,650,000
MORAGA
5
$328,000
$1,251,500
ORINDA
8
$890,000
$2,750,000
Home sales are compiled by Cal REsource, an Oakland real estate information company. Sale prices are computed from the county transfer tax information shown on the deeds that record at close of escrow and are published five to eight weeks after such recording. This information is obtained
from public county records and is provided to us by California REsource. Neither Cal REsource nor this publication are liable for errors or omissions.
ORINDAOAKS.COM ~ NEW CONSTRUCTION
Don’t miss your last chance to own one of Orinda Oaks beauful estate
homes. Compleon scheduled for March and April 2015.
345 Miller Court, 2.3 acres, 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath, Lot 5 - $2,695,900
350 Miller Court, 3.5 acre lot, 5 bedroom, 5.5 bath, Lot 6 - $2,595,900
GLENN AND KELLIE BEAUBELLE
925.254.1212
TheBeaubelleGroup.com
CABRE# 00678426, 01165322
©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304
LAFAYETTE
970 1st Street, $935,000, 4 Bdrms, 1785 SqFt, 1946 YrBlt, 12-3-14;
Previous Sale: $288,500, 05-12-95
3360 Beechwood Drive, $1,500,000, 4 Bdrms, 2372 SqFt, 1942 YrBlt, 12-4-14;
Previous Sale: $266,000, 05-18-94
840 Broadmoor Court, $1,564,000, 4 Bdrms, 1956 SqFt, 1954 YrBlt, 12-1-14
1678 Foothill Park Circle, $700,000, 4 Bdrms, 3526 SqFt, 1957 YrBlt, 12-2-14;
Previous Sale: $700,000, 05-27-10
1655 Glen Oak Court, $1,189,000, 2 Bdrms, 3199 SqFt, 1942 YrBlt, 12-11-14;
Previous Sale: $875,000, 08-06-09
3251 Glenside Drive, $2,650,000, 4 Bdrms, 3188 SqFt, 2013 YrBlt, 12-10-14;
Previous Sale: $1,275,000, 04-19-12
673 Jennie Court, $1,200,000, 5 Bdrms, 2392 SqFt, 1950 YrBlt, 12-4-14;
Previous Sale: $640,000, 01-14-13
115 Marsha Place, $1,030,000, 4 Bdrms, 1433 SqFt, 1963 YrBlt, 12-3-14
29 Olympic Oaks Drive, $1,350,000, 3 Bdrms, 2484 SqFt, 1996 YrBlt, 12-9-14;
Previous Sale: $598,000, 08-26-97
1072 Serrano Court, $980,000, 3 Bdrms, 2249 SqFt, 1954 YrBlt, 12-4-14;
Previous Sale: $49,000, 05-23-75
1115 Silverhill Court, $900,000, 3 Bdrms, 3022 SqFt, 1988 YrBlt, 12-9-14;
Previous Sale: $950,000, 10-21-08
MORAGA
2055 Ascot Drive #206, $328,000, 2 Bdrms, 1082 SqFt, 1971 YrBlt, 12-5-14;
Previous Sale: $140,000, 12-04-98
651 Moraga Road #36, $390,000, 2 Bdrms, 1144 SqFt, 1962 YrBlt, 12-9-14;
Previous Sale: $320,000, 05-08-13
1891 St. Andrews Drive, $1,251,500, 3 Bdrms, 3424 SqFt, 1983 YrBlt, 12-4-14;
Previous Sale: $555,000, 04-08-94
7 Via Barcelona, $760,000, 3 Bdrms, 2109 SqFt, 1986 YrBlt, 12-5-14;
Previous Sale: $267,500, 10-12-87
116 Via Joaquin, $620,000, 3 Bdrms, 2117 SqFt, 1980 YrBlt, 12-10-14
ORINDA
17 Bates Boulevard, $1,000,000, 3 Bdrms, 1432 SqFt, 1957 YrBlt, 12-10-14;
Previous Sale: $650,000, 05-06-04
68 Camino Sobrante, $890,000, 3 Bdrms, 1680 SqFt, 1951 YrBlt, 12-3-14;
Previous Sale: $143,000, 08-22-78
21 Cedar Lane, $1,035,000, 4 Bdrms, 2121 SqFt, 1961 YrBlt, 12-9-14;
Previous Sale: $90,500, 06-05-75
26 Coachwood Terrace, $2,070,000, 4 Bdrms, 2677 SqFt, 1972 YrBlt, 12-3-14
142 Crestview Drive, $1,380,000, 4 Bdrms, 2185 SqFt, 1941 YrBlt, 12-10-14;
Previous Sale: $53,500, 06-20-73
110 Estates Drive, $1,020,000, 2 Bdrms, 2463 SqFt, 1955 YrBlt, 12-10-14
658 Moraga Way, $1,100,000, 3 Bdrms, 1818 SqFt, 1952 YrBlt, 12-9-14;
Previous Sale: $900,000, 10-12-06
18 Rabble Road, $2,750,000, 12-1-14
Rare Lafayette Acreage
761Tofflemire Drive, Lafayette
Kurt Piper
Christine Gallegos
Leslie Piper
415.606.2047
415.990.4929
Amy Price
Scott Sans
925.997.6808
925.216.7583
Beautiful estate setting just minutes from town. Special 1.55± acre
lot with views of Mt. Diablo and room to roam. Expand this 2400±
sq. ft. traditional style home with “good bones” into the home of
your dreams. A rare opportunity.
Offered at $1,799,000
Five Listings Coming Soon
Spanish hacienda in Lafayette with
Mt. Diablo views. Grand 3700± sq. ft. floor plan.
Quiet country setting in Burton Valley.
4 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2400± sq. ft. single-level floorplan.
Realtors Recommended for a Reason
The best of Burton Valley. 4 bedroom, 2.5
bathroom craftsman style interior. Douglah Designs kitchen.
Court location in sought after Lafayette Trail
neighborhood. 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2500± sq. ft.
Burton Valley Beauty. Spacious 3200± sq. ft. single level,
modern floor plan in a prime close-in location.
Kurt Piper
925.818.8000
[email protected]
www.KurtPiperGroup.com
License #: 01130308
Page: D4
OUR HOMES
Wed., January 28, 2015
Donít Let It All Come
Tumbling Down
... continued from page D1
Coming soon
Moraga Charmer
Tucked back on a fabulous Moraga cul-de-sac sits this wonderfully
expanded 2,091+/-square foot home. With 4 bedrooms / 3 baths,
this inviting property enjoys a terrific indoor / outdoor feel and
great living spaces. A second story addition offers a beautiful full
bathroom and a spacious bonus room that can be used as a family
room, master retreat, in-law suite or teen hang-out. The large walkin closet with window is currently being used as an office. Situated
on a lovely .25+/- acre lot, the wonderful level backyard has great
patio, grass and play areas. Don't miss this fantastic property!
Construction experts say that as long as homeowners pay attention to upkeep, older
structures shouldn’t be too much of a threat when the next “Big One” hits.
“You have to inspect,” said Mike Fay of Mike’s Mobile Screen and Chimney Service. He’s not doing much work in Lamorinda now because of the quake last year that
took out most of Napa’s downtown and a lot of Vallejo. His crews are up there, still
busy. Bricks galore tumbled into the streets. Thank goodness it happened in the middle
of the night when a lot of people were not wandering the streets, Fay said. “It’s a lot of
work up there right now, but people can prevent this sort of thing.”
That means you need to know what you have. “What happens is that people who
have brick chimneys really need to be on top of their inspections,” he said. “When the
house shakes, the chimney doesn’t necessarily need to shake with it.” Brick strikes are
dangerous and, above head height, can be deadly. “One brick and that could be fatal.”
Fay recommends an annual inspection of anything brick. “Most people who use
their chimneys regularly do get inspected,” he said. The primary reason for malfunction,
he said, is unseen – water gets in between the cracks in the mortar, freezes, loosens the
bricks and makes them unstable. One earthquake, and they tumble.
Another hazard, he said, is listening to people who say that a chimney should be
attached to a house. “I see rebar, I see straps attaching chimneys to houses,” he said.
“That’s a mistake. A chimney is not attached to the house because a chimney is detached
from the house. It’s separate. When someone attaches the chimney to the house, in an
earthquake that’s going to make the chimney fall. Those straps will make the chimney
shake with the house, and that shouldn’t happen.”
Therefore, do not attach the chimney to the house, Fay says.
“Nobody is using brick for chimneys anymore,” said Dylan Llewellyn of Canyon.
“You can catch problems early but otherwise you’re outta luck.” Fay agrees.
“The best thing is to catch any problem early,” Fay said. “You can have structural
or water damage. It’s easiest to catch it early, otherwise it will have to be rebuilt.” Nowadays that is done by replacing brick chimneys with pre-fab metal and wood chimneys
that are built to live atop modern foundations and within houses that will pretend to
have brick chimneys, so that Santa Claus next year still feels welcome.
Call the Brydon & Ives Team for more information.
Lisa Brydon 925.285.8336 | Kristi Ives 925.788.8345
www.BrydonIvesTeam.com
CalBRE#: 01408025
CalBRE#: 01367466
[email protected]
Dylan Llewellyn checks out a neighbor's brick chimney for rot.
Photo Chris Lavin
A Very Special Lafayette Location and Neighborhood!
4018 Tilden Lane
Open Sunday 1-4pm
Enjoy a 4 Bed /4 Bath, 2668 square foot home
nestled on a private .49 acre level grassy parcel in Happy Valley.
31 Years Selling More Homes Than Any Other Individual Agent
Office: 925.254.8585
Cell: 925-998-7898
www.clarkthompson.com
Email: [email protected]
CalBRE: 00903367
Page: D6
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
OUR HOMES
www.lamorindaweekly.com
Feng Shui and Color
By Michele Duffy
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
flect relaxation, peace and trust, adventure and exploration.
Blue-Green (water element): Blue-green is less auspicious
than green, but it is also a secondary water color which is full
of life force.
Dark Brown (earth element): Brown stands for stability,
depth, something long-established and enduring, elegance,
autumn, the passage of time and heaviness.
Green (wood element): Green evokes hope, development,
family, tranquility, new beginnings and growth.
Grey (metal element): Too much grey denotes frustration
and hopelessness but the marriage of opposites such as black
and white creates balance and resolves conflict.
Gold (yin): Gold underscores health, nobility, calm, balance
and spirituality.
Orange (earth element): Orange promotes happiness and
power, and strengthens concentration and organization, but
never use it in a bedroom if you want to sleep.
Pink (earth element): Pink denotes love and pure intent, joy,
romance and happiness.
Pink creates romance in a bedroom. Adding brown will tone down and neutralize the pink for wider appeal.
Photos provided
olor can be transformative, especially in feng shui.
The principles of feng shui are founded on traditional Chinese medicine, based on the dynamic
opposites of yin and yang – together with the five elements:
water, wood, fire, earth and metal – as well as form, landscape, space orientation and time. Feng shui is about creating
a natural equilibrium while promoting health, harmony, stability and prosperity. Activating an area of your home located
on the Bagua map with color can activate the corresponding
area of your life. In feng shui we like to apply color to activate
a specific element that governs any of the nine Bagua areas
and each of the five elements.
Color and hue or intensity selection can be downright
daunting for many, but it doesn't have to be. Today there are
endless inspirations, oodles of samples to try out before you
commit to a color for an entire room. Start with the rooms
where you spend the most time. Create a more romantic master bedroom with a pinky brown or transform your kitchen
with feng shui favored whites that show off colorful food best.
If you overlay the Feng Shui Bagua (see diagram on page
D8) over the space from the front door wall, you can easily
see what rooms in the home are located in the areas of
“wealth” (far left, wood), “relationships” (far right, earth) or
C
“health” (center, earth). Take another look at the Feng Shui
Bagua to see which colors are associated with those areas and
identify which of the five elements is activated when applying
a color to that area of your home.
Picking specific colors based on what you do in a particular room needs special consideration. It would be inauspicious, for example, to incorporate “active” or yang colors –
red, orange, bright yellow – in a bedroom where calmer, more
yin colors work best for sleeping. Children’s rooms often
bloom with shades of soft green that signify growth and development.
It’s also critical to choose environmentally-friendly paint.
Remember to use a base coat and two coats of color for the
best results, especially if you are covering darker walls.
Here are some examples of feng shui color meanings you
can use to help decide what colors are appropriate for various
areas in your home:
Black (water element): Black represents life, intuition, spirituality, wisdom, and psychological and intellectual depth, but
if it is too dominant it creates depression and lack of hope.
Medium or Dark Blue (water and earth element): These
hues of blue represent calm. They are soothing colors that re-
Purple and Lavender (wood element): Purple, deep red or
plum are the colors of nobility, spirituality, and mental and
emotional healing.
Red (fire element): Red is auspicious, the color of happiness,
fire and passion, fame, strength and power. Never apply this
color to bedroom walls.
Tan or Café au lait (earth element): Tan is soothing and is
great for a master bedroom since it mimics the skin we should
be in at least part of the time in that room.
... continued on page D8
This white kitchen in Orinda shows off the colorful Qi
(energy) of the food prepared there.
WWW.HOLCENBERG.COM
Client satisfaction: a family tradition
Knowledgeable - Professional - Reliable - Local
Committed to exceeding your expectations!
Paul & Virginia Ratto
925.998.9501
[email protected]
www.RattoandRatto.com
License #: 00900621 | 01361537
This is one of the best
times to sell a home
in years.
We are Lamorinda
experts with more
than 49 years
combined
experience.
Give us a call and let us
handle the details!
Wendy Holcenberg
[email protected]
925.253.4630
CalBRE#00637795
Michelle Holcenberg
[email protected]
925.253.4663
CalBRE#01373412
©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal
Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304
500 DALEWOOD DRIVE, ORINDA
Luxury home in well sought
after Orinda Downs. Onetime owner, built with best
quality. Approximately 2907
square feet with two master
suites and one large guest
room, three bathrooms, and
pool on 1.02 acres. Home is
priced at $1,795,000.
Frank Woodward
Tina Jones
For further information, kindly call:
Joan Eggers of Village Associates at
925-254-0505 or cell 925-382-4141.
Joan Eggers
Broker/Partner
Cell: 925-382-4141
Office: 925-254-0505
[email protected]
Coming Soon!
925-330-2620
Member of
Top Agent Network
Selected to the Who’s Who
of Real Estate 2013
CalBRE #00711763
Giving Dreams an Address
WoodwardJonesTeam.com
Two Masters Providing
World Class Service
CalBRE#01335916/0885925 ©2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An
Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304.
Burton Valley Beauty with
views. Located minutes from
downtown Lafayette, this 3
bedroom 2 bath darling has it
all: Stunning landscaping,
updated kitchen, hardwood
floors, open floorplan with
large living/dining rooms.
Polished to perfection and just
two blocks from Lafayette Trail.
$950,000
Page: D8
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
OUR HOMES
Feng Shui and Color
... continued from page D6
White (metal element): White represents confidence and purity, and is used mostly in combination with gold and silver
to generate a calm atmosphere, but it needs other colors for
balance.
WEALTH &
PROSPERITY
"Gratitude"
REAR LEFT
Wood
Blues, purple & reds
HEALTH & FAMILY
"Strength"
MIDDLE LEFT
Wood
Blues & Greens
KNOWLEDGE &
SELF CULTIVATION
"Stillness"
FRONT LEFT
Earth
Black, blues & greens
FAME &
REPUTATION
"Integrity"
Yellow (earth element): Yellow stands for sunbeams, warmth,
motion, cheerfulness and friendliness. Yellows that are too
intense, however, can create anxiety.
If you find choosing color a daunting task, I offer color
LOVE & MARRIAGE
"Receptivity"
REAR RIGHT
REAR MIDDLE
Fire
Reds
Earth
Reds, pinks, & whites
CENTER
CREATIVITY &
CHILDREN
"Joy"
"Earth"
MIDDLE RIGHT
Yellow &
earth tones
CAREER
"Depth"
FRONT MIDDLE
Metal
White & Pastels
Michele Duffy, BTB M.F.S. is an Orinda resident who,
since 1999, enjoys creating “Space as Medicine” Feng Shui
one space at a time, as well as hiking in nature, cooking,
and spending time with her family; Canyon Ranch Feng
Shui Master, International Feng Shui Guild (IFSG) Red
Ribbon Professional. For more info, visit
www.mandalafengshui.com, email
[email protected], or call (520) 647-4887.
Metal
White, grey & black
DESIGN
INSTALLATION
IRRIGATION
DRAINAGE
STONEWORK
CONCRETE WORK
DECKS
FENCES
PATIOS
LAWNS
PONDS
CLEANUP &
HAULING
consultations to develop a color palette that will ignite your
home and life in colorful Qi and enhance your health, wealth
and happiness.
Feng shui (Wind and Water) is the practice of arranging your environment so that energy or “Qi” flows gently and smoothly through
your home or business. Feng shui is not a meditation practice, a
religion, or a New Age cult. In fact, its origins are thousands of
years old. Feng shui is based on the concept that everything in
your environment has a life force or energy. Just as Qi flows
through your body, Qi also flows through your living environment.
When the energy flow is stagnant, stuck, obstructed or moves too
quickly, unbalanced Qi may lead to ill health, domestic strife or financial concerns. Professional feng shui adjustments can help
you make sure, energetically, that everything in your environment
supports your wish for good luck, good health, harmonious relationships and prosperity.
FRONT RIGHT
“Front Door”
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Feng Shui Basics
HELPFUL PEOPLE
& TRAVEL
"Synchronicity"
Water
Black & dark tones
925-377-0977
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925-258-9233
cell: 510-847-6160
Landscape Company Inc.
Blue Jay Feldman
OWNER/OPERATOR
www.blueridgelc.com
LICENSED
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Kyle Davis
Mortgage Consultant/Owner/Partner
Lamorinda Resident Since 1995
CalBRE License #01111347/NMLS #274107
Direct: 925-314-5299 [email protected]
319 Diablo Rd., Ste 103 • Danville • CalBRE Lic. # 01327738, NMLS#280803
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Stonecastle Land and Home Financial, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Lender.
ROMANTIC GETAWAY
Holly Fitzsimmons,
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Heart to Heart Service
One of a Kind, Exclusive Castle Gate location, this 5
bedroom,3 bath, Tuscan Style Villa tucked in the trees features,
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©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a
registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity
Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage office
is owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304
DanaGreenTeam.com | 925.339.1918
Page: D10
OUR HOMES
LAMORINDA WEEKLY
www.lamorindaweekly.com
925-377-0977
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
The Real Estate Year in Review
By Conrad Bassett
HomesSold
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
Lafayette
Moraga
2014
L
2013
Orinda
2012
2011
ast year’s average sale price for residential real estate was up significantly in
Lafayette, Moraga and Orinda, making 2014 another extremely strong year
for sellers. Similar to last year, homes stayed on the market for a limited time and
prices rose as supply remained quite low throughout the year.
Per Contra Costa Association of Realtors statistics reported for closings Jan. 1
through Dec. 31, 2014, 302 single family homes closed in Lafayette versus 314 in
2013, 302 in 2012 and 245 in 2011. There were two sales where the sales prices were
not reported to the MLS. For the 300 reported closings, sales prices ranged from
$529,000 to $4 million and the average time on market was 23 days, down from 31
days in 2013. In 2012 it was 32 days and in 2011 it was 49 days. The average sale
price was $1,339,303 up from $1,248,532 in 2013, $1,042,921 in 2012 and
$1,040,014 in 2011. The average sales price was 101 percent of the final list price.
In 2013 it was 102 percent of the final list price. In 2012 it was 98.6 percent. Of the
two unreported sales prices, the combined list prices were just under $8 million so
the actual average price in Lafayette would be somewhat higher. Both of these sold
in less than three weeks on the market suggesting sale prices at or near the list price.
There were five short sales reported in the MLS for the year in Lafayette.
In Moraga there were 150 single family closings in 2014, up from the 136 single
family closings in 2013, the same as in 2012. There were 124 in 2011. Prices ranged
from $525,000 to $3,337,500. The average sale price was $1,205,576 up from
$1,147,207 in 2013. In 2012, it was $991,469 and in 2011 it was $894,768. The
number of days on market in 2104 was 21, similar to 2013 when it was 23, down
from 30 in 2012 and 40 in 2011. The average home sold for 102.5 percent of its last
list price. One hundred six sold at or above their listing price.
In Orinda the number of single-family closings was 276, continuing an upward
trend from 262 in 2013, 219 in 2012 and 164 in 2011. There was one property listed
at $4.95 million where the sale price was not reported to the MLS. The reported
sales ranged in price from $650,000 to $3.58 million with an average price of
$1,370,088. In 2013 it was $1,240,158 and in 2012 it was $1,068,303. The average
was $1,021,751 in 2011. The average market time was 28 days, versus 27 days a year
ago. It was 44 days in 2012 and down from 50 days in 2011. The sales price averaged
about $5,000 above the final list price for the reported sales. There were two short
sales and one REO (bank owned) sale in Orinda in 2014.
There were no reported sales in the MLS in Canyon last year.
On an average price per square foot basis for reported sales in 2014 Lafayette
homes sold for $546.87, versus $488.60 per square foot in 2013 and $431.45 in
2012. In 2014 Moraga homes sold for $495.15 per square foot, up from $455.90
per square foot in 2013 and $398.99 in 2012. In Orinda it was $520.77, which was
an increase from $489.85 in 2013, and $422.68 in 2012. In 2011, Lafayette homes
sold for $402.15 per square foot, Moraga homes for $381.61, and in Orinda it was
$423.17.
In the condominium/town home category, Lafayette had 21 closings, up from
16 a year ago. This increase included seven in the new development on Shreve Lane
that were reported to the MLS. Lafayette had 14 closings in 2012 and six closings
in 2011. Prices ranged in 2014 from $488,888 to $781,984. Moraga had 86, up from
70 in 2013 and 65 in 2012. Sales ranged from $245,000 to $870,000. This included
attached homes in Moraga Country Club. Orinda had 12 – a big increase from the
three in 2013. There were nine in 2012 and 12 in 2011. They sold from $285,500 to
$1,192,500.
There were also a few direct sales that did not go through the MLS including
some foreclosures that were sold at the courthouse as well as some sales between
private individuals.
As of Jan. 15, 2015, there were 39 dwellings under contract per the MLS in the
three communities combined with asking prices of $347,500 to $3.495 million.
There are only two “Potential Short Sales” that are currently pending. In each case,
the anticipated closing date may be several months into the future as sellers await
approval from their particular lender or lenders. There were eight a year ago and 17
pending short sales in January 2013. As prices have risen over the last several
months, more owners now have equity in their homes and have not had to go the
short-sale process.
A comparison of year-end inventory in the three communities combined versus
a year ago shows only 34 homes on the market. At this time a year ago there were
51. Typically the biggest inventory is in the spring and early summer, however this
current number may point to another year with a combination of qualified buyers
vying for a continued limited supply. The current asking prices range from $267,000
to $4.465 million in the three communities combined.
In Lamorinda in 2014, 81 homes sold for $2 million or more. This is a huge
increase from 2013 when 40 homes sold above $2 million. It was 28 in 2012 and
17 sold above this amount in 2011.
Interest rates have remained historically low and are still very attractive to those
with down payments of at least 20 percent. Corporations continue to expand and
contract and also to relocate families. The minimal amount of single family new construction has helped keep supply and demand within a better balance than a lot of
other neighboring communities. Lafayette, Moraga, and Orinda as well as Piedmont
and several neighborhoods in Oakland and Berkeley continue to benefit from their
proximity to San Francisco where prices are very high. The East Bay is a “bargain.”
There is a continued trend that began in 2011 in the three communities where
sellers receive multiple offers and homes sell for above the list price. This, when coupled with an extremely low supply and a willingness by sellers to be realistic in their
pricing, should continue to fuel a strong market.
Lic.: #611120
•
•
•
•
21 years buying and selling homes in lamorinda
level-headed strategy in a fast moving market
responsive service at every step
specific knowledge of neighborhoods, schools
and properties
to schedule a free consultation,
email [email protected] or
call (925) 788-6322.
calBre #00699318
& Landscaping
family owned in moraga since 1987
RISK ASSESSMENT
your friendly neighborhood
arborists darren and lew edwards
Some level of risk must be accepted to experience the benefits that the tree provides.
Fortunately, tree failure is an infrequent occurrence. Serious damage, injury, or death from
tree failure is rare. Tree failures during normal weather conditions are sometimes
predictable and preventable. Decisions on whether a tree inspection is required or what
level of assessment is appropriate should be made by an arborist with the consideration for
what is a reasonable and proportional to the specific condition and situations. Have an
arborist from Advance Tree Service take the risk away by assessing your trees health today.
So don’t wait until it’s too late, call your local Arborist at Advance Tree Service and
Landscaping to help you assess your risk today.
Advance Tree Service
Your Authority on Trees and Landscape.
925-376-6528
[email protected] www.advancetree.com
Giving Dreams an Address
follow us on twitter (advancetree) and like us on face Book
(advancetreeserviceandlandscaPinginc.)
L am or i n d a’s L e a d i ng In d e p en d ent Re a l E st ate Fi r m
ORINDA
ORINDA
ORINDA
ORINDA
ASSOCIATES
R E A L
40 Dos Osos
170 Glorietta Blvd.
New Listing
Incredible Orinda, San Pablo
Dam, Mt. Diablo views +
abundance of nature surrounds
this supersized parcel bordering
EBMUD land. Once in a
lifetime opportunity raw land
sale.
$489,000
Build dream home on .98 acre
lot with views near top rated
Glorietta schools. Ideal close in
commute location.
$525,000
ORINDA
ORINDA
500 Dalewood Drive
266 Sundown Terrace
Luxury home in well sought
after Orinda Downs. One-time
owner, built w/best quality. Apx.
2907sf w/two master suites, one
large guest rm, three baths, open
kitchen/FR & pool on 1.02
acres.
$1,795,000
Immaculate two story Orinda
Downs 4bd/3ba, 3427sf home on
.61ac lot w/open floor plan, pool,
yard & 3 car gar. Top schools
incl. Sleepy Hollow Elementary,
Orinda Int. & Miramonte HS.
$1,999,000
BERKELEY
1310 Haskell Street
MARTINEZ
Pending
360 Donegal Way
New Listing
Bring your investor/contractor/
sophisticated buyers only for this
fixer! 3bd/1.25ba w/1372sf on
.17ac. Frplc, formal dining rm &
basement area. Needs plenty of
work. Trust sale sold "as is".
$529,000
Spacious Virginia Hills 3bd/2ba
home with hardwood floors,
vaulted ceiling in living room
with fireplace, large family
room, great yard for
entertaining, Pleasant Hill
schools!
$579,000
18 Ichabod Lane
New Listing
Great Sleepy Hollow location.
This 3bd/2ba of apx. 1527sf on
.92 priv. lot is perfect canvas for
creating a masterpiece. Plenty of
level land & views on nice, quiet
street. Walk to S.H. Elementary.
$795,000
MORAGA
10 Magee Court
New Listing
Finally! Another great home
avail. in Moraga's only gated
comm., Sanders Ranch. 4bd/3ba,
3,551sf on upslope .68ac lot.
Views, outdoor kitchen, spa,
gazebo. Sep. bed/bath for
ofc/in-law.
$1,495,000
PLEASANT HILL
20 Whitfield Court
Great 2.58 acre parcel at top of
knoll with views of Mount Diablo
& ideal privacy. Truly special
setting sites for development
zoned R-10 & R-15. Wonderful
opportunity for investment.
$1,950,000
207 Camino Sobrante
Contemporary 3927sf 5bd/4ba
built in 1987 w/large level front
yd & level back yd surrounded
by trees just steps from OCC &
Lake Cascade. 2 master suites,
large family room & great room,
hardwood floors.
$1,795,000
LAFAYETTE
23 Sessions Road
Gated English Manor 12.18 acre
5bd/6ba Estate. Grand foyer,
living, family rms + "Club" rm,
deluxe kitchen, dramatic
solarium + executive office.
Gorgeous grounds w/lap
pool/lawns, views. $3,895,000
WALNUT CREEK
E S T A T E
THE VILLAGE
ASSOCIATES:
Ashley Battersby
Patricia Battersby
Joan Cleveland
Shannon Conner
Joan Eggers
Linda Ehrich
Joan Evans
Linda S. Friedman
Marianne Greene
Dexter Honens II
Anne Knight
Susan Zeh Layng
Art Lehman
Charles Levine
Erin Martin
April Matthews
Karen Murphy
Ben Olsen
Sue Olsen
Tara Rochlin
Jaime Roder
Altie Schmitt
Judy Schoenrock
Ann Sharf
Amy Rose Smith
Molly Smith
Jeff Snell
Lynda Snell
Clark ompson
Angie Evans Traxinger
Ignacio Vega
Terri Bates Walker
Ann Ward
Dan Weil
Margaret Zucker
2734 Oak Road #103
Pending
Remodeled lower unit w/no steps
in serene setting among redwds.
New kit. w/granite countertops.
New carpet & paint. Large fenced
patio. Walk to BART, downtown
W.C. & Club Sport.
$265,000
93 Moraga Way, Suite 103 • Orinda, CA 94563 • Phone: (925) 254-0505
Visit www.villageassociates.com Click on Sunday Open Homes
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