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2014 - 2015 University Catalog
Roger Williams
University
Undergraduate Admission
Phone: (401) 254-3500
Toll-free: (800) 458-7144, Ext. 3500
Fax: (401) 254-3557
E-mail: [email protected]
Main Campus
One Old Ferry Road
Bristol, RI 02809-2921
Phone: (401) 253-1040
School of Law
Ten Metacom Avenue
Bristol, RI 02809-5171
Phone: (401) 254-4555
Toll-free: (800) 633-2727
Fax: (401) 254-4516
Providence Campus
150 Washington Street
Providence, RI 02903
Phone: (401) 276-4800
Fax: (401) 276-4848
ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY AND
ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW
NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY
Roger Williams University and Roger Williams University School of Law do not discriminate against any person on the basis of
race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender expression or identity, disability, veteran status,
or any other legally protected basis in admission to, access to, employment in, and treatment in its programs and activities.
Inquiries regarding the application of this Non-Discrimination Policy may be referred to the following:
• Mirlen A. Mal, Assistant Vice President of Human Resources,
Roger Williams University, One Old Ferry Road, Bristol, RI 02809,
Telephone: 401-254-3028;
• Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights,
U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-1100,
Telephone: 1-800-421-3481; or
• Boston Office, Office for Civil Rights,
U.S. Department of Education, 8th Floor, 5 Post Office Square, Boston, MA 02109-3921,
Telephone: 617-289-0111.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator, Coordinator of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, and Coordinator
of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 is Mirlen A. Mal, Assistant Vice President of Human Resources, Roger Williams University,
One Old Ferry Road, Bristol, RI 02809, Telephone: 401-254-3028.
The Coordinator of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is Richard Hale, Chief of Staff, Roger Williams University,
One Old Ferry Road, Bristol, RI 02809, Telephone: 401-254-3079.
Roger Williams University reserves the right to modify the requirements for admission and graduation, to change the program
of study, to amend any regulation affecting the student body, to increase tuition and fees, and to dismiss from Roger Williams
University any student at any time, if it is deemed by the University to be in the best interest of the University or the student to
do so. Nothing in this Catalog may be considered as setting forth terms of a contract between a student or prospective student
and Roger Williams University.
Roger Williams University is committed to assisting all members of the RWU community in providing for their own safety and
security. As required by federal law, each year RWU prepares an annual Security Report and Fire Safety Report. The Reports
contain information regarding campus security and personal safety including topics such as crime prevention, fire safety, crime
reporting policies, disciplinary procedures and other matters of importance related to security and safety on campus. They also
contain information about crime statistics for the three previous calendar years concerning reported crimes that occurred on
campus, in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by RWU, and on public property within, or immediately
adjacent to and accessible from the RWU campus, as well as fire statistics for the three previous calendar years concerning
reported fires that occurred in RWU residence halls. You may obtain a copy of these reports by contacting the Admissions Office
or by accessing the following websites:
• The Security Report is available online at: http://rwu.edu/sites/default/files/clery_annual_security_report.pdf
• Crime Statistics are available online at:
http://rwu.edu/sites/default/files/clerystats.pdf
• The Fire Safety Report is available online at:http://www.rwu.edu/about/university-offices/ehs/fire-safety/fire-safety-report
Roger Williams University
2014-2015
University
Catalog
The Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences (FCAS)
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation (SAAHP)
The Mario J. Gabelli School of Business (GSB)
The School of Education (SED)
The School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management (SECCM)
The School of Justice Studies (SJS)
The School of Continuing Studies (SCS)
Please note: Matriculated students must complete the degree requirements specified in the Catalog under which they entered the University
unless they declare a later Catalog, in which case they are bound to all provisions specified unless otherwise stipulated therein. Responsibility
for course selection and fulfillment of all graduation requirements rests with the student.
General information and undergraduate and graduate courses of study for academic year 2014-2015.
Mission of the University
Roger Williams University is an independent university
that combines the unique strengths of small liberal arts
colleges and those of larger comprehensive universities
and where liberal and professional education are
enhanced by their integration and the recognition of
their unity.
At the foundation of the institution is a set of core values
that play a central role in guiding a respectful, diverse and
intellectually vibrant university community:
• Love of learning as an intrinsic value
• Preparation for careers and future study
• Collaboration of students and faculty in research
• Commitment to community through service and sustainability
• Appreciation of global perspectives
• Promotion of civil discourse
The Roger Williams University Education
The University strives to educate all students to become
productive citizens of the social and professional communities
in which they will live and build their careers. To participate in
a lifetime of such citizenship, it is the goal of Roger Williams
University to prepare our students to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Communicate clearly in a variety of formats
Appreciate the ability of the humanities to stir the soul
Advocate effectively through civil discourse
Acquire new information and perspectives through
traditional research techniques and the use of
information technology
Contribute productively in team projects through leadership
and cooperative efforts
Understand how different cultures, philosophies and
historical experiences affect the perspectives of others
Legacy of Roger Williams (1604 - 1684)
Roger Williams, founder of the State of Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations, was the first major figure in
colonial America to argue forcefully the need for democracy,
religious freedom, and for the understanding of America’s
native cultures. Roger Williams University has dedicated
itself to principles advocated by our namesake: education,
freedom and tolerance. Through his scholarship in language,
theology and law, Williams’ life reflected the value of
learning and teaching. The University honors the legacy of
Roger Williams by modeling a community in which diverse
people and diverse ideas are valued, in which intellectual
achievement is celebrated, and in which civic responsibility
is expected.
Academic Calendar 2014-2015
Fall Semester 2014: August 27 through December 16, 2014
Aug
19
Tue
Aug
22
Fri
Aug
23
Sat
Aug
25
Mon
Aug
26
Tue
Aug
27
Wed
Sept
1
Mon
Sept
3
Wed
Sept
10
Wed
Sept
11
Thu
Sept
15
Mon
Oct
3
Fri
Oct
13
Mon
Oct
14
Tue
Oct
17
Fri
Oct
27
Mon
Nov
3
Mon
Nov
26
Wed
Nov
30
Sun
Dec
1
Mon
Dec
9
Tue
Dec
10
Wed
Dec
10-12 Wed-Fri
Dec
11-12 Thu-Fri
Dec
13-14 Sat-Sun
Dec
15-16 Mon-Tue
Dec
16
Tue
Dec
23
Tue
International Student Orientation begins
Residence Halls open for first year students: noon - 4:00 pm
Residence Halls open for first year students: 8:00 am - 12:00 noon
Freshman Convocation: 2:30 pm
Residence Halls open for returning students: 12:00 noon
Advisement/Registration 10:00 am - noon, 1:00-3:00 pm
Fall Faculty Conference: 8:30 am
Placement Testing: 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Day and Evening classes begin
Labor Day: Day & Evening classes do NOT meet
Last day to add a course without instructor’s permission
Last day to add a course with instructor’s permission
Last day to make meal plan changes/deletions: 4:00 pm
May graduates: Degree Applications due in the Office of the Registrar
Last day to drop a course without the W (withdrawal) grade
Warning Grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Columbus Day: No Day and Evening Classes
Monday Classes meet: Day and Evening; Tuesday Classes do not meet
Last day to drop a course and receive the W (withdrawal) grade
Advisement period begins for Spring 2015
On-line registration begins for Winter Intersession and Spring 2015 semester
Residence Halls close: 9:00 am: Thanksgiving Recess begins: No classes
Residence Halls open at 12:00 noon
All classes resume
In-person registration begins for Winter Intersession and Spring 2015 semester
Last day of classes
Reading Day
Final examinations: Evening Classes
Final examinations: Day Classes
Reading Days
Final examinations: Evening Classes
Final examinations: Day Classes
Residence Halls close: 8:00 pm
Final Fall grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Winter Intersession 2015: January 2 through January 16, 2015
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
1
2
5
6
7
15
16
20
Thu
Fri
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Tue
University Housing for Winter Intersession students opens: 12:00 noon
Classes begin
Last day to add a course
Last day to drop a course without the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Last day to drop a course and receive the W (withdrawal) grade
Last day of classes for the Winter 2015 Intersession
Final examinations for all Winter Intersession classes
Final grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Spring Semester 2015: January 21 through May 13, 2015
Jan
19
Mon
Jan
20
Tue
Jan
21
Wed
Jan
28
Wed
Feb
4
Wed
Feb
6
Fri
Feb
10
Wed
Feb
16
Mon
Feb
18
Wed
Mar
4
Wed
Mar
5
Thu
Mar
6
Fri
Mar
7-15 Sat-Sun
Mar
15
Sun
Mar
16
Mon
Mar
23
Mon
Apr
3
Fri
Apr
9
Thu
May
6
Wed
4
Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday
Residence Halls open for new students
Orientation for new students begins
Placement Testing: 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
New student advisement and registration
Residence Halls open for returning students 8:00 am
In-person late registration for returning students: 10:00 am - 12:00 noon, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Day and Evening classes begin
Last day to add a course without instructor’s permission
Last day to add a course with instructor’s permission
Last day to make meal plan changes/deletions: 4:00 pm
Last day to drop a course without the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Presidents Day: No Day and Evening classes
Monday Classes meet: Day and Evening; Wednesday Classes do not meet
August and December Degree Applications due in the Registrar’s Office
Warning Grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Residence Halls close: 7:00 pm
Spring Break
Residence Halls open: 12:00 noon
All classes resume
Advisement period begins for Fall and Summer 2015
Last day to drop a course and receive the “W” (withdrawal) grade
On-line registration begins for Summer & Fall 2015
University Holiday - All Offices Closed - No Day or Evening Classes
In-person registration begins for Summer & Fall 2015
Last day of classes: No examinations
May
7
Thu
May
8
Fri
May
9-10 Sat-Sun
May
11-13 Mon-Wed
May
14
Thu
May
16
Sat
May
19
Tue
Reading Day
Final examinations: Evening classes
Final examinations: Day classes
Final examinations: Evening classes
Reading Days
Final examinations: Day classes
Final examinations: Evening Classes
Senior Day Rehearsal/Barbeque
Residence Halls close (except for graduating students): 12:00 noon
Commencement: 10:00 am
Residence Halls close for graduating students: 7:00 pm
Final grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Summer Session I 2015: May 19 through July 31, 2014 (3 week, 5 week and 10 week courses)
May
18
Mon
May
19
Tue
May
20
Wed
May
21
Thu
May
22
Fri
May
25
Mon
May
26
Tue
May
27
Wed
May
28
Thu
June
3
Wed
June
10
Wed
June
11
Thu
June
12
Fri
June
16
Tue
June
22
Mon
June
23
Tue
June
29
Mon
July
3
Fri
July
30
Thu
July
31
Fri
Aug
1
Sat
Aug
7
Fri
University Housing opens for Summer I students (3 week, 5 week and 10 week courses) at 1:00 pm
Classes begin for Summer Session I (3 week, 5 week and 10 week courses)
Last day to add a course without instructor’s permission for Summer Session I (3 week courses)
Last day to add a course with instructor’s permission for Summer Session I (3 week courses)
Last day to drop a Summer Session I (3 week courses) without the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Memorial Day: No Day and Evening classes
Last day to add a course without instructor’s permission for Summer Session I (5 and 10 week courses)
Last day to drop a Summer Session I (3 week courses) and receive the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Last day to drop a Summer Session I (5 and 10 week courses) without the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Last day to add a course with instructor’s permission for Summer Session I (5 and 10 week courses)
Last day to drop a Summer I (5 and 10 week courses) and receive the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Last day of classes for Summer I (3 week courses)
Final examination day for Summer Session I (3 week courses)
Residence Halls close for students who only took Summer Session I (3 week courses)
Summer Session I (3 week courses) final grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Summer Session I (5 week courses) last day of classes
Summer Session I (5 week courses) - Final examinations
Residence Halls close for students who only took Summer Session I (5 week courses)
Summer Session I (5 week courses) final grades due in the Registrar’s Office
July 4th Holiday Observed: No Day and Evening classes
Last day of classes for Summer Session I (10 week courses)
Summer Session I (10 week courses) - Final examinations
Residence Halls close for Summer Session I (10 week courses) students
Summer Session I (10 week courses) final grades due in the Registrar’s Office
Summer Session II 2015: July 1 through August 5, 2015
June
July
July
July
July
July
July
Aug
Aug
Aug
Aug
30
1
3
8
9
10
15
4
5
6
11
Tue
Wed
Fri
Wed
Thu
Fri
Wed
Tue
Wed
Thu
Tue
University Housing opens for Summer Session II students: 1:00 pm
Classes begin for Summer Session II
July 4th Holiday Observed: No Day and Evening classes
Last day to add a Summer Session II course without instructor’s permission
Last day to drop a Summer Session II course without the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Last day to add a Summer Session II course with instructor’s permission
Last day to drop a Summer Session II course and receive the “W” (withdrawal) grade
Last day of Classes for Summer Session II
Final examinations for Summer Session II
Residence Halls close for Summer Session II students
Final grades due in the Registrar’s Office for Summer Session II
5
Welcome to the University
A Short History
Roger Williams University’s roots originate in 1919 when the
Northeastern University School of Commerce and Finance opened
a branch at the Providence YMCA. The next year, Northeastern
University’s School of Law opened a Providence division.
Northeastern’s presence in Providence grew again in 1938, when
the University opened the Providence Technical Institute, offering
a certificate program in mechanical engineering.
After an amicable agreement to separate from
Northeastern in 1940, the YMCA Board of Directors
established the Providence Institute of Engineering and
Finance. The new Institute was only in its second year when
the outbreak of World War II forced its closure for the duration
of the war. The school reopened in 1945 as the YMCA Institute
of Engineering and Finance, later shortened to the YMCA
Institute. Over the next five years the Institute grew, serving
veterans through both the evening division and day division. In
1948 the State of Rhode Island authorized the Institute to grant
the associate degree.
In February 1956, the Institute received a state charter to
become a two-year, degree-granting institution under the name
of Roger Williams Junior College. The new junior college, the
state’s first, began offering a liberal arts program in 1958. By
1964, the College offered the associate of arts as well as the
associate of science degrees.
In the early 1960s, the institution, still based at the
Providence YMCA, grew rapidly. As a result of that growth,
the College, by that time a four-year institution, acquired 80
acres of waterfront land in Bristol and, in 1969, completed
construction of its new campus. The Providence Campus,
1,000 students strong, continued to house the business and
engineering technology programs. The new campus in Bristol
offered a full liberal arts program leading to the baccalaureate
and enrolled 1,500 students. In addition, the College offered
continuing education evening programs in both Providence
and Bristol. In 1992, the Board of Trustees voted to change the
name of the institution to Roger Williams University.
In the last decade, Roger Williams University has
achieved unprecedented successes including recognition as
one of the best colleges in the nation by Forbes, a College
of Distinction by Student Horizons, Inc. and as both a best
college in the Northeast and one of the nation’s greenest
universities by The Princeton Review. Building on its
current strengths, bolstered by a commitment to affordable
excellence and supported by its unique history, Roger
Williams University is poised to expand its tradition of
achievement and excellence as it moves forward.
A Brief Description
Roger Williams University located in Bristol, R.I. is a leading
independent, coeducational university with programs in
the liberal arts and the professions, where students become
community- and globally-minded citizens through projectbased experiential learning.
With more than 40 academic majors, an array of
co-curricular activities and study abroad opportunities on
six continents, RWU is an open community dedicated to the
success of students, commitment to a set of core values, the
pursuit of affordable excellence and providing a world-class
education above all else.
Our student body is comprised of more than 5,200
students pursuing undergraduate and continuing studies
programs, graduate and law degrees. RWU students come
from more than 40 states around the country and more than
30 countries around the world. The University is dedicated to
creating a challenging and supportive learning environment for
each of them.
Full-time undergraduates take classes on the Bristol
campus, and the majority live on campus. The student
population is 50% male and 50% female. International
students represent an increasingly significant portion of the
student body.
In 2012, Roger Williams University articulated its
commitment to Affordable Excellence – a comprehensive
campaign to increase access to higher education for all and
to tackle the issues of cost, debt and jobs. In the two years
since, this has included an ongoing tuition freeze (tuition will
remain at the 2012-13 level through the 2014-15 academic year
at minimum) as well as a tuition guarantee that continuously
enrolled full-time undergraduates will pay the same price for all
four years.
In addition to addressing cost, the University has also
committed to ensuring the value of a Roger Williams degree.
This includes project-based learning opportunities, a diverse
range of majors and minors, academic-based study abroad
experiences and community engagement, and much more.
The Community Partnerships Center, officially launched in
2011, provides students across all majors the opportunity to
work with nonprofit organizations, government agencies and
moderate-to-low income communities in Rhode Island and
Southeastern Massachusetts on real-world projects that will
deepen students’ academic experience while benefitting the
local community.
The University’s undergraduate curriculum is a fusion of
sound liberal arts studies and selective professional programs,
is delivered by the faculty of our Feinstein College of Arts and
Sciences and five professional schools. In addition, the School
of Continuing Studies enrolls primarily working adults who join
the University to expand their knowledge of their current fields
or explore new careers.
The School of Law, which opened in the fall of 1993 and
is accredited by the American Bar Association, is the only law
school in Rhode Island and offers a world-class faculty; a strong
and diverse student body; an extraordinarily close relationship
with the local legal community; and a rigorous, personalized,
marketable legal education. In 2014, the law school joined the
commitment to Affordable Excellence by unveiling a nearly 18
percent tuition reduction for 2014-15 and a three-year tuition
guarantee for incoming students – the reduced tuition makes
RWU Law the best-priced, ABA-accredited private law school
in the Northeast. In addition, the School of Law instituted an
explicit guarantee that every qualified student will be afforded a
substantial clinic experience through one of its in-house clinics
or a clinical externship.
7
Welcome to the University
The University’s main campus in Bristol has grown
considerably, especially during the last decade. State-of-the-art
facilities on campus include an Alumni & Admissions Center;
a modern 350-bed residence village; an expanded Marine
and Natural Sciences annex; and Global Heritage Hall – a
technology rich academic center that boasts heritage themed
classrooms, a world languages center, Mac labs for graphic
design communications and the Spiegel Center for Global and
International Programs. RWU’s newest athletic addition is
the Bayside turf field. Completed in the summer of 2011, this
facility has seating for 575, environmentally sensitive lighting,
a new scoreboard and press box. Throughout the design
and construction process, creating environmentally friendly
facilities has been emphasized.
The University Library provides space for a collection of
more than 300,000 volumes as well as cutting-edge technology
that allows students to take advantage of the latest information-
8
gathering tools. Other facilities include a modern Recreation
Center and a Performing Arts Center (more commonly known
as The Barn), as well as a variety of academic and residence
buildings. Our Providence Campus in downtown Providence
houses the graduate and continuing studies programs, and
provides urban experiences for students through law clinics and
cooperative education opportunities.
Roger Williams University’s location provides students easy
access to a wealth of recreational and cultural resources. The
Bristol campus is only 30 minutes by car from both Newport
and Providence. Downtown Boston is about an hour by car or
bus, and New York City is a three-and-a-half hour drive. Buses
stop in front of the main gate of the Bristol campus.
This accessibility to off-campus activities, coupled with the
array of on-campus athletic, social and other extracurricular
events, enriches the Roger Williams University student. The
total undergraduate experience prepares students for rewarding
and productive lives here at the University and beyond.
Welcome to the University
Accreditations
Roger Williams University
The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) through its Commission on Institutions of Higher Education
accredits Roger Williams University.
The Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Dean Robert M. Eisinger, Ph.D.
The American Chemical Society (ACS) accredits the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry.
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Dean Stephen White, AIA, Reg. Arch.
The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) accredits the Master of Architecture Program.
The Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
Dean Susan M. McTiernan, Ph.D.
AACSB International –
The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business accredits the Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Economics, Finance,
International Business, Management and Marketing programs.
The School of Education
Dean Kelly Donnell, Ph.D.
The Rhode Island Department of Education and the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification
(NASDTEC) approve the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Teaching Elementary Education programs, the Bachelor of Arts
Secondary Education program, and the Master of Arts in Literacy Education program.
The School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
Dean Robert A. Potter, Jr., Ph.D., P.E..
The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accredits the Engineering program.
The American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) accredits the Construction Management program.
The School of Justice Studies
Dean Stephanie P. Manzi, Ph.D.
The School of Continuing Studies
Interim Dean Jamie Scurry, Ph.D.
The American Bar Association (ABA) approves the Paralegal Studies program.
The School of Law
Dean David A. Logan, J.D.
The American Bar Association (ABA) approves the Law program.
Association of American Law Schools (AALS)
9
10
Life at Roger Williams
At Roger Williams University, undergraduate students
participate in a vibrant educational community in which
the exchange of ideas occurs both inside and outside the
classroom. Our students are engaged in service learning
initiatives, peer education programs, residence hall life,
Civil Discourse presentations, athletics competitions
(varsity, club and intramural) as well as more than 70
student clubs and organizations.
Students create new clubs each year, building leadership
and involvement opportunities for everyone who wants to
participate. Our goal is to help each Roger Williams University
student develop skills in leadership, group dynamics and
critical thinking as well as the self-confidence needed to
achieve success at the University and beyond.
The following pages provide the essentials on many of the
programs, initiatives and facilities that undergraduates will
encounter during their days on the Roger Williams campus.
Residential Living
The University offers student housing to suit a variety of
preferences and lifestyles, including co-ed, substance-free,
special interest units, single and multiple occupancy rooms,
and apartments. Several University residence halls overlook
the gentle, protected waters of Mt. Hope Bay, a popular haven
for local boaters and a relaxing diversion for students who
live here.
Our newest residential complex, the North Campus
Residence Hall opened in the fall of 2009, joining our
apartment-style complex for upperclassmen that opened in
1996. Other housing, ranging in size from eight units to 41, is
also available. While most University housing is closed during
vacation and holiday periods, students may exercise a number
of yearlong housing options. Roger Williams University
requires all first- and second-year students to reside in
University housing. Those students commuting from home and
transfer students with 48 or more credits are excluded from
this requirement.
The University’s Student Life Program is based upon
mutual respect and mutual concern. Students living in
University housing are expected to accept responsibility;
to respect University and personal property; to maintain
cleanliness; to cooperate with neighbors and to preserve a
harmonious living environment. Students should refer to the
Student Handbook and the Housing Contract for details.
Approximately 90 trained paraprofessional resident
assistants (RAs) and seven professional Coordinators of
Residence Education, assisted by the Residence Life and Housing
central staff, work to create a living-learning environment.
Our approach promotes and facilitates self-government, selfdiscipline and the acceptance of adult responsibility. In addition,
peers and professionals from Health Education work as a team to
create a humane learning community.
Student Government
The Student Government Association of Roger Williams
University involves all undergraduates. The Student Senate
carries out the executive and legislative functions of the
Association. The Student Senate consists of 18 senators. An
executive board, composed of a president, vice president,
treasurer and secretary, leads the Senate. Each class elects
officers. The mission of the Student Government Association
is to facilitate responsible and effective student participation
in University governance; to represent the interests of the
student body; and to enhance educational, social and cultural
opportunities. To achieve this, the Student Government
Association collects an activity fee from all undergraduates.
Students interested in student government should attend the
Club Fair during Welcome Week.
Undergraduate Student Conduct System
Roger Williams University is a community dedicated to
learning. We assume that students come to the University
for serious purposes. Students live and work together in
an atmosphere of mutual respect. They join faculty and
administrators to create a living/learning environment
conducive to both personal and academic growth. The
University invests students with considerable responsibility. In
return, the University assumes that students exercise maturity
and conduct that affirm human values.
Student Conduct intervention is intended to increase
students’ awareness of the effect of their actions on others in
the community. Our system strives to educate and encourage
self-responsibility. Self-control, a vital component in an
orderly society, is consistent with our educational mission.
Enforcement of the Code of Conduct is the process by
which the University community rules maintains standards
of student behavior. A detailed description of the Student
Conduct System and The Student Conduct Code are published
in the Student Handbook.
University Libraries
The University Libraries lead in the development, organization,
and sharing of resource collections, ensuring users optimal access
to information, instruction, and services responsive to their
needs through the Learning Commons. The Learning Commons
is comprised of three service areas: the University Library,
Media Services, and Instructional Design, and, with the Center
for Academic Development, Academic Advising, and Student
Advocacy provides a seamless, one-stop experience for student
academic support. The Architecture Library resides in the School
of Architecture Art and Historic Preservation, located directly
across the quad from the Main Library. Both libraries strive to
promote the values and capacities associated with intellectual
inquiry, knowledge management and lifelong learning.
The University Library system represents a rich academic
resource, offering students information, research tools and
instructional services as they pursue their education. The
book collection exceeds 250,000 volumes and is increasing
annually by more than 6,000 titles in both print and electronic
(e-book) formats. An integrated library system and an online
web-based catalog facilitate research. The collection includes
approximately 2,700 print periodical titles, including an
11
Life at Roger Williams
extensive back file in bound volumes and on microfilm, and
over 70,000 online titles with access to thousands more. More
than 140 computers are available throughout the library (both
Mac and PC) as well as printing and scanning services.
The Libraries’ website (http://library.rwu.edu) further
expands research capabilities by providing instant access to
a wide variety of specialized information databases, as well
as research and course guides prepared by the librarians. The
Libraries’ consortial partners, with whom borrowing privileges
are shared, include Brown University, the University of Rhode
Island, Rhode Island College, Community College of Rhode
Island, Bryant University, Providence College, Salve Regina
University, Johnson & Wales University, Wheaton College
and local hospital libraries. The Libraries also partner with
the Affinity Group Libraries – a national organization of
academic libraries from independent colleges and universities
– conducting annual planning and assessment activities.
Requests for materials from the other institutions can be
made electronically and are usually delivered within two days.
Reference and research consultation services are provided
during most hours; online reference service is also available
through chat, text and e-mail. The Main Library, open 112
hours a week, and the Architecture Library, open 83 hours a
week, ensure full services in both facilities for students and
faculty, and for distance learners, as well.
The Libraries supplement resources by affiliating with
statewide and national professional and academic groups and
associations. These include the American Library Association,
the Consortium of Rhode Island Academic and Research
Libraries, the Association of Rhode Island Health Sciences
Libraries, the Rhode Island Interrelated Library System, the
Consortium of College and University Media Centers, OCLC,
and the Higher Education Library Information Network
(HELIN Consortium).
Instructional Design Department
The Instructional Design Department, part of the Learning
Commons, supports through the Instructional Technology
Development Center (located in the University Library’s
Learning Commons) a curriculum design laboratory, and
provides useful resources for all supported academic software
as well as information on interesting strategies and techniques
that will enhance teaching and learning. The department’s
web pages include documentation and tutorials in a variety of
media that can serve faculty and students.
University students have access to over 20 Academic
Computing Labs, consisting of state-of-the-art workstation
computers, laser printers, laser scanners, and plotters.
These labs are located in the Mario J. Gabelli School of
Business (GSB), School of Architecture, Art and Historic
Preservation (SAAHP), School of Engineering, Computing,
and Construction Management (SEECM), Feinstein College of
Arts and Sciences (FCAS), School of Education (SED), Global
Heritage Hall (GHH), and the Marine and Natural Sciences
(MNS). For those who bring their own laptops or Tablet
computers we offer wireless in all of these spaces also.
The main public Academic Computers are located within
the Learning Commons area of the University Library. The
Learning Commons, which is accessible approximately 112
12
hours per week, contains both Mac and Pentium based personal
computers running Microsoft Windows XP, Microsoft Vista or
Mac OS X operating systems. All computers are connected to a
high-speed laser printer, color laser printer, and scanners.
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
computer labs are outfitted with Macintosh G5 workstations
(which dual boot for both Mac and Microsoft Vista users)
and HP workstations running Microsoft Vista. The network
provides students with access to software designed specifically
for Architecture majors.
The School of Engineering, Computing, and Construction
Management computer lab has Pentium Based PC workstations
running Microsoft Vista. The lab provides students with access
to software designed specifically for Engineering projects and
computer science.
The Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences as well as
the Marine and Natural Sciences building computer labs
include Pentium Based PC workstations running Microsoft
Vista. Global Heritage Hall consists of Macintosh computer
labs and classrooms running Mac OS X. These labs provide
students with access to software designed specifically for
communications, psychology, math and science majors.
The School of Education computer lab has Pentium Based
PC workstations running Microsoft Vista. The lab provides
students with access to software designed specifically for
Education majors.
In addition, a broad variety of application software is
available at all computer labs, including word processing,
specific curriculum software, web browsing, and email. All
campus computers are connected to a high speed network
for both wired and wireless use, which reaches all academic
departments and student residence halls.
Media Services Department
The Media Services Department, part of the Learning Commons,
provides multimedia and communications technology services
designed to enhance the teaching and learning experience.
Technicians provide media equipment, media facilities and
technical support for academic programs, public lectures,
symposia, and other official university events. The department
staff works in collaboration with faculty members and other
academic support departments to identify and facilitate the
use of emerging media technologies in academic programs.
Video recording, playback and viewing/listening facilities offer
immediate and individualized services for faculty and students.
An extensive and growing collection of video recordings, DVD,
and audio recordings is maintained by the University Library and
can be accessed via its online catalog.
Academic Advisement
Matriculating freshmen and transfer students are
assigned a faculty advisor by their School/College dean.
All undergraduate University faculty serve as academic
advisors. Although students are responsible for knowing and
complying with academic regulations, faculty advisors are
available on a regular basis to review academic regulations
and requirements, career planning resources, counseling and
tutorial services. Questions concerning advisement should be
addressed to the student’s dean.
Life at Roger Williams
University Advising Center
The University Advising Center at Roger Williams University
offers deciding students the opportunity of working with a
professional academic advisor to plan a coherent educational
program appropriate for your interests and goals. At Roger
Williams, we believe academic advising is a collaborative
educational process between students and their advisors to
achieve specific learning outcomes, ensure student academic
success, and outline the steps for achieving the student’s
personal, academic, and career goals.
For students who are still exploring their academic options
or for any student who finds her/himself in the wrong major,
the University Advising Center offers a decision making
program that supports each student in reaching an informed
and confident decision about a program of study. The advisors
in the UAC can help you to explore your interests, values,
passions and goals and the 42 different majors offered at Roger
Williams University.
Whatever major you are in, or if you are considering your
options, you can expect your advisor to:
• Guide you through a decision making process regarding
your choice of major
• help you understand degree completion requirements
• create a “map” for your undergraduate program
• assist with selecting appropriate courses for registration
• explain how to make good use of our academic support resources
• explain academic policies and expectations
• discuss how to integrate liberal arts learning with
professional preparation
You may meet with your academic advisor any time
you want. We encourage students who are ‘deciding’ or
‘in transition’ (that is, searching for a new major) to meet
several times each semester with a professional advisor in
the UAC. This is the most important decision you make
at Roger Williams and we are here to support you in that
decision making process. Our goal is to help you make
a confident and informed decision about your major, as
quickly as possible.
For students declared in a major, you may meet with your
assigned faculty advisor whenever you want. However, your
advisor is required to meet with you once each semester during
the advisement/pre-registration period (November and March).
See the Academic Calendar at the Registrar website for these
dates. Contact your advisor at least two weeks in advance to
schedule your appointment.
To supplement our advising program, our Peer Advisor
Leader (PAL) program offers all students the opportunity to
work with a Peer Advisor. PALS can help you:
• register via [email protected]
• understand academic requirements and regulations
• understand the academic advising system and the
academic expectations at RWU
• make a successful adjustment to the college classroom
• make good use of all available academic support services
• find other campus offices and departments you may need
to access
The University Advising Center is for every student on campus.
If you have questions regarding academic advising, please visit
our office located in the Learning Commons in the Center for
Academic Development.
The Center for Academic Success
Overview
The Center for Student Academic Success consists of five
service units, with a single point of student/faculty/staff
interface, under the direction of the Director of Retention and
Student Academic Success. Collected together are the Student
Advocacy Office, the University Advisement Center, Tutorial
Support Services, Student Accessibility Services, and a Facultyin-Residence.
Services Offered Through the Center for
Academic Success
Academic Advisement
Matriculating freshmen and transfer students are assigned a
faculty advisor by their School/College dean. All undergraduate
University faculty serve as academic advisors. Although students
are responsible for knowing and complying with academic
regulations, faculty advisors are available on a regular basis to
review academic regulations and requirements, career planning
resources, counseling and tutorial services. Questions concerning
advisement should be addressed to the student’s dean.
University Advising Center
The University Advising Center at Roger Williams University
offers deciding students the opportunity of working with a
professional academic advisor to plan a coherent educational
program appropriate for your interests and goals. At Roger
Williams, we believe academic advising is a collaborative
educational process between students and their advisors to
achieve specific learning outcomes, ensure student academic
success, and outline the steps for achieving the student’s
personal, academic, and career goals.
For students who are still exploring their academic options
or for any student who finds her/himself in the wrong major,
the University Advising Center offers a decision making
program that supports each student in reaching an informed
and confident decision about a program of study. The advisors
in the UAC can help you to explore your interests, values,
passions and goals and the 42 different majors offered at Roger
Williams University.
Whatever major you are in, or if you are considering your
options, you can expect your advisor to:
• Guide you through a decision making process regarding
your choice of major
• help you understand degree completion requirements
• create a “map” for your undergraduate program
• assist with selecting appropriate courses for registration
• explain how to make good use of our academic support resources
• explain academic policies and expectations
• discuss how to integrate liberal arts learning with
professional preparation
You may meet with your academic advisor any time
you want. We encourage students who are ‘deciding’ or ‘in
13
Life at Roger Williams
transition’ (that is, searching for a new major) to meet several
times each semester with a professional advisor in the UAC.
This is the most important decision you make at Roger
Williams and we are here to support you in that decision
making process. Our goal is to help you make a confident and
informed decision about your major, as quickly as possible.
For students declared in a major, you may meet with your
assigned faculty advisor whenever you want. However, your
advisor is required to meet with you once each semester during
the advisement/pre-registration period (November and March).
See the Academic Calendar at the Registrar website for these
dates. Contact your advisor at least two weeks in advance to
schedule your appointment.
To supplement our advising program, our Peer Advisor
Leader (PAL) program offers all students the opportunity to
work with a Peer Advisor. PALS can help you:
• register via [email protected]
• understand academic requirements and regulations
• understand the academic advising system and the
academic expectations at RWU
• make a successful adjustment to the college classroom
• make good use of all available academic support services
• find other campus offices and departments you may need
to access
The University Advising Center is for every student on campus.
If you have questions regarding academic advising, please visit
our office located in the Administration Building, first floor.
Tutorial Support Services
The Writing, Math, Science, and Foreign Language Tutoring
Centers offer curriculum-based peer tutoring on a walk-in
basis. All peer tutors must maintain a B average and participate
in training throughout the academic year. Students can go
to http://cad.rwu.edu to check the peer and faculty tutoring
schedules for all of the centers.
The Math and Writing Centers also provide faculty
tutoring. Students may make appointments with faculty
tutors by coming to the CAD and using our TutorTrac system.
Students can make appointments for one session or for regular
meetings for the duration of the semester.
All of the services provided through Tutorial Support
Services are at no charge to students.
Programmatic Tutorial Support
The Tutor in the Classroom Program places a team of tutors in
all Math sections up through Differential Equations. The tutors
attend class, take notes, and are available in the Math Center so
that students can meet with tutors who are familiar with their
assignments and class discussions. Math tutors schedule and
conduct group review sessions prior to tests.
In addition to in-center tutoring for the introductory
Biology, Chemistry, and Physics courses, Science Center
tutors conduct review sessions for Physics and Chemistry
tests. Tutors are also available several evenings per week
as part of the Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL) Program in
Chemistry. During these sessions, tutors provide curriculumbased assistance designed to reinforce classroom instruction.
The Center also offers tutoring for a number of higher-level
Science courses.
The Writing Center provides tutoring for any writingrelated assignment. During the fall semester, the Writing
14
Center sponsors Grammar with Karen, a weekly workshop
series covering a range of sentence and mechanical skills. The
Writing Center also posts a “Tutors by Majors” chart, which
lists all of the tutors, their majors, year in school, and hours in
the tutoring center. Students can then access a tutor for majorspecific writing assistance.
Student Advocacy
The Student Advocacy Office was launched in the Fall of 2003.
New and returning students making the often difficult and
challenging transition from high school to college, from home
to residence hall or from another college to RWU, can rely
on accurate answers to questions, sensitive and appropriate
referrals to other campus agencies as well as support and
guidance throughout the school year. The professional staff
work directy with students and also guide our trained corps
of student advocates, who make it their mission to help their
peers succeed.
The Student Advocacy Office can:
• Familiarize students with academic requirements and regulations.
• Explain the Academic Advising system and the Academic
Expectations at RWU.
• Provide assistance with adjustments to campus life.
• Introduce and encourage students to use available
campus resources.
• Make referrals to other campus offices and departments.
• Help students connect with clubs and activities on campus.
The office is located on the first floor of the Administration
Building. They are open Monday through Friday from 9:00
am to 5:00 pm. The Student Advocates welcome walk-ins, but
appointments are also available.
Student Advocacy Office
Telephone: (401) 254-3390
E-mail: [email protected]
Student Accessibility Services
Nearly 10% of the Roger Williams University student population
is comprised of students with documented disabilities, who
are registered with Student Accessibility Services (SAS). The
University is mandated by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 to
provide equal access to facilities, educational and co-curricular
programs, campus activities and employment opportunities to
qualified individuals with disabilities.
SAS ensures that students with disabilities have physical
and academic access to the educational experience here
at the University by providing reasonable and appropriate
accommodations. SAS believes that the most successful
students are self-advocates who identify their own needs, take
personal initiative in problem-solving and decision-making,
and effectively use all available resources to fully participate
in the educational experience. Services are available to all
students with documented disabilities that substantially limit
a major life activity, such as learning, hearing, seeing, reading,
walking, and speaking. It is the student’s responsibility to
provide current documentation (4 years old or less) from an
appropriate professional (physician, psychologist, etc.) to begin
the registration and accommodation process. Students must
request academic accommodations in person in the SAS office
each semester.
Life at Roger Williams
The students who are registered with SAS are not flagged
anywhere in the RWU community (i.e. class rosters, Registrar’s
office, etc.). Disability-related information is confidential and is
not shared outside the SAS office without a student’s permission.
After having met with a member of the SAS staff to discuss
accommodations for the current semester’s courses, eligible students
will request and then be provided an Academic Accommodation
Authorization form. It is the student’s responsibility to deliver the
authorization form to a faculty member in a timely manner and
to make arrangements for accommodations. The most commonly
requested accommodations are: extended time for test-taking,
testing in the SAS Testing Center, note-taking assistance and
requests for alternate/electronic texts. Accommodations are not
intended to guarantee success; they are intended to provide equal
access to the educational experience so that students can display
their level of learning.
To contact Student Accessibility Services and/or to
send documentation:
Student Accessibility Services
Center for Academic Development
Roger Williams University
One Old Ferry Road
Bristol, RI 02809
phone: 401-254-3841
fax: 401-254-3847
Feinstein Center for Service Learning and
Community Engagement
The Mission of the Feinstein Center is to nurture the
University’s Core Value of commitment to service in our
students while meeting the needs of the community by
fostering partnerships, encouraging and supporting service
learning initiatives, and offering resources and opportunities
for civic engagement.
Under the auspices of the philanthropy of Alan Shawn
Feinstein, Roger Williams University in 1998 created a campus
program, now known as the Feinstein Center, to design and
implement service learning and co-curricular service efforts.
Since 1998 Roger Williams University students have recorded
over 280,000 hour of service and been recognized by the
President’s Higher Education Honor Roll four times for their
efforts. The University has an expectation that all students
participate in a service experience during their time at Roger
Williams University.
Each of our students is introduced to the University’s
Core Value of commitment to service as freshmen when they
participate in Community Connections, a special day of service
involving the incoming class and 200 returning students,
faculty and staff. Through the Community Connections
program our students engage with 75 non-profit agencies in RI
and southeastern MA annually. These include:
Audubon Society of RI
RI Community Food Bank
Battleship Cove
RI Veterans Home
Boys and Girls Clubs of RI RI Oyster Gardening and
Child and Family Services
Restoration
Norman Bird Sanctuary Visiting Nurses of RI
Over the next four years, students will be exposed to
diverse opportunities in service learning, community service,
and civic engagement that are academically linked as well as
co-curricular. These may take the form of community service,
service learning, or civic engagement.
Community service is service that addresses the
symptoms of social problems. It can take the form of a onetime experience or a long term commitment to a non-profit/
community based or government agency. Many Roger Williams
University student clubs, athletic teams, and residential living
areas participate in community service throughout the year
by volunteering at agencies or by fundraising for non-profits.
RWU students have provided charitable support to St. Jude
Children’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, St. Baldrick
Foundation, Children’s Miracle Network, and several other
organizations each year.
Service learning involves service that is imbedded in an
academic course and is directly related to the course material.
Each year students are offered approximately 20 different
service learning courses. Service learning course offerings
have included:
ACCTG 405
Auditing
BUSN 430
Special Topics: Project Management
through Home Improvement Project
COMM 220
Principles and Practices of Public Relations
(formerly COMM 300)
EDU 302 and 303 Literacy in the Elementary School I & II
ENG 430
PEN Collaborative – Case Minding
MRKT 315
Qualitative Marketing Research
WTNG 400
Writing for Social Change
Civic engagement refers to activities that involve students
politically, allowing them to find their voice and advocate on
behalf of those in our society who have no voice. Programs such
as STAND, the ONE Campaign, and voter registration engage
students in the public political process, preparing them for a
life of active citizenship.
The Feinstein Center facilitates several programs
that encourage our students to become more active in the
community such as AmeriCorps Scholarships for Service,
Community Service Work Study, Bristol Reads, and 5th Grade
Day. The Center also supports, through funding and advising,
projects that students bring forward each semester in response
to the social and political issues they see on campus and
globally. All of these programs and activities are intended
to help our students develop their academic, leadership and
citizenship skills.
Educational Events and Activities
Programs and services are designed to complement
classroom learning and promote intellectual growth. Current
programs include:
Socrates Café, a co-curricular, participatory discussion where
attendees collectively formulate and evaluate answers to
philosophical questions relevant to current events. Socrates Café
meetings occur approximately once a month and are open to
all members of the RWU community and the general public.
Questions from past meetings have included ‘What is the nature
of courage?’, ‘What are the characteristics of a good leader?’, ‘How
does one distinguish one’s prejudice from one’s knowledge?’, and
‘What is the real distinction between war and terrorism?’
15
Life at Roger Williams
The Alive! Arts Series, consisting of five programs throughout
the academic year in coordination with the faculty in the
following areas: creative writing, dance, graphic design, music,
and theater. The series is open to the campus and regional
community. All performances are free.
The Civil Discourse Lecture Series, “Discussing the
Great Issues of Our Time with Reason & Respect,” annually
bringing an impressive array of nationally renowned
speakers to the University to lecture on the divisive issues
facing America today.
Small Seminar Academic Field Trips support faculty efforts
to present out-of-classroom activities designed to enhance
their courses.
New Student Orientation
So that all new students enter the University fully prepared
to meet the academic, personal and social challenges of
college, Roger Williams University requires all new students to
participate in the Orientation program. Freshman orientations
are offered throughout the summer and in January. There are
also special Orientations for international students and upperclass transfer students. The orientation program continues into
the Fall semester with specially designed programs that assist
in the new student’s acclimation to university life.
Division of Student Affairs
University Health Services
Health care is available to all full-time undergraduate students
through the University Health Service. The University Health
Service is open five days a week, and students can be seen on a
walk-in basis. A team of nurses, nurse practitioners, physicians
and a health educator provides care, which is focused both on
primary prevention and treatment during illness. Emergency
care is accessible during hours when Health Service is closed
and can be accessed through Public Safety. Health education
and health promotion are an integral part of the University
Health Service. Upon entry, all students are required to submit
report of a physical exam, proof of immunization and screening
for tuberculosis.
Center for Counseling and Student Development
The Center for Counseling and Student Development provides
short-term, solution-focused counseling for personal and
interpersonal problems. The Center also conducts workshops
in areas such as stress management, assertiveness training,
and procrastination. A PEER Program (Peer Educators with
Expertise in Referrals), coordinated by the Center, is comprised
of students trained to provide workshops and assistance. The
Center subscribes to legal and professional guidelines of the
State of Rhode Island. All full-time undergraduates are eligible
for all services free of charge. Limited services are available to
part-time undergraduates.
The Intercultural Center
Located on the north end of Maple Hall, the Roger Williams
University (RWU) Intercultural Center (IC) champions the
charge of “Welcoming every one of all nationalities, faiths and
16
personal identities.” Civil discourse and global perspectives
are two of RWU’s Core Values. With these values in mind, the
department has developed a multifaceted operation that works
to enrich the University community through student support,
programming and campus involvement around issues of
personal identity, diversity and inclusion.
Our Mission
The mission of the Intercultural Center (IC) is to develop
world citizens capable of critical thinking, compassion, and
respect for differences. It does this through student support
and outreach, programming and intercultural learning. The
IC provides the Roger Williams University community with
opportunities and an environment that encourage relationships,
leadership, and community building. It provides forums
that enhance the personal exploration and development of
its community members regarding social identity, academic
excellence, and exemplary citizenship. The IC challenges
community members to be life-long learners and active
members of our global society.
Who We Are
The IC serves as a community hub, often referred to as a “home
away from home.” Containing a kitchen, lounge, prayer corner,
meeting space, computer resources and professional staff, the
IC is utilized by members of our community as a place to host
informal socials, educational programs and cultural events, as
well as group meetings. The IC is open to all members of the
University community 7 days a week. We encourage all to take
advantage of our resources.
International Student Services
International Student Services works in concert with Student
Affairs, Enrollment Management & Retention and academic
departments on-campus to support the successful matriculation
and graduation of undergraduate and graduate international
students. From immigration assistance to interpersonal help, the
International Student Services staff works to inform international
students of their responsibilities as well as to expose them to
cultural opportunities both on- and off-campus. In addition,
programs are designed to foster a higher level of interest and
understanding of various cultures and backgrounds.
Multicultural Student Affairs
The IC reaches out to traditionally underrepresented students
to assist them in their transition to the RWU community
as well as to encourage them to take advantage of available
opportunities. The IC also supports the Multicultural Student
Union (MSU) with intercultural programming including
cultural heritage months, Lunar New Year and more. The IC
works to create an environment that responds to the needs of
students while promoting academic and personal development.
The IC also works to support campus initiatives that proactively
seek to critically examine issues of personal identity, diversity
and inclusion.
Spiritual Life Program
The Spiritual Life Program welcomes students, faculty, and
staff from all religious traditions, as well as those who are in
exploration. RWU has in residence a University Multifaith
Chaplain and affiliated chaplains from the Jewish, Catholic,
Protestant and Islamic traditions. These religious professionals
offer pastoral care to all members of the University community.
Life at Roger Williams
Moreover, the office supports specific faith group programming
on campus and encourages interfaith dialogue throughout the
University. In nearby Bristol and surrounding towns, many
houses of worship have welcomed RWU students to their
sanctuaries for religious services.
Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgendered, Queer and
Questioning (LGBTQQ) Community Support
The IC is a resource area for allies and members of the
LGBTQQ community. As a partner in RWU’s examination
of our global society, our office works to raise issues related
to the LGBTQQ community. We are a practical resource and
support for the Sexuality Advocacy for Everyone (SAFE)
student club, individual LGBTQQ students, faculty and staff
through recognition, programming and referral. In addition to
the IC, the LGBTQQ community has the support of the Gender
Resource Center, located adjacent to Maple Hall.
The Diversity Leadership Program
The Diversity Leadership Program is a unique leadership
development opportunity open to students of color, first
generation college students of any racial identity, students
who identify as LGBTQQ, international students and other
underrepresented first year students (freshman or transfer)
at RWU. The program is committed to fostering an inclusive
learning community that emphasizes the connection and
support that can positively impact underrepresented students’
success in college. The Diversity Leadership Program will focus
on strengthening the diversity community at RWU through
mentorship, relationship-building, ally development, and
extensive leadership development.
University Career Center
The Roger Williams University Career Center supports the
mission of the University and contributes to the University’s
Core Value of “Preparation for a Career or Future Study” by
providing on-going educational opportunities for students
and alumni to learn to manage their careers successfully. The
Career Center also provides opportunities for students to
meet with employers and graduate school recruiters through a
variety of activities, events and venues.
Mirroring the central reflection questions of the
University’s Core Curriculum, we challenge our clients to
answer the following questions: Who Are You? What Do
You Want to Do? How Will You Get There? We challenge
ourselves to provide our clients a variety of traditional and
innovative means through which they can discover the
answers to these questions.
Career Center Client Outcomes
By utilizing the Career Center, our alumni and students will be
able to:
• Assess their values, interests, personality and skills to
determine potential career paths
• Understand the importance of incorporating experiential
learning into their education and careers
• Evaluate the necessity of further education, and to understand
how to select and apply to educational institutions
• Successfully source, apply, interview, obtain professional
work, and to manage their careers for life
The Career Center provides students and alumni with a lifelong
connection to the University and to our local, national and
global communities. We strive to initiate, encourage, facilitate
and maintain relationships throughout the University and
working world to ensure the best possible outcome for all
parties involved.
Career Center Services Include:
• Individual career counseling
• Résumé and cover letter development
• Cooperative Education/Internship Program preparation
and coordination via Career Planning Seminars
• Job search assistance and interview preparation including
mock interviews
• On-campus interviewing program and résumé
matching program
• HAWK’S HUNT: searchable databases (full-time, parttime, summer and co-op/intern positions); and event
information and registration
• Graduate school information and application assistance
• Assessment of occupational interests, personality
preferences, skills, values and leisure pursuits and how
they all relate to possible career choices
• Classroom or group presentations
• Various workshops, panel presentations and
networking events
Some of our signature programs include:
• The Roger Williams University Career Fair
• On-Campus Recruiting, bringing employers to campus to
conduct first-round interviews for internships and jobs
• Graduate School Month, a series of panels teaching students
how to become exceptional graduate school applicants
• Liberal Arts Month- panels of graduates and other liberal
arts graduates describe where they came from and where
they are now professionally
• Career Planning Seminars
• Dining Etiquette, a four-course meal led by an
etiquette expert
• Customized networking receptions and panel presentations
bringing employers, alumni, faculty and students together
Contact us at [email protected], http://careercenter.rwu.edu;
Twitter at www.twitter.com/careercenterrwu
Facebook page: www.facebook.com/careercenterrwu
Phone: (401) 254-3224 Fax: (401) 254-3497
Student Activities
The Student Senate, working closely with the University
administration, oversees student clubs and activities; voices student
concerns; and allocates funds generated from the student activity
fee. An abundance of exciting and diverse co-curricular activities is
available at Roger Williams University. Social, cultural, and recreational
activities abound, both on and off campus. Choices include trips,
special events, films, membership in clubs, staffing publications, live
comedy performances, and concerts. Students also participate in a
variety of clubs, organizations, and departmental honor societies.
Some are career-oriented; others offer the chance to explore common
17
Life at Roger Williams
interests. The clubs sponsor seminars, lectures, dinner meetings, and
field trips, as well as numerous fundraising activities.
Many campus entertainment programs are organized,
promoted, and produced by students active in the Campus
Entertainment Network, a standing committee of the Student
Senate. The Network sponsors all entertainment programs.
The University Lecture Series brings world-class speakers to
the Bristol campus. In addition, the Alive! Arts Series annually
brings world-renowned performers, musicians, and writers to
the University’s Performing Arts Center, an intimate, 200-seat
venue housed in a restored 19th-century barn.
Student Programs and Leadership
The Student Senate, working closely with the University
administration, oversees chartered clubs and organizations, voices
student concerns and allocates funding from the Student Activities
Fee. Each year, an abundance of exciting and diverse co-curricular
activities is available at Roger Williams University. Social, cultural,
education and recreational activities are open to every student.
These activities include trips, special events, films, membership in
clubs, creating publications, performances and lectures. There is a
wide variety of student clubs and organizations, ranging from career
oriented to exploring current interests with the student body.
The Student Senate works with the 6 major organizations
to promote outside the classroom opportunities. The Campus
Entertainment Network (CEN) is the largest campus
organization and programs for the student body.
Student Organizations
Campus Entertainment Network (CEN): The Campus
Entertainment Network is responsible for creating,
programming, overseeing, and co-sponsoring social, cultural,
recreational, and educational events to benefit the Roger
Williams University community. Our efforts are concentrated
on offering a wide variety of diverse programs that will
entertain and benefit the RWU student body.
The Hawks’ Herald: is the student run newspaper which
publishes weekly through the academic year. The Herald
educates and informs the campus community of the important
and relevant information that affects the lives of students.
Inter Class Council (ICC): is comprised of elected
representatives of all 4 classes and the organization’s Executive
Board. Their mission is to support system to unify the voices
within and amongst the classes by gathering feedback to address
class concerns to the Student Senate, Administration and other
campus Organizations, resulting in effective programming that
fosters school spirit while upholding and creating new traditions
that will provide memorable college experiences.
18
student opinion on matters directly affecting students and/
or their rights and to provide leadership development for
multiculturalism on campus.
WQRI 88.3 FM: is a volunteer based, student-operated
station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) that operates daily at 650 watts. WQRI provides
diverse programming consisting of eclectic music, news,
sports, and talk radio while serving as a vehicle for promoting
new and emerging artists. WQRI strives to provide diverse
programming and events for the entertainment and education
of students and staff.
Student Clubs
Active Minds – [email protected]: mental health
awareness and information. Serves as a liaison between
students and mental health community.
Add Nothing – [email protected]: for responsible
drinkers and non-drinkers looking for alternative fun weekend
events and meeting new people!
Alternative Entertainment (AE) – [email protected]:
social club focusing on video games, card games, movies, and more
for students to socialize over.
American Chemical Society (ACS) – [email protected]: for
those interested in the science of Chemistry, ACS coordinates
trips to scientific conferences and creates an opportunity to
present research projects.
American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) –
[email protected]: RWU chapter of a national organization
focusing on bringing in professional speakers, conferences, and
an annual Beaux Arts Ball.
Ballroom Dancing Club – [email protected]: for students
interested in learning or improving their Ballroom Dancing
technique; competes in New England area from time to time.
Chorus – [email protected]: focuses on students with
interest in vocal technique and music, as well as organizing a
few concerts each year on and off campus.
Colleges Against Cancer – [email protected]: responsible
for planning Relay for Life and implementing other cancerrelated advocacy events on campus. As a University Chapter
of the American Cancer Society, we fight for a future with
more Birthdays!
College Democrats at RWU – [email protected]:
for students with a liberal political view to help campaign both
locally and nationally for the Democratic party, share ideas, and
bring political speakers and issues to light on campus.
Inter Residence Hall Association (IRHA): acts as a liaison among
Residence Life and Housing, Student Senate and the Residence
Halls. This organization strives to provide a variety of educational
and social programming for the residence life community.
College Republicans at RWU – [email protected]: for those
students with a conservative political view to help local and national
candidate campaigns as well as advance the Republican party, share
ideas, network, bring speakers to campus and attend conferences.
Multi-Cultural Student Union: provides leadership
development for cultural minorities as well as social,
educational, and recreational programming for the RWU
campus. The organization serves as the voice of multicultural
Commuters In Action – [email protected]: a place that
commuters can call home on campus; not a room, but a group
of diverse individuals who come together for the purpose of
social interaction.
Life at Roger Williams
Construction Management – [email protected]:
for those interested in Construction Management to network, bring
lectures to campus, and from time to time enter competitions.
Dance Club – [email protected]: focus on one large
dance show per semester with a variety of dances and
opportunities to choreograph for this show. Open to all
students regardless of dance history.
Dance Team – Hawkettes – [email protected]:
promotes enthusiasm and liveliness for school spirit at athletic
and charity events through dance.
Drastic Measures – [email protected]: this
fun, co-ed, a cappella group is open to all members of the
university. Members have the option to try out for the smaller,
auditioned group, Vocal Express.
FIMRC – Foundation of International Medical Relief for
Children – [email protected]: focus on providing access to
medical care to children in developing countries, with Spring
Break trip to a pediatric clinic in El Salvador, Central America.
Future Teachers of America (FTOA) – [email protected]: for those
interested in teaching as a career with opportunities to network as
well as bring lecturers to campus to discuss relative topics.
Graphic Design Club – [email protected]
edu: is focused on the art of Graphic Design as well as
visiting design firms and hosting speakers to discuss topics
pertaining to this field.
Green Technology Club – [email protected]: students will
learn from videos and other online resources how to construct
technology that runs from clean energy (ex. solar panels).
Habitat for Humanity – [email protected]: focus on
Habit for Humanity trip over Spring Break to help build houses
for underprivileged families.
Hawks For St. Jude – [email protected]:
nationwide, non-profit club that raises money and awareness
for St. Jude Research Hospital in order to help children with
catastrophic diseases.
Historic Preservation – [email protected]: focusing on field
trips to local Historic sites as well as issues concerning the field
of Historic Preservation today.
International Relations Association – [email protected]:
competing club that allows students to represent countries,
that sit on the United Nations, at competition and speak on
issues that would affect these countries.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF) – [email protected]:
for students interested in the Christian religion to perform service,
discuss their religion, and gather for holidays to celebrate.
John Jay Society (Criminal Justice Club) –
[email protected]: promotes strong ties between
local agencies and RWU. Opportunities for students to interact
with professionals in the Criminal Justice field.
Longboard Club – [email protected]
Mock Trial – [email protected]: competing club that
works on a case each year to present at competitions. The
Mock Trial advisors help students prepare for competitions
throughout New England.
Musicians’ Guild – [email protected]: for students
interested in music and musicianship, providing small concerts
and weekly events to showcase student talent on campus.
Muslim Student Association (MSA) – [email protected]: club
for students interested in or currently practicing the Islamic
faith to discuss ideas and bring their culture to the rest of the
RWU community.
My Turn – [email protected]: My Turn is an affiliate of
the non-profit orphanage, Flying Kites. We strive to help
better the lives of orphaned and poverty-stricken children
who attend school at Flying Kites. We have the power and
will to stand up and make a difference to improve the lives
of these wonderful children.
Outing Club – [email protected]: is a club focused on
outdoor and extreme sport trips that range from mountain
climbing to white water rafting to camping and more.
Peer Pals – [email protected]: works with individuals with
physical and mental disabilities. We work with L.I.F.E. (Living
In Fulfilling Environments), which provides support to these
individuals and brings them to our events. We plan parties
every month and go to sporting events on campus.
Photography Club – [email protected]: to engage
the photographic interests of anyone on campus through
photograph critiques, workshops and on-site photo shoots.
Polo Club – [email protected]: to teach and promote the
sport of polo while building a competitive team that will win a
National Championship!
Pre-Med/Pre-Vet – [email protected]: for students
interested in pursuing a career in either field after graduation.
We bring professional speakers to campus and discuss ideas
relating to these two fields.
Psychology Club – [email protected]: we hold several
fundraisers and events to raise money. We have professionals
from the Psychology Field come in and talk about their
experiences. We strive to attend the Eastern Psychological
Association Annual Meeting in Boston.
Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) –
[email protected]: for those interested in the field of public
relations, this club helps to create mutually beneficial
relationships between students and professional public relations
practitioners, while making the world a better place by
fundraising for various charities.
Scuba Club – [email protected]: gives students, especially
marine biology majors, the opportunity to learn how to scuba
dive. This club gives certified divers the opportunity to take
advanced courses and meet other divers.
Sexual Advocacy for Everyone (SAFE) – [email protected]:
dedicated to the promotion of tolerance and acceptance on the
RWU campus. Our goal is to make the campus community feel
comfortable enough to have open discussions about the personal
and political issues surrounding sexuality.
19
Life at Roger Williams
Ski and Snowboard – [email protected]: this club
takes RWU students to mountains in New England to have
them become more involved in the ski/snowboard industry.
Our mission is to promote active outdoor winter sports.
Society of Professional Journalists – [email protected]: our
Chapter is devoted to furthering the budding journalism culture
on campus by advocating for freedom of speech and press. We
maintain an open forum for discussion and debate, forge bonds,
and look into new methods for practicing the craft of journalism.
Society of Women Engineers (SWE) – [email protected]:
our purpose is to empower students to succeed and advance
in their aspirations and be recognized for their life-changing
contributions as engineering leaders.
Stage Company – [email protected]: celebrates the art of
theatre by attending plays and organizing productions of our
own to entertain and express ourselves. This club also strives to
bring together the campus and town communities by attending
local shows.
Students For A Sustainable Future – [email protected]:
Students For a Sustainable Future is a gathering of like-minded
students who have interest in preserving our environment.
Student Volunteer Association (SVA) – [email protected]: the
SVA is a group of students who are committed to service to the
community. Local events include three blood drives on campus,
the Thanksgiving turkey basket competition, various charitable
walks and other volunteer opportunities.
Sustained Dialogue – [email protected]:
creating a safe place for discussing important and sensitive
social issues on campus.
USGBC – U.S. Green Building Council – [email protected]:
non-profit committed to a prosperous and sustainable future
through cost-efficient, energy-saving, green buildings. We
spread education about “green building and sustainability” and
become involved with campus projects through educational
workshops, speakers, and presentations.
Values of Sisterhood – [email protected]: the purpose of this
club is to act as a sorority for girls with the same interests and
values of friendship.
Water Polo Club – [email protected]: water based sport where
you tread water constantly. The goal is to get the ball in the opposing
teams’ net while catching and throwing with only one hand.
The following student organizations, supported directly by
the University, offer additional fellowship, recreational, and
leadership opportunities:
Alpha Chi (Scholarship-Leadership Honorary Society)
Beta Beta Beta (National Honor Society in Biology)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Delta Sigma Pi (Business Fraternity)
Phi Alpha Theta (National Honor Society in History)
Phi Beta Delta (Society of International Scholars)
Psi Chi (National Honor Society in Psychology)
Sigma Delta Pi (National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society)
Sigma Tau Delta (International English Honor Society)
20
Student Ambassadors
Tau Sigma Delta (Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts)
Athletics
Roger Williams University adheres to the policies, philosophies,
and guidelines for National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) Division III athletic programs. The University is also
a member of the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC),
the Rhode Island Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
(RIAIAW), and the Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC).
Within the mission statement of the Athletic Intramural
and Recreation Department, the premise is that properly
administered athletic intramural and recreation programs
contribute greatly to the total educational mission of
the University. This philosophy supports the University’s
mission for the development of the total person – mentally,
emotionally, socially, and physically – in a learning
environment where students set goals for themselves and
work, with the support of the University community, to
achieve those goals.
Varsity Sports
The department offers 18 intercollegiate varsity sports and
five club activities. For men, varsity sports include baseball,
basketball, cross country, lacrosse, soccer, tennis, and wrestling.
Women’s varsity teams compete in basketball, cross-country,
soccer, softball, tennis, and lacrosse. Co-ed varsity sports
include equestrian, swimming, and sailing. The University
also sponsors men’s rugby, co-ed crew, track and field, a riding
equestrian program, and men’s volleyball as club sports.
Intramural and Recreation Programs
Teamwork and fun are at the core of our expanding
intramural and recreation programs. We offer a variety of
individual and team tournaments and leagues, including
flag football, volleyball, basketball, softball, floor hockey,
soccer and tennis. The walk-in recreation program provides
aerobics classes on campus, weight training, cybex, rowing
and exercise equipment, plus indoor tennis, soccer, basketball,
volleyball, racquetball/squash, and swimming opportunities in
the Campus Recreation Center. Special events throughout the
year offer competitive opportunities based on demonstrated
student interests.
Sports Facilities
The Campus Recreation Center, which celebrated its grand
opening in the Fall of 2003, is the focal point of the University’s
athletic, intramural and recreational programming. This airconditioned facility seats 1,200 and includes an eight-lane pool
with diving well, basketball courts, volleyball courts, stateof-the-art fitness center and aerobics/dance room, as well as
racquetball and squash courts.
The University also provides a variety of outdoor athletic
facilities, including fields for softball, baseball, soccer, rugby
and lacrosse, with a jogging path outside the Paolino Field. Six
tennis courts are available for varsity and University community
use. Four courts are lighted for evening play.
Life at Roger Williams
21
Admission to the University
Roger Williams University’s full-time, day-program
undergraduate admission requirements and procedures are
designed to select students whose abilities, preparation,
attitudes, interests, and personal qualities give them the
greatest promise of achieving academic success at the
University. Prospective students are urged to prepare
adequately for success at RWU. Candidates are expected to
complete (or have completed) a strong college preparatory
program that includes four units of English, three units of
mathematics (those interested in architecture, business, and
engineering programs should have four years), three units of
social science, and three units of natural science. A course of
study with these preparations provides a solid foundation for
college work.
When evaluating the qualifications of each applicant,
the admission committee pays particular attention to the
quality of secondary-school and, if applicable, collegelevel courses that applicants have completed (and their
achievement in those courses), their application essay,
high school grade point average, SAT I/ACT scores
(if applicable*), extracurricular activities, and the
recommendation of a school counselor or teacher. In
addition, candidates for the Architecture, Visual Arts
Studies, Dance Performance Studies, Creative Writing
and Graphic Design Communication programs must
complete additional requirements in order to be considered
for admission. The specifications of these additional
requirements are provided in the “Special Requirements
of Applicants” section of this catalog. Likewise, the
Secondary Education program will also be reviewed in
conjunction with second major choice as outlined in the
“Special Requirements of Applicants” section of the catalog.
Recognizing that experiences vary greatly, the University
makes every attempt to ensure that the selection process
is fair. Roger Williams University admits qualified students
without regard to gender, race, color, religion, sexual
orientation, disability, or ethnic origin.
Campus visits
Prospective students are strongly urged to visit Roger
Williams University for an information session and a studentguided tour.
To arrange a campus visit, contact the Office of Undergraduate
Admission at (401) 254-3500 or 1-800-458-7144, ext. 3500. Students
and families should allow two hours for their visit to the University.
The Office of Undergraduate Admission is open Monday through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., year-round; and on Saturdays
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., August through April.
Freshman Admission
Applicants may apply any time after the beginning of their
senior year of high school. To do so, applicants may submit
an Application for Full-Time Undergraduate Admission via
the Common Application (www.commonapp.org),. A nonrefundable application fee of $50 must be paid at the time
of application. Prospective freshman students may apply to
the early action, or regular decision programs. Official high
school transcripts with English translations if applicable),
SAT I/ACT scores (if applicable*), application essay and letter
of recommendation are required to complete the application.
Early Action candidates must submit all application
materials according to the following timetable:
• Early Action I - November 1 – Deadline for submitting the
application, credentials, application essay, test scores (if
applicable*), and, if applicable, supplemental materials.
• Applications fully completed for review by the deadline
date will be considered for first round decisions, which are
typically released around December 15.
• Early Action II – November 15 - Deadline for submitting
the application credentials, application essay, test scores (if
applicable*), and if applicable, supplemental materials.
• Applications fully completed for review by the deadline
date will be considered for first round decisions which are
typically released around January 15th.
Regular Admission candidates must submit all application
materials according to the following timetable:
•
February 1 – Deadline for submitting the application,
credentials, application essay, test scores (if applicable*),
and, if applicable, supplemental materials and financial
aid information.
•
Applications fully completed for review by the deadline
date will be considered for first round decisions which are
typically released around January 15th.
Candidates are encouraged to apply early in their senior
year, but must have applications completed by deadline of
February 1.
Freshman students who wish to be considered for
merit scholarships should submit their application for
undergraduate admission by February 1. All applications
received after February 1 will be reviewed on the basis of
space-availability only.
* SAT I/ACT test scores are strongly preferred if applying to the
Elementary or Secondary Education Programs.
Advanced Credit Guide
Freshman students at Roger Williams University are eligible to
receive advanced credit. Roger Williams University recognizes
the following exams to be academically and intellectually
rigorous, and awards advanced credit for:
• Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations
• College courses completed in high school
• French Baccalaureate Examinations
• GCE Advanced-Level Examinations
• International Baccalaureate Examinations
Advanced credit offers students more options and
opportunities, which can be helpful when:
• Completing a dual concentration
• Enrolled in a combined B.S./ M. Arch. program
23
Admission
•
•
Enrolled in the Honors Program
Planning for an early graduation
Credit that a student receives may be applied toward:
• Foundation requirements
• Elective credit requirements
• Prerequisites for the major
Evaluation Requirements
To receive advanced credit, students must request the
authorized examining body that administered the exam to send
an official copy of the examination results directly to the Office
of Undergraduate Admission. Only official exam reports will
be evaluated for advanced credit. Students are also required to
submit the corresponding course syllabi.
Based on the evaluation, students will be given appropriate
credit and standing in the areas in which they qualify. Credit
is granted for the equivalent course(s) at the University,
but no grade is assigned and the credit is not included in
calculating the grade point average. Notice of the advanced
credit evaluation is sent to the student and is recorded on the
student’s record.
Credit for courses in a particular major will be transferred
at the discretion of the respective College or School under
which the specific major is housed.
Transfer credit is not granted for physical education,
health, ROTC courses, non-academic activities or courses not
germane to a program at RWU.
Advanced Placement Examination
Roger Williams University participates in the Advanced Placement
Program administered by the College Board. Depending upon the
program, credit is awarded for test scores of 3, 4 and 5. Refer to
the course and credit equivalency chart located in the Academic
Regulations and Requirements section of the catalog.
To receive Advanced Placement Credit, official
examination scores must be submitted to Roger Williams
University by the College Board. Roger Williams University’s
College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) code is 3729.
24
To request credit for college coursework completed, the
students should submit official college transcripts to the
Office of Undergraduate Admission at the time of admission
for consideration.
French Baccalaureate Examinations
Roger Williams University awards advanced credit to students
who have successfully completed the French Baccalaureate
program and who have obtained a grade of 12 or higher, with a
coefficient of 4 or 5.
• A maximum of 3 credits is awarded for courses passed with
a grade of 12 or higher, and with a coefficient of 4.
• A maximum of 6 credits is awarded for courses passed with
a grade of 12 or higher, and with a coefficient of 5.
GCE Advanced Level Examinations
Roger Williams University awards advanced credit to
students who have successfully completed the GCE
Advanced Level program.
• Credit is only awarded for grades of C or better.
• Credit is awarded for a maximum of 4 A-level courses.
• A maximum of 6 credits is awarded for an A-Level
course completed.
• A maximum of 3 credits is awarded for an AS-Level
course completed.
• Students who have completed only O-Level exams are not
eligible for advanced credit.
International Baccalaureate Examination
Roger Williams University awards advanced credit to students
who have successfully completed the IB Diploma or IB
Certificate program.
• Credit is only awarded for scores of 4, 5, 6 and 7. Refer to
the course and equivalency chart located in the Academic
Regulations and Requirements section of the catalog.
• IB Math HL is awarded a maximum of 8 credits.
• Credit is not awarded for CAS or TOK.
Credit for College Coursework
IB Diploma
Matriculating students who earned college credit while
enrolled in high school may have that credit transferred
into Roger Williams University if the following conditions
are satisfied:
• The course was completed at or under the auspices of a
regionally accredited postsecondary institution.
• The content and vigor of the course is similar to a course
offered at Roger Williams University.
• The grade earned is C or better.
•
•
•
Roger Williams University operates on a semester system
and the unit of credit is the semester hour. Transferable
coursework completed under a semester credit-hour system
is awarded with an equal number of credit hours. Coursework
completed under a quarter-hour system is converted by
awarding approximately two-thirds of the total number of
quarter hours.
Merit Scholarship Consideration
A maximum of 6 credits is awarded for Higher Level completed.
A maximum of 3 credits is awarded for Standard Level completed.
IB Diploma students can earn a maximum of 31
advanced credits.
IB Certificate
•
A maximum of 3 credits is awarded for Higher Level
courses completed.
The University strives to recognize students with superior
academic achievement and leadership through the awarding
of merit scholarships. All freshman, transfer and international
students are considered for merit-based scholarships through
their admission application; no separate application is
necessary. Freshman students who wish to receive maximum
Admission
merit-based scholarship consideration should submit and
complete their admission application by the specific deadline.
After Admission to the University
In order to accept an offer of admission, thereby reserving
a place in the entering class, the Office of Undergraduate
Admission must receive a tuition deposit of $200 and, if
applicable, a housing deposit of $350, by May 1. Any student
offered admission with less than junior status who resides
outside of Rhode Island or Southeastern Massachusetts is
required to utilize University housing.
All U.S. Citizen and U.S. Permanent Resident students
who expect they may need help paying for a college education
should apply for financial aid; any entering student (U.S.
Citizen or U.S. Permanent Resident) who has been offered
admission to the University is eligible for aid consideration. To
ensure priority consideration, applicants must adhere to the
timelines for financial aid as outlined in this catalog.
All families (U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents)
are encouraged to meet with a financial aid counselor to review
the various available financing options. Those interested should
contact the Office of Student Financial Aid and Financial
Planning at (401) 254-3100.
Entrance Examination Requirement
If you are accepted to the University, SAT I/ACT scores will be
needed to assist in the proper academic advisement. The RWU
CEEB number for the SAT I is 3729. The number for the ACT
examination is 3814. Whenever possible, applicants should
indicate the appropriate number on the SAT I and/or ACT
forms at the time they take the test.
Special Requirements of Applicants
Some major programs require supplemental materials or
specific preparatory courses or their equivalents. Prospective
applicants should review program requirements outlined in the
Special Academic Programs section of this catalog.
1. Candidates for the Architecture Program: Architecture
applicants must have completed a minimum of one year of
geometry and two years of algebra in high school. Transfer
students are encouraged to have successfully completed
college-level calculus. Proficiency in trigonometry and
physics is necessary for students to take required collegelevel courses in calculus and structural systems. Students
who lack this proficiency are eligible to apply but must
complete the necessary course work before taking
calculus and structural systems. Courses taken at RWU in
preparation for calculus and structural systems may not
count toward degree requirements.
A portfolio of two- and three-dimensional work, showing
evidence of creative ability, must be submitted by all
applicants for admission. The portfolio (8-12 pieces
of art work) should consist of a simple 8-1/2” x 11”
folder containing the following: reproductions of
original design projects, and reproductions of two- or
three-dimensional work recently executed. This work
may be reduced photostatically or may be photographed.
Smaller pieces should be affixed to an 8-1/2” x 11” sheet.
The portfolio becomes a permanent part of the candidate’s
application and is not returned. Applicants are admitted
on the basis of academic excellence and potential in areas
relevant to the profession of architecture as demonstrated
by the required materials submitted for admission.
Portfolios may also be submitted on electronic media,
preferably CD.
2. Candidates for Performing Arts Programs: Candidates
applying to these programs should demonstrate
achievement and career potential in areas of dance
or theatre. Dance Performance Studies applicants are
required to audition for acceptance into the program.
Applicants accepted into the Theatre program should be
prepared to audition during the freshman year.
3. Candidates for the Secondary Education Program:
The Rhode Island Department of Education requires
a minimum SAT score of 1150 (minimum 530 critical
reading and 530 math) or a minimum ACT math score
of 20 and ACT reading score of 24. Students who do not
meet these thresholds may be considered for admission as
an undeclared education student until he/she attains the
necessary scores.
Applicants must select one of the following additional
majors within the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences:
Biology, Chemistry, English, Foreign Languages, History,
and Mathematics. We also offer Dance certification for
grades PK-12, which requires a double major in Dance
Performance Studies and Secondary Education.
4. Candidates for the Elementary Education Program:
The Rhode Island Department of Education requires
a minimum SAT score of 1150 (minimum 530 critical
reading and 530 math) or a minimum ACT math score of
20 and ACT reading score of 24. Students who do not
meet these thresholds may be considered for admission as
an undeclared education student until he/she attains the
necessary scores.
5. Candidates for the Graphic Design
Communication Program:
STANDARD PORTFOLIO
A portfolio on CD or mailed slides or samples. Portfolio
submissions must be 18-20 pieces. The portfolio
submissions should include computer-generated graphic
design work: logos, posters, publications, websites, etc.
In certain situations other media may be considered.
Interview optional.
or
TARGETED PORTFOLIO
10-15 pieces* including the following 3 assignments:
*(a series would be considered one piece and should be
identified as such on separate information sheet)
• Photographic Story – Use a familiar object (no
people) that has meaning in your daily life, create a
visual story - fictitious or realistic - with that object in
5 images (considered one entry).
25
Admission
• Collage – Create a color collage from magazine
clippings using a unique two-color scheme (should
be created by hand not on the computer). Size:
approximately 8” x 8”.
• Signage – If your home or personal room was a museum,
what would it be called and what would the sign look
like. No computer type or computer rendering.
The following are optional.
If necessary to meet the minimum requirement, or if
desired to broaden your portfolio, you may add two of
these to your submission:
• Visual Message – Create a distress/”S.O.S.” or “message
in a bottle” letter. Using ONLY found type from
magazines, newspapers, and/or other printed material
such as menus or business cards as well as photographs
of letters on a one-sided page. Size is up to you,
mention the dimensions and rationale, if any, on the
information sheet. No pictures.
• Map your day – Using various mediums (not a
computer) such as collage, pencil, ink, markers, pastels,
watercolors, etc. create a visual map of your typical day.
• Video – Create a 20-60 second video that responds to
the theme “Make/Think.”
Tips:
The pieces included in your portfolio should be the best
representations of you – how you think, how you solve
problems, how you see the world, and how you visually
compose. The work should be finished. Although there
are no requirements as to media, it is recommended that
work is diverse in nature and shows the breadth and
depth of your experience and interests. If you do not have
experience in one medium or another, then include the
work that shows your strengths. Computer work is not
necessarily the primary indicator of potential success in
graphic design.
6. Candidates for the Creative Writing Program:
Applicants must provide the following:
1) Short Story and/or (3) poems.*
2) A 600-900 word statement that discusses how one book
has influenced you as a writer.
7. Candidate for the Visual Arts Program:
A portfolio of two and/or three-dimensional work
demonstrating evidence of an applicant’s creative potential
is required for all applicants for admission to the B.A. in
Visual Art Studies program.
The intent of the portfolio requirement is to allow the
school to begin to estimate your emerging potential at
this earliest stage of your Arts education. Consistent with
the mission of our program, Roger Williams University is
interested in and celebrates the variety of expression that
applicants demonstrate. Applicants come from a variety of
backgrounds, and we appreciate this variety as a basis for
beginning the study of Visual Art at the college level.
Submission of a portfolio of 10 to 20 recent artworks
in photographic form with the admission application.
Applicants may submit color prints, or digital
26
reproductions on CDs. Digital Images need to be in
a universally readable format such as JPG, PDF or
Powerpoint documents. All work should be labeled with
the applicant’s name, the size of the original, and the
medium. Admissions portfolios will not be returned.
* Please see website for updated criteria regarding genre type of the
creative writing short story and/or poems.
* Applicants interested in the Pharmacy and Biology, Pharmacy and
Chemistry and Pharmacy and BioChemistry programs should
call the Office of Admission for additional requirements.
International Student Admission
Roger Williams University welcomes students from around
the world. Approximately international students from over
48 different countries, including Brazil, China, France,
Saudi Arabia, the Dominican Republic, Turkey and Panama.
International students are eligible to apply to the undergraduate
program of RWU if they have completed the equivalent of
a United States secondary school education (approximately
twelve years of formal education) and have the appropriate
diplomas or satisfactory results on leaving examinations.
Additional International Admission Requirements
All official secondary school and college/university scholastic
records in the language of instruction, as well as English
translations must be submitted.
Official Documents:
All documents submitted for review must be official; that is,
they must be either originals with a school seal and/or signature
OR copies certified by authorized persons. (A “certified” copy
is one that bears either an original signature of the registrar
or other designated school official and an original impression
of the institution’s seal.) Uncertified photocopies are not
acceptable. Submission of falsified documents is grounds for
denial of admission or dismissal from the University. These
documents should be sent directly to RWU from the institution
of attendance in a sealed envelope. School profiles, in English,
including information on the school’s grading/marking system
will facilitate accurate evaluation. All documents become the
property of Roger Williams University and will not be given
back to students.
English Translations:
English translations have to be official. They should include:
dates of attendance, name of each course, number of hours and
weeks each course was in session, grade or mark earned in each
course and grading scale used.
Entrance Examinations:
Roger Williams University does not require the Test of
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for a conditional
admission. International students must submit a test of
English proficiency for a direct or bridge admission. English
proficiency testing requirements may be waived for students
in IB or AP English courses. Students with a TOEFL score
between 500-550 PBT/173-213 CBT/61-78IBT or IELTS score
between 5.0-6.0 band width may be admitted through the
RWU Bridge Program. Students with a TOEFL score greater
than 550 PBT/213 CBT/79IBT or an IELTS score greater
than 6.0 band width may be admitted directly into their
undergraduate program. Students with a TOEFL below 61
AND students who do not submit a TOEFL score may be
Admission
admitted conditionally and directed to the ESL Language
Center at RWU. We strongly recommend that students who
have taken the TOEFL submit their scores for review in
order to receive the best placement for their English Level.
English Proficiency Requirement:
Students with a TOEFL equal to or greater than 550/213/79 (or
who have completed Level 112 at ELS Language Centers) can
be admitted directly into the undergraduate program. Students
with a TOEFL equal to or greater than 500/173/61 and less
than 550/213/79 (or who have completed Level 109 at ELS
Language Centers) will be required to enroll in the RWU ESL
Bridge Program. Students with a TOEFL less than 500/173/61
(or without a TOEFL score) will be conditionally admitted and
directed to the ESL Language Center on campus.
Financial Statement / Immigration Form I-20:
Applicants requiring a non-immigrant “F-1” visa who
are coming to the U.S. for full-time study or transferring
from one academic institution to another for the purpose
of study, must submit documentation that confirms that
funding is available for the annual costs of study (tuition,
fees, and living expenses). It is extremely important that all
international nonimmigrant applicants review RWU expenses
before deciding whether or not to apply. This information
is NOT needed to make an admission decision and may be
submitted after acceptance and after the student has decided
to enroll at RWU.
The Immigration I-20 form (the form needed to obtain
a student visa from a U.S. embassy or consulate) will be
issued when:
1. The student is accepted
2. Tuition ($200) and housing ($350) deposits are received
3. Proof of financial support for annual cost of study is submitted
4. I-20 Request Form (including a photocopy of your
passport) is submitted.
5. F-1 Student Transfer Verification Form (including copies of
your I-94 card and I-20s from other schools) is submitted –
Only for students attending a school in the U.S.
The International Student Financial Statement is available
on the For International Students webpage for your
convenience. Proof of financial support can be submitted
by completing this form and by submitting official bank
statements/certificates. Documentation will not be accepted
unless it is properly certified by the sponsor’s or family’s
financial institution. All documented sources of support
must be in English, in U.S. dollars, and dated within twelve
months of enrolling at RWU.
RWU International Merit Scholarships:
Roger Williams University strives to recognize students with
superior academic achievement through the awarding of
merit scholarships (transfer and freshman students). RWU
International Scholarships are awarded to the top international
applicants who are considered to be above average students in
their school. All international students will be considered for
merit-based scholarships through their admission application;
no separate application is necessary. International transfer
students who will graduate with an A.A. or A.S. degree from
a U.S. two-year institution may qualify for the Roger Williams
University Transfer Scholarships.
English as a Second Language (ESL) Program
Roger Williams University offers ESL to undergraduate students.
The RWU ESL Bridge Program offers advanced-level ESL
students appropriate ESL courses in addition to their academic
courses, along with special ESL tutoring in preparation for
taking a full-time academic course load. This program is for
non-native English speaking students interested in RWU’s
undergraduate program with a TOEFL (Test of English as a
Foreign Language) greater than 500 Paper/173 Computer/61
Internet and less than 550/213/79 or who have completed level
109 at an ELS Language Center.
ELS Language Center at RWU – Conditional Admission
The ELS Language Center on the Roger Williams University
campus offers an Intensive English Program to beginner
and intermediate level English as a Second Language (ESL)
students whose test scores do not qualify them for admission
to Roger Williams University. ELS Language Center students
attend classes on campus and may live in the residence halls.
This program is for non-native English speaking students
interested in RWU’s undergraduate program who do not
submit evidence of English proficiency or have a TOEFL (Test
of English as a Foreign Language) less than 500 Paper/173
Computer/61 Internet.
International Student Services at The Intercultural Center
International Student Services are located at the Intercultural
Center (IC), Maple Hall North. The IC and International
Student Services staff supports all aspects of international
student life at Roger Williams University including personal
and academic adjustment to living and studying in the
U.S., immigration advising, and social programming. The
International Student Services staff strive to bring international
students together and to create cultural awareness among the
University community.
Transfer Admission
Roger Williams University welcomes applications from students who
wish to transfer from regionally accredited colleges and universities.
Transfer students must submit the following materials:
• An official high school transcript (with Enlgish translations
if applicable) from the high school of graduation
• An official college transcript (from all previously
attended institutions)
• One academic letter of recommendation
• Essay of Intent
• Transfer Registrar Report (from the Common Application)
Transfer Credit Evaluation: For work completed at regionally
accredited U.S. institutions, credit evaluations are mailed
shortly after the offer of admission has been made. Transfer
students are asked to provide copies of course descriptions,
syllabi, or a college/university catalog from each college or
university attended.
RWU policy states that transfer students with credentials from
non-U.S. institutions will be reviewed for admission only after
submission of all college/university official transcripts with
English translations.
A transfer credit evaluation of credentials from non-U.S.
institutions requires an “external” World Evaluation Services
27
Admission
(www.wes.org) evaluation. Therefore, if you would like your
non-U.S. institution credentials evaluated for transfer credit,
you must submit the following:
1) Official copies of an evaluation of your credentials by a
professional international credential evaluation company. You
may choose to pursue an “external” evaluation on your
own through a professional evaluation company, such as
World Evaluation Services, http://www.wes.org.
2) Course descriptions: These may be in the form of a college/
university catalog, copies of your courses from a college/
university catalog, course syllabi, or course descriptions
signed by your professor or dean. This information should
be as detailed as possible in order to determine and award
the most appropriate transfer credit for your program at
Roger Williams University.
institution must change the student’s P grade to a C or better
on their transcript. The associate registrar, in consultation with
the deans (where necessary), evaluates courses, and a copy of
the evaluation is mailed as soon as possible after admission to
the University is granted.
Students transferring from an accredited two-year college
must complete at least 45 of their final 60 credits at Roger
Williams University. Those transferring from a four-year
institution must complete at least their final 45 credits at Roger
Williams University.
Transfer students with a completed baccalaureate
degree from an accredited liberal arts or comprehensive
college or university must complete at least 30 credits and
all major course requirements for the second degree at
Roger Williams University.
In some cases, RWU may be able to conduct an “internal”
evaluation. If you are interested in having an “internal”
evaluation completed, please submit your official transcript,
English translations, course descriptions, program outline,
and school profile (credit system, hours, etc.). If you have
been accepted to RWU, we will be happy to take a look at
your documents and determine if an “external” evaluation is
necessary before you pursue an “external” evaluation.
Additional Special Requirements for
Transfer Applicants
For all credit evaluations (U.S. and Non-U.S. Institutions):
Evaluation of courses is based on several factors:
1) Courses are compared as they relate in depth and content
to those offered at RWU.
2) Courses with grades lower than ‘C’ will not transfer.
3) If taken at a U.S. institution, courses must have been taken
at an regionally accredited school.
The University does not factor transferred credits into your
GPA at RWU. All courses are applied to your program of study
in accordance with curricular requirements.
Special notes: A maximum of 60 credits may be applied to
a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited two-year
college and a maximum of 75 credits may be applied from a
regionally accredited four-year college. The overall number
of courses needed for a degree may exceed 120 credits. A
student may transfer a maximum of three credits toward
an undergraduate certificate comprised of fifteen or fewer
credits and a maximum of six credits toward a certificate
of sixteen credits or more. We will accept all credits of
an associate degree provided that courses carry a grade of
‘C’ or higher, and meet all other conditions of evaluation,
however, the number of courses which apply to a particular
program will ultimately determine the number of credits and
courses needed to be taken at RWU. We reserve the right to
require students to repeat transferred courses if it is deemed
necessary for success in requisite courses.
Students who have attended regionally accredited
institutions can expect to receive credit for successfully
completed courses (bearing a grade of ‘C’ or higher) that
are comparable in depth and content to those offered at
Roger Williams University. Credit for courses successfully
completed with a grade of “P” will be transferred only if the
issuing institution transcript key states that the grade of P was
the equivalent of the grade of C or higher or the originating
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In addition to the credentials noted above, please see the
Special Requirements of Applicants section if you are applying
to the Architecture, Secondary Education, Theatre, Dance,
Graphic Design, or Creative Writing. Transfer students applying
for admission to Architecture should demonstrate a high-level
of math proficiency.
University Core Curriculum Requirements for
Transfer Students
Students transferring to the University must meet the
following Core Curriculum requirements: all transfer
students’ transcripts will be evaluated so that, when
applicable, course work will be applied toward the Core
Concentration requirement. All interdisciplinary Core
courses, if required, must be taken at the University. Core
Concentrations and interdisciplinary Core courses are listed
in the Core Curriculum section of this catalog.
1. Students matriculating with fewer than 24 accepted
transfer credits must complete:
• all skills courses that have not been satisfied through
transfer credits
• all five interdisciplinary Core courses*
• a Core Concentration (transfer credit may be applied)
• the Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
• the service learning requirement
* In the case of the Core interdisciplinary science requirement,
students may substitute one of the two-semester, four-credit
laboratory science sequences.
2. Students matriculating with 24-30 accepted transfer
credits must complete:
• all skills courses that have not been satisfied through
transfer credits
• four of the five interdisciplinary Core courses*
• a Core Concentration (transfer credit may be applied)
• the Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
3. Students matriculating with 31-44 accepted transfer
credits must complete:
• all skills courses that have not been satisfied through
transfer credits
Admission
4.
• three of the five interdisciplinary Core courses*
• a Core Concentration (transfer credit may be applied)
• the Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
Students matriculating with 45-59 accepted transfer
credits must complete:
• all skills courses that have not been satisfied through
transfer credits
• two of the five interdisciplinary Core courses*
• a Core Concentration (transfer credit may be applied)
• the Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
5. Students matriculating with 60 or more accepted
transfer credits or an Associate degree must complete:
• all skills courses that have not been satisfied through
transfer credits
• a Core Concentration (transfer credit may be applied)
• the Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
Mid-Year (Spring) Admission
Roger Williams University welcomes applications for mid-year
admission from freshman and transfer candidates. A full range
of courses is available during the spring semester, and the midyear entrant may also accelerate work toward a degree through
summer study.
Graduate Admission
Interested students should contact the Office Graduate
Admission at (401) 254-6200. The following schools offer
master’s programs:
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Master of Architecture
Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History
Master of Science in Historic Preservation
Master of Science in Historic Preservation / Juris Doctor Joint Degree
School of Education
Master of Arts in Literacy Education
Master of Arts in Teaching – Elementary Education
Master of Arts in Teaching – Elementary Education (Gordon
School Teacher Residency Program)
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology
Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology
School of Justice Studies
Master of Public Administration
Master of Science in Criminal Justice
Master of Science in Criminal Justice / Juris Doctor Joint Degree
Master of Science in Cybersecurity
Master of Science in Leadership
Students interested in the Juris Doctor in Law should contact
the School of Law Admission office.
Admission of Veterans
Roger Williams University is approved for benefits for the
education of veterans, active duty service personnel, disabled
veterans, and qualified dependents. Veterans who seek
admission should follow the regular admission policies but
should also contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator in the
Registrar’s Office. This should be done as early as possible to
expedite handling of applicant’s V.A. forms and counseling.
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) is offered by
the University and is available to all male and female students.
Physically qualified American citizens who complete the entire
four-year program are eligible to be commissioned in the U.S.
Army. Delayed entry into active service for the purpose of
graduate study is available.
Military science course work is designed to complement
other instruction offered at the University. Emphasis
throughout is on the development of individual leadership
ability and preparation of the student for future leadership roles
in the Army. Professional military education skills in written
communications, human behavior, history, mathematical
reasoning, and computer literacy are fulfilled through required
University Core Curriculum requirements and the military
science curriculum.
29
Financial Aid
(For U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents)
Financial Aid
Roger Williams University strives to maintain an active
and equitable program of financial assistance for students
who would otherwise not be able to attend the institution.
The criteria for financial assistance are demonstrated
need, academic performance, and a U.S. citizenship or
eligible non-citizen status. Aid is awarded without regard
to age, gender, race, sexual orientation, creed, national
origin, or disability.
There are three types of financial aid: loans, employment,
and grants/scholarships. Assistance may consist of one or any
combination of these types of financial aid. Awards can be from
the federal government, the student’s state of residence, private
agencies, and/or Roger Williams University.
How and When to Apply
In order for Roger Williams University to assess the financial
need of each candidate in a uniform manner, all freshman and
transfer applicants must submit:
Early Action and Regular Decision Applicants
• CSS Profile Form (Institutional Aid) by January 1
• Roger Williams University Verification Form
• Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) (Federal
and State Aid) by February 1
• A copy of Federal Tax Transcripts from the IRS, W2 forms
and that of their parents by April 15
Returning Students: Students must reapply for financial aid
each year to have their current eligibility determined. All
returning students must submit:
• Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) (Federal
and State Aid) by February 1
• Roger Williams University Data Form, available at the
Office of Student Financial Aid and Financial Planning by
February 1
• A copy of Federal Tax Transcripts from the IRS, W2 forms
and that of their parents by April 15
Students must satisfy the academic standards of the University
to be considered for continuing financial assistance.
The CSS Profile Form and Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) are available online at www.CollegeBoard.com
for the CSS Profile and www.fafsa.ed.gov for the FAFSA. The
CSS Profile Registration Form and the FAFSA On The Web
Worksheet are available from high school offices, transfer
offices, and Roger Williams University’s Office of Student
Financial Aid and Financial Planning.
Priority consideration for Institutional Aid is given
to applicants whose FAFSA is received by the federal
processor no later than February 1. Priority applicants are
considered for the maximum aid possible according to their
demonstrated need and Roger Williams University policies. If
30
actual income tax figures are not available, please estimate to
the best of your ability.
Satisfactory Progress Policy for Financial
Aid Recipients
Policy: Students receiving financial aid who do not meet the
minimum requirement as outlined under the Rate of Progress
may not be eligible to receive financial aid.
Appeals: Any student who believes that mitigating
circumstances prevented him or her from achieving the
minimum requirement should write an appeal letter.
This letter should explain the circumstances and state
how the student anticipates achieving the required Rate
of Progress. The letter should be addressed to Appeals
Committee, Office of Student Financial Aid and Financial
Planning, Roger Williams University, One Old Ferry Road,
Bristol, RI 02809-2921.
Federal Financial Aid Return Policy
Any student receiving federal financial aid who withdraws is
required under federal regulation, to have federal and/or state
financial aid funds pro-rated.
If a student withdraws, return of financial aid will
be applied in accordance with federal regulations and
institutional policy.
Sources of Financial Aid Available Through
the University
Educational Assistance for Veterans: The Veterans
Administration administers programs for veterans
and service people seeking assistance for education
or training. Veterans and service people who initially
entered the military on or after January 1, 1977 may
receive educational assistance under a contributory
plan. A deferred payment plan is available for veterans
enrolling full time.
Federal Direct Subsidized Loan: This program enables
students with demonstrated need to borrow federally
subsidized funds from the U.S. Department of Education.
Repayment and interest accrual does not begin until six
months after students graduate or drop to less than half-time
enrollment. To apply for this loan, complete a FAFSA form,
sign an Award Letter and complete a Master Promissory Note
and Entrance Interview.
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan: This program allows
students who do not qualify based on need for the subsidized
loan program to apply for this federal loan. Interest is accrued
while the student is in school, with repayment of interest
and principal beginning six months after graduation. The
application criteria for the above program also applies to this
loan program.
Financial Aid
Federal Pell Grants: This program also uses the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form to
determine a student’s eligibility. Pell Grant eligibility
is determined strictly by the students’ Expected Family
Contribution (EFC.)
Federal Perkins Loan: The Federal Perkins Loan Program
makes funds available to students with exceptional financial
need. Repayment of the loan at five percent (5%) interest does
not begin until at least nine months after students graduate or
drop to less than half-time enrollment.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
Program: This grant program provides assistance to students
with exceptional financial need. Consideration is first given to
Pell Grant recipients and students with the lowest Expected
Family Contribution.
Work-Study Programs: Roger Williams University participates
in these federal, state, and institutionally funded programs
which provide employment opportunities on and off campus.
Students are employed in many areas of the University and
are encouraged to work in an area that will complement their
chosen majors. These programs are normally awarded on the
basis of financial need.
Roger Williams University Grants/Scholarships: The
University also makes available funds from its own resources
to assist qualifying students. These grants/scholarships are
awarded on the basis of financial need.
State Scholarship and Grant Programs: Many states have
scholarship and grant programs for students attending
institutions of higher education. The application process,
eligibility criteria, and the number of awards differ from state
to state. Specific information can be obtained from high school
guidance offices and the Department of Education in the
applicant’s state.
Academic Scholarships, Grants, and Awards
(For U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents)
At Roger Williams University, experienced financial aid
counselors work with students and parents to identify
appropriate options and to assist with paperwork. Because
competition is fierce, students are encouraged to submit
materials well in advance of posted deadlines. The sooner the
materials are submitted, the better chance students have of
getting the scholarships. Students seeking scholarships are
encouraged to:
1. Read this material thoroughly.
2. Make notes on anything they need to have clarified.
3. Consult a financial aid counselor for information about
the availability of scholarships and application deadlines.
4. Call the Office of Student Financial Aid and Financial
Planning at (401) 254-3100 with any questions or to make
an appointment.
The following scholarships are made available to Roger
Williams University students who fit the qualifications.
Certain scholarships may not be available every year and a
student may not be awarded more than one Institutionally
Supported Scholarship.
Institutionally Supported Scholarships
Roger Williams University awards merit scholarships to
recognize academic achievement, leadership and civic
engagement. The merit scholarships are awarded through the
Office of Admission. No separate application is needed.
Transfer Scholarship’s
Phi Theta Kappa Transfer Scholarship: A $7,000.00
scholarship awarded to eligible transfer students who have
achieved a minimum GPA of 3.5, have membership in the
Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society and have an
associate’s degree from a regionally accredited community
college and enroll with full time, day student status.
Presidential Transfer Scholarship: A $6,000.00 scholarship
awarded to eligible transfer students who have achieved a
minimum GPA of 3.6 and have an associate’s degree from a
regionally accredited community college and enroll with full
time, day student status.
Dean’s Transfer Scholarship: A $4,000.00 scholarship
awarded to students who have achieved a minimum GPA of
3.0. This scholarship is awarded to students from regionally
accredited community colleges that do not hold an associate
degree and enroll with full time, day student status
Bristol Community College Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship:
A $10,000.00 scholarship awarded to eligible transfer students
who have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.5, have membership in
the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society and have an
associate’s degree from Bristol Community College and enroll
with full time, day student status.
Bristol Community College Presidential Transfer
Scholarship: A $10,000.00 scholarship awarded to
eligible transfer students who have achieved a minimum
GPA of 3.6 and have an associate’s degree from Bristol
Community College and enroll with full time, day
student status.
Bristol Community College Dean’s Transfer
Scholarship: A $8,000.00 scholarship awarded to
eligible transfer student who have achieved a minimum
GPA of 3.3 and have an associate’s degree from Bristol
Community College and enroll with full time, day
student status.
Bristol Community College Transfer Achievement
Scholarship: A $6,000.00 scholarship awarded to eligible
transfer students who have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0.
This scholarship is awarded to Bristol Community College
students that do not hold an associate degree and enroll with
full time, day student status.
Community College of Rhode Island Phi Theta Kappa
Scholarship: A $10,000.00 scholarship awarded to eligible
transfer students who have achieved a minimum GPA of
3.5, have membership in the Phi Theta Kappa International
31
Financial Aid
Honor Society and have an associate’s degree from the
Community College of Rhode Island and enroll with full
time, day student status.
Community College of Rhode Island Presidential Transfer
Scholarship: A $10,000.00 scholarship awarded to eligible
transfer students who have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.6
and have an associate’s degree from the Community College of
Rhode Island and enroll with full time, day student status.
Community College of Rhode Island Dean’s Transfer
Scholarship: A $8,000.00 scholarship awarded to eligible
transfer student who have achieved a minimum GPA of
3.3 and have an associate’s degree from the Community
College of Rhode Island and enroll with full time, day
student status.
Community College of Rhode Island Transfer Achievement
Scholarship: A $6,000.00 scholarship awarded to eligible
transfer students who have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0.
This scholarship is awarded to Community College of Rhode
Island students that do not hold an associate degree and enroll
with full time, day student status.
Transfer Achievement Scholarship: This scholarship is based
on academic merit from accredited four year institutions.
The requirements to be reviewed for the $8,000 Transfer
Achievement Scholarship are a minimum GPA of 3.3 and
enrollment at a full time accredited four year institution.
RWU International Merit Scholarship: Roger Williams
University strives to recognize students with superior academic
achievement through the awarding of merit scholarships.
The RWU International Scholarship is a limited, merit-based
scholarship for international students. RWU International
Scholarships average $4,000 and will be awarded to the top
international applicants who are considered to be aboveaverage students in their secondary school. All international
students will be considered for merit-based scholarships
through their admissions application. No separate application
is necessary.
Harold Payson Memorial Scholarship: A four-year, fulltuition scholarship awarded annually on the basis of academic
promise to a candidate who has resided in Bristol for at
least two years, has graduated from high school and plans
on attending Roger Williams University. This scholarship is
awarded in honor of Harold Payson, a Bristol native, who
served the University as a faculty member, ombudsman and
academic dean from 1968-74. (For U.S. Citizens and U.S.
Permanent Residents only.)
Roger Williams University Memorial Fire and Police
Department Grant: A four-year, full-tuition grant awarded
annually to a candidate who is a Bristol resident, has
graduated from an accredited American high school, who
is an American citizen or permanent resident without
previous college experience, who has filed a formal
application for admission and financial aid and whose
parent or grandparent serves or has served in the Bristol
police or fire departments. (For U.S. Citizens and U.S.
Permanent Residents only.)
32
Michael Andrade Memorial Scholarship: A four-year, fulltuition and fees scholarship awarded annually to a graduate
of Mount Hope High School who maintains a B average
and has a combined SAT score of at least 1000 (CR + M).
Preference will be given to undergraduate students who have
an intended major of construction management, engineering or
architecture. This scholarship is awarded in honor of Michael
Andrade, a native Bristolian and graduate of Mount Hope High
School, who was killed in Iraq while on National Guard duty.
(For U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents only.)
Mount Hope High School (RI) Scholarship: A four-year,
$10,000 scholarship awarded annually to graduates of
Mount Hope High School (RI) who maintain a B average
and have a combined SAT score of at least 1000 (CR + M).
The scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic and
extracurricular achievements. (For U.S. Citizens and U.S.
Permanent Residents only.)
Portsmouth High School (RI) Scholarship: A four-year,
full-tuition scholarship awarded annually to a graduate of
Portsmouth High School (RI) who maintains a 3.0 GPA
and has a combined SAT score of at least 1100 (CR + M).
The scholarship is awarded on the basis of academic and
extracurricular achievements. To renew the scholarship for four
years, the candidate must maintain a minimum Roger Williams
University GPA of a 3.0 and commit five hours of community
service to the Portsmouth School District (RI). (For U.S.
Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents only.)
Stamford High School (CT) Scholarship: A four-year,
$15,000 scholarship will be awarded annually to a graduate
of Stamford High School who maintains a high GPA.
The scholarship is awarded on the basis of academic and
extracurricular achievements. Those students who pursue
a study-abroad semester will be awarded a U.S. Passport
and an additional $1000 for the semester abroad. The
scholarship is renewable for four years. Students must
maintain a minimum Roger Williams University GPA of 3.0
and commit five hours of community service to the Stamford
School District. (For U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent
Residents only.)
Intercultural Leadership Award: The Intercultural Leadership
Award rewards students that have shown a combination of
academic achievement and substantial dedication to creating
an inclusive community. This meritorious award coupled
with an enhancement program, seeks to further the holistic
growth of recipients throughout their careers at Roger Williams
University. Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA while continuing
the co-curricular involvements demonstrated through the
application process.
Venture Scholarship: The University is committed to
supporting students who have achieved excellence in their
studies. Roger Williams University is pleased to be able to offer
a $10,000 scholarship to students selected as Venture Scholars.
This program, designed to recognize excellence in the study of
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics is a new
addition to the scholarship opportunities at the University.
Students who qualify are urged to contact the Office of
Admission for further information.
Financial Aid
Gift-Supported Scholarships
(For U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents)
ASM International Scholarship: Awarded annually to an
engineering student who is a resident of Rhode Island or
Southeastern Massachusetts. The Rhode Island Chapter of
ASM International sponsors this scholarship based on merit
and need.
Barnes and Noble Bookstores, Inc. Scholarship: Barnes
and Noble, one of the leading booksellers in the United States
and operator of the Roger Williams University bookstore,
contributes annually to this scholarship fund. Consideration is
given to an upper-class student showing financial need.
The Deputy Superintendent Charles J. Cullen Memorial
Scholarship Fund: Established in memory of Charles J. Cullen
‘83, a University College graduate with a B.S. in Administration
of Justice. Preference will be given to a student who is majoring
in criminal justice and is in good academic standing and who
demonstrates financial need. The student must be a current
student working for the MA Dept. of Corrections or the Bristol
County Sheriff’s Office as a correctional officer. However,
should no candidate meet the requirements, the University
may make an award to the qualified candidate who most
closely meets these criteria as long as the student is employed
by these two departments.
Thomas E. Fitzgerald, Jr. Annual Scholarship Award:
Awarded annually to students majoring in visual studies,
including sculpture and photography, who are currently
enrolled full-time as freshmen, sophomores or juniors.
Portfolio required.
Grimshaw-Gudewicz Scholarship: Established by the
Grimshaw-Gudewicz Charitable Foundation, this annual
scholarship award is available to students from Bristol County,
Massachusetts with good academic standing and demonstrated
financial need.
James Tackach English Department Award for
Distinguished Scholarship and Service to the University:
Established in 2008 through a generous gift from Professor
Mel Topf, this scholarship is awarded to a junior English
Literature major who has demonstrated outstanding
academic achievement and significant service to Roger
Williams University.
Kaestle Boos Associates, Inc. Architecture Student
Scholarship Award: Awarded annually to a full-time,
fourth-year architecture major with a minimum GPA of
3.0, who exhibits a passion for learning, an ability to think
in three dimensions and skill in intuitive and analytical
problem-solving.
Steven M. Kellert Memorial Scholarship: This fund has been
established to honor the late Steven M. Kellert’s memory and
to provide a significant scholarship award to one student each
year in the Biology Department at the University.
William T. Morris Foundation Scholarship: Established by
the William T. Morris Foundation, this scholarship is awarded
to students in good academic standing and who demonstrate
financial need.
Roger Williams University Faculty Association Scholarships:
Awarded annually to returning students, these scholarships are
based on academic achievement, financial need, service to the
University and the community.
Social and Health Services Alumni Scholarship Fund: Awarded
by the Social and Health Services Advisory Board Scholarship
Committee to a student currently enrolled in the Social and Health
Services program who has demonstrated financial need.
Student Senate Scholarship: Awarded to a full-time
student entering their sophomore, junior, or senior year, this
scholarship is based on distinguished academic performance,
contribution to the University and financial need.
University College Scholarship Fund: This annual merit
and need-based scholarship was established by the University
College Advisory Board and is given at the discretion of the
Advisory Board each spring to Continuing Studies students
in good academic standing. One of the scholarships is named
in honor of Aram Garabedian and is given to a student from
a public service profession; one is named in honor of Mary
Dionisopoulos; and one is named in honor of Lloyd E. Bliss.
Endowed Scholarships
(For U.S. Citizens and U.S. Permanent Residents)
George I. Alden Need-Based Scholarship Aid Endowment:
Established by the prestigious George I. Alden Trust of
Worcester, Massachusetts, this scholarship is awarded to Roger
Williams University students based on financial need.
Alumni Association Scholarship: This scholarship, based
on high academic standing, contributions to the University
community, and financial need, provide assistance to full-time
students entering their junior or senior years.
Andrade Family Endowed Scholarship Fund: Established
in 2012, this scholarship will be awarded to a first generation
college attendee with demonstrated financial need, in good
academic standing with demonstrated academic achievement
from Bristol County, MA, Newport or Bristol Counties, RI or
from the city of East Providence, RI. Preference will be given
to students who have an expressed interest in the Portuguese
language and/or an expressed interest in Portuguese or
Brazilian culture, history or heritage.
Paul L. Arris Memorial Scholarship: Established in December
1990 in memory of Paul L. Arris, a third-year student in the
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation, this
scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in architecture
based on merit and financial need.
L.G. Balfour Scholarship for Underserved and
Underrepresented Students: Established through a generous
grant from the L.G. Balfour Foundation, this fund provides
scholarship assistance to qualified minority students based
upon financial need and academic merit.
Brett Bergman ’11 Endowed Memorial Senior Merit
Scholarship: Established in 2012 in memory of Brett
Bergman, this scholarship will be awarded to a graduating
33
Financial Aid
senior from the Gabelli School of Business who has exhibited
an entrepreneurial spirit through participation in course
work, clinics, internships, entrepreneurial ventures or other
activities. Recipient will be an active participant in University
campus life with a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
Orlando J. Bisbano Meritorious Scholarship: Awarded to a
Bristol, RI resident currently enrolled as a second- or thirdyear student who aspires to do public service. This scholarship
is based first upon merit and then upon financial need. This
award is in memory of Orlando J. Bisbano, former Bristol, RI
town clerk.
Patrolman Gregory W. Bolden Memorial Scholarship:
This scholarship was established in 2007 in loving memory
of Patrolman Gregory Bolden by the Bolden family, with the
voluntary support of the Providence Police Department and
the active participation of the Providence School Department
and Roger Williams University. Patrolman Bolden received
both his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the RWU
School of Justice Studies. This scholarship’s objective is to
award academic scholarships to qualified under-represented
students desiring to attend Roger Williams University’s
School of Justice Studies, in preparation for a career in law
enforcement or criminal justice. Applicants must be residents
of the city or graduating students in the Providence Public
School System, with a minimum GPA of 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale).
Student applicants must be accepted for enrollment (or
already enrolled) at Roger Williams University, with a declared
major in the School of Justice Studies or a related course of
study, must maintain a 2.75 GPA, have a history of voluntary
community service, and demonstrated financial need.
The Richard L. Bready Minority Scholarship: Established
by Richard L. Bready, Chairman of the Board of Trustees
of Roger Williams University. This Scholarship provides
financial assistance to a deserving, under-represented
student(s) who consistently maintain(s) high academic
standards-2.5 GPA or higher.
Bristol Rotary Scholarship: Awarded to a Bristol, RI resident
who is currently enrolled as a sophomore, junior or senior at
the University, this endowed scholarship will be given to those
who are in financial need.
The Ben N. Carr II Endowed Scholarship: This award, given
in honor of Professor Ben Carr, a University faculty member,
was established by alumni of Roger Williams University. The
recipient of this award will be a junior (preferably no transfer
students), Mario J. Gabelli School of Business student, in good
academic standing with financial need.
The Ceasar Brito Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship
has been established in honor of Ceasar Brito, well-known
businessman, philanthropist and civic leader, who passed away
October 24, 1998. The scholarship will be available annually to
an entering freshman majoring in engineering. The recipient
must be a Bristol, RI resident at the time of acceptance to the
University, must have demonstrated academic achievement and
be in financial need. In the event there are no applicants who
have declared engineering as a major field of study, residents
majoring in other disciplines will be given consideration.
The award was established through a substantial gift to the
34
University from the Brito family and through contributions
made to the fund by friends, associates and people in the
Bristol, RI community.
Coca-Cola Scholars: This annual scholarship was established by
the Coca-Cola Foundation and is awarded to underserved students.
Sergeant Jim Cole Peace Officer Scholarship: Established to
honor the memory of Sergeant James Cole ‘91, a police officer
of the Warwick Police Department who graduated from the
University College Program with a B.S. in Administration of
Justice. The Sergeant Jim Cole Peace Officer Scholarship is
available to a Roger Williams University student enrolled in the
School of Justice Studies’ criminal justice program. Preference
is given to active police officers or civilian employees of the
Warwick Police Department, their children or Warwick Police
Cadets. If these criteria cannot be met, the scholarship will be
awarded to a Rhode Island resident (preferably from Warwick).
The Construction Management Professional Advisory Board
Scholarship: Established by the Construction Management
Professional Advisory Board to support students enrolled in
the Construction Management program. Awarded annually
to student(s) enrolled full time and majoring in Construction
Management with a sophomore, junior or senior class standing,
good academic standing, and in financial need.
The Construction Management Endowed Scholarship
Fund: Established to award one or more scholarships annually
to sophomore, junior, or senior students enrolled full-time in
the construction management program with demonstrated
financial need and in good academic standing.
Dianne B. Crowell Scholarship: Established to honor a long
time teacher of Musical Theatre at Roger Williams University.
Awarded to a student majoring in theatre who demonstrates
excellence in musical theatre performance. The award is based
upon merit, then upon financial need.
E. Diane Davis Scholarship Fund for Social and Health
Services Students in Honor of Dr. Bruce Thompson:
Established to honor Dr. Bruce Thompson, coordinator of the
Roger Williams University Social and Health Services program,
this scholarship is awarded annually to a student enrolled in the
Social and Health Services program. This award is in memory
of E. Diane Davis, a prominent educator, social worker and
Roger Williams University faculty member.
Diane Drake Memorial Scholarship: Established in memory
of Roger Williams University student Diane Drake, a criminal
justice major, this annual scholarship is awarded to a senior
who has demonstrated academic achievement and financial
need. Preference is given to students enrolled in the Criminal
Justice program.
The Robert D. Eigen Scholarship in memory of Jeanette
Altman: This scholarship, established in honor of Robert
D. Eigen ‘93 and in memory of Jeanette Altman, is awarded
to students in the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
with a humanities major, based on merit and demonstrated
financial need.
Faculty/Staff Emergency Scholarship: Established for
returning students with demonstrated financial need.
Financial Aid
Steven Ficorilli Memorial Scholarship: Awarded to a full-time
University student majoring in criminal justice. Preference is
given to an individual who plans to work with juveniles.
Mario Geremia Scholarship: Awarded annually to an upperyear University student who is in need of financial assistance
to complete his or her undergraduate education. The recipient
must be a resident of Rhode Island in good academic standing.
The Gingerella Family Scholarship: Awarded to a deserving
full-time, upper-year student. Preference is given to family
members of alumni, business majors, resident assistants, and
University staff.
Mark Gould Memorial Scholarship and Research Fund:
Each year, this fund provides Roger Williams University
students with a stipend to conduct independent research in
marine biology, biology, or chemistry during the summer.
Applicants must be full-time marine biology, biology, or
chemistry majors in good academic standing. Students must
have completed at least their freshman year. The fund was
established in memory of Mark Gould, long-time Professor
of Biology and Director of the Center for Economic and
Environmental Development at Roger Williams University.
William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarship for
Underserved Undergraduate Students: This scholarship is
awarded to underserved undergraduate students at the University.
Hemond Brothers Scholarship: Established by George ’72
and Albert Hemond ’70, this scholarship is renewable for up
to three years and is awarded to (1) students enrolled at the
University majoring in engineering technology, industrial
technology, construction management, or business; or (2)in
the absence of students meeting the aforementioned criteria,
students enrolled in other academic disciplines who are
actively serving in, or have been honorably discharged from the
U.S military. This fund was established to address the financial
need of students from middle income families.
The Lt. Charles A. Henderson III USN ’99 Outstanding
Tutor Awards: These awards, in memory of Lt. Charles A.
Henderson III USN ’99, will be presented by the Center for
Academic Development to a tutor in Math, Writing and Core
Curriculum, who best and most consistently demonstrate
superior tutoring skills and content area knowledge,
commitment to the collaborative learning process, and
dedication to helping and inspiring all learners to achieve
success in a positive, encouraging environment.
The Lt. Charles A Henderson III USN ’99 Spirit Award:
This award, in memory of Lt. Charles A. Henderson USN ’99,
will be presented annually to one graduating senior who best
and most consistently demonstrates the embodiment of a true
scholar as exemplified by striving for excellence in academics,
co-curricular involvement, character through acts, words and
deeds, and an indomitable spirit in the face of adversity.
Harriet Iacoletti Award: Awarded to a top-ranked student
entering his/her senior year, the recipient must be enrolled as a
full-time student and in visual arts.
Sgt. Michael J. Jannitto Memorial Scholarship: Awarded
to the son or daughter of a Barrington, Bristol or Warren
police officer or to a son or daughter of a Rhode Island
State Police officer. The recipient must be a full-time
student at Roger Williams University, in good standing and
demonstrates financial need. The award was established in
1988 in memory of Sgt. Michael J. Jannitto, a member of the
Bristol Police department.
Rebecca Anne Kelton Memorial Scholarship: Established in
2000 in memory of Rebecca Kelton, this scholarship is awarded
annually to a student majoring in education. Preference is given
to students in the elementary education program. A third-year
education major, Rebecca was very active at Roger Williams
as a resident assistant, member of the Intervarsity Christian
Fellowship and DJ at the University radio station.
David and Matilda Kessler Endowed Scholarship Fund:
Established by David ’54 and Matilda Kessler, this scholarship is
awarded annually to a full-time junior majoring in engineering
with emphasis in mechanical or electrical engineering.
This award is based on merit, a minimum GPA of 3.5, and
demonstrated financial need. Preference will be given to a
member of the student chapter of the Institute for Electrical
and Electronic Engineers.
John W. King, P.E. Electrical Industry Scholarship:
Awarded to an engineering major attending full time with a
junior or senior class standing based on academic merit and
demonstrated financial need. This scholarship was established
in memory of John W. King whose career in the electrical
engineering profession spanned more than a half century
and encompassed all major subspecialties, including those of
electrician, electrical contractor, teacher, electrical inspector
and electrical engineer.
Paul S. Langello Scholarship: This scholarship, established
in memory of Paul Langello, is available to a student who is
enrolled full-time in the Mario J. Gabelli School of Business and
is in good academic standing. Paul Langello was a member of
the Business faculty from 1969-92. He was founder and director
of the University’s Small Business Institute.
Darlene Lycke Memorial Scholarship: Awarded annually to a
University student, majoring in english, history, or philosophy
or enrolled in the Education program, who has demonstrated
financial need. Darlene Lycke, a humanities major, class of
1985, served as resident assistant and editor of the 1985 edition
of The Talisman, the Roger Williams University yearbook.
Jeffrey William Manuck ’04 Memorial Scholarship:This
scholarship, established in memory of Jeffrey William Manuck,
Class of 2004, is awarded annually to a full-time student(s)
majoring in Business, who is in good academic standing and
has demonstrated financial need. Preference will be given to
students with co-curricular interests, especially in sports, music
or graphics.
Alister C. McGregor Scholarship Fund: This scholarship
was established in 2009 in loving memory of Major Alister
C. McGregor ’89, a Roger Williams University alumnus who
dedicated his life to protecting children and who was killed
in the line of duty. This scholarship is intended to provide
financial assistance to children, stepchildren or spouses of
police officers who have been killed in the line of duty, and who
have been accepted and are enrolled full-time as undergraduate
35
Financial Aid
students at Roger Williams University. Residents of Rhode
Island have priority, followed by (1) New England, (2) Reno,
Nevada and (3) all other U.S. states. If no undergraduate
applicant(s) meets these criteria, graduate students will be
considered using the same prioritization. In the event that no
student applicants meet the above qualifications, scholarship
funds will be awarded – based on financial need – and made
available to students accepted and enrolled full-time who are
children of Rhode Island police officers. Should no applicants
meet these criteria, consideration will be given to students in
the School of Justice Studies with financial need and interest in
pursuing careers in law enforcement.
Ethel Barrymore Colt Miglietta Memorial Scholarship:
Established to honor Broadway performer Ethel Barrymore
by Colt Miglietta, a resident of Bristol and daughter of actress
Ethel Barrymore, this scholarship is awarded annually to a
University student who has demonstrated talent in theatre.
The Montrone Family Scholarship: This scholarship is
awarded annually to a student(s) who is from the seacoast
area of New Hampshire or Scranton, Pennsylvania, is in good
academic standing who demonstrates financial need. However,
should no candidate meet the requirements, the University
may make an award to the qualified candidate who most
closely meets these criteria.
Underrepresented Student Scholarship Fund: Awarded to a
freshman, underrepresented student, this scholarship is based
on financial need, involvement in high school, the community
and academic promise. The FAFSA must be completed by
February 1 to be considered.
Judge Thomas J. Paolino Theatre/Arts Scholarship Fund:
Established in 1987 in memory of Thomas J. Paolino, former
chairman of the Board of Trustees, this scholarship is awarded
annually to a continuing Roger Williams University student for
excellence in the visual or performing arts.
Harold Payson Endowed Scholarship: The Fund has been
established in the memory of Harold Payson to provide
financial support for full-time undergraduate students of the
University who have been residents of Bristol, RI for at least
two (2) years at time of application. Must be a high school
graduate intending full-time undergraduate enrollment at
the University; and will be based on academic promise and
financial need
Evelyn and Rita Pendergast Memorial Scholarship, given by
Dr. and Mrs. Peter Mogayzel: This scholarship is awarded to
a female student enrolled in the Marine Biology Program who
demonstrates academic merit and financial need.
The Pompei Family Engineering Endowed Scholarship:
has been established to assist financially deserving students
majoring in Engineering. The recipient must be enrolled fulltime and majoring in Engineering with a sophomore, junior
or senior class standing; in good academic standing with
demonstrated financial need.
Lincoln W. N. Pratt Memorial Scholarship: The Lincoln
W.N. Pratt Memorial Scholarship is awarded annually to a
student who has a keen interest in music. The scholarship was
36
established in memory of Lincoln W. N. Pratt, who served on
the University’s Board of Trustees since 1989.
The Pompei Family Engineering Endowed Scholarship:
Established to assist financially deserving students majoring
in Engineering. The recipient must be enrolled full-time
and majoring in Engineering with a sophomore, junior, or
senior class standing; and in good academic standing with
demonstrated financial need.
Jonathan Redler Memorial Scholarship: Established by the
Hannon family in memory of Jonathan Redler, a former student
at Roger Williams University. This Scholarship is to be awarded
to a student with financial need.
The Raj Saksena Memorial Scholarship: Established in honor
of the late Raj Saksena, FAIA, founding dean of the School of
Architecture, professor, and practicing architect, who passed
away in India on October 4, 2003. The Scholarship is awarded
to an upper-class or graduate student majoring in architecture
demonstrating leadership and special interest in sustainable
architecture or affordable housing.
The Mary J. Staab Memorial Scholarship: This scholarship
was established in memory of Mary J. Staab, trusted and
loyal member of the Roger Williams University community
and secretary for the Department of Performing Arts for
eighteen years. The Mary J. Staab Memorial Scholarship is
awarded annually to a Roger Williams University student in
good academic standing, enrolled full-time and demonstrates
financial need. Preference will be given to a student pursuing
a degree through the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences,
either majoring in or with a strong interest in the area of
theater and/or dance.
“Walk of Fame” Alumni Association Scholarship: This
scholarship was established by University constituents who
purchased bricks in the Roger Williams University “Walk
of Fame.” Awarded annually, this scholarship is based on
high academic standing, contributions to the University
community and financial need. Students entering their
sophomore, junior or senior years are eligible and preference
will be given to legacies.
The Jeremy Warnick Scholarship: Established in memory of
Jeremy Warnick, a well respected and admired student at Roger
Williams University who sadly passed away in his sophomore
year in 2005, this scholarship is awarded annually to a
student(s) who despite documented learning disabilities, has
succeeded in a university setting. Students must have required
formal academic interventions in primary or secondary
education and be actively involved with existing academic
support services for students with learning disabilities at the
University. Preference will be given to students enrolled in the
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business.
Dr. Harold Way Memorial Scholarship: Established in
memory of Dr. Harold Way, former University faculty member
from 1969-74, this scholarship, based upon academic standing
and the student’s contribution to the University, is awarded to
a junior.
Idalia Whitcomb Scholarship: Established in 1989 by the
Idalia Whitcomb Charitable Trust, the purpose is to provide
Financial Aid
scholarship assistance for students with demonstrated financial
need in all grades who are studying pre-veterinary medicine. If
no student in pre-vet qualifies, then secondary preference will
be given to a student studying fine and/or performing arts.
The Matthew Wolfe Memorial Scholarship in Creative
Writing: Established in 1989 in memory of Matthew Wolfe, a
prolific writer, this annual scholarship is awarded to a student
majoring in creative writing. Student must be a sophomore or
above, must maintain a 3.0 G.P.A. in creative writing courses
taken at Roger Williams University and be able to show
evidence of above-average writing ability in fiction or poetry. In
the event there is no eligible student with sophomore standing
or above, a second-semester freshman will be considered,
contingent upon final grades for the freshman year.
The Wright Family Scholarship: This scholarship, awarded
to a University junior or senior majoring in paralegal studies
or criminal justice, is based first upon merit, then upon
financial need.
Michele Cron-Yeaton ’80 Memorial Scholarship: This
memorial scholarship honoring an alumna, Class of 1980,
will be awarded annually to an upper-year student majoring
in business, in good academic standing and demonstrating
financial need.
Preference is given to the son or daughter of a single parent.
The scholarship was established through a gift from Tim
Yeaton ’80, husband of the late Michele Cron-Yeaton, who
earned a B.S. degree in business management at Roger
Williams University.
Zachary Shapiro Study Abroad Fund: This fund, established
in memory of Zachary Shapiro, Class of 2005, is awarded
annually to a full-time student(s) majoring in architecture
in the School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
(SAAHP), who qualifies by virtue of academic standing
to participate in the Study Abroad program. The award
recipient(s) will be selected by the Dean of the SAAHP based
on academic achievement and financial need.
37
Bursar
Fee Schedules and Payment Options
Listed below are tuition, room, and board fees for the
2014-15 academic year. The University reserves the right
to change any of the following charges at the University’s
discretion without prior notice. Additional charges may be
applicable for specific areas of study. Questions concerning
University charges should be directed to the Office of the
Bursar at (401) 254-3520.
Admission Application Fee: This $50 fee is payable at the time
when prospective candidates file the application for admission. It
is non-refundable and is not credited toward tuition.
Upon Acceptance Tuition Deposit: This $200 deposit is
payable when the candidate receives a letter of acceptance
from the University. It is refundable until May 1st for
fall semester applications and December 15th for spring
semester applications, providing a request in writing is
made to the Office of Admissions. This deposit is credited
towards tuition.
Housing Reservation Deposit: This non-refundable $350
deposit is due and payable when returning students have
submitted a complete and signed application for student
housing and the housing contract has been confirmed. New
students (freshmen and transfers) must return this deposit
with their application for student housing. The deposit may
be refunded to new students prior to May 1st. This deposit is
credited towards housing.
Residential Security Deposits: Undergraduates living in
University housing are required to pay a $350 security deposit.
The security deposit will be credited to the student’s account
after the end of the school year, following inspection of the
premises and credit verification by the Office of Student
Life. Normally, deposit credits are applied to reduce the next
semester charges. However, refunds for credits resulting in
credit balances for non-returning students may be made after
deductions have been made for any unpaid charges on the
student’s account. Requests for refunds must be submitted in
writing to the Office of the Bursar. Authorized refunds require
approximately three weeks to be processed after the written
request is received.
Multiple Sibling Tuition Discount
Statement of Purpose
Roger Williams University and Roger Williams University
School of Law recognize that the increasing cost of higher
education has a serious impact on the ability of potential
students to further their education; and this is especially true
where there is more than one college-age child within a family.
The cost often impedes a student and his or her family from
considering their top choice college/university. In an effort
to allow potential students and their families to have access
to and the choice of considering Roger Williams University
and the Roger Williams School of Law, the University has
established a tuition discount in situations in which multiple
siblings attend the University and/or the Law School.
38
Policy
If two or more siblings are enrolled simultaneously as fulltime students at Roger Williams University as undergraduate
or graduate students, and/or at the Roger Williams University
School of Law, a tuition discount will be granted to the
students. The siblings must have been accepted for admission
to one or more of the component parts of the university or the
Law School in accordance with all normal admission standards.
The tuition discount rate for siblings enrolled full-time at
the University or Law School is as follows:
Schedule:
i. One student enrolled – no discount
ii. Two students enrolled – 10% discount for each student
iii. Three students enrolled – 10% discount for the first two
students; 20% discount for the third student
iv. Four or more students enrolled – 10% discount for the
first two students; 20% discount for the third student; 25%
discount for each of the fourth and any additional students
• The discount shall be applied in order of the year of
enrollment of each sibling (i.e., first to enroll as an
undergraduate, graduate or law school student) and
the discount shall continue to be applied based upon
continuous years of enrollment at the University/School
of Law. If a sibling has a break of one academic year or
more (either within a degree program or moving from
one degree to another), his/her date of enrollment for
purposes of this policy shall re-set.
• In the event of a discount involving more than two
siblings with the same date of enrollment, the higher
discount rate shall apply to the lesser tuition cost.
Siblings are eligible for tuition discount before the age of
twenty-four (24) for the undergraduate program and before the
age of twenty-six (26) for the graduate program and the School
of Law. The tuition discount for students shall be terminated at
the end of the semester in which the student reaches the age of
24 or 26, as the case may be.
Any financial aid awarded to a sibling would reflect the
discount prior to being awarded the financial aid.
The discount shall not be applied retroactively, and cannot
be combined with any other published tuition discounts.
This policy does not apply to fees and other charges.
Proof of Eligibility for Sibling Tuitition Discount:
The Bursar shall demand adequate proof that a student is eligible
for the sibling tuition discount. In most cases the required proof
would be a copy of a birth certificate or proof of adoption.
Definitions:
Full-time Enrollment – This policy applies to siblings enrolled
full-time (12 credits minimum) in an undergraduate day
program leading to a Bachelor’s Degree; full-time (9 credits
minimum) in a graduate program leading to a Master’s Degree;
and full-time (12 credits minimum) in a School of Law program
leading to a Juris doctorate.
Sibling – One or more individuals having at least one common
parent, either biological or legally adopted.
Fees
Academic Year 2014-2015 –
Undergraduate Tuition and Fees
Tuition: (12 – 20 credits per semester)
Full-time students excluding architecture majors $29,976
Architecture majors
33,792
English as a Second Language (ESL)
14,988
Semester Fee/Yr.
1,774
* Health Insurance Fee/Yr.
1,189
* All full-time undergraduate, masters of architecture and
international students must be covered by an adequate health
insurance policy. Those who are covered under an existing health
insurance plan may waive the University sponsored student
health insurance. To waive, students are required to decline the
University’s insurance plan and provide information on their
existing plan by completing the form available at: www.rwu.edu/
go/insurance. Fall waivers are due no later than August 14, 2014.
Room:
Traditional Residence Halls
Single
$9,610
Standard Occupancy
7,840
Baypoint
Double
8,050
North Campus Residence Hall
Suite–Single
10,210
Suite–Double
8,400
Apartment-Private
12,540
Apartment-Shared
11,060
Bayside
Single (2-person)
10,550
Quad
10,550
Quint (Single)
11,670
Almeida
2 Person Apartment
10,550
4 Person Apartment
(Double-larger)
10,550
(Double-smaller)
9,700
Grad Flats (Single)
12,770
Grad Townhouse (Large)
9,080
Grad Townhouse (Small)
8,780
Board Plans: (Mandatory for traditional residence hall,
Baypoint, and North Campus suite style students. Optional
for Almeida, Bayside, North Campus apartments and
commuter students.)
Carte Blanche Platinum
$7,024
Carte Blanche Gold 6,706
200 Block 6,706
Optional Board Plans
125 Block Plus
3,430
Commuter Plan (15 meals plus $300 Hawk $)
928
Day students who have written authorization to take more than
20 credits (overload) must pay for each additional credit over
20. Each credit over 20 will be charged at $1,249 per credit.
Architecture students will be charged $1,408 per credit for
each credit over 20.
Students registering for over 14 credits in the
Continuing Studies program will be charged the standard
full-time day rate.
Other Charges and Fees:
Audit charge per course
374
Laboratory fee per course
386
*Music lab/instrument and/or voice lessons
on-campus582
**Music lab/instrument and/or voice lessons
off-campus822
Legal research fee
143
Late Payment Fee
270
Parking Permit Fee
160
Transcript
5
Aesthetics Field Trip
50
Security Deposit (University housing)
350
Architectural studio for non-architecture
students per semester
1,947
Architectural studio for Intersession – all students 1,947
Non-classroom 3-credit summer or winter courses
(including independent studies, external courses,
internships, co-ops)
1,251
* These fees are waived for declared Music majors and minors who
demonstrate a satisfactory rate of progress in the Music program.
** The RWU portion of these fees is waived for declared Music
majors and minors who demonstrate a satisfactory rate of
progress in the Music program. All students must pay the offcampus fee of $240.
Academic Semester 2014-2015 –
Graduate Tuition
Tuition:
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
(Master of Architecture)
Per credit
$1,408
Three credit course
4,224
12-20 credits
16,896
Summer per credit
947
(Master of Science in Historical Preservation)
Per credit
794
Three credit course
2,382
(Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History)
Per credit
794
Three credit course
2,382
School of Education
(Master of Arts in Teaching)
Per credit
520
Three credit course
1,560
(Master of Arts in Literacy)
Per credit
520
Three credit course
1,560
(Master of Arts in Teaching at Gordon School and RWU)
Per credit
644
Three credit course
1,932
School of Engineering
(Master of Science in Construction Management)
Per credit
1,142
Three credit course
3,426
School of Justice Studies
(Master of Science in Criminal Justice)
Per credit
794
Three credit course
2,382
39
Fees
(Master of Public Administration)
Per credit
Three credit course
(Master of Science in Leadership)
Per credit
Three credit course
(Master of Cybersecurity)
Per credit
Three credit course
(Graduate Certificate in Digital Forensics)
Per credit
Three credit course
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
(Masters of Arts in Clinical Psychology)
Per credit
Three credit course
(Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology)
Per credit
Three credit course
Other Charges and Fees
Lab Fee
Graduation Fee
520
1,560
520
1,560
794
2,382
794
2,382
794
2,382
794
2,382
386
242
Academic Semester 2014-2015 –
Continuing Studies Tuition and Fees
Tuition: 3 credit course
Day course
Evening course
Directed Seminar
Online course
Other Charges and Fees:
Audit
Semester Fee Computer Fee
Lab Fee
Graduation Fee
$3,747
966
1,185
1,452
374
30
160
386
242
Payment of Charges and Registration for Courses
One-half of the annual fees listed above are payable before
the beginning of each semester, July 1st for the fall semester
and January 2nd for the spring semester. Payment may be
made by cash or personal check. MasterCard, Visa, Discover,
or American Express payments may be made through Tuition
Management Systems. The University considers each student
responsible for payment of all charges. Accounts that are not
paid in full by the above dues dates will be assessed a $270
late fee.
Students shall not be permitted to register for the
next semester’s classes until all outstanding balances for
the current semester have been paid in full. A student is
considered registered only when all prior balances, present
tuition, and all other charges for the semester have been paid
in full. Outstanding balances are subject to a 1% per month
interest charge. Students are responsible for all collection
costs incurred by the University with respect to their
delinquent accounts.
Registration for returning students occurs during
November for the spring semester and during April for the fall
semester. As early as possible, students and families needing
40
financial information or assistance in financing a Roger
Williams University education are urged to contact the Office of
Student Financial Aid and Financial Planning.
Payment Alternatives:
Roger Williams University understands that families
look for as many options as possible to make financing
an education more convenient and affordable. Tuition
Management Systems of Warwick, R.I., offers a wide array
of valuable options. The available options are described
below. If you have any questions, please feel free to
contact: Tuition Management Systems at 1-800-343-0911
or the Offices of the Bursar, Student Financial Aid and
Financial Planning, or Admissions.
Interest-Free 10-Month Payment Option
The Interest-Free Monthly Payment Option, the most
popular plan at the University, enables families to extend
all or part of their tuition, room, board, and fees over 10
monthly payments. This eliminates the need to make lump
sum payments at the start of each semester. One of the major
benefits of this option is that there are no interest charges.
For detailed information about the payment plans, call Tuition
Management Systems (TMS) at 1-800-343-0911 or write to the
company at 171 Service Avenue, Warwick, RI 02886. Those
interested in payment plan options should determine the
cost of attending the University for the coming year, subtract
all net financial aid received, (not including Federal WorkStudy), and budget the remaining balance through Tuition
Management Systems. If your monthly payment exceeds
your ability to pay, the BorrowSmart option is available
through TMS and can help you meet the cost of attendance by
combining the Interest-Free Monthly Payment Option with a
low-interest loan.
The first payment is due on July 1st and the last payment is
due on April 1st (10 equal payments). The Plan is very flexible,
allowing participants to increase or decrease their budget
amount as needed. The annual enrollment fee for the Payment
Plan option is $55.
Federal Parent Plus Loan (For U.S. Citizens and U.S.
Permanent Residents)
Plus Loans are available to the parents of undergraduate
dependent students. The loan is credit-based and the amount
borrowed can be up to the Cost of Attendance (COA) minus
financial aid received. Plus loans may be deferred as long as the
student attends on at least a half-time basis. Interest will accrue
during the deferment period.
Posting of Loan and Outside Scholarship Proceeds
Payments from outside sources (e.g. state scholarship offices)
will be credited to student accounts as the funds are received
and recorded by the University.
Any questions regarding student account information
should be directed to the Office of the Bursar (401) 254-3520,
Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 8:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. on Friday.
Summer hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Fees
Questions regarding financial aid and the above
mentioned loan programs should be directed to the
Office of Student Financial Aid and Financial Planning,
(401) 254-3100.
Withdrawal/Refund Policy
Any applicable credit to reduce tuition charges for students
who leave the University will be granted upon presentation
of the approved and signed Withdrawal from the University
form or the Add/Drop form in accordance with the
following schedule:
Fall and spring semesters
Before 1st day of class
100% of tuition, fees, room and board
Within 1st week
100% of tuition/forfeit one week
room and board
Within 2nd week
80% of tuition, room and board
Within 3rd week
60% of tuition, room and board
Within 4th week
40% of tuition, room and board
After 4th week
no refund
Intersession and Summer sessions
Prior to 1st class meeting
100% of tuition
Prior to second class meeting 50% of tuition
Prior to third class meeting 25% of tuition
After third class meeting
no refund
Any outstanding balance on a student’s account is
deducted from the tuition credit. All fees are for a full
semester and are not refundable. Room and board charges
are for a full semester and are not refundable. Students who
are suspended or expelled from the University during the
academic year are responsible for all charges related to the
semester in which the suspension or expulsion occurred.
Any credits resulting in a refund to the students account
as authorized by the Office of the Bursar, will require
approximately three weeks for processing.
The Office of the Bursar does not provide checkcashing services for students. All banking services required
by students must be personally arranged with local banking
facilities. The University does have ATM banking machines
located in the Dining Commons, the Center for Student
Development, Global Heritage Hall and the Roger Williams
University Campus Recreation Center.
Change of Address
A student must complete a Change-of-Address form in
the Office of the Registrar whenever a change is made
in his or her local or mailing address. The form can be
downloaded at http://registrar.rwu.edu/. You can also
change your address on-line via myRWU.
41
Academic Regulations and Requirements
Academic Integrity Pledge
We, the students of Roger Williams University, commit
ourselves to academic integrity. We promise to pursue the
highest ideals of academic life, to challenge ourselves with
the most rigorous standards, to be honest in any academic
endeavor, to conduct ourselves responsibly and honorably,
and to assist one another as we live and work together in
mutual support.
Breaches of Academic Integrity
Roger Williams University exists to foster the mature pursuit of
learning, which is premised upon the exercise of mutual trust
and honest practice when representing data, findings and the
sources of ideas used in an academic exercise. The University
expects students to observe these principles of academic
integrity that ensure the excellence of their education and the
value of their diploma.
Examples of breaches of academic integrity include but are
not limited to:
Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials,
information or citation in any academic exercise. Examples
include, but are not limited to
• Copying from another student on exams or assignments;
• Altering graded exams of assignments and resubmitting
them for a new grade;
• Submitting the same paper for two classes without both
instructors’ written permission.
Fabrication: Unauthorized falsifications or invention of any
information or citation in any academic exercise. Examples
include, but are not limited to
• Using made-up citations in papers or other assignments;
• Representing collaborative work as the result of
individual effort;
• Collaborating on graded assignments beyond the extent
authorized by the instructor.
Plagiarism: Plagiarism is best defined as the incorporation of
words and ideas of another person in an attempt to claim that
person’s work as one’s own. Thus, plagiarism fails to engage in
civil, scholarly discourse. It is sometimes a form of intellectual
theft and is always a form of intellectual fraud.
In its worst form, plagiarism may consist of directly
copying large or small portions of either printed or online
works, or, as frequently happens in schools, written papers
of another student, without properly crediting the source(s)
from which they came. There are, however, more subtle forms
of plagiarism as well. Paraphrasing, which is the process of
using alternative expressions to communicate the meaning
of another author’s words, is also a form of plagiarism, unless
the sources of those ideas are acknowledged. Roger Williams
University provides resources and advice to students to help
avoid plagiarism. See How to Avoid Plagiarism
(http://library.rwu.edu/howdoI/plagiarism.php) and the Cite
Right Manual (www.rwu.edu/academics/centers/cad/writing/
resources/citeright.htm). Students are encouraged to consult
their instructor if they have questions regarding proper
documentation of sources and avoiding plagiarism. Examples of
plagiarism include, but are not limited to
• Quoting or paraphrasing someone else’s work without
correct citation;
• Copying work of another and representing it as your own;
• Purchasing a paper, essay or other work;
• Having someone else do your work for you.
Fraud: Altering, forging, or encouraging another person to alter
or forge, official records of the institution, or assisting others
in such activities. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not
limited to
• Taking an exam for someone else;
• Changing the grade on an assignment and representing it
as the original.
Willful Damage: Damaging another’s creative work or property.
Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Assisting or aiding
someone else in committing a breach of academic integrity.
Examples include, but are not limited to
• Allowing another student to copy a paper, problem
set, exam or other assignment that is meant to be
completed individually;
• Taking an exam or completing an assignment for
another student;
• Obtaining a copy of an exam ahead of time for oneself or
another student.
Consequences of a Breach of Academic Integrity
Civil discourse and the entire academic project depend on
mutual trust among the community of scholars that is Roger
Williams University. Even a minor breach of academic integrity
diminishes that trust. Accordingly, the consequences of a
breach of academic integrity, depending on severity, include:
• Failure on the assignment on which the breach occurred;
• Failure of the class in which the breach occurred;
• Academic probation for one semester;
• Suspension for one semester;
• Separation (dismissal) from the Roger Williams
University community.
Academic Conduct Committee
The University Academic Conduct Committee is empowered
to investigate and adjudicate all cases of suspected breaches
of academic integrity. This committee will also serve as
the record keeper of all academic integrity breaches. The
University Academic Conduct Committee may, as part of
its deliberations, consider a student’s prior breaches of
academic integrity on file. The University Academic Conduct
Committee shall establish and publish by-laws and procedures
pertaining to its own operations.
Committee Composition
The University Academic Conduct Committee shall be
composed of one elected faculty representative from each
school or college (including one from each CAS division),
two representatives elected by the Student Senate, and one
administrator (ex officio) from Academic Affairs.
43
Academic Regulations
Procedure for Dealing with Alleged Breaches of
Academic Integrity
1. A faculty member who suspects a breach of academic
integrity shall investigate, including opportunity for the
student to answer the allegation. Upon finding evidence of
a breach of academic integrity, a faculty member may elect
to penalize the offending student by
• Issuing the student a formal warning
• Failing the student on the assignment on which the
breach occurred
• Failure the student in the class in which the
breach occurred
2. The faculty member must communicate directly with the
student via RWU e-mail, with copies sent to the Dean’s
office of the faculty member, and to the dean of the
student’s major, if different. Documentary evidence must
also be forwarded to the dean’s office.
3. The Dean’s office will inform the student of her/his right
of appeal, along with the forms to be completed to initiate
the appeal process.
4. The Deans’ offices will forward all actions taken by faculty
regarding academic integrity violations, along with all
corresponding documentary evidence, to the Office of the
Academic Provost, which shall serve as a clearinghouse.
5. Students may appeal any penalty for a breach of academic
integrity enforced by a faculty member to the University
Academic Conduct Committee by notifying the Dean’s
office, the faculty member, and the University Academic
Conduct Committee in writing within 21 days of the final
action of the faculty member.
6. The University Academic Conduct Committee shall hear
student appeals of faculty actions concerning academic
integrity. The decision of the University Academic
Conduct Committee will be communicated to the student,
to the Dean, and to the faculty member in writing via
RWU e-mail. Student(s) may appeal a decision of the
University Academic Conduct Committee to the Office of
the Provost within 21 days of the decision. The Provost’s
decision is final.
7. Upon finding recurring or particularly egregious instances
of breaches of academic integrity by a student, the Office
of the Provost reserves the right to levy
• Academic probation for one semester
• Suspension for one semester
• Separation (dismissal) from the Roger Williams
University community.
Academic Standards
Students are responsible for knowing and complying with
the academic regulations of the University. Each College
and School has an Academic Standards Committee that
serves as the appeal committee for students requesting
exceptions to academic policy. A petition obtained from
the appropriate dean’s office must be completed and
submitted to the dean of the college or school in which
the student is enrolled. The dean of the college or school,
44
if necessary, forwards the petition to the appropriate
Academic Standards Committee.
Right of Appeal
In cases where an academic regulation or requirement
constitutes a hardship, students may submit a written petition
to the appropriate dean. Forms are available at the offices
of the Registrar and the School of Continuing Studies in
Providence. Any appeal is subject to review by the appropriate
dean and designated Academic Affairs officer, whose decision
shall be final.
An appeal must be filed within one semester after the
semester in which the course was taken, or the event that is the
basis for the appeal, occurred. Unless an appeal is filed within
this period, it will not be considered.
Attendance Policy
Regular attendance in classes is expected of all students.
Professors announce attendance policies to all classes by the
end of the first week of classes during each semester, and by the
end of the fourth day of classes during the January Intersession
and summer sessions. Any student who fails to attend a course
by the end of the add/drop period may be administratively
withdrawn from the course. A W grade is assigned in such
instances and the Registrar notifies the student. Withdrawal
from classes may impact financial aid.
With regards to absence due to religious observance,
Roger Williams University welcomes and values people
and their perspectives and respects the interests of all
members of our community. RWU recognizes the breadth
of religious observance among students, faculty, and staff,
and the potential for conflict with scheduled components of
the academic experience. Students are expected to review
their syllabi and notify faculty as far in advance as possible
of potential conflicts between course requirements and
religious observances. Any student who faces a conflict
between the requirements of a course and the observance
of his or her religious faith should contact the instructor
as early in the semester as possible. In such event the
instructor will provide reasonable accommodations that do
not unduly disadvantage the student.
Withdrawal from the University
Required Procedure: Full-time students who wish to
withdraw from the University are required to make formal
application. To begin the withdrawal process students
must notify the Student Advocacy Office and complete
the exit interview process. Students withdrawing from the
University after the last day to drop a course without the W
(withdrawal) grade will be graded at the end of the semester
by their instructor(s).
The Student Advocacy Office will inform the academic
dean and the appropriate offices of the withdrawal. Students
should also refer to the Financial Information section of this
catalog for information regarding policies governing the refund
of tuition and fees.
Academic Regulations
Leave of Absence
Medical Leave: A student may apply to the Office of Student
Affairs for a medical leave of absence from the University for
one full semester. When students are approved for a medical
leave they receive grades of W, withdrawn, for enrolled classes.
Applications are due no later than December 1 for the fall
semester and May 1 for the spring semester. The request must be
supported by documentation from a physician or psychologist. The
physician or psychologist responsible for treatment must provide a
recommendation supporting readmission of the student. Generally,
a student is limited to one medical leave of absence during
matriculation at the University. Students are encouraged to contact
the Dean of Students in the Office of Student Affairs in advance
regarding the financial implications of the medical leave policy and
to gain approval. It is also suggested that students consult with the
office of financial aid to discuss financial implications. Additionally,
it is recommended that the student contact their academic advisor
to determine the impact on their academic program.
Non-medical Leave: The application for a non-medical leave
of absence must be initiated in the Student Advocacy Office
prior to the beginning of the semester. The applicant must then
receive a signature of approval from the dean of the appropriate
school/college. The applicant must be in satisfactory academic
standing and have no outstanding debts at the University. A
student on academic leave of absense may apply for a onesemester extension only. If a leave is granted, the Student
Advocacy Office will notify the appropriate offices.
Reinstatement
Return to the University from a Non-Medical Leave: A full-time
student on a non-medical leave may apply through the Student
Advocacy Office. The Student Advocacy Office will inform the
appropriate offices. Full-time students who fail to initiate a return
after one semester are automatically withdrawn from the University
and must contact the Student Advocacy Office to subsequently
return to the University. All reinstatements require a school Dean’s
approval prior to selecting and enrolling for a subsequent term.
Administrative Withdrawal
Students who do not formally withdraw from the University
are administratively withdrawn from the University. Students
who do not follow the procedure for withdrawal must
follow the reinstatement process by contacting the Student
Advocacy Office. If readmitted, they must enter under the
requirements of the University Catalog for the year they
re-enter unless determined otherwise by the student’s dean.
Students who leave the University on academic or nonacademic probation may be considered for reinstatement; all
requests require the approval of their school/college dean.
Students who follow procedure for withdrawal and who
are in good academic standing may request their reinstatement
through the Student Advocacy Office. Students must initiate
their reinstatement prior to the start of the term for which they
intend to enroll.
University Transcripts
The University transcript is an official document reflecting a
student’s cumulative academic record. An official transcript
is reproduced on colored paper stock bearing the seal of the
University and is normally issued directly to the person or
institution specified by the student. A sealed transcript given to
the student is identified with a stamp as being issued directly
to the student. All transcripts are issued in accordance with the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and may not
be released to a third party without the prior written consent of
the student.
Transcripts noted at the point of graduation issued from
Roger Williams University reflect second majors, with minors,
and honorary distinctions and the required Service Learning
experience. Transcripts may be requested from the Office of
the Registrar in person or by mail or fax. They may not be
requested by telephone. Transcript Request forms are available
at the Office of the Registrar and on the Registrar’s section of
the University website. A fee of $5.00 per transcript must be
remitted and all outstanding debts satisfied prior to release of
the transcript. Requests for transcripts should include dates
of attendance or graduation, name at time of attendance and
specific school, declared major, and student’s RWU ID number.
Transcripts are normally issued within five business days
of receipt of request. However, during certain periods, mailing
of transcripts may be delayed by an additional three or four
days. Transcripts requested in person may not be available
for immediate issuance to the student. To avoid delays in
forwarding transcripts to colleges, graduate schools, employers,
and government agencies, students are advised to request
transcripts well in advance of their deadlines for application,
reimbursement, or incentive pay.
Undergraduate Degrees
The following undergraduate degrees are awarded by Roger
Williams University:
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Creative Writing and Visual
Arts Studies)
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of General Studies (continuing studies
students only)
Degree Application
To become a candidate for graduation, a student must file
the Degree Application before registering for the senior year.
Degrees are conferred in December, May, and August. Degrees
conferred reflect the graduation date that follows the student’s
successful completion of all degree requirements.
Participation in Commencement
Commencement ceremonies occur only in May. Students in
good academic standing may participate in Commencement
subject to the following conditions:
• they will have satisfied all graduation requirements
by Commencement; or they have no more than two
remaining courses including Incompletes;
• all academic matters affecting the graduation, including
incomplete grades and matters needing an Academic
Standards committee decision, are resolved 6 weeks prior
to the May ceremony;
45
Academic Regulations
•
•
all skills courses, University Core courses, the Service
Learning requirement, and all degree requirements are
successfully completed; and,
the cumulative grade-point average in the semester before
graduation must be 2.0 or higher.
Honorary Distinction
Curriculum Declaration Form
Final transcripts and diplomas reflect the honorary distinction
when graduates meet the criteria noted above.
This form is available from the Office of the Registrar or on
the Registrar’s website http://www.rwu.edu/sites/default/files/
downloads/registrar/curriculumdeclaration.pdf and must be used:
• to declare a major
• to declare a second major
• to change a major
• to declare a Core Concentration
• to change a Core Concentration
• to declare a minor
• to declare a second minor
• to change a minor
• to change the Catalog under which they will be evaluated
for graduation.
Students must file Curriculum Declaration form(s) within the
time periods stated below.
Degree Requirements
Declaration of a First Major
Degree requirements stated in the University Catalog for the
year a student matriculates apply to his or her graduation,
provided that the student maintains active status. If students
elect to change the Catalog under which they will be evaluated,
they must meet all graduation requirements stated within that
Catalog. Students must declare a Change of Catalog with the
Registrar before filing a Degree Application. Student may not
submit a change of catalog request once the Degree Application
has been evaluated.
Students are responsible for knowing and complying with
all academic regulations including degree requirements.
Full-time students are required to declare a major by the third
semester and must file the Curriculum Declaration form with
the Registrar. Students must successfully complete all major
requirements as stipulated in the Catalog under which they
first matriculated.
Three honorary distinctions are conferred upon properly
qualified candidates for graduation:
• Degrees with highest honors, summa cum laude: awarded
to students who have attained a GPA of not less than 3.8
(based on at least 54 credits of study in residence).
• Degrees with high honors, magna cum laude: awarded
to students who have attained a GPA of not less than 3.6
(based on at least 54 credits of study in residence).
• Degrees with honors, cum laude: awarded to students who
have attained a GPA of not less than 3.4 (based on at least
54 credits of study in residence).
All students must:
• earn a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of
2.0 in order to graduate. Each college or school may also
require a minimum grade-point average in the major;
• successfully complete a minimum of 30 credits of
course work in a major, all University Core Curriculum
requirements, and the Service Learning requirement; and
• complete 45 of the last 60 credits at Roger Williams
University or at a Roger Williams University Semester
Abroad program.
• All financial obligations must be satisfied.
Additional Degrees
The following applies to matriculated undergraduates pursuing
two baccalaureate degrees (for example, a B.A. and a B.S.)
and to students who return to complete a second degree
after earning a baccalaureate degree from Roger Williams
University: All candidates for two baccalaureate degrees must
complete at least an additional 30 credits in residence and all
requirements of the second major must be met.
In such cases, completion of the second degree is recorded
on the student’s transcript and dated accordingly.
46
Returning students pursuing an additional degree
from Roger Williams University must have completed all
requirements for the first degree and be formally approved to
receive that degree before going on to the second degree.
Declaration of a Second Major
Students who pursue a second major must successfully
complete the requirements of each major and must declare
their second major by filing a Curriculum Declaration
form with the Registrar no later than the end of the third
semester. One diploma will be awarded. If one major leads
to a Bachelor of Arts degree and the other a Bachelor of
Science degree, the student selects either the Bachelor of
Arts or the Bachelor of Science. Both majors, however, are
listed on the transcript. Students who wish to earn a second
degree, as opposed to a second major, must complete at least
30 additional credits in residence.
Change of Major
Students who change the major in which they are enrolled must
also file the Curriculum Declaration form with the Registrar.
All changes of major must be approved by the appropriate dean
and be filed with the Registrar before students file the Degree
Application to ensure that course requirements can be met
by the student’s expected date of graduation. Attention must
be given to the Core Concentration requirement whenever a
student changes his or her major.
Declaration of a Core Concentration
All full-time students are required to declare their Core
Concentration by filing the Curriculum Declaration form
with the Registrar no later than the end of the third
semester. The major must be declared before the Core
Concentration is declared.
Academic Regulations
Declaration of Minor(s)
Bachelor degree candidates who decide to minor in a Core
Concentration or in another discipline are required to declare
their minor(s) by filing a Curriculum Declaration form with
the Registrar no later than the end of the junior year and before
they file the Degree Application. Students must successfully
complete all minor requirements prior to graduation.
Declaration to Change Catalog
Students are assumed to be following requirements for the
various degrees/majors/minors as are printed in University
Catalog for their first enrollment term at the university.
Students who wish to follow degree requirements in a
subsequent catalog must file a Curriculum Declaration form
with the Registrar that has been approved by the appropriate
advisor and dean prior to submitting a Degree Evaluation form.
No change may be made to a catalog year once the official
degree evaluation has been completed.
Interdisciplinary Individualized Major
Prior to having completed 90 credit hours, students may, with
the assistance of a faculty advisor from each sponsoring area,
create a major leading to a bachelor degree that draws upon
courses from more than one discipline and/or college or school
of the University. The student must, in consultation with
faculty, formulate a course of study that constitutes a coherent
major program consisting of a minimum 36 credit hours. The
student and the faculty advisor must sign the proposed course
of study and submit it to the appropriate Dean for review
and to the Provost for final approval. An Interdisciplinary
Individualized major, if approved, is recorded in the Office of
the Registrar and serves as the basis for the degree evaluation.
REGISTRATION FOR COURSES
Students may register for courses through the Web via
myRWU. Class and semester standing determine registration
priority. New students enrolling for the fall semester may
register during one of several summer orientations.
Before registering for classes, matriculated students meet
with a faculty advisor to review academic progress and select
courses. Students are encouraged to register through myRWU.
Before attending any class, a student must officially
register and satisfy all financial obligations to the University.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to class to
any student who has not registered or remitted full payment of
tuition and fees.
The University reserves the right to cancel or limit
enrollment in any class and does not guarantee course
registrations, assignment of instructors, locations, or meeting
times. Each semester, courses are published in an official
schedule, available through the myRWU portal. Responsibility
for course selection and fulfillment of graduation requirements
ultimately rests with the student.
Course Numbering
Courses at Roger Williams University are numbered as follows:
100-199
Introductory courses
200-299
Intermediate courses
300-499
500-599
600-699
700-799
Advanced courses
Fifth-year undergraduate courses; first year
graduate courses
Second-year graduate courses
Third-year graduate courses
Add/Drop Procedure
All course and section changes must be identified on an Add/
Drop form submitted to the Office of the Registrar during the
add-and-drop periods. Students should refer to the academic
calendar for specific dates and deadlines. On a space available
basis, courses may be added during the first week of classes
without the instructor’s signature. The last day to add a course
is noted in the academic calendar.
Dropping a Course: When a student files an Add/Drop
form that results in a total credit load that changes his or her
enrollment status, the form must be validated by the Office
of the Bursar and the Office of Student Advocacy before it is
submitted to the Registrar.
Courses dropped during the drop period are deleted from
the record. Students should consult with their advisor or dean.
Dropping below 12 credits reduces student status to part-time
and impacts financial aid as well as rate of progress.
Withdrawal from a Course
After the drop period, a student may officially withdraw from
a course by submitting an Add/Drop form before the date
designated in the calendar for the semester or session involved.
The grade of W is recorded. Neither credit nor quality points
are assigned. When a student files an Add/Drop form that
results in a total credit load that changes his or her enrollment
status, the form must be validated by the Office of the Bursar
and the Office of Student Advocacy before it is submitted to
the Registrar. Students are advised that financial aid is affected
when a student’s course load drops below 12 credits. Any
student who fails to attend a course by the end of the add/drop
period may be administratively withdrawn from the course. A
W grade is assigned in such instances and the Registrar notifies
the student. Withdrawal from classes may impact financial aid.
Students who withdraw or are administratively withdrawn
from courses should expect to take summer courses to ensure
minimum rate of progress and timely graduation.
Semester Credit Limit
Students normally carry 15-17 credits each regular semester. To
be classified as full-time, undergraduate students must register
for at least 12 credits. Students receiving financial aid are
expected to complete 12 credits each semester. Students seeking
to enroll in 18 credits during regular semester must receive
permission from their academic advisor for the additional credit.
Students seeking to enroll in more than 18 credits during a
regular semester must receive permission from their dean before
registering for the additional credits. Students may register for
up to and including 20 credit hours without paying additional
tuition. Students may only register for one course during Winter
Intersession and the 3-week Summer Session, and two courses
during other Summer Sessions or a total of 9 credits without
Dean’s approval. 10 credits and above require a Dean’ approval.
47
Academic Regulations
Transfer of Credit After Matriculation
Matriculated students who plan to take courses at other
regionally accredited institutions and transfer credit to Roger
Williams University must obtain prior approval from the dean
of their college or school by completing a Transfer Course
Pre-Approval form available at the Office of the Registrar or
on-line http://www.rwu.edu/sites/default/files/downloads/
registrar/transfer_course_preapproval_form.pdf. It is the
student’s responsibility to provide catalog copy of the course
description(s) at the time the request is made. An official
transcript must be submitted to the Roger Williams University
Registrar directly from the other institution when course work
is completed.
Credit for courses successfully completed with a grade of C
or higher are posted to the student’s record. Credit for courses
successfully completed with a grade of P and are not a required
course in the students Major, Minor, Core Concentration or
satisfy the University Core Curriculum requirement, will be
transferred only if the issuing institution transcript key states
that the grade of P was the equivalent of the grade of C or
higher or the originating institution must change the student’s
P grade to a C or better on their transcript. Grades earned for
course work completed at another university are not recorded
and are not calculated into the GPA.
Variable Content/Special Topic Courses
Variable content/special topic courses rotate topics on a regular
basis. These courses may be retaken provided that the topic is
not repeated. When the topic is repeated, rules for repeated
courses apply.
Re-numbered or re-titled courses are not variable
content/special topic courses and may not be repeated for
duplicate credit.
Audited Courses
Students may audit a course if space is available. Courses
audited are indicated on the transcript, but credits and grades
are not assigned. The extent to which auditors may participate
in a course is established by the professor. Permission must
be obtained from the professor before a student registers for a
course as an auditor. There is no charge for one audited course
per semester for students classified as full-time, but additional
audited courses are billed at the established rate. Anyone not
classified as a full-time student must pay the established rate
for each audited course. A student who enrolls in a course as
an auditor may elect to change to credit-bearing status and
receive credit and a grade. A student who enrolls in a course
for credit may elect to change to audit status. All changes must
be made no later than by the last day to drop a course without
the W (withdrawn) grade for the semester or session.
A Course Status form must be filed with the Registrar
and the Office of the Bursar, and payment in full must be
made for the applicable tuition and fee charges resulting
from the change.
Alternatives to Classroom Study
The deadline for submitting a Proposal for Alternative Study
is the last day to add a course without instructor permission.
For intersessions prior to the start of classes and summer
48
sessions, the deadline is three calendar days after the class
begins. Requests after the semester/session deadline require an
Academic Standards Petition to extend the add date.
Independent Study, Internships, and Cooperative
Education (COOP) courses are available to students in good
standing who have completed more than 30 credits of course
work. Full-time students are limited to a maximum of 15
credits of Independent Study, Internship, or Cooperative
Education course credits in any combination during their
career at Roger Williams University. This limit does not
apply to students in the School of Continuing Studies.
Independent Study courses must be approved by the
appropriate academic dean. Forms are available online
http://www.rwu.edu/sites/default/files/downloads/registrar/
independent_study_petition.pdf. Students wishing to take
a cooperative education course should seek guidance at the
Career Center.
Independent Study
Independent Study courses provide an opportunity for
individual pursuit of knowledge in an area not covered in
regularly scheduled classroom courses at Roger Williams
University. Independent Study courses include directed
readings, thesis preparation, advanced problems, and
specialized research. All independent study courses are directed
by faculty and must be approved by the appropriate dean prior
to the last day to add a course without an instructor permission
of the semester in which they are to be taken. Forms are
available online http://www.rwu.edu/about/university-offices/
registrar/frequently-used-forms.
Internships
Internships provide opportunities to work within and outside the
University. Directed by an external supervisor and faculty sponsors,
internships are oriented toward specific career and professional
development and must be academically significant. Internships
include apprenticeships, senior projects, and fieldwork.
Cooperative Education/Internship
The Cooperative Education/Internship program is managed by
the Career Center. This program enables students who have
completed two semesters at Roger Williams University and are
in good academic standing to earn academic credit through an
approved experience. Students must first complete a Career
Planning Seminar of five sessions facilitated by the Career
Center. A cooperative education/internship experience is
required by the following majors: Accounting, Graphic Design,
Management,, Marketing, all Communication, Psychology, Web
Development, Forensics, Networking and Security, and Security
Assurance Studies. The Career Center supports all students who
wish to participate in cooperative education and/or internships,
required or not. Career Center staff and the student’s faculty
sponsor approve the experiential education experience in
advance. Assignments must be of sufficient duration, typically 135
hours, and must be considered a meaningful part of the academic
program in which the student is enrolled. For additional
information, visit careercenter.rwu.edu.
Academic Regulations
Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate
Roger Williams University offers course equivalencies and credits
for any Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate
subject areas. Please consult the tables to determine subject areas
available and minimum score requirements.
International Baccalaureate (IB)
Credit only awarded for Higher Level (HL) courses completed.
No credit awarded for Standard Level (SL) courses completed.
IB Exam
BIOLOGY
BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT
CHEMISTRY
Score
Credits
RWU Equivalent Course
Core Concentration
5 or 6
4
BIO 104
BIO 104
7
8
BIO 103 & BIO 104
BIO 103 & BIO 104
5
3
MGMT 200
5 0r 6
4
CHEM 191
CHEM 191
7
8
CHEM 191 & CHEM 192
CHEM 191 & CHEM 192
COMPUTER SCIENCE
5
4
COMPSC 110
COMPSC 110
DANCE
5
3
DANCE 150
ECONOMICS
5
6
ECON 101 & ECON 102
FILM
5
3
FILM 101
GEOGRAPHY
5
3
RWU 900
5
6
RWU 900
ECON 101 & ECON 102
HISTORY
European & Islamic World
5
3
HIST 101
20th Cent. World History
5
3
HIST 900
5
3
ENG 900
LANGUAGE A1
HIST 101
(LITERATURE)
LANGUAGE B
5
3
Target Language 101
Target Language 101
(LANGUAGE ACQUISITION)
7
6
Target Language 101 & 102
Target Language 101 & 102
LITERATURE &
5
3
ENG 900
4
4
MATH 136
PERFORMANCE
MATHEMATICS
5 or 6
4
MATH 213
MATH 213
7
8
MATH 213 & MATH 214
MATH 213 & MATH 214
MUSIC
5
3
MUSIC 900
PHILOSOPHY
5
3
PHIL 100
PHIL 100
PSYCH 100
PSYCHOLOGY
PHYSICS
SOCIAL & CULTURAL
5
3
PSYCH 100
5 or 6
4
PHYS 109
7
8
PHYS 109 & PHYS 110
5
3
ANTH 100
ANTH 100
5
3
THEAT 130
THEAT 130
3
RWU 900
ANTHROPOLOGY
THEATRE
IB HIGHER LEVEL
CERTIFICATE
49
Academic Regulations
Advanced Placement (AP)
AP Exam Title
Credits
RWU Equivalent Course
3
3
AAH 121
AAH 121
4 or 5
6
AAH 121 & 122
AAH 121 & 122
Studio Art: Drawing
4 or 5
3
VARTS 101
VARTS 101
Studio Art: 2-D Design
4 or 5
3
VARTS 101
VARTS 101
Studio Art: 3-D Design
ART HISTORY
Art History
Score
Core Concentration
ART STUDIO
4 or 5
3
VARTS 231
VARTS 231
BIOLOGY
4
4
BIO 104
BIO 104
5
8
BIO 103 & BIO 104
BIO 103 & BIO 104
CHEMISTRY
4
4
CHEM 191
CHEM 191
5
8
CHEM 191 & CHEM 192
CHEM 191 & CHEM 192
Computer Science A
3, 4 or 5
4
COMSC 110
COMSC 110
Computer Science B
3, 4 or 5
8
COMSC 110 & COMSC 111
COMSC 110 & COMSC 111
Macroeconomics
3, 4 or 5
3
ECON 101
ECON 101
Microeconomics
3, 4 or 5
3
ECON 102
ECON 102
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
Literature &
4
3
ENG 900
ENG 900
Composition
5
3
ENG 100
ENG 100
Language &
Composition
4 or 5
3
WTNG 102
4 or 5
4
NATSC 103
3
3
LANG 101
LANG 101
4 or 5
6
LANG 101 & LANG 102
LANG 101 & LANG 102
ENVIRON. SCIENCE
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Language
Literature
GEOGRAPHY
NATSC 103
3
3
LANG 350
LANG 350
4 or 5
6
LANG 350
LANG 350
4
3
RWU 900
5
6
RWU 900
United States
4 or 5
3
POLSC 100
POLSC 100
Comparative
4 or 5
3
POLSC 120
POLSC 120
GOVT & POLITICS
HISTORY
United States
European
World History
4
3
HIST 151
HIST 151
5
6
HIST 151 & HIST 152
HIST 151 & HIST 152
4
3
HIST 101
HIST 101
5
6
HIST 101 & HIST 102
HIST 101 & HIST 102
4
3
HIST 900
5
6
HIST 900 & RWU 900
Calculus AB
3, 4 or 5
4
MATH 213
MATH 213
Calculus BC
3, 4 or 5
8
MATH 213 & MATH 214
MATH 213 & MATH 214
Statistics
3, 4 or 5
3
MATH 124
Physics B
4
4
PHYS 109
Physics B
5
8
PHYS 109 & PHYS 110
PHYSICS 1
4 or 5
4
PHYS 109
PHYSICS 2
4 or 5
4
PHYS 110
MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS
Physics C—Mechanics
3, 4 or 5
4
PHYS 201
Physics C—Electricity
& Magnetism
4 or 5
4
PHYS 202
4 or 5
3
PSYCH 100
PSYCHOLOGY
50
PSYCH 100
Academic Regulations
External Study
External study is similar to independent study, except that
the material covered out of class is the same as that taught in
a regularly scheduled course. External courses are restricted
to students formally admitted to the School of Continuing
Studies or to students who have achieved senior status as
bachelor degree candidates but who have not and cannot satisfy
graduation requirements on time through regularly scheduled
classes. Students are advised that a number of courses cannot
be satisfied through external study. External study requires the
approval of the dean.
Students interested in enrolling in external courses
must first meet with a member of the faculty to complete
an External Course Petition available on the Registrar’s
website. http://www.rwu.edu/sites/default/files/downloads/
registrar/petition_for_external_course.pdf. The form must be
submitted to the student’s dean for approval.
Students should complete this process one semester in
advance of taking an external course.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
The CLEP program applies only to students who have been
out of high school for at least three years. Students must have
taken the CLEP examination before matriculating at Roger
Williams University. No student will receive credit for a CLEP
examination if they have received credit at Roger Williams
University or transferred credit to the University for an
equivalent course.
Students may receive academic credit by completing the
College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Examinations
are offered in a wide variety of subjects and are tied closely to
specific courses. In order to receive credit for CLEP exams,
students need to achieve the scores recommended and
published by the American Council on Education.
CLEP exams are not given at Roger Williams University.
Interested students must contact CLEP, Box 6600, Princeton,
NJ 08541-6600 (609) 951-1026 for dates and locations of
CLEP exams.
1. Students must complete a Challenge Examination Request
form available from the secretary of the appropriate
college or school.
2. Students must pay a $50 non-refundable fee for each
examination to the Bursar after approval has been
obtained but before the examination date.
3. Students must request permission during the first week of
classes to take challenge exams in courses in which they
are enrolled. Such examinations must be administered
during the first two weeks of the semester and graded
before the end of the third week of the semester.
4. Successful completion of a challenge examination results
in the listing on the student’s permanent record of the
course equivalent, the notation “credit by examination,”
and the amount of credit granted.
UNIVERSITY GRADING SYSTEM
Grade
Description
Grade Points
A Excellent
4.00
A- 3.67
B+Good3.33
B 3.00
B- 2.67
C+ Average 2.33
C 2.00
C- 1.67
D+Passing1.33
D 1.00
D- 0.67
F Failure 0.00
The following grades are not calculated in the GPA:
P
NP
I
Pass (C or Higher)
No Pass
Incomplete*
W
AU
L
Withdrawal
Audit
Lab Participant
*Incompletes must normally be completed before the end of the
subsequent semester.
Roger Williams University Challenge Examinations
Grade Appeal
Regularly enrolled students who demonstrate competence
in material covered by certain scheduled courses may be
waived from or obtain credit for such courses by passing
a “challenge” examination. Students should consult the
dean of the college or school for specific information and
any limitations. Challenge examinations are not offered for
University Core Curriculum interdisciplinary and seminar
course requirements.
Regularly enrolled students who have paid the
applicable tuition and fees for the course and can
demonstrate evidence of expertise are eligible to apply for
a challenge examination, which has been approved by the
appropriate college or school. Challenge examinations may
not be repeated.
A student may test out of no more than 25 percent of
the courses needed for graduation.
Interested and eligible students should be aware of
the following:
Any student who formally appeals a course grade must do so in
writing. Correspondence should be addressed to the professor
and a copy sent to the dean of the college or school in which
the course is offered.
A change of grade may be made if the professor and dean
both approve and sign a Change-of-Grade form, which is
forwarded to the Registrar. If either the professor or the dean
disapproves of the change of grade, the student has the right to
appeal to the college or school Academic Standards Committee
within two weeks of receiving written disapproval.
Change of Grade Procedures
If a student is unable to complete assigned classroom work
by the end of the semester due to documented extenuating
circumstances, faculty may assign a grade of Incomplete (I)
if the quality of work already done warrants an extension and
provided that the student is able to complete the remaining
work. In all cases, faculty stipulate work remaining and the
51
Academic Regulations
duration of the extension in writing. Such extension shall not
exceed one semester.
Faculty submit a Change-of-Grade form before the conclusion
of the next regular semester. An Incomplete (I) is automatically
converted to an F unless the Registrar receives a Change-of-Grade
before the conclusion of the next regular semester.
A student who is unable to complete assigned work in a
non-classroom course may request from faculty an extension
not to exceed one additional semester. If a Change-of-Grade
form has not been submitted before the end of the second
semester, the Incomplete (I) will be converted to an F.
Beyond a second semester, change-of-grade requests must be
appealed to the college or school Academic Standards Committee.
Other than Incompletes (I), course grades may not be
changed beyond one semester after the course is completed,
except with the approval of the appropriate college or school
Academic Standards Committee.
Note: Refer to graduation requirement section for change of grade
deadline date.
Pass/No Pass Option
To encourage students to enroll in courses outside their
major, and thus broaden their academic foundation, juniors
and seniors may enroll in one course per semester outside
their major area on a Pass/No Pass basis. Music lessons for
non-majors and Student Teaching courses are graded Pass/
No Pass and are not part of this restriction. Those who pass
the course receive the appropriate credit; those who fail the
course receive no credit. Students who elect this option must
file a Course Status form with the Registrar. A student who
enrolls in a course for Pass/No Pass may elect to change to a
graded status. All changes must be made no later than by the
last day to drop a course without the W (withdrawn) grade
for the semester or session.
Courses required for the student’s major(s), minor(s),
and University Core Curriculum courses may not be taken on
a P/NP basis. Professors may not assign Pass or No Pass grades
as substitutes for passing or failing grades unless the course is
designated Pass/No Pass for all students or a student formally
elects the Pass/No Pass option within the timeframe noted above.
Repeated Courses
A course may be repeated for credit if a grade of C- or less is
received on the first attempt. If a student receives as second
grade of C- or less in the repeated course, the course may be
repeated only once more. The grade for the repeated course is
calculated in the GPA in place of the initial grade(s) provided
that the course is taken at Roger Williams University and
the grade in the repeated course is higher than the previous
grade(s). The previous grade(s) remains on the record, but
neither the previous grade(s) nor the credits are calculated.
Students who repeat courses for a higher grade must expect
to do course work in the summer to ensure minimum rate of
progress and timely graduation.
A grade of C- or less in a course taken at Roger Williams
University may also be repeated at another institution
provided that it is not a Core course. However, only the
credits for a course completed with a C or better at another
52
institution are accepted in transfer. The grade and grade
points for the course are not calculated in the GPA. The
previous grade remains on the record, but neither grade nor
credit is calculated in the GPA.
All applicable tuition and fees are charged and must be
paid for all repeated courses. A course may not be repeated for
credit if a grade of C or higher or Pass was assigned.
Mid-Semester Warning Grades
Faculty issue warning grades i to students whose academic work
is marginal. Warning grades are issued for all freshman receiving
C- or below in any of their classes. Warning grades are issued to
other students at the discretion of the course instructor. Students
who receive warning grades should meet with their professors
and advisor, discuss ways to improve the quality of their work,
and seek help from all available campus resources.
Semester Grades
Final Semester grades for each course in which students
are officially registered are available on-line via myRWU
throughout the final exam period. All financial obligations
must be met before grades are submitted. Grades will not be
accessible to students who have not submitted immunization
records to University Health Services. Grades are not reported
by telephone.
Grade-Point Average
Each semester the grade-point average (GPA) is calculated by
dividing the total grade points obtained during the semester
by the number of credits for which a student received an F or
better. Courses for which a student is assigned a P, NP, I, W, or
AU do not affect the GPA.
A cumulative GPA for all courses completed to date is also
computed. At the time of degree certification, all Incompletes
(I) are assigned a grade of F.
Dean’s List
Full-time students who complete 12 or more credits per
semester and earn a GPA of 3.4 or higher are placed on the
Dean’s List that semester, provided that they have not received
any of the following grades: F, I, or NP or NS.
Part-time students who take 12 or more credits per year
and earn a GPA of 3.4 or higher are placed on the Dean’s List in
June, provided that they have not received any of the following
grades: F, I, NP, or NS.
Undergraduate Academic Good Standing
The University is committed to the academic success of all
students. It monitors progress toward success via the Academic
Good Standing requirements. To remain in Academic Good
Standing students must meet both rate of progress and required
cumulative grade point requirements. Failure to meet Academic
Good Standing requirements will result in sanctions and
interventions, including dismissal from the University, in cases
of serious or repeated poor academic performance.
Academic Regulations
Academic Good Standing Requirements
Minimum Rate of Progress: To meet the rate of progress
requirement full-time students must accumulate at least the
minimum number of credit hours noted in the scale below.
The minimum satisfactory rate of progress would necessitate
five years for completing an undergraduate degree. Students
who wish to complete their undergraduate degree in four
years should plan on completing at least fifteen (15) credits
per semester, and are strongly advised to enroll in Winter
Intersession or Summer Session courses if they elect to take
a reduced program of study (12-14 credits) during the fall and
spring semesters.
To meet the academic expectations of advanced courses
students are strongly advised to: 1) satisfactorily complete
the writing and math core requirements by the end of the 3rd
semester; 2) satisfactorily complete all Core Interdisciplinary
courses by the end of the 4th semester.
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA): To
remain in academic good standing all students must maintain
the minimum GPA according to the scale below.
Scale for Satisfactory Academic Standing
Full-Time Minimum
Semesters
Minimum
Credit Hours
CompletedGPACompleted
End of 1st Semester
1.70* 12
End of 2nd Semester
1.80
24
End of 3rd Semester
1.90
36
End of 4th Semester
2.00
48
End of 5th Semester
2.00
60
End of 6th Semester
2.00
72
End of 7th Semester
2.00
84
End of 8th Semester
2.00
96
End of 9th Semester
2.00
108
End of 10th Semester
2.00
120
*Does not include semesters when a student has withdrawn for medical reasons.
*Transfer students will be considered to have completed one semester of
full-time study for every 12 credits of posted transfer credit. For example a
student who transfers 24 credits must have a GPA of 1.9 at the end of their
first semester at the University to achieve Academic Good Standing. While
part-time students do not have a rate of progress requirement they must
meet the GPA requirement for full-time students based on the number of
credit hours they have completed. For example, a part-time student who
has completed between 24 and 35 credits would be expected to have a
GPA of 1.80. A part-time student who has completed 48 credits would be
expected to have a GPA of 2.0.
Academic Sanctions
Academic Probation: Students who fail to meet the minimum
requirements for either rate of progress or GPA are placed on
probation for the one semester, fall or spring, immediately
following an unsatisfactory academic performance. Probation
formally warns students of the need to increase their focus on
their academic programs and to take personal responsibility for
addressing their deficiencies. Students with serious academic
deficiencies are subject to suspension or dismissal as noted
below without being first placed on probation.
Freshman and new transfer students placed on probation at
the end of their first academic semester at the University must
participate in an academic probationary support program.
All students placed on probation are directed to meet with
their advisor at the start of the following semester to develop
a plan to reestablish Academic Good Standing. Students
on probation may not serve as officers in student clubs or
student government, serve as resident assistants or participate
in intercollegiate athletic competitions without the written
permission of their academic dean. While probation may
continue for more than one semester, probationary students
who do not make adequate progress in addressing their
deficiencies are subject to suspension or dismissal.
Academic Suspension: Academic Suspension is a serious
sanction that is noted on students’ transcripts. Academic
suspensions are for one semester, either fall or spring. During
the suspension period student may not live on campus or be
registered for courses. Students are automatically suspended
when they fail to meet Academic Good Standing requirements
after a total of three semesters of probation beyond the
freshman year. Students may also be suspended if they fail
to make adequate progress in restoring their Academic Good
Standing during a semester they are on probation, or if they
have serious academic deficiencies.
Students are urged to use their suspension period to seriously
examine their performance and to address any personal issues
that have impeded their academic performance. If a suspended
student elects to take courses at another institution the
student is advised to have these courses pre-approved by his
or her academic dean. Suspended students are encouraged to
participate in the pre-registration process for the next semester.
Academic Dismissal: Students will be dismissed from the
University if their GPA is below 1.4 after two semesters of fulltime study or if their GPA is below 1.8 after four semesters of
full-time study. Students may also be dismissed for other serious
academic deficiencies. Deans, in consultation with faculty
members, may dismiss a student with serious deficiencies
without first placing a student on suspension. Dismissals are
noted on student transcripts.
Determination of Sanctions and Notification
Determination of suspensions and dismissals are made by the
academic deans in consultation with their school/college faculty
members. Notification of suspension or dismissal occurs shortly
after the end of an academic semester by overnight mail from
each school/college. Notifications of probation are sent by the
Dean’s Office shortly thereafter.
Appeal of Sanctions
Probation may be appealed only when students can document for
the Registrar that there was an error in fact or if the completion
of incomplete grades restored their Academic Good Standing.
Appeals of academic suspension or dismissal are heard by the
University Academic Appeals Committee at a fixed time in the
months of January and June. The committee is composed of
the school/college deans, three faculty members selected by
the Academic Standards and Policies Committee of the Faculty
53
Academic Regulations
Senate and two students selected by the Student Senate. A
chair of the University Appeals Committee is appointed by the
Provost. The Student Advocacy Office is a resource students
may use for suggestions to draft their appeal.
Appeals, either in writing or in person are heard by the
committee within ten days of the notification of suspension
54
and dismissal decisions. If an appeal is granted the student may
return to the University for the next semester on probation.
The Appeals Committee may stipulate individual performance
requirements and restrictions for the next semester as a
condition of granting an appeal. All decisions of the Appeals
Committee are made on the day that the appeal is heard. All
decisions are final.
Academic Regulations
55
Licensure and Accreditation Information and Complaint Process
The United States Department of Education, pursuant to 34
CFR § 668.43(b), requires institutions of higher education
authorized under Title IV of the Higher Education Act to
make available for review to any enrolled or prospective
student, upon request, a copy of the documents describing the
institution’s licensure and accreditation. The institution must
also provide its students or prospective students with contact
information for filing complaints with its accreditor and with
its state approval or licensing entity and any other relevant
state official or agency that would appropriately handle a
student’s complaint. Roger Williams University and Roger
Williams University School of Law (collectively, “University”)
provide the following information in accordance with the
above requirements:
State Licensure and Accreditation Information
The University was originally chartered in 1956 and is licensed by
the State of Rhode Island as an institution of higher education.
The University is accredited by the New England
Association of Schools & Colleges, Inc. (“NEASC”) and has
been since 1972. In addition, Roger Williams University School
of Law is accredited by the American Bar Association (“ABA”).
Other University schools and programs hold various other
accreditations, a comprehensive list of which is available at
http://www.rwu.edu/about/accreditation.
Copies of the documents describing the University’s
licensure and accreditation may be obtained by contacting the
University’s Office of General Counsel, One Old Ferry Road,
Bristol, RI 02809.
Complaint Process
Recommended Content of Complaints
A complaint should contain the complainant’s contact information,
including name, address, telephone number, and email address and
specify whether the complainant is a prospective, current, or former
student. Complaints should contain as much detail as possible,
including the names of individuals involved, dates, supporting
documentation, and requested remedy.
Internal Complaint Process
The University recommends that students and prospective
students first file complaints internally before resolution
is sought from the University’s state licensing entity or
accreditor. Internal complaints may be filed with the University
administrators referenced below. Complainants who are unsure
where to file internal complaints may contact Richard Hale,
Chief of Staff, or the Office of General Counsel, One Old Ferry
Road, Bristol, RI 02809.
Prospective Student Complaints
Roger Williams University prospective students may report all
complaints to the Vice President for Enrollment Management,
One Old Ferry Road, Bristol, RI 02809.
Roger Williams University School of Law prospective
students may report all complaints to the Assistant Dean of
Admissions, 10 Metacom Avenue, Bristol, RI 02809.
56
Roger Williams University Student Complaints
Roger Williams University students may report complaints
to the applicable vice president, dean, or department head
having jurisdiction over the matter. For example, academic
matters may be reported to the dean of the applicable
school and student matters may be reported to the Dean of
Students. Contact information for vice presidents, deans, and
department heads is located on Roger Williams University’s
website http://www.rwu.edu/.
Roger Williams University School of Law Student Complaints
Roger Williams University School of Law students may
report complaints to the applicable dean or department
head having jurisdiction over the matter. For example,
academic matters may be reported to the Associate Dean
for Academic Affairs and student matters may be reported
to the Assistant Dean of Students. Contact information for
deans and department heads is located on the School of
Law’s website http://law.rwu.edu/.
External Complaint Process
If a complaint is not resolved satisfactorily internally or if
the internal complaint process is not utilized, a student or
prospective student may file a complaint with the University’s
state licensing entity and/or accreditor.
State of Rhode Island Complaint Process
The Rhode Island Department of Attorney General has
established the following complaint process related to receiving
and resolving complaints for all institutions that are legally
authorized to provide post-secondary higher education in
Rhode Island that are not subject to regulation by the Rhode
Island Department of Education or other state agency:
• Violations of state consumer protection laws (e.g., laws related
to fraud or false advertising) will be referred to the Consumer
Protection Unit within the Department of Attorney General
and shall be reviewed and handled by that Unit.
• Violations of state laws or rules related to approval to
operate or licensure of post-secondary institutions will be
referred to the appropriate Division within the Department
of Attorney General and shall be reviewed and handled by
that Division.
• Complaints relating to quality of education or accreditation
requirements shall be referred either to NEASC, the entity
with primary responsibility for accreditation of Rhode
Island institutions of higher education, or a specialized
accreditor with oversight of particular programs.
Contact information:
Rhode Island Department of Attorney General
150 South Main Street
Providence, RI 02903
Telephone: (401) 274-4400
Web: http://www.riag.ri.gov
Accreditor Complaint Process
NEASC responds to complaints regarding allegations of
institutional conditions that raise significant questions about
the institutions’ compliance with the NEASC Standards
Licensure and Accreditation Information
for Accreditation. NEASC’s Policy and Procedures for the
Consideration of Complaints against Affiliated Institutions is
available at http://cihe.neasc.org/downloads/POLICIES/Pp11_
Consideration_of_Complaints.pdf.
Contact information:
New England Association of Schools and Colleges
Commission on Institutions of Higher Education
3 Burlington Woods Drive, Suite 100
Burlington, MA 01803-4514
Telephone: (781) 425-7785
Facsimile: (781) 425-1001
Web: http://cihe.neasc.org
The ABA has designed a complaint process to bring to the
attention of the ABA any facts and allegations that may indicate
that an approved law school is operating its programs of legal
education out of compliance with the ABA Standards for the
Approval of Law Schools. Information on how to file a complaint
is available at http://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_
education/resources/accreditation/complaint_proceedures.html.
Contact information:
Office of the Consultant on Legal Education
American Bar Association
321 N. Clark Street, 21st Floor
Chicago, IL 60654
Telephone: (800) 285-2221
Web: http://www.americanbar.org
Online Learning Complaint Information for Students and
Prospective Students Residing Outside of Rhode Island
Students and prospective students that reside outside of
Rhode Island and are enrolled in or have contacted the
University requesting information concerning admission to the
University’s Online Learning Program may also file complaints
with their state approval or licensing entity and any other
relevant state official or agency that would appropriately handle
a student’s complaint. Contact information for out-of-state
agencies is available at http://www.sheeo.org/sites/default/files/
Complaint%20Process%20Links%2012-2012.pdf.
57
The Undergraduate Course of Study
Roger Williams University takes its name from the founder
of the state of Rhode Island, a 17th-century free-thinker who
was not satisfied with the status quo of his day. Neither is the
University. But Roger Williams did not just criticize the status
quo. He changed it, founding a community dedicated to openmindedness, tolerance and diversity. This is such a community.
We welcome all students who come here and prepare them to
meet life’s challenges.
At the heart of Roger Williams University is our abiding
commitment to undergraduate education. Undergraduates
who enter Roger Williams find more independence than
they have had at home and more support than they will have
after college. Here they find diverse experiences and endless
opportunities to exercise curiosity. They also develop a set of
values that is captured in the Pledge of Academic Integrity that
all undergraduates make at Convocation:
We, the undergraduate students of Roger Williams
University, commit ourselves to academic integrity. We
promise to pursue the highest ideals of academic life, to
challenge ourselves with the most rigorous standards, to be
honest in every academic endeavor, to conduct ourselves
responsibly and honorably, and to assist one another as we
live and work together in mutual support.
The undergraduate curriculum is designed to guide
students toward inquiry, toward establishing and realizing
their goals, and toward becoming productive professionals. In
this community of teachers and learners, we are dedicated to
excellence. Those who complete their undergraduate studies
enter the world with knowledge, skill and confidence.
The distinguishing hallmark of the Roger Williams
tradition is this: each graduate of the University completes
both a focused, specialized program of study – the major – and
a broad-based, comprehensive program of study – the Core
Curriculum, which includes a second field of specialization,
that can be extended into a second major. In increasingly
competitive times, more and more students here are
preparing themselves to excel in multiple fields. Moreover,
the Semester Abroad Interdisciplinary Core Concentration
provides an additional, incomparable opportunity in this era of
internationalization. The University encourages and supports
these initiatives.
All undergraduates enrolled in the University, regardless
of major, study in order to understand, and they are civilized
by this process. They learn to gain experience, and their lives
are thereby further enriched. They learn about themselves and
about others, and their intellect is consequently strengthened,
made more acute, more reflective, more responsive and, indeed,
more humane.
59
The Undergraduate Course of Study
The Elements of Undergraduate Curriculum
Baccalaureate Majors
Roger Williams University offers baccalaureate degrees in the
following disciplines:
Feinstein College of Arts and
Sciences
American Studies
Anthropology + Sociology
Biology
Biochemistry
Chemistry
Creative Writing
Dance/Performance
English Literature
Environmental Science
Foreign Languages
Global Communication
Graphic Design Communication
History
International Relations
Journalism
Marine Biology
Mathematics
Media Communication
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Theatre
School of Architecture, Art and
Historic Preservation
Architecture
Art & Architectural History
Historic Preservation
Visual Arts Studies
Mario J. Gabelli School of
Business
Accounting
Computer Information Systems
Economics
Finance
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International Business
Management
Marketing
Web Development
School of Education
Elementary Education
Secondary Education
Education Studies
School of Engineering,
Computing and Construction
Management
Computer Science
Construction Management
Engineering
School of Justice Studies
Criminal Justice
Forensics, Networking, and
Security
Forensic Science
Legal Studies
Security Assurance Studies
School of Continuing Studies
Community Development
Criminal Justice
Healthcare Administration
Humanities
Individualized Program
Management
Paralegal Studies
Public Administration
Psychology
Social Health Services
Social Sciences
Technology, Leadership and
Management
Theater
1. The University Core Curriculum: Without the benefit of
the Core Curriculum, students would not be fully educated,
much less well rounded. At Roger Williams the Core is a
course of study different from, but equal in importance to, the
major. Core requirements, like those in the major, are fulfilled
throughout the undergraduate program.
2. The Major: All students complete at least one major.
Students usually declare a major by the end of the first year,
if not earlier. The major develops depth and competence in a
single field of study.
Students may achieve dual majors by applying Core
Concentration course work toward a second major. To
accomplish this, the Core Concentration should be declared
before registration for the sophomore year. Program
descriptions and requirements for each major are noted in
this catalog.
3. The Minor: Students are encouraged to minor in at least
one discipline. The University offers minors in all the major
programs and in the following disciplines: anthropology,
aquaculture and aquarium science, economics, environmental
chemistry, military science, music, public health, sociology
and sustainability. Requirements for each minor are noted in
this catalog.
4. Study Abroad: All students are strongly encouraged
to apply for a passport during their freshman year and
to participate in Roger Williams University Semesterlong International Studies Abroad during their junior or
senior years. Students can satisfy their Core Concentration
requirement in one semester by registering for a
semester abroad Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
International Studies Abroad.
5. Service Learning: All students must fulfill the Service
Learning requirement.
Special Academic Programs
The Feinstein Center for Service Learning and
Community Engagement
Mission
The Mission of the Feinstein Center is to nurture the
University’s core value of commitment to service in our
students while meeting the needs of the community by
fostering partnerships, encouraging and supporting service
learning initiatives, and offering resources and opportunities
for civic engagement.
Under the auspices of the philanthropy of Alan Shawn
Feinstein, Roger Williams University in 1998 created a campus
program, now known as the Feinstein Center, to design and
implement service learning and co-curricular service efforts.
Each of our students is introduced to the core value of service
as freshmen when they participate in Community Connections,
a special day of service involving the incoming class and 200
returning students, faculty and staff. Over the next four years,
students will be exposed to diverse opportunities in service
learning, community service, and civic engagement that are
academically linked as well as co-curricular.
The University has an expectation that all students
participate in a service experience during their time at Roger
Williams University. This may take the form of community
service, service learning, or civic engagement.
Community service is service that addresses the
symptoms of social problems. It can take the form of a onetime experience or a long term commitment to a non-profit/
community based or government agency. Many Roger Williams
University student clubs, athletic teams, and residential living
areas participate in community service throughout the year.
Service learning involves service that is imbedded in an
academic course and is directly related to the course material.
Each year students are offered approximately 20 different service
learning courses in Architecture, Education, Dance, Historic
Preservation, CORE, English, Business, Communication, and
Justice Studies. Service learning courses in other disciplines are
offered schedule permitting. Some coop/internships are service
learning as they are unpaid positions in non-profit organizations
and have clear learning outcomes.
Civic engagement refers to activities that involve students
politically, allowing them to find their voice and advocate on
behalf of those in our society who have no voice.
The Feinstein Center facilitates several programs
that encourage our students to become more active in the
community such as AmeriCorps Scholarships for Service,
Community Service Work Study, and Bristol Reads. All of
these programs and activities are intended to help our students
develop their academic and citizenship skills, preparing them
for life after Roger Williams University.
Academic Honor Societies
Alpha Chi
Roger Williams University sponsors the Rhode Island Alpha
Chapter of the Alpha Chi Scholarship-Leadership Honorary
Society. Membership is by invitation to outstanding students
who rank in the top five-percent of the junior and senior classes.
Alpha Phi Sigma
Alpha Phi Sigma is the only National Justice Honor Society
for Criminal Justice Majors. The society recognizes academic
excellence of undergraduate, graduate students of criminal
justice, as well as Juris doctorate.
Alpha Sigma Lambda
Alpha Sigma Lambda National Honor Society was founded
in 1945-46 to recognize adult students in continuing higher
education who achieve academic excellence while managing
responsibilities to family, work and community. Inductees
of Roger Williams University’s chapter, Rho Alpha, must be
matriculated and have a minimum of twenty-four graded
semester hours in an undergraduate degree program at Roger
Williams University. Members shall be selected only from the
highest ten percent of their class and must have a minimum
grade point average of 3.2.
Beta Beta Beta
Beta Beta Beta is a national honor society in the biological
sciences. The Theta Gamma Chapter was established at
Roger Williams University in 2003. The society emphasizes
stimulation of scholarship, dissemination of scientific
knowledge, and promotion of biological research.
Membership is by invitation to upper-level biology and marine
biology majors who have maintained at least a 3.3 GPA in
their biology courses.
Beta Gamma Sigma
Beta Gamma Sigma is the honor society serving business
programs accredited by AACSB International – The Association
to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Membership in Beta
Gamma Sigma is the highest recognition a business student
anywhere in the world can receive in a business program
accredited by AACSB International. Juniors and Seniors in the
top 10% of their respective classes are invited to join.
Eta Sigma Phi
Eta Sigma Phi is the national honorary collegiate society
for students of Latin and/or Greek. Established in 1914, the
purposes of the Society are to develop and promote interest in
classical study among the students of colleges and universities;
to promote closer fraternal relationship among students who
are interested in classical study; to engage generally in an effort
to stimulate interest in classical study, and in the history, art,
and literature of ancient Greece and Rome. To be eligible,
students must complete at least six credits in Latin, Greek or
Classics related field.
Lambda Epsilon Chi
Lambda Epsilon Chi (LEX) is the national honor society
in paralegal studies. LEX recognizes students who have
demonstrated superior academic performance in an established,
qualified program of paralegal studies. Roger Williams
University qualifies as a member in good standing of the
American Association for Paralegal Education (AAPE).
Phi Alpha Theta
Phi Alpha Theta, the professional History Honor Society,
promotes the study of history through research, good
teaching, publication, and exchange of learning and
thought. It brings together, both intellectually and socially,
61
Special Academic Programs
students, teachers, and writers of history. To be eligible for
membership, students must complete at least 12 credits in
history, must possess the requisite GPA, and must rank in the
top third of the class.
Phi Beta Delta
Phi Beta Delta is the premier honor society dedicated
to scholarly achievement in international education,
founded in 1987. Phi Beta Delta honors those who serve
internationalism—the idea of an interconnected world, of
respect for different traditions, of the need for education to
enhance one’s knowledge and understanding of the many
regions and cultures around the globe. The Epsilon Rho
chapter was established at Roger Williams University in
2007. Membership is open to students, faculty and staff with
high academic achievement and a demonstrated interest or
involvement in international or intercultural affairs. Specific
criteria are stated in the applications for membership, which
are due by the first day of October.
Phi Delta Kappa
Phi Delta Kappa is an international association for professional
educators. The organization’s mission is “to promote quality
education with particular emphasis on publicity supported
education, as essential to the development and maintenance of
a democratic way of life.” Membership includes students who
are enrolled in or who have successfully completed student
teaching, graduate students in a program leading to teacher
certification, and teachers matriculating in other graduate
education programs. Roger Williams University is in the
process of petitioning to become a chapter.
Pi Sigma Alpha
The Pi Lambda chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the National
Political Science Honor Society, was established at Roger
Williams in 1997. Founded in 1920, the purpose of Pi
Sigma Alpha is to promote interest and scholarship in the
subjects of politics, government and international relations
by providing recognition and support to students who
have excelled in the field. Membership is open to juniors
and seniors who have completed at least four courses in
political science, maintained at least a B average in those
courses, and have an overall GPA which places them in
the top third of their class. The national organization
offers opportunities for scholarships, grants, and awards
for academic achievement, and the local chapter sponsors
co-curricular activities, which provide a forum for research
and the exchange of ideas in the discipline.
Psi Chi
Membership to the Roger Williams University Chapter of
Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology, is open
to psychology majors and minors who have completed
at least 12 credits in psychology, and have maintained a
3.5 GPA in psychology, as well as an overall GPA of 3.3.
Established in 1978, Psi Chi encourages and stimulates
students to achieve and maintain excellence in scholarship
and in the science of psychology.
Sigma Delta Pi
Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor
Society, was established on November 14, 1919, at the
University of California in Berkeley. Sigma Delta Pi is
the only honor society devoted exclusively to advance
62
students of Spanish in four-year colleges and universities.
The society honors those who seek and attain excellence in
the study of the Spanish language and in the study of the
literature of the Spanish-speaking peoples and encourages
college and university students to a deeper understanding
of Hispanic culture.
Sigma Iota Rho
The Epsilon Mu chapter of Sigma Iota Rho, the
international honor society for international relations, was
established in 2008 to promote and reward scholarship
and service among students and practitioners. The motto
of Sigma Iota Rho is “Synesi, Ideodoi, Rhomi” meaning
“Prudence, Ideals, and Power” three of the key elements
of international affairs. The chapter motto is Episteme
Mundi meaning “Knowledge [of the] World.” Juniors who
meet the standards of a 3.2 cumulative GPA and a 3.4 GPA
in International Relations are eligible for membership.
Membership in Sigma Iota Rho is intended not only to
enhance the credentials of its members, though public
recognition of the best and the brightest students in
international relations, but is meant to encourage a lifelong devotion to a better understanding of the world we
live in and to continuing support for and engagement
in education, service, and occupational activities that
reflect the highest standards of practice in international
affairs. The chapter sponsors co-curricular activities and
the National Organization sponsors a journal and other
activities for students and practitioners.
Sigma Lambda Chi
Sigma Lambda Chi, the international construction honor
society, provides recognition to outstanding students in
the Construction Management major for their academic
accomplishments. Membership is by invitation to majors who
possess the requisite grade point average.
Sigma Tau Delta
Sigma Tau Delta, the international English Honor Society,
confers distinction for high achievement in English
literature and language, promotes interest in literature and
language on campus and in the surrounding communities,
and fosters the discipline of English in all its aspects,
including creative and critical writing. The Alpha Alpha Nu
chapter, established at Roger Williams University in 1990,
invites English majors and minors who are in the top third
of their class, who complete three semesters of course
work, including three English courses, and who maintain a
high GPA.
Tau Sigma Delta
The Beta Tau chapter of the Tau Sigma Delta Honor
Society in Architecture, established on campus in 1989, is
a national collegiate honor society for accredited programs
in architecture, landscape architecture, and the allied
arts, whose prime objective is to celebrate excellence
in scholarship, to stimulate achievement, and to reward
students who attain high scholastic standards. Its motto,
“Technitai Sophoikai Dexioti” means “Craftsmen, skilled
and trained.” Membership is open to students who complete
five semesters of the program in architecture or landscape
architecture, who maintain a B average, and who are in the
top fifth of their class.
Special Academic Programs
The Three-Plus-Three Program
Outstanding students who qualify for this special program may
be able to complete all requirements for a baccalaureate degree
and the Juris Doctor degree in six years.
Full-time students who matriculate at the University in
their freshman year and who maintain superior academic
records with outstanding academic averages and superior
scores on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) may apply to
the School of Law at the end of their junior year, substituting
the first year of work in the School of Law for up to 30 credits
of free electives for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students who
apply must meet the following conditions:
• A student must have earned at least 90 credits in three
years of study at Roger Williams University before
beginning at the School of Law.
• All Core Curriculum requirements and major
requirements must be met within those 90 credits.
• The student’s cumulative grade-point average must be at
least 3.0 with no grade lower than a C (2.0).
• The student must score significantly above the 50th
percentile on the LSAT.
In completing the first year of work in the School of Law,
a student in the Three-Plus-Three program must pass all law
courses with a grade-point average of at least 2.0. It is mandatory
that all non-law academic work toward the combination degree
be completed before any work in law is undertaken.
Those interested in pursuing the Three-Plus-Three
Program must contact the Dean of Admissions at the School
of Law and either the Dean of the School of Justice Studies
or the Dean of the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences, no
later than the end of the freshman year. This program is not
available to transfer students.
Those interested in pursuing the Three-Plus-Three Business
Law Program must contact the Dean of the Mario J. Gabelli
School of Business no later than the end of the freshman year.
This program is not available to transfer students. Details of
the Three-Plus-Three Business Law Program are found with the
School of Business majors in this catalog.
Three-Plus-Four in Biology-PharmD and
Chemistry-PharmD Dual Degree Programs
Roger Williams University has partnered with Albany
College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (ACPHS Vermont
Campus) to provide a dual Chemistry or Biology-PharmD
degree program. Chemistry fulfills a significant role for
students in health science programs, the Department of
Chemistry and Physics administers the university’s prepharmacy program through its introductory and advanced
courses in chemistry and physics. Outstanding students who
qualify for this special program may be able to complete all
requirements for a baccalaureate degree in Chemistry (B.S. or
B.A.) or Biochemistry (B.S.) or Biology (B.S. or B.A.) and the
Doctor of Pharmacy degree in seven years, as opposed to the
traditional eight-year period of study.
Students who matriculate at ACPHS must meet the
following conditions:
•
A student must have earned at least 90 credits in three
years of study at Roger Williams University before
beginning at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health
Sciences (Vermont campus).
• A student must successfully complete the required
Pre-pharmacy courses at Roger Williams University, as
specified in this catalog.
• All Core Curriculum requirements and pre-pharmacy
course requirements must be met within those 90 credits.
• The student’s cumulative grade-point average must be at
least 3.0. No grade lower than a C (2.0) will count toward
the 90 credits.
• The student must meet or exceed Albany College of
Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Vermont campus) PCAT
entry requirements.
• The student must successfully interview, submit a required
background check and complete a writing assessment as
determined by the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health
Sciences (Vermont campus).
Those interested in pursuing the Three-Plus-Four
Chemistry or Biology-PharmD Dual Degree Program must
show intent on their RWU college application. The potential
candidates’ information will then be forwarded and vetted
by the admissions office of ACPHS for acceptance into the
dual degree program. Acceptance into the program is based
on SAT, class rank, GPA for ACPHS course requirements and
NYS regents scores if available. More details can be found
in ACPHS Catalog. Once accepted into the Three-Plus-Four
Chemistry or Biology-PharmD Dual Degree Program you
must contact the Chair of the Department of Chemistry and
Physics at the beginning of your freshman fall semester for
correct advisement. Further details of the Three-Plus-Four for
Chemistry or Biology-PharmD Dual Degree Program are found
with the Chemistry and Biology majors’ description in this
catalog. This program is not available to transfer students.
The Community Partnerships Center
The CPC is a centralized home to an array of RWU
resources. These resources come from within RWU’s liberal
arts and professional degree programs, as well as from
strong relationships with external organizations. Through
the CPC, these resources are organized and made available
to a wide spectrum of nonprofit, municipal and community
groups to carry out projects throughout Rhode Island and
Southeastern Massachusetts.
The CPC provides RWU students at the undergraduate
and graduate levels with meaningful, project-based educational
experiences which address real community needs through
coursework, team projects, graduate assistantships, work study
positions, internships and volunteer experiences. These projects
provide real world experience that is integrated with their
growth as scholars and future practitioners.
The CPC provides communities with valuable services
through its work with client organizations, government
agencies and community organizations as they seek to achieve
their missions.
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Special Academic Programs
Cooperative Education/Internship
The Cooperative Education/Internship program is managed by
the Career Center. This program enables students who have
completed two semesters at Roger Williams University and are
in good academic standing to earn academic credit through an
approved experience. Students must first complete a Career
Planning Seminar of five sessions facilitated by the Career
Center. A cooperative education/internship experience is
required by the following majors: Accounting, Graphic Design,
64
Management, Marketing, All Communication, Psychology, Web
Development, Forensics, Networking and Security, and Security
Assurance Studies. The Career Center supports all students who
wish to participate in cooperative education and/or internships,
required or not. Career Center staff and the student’s faculty
sponsor approve the experiential education experience in
advance. Assignments must be of sufficient duration, typically
135 hours, and must be considered a meaningful part of the
academic program in which the student is enrolled. For
additional information, visit careercenter.rwu.edu.
Special Academic Programs
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The Peggy and Marc Spiegel Center for
Global and International Programs
Study Abroad
GENERAL INFORMATION
About the Center
The Peggy and Marc Spiegel Center for Global and
International Programs at Roger Williams University seeks to
strengthen liberal arts and professional school education by
engaging students and faculty with global learning. The Spiegel
Center is committed to working closely with all members of
the Roger Williams University campus community to develop
and facilitate educational programming activities, at home and
abroad, that will equip students from all disciplines with the
knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to succeed in a world
marked by interdependence, diversity and rapid change.
The Study Abroad Program
Roger Williams University Study Abroad Program is designed
to immerse students in foreign cultures through classroom
instruction and field experiences. Students gain a comprehensive
education marked by high standards and quality. The emphasis
on delivering student-oriented education that defines life at
Roger Williams University applies also to the programs abroad.
The University’s flagship programs are offered in Florence,
Italy each semester, and London, England every fall. Each site
offers a comprehensive program of studies. The University has
also established semester-long partnerships around the world
with a select group of Roger Williams University Affiliated
Programs that have demonstrated a proven track record for
academic integrity, a strong focus on experiential learning and
an earned reputation for excellence in providing solid support
services to students throughout the study abroad cycle. These
providers currently include:
BIOS (Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences)
Central College Abroad
Arcadia University
Council on International Educational Exchange
Institute for Foreign Study Abroad/Butler University
International Partnership for Service Learning and Leadership
The University also offers exchange and direct enroll programs
for a semester or academic year abroad. These programs are
the result of our ongoing initiative to expand relations with
universities abroad. Currently there are Exchange and Direct
Enroll Programs located at:
The University of Westminster, London England
The University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
University College Dublin, Ireland
ICN Business School, Nancy, France
Lingnan University, Hong Kong, China
Universidad Torcuato di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia
Beijing Foreign Studies University, Beijing, China
Yokohama University, Yokohama, Japan
Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
Universidad Veritas, San Jose, Costa Rica
Short-term, faculty-led programs are offered during Winter
Intersession and Summer Session. These programs offer a unique
opportunity to gain a credit bearing international experience
under the instruction of a university faculty member.
CREDIT AND TRANSCRIPTS
All approved course work undertaken in the Roger Williams
University semester-long programs noted above will be
recorded on student’s Roger Williams University transcripts.
Course equivalents that are assigned for coursework that
is completed abroad are subject to final approval by the
appropriate RWU department and dean.
GRADES
Final Semester grades for each course in which students
are officially registered are available on-line via myRWU
throughout the final exam period. All financial obligations
must be met before grades are submitted. Grades will not be
accessible to students who have not submitted immunization
records to University Health Services. Grades are not reported
by telephone.
CORE CONCENTRATION IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Students have the opportunity to satisfy a Core Concentration
in International Studies through successful completion of a
semester abroad on a Roger Williams University sponsored or
Roger Williams University affiliated program. Completing a
Core Concentration in International Studies will demonstrate to
employers that a student who studied abroad has the maturity,
resourcefulness and resilience required to navigate successfully in
challenging and increasingly diverse working environments.
The following institutional policy has been established by Roger
Williams University for completion of the Core Concentration
in International Studies:
Roger Williams University requirements for the Core
Concentration in International Studies
• International Studies Core Concentrations are to be
identified by the name of the country or region visited. For
example: French Studies, Australian Studies, etc.
• International Studies Core Concentrations are to consist
of fifteen (15) credits that focus on the host country/region
and are normally transferable to Roger Williams University.
• The courses used in an International Studies Core
Concentration may not be used to fulfill any Roger
Williams University major requirements.
• At least nine (9) semester hours in the International
Studies Core Concentration must be taken abroad.
• At least nine (9) credits in the International Studies Core
Concentration must directly focus on aspects of the culture
or history of the particular country or region.
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Study Abroad
•
A maximum of six (6) credits in the International Studies
Core Concentration may be in an appropriate foreign
language or professionally related international topic, e.g.,
a course in the Danish language or in Danish Banking
Practices would be acceptable for a concentration in
“Danish Studies”.
SEMESTER LOAD
Students must be enrolled in 12-20 credits to be considered
full-time. Students normally carry fifteen to seventeen credits
while abroad. Exceptions to this require the permission of the
student’s dean and the appropriate program coordinator. All
students must meet with their advisor or dean to review course
requirements before registering for a Study Abroad Program.
Students are advised to visit the Study Abroad Office early on
in their academic career to properly plan to go abroad.
PRE- AND POST-DEPARTURE AND ON-SITE SUPPORT
All Roger Williams University Study Abroad programs include
pre-departure and post-departure advisement and orientation.
This includes the deposit, application, approval and visa
processes as well as acculturation to the country of study and
institutional expectations of the host academic community.
On-site orientation and advisement are also offered. These
functions are facilitated by the Director of Study Abroad
Programs in coordination with the directors and staff abroad.
PRE-APPROVED COURSE WORK
Students applying to Roger Williams University Study Abroad
programs must secure course advisement and approval before
they leave. Students may change their course selections at the
study abroad site, but if this is necessary, their Roger Williams
University faculty advisor and the Study Abroad Office must be
contacted via e-mail for approval.
ATTENDANCE POLICY
Students are expected to attend all scheduled course meetings
and activities including field trips and special events. Excessive
absenteeism may result in dismissal from the program.
GENERAL PREREQUISITES FOR STUDY ABROAD
In most cases, Roger Williams University students can go abroad as
early as the beginning of their sophomore year. Each study abroad
program will have a minimum GPA requirement to be considered
for admission. A student will need at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA
to be considered to go abroad. For Roger Williams University’s
Semester Abroad in London program, students must have a 2.6
cumulative grade point average at the time of application. For
Roger Williams University’s Semester Abroad in Florence program,
students must have a 2.75 cumulative grade point average at the
time of application. For all Roger Williams University affiliated
programs, minimum cumulative grade point averages vary from
2.5 to 3.0. Consult with the Spiegel Center for specific program
requirements. Other requirements include the following:
• Declaration of major and Core Concentration
• Acceptable conduct record
• Advisor’s/dean’s approval
APPLYING FOR STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS
All applications are available in the Spiegel Center for Global
and International Programs and online as well. Every student
considering to study abroad should first meet with the Director
of Study Abroad Programs. The next step is to meet with his/
her advisor as soon as possible to begin planning for a semester
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abroad. These are important first steps to make – and steps that
can start as early as freshman year. Academic advisors can help
figure out which semester and/or academic year would work
best. The application process:
• A non-refundable $50 application fee is due with the
application (payments should be made payable to Roger
Williams University. No deposits or payments should be
made to any affiliated program provider).
• Applications are due no later than the first business day
in October for spring/winter participation and the first
business day in March for fall/summer. Applications are
always due the semester before a student intends to study
abroad. For each program, the student must fill out a
general application and a program specific application
materials. If a student is interested in more than one
program, a general application and an application for each
individual program must be completed and submitted.
• Shortly after mid-semester, students accepted into a
RWU sponsored study abroad program will be required to
attend several mandatory meetings with the Director of
Study Abroad Programs to receive a comprehensive predeparture orientation.
REGISTRATION
All students who are participating in a Flagship Roger Williams
University Study Abroad Program will register at the assigned
time using the courses listed in RWU’s system. For those
students participating in Affiliated Programs (Arcadia, CIEE,
Central, etc.) students will be assigned temporary holding
credits while they are abroad.
Students from other institutions who are accepted into
the Study Abroad Program must contact the Spiegel Center for
Global and International Programs to facilitate registration into
the study abroad program. Registration may be arranged by
calling (401) 254-3040 or by emailing [email protected]
FINANCIAL AID
The University’s effort to maintain an active and equitable
program of financial assistance applies fully to all Roger
Williams University students enrolled in Roger Williams
University sponsored and approved or affiliated semester or
year-long study abroad programs (consult the Spiegel Center
website http://www.rwu.edu/global for the most up-to-date
list of approved program affiliates.) The criteria for financial
assistance are demonstrated need and academic performance.
Aid is awarded without regard to age, gender, race, sexual
orientation, creed, national origin, or disability.
Students must reapply for financial aid each year to have their
current eligibility determined. All returning students must submit
a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal
processor before February 1. Students must satisfy the academic
standards of the University as specified in the University Catalog
to be considered for continued financial assistance. To receive aid,
students entering the junior year must have a cumulative grade
point average (GPA) of at least 2.0. Students whose GPA falls
below 2.0 are not eligible until they attain a 2.0 GPA.
Students interested in Study Abroad Programs should
meet immediately with a financial aid advisor to complete
the necessary forms other than the FAFSA and to submit
signed copies of their federal income tax form and that of
their parents.
Study Abroad
All payment options described in the University
Catalog may be applied to the approved RWU study abroad
programs. Questions may be directed to the Office of the
Bursar at (401) 254-3520.
No student placed on academic suspension is eligible
for financial aid. Students receiving financial aid who do not
meet the minimum requirements as outlined under the Rate
of Progress in the University Catalog shall not be awarded
financial aid.
A student must be an accepted, full-time matriculated
Roger Williams University day student in order to be
considered for financial aid.
TUITION REMISSION AND TUITION
EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
Most of the Study Abroad Programs are not eligible for tuition
remission and tuition exchange. Please check with the Spiegel
Center for any exceptions. Students may apply for Financial
Aid and determination will be based upon demonstrated need
and academic performance.
ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS AND AWARDS
Roger Williams University academic scholarships, grants and
awards are applied to nearly all of the approved Study Abroad
programs. Students are encouraged to check with the Spiegel
Center for current exceptions. Academic scholarships, grants
and awards are not available to students who are not full-time,
matriculated Roger Williams University students. There are
many study abroad scholarships available. Please consult with
the Spiegel Center for current resources.
FEES
Application Fee
A non-refundable $50 application fee is due with the application
(payments should be made to Roger Williams University).
Deposit
A $600 deposit is due 30 days after acceptance to reserve a
place in the program. All deposits must be received by May 1 –
fall/year; or November 1 – spring. If a deposit is not paid within
the 30 days following the stated deadline, the student may be
dropped from the program. The deposit is applied to the tuition
bill for the semester the student will be abroad. Deposits are
non-refundable except in the extraordinary circumstance that a
program is cancelled.
Students withdrawing from the program will forfeit their
application fee and deposit by having a charge of $650.00 placed
on their account to off-set the initial $650.00 credit posted to the
account when the application fee and deposit were first made.
Tuition and Comprehensive Fee
For the vast majority of programs abroad, the tuition and
semester fees is comparable to tuition, room and board on the
Bristol campus. Some study abroad programs include meal
plans as part of their overall charges. Students who participate
in these programs will have the meal charges calculated into
the semester fee. Otherwise students will not be charged for
meals. For a select few programs, however, there may be an
additional fee premium that will be required. Students are
advised to consult with the Spiegel Center to obtain the most
up-to-date list of study abroad programs that require a premium
fee above Roger Williams University tuition, room and board. In
addition, students are responsible for the cost of airfare as well
as lab, materials and site-visit fees; if indicated on the financial
aid form, these costs will be considered. Students need to
budget independently for optional and extracurricular activities,
including personal travel and spending money.
Tuition payment in full for the fall semester is due July
1 and tuition payment in full for the spring semester is due
January 3. Students who have not paid their outstanding
balances by these dates will not be permitted to participate in
the Study Abroad Program.
Billing
Students are billed by Roger Williams University in the
usual manner.
Roger Williams University Study Abroad Program
Refund Policy
If a student voluntarily withdraws or is dismissed from a Study
Abroad program, he or she will be responsible for all costs associated
with the withdrawal including the cost of changing the return date
of the plane ticket, the cost of the room abroad, tuition, board and
financial aid according to the University refund schedule below.
Students who voluntarily leave a program must submit a signed
“Withdrawal From the University” form and obtain Bursar
approval. The student is responsible for any non-recoverable
charges assessed as a result of their withdrawal.
For students who do not return to the Bristol campus for the
semester, the refund schedule is as follows:
1. Before the first day of class: 100% of tuition only, less
the deposit.
2. Within the first week: 80% of tuition only.
3. Within the second week: 60% of tuition only.
For students allowed to return to campus, the refund schedule
is as follows:
1. Before the first day of class: 100% of tuition, room and
board only, less the deposit.
2. Within the first week: 80% of tuition, room and board only.
3. Within the second week: 60% of tuition, room and
board only.
If the student is permitted to return to the Bristol campus
during that same semester to continue his or her studies and is
permitted to live on campus, he or she will be responsible for
the entire cost of tuition, fees, room and board.
Any outstanding balance on a student’s account is deducted
from the refund. Any refund due the student, as authorized by
the Office of the Bursar, requires approximately three weeks
for processing.
Health Insurance
Roger Williams University requires all students studying abroad in
one of its programs to have medical insurance. Students enrolled in
the RWUs student health plan will maintain their coverage while
abroad. If students carry their own health insurance they will need
to certify their coverage to the Spiegel Center before going abroad.
PASSPORTS
All students enrolled in the Study Abroad Program must secure
passports. This is the responsibility of the student. Forms are
available at local U.S. Post Offices. Currently, passports can take
several months to procure. Therefore, students are strongly
encouraged to apply immediately. United States passports are
valid for 10 years.
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Study Abroad
PERSONAL TRAVEL & COMMUNICATIONS
Students may travel on their own during their time abroad,
provided it does not interfere with scheduled classes and activities
including field trips and special events. Students should be
aware of any travel alerts or restrictions that may be in effect.
Students studying abroad are encouraged to consider renting or
purchasing an international cell phone during their time overseas.
Many programs currently require this since it is an effective way
to ensure a means of communication while you are traveling.
Semester Abroad in Florence, Italy
THE FACULTY
Roger Williams University partners with the International
Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai for the delivery of this
program. Students have access to the Institute’s faculty and staff,
which include a Program Director and a Student Services staff.
All speak English and are credentialed in their respective fields.
PROGRAM PREREQUISITES
In addition to the general prerequisites listed in the General
Information section, students must also have at least 45 credits of
completed course work and a 2.75 cumulative grade point average.
THE INSTITUTE
Semester Abroad in Florence is offered at ISI/The International
Studies Institute, a center established by Academic Centers
Abroad, to meet the growing demand of study abroad with
a unique program set in Florence, Italy. The Institute’s
distinguished faculty and resources complement Roger
Williams University’s academic programs.
The Institute has chosen Palazzo Rucellai, a well-known
Renaissance structure of the 15th century, as the main site of
its facilities. The Institute occupies several floors of Palazzo
Rucellai and has classrooms, student and faculty lounges, a
library and computer rooms.
The architect Leon Batista Alberti designed the façade of
Palazzo Rucellai. Alberti also designed the façade of the famous
Florentine church, Santa Maria Novella. Bernardo Rossellino,
following the plans of Alberti, built the palace between 1455
and 1458. It was one of the richest and most decorated palaces
of Renaissance Florence. Palazzo Rucellai is located on via della
Vigna Nuova 18 in Florence, Italy in the Santa Maria Novella
quarter of the city, where there are many buildings of great
historical and artistic interest and importance to the history
of Florence. The group of buildings belonging to the Rucellai
family, one of the most involved families in the history of the
Santa Maria Novella complex, is placed between via della
Vigna Nouva, via Federighi and the Palazzo Strozzi.
Students enjoy the advantages of an English-speaking program,
and, at the same time, immerse themselves in an historical, cultural
and artistic tradition that is, arguably, beyond compare. Courses
exploit the city’s and the country’s wealth and legacy; typically, they
involve site visits throughout the surrounding region.
ARCHITECTURE STUDIO
The facility includes studio space, an extensive pin-up area,
computer lab, architecture library, conference room and
administrative offices. The studio is spacious and exceptionally
well lit with natural light. A network connects a series of
Internet accessible computers with the latest design software
including AutoCAD®, other applicable programs and large
format color printers.
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All architecture studio students are provided with an
architectural table, slide rulers, table lamps, and a common
work area for the semester’s duration. The studio and context
courses are taught by practiced architects and academics and
are designed to integrate lectures and discussion workshops,
on-site visits to churches, museums and monuments and field
trips to a variety of relevant destinations. The courses allow
students to sketch on-site and explore ideas for a team project
that is the core of the advanced design studio course.
ACCOMMODATIONS
Students live in shared apartments with other U.S. students
enrolled in the program. All housing is within walking distance
to the Institute and architecture studio. Bedrooms are furnished
with beds, a closet or armoire, sheets, pillows and blankets.
This program is considered self-catered since students will be
responsible for their own meals. Kitchen facilities include a
stove, refrigerator, cooking utensils and dishes. Everyone in the
apartment shares kitchen and bathroom facilities.
LIBRARY RESOURCES
The ISI library and the Internet serve as the main sources
of research in support of the program. The Library also
offers a quiet place for reading and studying. Students also
have limited, privileged access to various library and video
collections that maintain holdings in English as well as Italian
throughout Florence.
COMPUTER CENTER
The Computer Center at ISI contains PC systems equipped
with updated software and printers as well. WiFi is available in
school buildings.
PERMESSO DI SOGGIORNO
Upon arrival in Florence, students must obtain a Permesso
di Soggiorno (“Permit to Stay”). To procure this document,
students must provide the same documents necessary for
procuring an Italian visa. Further information on this process
is distributed to accepted students during the semester prior to
the semester abroad. Students will be responsible for the cost
of securing the Permesso and will receive assistance with this
process once in Italy from the Institute’s staff.
PROGRAM OPTIONS
Students participating in the Semester Abroad in Florence
Program have many course choices available to them. All
students are required to enroll in an appropriate level
Italian language course. It should be noted that a complete
Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in International
Studies can be satisfied in one semester. Courses that
satisfy this option can be obtained through the Spiegel
Center for Global and International Programs. For specific
course lists for a given semester, consult the Spiegel Center
for Global and International Programs (401) 254-3899 or
visit www.rwu.edu/global.
Semester Abroad in Florence Course Descriptions
PLEASE NOTE that the following descriptions are for
courses that have been consistently offered in Florence.
Course offerings may vary from semester to semester and
therefore the following courses should not be considered to
be definitive. While every attempt is made to accommodate
students’ first choice of courses, enrollment cannot be
guaranteed. Students are advised to consult the Spiegel
Study Abroad
Center for Global and International Programs before
selecting courses.
All courses carry 3 credits unless otherwise noted.
ARCH 477 – Architecture in Context
Fulfills Architecture major requirement
Prerequisites: Architecture major or completed architecture minor
The goal of this course is to teach students a method by which
to understand, analyze, and visually represent a city/site and its
context, producing tools that will be useful and applicable in
Architectural Design. The course will focus on Florence as a living and
contemporary city rather than an open air museum, pointing students
in their reading and understanding towards the context of the city
beyond the monuments. Using its built history of Florence as a case
study, the students will explore various meanings of context: urban
context, landscape and geography, social and human environment,
historical processes and stratified layers. A site-visit and materials fee
will be applied. (3 credits)
AAH 214 – The Art of Florence in Context: Masters and Monuments
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
This course examines the factors which made Florence the birthplace
and greatest focal point of the Renaissance. It is a heavily contextual
course, which emphasizes the value of seeing and analyzing
Renaissance art in its original, intended locations. Students will
become familiar with the art of the Florentine Renaissance, will be
better able to understand art by exploring its historical, social and
urban contexts, and will develop the analytical and interpretive skills
required to examine and understand successfully other kinds of
imagery. A site-visit and materials fee will be applied. (3 credits)
AAH 318 – History of Italian Renaissance Art II: Michelangelo
to Bernini
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
Beginning with Michelangelo, whose effect on the art of the period
was pervasive, this course will explore the progress and stylistic
developments in painting, sculpture and architecture of this period,
considering also the work of contemporary painters: Raphael, Fra
Bartolomeo, del Sarto, Signorelli, Pontormo and others. Attention
will be focused on the way art evolved in the most important artistic
centers: Florence, Rome and Venice. Offered in the spring semester
only. A site-visit fee will be applied. (3 credits)
AAH 330 – Topics in Art and Architectural History: Michelangelo
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
A study of the drawings, paintings, sculptures and architecture
of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564). Through a study of
Michelangelo’s precursors, including Masaccio and Jacopo della
Quercia, his apprenticeship with Ghirlandaio, his devotion to
classical antiquity, his early and mature work, and his writings and
his enduring artistic legacy, students will get a complete view of one
of the most influential artists of the High Renaissance. The course
includes site visits in Florence and Rome. Offered in the fall semester
only. A site-visit fee will be applied. (3 credits)
AAH 330 – Topics in Art and Architectural History: Leonardo
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
An in depth study of Leonardo da Vinci’s (1452-1519) drawings,
paintings and writings on art and the meaning of his anatomical
and physiognomic studies. This course seeks to define Leonardo’s
development as a painter and as a draftsman. The student will become
familiar not only with Leonardo’s individual masterpieces, but also
with his working methods, interests, inventiveness, and indebtedness
to other artist’s works. Offered in the spring semester only. A site-visit
fee will be applied. (3 credits)
ENG 430 – 20th Century Italian Literature in Translation
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
This course focuses on the main trends in the development of Italian
narrative since the end of the 19th century. Students will read works
by such prominent writers as Verga, Pirandello, Svevo, Ginzburg,
Buzzati, and Calvino. By placing these authors in the broader
context of European culture, students will acquire a critical language
appropriate to the reading and analysis of the ‘modernist’ novel and to
an understanding of the implications of ‘postmodernism’ in the Italian
literary tradition. (3 credits)
HIST 310/ POLSC 430 – Special Topics: Studies in the European Union
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
An exploration of the European Union through two main themes:
the national level which focuses on democracy as it unfolds within
the boundaries of the nation states and the creation of unity on
the supra-national level in Europe. It aims to give insight into the
political institutions, processes and policies of the major countries
in Europe, an appreciation of the diversity of systems encountered
in Europe, as well as the nature and function of the European
Union. (3 credits)
HIST 310 – Ancient Rome
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman
world, from Rome’s beginnings in myth and legend through its rise to
domination of the Mediterranean world, its violent conversion from a
Republic to an Empire, and the long success of that Empire down to its
collapse in the fifth century A.D. (3 credits)
HIST 315/ POLSC 430 – History and Politics of Modern Italy
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
This is designed to review and examine the modern political history
of Italy from the Second World War to the present time. After a short
review of Italian history before WWII, the main areas of focus will
be: WWII and the Cold War, the workings of governing institutions
in the post-war period, the role of the Church, political parties and
movements, the European unification process, black and red terrorism,
as well as political corruption and political conspiracy. (3 credits)
HUM 306 – The History and Culture of Food: A Comparative Analysis
Fulfills Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies requirement;
free elective
This course examines the history and culture of food in Italy and in
the US from a comparative perspective drawing particular attention to
the differences but also the connections between both. The evolution
of Italian food is explored with a focus on foreign influences which
have shaped the use of different food products, preparation methods,
consumption patterns, etc., over the centuries. Consideration will
be given to the role of food reform movements and food lobbies;
the creation of the Mediterranean diet, and the advent of a “new”
food culture in the United States. The emergence of a specific ItaloAmerican food culture from the beginning of the 20th century will
also be discussed. (3 credits)
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Study Abroad
HUM 399/ANTH 299 – Contemporary Italy: Culture and Society
Fulfills Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free
This course is an introduction to a variety of topical areas and major
themes of social and cultural anthropology. It looks at the concepts of
culture, modernity, and social structure, by applying them to Italian
politics, media, gender relationships, and medical practices. The
course thus guides students toward the discovery and understanding
of contemporary Italy. To this end, we deal both with direct
experience and with anthropological accounts of Italian society and
culture. (3 credits)
dedicated to develop proficiency in various genres and styles, the oral
component of the course will focus on argumentative exposition and
debates on topics of contemporary Italian culture. Prerequisite: 4
semesters of Italian language study. (3 credits)
ITAL 101 – Elementary Italian I
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
Proficiency-based instruction in basic grammar, discursive patterns,
vocabulary and syntax of the language within a cultural context, the
course emphasizes listening, speaking, reading and writing, and prepares
the student for more advanced study of the Italian language. It encourages
use of “the city as language lab,” and serves as an introduction to various
aspects of contemporary Italian culture. (3 credits)
ITAL 340 – Advanced Literary Topics
Fulfills Modern Language major requirement; minor requirement;
Core Concentration
An interdisciplinary introduction to the literary culture of modern Italy,
focusing primarily on the main trends in the development of Italian
narrative since the end of the 19th century. Students will read works by
the most prominent modern Italian writers, placing them in the broader
context of European culture, with an aim to acquiring a critical language
appropriate both to the reading and analysis of the “modernist” novel
and to an understanding of the implications of “post-modern-ism” in the
Italian literary tradition. Taught in Italian. (3 credits)
ITAL 102 – Elementary Italian II
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
This course follows Elementary Italian I, and is a continuation of the
study of the basic elements of the Italian language and its culture.
Proficiency-based instruction includes basic grammar, discursive patterns,
vocabulary and syntax of the language within a cultural context. The
course emphasizes listening, speaking, reading and writing, and prepares
the student for more advanced study of the Italian language. It encourages
use of “the city as language lab,” and serves as an introduction to various
aspects of contemporary Italian culture. (3 credits)
ITAL 201 – Intermediate Italian I
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
An intermediate Italian course building, through proficiency-based
instruction, on two semesters of previous work. A greater depth and
range of linguistic skills beyond the elementary level are pursued
through grammar review and conversational practice. Emphasis is
placed on achievement of fluency and the integration of language
and culture through more extensive reading and writing assignments.
The course explores various aspects of contemporary Italian culture,
including media such as TV news, children’s programs, popular music,
and newspapers. (3 credits)
ITAL 202 – Intermediate Italian II
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
An advanced intermediate course based on three previous semesters
of study. Students read a variety of textual materials covering various
aspects of Italian culture and society, engage in active discussion, and
develop their ability to write clear and well-articulated prose. Course
work includes presentation of grammar topics not covered in previous
courses. (3 credits)
ITAL 310 – Advanced Grammar and Composition
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; Core Concentration
requirement; Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in Italian Studies
requirement; free elective
This course furthers the students’ ability to communicate in
written and spoken Italian through discussions, presentations, and
compositions on assigned topics. While the written practice will be
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ITAL 338 – Italian Literary Tradition I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Modern Language Core Concentration
A survey of early Italian literary masterpieces with special consideration
of Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the
tools of analysis specific to literary studies, as well as on reaching an
understanding of historical context and the place of the works studied in
the broader European scene. Taught in Italian. (3 credits)
IB 430 – The Business and Management of Art and Culture
Fulfills major requirement; minor requirement; free elective
Markets for visual arts provide a particularly fertile ground for those
concerned with the economics of culture. The study of the past and
current structure of the market for visual art, the mechanisms that
fuel this flourishing market and the involvement of public and private
institutions in the context of the current globalization of the arts, provides
significant instruments for business and marketing studies. While
analyzing the economic impact of past and current art law, students will
evaluate the organization of visual arts and entertainment industries both
in the past and in the ‘new economy’ environment, which will be enriched
by meetings with significant professional figures working the world of
museums, foundations and international art trade. (3 credits)
VARTS 204 – Renaissance Drawing Techniques: The Human Figure
Fulfills a course requirement in Visual Arts studies; Interdisciplinary Core
Concentration in Italian Studies requirement; free elective
This course combines a concise and informative historical survey of
the image of the nude figure from the Classical to Mannerist periods
in art with an in-depth artistic analysis of human anatomy. Beginning
with a general study of the canon of the nude in classical sculpture,
its translation into Proto-Renaissance mosaics and Early and High
Renaissance painting and sculpture, the nude’s most expressionistic
appearance, and finally, in Mannerist art, the course will explore the
development of the portrayal of human figure. Students will draw in
the manner of the old masters from prototypes and live models. Sitevisit and materials fees will be applied. (3 credits)
VARTS 261 – Introduction to Photography: Portfolio of Florence
Fulfills a course requirement in Visual Arts studies; Interdisciplinary Core
Concentration in Italian Studies requirement; free elective
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of photography
including proper camera usage and exposure techniques using
photography as a creative art. Students will explore the architecture,
history, people, and culture of Florence to record and document their
visual impressions. Lecture, discussions, slide viewing and critiques,
and field work will be integrated into the course. Site-visit and
materials fees will be applied. (3 credits)
VARTS 282 – Beginning Oil Painting
Fulfills a course requirement in Visual Arts studies; Interdisciplinary Core
Concentration in Italian Studies requirement; free elective
By following, in abbreviated form, the step-by-step process for training
of the Renaissance painter as outlined in Cennino Cennini’s 14th
Study Abroad
century treatise on art, Il Libro dell’ Arte. students will experience the
instructional methods of that period’s apprenticeship system. Using
the same materials and following the same course of instruction as
did Renaissance apprentices, students are introduced, following basic
exercises in drawing, to various painting techniques, including egg
tempera and fresco, to round out their artist’s education. Students will
copy directly from frescoes and sculptures in Florence as Renaissance
apprentices did. Site visit and materials fees will be applied. (3 credits)
VARTS 383 – The Art of Buon Fresco
Fulfills a course requirement in the Visual Arts studies; Interdisciplinary
Core Concentration in Italian Studies requirement; free elective
This course provides a unique combination of art history and studio
work to pro-vide a complete exploration of the technical and creative
aspects of fresco painting in the Renaissance. Through an analysis
of early to high Renaissance frescoes in Florence, Siena, Arezzo and
Rome, and hands-on experience in the studio creating frescoes in
the traditional method, the history of the development of the fresco
technique and its widespread use in Renaissance art and society will
be explored. Site-visit and materials fees will be applied. (3 credits)
Semester Abroad in London, England
Instituted in 1971 to provide theatre students with an
opportunity to see the finest theatre in the world and be
immersed in English history, culture, arts and architecture,
this program also welcomes students from other majors who
wish to experience a semester abroad in a Roger Williams
program while working to complete their major or pursue a
Core Concentration in British Studies. Special courses and
opportunities are added to the curriculum customized to the
needs of each student, helping them fulfill their educational
goals. Special curriculums have been designed and are available
for students in Dance, Education, Education/English and
Graphics. The program is offered each fall semester.
The London Program is unique in being designed as an
experiential study-abroad semester. Courses in the program
build on the limitless opportunities that London and England
provide to experience historical and cultural sites directly.
Courses are conducted at historic sites, in the museums and
on the streets. The curriculum includes field trips during the
day and performances during the evening and opportunities to
meet with practitioners as well as scholars.
THE FACULTY
Dr. Jeffrey Martin, theatre professor, serves as overall Program
Director. A Roger Williams faculty member leads the program
each year, assisted by distinguished adjunct faculty affiliated
with British universities and theatrical training institutions
who teach courses for the program. Additional guest lecturers
from the world of British theatre often supplement the
Semester Abroad Studies in London program.
PROGRAM PREREQUISITES
In addition to the general prerequisites, students must also
have at least 45 credits of completed course work and a 2.6
cumulative grade point average.
ACCOMMODATIONS
The London branch campus of Roger Williams University
is housed in the Pickwick Hotel in the heart of London’s
Bloomsbury district and around the corner from the British
Museum. The hotel facilities include our dorm rooms, office/
library, lounge, kitchen, and computer facilities with wireless
access throughout the building. Some classes are held in the
hotel or in a nearby facility, although the majority of class time
is spent at the site being studied.
Transportation within Central London is provided for each
student by means of a 12-week travel card. Special information
about housing is discussed at orientation sessions.
LIBRARY RESOURCES
A small library of reference books is housed at the London
campus. Students may arrange to have lending cards issued
to them by a local London library. These cards extend
borrowing privileges to the students at all seven libraries in the
Westminster group, including the Central Reference Library
on St. Martin’s Lane, which holds London’s largest collection of
theatre and literature books.
PROGRAM OPTIONS
Students participating in the Semester Abroad Studies in
London program have four options of study available to them.
All students enroll in THEAT 490 Cultures in Contact: British
Heritage and Its Impact. It should be noted that a complete
Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in British Studies can be
satisfied in one semester. The program options are:
I. The Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in British Studies
II. Four courses toward the Core Concentration in London Theatre
III. Four courses toward the Theatre Major/Minor Course
of Study
IV. Five courses toward an Elective course of study
V. Four courses toward an English/Secondary Education
Course of Study
Semester Abroad in London Course Descriptions
All courses carry 3 credits unless otherwise noted.
HUM 330 – Society and Shelter in Britain
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies
A study of the development of English culture through the interaction
of architecture, urban planning, social organization, and history. The
course addresses the overlay of cultures and ideas in England through
the use of sites from various periods from prehistoric (Stonehenge,
Avebury) through the developments of the industrial age (St. Pancras
railway terminal and the development of the London suburb).
HUM 430 – History through the Museums of England
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies
Using the vast museum resources of London, the course studies the
changes in European society through the visual arts starting with the
Elgin marbles and Egyptian collection in the British Museum and
ending with the new modern art Tate Gallery on the South Bank. The
course will emphasize how museums shape our perceptions of the past
and understanding of ourselves, through their holdings, organization
and presentation.
THEAT 312 – Acting Workshop
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Prerequisite: Two semesters of introductory acting courses or their
equivalent and a serious commitment to acting as a profession.
Advanced study of experimental theatre techniques. The aim of the
work is to extend the creative range of the actor by developing his or
her physical and vocal equipment, releasing the imagination so that
the actor is able to bring a new freedom and new depth to his or her
work, whether in the experimental or the traditional theatre.
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Study Abroad
THEAT 322 – Theatre Design Workshop
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies;
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Prerequisites: THEAT 120, 220
Advanced design project in scenery, costume, or lighting. Each student
submits a plan for his or her own course of study, augmented by
museum visits and research checklists, using the various resources
available in London. Ordinarily, the goal of this study is a major design
project of portfolio quality.
THEAT 330 – Theatre of Shakespeare
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies;
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Critical analysis of selected comedies, tragedies, and histories,
including a study of the Globe Theatre and of contemporary
production techniques. Plays chosen reflect the announced seasons of
local and nearby London theatre production companies.
THEAT 331 – Modern Theatre and Drama
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Examines the ideas and practices of the modern theatre. Beginning
in the late nineteenth century with realism and the anti-realistic
rebellion, the course follows the major theories, plays and
practitioners that shaped our contemporary theatre.
THEAT 332 – British Theatre and Performing Arts
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies;
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Study of current trends in European performance based on the experiences
of a wide range of plays, concerts, dance and other performance events in
London. Classroom discussions, reading and writing assignments bring the
viewing activities into academic perspective.
THEAT 341 – Seminar in Directing Problems
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies;
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a Directing class, directing
experience, or consent of instructor
Study of specific problems of play direction as seen in the current
productions in the London theatres. Analyzes each production to
identify directing problems and possible solutions. Class attendance
at the productions and guest lectures by British directors, whenever
possible, supplements the study.
THEAT 490 – Cultures in Contact: British Heritage and Its Impact
Fulfills a requirement for the Interdisciplinary Core Concentration in
British Studies;
Fulfills a course requirement in the Core Concentration in London Theatre
Accompanied by lectures in English history, art, and mores. The bulk
of the course is an on-the street workshop exploring British culture.
Includes individual visits to many important museums and galleries,
and tours of London, Greenwich, Windsor, Hampton Court, St. Albans
(Verulamium), Shaw’s Corner, Canterbury, and Stratford-Upon-Avon.
Required of all participating students.
DANCE 225 – Intermediate Technique: London
Pre-requisites: DANCE 301, 302; or consent of department faculty
Designed for students who must complete additional technical work on
the intermediate level. In addition to class performance, students increase
knowledge of techniques associated with modern, ballet and dance masters.
DANCE 325 – Advanced Technique: London
Prerequisites: DANCE 320, 321; or consent of department faculty
Offered to students who exhibit special talents in the field of dance.
Each will be required to challenge and maximize his or her abilities in
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technique, improvisation, and repertory. (3 credits – 1 credit applied to
upper level technique requirement for Dance majors) Fall, London only.
DANCE 350 – British Dance and Performance Art: London
Co-requisites THEAT490 (Students pursuing a Core Concentration in dance
may substitute this course for THEAT 350.)
Offers opportunities to see dance, movement theatre, and performance
art in Britain, and to study the cultural influences of Britain on
these performing arts. Students attend several performances a week,
participate in group discussions, and complete written reports.
Semester Abroad at
Universities Worldwide:
RWU Affiliated Programs Abroad
Roger Williams University has developed formal affiliations
with a carefully selected group of quality program providers
that are recognized nationally for their proven academic
integrity, strong focus on experiential learning and excellent
reputation for providing quality support services to students
abroad. Through these affiliations, students study at prestigious
universities around the world. At these sites, students study
with faculty and peers not only native to these institutions,
but also with other international students representing many
countries around the globe. Depending on the program,
students may choose to pursue studies in their majors, minors
or to complete a Core Concentration in International Studies.
For information about specific course offerings and other
program details, students should contact the Spiegel Center for
Global and International Programs.
PROGRAM PREREQUISITES
In most cases, RWU students can go abroad as early as the
beginning of their sophomore year. For RWU affiliated
programs, minimum cumulative grade point averages vary from
2.5 to 3.0. Consult with the Spiegel Center for specific program
requirements. Other requirements include the following:
– Declaration of major and Core Concentration
– Acceptable judicial record
– Advisor’s/dean’s approval
Roger Williams University students have a choice between
different program models offered through our affiliate partners as
well as our direct enroll and exchange relationships. These models
include classic lecture-based programs housed in a campus setting
at a university overseas, field based programs that allow students
to immerse themselves as much as possible into the local culture
and discipline-specific programs that allow certain majors to
incorporate an international dimension into their studies.
Study Abroad Program Locations
(Program Roster is subject to change)
Amman, Jordan – University of Jordan
Council on International Educational Exchange
The University of Jordan is the first and oldest university in Jordan.
Students take a required Arabic course and round out their schedules
with three area studies courses taught in English. Area studies courses
are offered in anthropology, history, economics, literature, religion,
archaeology, environmental studies, political science, and the media.
Study Abroad
Service-learning and internship opportunities are also available for
interested students.
Athens, Greece – Center for Hellenic and Balkan Studies
RWU/Arcadia University
This program offers courses in classical, Byzantine, and modern
Greek studies for students of North American universities. Studies are
enhanced by the wealth of historical and cultural resources available
in Athens and the surrounding region, with both excursions and fieldstudy possibilities for a hands-on experience. With the exception of
Greek-language courses, all courses are taught in English.
Auckland, New Zealand – University of Auckland, New Zealand
RWU/Arcadia University
This program offers study abroad students a large comprehensive
university in a lively and diverse multi-cultural city. The city of
Auckland has a truly international flavor and unique environmental
features. Courses of study include biology, marine studies,
engineering, anthropology, Maori and Pacific Studies.
Barcelona, Spain - Arcadia Center for Catalan, Spanish &
Mediterranean Studies
RWU/Arcadia University
This program, located in the bustling neighborhood of L’Eixample,
allows students at all levels of Spanish to be accommodated. Courses
that are available include, Spanish and Catalan language, business,
studio art, political science, art history and literature. Instruction is in
both Spanish and English.
Beijing, China – Beijing Foreign Studies University
This direct enroll program allows students to experience an immersive
experience in Chinese Culture while studying a variety of subjects.
Courses available include Business, Management, Political Science,
Languages and much more.
Berlin, Germany – CIEE Study Center in Berlin
Council on International Educational Exchange
This program is intended for students who have an interest in
contemporary Germany, who wish to pursue coursework in English
and study German language. The Language and Culture program at
the CIEE Study Center in Berlin provides challenging and stimulating
courses in a range of subjects with the aim of increasing students’
understanding of contemporary cultural realities in Berlin, Germany,
and Europe, as well as language courses to improve students’ facility
with the German language.
Brisbane, Australia – Griffith University (Nathan & Gold Coast Campus)
Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
Griffith University is one of Australia’s most progressive universities.
Located in Brisbane, Australia’s third largest city, the traditional
strength of their classes lies in environmental science, international
business and education courses. Interested students have an
opportunity to participate in a two-week environmental conservation
volunteer program with Wild Mountains.
Cairns & Townsville, Australia – James Cook University
RWU/Arcadia University
James Cook University, located in Northern Australia, uses its
proximity to the Great Barrier Reef, tropical rainforests, arid outback
Queensland, and indigenous communities to create an innovative
study abroad experience. A comprehensive university, James Cook
offers a wide variety of disciplines, not only in marine biology, but
business, economics, engineering and sociology.
Cape Town, South Africa – University of Cape Town
RWU/Arcadia University
The University of Cape Town (UCT) is South Africa’s oldest university,
and is one of Africa’s leading teaching and research institutions.
UCT is a comprehensive university but offers an exceptional
opportunity for business, science and engineering majors to spend a
semester or year of study taking courses in English.
Dakar, Senegal – Suffolk University Dakar Campus
Council on International Educational Exchange
This is an ideal program for students who are interested or majoring in
French studies, developmental studies or international relations. The
program is geared toward students interested in continuing French
language study and learning Wolof, while taking other courses in
English and having a cultural immersion experience. Opportunities
also include service-learning, or internships.
University College Dublin, Ireland
RWU Direct Enroll Program
A Leading European research-intensive university, UCD is the largest
university in Ireland, and is one of the two Irish universities ranked
within the top 200 universities in the world (THE World University
Ranking). With a history stretching back to 1854 and an impressive
list of notable alumni, including the writer James Joyce and many
current and former government ministers, we can rightly claim to have
been a formative influence and an integral part of the Irish State since
its foundation.
Dublin, Ireland – Dublin City University
Council on International Educational Exchange
Dublin City University enjoys a reputation as Ireland’s most
progressive university. The goal of the program is to introduce students
to the breadth and depth of Irish culture while enhancing their
academic studies through integrated study at Dublin City University.
The program offers a core course in Irish culture and society, followed
by opportunities to study in a variety of disciplines from business to
international relations to communications.
Dunedin, New Zealand – University of Otago
RWU/Arcadia University
New Zealand’s oldest university has a reputation for academic
excellence and a high level of services for international students.
Participants can take courses in political studies, anthropology, media
studies, theatre, environmental studies, business as well as many more
options. Students are able to live with and interact with students from
New Zealand as well as from around the world.
Galway, Ireland – National University of Ireland, Galway
RWU/Arcadia University
Students select courses from the National University’s regular
degree programs with a variety of course offerings including, but
not limited to the humanities, sciences, and business. Students will
study alongside Irish students in the university community of Galway.
While classes are taught in English, the University maintains a strong
commitment to the Irish language, Gaelic.
Granada, Spain – University of Granada
Central College Abroad
The Central College Granada program is a Spanish immersion
program with the goal of developing students’ Spanish language and
cross-cultural skills, as well as providing them the opportunity to
take courses in the liberal arts. With its distinctive cultural heritage
and history, Granada provides a unique experience for students at all
levels of Spanish, from beginning to bilingual. Students may choose an
intensive language program or a combination of language and liberal
arts courses. They may also enhance their skills by participating in an
internship or service learning experience.
Heredia, Costa Rica – Universidad Nacional Autónoma
Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
Heredia located only seven miles away from the nation’s capital, San
José. The Universidad Nacional Autonóma is a public university that
offers a full curriculum of undergraduate courses, including Latin
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Study Abroad
American studies, sociology, economics and business, environmental
sciences, ecology and marine biology. Students are required to enroll
in an advanced Spanish language course and a History of Costa Rica
course, both arranged by IFSA-Butler. Students then complete their
course load by adding three or four courses from the university. All
courses are taught in Spanish.
Hong Kong, China – Lingnan University
RWU Exchange Program
Lingnan University, the only liberal arts university in Hong Kong,
is a small university situated in Tuen Mun in the New Territories.
The university offers courses taught in English in Cultural Studies,
English, History, Philosophy, Visual Studies, Business, Social Sciences,
and Economics. Students live in dormitories with Chinese students.
The campus is a beautiful example of both eastern and western styles
which represents Hong Kong as a whole.
Hyderabad, India – University of Hyderabad
Council on International Educational Exchange
The program offers students a combination of specially
designed courses and regular university courses in such fields
as communications, anthropology, dance, art, political science,
economics, and Hindi, Telugu, and Urdu languages. Students can
study the impact of modernity upon tradition in the world’s largest
democracy though history, literature, philosophy and sociology. This
program is also ideal for a student who would like partake in a servicelearning project or undertake an internship.
Istanbul, Turkey – Istanbul Technical University
RWU Exchange Program
This program offers students the opportunity to study at a leading
university situated in one of the most vibrant cities in the world.
Students will engage in a vigorous academic program and engage in
a culturally immersive program as well. ITU has a 238 year history
as being a leader in higher education with strong programs in
engineering and architecture to name a few.
Istanbul, Turkey – Koc University
Council on International Educational Exchange
Choice of English-taught courses in a wide range of subjects, from
archaeology to accounting and engineering to social sciences. There
are opportunities to participate in community involvement, through
internships or volunteering. Students are immersed in cultural and
educational activities such as visits to museums, international film
and music festivals, the State Ballet, the opera and more.
Leiden, the Netherlands – Leiden University
Central College Abroad
Leiden, the Netherlands is located less than 30 minutes from
Amsterdam, Rotterdam and The Hague. Leiden University is the
nation’s oldest and most prestigious university. Students take a
required Dutch course with additional classes to round out their
schedule. Classes range from traditional courses to internships or
service-learning opportunities. All courses taught are geared to
highlight your study abroad experience and many courses include
field-trips both within and outside of the country.
Limerick, Ireland – University of Limerick
RWU Direct Enroll Program
The University of Limerick (UL) is an independent, internationally
focused university with over 11,000 students and 1,313 staff. The
University has a proud record of innovation in education and
excellence in research and scholarship. UL offers programs across four
schools: Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Education and Health
Sciences; Kemmy Business School; and Science and Engineering.
Outstanding recreational, cultural and sporting facilities further
enhance this exceptional learning and working environment. The
campus is located 5km from Limerick city and 20km from Shannon
International Airport.
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Lisbon, Portugal – Universidad Nova de Lisboa
Council on International Educational Exchange
This program is designed for students of all levels of Portuguese,
beginner to advanced. Beginning and intermediate students can start
their Portuguese training or strengthen their existing skills while taking
content courses in English. Advanced Portuguese students are able to
directly enroll in university courses in Portuguese alongside local and
other international students. The range of courses available appeals to
students with a strong interest in the social sciences and humanities and
include anthropology, literature, music, politics, and sociology.
London, England – University of Westminster
RWU Direct Enroll Program
This program offers a distinctly British learning experience within a
truly international environment. You can choose from a wide range
of subjects, course levels and modes of delivery. The University
of Westminster is a comprehensive university allowing students
to enroll in courses in disciplines that include criminal justice,
communications, humanities, science and art.
**The School of Justice Studies has established a semester program at
the University of Westminster to allow Criminal Justice and Legal Studies
majors the chance to take a semester worth of courses at this location**
Mendoza, Argentina – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo
Intermediate Latin American Studies Program
Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
The Universidad Nacional de Cuyo differs from most South American
institutions in that it has a self-contained campus. UNC is considered a
top regional university overall and one of the most respected universities
in South America in the liberal and fine arts, with courses in social
science available. Students take university courses in regular classroom
settings with Argentine students. All courses are taught in Spanish.
Melbourne, Australia – Deakin University
RWU Direct Enroll Program
Deakin University has four campuses all of which offer a distinctive and
unique living and learning experience. Each campus offers a wide range
of services and facilities that all students can enjoy, and reflects the
student-centered approach for which Deakin is renowned. Students have
the opportunity to study a range of topics alongside Australian students.
Courses are available in Architecture, Construction Management,
Humanities, Law, Business and management, Communications,
Engineering, and Environmental Studies.
Monteverde, Costa Rica – Monteverde Biological Field Station
Council on International Educational Exchange
This program is designed for students with biology-related majors
who have completed at least one year of introductory biology. Its aim
is to give biology and related majors a sophisticated and up to date
understanding of tropical ecology and its conservation. All biology
courses are taught in English.
Northern Ireland – University of Ulster
Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
The University of Ulster is the largest university on the island of Ireland
and one of the largest in the UK. There are four campuses: Coleraine,
Jordanstown in Newtownabbey, Belfast, and Magee in Derry. Each
campus has its strength; Coleraine’s coursework includes environmental
studies, Jordanstown courses focus on business, management and
engineering, Belfast’s coursework concentrates on art and design, and
Magee has a unique program for peace and conflict studies.
Palmerstown North, New Zealand – Massey University
Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
Massey University, New Zealand’s largest university is located in the
Manawau region on the North Island and is a major comprehensive
university. Massey has a philosophy of helping students prepare for
their careers with programs that are relevant, innovative, flexible and
progressive. Study abroad students are able to choose courses from
Study Abroad
across a wide range of disciplines and faculties, including its fine arts
and design program.
Paris, France – CIEE Study Center/ Paris Center for Critical Studies
Council on International Educational Exchange
Expand your interest in contemporary French society and culture
on this program uniquely adapted to the intermediate and advanced
student. Students can take content courses in both English and
French, with a French-only option and participate in cultural outings
integrated into classes. Participants will live with a homestay family
while studying in Paris.
Prague, Czech Republic – CIEE Study Center in Prague/
Charles University
Council on International Educational Exchange
The Central European Studies program offers students a series of
specially designed courses in a wide range of academic disciplines
taught in English by local faculty. Although there is no language
prerequisite for participation in the program, students are required to
take a Czech language course in order to better immerse themselves
in local culture. The combination of Czech language and academic
courses allows students to explore the dynamics of this Central
European nation and its culture.
San Jose, Costa Rica – Universidad Veritas
RWU Direct Enroll Program
Universidad Veritas offers a wide variety of programs of different
lengths in Costa Rica that can be combined and customized for different
educational needs. On this tropical campus you will learn Spanish in
one of the happiest countries in the world, discover Latin America from
a new perspective, and develop your skills in a different country.
Santiago, Chile – Pontificia Universidad de Chile
Institute for Study Abroad, Butler University
For outstanding academics, consider the Chilean Universities Program
(CUP) in Santiago. On the CUP, students can choose from an array of
courses at Universidad de Chile and Pontífica Universidad Católica de
Chile. University coursework ranges from humanities to natural sciences
to business classes. Students take these university courses in regular
classroom settings with Chilean students. All courses taught in Spanish.
SEA Semester: Sea Education Association of Woods Hole
SEA Semester is taught through the Sea Education Association
(SEA) of Woods Hole, Massachusetts.
This exciting and challenging off-campus program combines onshore
classes, labs, and field work in ocean science and maritime studies
with an offshore sailing and research experience. The first half of
the program (the shore component) is spent at the SEA campus in
Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Studying oceanography, maritime history
and literature, and ship navigation, students learn about the human
experience and the sea, use specific methods to study it, and design
research projects that will be the focus of their work at sea. The sea
component takes students to the open sea on a traditional sailing
vessel that is a campus, classroom and home. Applying knowledge
acquired ashore, students learn new skills, complete their research
projects, and meet the age old challenges the sea poses to mariners.
(This program is academically affiliated with RWU however certain
restrictions exist for the transfer of institutional aid. Please consult
with the Spiegel Center for details)
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China – East China Normal University
Council on International Educational Exchange
The program offers various area studies courses in English, in
global studies, international relations, economics, and modern
Chinese history, and intensive language-training at one of the most
highly rated language-training centers in Shanghai. The program
accommodates both students who have no previous course work in
Chinese and those who have studied Chinese for several semesters.
St. Georges, Bermuda – BIOS: Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences
Students take a semester-long immersion into the study of marine
science with a program of class work and research that is unique in
marine education. In addition to academic pursuits, a semester at
BIOS will expose students to a unique research environment unlike
a normal university setting. As BIOS is a residential community of
researchers, students not only study and work with active scientists,
but eat meals, play sports and socialize with faculty, graduate students
and technicians who reside on the campus.
Stirling and Edinburgh, Scotland – University of Stirling/
University of Edinburgh
RWU/Arcadia University
The University of Stirling, located in the center of Scotland, offers
a great choice of subjects, with high-quality courses in 42 areas
with notable strengths in Scottish studies, environmental studies,
psychology, marine science and marine biology.
The University of Edinburgh, in the nation’s capital, enjoys a
distinguished status as one of the leading research universities in
Europe. Its extensive range of subject offerings makes the University of
Edinburgh a popular choice for study abroad students.
St. Petersburg, Russia – St. Petersburg State University, CIEE
Study Center
Council on International Educational Exchange
The Russian Area Studies program is for students who are interested
in an academic program in Russia with an English component. The
program offers a set of course, taught in English, on Russian history,
culture, politics, civilization, and cinema, as well as a rigorous
language program.
Nancy, France – ICN Business School
RWU exchange Program
This exchange program was created specifically for students in the
Gabelli School of Business. This program allows students to complete
either a semester or a full academic year at ICN, engaged in business
topics as well as language instruction. Students are enrolled alongside
other European students at ICN, a leading business school in France.
Sydney, Australia Summer Internship
RWU/Arcadia University
This program allows you to earn academic credit while enhancing your
professional knowledge. Placements are available in a broad range of
areas including business; social sciences; humanities; and the visual,
fine and graphic arts. You’ll work full time three days per week during
your internship and will also attend class one day per week.
Tokyo, Japan – Sophia University
Council on International Educational Exchange
The CIEE Study Center at Sophia University is designed to provide
students with superior cross-cultural and language training by way of
intensive Japanese language course work, offering a range of courses
in various disciplines, a managed homestay program, and providing
on-site staff to support the students.
Wollongong, Australia – University of Wollongong
RWU/Arcadia University
The University of Wollongong is located in New South Wales’
Pacific coastline, some 80 kilometers south of Australia’s economic
center, Sydney. With course offerings ranging from engineering to
contemporary indigenous issues, Wollongong offers a wide range of
classes. The university attracts large numbers of international students,
and is renowned for its challenging academic programs.
Yokohama, Japan – Yokohama National University
This program offers a variety of courses available in English while
still being able to integrate with Japanese students. This allows an
exceptional cultural experience. This program is located in one of
Japan’s most vibrant cities.
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Study Abroad
Faculty-Led
Study Abroad Programs
Each year a number of faculty-led travel abroad programs
are offered and are announced in the Fall or Spring Course
Schedules. At present these trips are specifically tied to
courses that begin and end on the Bristol campus. Students are
encouraged whenever possible to participate in these programs
as well as semester abroad programs. These are supplemental,
value added Roger Williams University course experiences.
The fee schedule for these programs will vary and is
usually published the semester before the trip is offered. Fees
associated with Winter Intersession and Summer Session trips
are the full responsibility of the student however students are
eligible to apply for the Bridging the World scholarship.
Students who apply to these faculty-led programs are
subject to the same criteria as those of the semester-long
programs, that is, the appropriate cumulative grade point
average (as determined by the program leader), a good judicial
history and the support of the dean and advisor.
Roger Williams University reserves the right to cancel
any faculty-led program offered during the academic year for
insufficient enrollment or for any other reason. These reasons
may include safety and security concerns at the program
location. Should it prove necessary to do so, the School will
promptly notify all registrants.
78
Winter Intersession and Summer Session Study Abroad
opportunities offered to undergraduates in recent years include:
Winter Intersessions:
Belize through the Department of Marine Biology
Ireland through the Department of Communication
Panama through the Department of Marine Biology
Jamaica through the Department of Psychology
Germany through the School of Architecture, Arts and
Historic Preservation
Summer Sessions:
Brazil through the Departments of Anthropology, Sociology
& Communication
China through the Department of Foreign Languages and
through Gabelli School of Business
France through the Department of Foreign Languages
Japan through Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
London and Paris, through the Departments of History & Sociology
Netherlands through the School of Architecture, Arts &
Historic Preservation
Perugia, Italy through the School of Business and Department
of Foreign Languages
Rome, Italy through the School of Education
Study Abroad
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The University CORE Curriculum
Mankind is now in one of its rare moods of shifting its outlook. The
mere compulsion of tradition has lost its force. It is the business
of philosophers, students, and practical people to re-create and
re-enact a vision of the world, conservative and radical, including
these elements of reverence and order without which society
lapses into a riot, a vision penetrated through and through with
unflinching rationality. Such a vision is the knowledge which Plato
identified with virtue.
– Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947)
•
forge meaningful connections between past, present
and future;
•
emphasize the ethical, practical, and theoretical
challenges of contemporary life in the context of the
historical continuum;
•
stimulate interest in interdisciplinary relationships,
because in an international society’s global marketplace
breadth of knowledge, multiple areas of expertise,
innovative ideas and new methodologies are essential;
The Purpose of the CORE
•
develop skills such as problem solving, reasoned judgment,
articulate communication, and cooperative teamwork;
•
incorporate knowledge and skills specific to the CORE
with those specific to the majors;
•
construct new paradigms and solutions by integrating
apparently disparate categories of thought;
•
provide an intellectual enterprise that links scholarship to
practice, learning to experience, and individual to community;
•
entertain discourse about a central idea: the tension
between order and chaos and resulting dilemmas; and
•
encourage reflection on central questions: Who am I?
What can I know? And, based on what I know, how
should I act?
Students matriculating at the University today enter the
academy at an extraordinary moment, for as their formal
education concludes, graduates are entering a world in which
life and work are permeated by rapid and dramatic change.
Mindful of this and mindful of our commitment to
prepare students for the future, the University has instituted
the CORE Curriculum. Though rooted in the time-tested
foundation of the liberal arts and sciences, the CORE is a
contemporary education that celebrates not only the tradition
of the individual disciplines, but also the inexhaustible
knowledge that we gain when we compare, integrate, and
reflect on these subjects. A model for living, learning, and
working in the 21st century, studies in the CORE:
81
Core Curriculum
University CORE Professors
CORE 101: Science: Discoveries in Context
Nancy Breen, Associate Professor of Chemistry
Loren Byrne, Assistant Professor of Biology
Sean P. Colin, Associate Professor of Environmental Science
Avelina Espinosa, Associate Professor of Biology
Marcia Marston, Professor of Biology
Clifford Murphy, Associate Professor of Chemistry
Stephen O’Shea, Associate Professor of Chemistry
Harold Pomeroy, Professor of Biology
Scott Rutherford, Associate Professor of Environmental Science
Timothy Scott, Professor of Biology
Thomas Sorger, Professor of Biology
David Taylor, Associate Professor of Biology
Clifford Timpson, Professor of Chemistry
Kerri Warren, Associate Professor of Biology
Paul Webb, Professor of Biology
Brian Wysor, Associate Professor of Biology
CORE 102: History and the Modern World
Charlotte Carrington, Assistant Professor of History
Laura D’Amore, Assistant Professor American Studies
Sargon Donabed, Assistant Professor of History
Ernest Greco, Associate Professor of Political Science
Jeffrey Meriwether, Associate Professor of History
Debra Ann Mulligan, Associate Professor of History
David Moskowitz, Associate Professor of Political Science
Autumn Quezada-Grant, Assistant Professor of History
Joseph W. Roberts, Assistant Professor of Political Science
June Speakman, Professor of Political Science
Jennifer Stevens, Associate Professor American Studies
Michael Swanson, Professor of History
CORE 103: Perspectives in Human Behavior
Garrett Berman, Professor of Psychology
Bonita G. Cade, Associate Professor of Psychology
Jeremy Campbell, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Alan Canestrari, Professor of Education
MaryBeth MacPhee, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Bruce Marlowe, Professor of Education
Jason Patch, Associate Professor Sociology
Judith Platania, Associate Professor of Psychology
Teal Rothschild, Associate Professor of Sociology
Jessica Skolnikoff, Professor of Anthropology
Becky L. Spritz, Associate Professor of Psychology
Charles Trimbach, Professor of Psychology
Laura Turner, Associate Professor of Psychology
Donald Whitworth, Professor of Psychology
Ann Winfield, Associate Professor of Education
Matt Zaitchik, Professor of Psychology
CORE 104: Literature, Philosophy and the Ascent of Ideas
Roberta Adams, Professor of English Literature and Associate Dean
of Arts & Humanities
Paul Bender, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric
and Composition
Robert Blackburn, Professor of Philosophy
Adam Braver, Associate Professor of Creative Writing
Jennifer Campbell, Associate Professor of Writing, Rhetoric
and Composition
Margaret Case, Associate Professor English Literature
Anthony Hollingsworth, Professor of Foreign Language
82
Dong-Hoon Lee, Associate Professor of English as a Second Language
Jason Jacobs, Assistant Professor of Foreign Language
John M. Madritch, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric
and Composition
Kate Mele, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric
and Composition
Nancy Nester, Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Dahliani Reynolds, Assistant Professor of Writing, Rhetoric
and Composition
Deborah Robinson, Professor of English
Renee Soto, Associate Professor of Creative Writing
James Tackach, Professor of English
Peter Thompson, Associate Professor Foreign Languages
Michael Wright, Professor of Philosophy
Min Zhou, Associate Professor of Foreign Language
CORE 105: Aesthetics in Context: The Artistic Impulse
William Ayton, Professor of Music
Sara Butler, Associate Professor of Art and Architectural History
Elizabeth Duffy, Associate Professor of Art
Catherine Hawkes, Assistant Professor of Music
France Hunter, Associate Professor of Dance
Nermin Kura, Professor of Art and Architectural History
Marilynn Mair, Professor of Music
Jeffrey Martin, Professor of Theatre
Murray McMillan, Associate Professor of Art
Gary Shore, Associate Professor of Dance
Jeffrey Silverthorne, Professor of Art
Robin Stone, Associate Professor of Theatre
Anne Tait, Assistant Professor of Art
Randall Van Schepen, Associate Professor of Art and
Architectural History
The CORE Interdisciplinary Senior Seminars
William Ayton, Professor of Music
Paul Bender, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric
and Composition
Adam Braver, Associate Professor of Creative Writing
Bonita Cade, Associate Professor of Psychology
Jennifer Campbell, Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric
and Composition
Edward Delaney, Professor of Cretive Writing
Robert Eisinger, Professor of Political Science
Robert Engvall, Professor of Criminal Justice
Steven Esons, Professor of Public Administration
Avelina Espinosa, Associate Professor of Biology
Anthony Hollingsworth, Professor of Foreign Language
Jason Jacobs, Assistant Professor of Foreign Language
Robert Jacobson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Marilynn Mair, Professor of Music
Marcia Marston, Professor of Biology
William McKenzie, Professor of Computer Information Systems
David Moskowitz, Associate Professor of Political Science
Nancy Nester, Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Harold Pomeroy, Professor of Biology
Joseph W. Roberts, Associate Professor of Political Science
Deborah Robinson, Professor of English
Anthony Ruocco, Professor of Computer Science
Timothy Scott, Professor of Biology
Valerie Sloan, Associate Professor of Graphic Design
Thomas Sorger, Professor of Biology
Becky Spritz, Associate Professor of Psychology
Core Curriculum
Jennifer Stevens, Associate Professor American Studies/History
June Speakman, Professor of Political Science
Kerri Ullucci, Assistant Professor of Education
Randall Van Schepen, Associate Professor of Art and
Architectural History
Michael Yuehong Yuan, Assistant Professor of Computer
Information Systems
The University CORE Course of Study
I. Three Skills Courses – one in mathematics and two in
writing – prepare students to think abstractly and express their
ideas clearly. Students complete these courses during the first
three semesters.
II. The Five-Course Interdisciplinary CORE comprises one
course in each of five areas: the sciences, western civilization,
the social sciences, literature and philosophy, and the fine
arts. In these courses students examine great ideas, historic
milestones, and works of art; discover connections among
the traditional disciplines; learn to reason logically, to sift
through deception and cant, and to integrate knowledge.
Students complete these five courses during the freshman and
sophomore years. All interdisciplinary CORE courses must be
completed at Roger Williams.
III. The CORE Concentration involves a five-course
exploration of one liberal arts discipline unrelated to the
major. Students select from concentrations in world languages
and culture; science and mathematics; the social sciences; or
the humanities and fine arts. This requirement ensures that
students graduate with significant knowledge of at least two
fields, that of the major and that of the CORE Concentration.
Semester Abroad Option: Students may satisfy the CORE
Concentration requirement by completing a semester-long
International Studies CORE Concentration. Information about
this option may be obtained from the Spiegel Center for Global
and International Programs.
Students who declare double majors are not required
to complete a separate CORE Concentration if both of the
following conditions are met: one of the majors must have an
approved CORE Concentration and that concentration must
not be restricted from the other major.
Because each CORE Concentration consists of specific
courses and prerequisites, students should declare their CORE
Concentration and begin required courses no later than the
sophomore year to ensure that course work is completed before
graduation. Course requirements for each Concentration are
listed below.
Most CORE Concentrations may be expanded to a minor
by taking one additional course. Students should consult their
advisor about this option.
Students may also, in consultation with their advisor,
elect to expand their declared CORE Concentration into a
second major. Students who wish to exercise the option are
strongly advised to declare the second major no later than the
third semester to ensure that course work is completed before
graduation. Interested students should consult this catalog and
their advisor or dean for specific requirements.
IV.The CORE Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
unites studies in the liberal arts and sciences; integrates
knowledge; and involves sophisticated analysis, synthesis,
and defense of original ideas. Students may not enroll in this
THE CORE INTERDISCIPLINARY SENIOR SEMINAR
THE WRITING REQUIREMENT
THE MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT
WTNG 102, and a 200 or 300 level WTNG course
One mathematics course numbered 110 or above
THE FIVE-COURSE INTERDISCIPLINARY CORE REQUIREMENT
Core 101
Core 102
Core 103
Core 104
Core 105
Discoveries in Context
or
2 Semesters of a Lab Science
History and the Modern
World
Perspectives in Human
Behavior
Literature, Philosophy and
the Ascent of Ideas
Aesthetics in Context:
The Artistic Impulse
or
May take AAH 121 + AAH 122
THE FIVE-COURSE CORE CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENT
All Core Concentrations must be in the liberal arts. Students must select one of the following according to the
Table of Core Concentration Choices and Restrictions
American Studies
Anthropology +
Sociology
Art/Arch. History
Biology
Chemistry
Creative Writing
Dance/Performance
Economics
Educational Studies
English Literature
Environmental Science
Foreign Languages
Graphic Design
Global Communication
History
Marine Biology
Mathematics
Music
Performing Arts
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sustainability
Theater
Urban Studies
Visual Arts
Professional and Public
Writing
Other Programs:
RWU Semester-long
International Studies
Core Concentration
Please see specific information on the reverse side.
Students who declare double majors are not required to complete a separate CORE Concentration if both of the following conditions are met:
one of the majors must have an approved CORE Concentration and that concentration must not be restricted from the other major.
All students are eligible for an approved semester-long RWU International Studies Core Concentration.
THE UNIVERSITY CORE CURRICULUM 2014-2015
83
Core Curriculum
Senior Seminar before they achieve sixth-semester status.
Completion of all skills and the five-course Interdisciplinary
CORE requirement is prerequisite. Students may not
substitute any course from another institution for the CORE
Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar.
Study abroad may not be used to waive any of the five
Interdisciplinary CORE courses which are to be completed
before the junior year.
Table of CORE Concentration Choices
and Restrictions
Accounting majors may not take the Economics CORE Concentration.
American Studies majors may not take the American Studies, History
or Political Science CORE Concentrations.
Anthropology + Sociology majors may not take the Anthropology/
Sociology or Psychology CORE Concentrations.
Architecture majors may take any CORE Concentration.
Art and Architectural History majors may not take the Art and
Architectural History CORE Concentration.
Biology majors may not take the Biology, Chemistry, Computer
Science, Environmental Science, or Marine Biology CORE
Concentrations, or the SEA Semester Option
Biochemistry majors may not take the Biology, Chemistry,
Computer Science, Environmental Science or Marine Biology CORE
Concentrations, or the SEA Semester Option
Chemistry majors may not take the Biology, Chemistry, Computer
Science, Environmental Science, or Marine Biology CORE
Concentrations, or the SEA Semester Option
Computer Information Systems majors may not take the Computer
Science or Economics CORE Concentration.
Computer Science majors may not take the Computer Science
CORE Concentration.
Construction Management majors may not take the Computer
Science CORE Concentration.
Creative Writing majors may not take the Creative Writing, English
or Professional and Public Writing CORE Concentrations.
Criminal Justice majors may take any CORE Concentration.
Dance Performance majors may not take the Dance, Music,
Performing Arts, or Theater CORE Concentrations.
Economics majors may not take the Economics CORE Concentration.
Elementary Education majors may not take Educational Studies
CORE Concentration.
Engineering majors may not take the Computer Science CORE Concentration.
English Literature majors may not take the Creative Writing, English,
or Professional and Public Writing CORE Concentrations.
Environmental Science majors may not take the Biology, Chemistry,
Computer Science, Environmental Science, or Marine Biology CORE
Concentrations, or the SEA Semester Option
Finance majors may not take the Economics CORE Concentration.
Foreign Language majors may not take any Foreign Language
CORE Concentration.
Forensic Science majors may take any CORE Concentration.
84
Global Communication majors may not take the Global
Communication CORE Concentration.
Graphic Design majors may not take the Graphic Design CORE Concentration
Historic Preservation majors may take any CORE Concentration.
History majors may not take the American Studies, History or Political
Science CORE Concentrations.
International Business majors may not take the Economics
CORE Concentration.
International Relations majors may not take the Global
Communication CORE Concentration.
Journalism majors may not take the Global Communication
CORE Concentration.
Legal Studies majors may take any CORE Concentration.
Media Communication majors may not take the Global
Communication CORE Concentration.
Management majors may not take the Economics CORE Concentration.
Marine Biology majors may not take the Biology, Chemistry,
Computer Science, Environmental Science, or Marine Biology CORE
Concentrations, or the SEA Semester Option.
Marketing majors may not take the Economics CORE Concentration.
Mathematics majors may not take the Computer Science or
Mathematics CORE Concentration.
Music majors may not take Dance, Music, Performing Arts, or Theatre
CORE Concentrations.
Philosophy majors may not take the Philosophy CORE Concentration.
Political Science majors may not take the American Studies, History
or Political Science CORE Concentrations.
Psychology majors may not take the Anthropology + Sociology or
Psychology CORE Concentrations.
Theater majors may not take the Dance, Music, Performing Arts,
Theater or London Theatre CORE Concentrations.
Visual Arts Studies majors may not take any Visual Arts Studies
CORE Concentration.
Other programs:
Study Abroad
All students may take an International Studies core concentration.
Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science and Marine Biology
majors may not take the Sea Semester as their CORE Concentration.
CORE Course Requirements
Two Courses in Writing: 6 credits
During the first two years, all students complete Expository
Writing and a 200- or 300-level WTNG course that is tailored
to their interests and/or major area of study. Expository Writing
is a prerequisite for all 200- and 300-level WTNG courses.
(Students may also be required to complete WTNG 100:
Introduction to Academic Writing. This course does not fulfill
the University CORE Writing requirement. Students assigned
to this course must register for it in their first semester and
must achieve a C- or higher before being permitted to enroll in
Expository Writing.)
Core Curriculum
One Course in Mathematics: 3 or 4 credits, depending on
the course selected.
During the first year, all students complete, in consultation
with their advisor, a mathematics course numbered 110 or above.
The Five-Course Interdisciplinary CORE
At least 16 credits.
CORE 101 Science: Discoveries in Context (4 credits) (or two
laboratory science courses)
CORE 102 History and the Modern World: The Nature of
Revolution (3 credits)
CORE 103 Perspectives in Human Behavior (3 credits)
CORE 104 Literature, Philosophy, and the Ascent of Ideas
(3 credits)
CORE 105 Aesthetics in Context: The Artistic Impulse (3 credits)
(or AAH 121 and AAH 122)
Students may take the five courses listed above in any order, but the
Interdisciplinary CORE must be completed by the end of the first
two years of study, except for five-year architecture majors who must
complete the five courses by the end of the fifth semester. All first
and second year students must enroll in at least one, but no more
than two, of these courses during each of the first four semesters. All
CORE courses subscribe to a common set of writing standards. All
five courses must be completed at the University.
The Five-Course CORE Concentration
At least 15 credits
The CORE Concentration is designed to ensure depth,
sequence, and progressive learning in one liberal arts
discipline. Students must select a CORE Concentration
according to the Table of CORE Concentrations.
CategoriesCORE
Concentrations
I.
Languages:
II.
III.
IV.
Mathematics and the Sciences:
The Social Sciences:
The Humanities and the Arts:
Chinese, French,
German, Italian, Latin,
Portuguese or Spanish
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
The SEA Semester
Environmental Science
Marine Biology
Mathematics
American Studies
Anthropology + Sociology
Economics
Educational Studies
History
Political Science
Psychology
Art and Architectural History
Creative Writing
Dance Performance
English Literature
Global Communication
Graphic Design
Music
Performing Arts
Philosophy
Professional and Public
Writing
Theatre
Visual Arts Studies
V. Interdisciplinary Studies:
Sustainability
Urban Studies
VI. The International Studies CORE Concentration.
Juniors and seniors intending to declare an International Studies
CORE Concentration should contact the Center for Global and
International Programs as soon as possible so that they are aware
of requirements to go abroad. For example, students will need
passports and specific cumulative grade point averages.
CORE Concentration Course Requirements
Minimum Standard:
It is necessary from time to time for students to substitute other
courses for specified CORE Concentration course requirements.
Substitutions may be made only if the following criteria are met:
1. At least two courses in the CORE Concentration discipline
must be at the 100- or 200-level;
2. At least two courses in the CORE Concentration discipline
must be at the 300- or 400-level;
3. At least five courses (or a total of 15 credits) must be taken
in one CORE Concentration discipline.
This standard applies to all matriculated students.
CATEGORY I – FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES
CORE Concentration in Chinese, French, German, Italian,
Latin, Portuguese or Spanish
Language 101
Elementary Language I
Language 102
Elementary Language II
Language 201
Intermediate Language I
Language 202
Intermediate Language II
and
One 300-level language course
Note: Students who begin this CORE Concentration at a level above
101 must complete at least three courses, including the 300-level
course in a single language. Waiver from prerequisite courses does not
carry credit. Documentation of the waived courses and placement test
results must be sent to the registrar and to the appropriate dean.
CORE concentrations are not permitted in a student’s native language.
CATEGORY II – MATHEMATICS AND THE SCIENCES
CORE Concentration in Biology
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
BIO
104
Biology II and Lab
and
Two Biology courses at the 200-level or above, at least one of
which must have a laboratory component
CORE Concentration in Chemistry
CHEM 191
Principles of Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 192
Principles of Chemistry II and Lab
and
Two upper level chemistry courses, one of which must be at the
300 level
85
Core Curriculum
CORE Concentration in Computer Science
MATH 221
Discrete Mathematics
COMSC110
Introduction to Computer Science
COMSC111
Data Structures and Lab
COMSC210
Principles of Computer Organization and Lab
COMSC230
Principles of Programming Languages
CORE Concentration in Environmental Science
NATSC 103
Earth Systems Science and Lab
NATSC 203
Humans, Sustainability & Environmental Change
BIO
104
Biology II and Lab
and
At least 4 credits from the following list:
BIO
230 Microbiology and Lab
BIO
312
Conservation Biology
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
CHEM
434 Advanced Environmental Chemistry
ENGR 320 Environmental Engineering
ENGR
405 Air Pollution and Control
ENGR
407 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
PLS
200 Environmental Law
NATSC
301 Marine Resource Management
NATSC
305 Marine Geology
NATSC
310 Biogeochemical Cycling
NATSC
315
Meteorology and Climatology
NATSC
333
Environmental Monitoring and Lab
NATSC/ BIO 375
Soil Ecology
NATSC
401 Environmental Toxicology and Lab
CORE Concentration in Marine Biology
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
NATSC 204
Principles of Oceanography
and
At least 8 additional credits in Marine Biology courses.
CORE Concentration in Mathematics
MATH 213
Calculus I and Lab
and
MATH 214
Calculus II and Lab
and
Any three Mathematics courses numbered above 200, at least
one of which must be at the 300- level or above.
CATEGORY III – THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
CORE Concentration in American Studies
AMST 100
Approaches to the Study of American
Society and Culture
and
Any four 200 level or above American Studies courses.
CORE Concentration in Anthropology + Sociology
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
SOC
100
Introduction to Sociology
and
Three additional Anthropology and Sociology courses, which
must comprise courses from both disciplines (1 ANTH and 2
SOC or 2 ANTH and 1 SOC); at least one of these courses must
be at the 300- level or above.
CORE Concentration in Economics
A total of five courses:
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ECON 101
Macroeconomics
ECON 102
Microeconomics
And at least one of the following:
ECON 201
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON 202
Intermediate Microeconomics
And an additional two Economics courses, one of
which must be at the 300- or 400-level. ENGR 335
(Engineering Economic Analysis) may also be taken to
fulfill this CORE Concentration.
CORE Concentration in Educational Studies
EDU
200
Foundations of Education
EDU
202
Psychology of Learning and Development
EDU
308
Technology and Education
EDU
310
Curriculum Studies
EDU
330
Issues in Multicultural Education
CORE Concentration in History
Any three of the following:
HIST 101, 102 History of Western Civilization I and II
HIST 151, 152 United States History I and II
and
Any two History courses at the 250 level or above
CORE Concentration in Political Science
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
and one of the following:
POLSC 110
The United States in World Affairs
POLSC 120
Comparative Politics
and
Any three 300- or 400- level courses provided that at least
one of these is from the American National Politics/Political
Theory category and one is from the International Relations/
Comparative Politics Category.
CORE Concentration in Psychology
PSYCH 100
Introduction to Psychology
and
Four additional Psychology courses, three of which must be at
the 300-level or above.
CATEGORY IV – THE HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS
CORE Concentration in Art and Architectural History
AAH 121
History of Art and Architecture I
AAH 122
History of Art and Architecture II
and
Three courses at 300-level or two courses at 300-level plus
one course at 400-level from the Art and Architectural
History major.
CORE Concentration in Creative Writing
CW
210
Form in Poetry
CW
220
Narrative in Writing the Short Story
Any 200 Level or above English course
and
One Creative Writing Advanced Bridge course:
CW
350
Writers Reading Poetry Seminar
CW
360
Writers Reading Fiction Seminar
and
One Creative Writing Advanced Breadth course:
CW
310
Creative Nonfiction
Core Curriculum
CW
330
Literary Publishing
CW
340
Introduction to Playwriting
CW
430
Special Topics in Creative Writing
CORE Concentration in Dance/Performance
DANCE 101
The Creative Athlete
Three Dance Technique Classes or a total of nine credits in
Dance Technique (Placement made through consultation with
a member of the dance faculty)
and one of the following:
DANCE 290
Introduction to Choreography
DANCE 310 Dance History
DANCE 350 British Dance and Performance Art: London
DANCE 425 Kinesiology for Dancers
DANCE 435 The Performance Artist in Society
CORE Concentration in English Literature
At Least two (2) English courses at the 100-200 level
At Least two (2) English courses at the 300-400 level
One English course at any level
CORE Concentration in Global Communication
COMM 100
Introduction to Communication Studies
and
Any four of the following (at least one must be at the 200-Level
and two at the 300-Level or above)
COMM 165
Introduction to Visual Communication
COMM 250
Intercultural Communication
COMM 265
Visual Rhetoric, Visual Culture
COMM 330
International Communication
COMM 365
Digital Media in a Global Context
COMM 375
Global Audiences, Global Consumers
COMM 380
Visual Media in a Cultural Context
COMM 390 Qualitative Research Methods in Communication
COMM 432
Special Topics in Global Communication
COMM 465
McLuhan’s Global Village
WTNG 300
Rhetoric and Cultural Differences
CORE Concentration in Graphic Design
DSGN 100
Introduction to Graphic Design Communication
DSGN 110
Introduction to Typography
DSGN 210
Advanced Design Communication
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
And one course chosen from:
DSGN 200
History of Design Communication
DSGN 300
Web Design Communication
DSGN 310
Brand Identity
DSGN 320
Publication Design
DSGN 430
Special Topics in Graphic Design
CORE Concentration in Music
MUSIC 161
The Art of Rock and Roll
MUSIC 170
Basic Musicianship
MUSIC 211
Evolution of Musical Style
MUSIC 212
Great Personalities in Music
And one of the following:
MUSIC 121
Evolution of Jazz
MUSIC 270
Music Theory and Composition I
MUSIC 299
Special Topics in Music
MUSIC 310
World Culture Through Music/North America
MUSIC 311
World Culture Through Music/Latin America
MUSIC 312
World Culture Through Music China & Japan
MUSIC 313
World Culture Through Music/India &
Middle East
MUSIC 314
World Culture Through Music/
Indigenous Peoples
CORE Concentration in Performing Arts
Select three credits from each of the three program foundation
areas below (9 credits total):
Music
MUSIC 170
MUSIC 211
MUSIC 270
Dance
DANCE 101
or
DANCE 161
DANCE 310
Basic Musicianship
Evolution of Musical Styles
Music Theory and Composition I
Creative Athlete
Introduction to Dance Technique (or higher)
Dance History
Theatre
THEAT 130
Art of the Theatre
or
THEAT 110
Introduction to Acting
THEAT 120
Design for the Theatre I
THEAT 121
Design for the Theatre II
And 6 credits
At least three credits must be from studio/performance courses.
At least three credits must be from theory/literature courses.
With one course at the 300 level or above.
CORE Concentration in Philosophy
PHIL 100
Introduction to Philosophy: The Art of Inquiry
PHIL 200
Ethics
PHIL 205
Logic
and one of the following:
PHIL 251
Ancient Philosophy
PHIL 253
Modern Philosophy
and one of the following:
PHIL 333
Epistemology
PHIL 366
Metaphysics
CORE Concentration in Professional and Public Writing
WTNG 102
Expository Writing
and
Two WTNG courses at the 200 level or above
Two WTNG courses at the 300 level or above
WTNG 200
Critical Writing for the Humanities and the
Social Sciences*
WTNG 220
Critical Writing for the Professions*
WTNG 230
Rhetoric of Film: Writing about Film*
WTNG 270
Travel Writing*
WTNG 299
Special Topics in Writing *
WTNG 300
Rhetoric in a Global Context*
WTNG 301 The Rhetoric of Narrative*
WTNG 303 Environmental Rhetoric*
WTNG 305 Writing the City*
WTNG 311 Technical Writing*
WTNG 320
Writing for Business Organizations*
WTNG 321 Multimodal Writing in Public Spheres*
WTNG 322
Advancing Public Argument*
WTNG 400 Writing for Social Change
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Core Curriculum
WTNG 430 WTNG 470 Special Topics
The Writing Thesis/Portfolio
*This course meets the 200 level University writing
requirement for the Core Curriculum.
CORE Concentration in Theatre
THEAT 110
Acting I
THEAT 120/121 Design for the Theatre I or II
THEAT 130
The Art of the Theatre
and one of the following:
THEAT 230
Theatre History I
THEAT 231
Theatre History II
THEAT 330
Theatre of Shakespeare
THEAT 331
Modern Theatre and Drama
THEAT 333
Asian Drama and Dance
THEAT 334
Contemporary Drama
THEAT 431
Drama Theory and Criticism
and
Three (3) additional theatre credits
London Option
THEAT 130
The Art of the Theatre
and
Four approved courses taken as part of the London
Theatre Program
CORE Concentration in Visual Art Studies: Film,
Animation and Video
FILM 101
Introduction to Film Studies
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
VARTS 362
Film, Animation and Video
VARTS 364
Intermediate Concepts in Film, Animation
and Video
and one of the following:
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts in Digital Media
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/Digital Media
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Art Studies
CORE Concentration in Visual Arts Studies: Painting/
Drawing/Printmaking
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
AAH 121
History of Art and Architecture I
VARTS 281
Foundations of Painting: Color and Design
and two of the following six courses:
VARTS 201
Drawing The Figure
VARTS 241
Introduction to Printmaking
VARTS 282
Oil Painting
VARTS 301
Advanced Drawing: Process and Content
VARTS 381
Painting The Figure
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 481
Topics in Painting/Drawing/Printmaking
CORE Concentration in Visual Arts Studies: Photography/
Digital Media
AAH 121
History of Art and Architecture I
VARTS 261
Foundations of Photography
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
and two of the following:
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VARTS 351
Intermediate Concepts in Photography
VARTS 352
Advanced Photography: Process and Content
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts in Digital Media
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/Digital Media
CORE Concentration in Visual Arts Studies: Sculpture
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
AAH 121
History of Art and Architecture I
VARTS 231
Foundations of Sculpture
and two of the following:
VARTS 232
Intermediate Concepts in Sculpture
VARTS 333
Advanced Sculpture: Process and Content
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 431
Topics in Sculpture
CATEGORY V – Interdisciplinary Studies CORE Concentrations
CORE Concentration in Sustainability Studies
SUST 101 Introduction to Sustainability Studies
SUST 301
Analysis and Decision Making for Sustainability
SUST 401 Working toward Sustainability
and
Two of the following courses, one of which is at the 200-level
or above and both of which 1) could not be used to fulfill
requirements for the student’s major (e.g., have the same
program designation or are required for the major) and 2)
do not come from prohibited Core Concentration programs
as based on the student’s major following the table of CORE
Concentration choices and restrictions.
ANTH 222
Environmental Anthropology*
ARCH 101
Introduction to Architecture
ARCH 321
Site and Environment
AAH 423 Nature and Art
BIO 104 Biology II and Lab
BIO 231
Bioethics*
BIO 240 Concepts of Ecology#
BIO 312 Conservation Biology#
BIO 345
Aquaculture and Lab#
CHEM 201 Environmental Chemistry I and Lab*
CHEM 202
Environmental Chemistry II and Lab*
CNST 540 Sustainable Construction
ECON 320 Resource and Environmental Economics*
ENG 110
Serpents, Swords, Symbols & Sustainability
ENGR 320 Environmental Engineering*
ENGR 340 Sustainable Energy Systems*
ENGR 405 Air Pollution and Control*
ENGR 407 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management*
HIST 354 United States Environmental History*
HP 150 Introduction to Historic Preservation
NATSC 103 Earth Systems Science and Lab
NATSC 203
Humans, Environmental Change
and Sustainability#
NATSC 204
Principles of Oceanography
NATSC 301 Marine Resource Management#
PLS
200 Environmental Law
POLSC 383
Environmental Politics & Policy
SUST 430 Special Topics in Sustainability Studies#
Core Curriculum
*These courses have pre-requisite requirements that do not
fulfill requirements for completion of the Sustainability Studies
Core Concentration. Some pre-requisites may be waived with
the instructor.
#These courses have pre-requisite requirements that can
also be taken as an elective for the Sustainability Studies
Core Concentration
CORE Concentration in Urban Studies
URBN 100
Introduction to Urban Studies
URBN 400
Urban Studies Colloquium
and
Three courses from the following list that meet the following
requirements: 1) none of the courses may be from the
departmental designation (prefix) of the student’s major; and
2) at least one course must be at the 300-level or above that
does not count toward the student’s major or any other minor.
This is intended to encourage students to take electives in
multiple areas that balance their major course of study.
AMST 100
Approaches to the Study of American
Society & Culture
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
BIO 104
Biology II
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
AAH 122 History of Art and Architecture II
HIST 102 History of Western Civilization II
HIST 152 United States History II
SUST 101 Introduction to Sustainability Studies
AMST 201 American Studies Research Methods*
ANTH 222 Environmental Anthropology*
ANTH 230 Political Anthropology*
NATSC 203 Humans, Environmental Change
and Sustainability*
PA 220 Elements and Issues in Community
Development (Providence)
POLSC 260/
PA 201 Public Administration*
PH
201 Public Health Essentials*
SOC 201 Social Stratification*
SOC 220 Sociological Perspectives on Race*
URBN 299 Special Topics in Urban Studies
*Courses w/ pre-requisites or that require consent
and at least one of the following:
AMST 370
Topics in Race, Class, Gender & Sexuality
in America*
AMST 371 Topics in Ethnicity Class and Region in America*
ANTH 310 Applied Anthropology*
ANTH 380 Culture, Change and Development*
ARCH 324 Evolution of Urban Form
ARCH 325 History of Modern Architecture
BIO 376 Urban Ecosystems (new course for 2014-15 –
pending final approval)
CIS
350 Geographic Analysis of Data: An
Introduction to GIS
ENG 360 Studies in Ethnic American Literature*
HIST 390 Great Cities in History
HP
302/502 Principles of Preservation Planning
HP 342
Industrial America HP PA PA
POLSC
SOC SOC
WTNG
CJS
URBN ARCH ARCH ARCH
ARCH ARCH 384/582L Preservation Planning Lab
306 City Management*
351
Sustainable Economic and Community
Development (Providence)
362 Urban Politics
330 Globalization and Identity*
348 Urban Sociology
305 Writing the City
428 Crime Prevention
430 Advanced Special Topics in Urban Studies
572
Urban Design Theory**
575 Contemporary Asian Architecture & Urbanism**
593 Sustainable Paradigms**
594 Urban Ecology**
577 American Skyscraper**
*Courses w/ at least one prerequisite other than URBN 100
**Courses at the 500 level require senior standing.
CATEGORY VI – RWU Semester Abroad
Interdisciplinary Studies
CORE Concentration in International Studies
This concentration is open to all students. Students are advised
to register one year in advance.
The CORE Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar (CISS) Requirement
At least three credits. Should students choose to enroll
in additional CORE Seminars, credit earned may not be
applied to satisfy any requirement in the major, minor, or
CORE Curriculum.
Prerequisites: Completion of all skills and the fivecourse Interdisciplinary CORE requirements; at least sixth
semester standing.
All CORE Interdisciplinary Senior Seminars:
1) build upon the defining idea of the five-course freshmansophomore Interdisciplinary CORE:
The tension between order and chaos, which are apparent opposites,
has always concentrated human intelligence and imagination.
Throughout the ages people have adopted different and differing
ways to resolve the dilemmas that derive from this tension.
Throughout the Interdisciplinary CORE, we, too, confront dilemma,
explore an inherent tension between order and chaos, and consider
its concomitant questions: Who am I? What can I know? Based
upon what I know, how should I act?
and
2) examine a topic of recognized academic and educational
significance and through it:
• explore the idea of order and chaos and its
concomitant questions;
• situate the topic in interdisciplinary contexts;
• draw connections among all five domains of the freshmansophomore CORE, namely: science, history, social science,
literature and philosophy, and aesthetics;
• pursue inquiry into the course topic, its contexts, and the
order/chaos dialectic through primary, substantive, and
representative texts; and
• frame the Seminar topic according to one or more of the
following schemes: great idea(s), culture(s), figure(s),
work(s), city(ies), both western and/or non-western.
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Core Curriculum
Common Seminar Requirements
1. Guided reading based upon questions, and preparation for
class based upon response to questions.
2. Competent summary, analysis and synthesis in seminar
presentation and papers.
3. Assigned research and preparation resulting in class
presentations and student-led seminar discussions.
4. A seminar thesis or project that demonstrates scholarship
and competent writing and pursues research.
5. Reflection not only on the topic of seminar, but also on
the central questions of the CORE: Who am I? What can I
know? Based on what I know, what should I do?
The CORE Interdisciplinary Senior Seminars
CORE 430
Special Topics in Liberal Studies
CORE 441
Disease and Society
CORE 442
Prejudice and Institutional Violence
CORE 443
The Proper Order of Things
CORE 444
Perspectives in World Culture
CORE 445
Creating the American Image: 1919-1941
CORE 446
Visions of Utopia: Dreams and Delusions
CORE 447
Cultural Creations: Women Across Time
CORE 449
Environmental Ethics
CORE 450
Are We of It or Against It? People and Their
Planet in the 21st Century
CORE 451
It’s All Greek to Us
CORE 452
Collecting Ourselves: Why We Build,
Preserve and Display Collections
CORE 453
Obsession: Understanding it through the Arts
CORE 456
The Internet and the Digital Revolution
CORE 457
Families and Society
CORE 458
Technology, Self and Society
CORE 459
Popular Culture and Globalization
CORE 461
Researching Race
CORE 462
Sexual Identities
CORE 463
Innovation
University Studies
The University Honors Program
The University Honors Program offers a social and academic
community for qualifying students who seek to enhance their
classroom and co-curricular experiences. As a member of the
National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC), the national
organizing body for college and university Honors, we seek to
enrich the RWU experience for our students by:
• Providing opportunities to achieve excellence through
intellectual and creative scholarship
• Fostering citizenship and social responsibility through leadership
in and engagement with local and global communities
The University Honors Program prepares students through
engaged scholarship, service, and leadership. The curriculum
focuses on civic action and reflection, delivered through
academic and co-curricular experiences and the practice of
civil discourse.
90
Membership and Eligibility
Any prospective or current RWU student meeting the
established criteria for academic excellence may be eligible
for the University Honors Program. For further information,
please contact the Honors Program Director, Becky Spritz
([email protected], 401-254-3663).
Prior to the start of the freshman year, candidates who
complete a separate Honors Program application are selected
from the pool of applicants. Applicants minimally have earned
cumulative averages of at least a B+ in major subjects and
demonstrate a strong interest in being a member of the RWU
Honors Living-Learning Community (LLC). The selection
committee also considers the number of honors and advanced
placement courses taken in high school, academic honors,
community service experience, and extra-curricular activities.
Currently enrolled Roger Williams University students
performing with academic distinction within their first three
semesters are encouraged to apply provided they are able to
complete all program requirements through their remaining
course of study. Transfer students of academic distinction may
also be considered for Honors Program membership.
As the university’s first Living-Learning Community (LLC),
the program provides an Honors residence housing, including
quiet study areas and an activities and seminar space. Cultural
activities and co-curricular opportunities supplement students’
coursework and academic requirements. Official transcripts
awarded to Honors students document their completion of this
prestigious and rewarding program.
Program Requirements
The Honors Program requirements consist of:
• The Honors Core Curriculum
• The Honors Service-Learning Experience
• The Honors Capstone
The Honors Core Curriculum
Honors students enroll in designated sections of the university’s
core curriculum. This requirement can be fulfilled by all or any
combination of the following courses.
WTNG 102-H Expository Writing
CORE 101-H Discoveries in Context
CORE 102-H History and the Modern World
CORE 103-H Perspectives on Human Behavior
CORE 104-H Literature, Philosophy, and the Ascent of Ideas
CORE 105-H Aesthetics in Context: The Artistic Impulse
CORE 400-levelThe Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
(CISS) with Honors
The Honors Service-Learning Experience
The University Honors Program prepares its students to be citizenscholars through a unique service-learning experience completed
before the senior year. Honors students may fulfill their servicelearning requirement via the Honors-designated service-learning
course or a pre-approved, independent service-learning experience.
Students must be granted approval of the experience and obtain
a designated faculty sponsor prior to engaging with the community.
The Honors Capstone
The Honors Capstone complements and enhances the student’s
intellectual and/or creative scholarship at the end of his or her
course of study at the university. The Honors Capstone is generally
linked with another academic or creative project, such as a
Core Curriculum
thesis or senior project in the major, or a major capstone course.
Students may pursue their capstone in their major, minor, or as
an interdisciplinary project with approval of an identified faculty
advisor and the relevant sponsoring departments.
The Honors Capstone involves two components: a written
critical reflection and a public oral defense. The written
reflection may be completed as an independent preface or
conclusion, or may be incorporated into the student’s project
or paper. The oral defense is typically completed through
a student symposium presentation at the RWU Student
Academic Showcase (SASH). Both components of the Honors
Capstone are evaluated by designated faculty including the
student’s primary capstone advisor and members of the Honors
Advisory Council, as evidence of the student’s satisfactory
completion of the Honors Program requirements.
Academic standards and policies for the Honors Program
To remain in good standing with the program, an Honors
Program student:
• maintains a cumulative 3.3 GPA throughout their
matriculation at the university
• completes all or any combination of Honors Core Curriculum
• satisfies the Honors Service-Learning Experience prior to
the senior year
• fulfills the Honors Senior Capstone Requirement
• demonstrates engagement in Honors coursework and
co-curricular activities
• models university standards for academic integrity and
student conduct
The Honors Program director reviews students’ academic progress
and compliance with these academic standards each semester.
Students failing to meet expectations are notified by letter, and
placed on a one-semester of Honors academic probation. Students
assigned to the Honors probationary status are required to meet
with the Honors director to discuss the circumstances of his/
her probation and the corresponding remediation plan. If the
remediation plan requires more than one semester to return the
student to good standing, students must apply for an extended
probation via an academic appeal to the Honors Advisory Council
to avoid termination from the program.
Academic appeals and substitutions
Students may appeal for exemptions or substitutions of Honors
Program academic standards and requirements through the
Honors Advisory Council. Copies of the appeal applications are
available in the Honors Program office.
Gender and Sexuality Studies
The Gender and Sexuality Studies Minor
The Gender and Sexuality Studies Minor provides students
with the opportunity to explore gender and sexuality from an
interdisciplinary perspective. As an interdisciplinary field of study,
Gender and Sexuality Studies bridges the methodological traditions
of feminist studies, gay and lesbian studies, gender studies, and
transgender studies. The aim of the minor is to interrogate the
social, cultural, and natural frameworks through which societies
create, resist, and revise normative standards for the self, the body,
and social relations in culturally and historically specific ways. Key
topics of inquiry include: the complex interaction between gender
and sexuality as they intersect with other identity constructions
such as race, class, ethnicity, nationality, or religion; the ways that
gender and sexuality influence and are influenced by economics,
medicine, and the law; gender and sexuality as focal points for major
political contestation and struggle; and representations of gender
and sexuality in creative and imaginative work in art, cinema,
literature, and mass media. The minor links a common introductory
course with multi-disciplinary course offerings from throughout the
curriculum so that students will develop critical responses to social
justice and civil discourse that are essential to careers in a diverse
global community.
Requirements for the Minor in Gender and Sexuality Studies
GSS
100
Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
GSS
420
Gender and Sexuality Studies Seminar
and
Four additional elective course, no more that 2 of which may
come from any one department
AMST 370 Race, Gender, and Sexuality in America*
CJS 402 Women and the Criminal Justice System*
ENG 220
Literary Analysis*
POLSC 307 Gender in American Politics*
PSYCH 215
Human Sexuality*
PSYCH 220 Psychology of Women*
PSYCH 230
Psychology of Men*
SOC 316
Sociology of Gender*
*These courses have pre-requisite requirements that do not
fulfill requirements for completion of the Gender & Sexuality
Studies minor. Some prerequisites may be waived with instructor
permission. ENG 100 is waived for GSS minors enrolled in ENG
220; POLSC 100 is waived for GSS minors enrolled in POLSC 307.
Sustainability Studies
The Sustainability Studies Minor
The minor in Sustainability Studies will facilitate deeper student
exploration of complex interrelationships among contemporary
environmental, social and economic problems and their possible
solutions. In addition, courses will help student’s articulate personal
philosophies to guide more sustainable lifestyles (i.e. choices for
resource use and other behaviors). After completing a minor in
Sustainability Studies, students will be expected to have the requisite
interdisciplinary knowledge to think clearly and critically about
the complexity of interrelated environmental, social, and economic
problems. In addition, the working vocabulary associated with this
knowledge base will enable them to communicate across disciplines
and more effectively work as part of teams engaged in seeking
solutions to problems of sustainability within the business sector,
government and non-governmental agencies, the public policy
realm, and environmental organizations, among other institutions.
In short, the acquisition of a broader, synthetic understanding of
complex contemporary sustainability-related issues will allow RWU
graduates completing the minor to contribute more effectively
in their future careers and as public citizens to creating a more
sustainable future for humanity and other species on Earth.
Requirements for the Minor in Sustainability Studies
SUST 101
Introduction to Sustainability Studies
SUST 301
Analysis and Decision Making for Sustainability
SUST 401
Working Toward Sustainability
and
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Core Curriculum
Three of the following courses, one of which must be at the 200
level or above:
ANTH 222
Environmental Anthropology
ARCH 101
Introduction to Architecture
ARCH 321 Site and Environment
ARCH 461 Introduction to Landscape Architecture
ARCH 593 Sustainable Paradigms
AAH 423 Nature and Art
BIO
104
Biology II and Lab
BIO 231
Bioethics: Life, Health and Environment#
BIO 240
Concepts of Ecology#
BIO 312
Conservation Biology#
BIO
320
Marine Ecology and Lab*
BIO 345
Aquaculture and Lab#
BIO 360
Limnology and Lab*
BIO/
NATSC 375
Soil Ecology and Lab#
CHEM 201
Environmental Chemistry I and Lab*
CHEM 202
Environmental Chemistry II and Lab*
CHEM 434
Advanced Environmental Chemistry*
CNST 540
Sustainable Construction*
ECON 320 Resource and Environmental Economics*
ENG 110
Serpents, Swords, and Symbols
ENGR 320
Environmental Engineering*
ENGR 340
Renewable Energy Systems
ENGR 405
Air pollution and control*
ENGR 407
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management*
ENGR 412
Water Resources Engineering and Lab*
ENGR 415
Waste Water Treatment*
HIST 354
United States Environmental History*
HP 150
Introduction to Historic Preservation
NATSC 103
Earth Systems Science and Lab
NATSC 203
Humans, Environmental Change and Sustainability
NATSC 204
Principles of Oceanography#
NATSC 301
Marine Resource Management#
NATSC 310
Biogeochemical Cycling*
NATSC 333
Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
and Lab*
NATSC 401
Environmental Toxicology and Lab*
PLS 200
Environmental Law
POLSC 383
Environmental Politics and Policy#
SUST 430
Special Topics in Sustainability Studies#
*These courses have pre-requisite requirements that do not fulfill
requirements for completion of the Sustainability Studies minor.
Some pre-requisites may be waived with instructor’s permission.
#These courses have pre-requisite requirements that fulfill
requirements for the Sustainability Studies minor.
Urban Studies
The Urban Studies Minor
URBN 100
Introduction to Urban Studies
URBN 400
Urban Studies Colloquium
and
Four courses from the following list that meet the following requirements:
1) none of the courses may be from the departmental designation (prefix)
of the student’s major; and 2) at least one course must be at the 300-level
or above that does not count toward the student’s major or any other
92
minor. This is intended to encourage students to take electives in multiple
areas that balance their major course of study.
AMST 100
Approaches to the Study of American Society
& Culture
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
BIO 104
Biology II
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
AAH 122 History of Art and Architecture II
HIST 102 History of Western Civilization II
HIST 152 United States History II
SUST 101 Introduction to Sustainability Studies
AMST 201 American Studies Research Methods*
ANTH 222 Environmental Anthropology*
ANTH 230 Political Anthropology*
NATSC 203 Humans, Environmental Change and Sustainability*
PA
220 Elements and Issues in Community
Development (Providence)
POLSC 260/
PA
201 Public Administration*
PH
201 Public Health Essentials*
SOC 201 Social Stratification*
SOC 220 Sociological Perspectives on Race*
URBN 299 Special Topics in Urban Studies
* courses w/ pre-requisites or that require consent
and at least one of the following:
AMST 370
Topics in Race, Class, Gender & Sexuality
in America*
AMST 371 Topics in Ethnicity Class and Region in America*
ANTH 310 Applied Anthropology*
ANTH 380 Culture, Change and Development*
ARCH 324 Evolution of Urban Form
ARCH 325 History of Modern Architecture
BIO 376 Urban Ecosystems (new course for 2014-15 –
pending final approval)
CIS
350 Geographic Analysis of Data: An
Introduction to GIS
ENG 360 Studies in Ethnic American Literature*
HIST 390 Great Cities in History
HP
302/502 Principles of Preservation Planning
HP 342 Industrial America
HP 384/582L Preservation Planning Lab
PA 306 City Management*
PA
351
Sustainable Economic and Community
Development (Providence)
POLSC 362 Urban Politics
SOC 330 Globalization and Identity*
SOC
348 Urban Sociology
WTNG 305 Writing the City
CJS
428 Crime Prevention
URBN 430 Advanced Special Topics in Urban Studies
ARCH 572
Urban Design Theory**
ARCH 575 Contemporary Asian Architecture & Urbanism**
ARCH 593 Sustainable Paradigms**
ARCH 594 Urban Ecology**
ARCH 577 American Skyscraper**
*Courses w/ at least one prerequisite other than URBN 100
**Courses at the 500 level require senior standing.
Core Curriculum
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Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Mission Statement
At the heart of each strong, established university is its
College of Arts and Sciences. At Roger Williams, the
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences (FCAS), like its
counterparts on other campuses across the world, houses and
ensures the vitality of that tradition. Here as elsewhere, today
as in the times when human imagination first entertained the
enterprise of higher education, the College is the unifying
center of the University and of undergraduate studies. Here
students and faculty come together from all parts of the
University and of the world. Here we pursue knowledge.
We master skills. We become informed. We discover how
the traditional arts and sciences impact contemporary
interdisciplinary and professional studies. We achieve-in the
fullest sense of the term-a well-rounded education.
The following pages describe the College’s wealth of
knowledge and diversity of programs in the humanities, in the
natural and social sciences, and in the fine and performing arts.
Here all paths-toward graduation, toward rewarding work and
toward enriched lives-converge. As each student pursues his or
her own path through professional studies majors or through
arts and sciences, all students meet in the College to explore
the traditional disciplines, to accomplish the University Core
Curriculum, and, in growing numbers, to earn dual majors.
The College’s programs and its faculty are dedicated
not only to preserving and transmitting the tradition, but to
developing habits of mind that appreciate and can deal well
with the increasing complexities of contemporary, global
life and work. Teaching and learning in the College are
characterized by exploration, diversity, inquiry, interaction,
tolerance, confidence, competence, community and service.
Education is relevant and interpersonal. It is the means
by which students prepare for the challenging roles they will
play and for the civic responsibilities they will fulfill in this
rapidly changing world. As students complete their studies
in the College, they carry forward a sense of the joy involved
in the process of discovery and an understanding of why that
fundamental process must be an integral component of their
daily lives.
Overview
In the finest liberal arts tradition, Roger Williams
undergraduates pursue liberal studies course work in the
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences as they major or minor
in the humanities, fine arts, social or natural sciences. All
University undergraduates enter the halls of the College as
they pursue Core Curriculum requirements and as they take
electives to explore subjects outside their respective majors.
With the largest number of students, faculty and courses of
study, the College is the heart of the University.
Throughout the College, professors and students
work together in an academic community that values the
hallmarks of a strong, competitive liberal arts education:
intellectual inquiry, the lively exchange of ideas, scholarship
and commitment to the mission of teaching and learning.
Dedicated not only to the study of established disciplines, the
College also fosters cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary
studies. Graduates prove that the traditional liberal arts
curriculum combined with cutting-edge inquiry into newly
emerging fields provide the essential education for the 21st
century. Knowledge and skills acquired through studies in
the arts and sciences apply more than ever to the demands
and challenges of our increasingly diverse and ever-changing
international workplace.
To learn how to learn: that is the key to our students’
futures and the defining purpose of the College. Small classes,
none taught by teaching assistants, a commitment to studentcentered learning, achievement and quality distinguish the
College, its faculty, students and programs.
Programs of Study
Academic programs emphasize analytical thinking, problemsolving and research, all of which prepare FCAS graduates to
compete effectively in a world that increasingly requires flexible
habits of mind, teamwork, the ability to reason well and a
broad base of knowledge. Students enrolled in the College also
develop competence in effective communication; they learn
to read, write and speak with clarity and precision. They learn
to think critically about the works, ideas and events that have
shaped knowledge. They learn to explore how these relate not
only to the past, but also to the present and future. They engage
in the creative process and learn how the arts are produced and
why they are integral to humanity. As they study and learn in
multiple areas of the arts and sciences, FCAS students develop
intelligence, talent, competence and confidence.
Choosing from over 20 majors and minors, FCAS students
are able to combine and tailor their academic programs
to meet their goals and interests. They can exercise the
option to complete two majors by applying work in the Core
Concentration toward a second major. In addition to traditional
majors, students in good standing may undertake individualized
majors and directed independent studies. Cross-disciplinary
programs further promote the flow of knowledge and skill
across traditional academic fields of study, and students
develop competence in multiple areas. FCAS students may also
expand their portfolios by enrolling in courses in the School of
Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation, the Mario J. Gabelli
School of Business, the School of Engineering Computing and
Construction Management or the School of Justice Studies.
Pre-professional and interdisciplinary courses of study
offer additional options. Students interested in preparing for
law school enroll in a joint program that includes course work
in the College and in the School of Justice Studies. FCAS
majors who plan to enter the medical or veterinary fields can
pursue studies that prepare them for graduate studies in those
areas. Those who elect careers in secondary education follow
a program of study that ensures a rich background in the arts
and sciences, coupled with course work in educational history,
philosophy, and the teaching-learning process.
As a result of this rich range of choices, graduates of the
College possess both multi-disciplinary perspectives and multiple
skills-competitive advantages always, but never more so than
today. Well-rounded, knowledgeable and skilled, FCAS graduates
are well prepared and highly competitive as they enter either
95
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
the workforce or graduate school. All majors offered through
the College of Arts and Sciences lead to the Bachelor of Arts,
Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.
Facilities
The academic departments of the Feinstein College of Arts and
Sciences are housed in several campus buildings, conveniently
grouped according to their shared needs for laboratories,
studios, stages, lecture halls, seminar rooms, computer
and audio-visual equipped classrooms and other facilities.
Administrative offices are located in CAS; faculty offices are
also located there and in other buildings on the campus.
The College’s Marine and Natural Sciences Building
(MNS), houses the science and mathematics programs.
This two-level bayside complex contains state-of-the-art
laboratories, including an open seawater lab that was expanded
in 2009. The Performing Arts Center (PAC), affectionately
called The Barn, is a lively venue of cultural activity on
campus. The Performing Arts Annex (formerly the North
Campus Classroom Building) is another hub of creative activity
for the Theatre, Dance and Music programs for rehearsals
and classes. It includes two rehearsal/dance studio spaces, a
chorus room, music practice rooms, a classroom and faculty
offices. The Center contains professionally lighted stage and
performance areas as well as costume, makeup and scenery
rooms. More than 30 events are staged here each year.
Global Heritage Hall – the newest academic facility on
campus, opened in fall 2009 – is home to the humanities
including the departments of communication and graphic
design, English and creative writing, foreign languages,
philosophy and culture, history, and writing studies, rhetoric
and composition. This four-story technology-rich academic
center features heritage-themed classrooms, an interactive
world languages center, four Mac labs and a fully equipped
broadcast production studio for hands-on learning experiences.
Learning Outcomes for Academic Programs in Arts &
Sciences can be found at
http://www.rwu.edu/academics/schools/fcas/outcomes/
Degrees Offered
The Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences offers the following
graduate degrees.
Master of Arts in Psychology (Clinical)
Master of Arts in Psychology (Forensic)
Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology 4+1
The College offers the Bachelor of Arts in:
American Studies
Graphic Design Communication
Anthropology + Sociology
History
Biology
International Relations
ChemistryJournalism
Dance
Marine Biology
English Literature
Media Communication
Environmental Science Music
Foreign Language
Philosophy
(Classics/Modern & Latin
Political Science
American Language Studies)Psychology
Global Communication
Theatre
96
The College offers the Bachelor of Science in:
Biochemistry
Marine Biology
BiologyMathematics
Chemistry
Public Administration
Environmental Science
(Continuing Studies only)
The College offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.
The College offers Dual Degrees in:
Biochemistry B.S. and Pharm D
Biology B.A. and Pharm D.
Biology B.S. and Pharm D.
Chemistry B.A. and Pharm D.
Chemistry B.S. and Pharm D.
For part-time adult students, the College offers the Bachelor of
General Studies through the School of Continuing Studies.
Minors are offered in:
American Studies Foreign Language
Anthropology + Sociology
(Modern Language)
Aquaculture and Aquarium
Global Communication
Science
Graphic Design Communication
BiologyHistory
Chemistry
Marine Biology
ChineseMathematics
Computational Mathematics Music
Creative Writing
Philosophy
Dance
Political Science
East Asian Studies
Professional & Public Writing
English Literature
Psychology
Environmental Science
Public Health
Film Studies
Theatre
Certificate Program offered in:
Biotechnology
Feinstein College of Arts and Science Faculty
Robert M. Eisinger, Ph.D., Dean, Professor of Political Science
Frank Eyetsemitan, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Professor of Psychology
Roberta E. Adams, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Professor of English
Professors:
Peter Alfieri – Foreign Language
Garrett Berman – Psychology
Robert Blackburn – Philosophy
Dorisa S. Boggs – Theatre
Bruce Burdick – Mathematics
Sean Colin – Environmental Science
Edward Delaney – Creative Writing
Sharon DeLucca – Graphic Design Communication
Steven Esons – Public Administration
Earl Gladue – Mathematics
Anthony Hollingsworth – Classics and Modern Languages
Ruth A. Koelle – Mathematics
Marilynn Mair – Music
Marcia Marston – Biology
Jeffrey B. Martin – Theatre
Jeffrey Meriwether – History
Nancy Nester – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Stephen K. O’Shea – Chemistry
Judith Platania – Psychology
Harold Pomeroy – Biology
Anjali Ram – Communication
Deborah A. Robinson – English Literature
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Teal Rothschild – Sociology
Mark Sawoski – Political Science
Timothy Scott – Biology
Jessica Skolnikoff – Anthropology
Thomas Sorger – Biology
June Speakman – Political Science
Michael R.H. Swanson – History and American Studies
Louis Swiczewicz – Industrial Technology
James Tackach – English Literature
Cliff J. Timpson – Chemistry
Mel A. Topf – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Charles Trimbach – Psychology
Yajni Warnapala – Mathematics
Paul Webb – Biology
Donald Whitworth – Psychology
Michael B. Wright – Philosophy
Peter Wright – Theatre
Matt Zaitchik – Psychology
Associate Professors:
Paul Bender – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Adam Braver – Creative Writing
Nancy Breen – Chemistry
Loren Byrne – Biology
Bonita G. Cade – Psychology
Jennifer Campbell – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Margaret Case – English Literature
Jacquline Cottle – Psychology
Frank DiCataldo – Psychology
Avelina Espinosa – Biology
Kamille Gentles-Peart – Communication
Ernest Greco – Political Science
France Hunter – Dance/Performance
Jason Jacobs – Foreign Languages
Dale Leavitt – Biology
Dong-Hoon Lee – ESL
MaryBeth MacPhee – Anthropology
John Madritch – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Kate Mele – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
David Moskowitz – Political Science
Deborah Mulligan – History
Clifford B. Murphy – Chemistry
Roxanne O’Connell – Communication
Koray Ozer – Mathematics
Jason Patch – Sociology
Joseph W. Roberts – Political Science
Scott Rutherford – Environmental Science
Amiee Shelton – Communication
Gary Shore – Dance/Performance
Valerie Sloan – Graphic Design
Renee Soto – Creative Writing
Becky Spritz – Psychology
Jennifer Stevens – American Studies
Robin Stone – Theatre
David Taylor – Biology
Peter Thompson – Foreign Languages
Laura Butkovsky Turner – Psychology
Kerri Warren – Biology
Brian Wysor – Biology
Min Zhou – Foreign Language
Assistant Professors:
Kelly Brooks – Psychology
Jeremy Campbell – Anthropology
Charlotte Carrington – History
Laura D’Amore – American Studies
Sargon Donabed – History
Annika Hagley – Political Science
Robert Jacobson – Mathematics
Hume Johnson – Communication
Tadeusz Kugler – Political Science
Rebecca Karni – English Literature
Alejandro Leguizamo – Psychology
Cathy Nicoli – Dance/Performance
Hubert Noussi-Kamdem – Mathematics
Erica Oduaran – Chemistry
Jennifer Pearce – Physics
Paola Prado – Communication
Autumn Quezada-Grant – History
Dahliani Reynolds – Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition
Andrew Rhyne – Marine Biology
Lauren Rossi – Chemistry
Michael Scully – Communication
Roxanna Smolowitz – Biology
Erin Tooley – Psychology
Adria Updike – Physics
Special Events
The Professor John Howard Birss, Jr. Memorial Lectureship and
Professor John Howard Birss, Jr. Endowed Library Fund, were
established by Roger Williams University alumnus Robert Blais
‘70, to honor Professor John Howard Birss, Jr., mentor and lifelong friend of Mr. Blais. Professor Birss studied in the New York
public school system and completed his academic work at New
York University, Harvard University, and Columbia University.
An English instructor at Rutgers University and later a professor
of English and American Literature, Birss was a noted Herman
Melville scholar and one of the founders of the Melville Society.
He was also a bibliographer and collector of letters as well as
inscribed and rare first edition books. His extensive collection
included a wide variety of material on Melville, Hart Crane,
Edgar Allan Poe and Walt Whitman.
The library funds are allocated for the purchase of reference
and research books for the library and expand holdings in the
Humanities area. The Professor John Howard Birss, Jr. Memorial
Lectureship is an annual event that features an important work
of literature. Past works honored have included Ray Bradbury’s
Fahrenheit 451, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Herman
Melville’s Moby Dick, and Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.
97
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences Academic Programs
American Studies
Anthropology + Sociology
The American Studies Major
The Anthropology + Sociology Major
The American Studies major involves the interdisciplinary
study of American culture and leads to a Bachelor of Arts in
American Studies. Students focus on the regional and subcultural diversity of the United States, while at the same time
exploring the shared history and values of the nation.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors must satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements
and the College speech requirement, COMM 210. Students
should formulate a specific program of study in consultation
with the American Studies faculty. Students must complete
the following fourteen (14) courses (42 credits) and sufficient
electives to total at least 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to
apply electives toward a minor or second major.
Foundation Courses (15 Credits)
AMST 100 Approaches to the Study of American
Society and Culture
AMST 201 Research Methods
AMST 301 Junior Community Colloquium
AMST 420 Senior Seminar I
AMST 421 Senior Seminar II
5 courses selected from the following topical areas
*Note-These are variable content courses and may be repeated for
credit, but students may study a single topic only once.
AMST 370 Topics in Race, Gender and Sexuality
in America
AMST 371 Topics in Ethnicity, Class and Region
in America
AMST 372 Topics in American Material and
Popular Culture
AMST 373 Topics in American Ideas and Institutions
Four Interdisciplinary electives:
At least two at the 200 level or above from offerings on United
States life and culture from related disciplines such as Art and
Architectural History, Architecture, English, History, Music,
Philosophy, Political Science.
The American Studies Minor
AMST Approaches to the Study of American
Society and Culture
AMST
201
Research Methods
AMST 420
American Studies Senior Seminar I
and three courses selected from the following topical areas:
*Note-These are variable content courses and may be repeated for
credit, but students may study a single topic only once.
AMST 370 Topics in Race, Gender and Sexuality
in America
AMST 371
Topics in Ethnicity, Class and Region
in America
AMST 372 Topics in American Material and
Popular Culture
AMST 373 Topics in American Ideas and Institutions
98
100 The Anthropology + Sociology Program seeks to provide
an enriching learning experience for students interested in
focusing their studies on socio-cultural components of human
behavior. Anthropology and sociology share an interest in
studying social and cultural behavior, community development,
social organizations, diverse groups of people, cross-cultural
comparisons, and the interactions of all these categories. The
major seeks to acquaint students with the fundamentals of both
anthropology and sociology, highlighting the similarities of the
fields in their first two years of study. The ultimate goal is that
the student gains a broad understanding of both fields, and a
more specialized understanding of specific issues pertinent to
either anthropology or sociology.
Students who declare Anthropology + Sociology as a
major must complete ANTH 260, SOC 260, SOC 300 and
ANTH 454 with a grade of C- or higher in order to continue
in the program.
Students who major in anthropology and sociology have
many options open to them in terms of careers and further
education. An undergraduate degree in anthropology and
sociology can prepare a student for work in community
outreach, social services, the non-profit sector, education,
and the for-profit sectors of business. Students will also
have the foundation to continue their education in a range
of professions including but not limited to: anthropology,
sociology, law, medicine, and public policy.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology + Sociology
must satisfy the University Core Curriculum requirements
including the mathematics requirement (MATH 124, Basic
Statistics is recommended); the College speech requirement,
COMM 210; the courses listed below; and a sufficient number
of electives to total 120 credits.
Foundation Courses
The seven courses listed below are required of all majors:
SOC
100
Introduction to Sociology
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
SOC
260
The Sociological Imagination
ANTH 260
The Anthropological Lens
SOC
300
Social Theory
ANTH 454
Research Methods
ANTH 460 or
SOC
460
Senior Seminar
Elective Requirements
Five additional Anthropology and Sociology courses, which
must comprise courses from both disciplines (2 ANTH and 3
SOC or 2 SOC and 3 ANTH); at least three of these courses
must be at the 300 level or above.
The Anthropology + Sociology Minor
ANTH
SOC
100
100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Sociology
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
ANTH 260
Anthropological Lens
or
SOC
260
Sociological Imagination
and
Any three additional Anthropology/Sociology courses which
must be a combination of courses from both disciplines (1
ANTH and 2 SOC or 1 SOC and 2 ANTH); with at least two
courses at the 300 level or above.
Biology and Marine Biology
The Biology and Marine Biology Majors
Biology and Marine Biology majors investigate the
interconnected processes that shape the living world. The
Department of Biology and Marine Biology is housed in a
large, new building offering modern teaching and research
laboratories, a spacious wet-lab with running seawater, several
greenhouses and state-of-the-art instrumentation for cell and
molecular biology. The Department offers the Bachelor of
Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees in biology and marine
biology. Minors are also offered in biology, marine biology and
aquaculture and aquarium science. The Department has a very
active program for undergraduate research, and students are
encouraged to join an ongoing project as early as their first year.
Biology
Since the life sciences are increasingly interdisciplinary, biology
majors can take a wide range of courses in the following general
areas: cell and molecular biology; microbiology; physiology and
developmental biology; animal behavior; botany; and ecology.
Students prepare for graduate study and careers in these fields, as
well as the health sciences, through lectures and labs, independent
research and internships. Any student who wishes to pursue
a career in medicine, dentistry or veterinary medicine should
contact his/her advisor immediately to ensure appropriate course
planning. Research is an integral part of the biology curriculum,
and biology majors are encouraged to participate in ongoing
research in areas that include: evolutionary genetics, cell biology,
developmental biology, microbiology, neurobiology and ecology.
Dual Degree in Biology and Pharmacy – B.S./PharmD or
B.S./PharmD.
Biology majors completing the 3+4 Dual Degree Program
receive either a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science
(B.S.) degree from RWU in addition to the Doctor of Pharmacy
(Pharm.D.) degree from The Albany College of Pharmacy
and Health Sciences (ACPHS) Vermont campus. Students
matriculate in the Biology program for three years at RWU and,
if accepted, attend 4 years of Professional Pharmacy training at
ACPHS leading to the Pharm.D. Participating students receive
the Bachelor’s in Biology after the first year at ACPHS.
Marine Biology
Marine Biology majors explore the unique challenges faced by
organisms living in the marine environment and the methods by
which they meet these challenges. Students begin the program by
obtaining a broad understanding of oceanographic principles, and
through subsequent lectures, laboratories, and field work, build on
this knowledge for a more complete appreciation of the aquatic
world. The department also fosters undergraduate research
programs in such fields as biological oceanography, coastal and
wetland studies, marine environmental physiology, and marine
biotechnology and aquaculture in order to enhance the educational
experience provided to undergraduates. Upon completion of the
degree, students are prepared to specialize at the graduate level in
the oceanographic sciences or other environmental disciplines.
Students may also elect to undertake a SEA Semester
through the SEA Education Association (SEA) of Woods Hole,
Massachusetts or a semester in Bermuda at the Bermuda
Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS).
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students who declare biology and marine biology must achieve
a minimum average grade of C- for BIO 103 and BIO 104 in
order to advance in these majors. This minimum average grade
is a prerequisite for all biology and marine biology courses at the
200-level or above. In order to be considered a candidate for a
B.A. or B.S. in biology or marine biology, students must achieve
a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C) averaged over all
required courses in biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics.
The Biology Major
Biology majors can receive either a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Biology majors must satisfy
all University Core Curriculum requirements and the College
speech requirement, COMM 210. A 200-level Critical Writing
course is a prerequisite to advanced courses and should be
completed prior to the junior year. In addition, biology majors
must successfully complete the following courses and sufficient
electives to total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to apply
electives toward a minor or second major. Biology majors
may apply a maximum of two (2) courses from the major
requirements towards a minor in Environmental Science, or a
maximum of two (2) upper-level Biology electives towards the
elective requirements for the major in Environmental Science.
BIO
103 Biology I and Lab
BIO 104 Biology II and Lab
BIO 200
Genetics and Lab
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I and Lab
MATH 250 Biostatistics
or
MATH 315 Probability and Statistics
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology
must also complete the following courses:
One additional course from the following list:
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II and Lab
CHEM 201 Environmental Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 202 Environmental Chemistry II and Lab
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
BIO 333 Biochemistry for the Life Sciences
*Note that students who complete BIO 333 may use the course
to satisfy the above requirement or they may count the course
as a BIO elective, but the course may not count for both.
and
MATH 213, 214
Calculus I and II and Labs
PHYS 201, 202
Principles of Physics I and II and Labs
Five (5) upper-level (200 or above) courses in Biology, of which
at least four (4) must be laboratory courses.
BIO 450 (Research in the Life Sciences) and BIO 451 (Senior
Thesis) may not be counted towards these upper-level courses.
99
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Biology must also
complete the following courses:
MATH 136
Precalculus
PHYS 109, 110 Physics I and II and Labs
and
Six (6) upper-level (200 or above) courses in Biology, of which
four (4) must be laboratory courses.
BIO 450 (Research in the Life Sciences) and BIO 451 (Senior
Thesis) may not be counted towards these upper-level courses.
The Dual Degree in Biology and Pharmacy – B.S./PharmD
or B.S./PharmD.
Biology majors interested in the Dual Degree program must
satisfy all University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. All RWU courses
listed below must be completed by the end of the junior year.
Completion of at least 60 credits at RWU with an overall
minimum GPA of 3.0 is required; only grades of C or better
count towards the 60 credits. In addition, biology majors must
successfully complete the fourth year courses at ACPHS to
total 120 credits for the Bachelor’s degree in Biology.
Formal application to the program occurs in the fall
of junior year and requires approval of the Departmental
Pharmacy Advisor, completion of the PCAT exam including
a writing assessment, and a successful interview at ACPHS.
The ACPHS Doctor of Pharmacy Program is a full-time,
professional four-year program. For more information about
the Dual Degree in Biology and Pharmacy please contact the
chair of the Biology Department.
All Dual Degree (Biology/Pharm.D.) candidates must
complete the following courses at RWU:
BIO 103 & BIO 104 Biology I and II and Labs
BIO 200
Genetics and Lab
BIO 230 Microbiology and Lab
BIO/CHEM 390
Biochemistry and Lab
One Advanced Biology Course (200-level or above) with lab
CHEM 191 & 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301 & 302 Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
One of the following Mathematics courses
MATH 250
Introduction to Biostatistics
MATH 315
Probability and Statistics
Other requirements
PSYCH 100 Introduction to Psychology
and
Three (3) courses from Anthropology, Sociology,
Psychology, Music, Lanugages, Political Science,
Economics, English Literature.
(These courses may be used to satisfy Core Concentration requirements.)
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science dual degree in
Biology/Pharm.D. must also complete the following courses
at RWU:
MATH 213 Calculus I and Lab
and either
MATH 214
Calculus II and Lab
or
MATH 218
Applied Calculus for Life Sciences
PHYS 201 and 202 Physics I and II with Calculus and Labs
100
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts dual degree in
Biology/Pharm.D. must also complete the following
courses at RWU:
MATH 136
Precalculus
MATH 213
Calculus I and lab
PHYS 109 and 110 Physics I and II – Algebra based and Labs
The Marine Biology Major
Marine Biology majors can receive either a Bachelor of
Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Marine
Biology majors must satisfy all University Core Curriculum
requirements and the College speech requirement, COMM 210.
A 200-level Critical Writing course is a prerequisite to advanced
courses and should be completed prior to the junior year. In
addition, Marine Biology majors must successfully complete the
following courses and sufficient electives to total 120 credits.
Majors are encouraged to apply electives toward a minor or
second major. Marine Biology majors may apply a maximum of
two (2) courses from the major requirements towards a minor
in Environmental Science, or a maximum of two (2) upper-level
Marine Biology electives towards the elective requirements for
the major in Environmental Science.
BIO 103
Biology I and Lab
BIO 104 Biology II and Lab
BIO 200
Genetics and Lab
BIO 204 Introduction to Marine Biology
NATSC 204 Principles of Oceanography
CHEM 191,192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I and Lab
MATH 250 Biostatistics
or
MATH 315
Probability and Statistics
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in Marine
Biology must also complete the following courses:
One additional course from the following list:
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II and Lab
CHEM 201 Environmental Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 202 Environmental Chemistry II and Lab
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
BIO 333 Biochemistry for the Life Sciences
*Note that students who complete BIO 333 may use the course
to satisfy the above requirement or they may count the course
as a BIO elective, but the course may not count for both.
and
MATH 213, 214
Calculus I and II and Labs
PHYS 201, 202
Principles of Physics I and II and Labs
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Marine Biology
must also complete the following courses:
MATH 136
Precalculus
PHYS 109, 110
Physics I and II and Labs
Students completing the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of
Arts in Marine Biology must also complete a minimum of 21
(B.S.) or 28 (B.A.) additional credits from among the following
courses. Students must take at least one course from either the
Applied or the Molecular Category.
Organismal Category
Students must take at least one course marked * and at least
one course marked **
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
BIO 220
BIO 302 BIO 335 BIO 350 Marine Vertebrate Zoology and Lab*
Ichthyology and Lab*
Invertebrate Zoology and Lab*
Marine Mammalogy*
BIO 255
BIO 355 BIO 356 Survey of Marine Autotrophs**
Marine Phycology and Lab**
Biology of Plankton and Lab**
BIO 315 BIO 320
BIO 392/393
Animal Physiology and Lab
Marine Ecology and Lab
Animal Nutrition/Animal Nutrition Lab
Students must take at least one course from either the Applied or
the Molecular Category.
Applied Category:
AQS 260 AQS 262 AQS 314
AQS 346
BIO 310 BIO 312
BIO 332
BIO 345
NATSC 301 NATSC 333
Principles of Aquatic Animal Husbandry
and Lab
Aquarium System Design and Life
Support and Lab
Field Collection Methods (Bahamas)
Principles of Hatchery Management and Lab
Tropical Ecology
Conservation Biology
Fisheries Science
Aquaculture and Lab
Marine Resource Management
Environmental Monitoring and Analysis
and Lab
Molecular Category:
BIO 340 Biotechnology and Lab
BIO 370 Virology and Lab
NATSC 401
Environmental Toxicology and Lab
The SEA Semester Option
Prerequisite for majors: Satisfactory completion of the
writing and mathematics requirements and the five-course
Interdisciplinary Core; a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above; and
permission from the program faculty.
Prerequisite for Core Concentration: Students who are not
majoring in science or mathematics may use the SEA Semester
to fulfill the Core Concentration requirement provided the
following prerequisites are met before the SEA Semester:
satisfactory completion of the writing, mathematics, and
the five-course Interdisciplinary Core; a GPA of 2.5; and
permission of the program faculty.
Students in good academic standing who meet the
prerequisites may apply to attend a SEA Semester through
the Sea Education Association (SEA) of Woods Hole,
Massachusetts. This exciting and challenging off-campus
program combines onshore classes, labs, and field work, in
ocean sciences and maritime studies with an offshore sailing
and research experience. Students attending a SEA Semester
enroll in the following courses:
BIO
411
Applied Oceanography 3 credits
BIO
412
Nautical Science
3 credits
BIO
414
Maritime Studies
3 credits
BIO
416
Marine Technology
4 credits
BIO
418
Practical Oceanographic
4 credits
Research
Marine biology majors who successfully complete a SEA semester
receive eight (8) credits towards the Applied elective category.
This program is academically affiliated; however, certain
restrictions exist for the transfer of institutional aid. Please
consult the Spiegel Center for details.
Semester Program at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean
Sciences (BIOS)
Prerequisite for majors: Satisfactory completion of the
University Core Curriculum requirements and the five-course
Interdisciplinary Core; a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above; and
permission from the program faculty.
This semester-long course of study examines the natural
processes and human interventions found in the Gulf Stream,
the Sargasso Sea, and the coral archipelago, Bermuda.
Students are introduced to the interactions that determine
the distribution and abundance patterns of tropical marine
organisms, with emphasis on the ecology of near-shore
areas. Basic principles of ecology are integrated with an
understanding of the sea as a habitat for life. Major groups of
dominant marine organisms of the region are examined in the
field. Major near-shore marine habitats are examined, along
with their associated biotic communities. Coral reef ecosystems
are emphasized to illustrate basic concepts. Students conduct a
major research project. Fall
Students enroll in the following courses:
BIO
361
Coral Reef Ecology
4 credits
BIO
336
Tropical Marine
Invertebrate Zoology 4 credits
BIO
410
Research Diving Methods 3 credits
BIO
410
Marine Biology Research6 credits
For marine biology majors participating in the Bermuda semester,
BIO 361 replaces BIO 320 (organismal) and BIO 336 replaces BIO
335 (organismal). In addition, students receive 3 elective credits
towards the Applied category.
Marine Biology Internship at the New England
Aquarium (NEAq)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the writing and
mathematics requirements and the five course interdisciplinary
CORE; a cumulative GPA of 2.8 or above; recommendation from a
RWU Faculty member; and acceptance by the program faculty at
the New England Aquarium (NEAq).
This semester-long course of study provides a rigorous
introduction to the research and educational opportunities
provided by a major public aquarium. The internship will
consist of an active research component in a laboratory setting
under the direction of an NEAq research scientist, an animal
husbandry experience with responsibilities that may include
feeding animals, cleaning tanks and equipment, and providing
treatment for diseased animals, and the successful completion
of a dedicated course of research under the direction of an RWU
biology faculty member. Students enroll in the following courses:
AQS
260
Principles of Animal Husbandry and Lab
AQS420 Research Internship at the New
England Aquarium
AQS
450
Research in Aquarium Science
101
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
The Biology Minors
Requirements for the Minor in Aquaculture and
Aquarium Science
AQS 260
Principles of Aquatic Animal Husbandry
and Lab
AQS
262
Aquarium System Design and Life
Support and Lab
and
Three (3) courses from the following list:
AQS
306
Principles of Exhibit Development
(offered at RWU and NEAq)
AQS
314
Field Collection Methods (offered by
NEAq in the Bahamas)
AQS
346
Hatchery Management and Lab
AQS
352
Public Aquarium Management
AQS
450
Aquaculture/Aquarium Science Research
BIO
302
Ichthyology and Lab
BIO
345
Aquaculture and Lab
*A maximum of two (2) courses may be applied towards both
the Aquaculture & Aquarium Science minor and to the major in
Marine Biology.
Requirements for the Minor in Biology
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
BIO
104
Biology II and Lab
Three Biology courses, of which one must be a lab at the 200level or above and one must be at the 300-level or above.
Requirements for the *Minor in Marine Biology
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
or
BIO 104
Biology II and Lab
and
BIO
204
Introduction to Marine Biology
NATSC 204
Principles of Oceanography
And a minimum of 8 additional credits taken from the Applied
or Organismal categories of marine biology courses
*NOTE: Biology may not serve as a minor for a Marine Biology
major and Marine Biology may not serve as a minor for a
Biology major.
Certificate in Biotechnology
This Program is designed to provide training and certification
of the technical skills of Majors in Biology, Marine Biology,
Environmental Sciences and Chemistry. The emphasis on
mastery of these skills will make them more competitive for
graduate programs and jobs in the biomedical research and
the biotech and pharmaceutical industries. Students with a
broad and interdisciplinary training can become leaders and
positive contributors to modern society. Scientific knowledge
is a point in which we can now examine and change the
genetic material that controls the structure and behaviors of
living organisms. Biotechnology is revolutionizing industry,
medicine, agriculture and aquaculture. A Biotechnology
certificate at Roger Williams University will offer successful
students a credential that will make them attractive
candidates for a wide range of technical positions in industry
and biomedical research.
102
Requirements for a Certificate in Biotechnology
Biology, Environmental Sciences, Marine Biology or Chemistry
Majors will be eligible for a Certificate in Biotechnology by
having a 3.0 GPA, filing an application, completing required
courses, and completing an internship/research project.
Internships can be conducted in research laboratories (at
academic institutions) Biotechnology companies in New
England, other areas in the U.S. and abroad. For successful
completion of the Certificate in Biotechnology students will
be expected to maintain a 3.0 GPA and take a comprehensive
knowledge and laboratory evaluation test. The certificate
will be conferred only in conjunction with the awarding of a
bachelor’s degree from Roger Williams University.
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
BIO 200 Genetics and Lab
BIO 230
Microbiology and Lab
BIO 231
Bioethics
BIO
340
Biotechnology and Lab
BIO
420
Research Internship
CHEM 191
Principles of Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 192
Principles of Chemistry II and Lab
And two (2) of the following laboratory courses
BIO
323
Developmental Biology and Lab
BIO 325
Cell Biology and Lab
BIO/
COMSC 331
Bioinformatics and Lab
BIO
370
Virology and Lab
BIO/
CHEM 390
Biochemistry I and Lab
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
Chemistry
The Chemistry Major
Students may pursue the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts
through the Department of Chemistry.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry, certified by
the American Chemical Society (ACS), emphasizes laboratory
and independent research beyond that required of the Bachelor
of Arts and is designed to prepare graduates for graduate school,
medical school, and chemistry-related positions in business,
government and industry.
All degrees in Chemistry are designed to stimulate analytical
reasoning and encourage a discriminating approach to problemsolving. All degrees provide a working knowledge in chemistry
and the skills to pursue careers in chemistry and related fields.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors must satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements
and the College speech requirement, COMM 210. Chemistry
majors must complete the following courses and sufficient
electives to total at least 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to
apply electives toward a minor or second major.
Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry:
MATH 136 or
above
Precalculus or above
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
and 24 credit hours of Chemistry courses at the 300 or 400 level.
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
(ACS certified curriculum):
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301, 302 Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
CHEM 320
Inorganic Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 390
Biochemistry and Lab
CHEM 391
Chemical Thermodynamics and Lab
CHEM 392
Quantum Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 421
Advanced Chemistry Lab I
CHEM 450
Research in the Chemical Sciences
MATH 213, 214 Calculus I and II and Labs
PHYS
201, 202 Physics I and II and Labs
One or more courses selected from the following:
CHEM 431
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 432
Advanced Organic Chemistry
CHEM 433
Advanced Physical Chemistry
The Major in Chemistry with an
Environmental Concentration
This course of study expands the student’s knowledge of
the environment and how best to live in it, particularly
from a chemical point of view. Studies dealing with actual
environmental problems in modern society provide students
with the logical scientific framework and develop the
intellectual power necessary for finding possible solutions
and deciding upon the more desirable ones. Emphasis is on
laboratory and field studies designed to develop the skills
and techniques necessary for analyzing environmental
problems. Students may pursue either the Bachelor of Arts or
Bachelor of Science.
The Bachelor of Science in chemistry with an environmental
concentration prepares students for positions in industry and
governmental agencies. Employment opportunities include:
state health departments, municipal sewage treatment plants,
environmental protection agencies, Army Corps of Engineers,
industrial consulting firms, and chemical industries.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Chemistry majors who elect the environmental concentration
must satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. Chemistry majors
with the environmental concentration must successfully
complete the following courses and sufficient electives to total
at least 120 credits.
Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry with
an Environmental Concentration
MATH 136 or
above
Precalculus or above
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
BIO
104 Biology II and Lab
or
NATSC 204
Principles of Oceanography
CHEM 191, 192
Principles of Chemistry I and II
and Labs
CHEM 201, 202
Environmental Chemistry I and II
and Labs
and 16 credit hours of Chemistry courses at the 300 or 400 level.
Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with
an Environmental Concentration (ACS certified curriculum)
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301, 302 Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
CHEM 320
Inorganic Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 390
Biochemistry and Lab
CHEM 391
Chemical Thermodynamics and Lab
CHEM 392
Quantum Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 421
Advanced Chemistry Lab I
CHEM 434
Advanced Environmental Chemistry
CHEM 450
Research in the Chemical Sciences
MATH 213, 214 Calculus I and II and Labs
PHYS
201, 202 Principles of Physics I and II and Labs
The Biochemistry Major
The biochemistry major offers students the opportunity to
delve into the science that is at the interface of two distinct
disciplines by learning about the chemistry of biology and the
biological applications of chemistry. Students will be equipped
for future work, research and study by being able to draw from
experiences in both disciplines. They will be comfortable with
the terminology in both disciplines and be able to use the latest
techniques in the field. For those who wish to continue their
studies in professional programs, they will be prepared and
competitive for the career paths that they are choosing.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors must satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements
and the College speech requirement, COMM 210. Biochemistry
majors must complete the following courses and sufficient
electives to total at least 120 credits. Majors are encouraged
to take Microbiology, Biotechnology, Bioethics and 3 credits
of Internship/Research in order to obtain the biotechnology
certification along with the B.S. in Biochemistry.
Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry:
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301, 302 Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
CHEM 320
Inorganic Chemistry and Lab
CHEM/
BIO
390
Biochemistry and Lab
CHEM 391
Chemical Thermodynamics and Lab
CHEM 435
Advanced Biochemistry
CHEM 423L
Advanced Biochemistry Lab
BIO
450
Research in Biochemical Sciences
MATH 213, 214 Calculus I and II and Labs
PHYS
201, 202 Physics I and II and Labs
BIO
103
Biology I and Lab
BIO
200
Genetics and Lab
BIO 325
Cell Biology and Lab
BIO
331
Bioinformatics and Lab
Plus an additional 8 credits from the following courses, at least
one must be a Chemistry course.
BIO
315
Animal Physiology and Lab
BIO
323
Developmental Biology and Lab
BIO330 Neurobiology
BIO340 Biotechnology
103
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
BIO
BIO
BIO
CHEM CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
370
380
392
392
421
431
432
433
434
Virology and Lab
Parasitology and Lab
Animal Nutrition
Quantum Chemistry and Lab
Advanced Chemistry Lab I
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Advanced Organic Chemistry
Advanced Physical Chemistry
Advanced Environmental Chemistry
*NOTE: Biology or Chemistry may not serve as a second major or
minor for a Biochemistry major and Biochemistry may not serve as
a second major or minor for a Biology or Chemistry major.
Dual Degree in Chemistry and Pharm D.
Three-Plus-Four Chemistry-PharmD Dual Degree Program
Roger Williams University has partnered with Albany College of
Pharmacy and Health Sciences (ACPHS Vermont Campus) to
provide a dual Chemistry-PharmD degree program. Outstanding
students who qualify for this special program may be able to
complete all requirements for a baccalaureate degree in Chemistry
(B.S. or B.A.) or Biochemistry (B.S.) and the Doctor of Pharmacy
degree in seven years, as opposed to the traditional eight-year period
of study. The program requires students to declare Chemistry or
Biochemistry as their primary undergraduate major, and to take
the pre-pharmacy courses at Roger Williams University, Feinstein
College of Arts and Sciences. Chemistry or Biochemistry majors
must satisfy the University Core Curriculum requirements, the
College speech requirement, and complete a total of at least 120
credits including transfer credits from ACPHS. Students successfully
completing the dual degree program will be eligible to participate in
the commencement exercises of each institution.
Students are required to indicate their intent to pursue
the Chemistry-PharmD dual degree program on their college
application form. The student’s application must be evaluated
by the office of admissions at ACPHS for acceptance into the
program as well. Full-time students who matriculate into the
program in their freshman year and who maintain superior
academic records with outstanding academic averages must
formally declare at the beginning of their junior year to the Chair
of the Chemistry and Physics Department their intent to apply
to ACPHS. Students would complete the PCAT examination
and the PharmCAS application to ACPHS by March 1 of their
junior year. ACPHS Doctor of Pharmacy program is a full-time,
four year program. Courses taken during the first year at ACPHS
Vermont campus will transfer for credits for the Bachelor of Arts
degree in Chemistry or an American Chemical Society approved
Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry or Biochemistry.
Students who matriculate at ACPHS must meet the
following conditions:
• A student must have earned at least 90 credits in three
years of study at Roger Williams University before
beginning at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health
Sciences (Vermont campus).
• A student must successfully complete the required
Pre-pharmacy courses at Roger Williams University, as
specified in this catalog.
• All Core Curriculum requirements and pre-pharmacy
course requirements must be met within those 90 credits.
104
•
The student’s cumulative grade-point average must be at
least 3.0. No grade lower than a C (2.0) will count toward
the 90 credits.
• The student must meet or exceed Albany College of
Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Vermont campus) PCAT
entry requirements.
• The student must successfully interview and complete a
writing assessment as determined by the Albany College of
Pharmacy and Health Sciences (Vermont campus).
The following are the required pre-pharmacy courses at
Roger Williams University:
CHEM 191/L*
Principles of Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 192/L* Principles of Chemistry II and Lab
CHEM 301/L* Organic Chemistry I and Lab
CHEM 302/L* Organic Chemistry II and Lab
CHEM/BIO390/L
Biochemistry and Lab
BIO
103/L* Biology I and Lab
BIO
104/L
Biology II and Labs
BIO
230/L
Microbiology and Lab
Select one Biology course at the 200 Level or above*
Select one of the following mathematics courses:
MATH 124
Basic Statistics
MATH 250
Introductions to Biostatistics
MATH 315
Probability and Statistics
and take
*MATH 213/L
Calculus I and Lab
PHYS
109/L
Physics I and Lab (Algebra based)
PHYS
110/L* Physics II and Lab (Algebra based)
or
PHYS
201/L* Physics I with Calculus and Lab
*PHYS 202/L* Physics II with Calculus and Lab
and
PSYCH 100
Introduction to Psychology
COMM 210
Introduction to Public Speaking
WTNG 102
Expository Writing
WTNG 200 or 220 Critical Writing
* MATH 213, PHYS 201, and PHYS 202 are required for the
Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry or Biochemistry
As part of the dual degree program, students who have been
admitted to ACPHS will be candidates for an American
Chemical Society approved Bachelor of Science degree in
Chemistry or Biochemistry or a Bachelor of Arts degree in
Chemistry from Roger Williams University once they have met
the following additional requirements:
• Completion of the Chemistry or Biochemistry major degree
requirements at Roger Williams University. (Details of the
major degree requirements are found in this catalog.)
and
•
Completion of the first year of the Doctor of Pharmacy
at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
(Vermont campus).
Such candidates for the baccalaureate degree must file an
application for degree with the University Registrar before
registering for their fourth-year courses (first year ACPHS courses).
In completing the first year of coursework at ACPHS, a
student in the Chemistry-PharmD dual degree program must
pass all courses noted by an asterisk with a grade of C or better.
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
These courses are those completed during the first year at
ACPHS are:
Fall Semester
Credits Spring Semester
Credits
*Pharmaceutics I 3
*Pharmaceutics II
3
*Physiology/ *Physiology/
Pathophysiology I 4
Pathophysiology II 4
*Immunology
3
Self Care/OTC
3
Pharmacy Skills Lab I1
Pharmacy Skills Lab II 1
IPS Workshop I
1
IPS Workshop II
1
Foundations of *Molecular
Pharmacy
1
Biology
3
In the event that a student does not successfully matriculate to
ACPHS after three years of study at Roger Williams University,
the dual degree program has been structured such that the
Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry or the Bachelor of
Science degree in Chemistry or Biochemistry requirements
may be completed at Roger Williams University within a fourth
year of study.
The Chemistry Minors
Requirements for the Minor in Chemistry
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 301, 302 Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
and two of the following:
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
CHEM 320
Inorganic Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 390
Biochemistry and Lab
CHEM 391
Chemical Thermodynamics and Lab
CHEM 392
Quantum Chemistry and Lab
Requirements for the Minor in Environmental Chemistry
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 201, 202 Environmental Chemistry I and II and Labs
CHEM 311
Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis and Lab
Majors in Communication
Communication is at the heart of being human and
encompasses everything from how we create and maintain
relationships to how we generate and distribute messages and
information in our communities, in a workplace and around
the world. Communication is essential to our identity and
our culture. Within the framework of a sound liberal arts
education, the Department of Communication offers students
two exciting majors that help prepare them for careers in
a wide variety of fields and industries. All Communication
majors should have good writing and verbal skills and should
display a critical curiosity about the world.
The Global Communication major recognizes that
Communication does not occur in a vacuum and is always
situated in a cultural context. It is designed to help students
develop an awareness of this cultural interplay, helping them
become competent and sensitive global citizens who can
adapt and navigate successfully in the ever-changing, crosscultural environment.
The Media Communication and Journalism majors prepare
students for careers in the exciting and demanding fields
of Journalism and Public Relations with focus on both solid
communication theory and practical communication skills
training. Knowledge of how emerging technologies are used by
audiences and publics is key to Public Relations, Journalism and
Digital Media practitioners in the 21st century.
Global Communication Major
The Global Communication major recognizes that we live
in a world where national boundaries are disappearing as
international and domestic concerns and issues intersect,
interact and overlap. To ensure that our students are
prepared for living and working in this new global
community, the Global Communication curriculum
is committed to examining the mutually constitutive
relationship between culture and communication
and its impact in a globally diverse and multicultural
environment. Coursework in Global Communication
examines the production, transmission and reception
of messages to inform, persuade, entertain, develop
relationships and build community in an ever-changing,
cross-cultural context.
Students undertaking a major in Global Communication:
• Learn theories, models, and concepts that investigate the
relationship between culture and communication
• Develop research skills relevant to the study of culture
and communication
• Cultivate a concern for communication ethics, social
justice and civic responsibility
• Understand the dynamics related to communication
technologies and new media and develop appropriate
applied skills.
• Enhance and foster writing skills, critical thinking skills,
creativity and problem-solving abilities.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelors of Arts in Global
Communication must satisfy University Core Curriculum
requirements and the College speech requirement, COMM
210. In addition, majors must successfully complete 13 major
courses, including an internship and a sufficient number of
electives to total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to apply
electives towards a minor or second major.
Required Courses:
COMM 100
Introduction to Communication Studies
COMM 165
Introduction to Visual Communication
COMM 200
Media Law and Ethics
COMM 240
Digital Communication: Technology,
Modes & Methods
COMM 250
Intercultural Communication
COMM 265
Visual Rhetoric-Visual Culture
COMM 305
Mass Communication Theory and Criticism
COMM 330
International Communication
COMM 390
Qualitative Research Methods
in Communication
and one of the following required Internships:
COMM460
Internship
COMM 461
Washington Internship and Experiential
Learning Seminar
105
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
and two (2) upper level courses in Global Communication from the
following list:
COMM 365
Digital Media in a Global Context
COMM 375
Global Audiences, Global Consumers
COMM 380
Visual Media in a Cultural Context
COMM 432
Special Topics in Global Communication
COMM 462
Washington DC Global Comm Seminar
COMM 465
McLuhan’s Global Village
And one (1) elective course from the following list, some of which
have prerequisites:*
AMST 331
Culture and Gender
AMST 340
Ethnic Cultures in America
ANTH 380
Culture Change and Development*
ECON 360
International Macroeconomics*
A Language course at the 201 Level*
POLSC 321
Politics and Ethnic Conflict*
POLSC 335
International Negations*
SOC
316
Sociology of Gender*
SOC
330
Globalization and Identity
SOC
350
Comparative Social Movements and
Social Change
WTNG 300
Rhetoric and Global Context
WTNG 400
Writing for Social Change
The Journalism Major
At its core, Journalism is—regardless of the medium—a writing
major. The purpose of the Journalism major is to teach students
the craft of news gathering and writing. The curriculum begins
with an emphasis on the rigor and traditions of news reporting
before introducing tools and training for electronic-based media
production. As students move through the major, they will add
to their writing skills an appreciation for digital journalism.
With completion of the Journalism major, students should have
excellent writing and verbal skills, an understanding of media
history and ethics, a proficiency in digital journalism and a
superior understanding of news in all its forms.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students who declare Journalism as a major must complete
COMM 101, COMM 111, COMM 200, and JOUR 170 with a
grade of C- or higher in order to continue in the program.
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Journalism must
satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition,
students must successfully complete 14 major courses,
including a Portfolio and a sufficient number of electives to
total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to apply electives
toward a minor or second major.
Foundation Courses
COMM 101
Introduction to Mass Media
COMM 111
Writing for the Mass Media
COMM 200
Media Law and Ethics
COMM 240
Digital Communication: Technology,
Modes & Methods
COMM 305
Mass Communication Theory and Criticism
and one of the following required Internships:
COMM460
Internship
COMM 461
Washington Internship and Experiential
Learning Seminar
106
Required Courses
JOUR
170
News I: Basic Journalism
JOUR
270
Journalism and Society
JOUR
355
Digital Journalism I
JOUR
370
News II: Advanced Journalism and Lab
JOUR
455
Digital Journalism II
JOUR
470
Journalism Capstone + Portfolio
and two (2) additional courses, at least one of which must be at
the 300-level or above from the following offerings, some of which
have prerequisites*:
JOUR
280
Feature Writing
JOUR
299
Special Topics in Journalism
JOUR
315
Introduction to Photojournalism
JOUR
320
Broadcast News
JOUR
430
Special Topics in Journalism
FILM
270
Documentary Film*
VARTS 261
Foundations of Photography
POLSC 303
Politics and the Media
POLSC 361
State and Local Government*
The Media Communication Major
The Media Communication major completes five foundation
courses including one internship in their field of study. The
public relations degree in Media Communication (seven courses)
prepares students for careers in corporate, not-for-profit and
agency public relations. The internship is integral to the Media
Communication major. Junior and senior majors serve an
apprenticeship at more than 30 nearby organizations, including
media outlets, public relations agencies and not-for-profit.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Media Communication
must satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, students
must successfully complete 12 major courses, including an
internship and a sufficient number of electives to total 120
credits. Majors are encouraged to apply electives toward a
minor or second major.
Foundation Courses
COMM 101
Introduction to Mass Media
COMM 111
Writing for the Mass Media
COMM 240
Digital Communication: Technology,
Modes & Methods
COMM 200
Media Law and Ethics
and one of the following required Internships:
COMM460
Internship
COMM 461
Washington Internship and Experiential
Learning Seminar
Required Courses
COMM 220
Principles and Practices of Public Relations
COMM 305
Mass Communication Theory and Criticism
COMM 340
Mass Communication Research
COMM 350
Public Relations Techniques
COMM 420
Public Relations Case Studies
MRKT 200
Marketing Principles
and
One MRKT elective at the 300 Level or above
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
The Global Communication Minor
COMM 100
and
Introduction to Communication Studies
Any five of the following (at least one must be at the 200-Level and
two at the 300-Level or above)
COMM 165 Introduction to Visual Communication
COMM 250 Intercultural Communication
COMM 265 Visual Rhetoric, Visual Culture
COMM 330 International Communication
COMM 365 Digital Media in a Global Context
COMM 375 Global Audiences, Global Consumers
COMM 380 Visual Media in a Cultural Context
COMM 432 Special Topics in Global Communication
COMM 462 Washington DC Global
Communication Seminar
COMM 465 McLuhan’s Global Village
WTNG 300 Rhetoric and Cultural Differences
Creative Writing
The Creative Writing Major
The creative writing program leads to the Bachelor of Fine
Arts. By dedicating their collegiate study to creative writing,
students commit to becoming writers; they can expect to be
treated as serious writers. As such, they will engage in the
formal and rigorous study of craft through reading, revising,
and developing the methodical and critical skills that assist
in improving their own creative work as well as the work of
others. If students apply themselves deliberately to the study
of writing in their time at RWU, they can expect to establish
solid foundations for these essential practices, common to all
writers/artists.
Incoming freshmen are accepted to the creative
writing program on the basis of a portfolio, containing both
creative and analytical writing, submitted as part of the
application process. Matriculating students may enter the
creative writing program by earning a grade of B- or higher
in CW 210 and CW 220, on the basis of a portfolio, or by
recommendation of one or more full-time creative writing
faculty members. (See: Special Requirements for Applicants
section of the catalog.)
Each year, the creative writing program brings to campus
such writers as Rick Moody, Kim Addonizio, Marjorie Agosin,
Steve Almond, Ann Waldman, Tom Chandler, Stuart Dischell,
Mark Halliday, Stewart O’Nan, Dan Chaon, Tobias Wolff,
Jennifer Haigh and C.D. Wright who speak on literature and
writing and read from their works.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Creative writing majors must satisfy University Core
Curriculum requirements and the College speech requirement,
COMM 210. In addition, the creative writing major must
successfully complete the fourteen (14) courses listed below
and sufficient electives to total 120 credits. Majors are
encouraged to apply electives toward a minor or second major.
Foundation Courses
CW
210
Form in Poetry
CW
220
Narrative in Writing the Short Story
Four (4) courses from the English major
Advanced Bridge Courses (Take two)
CW
350
Writers Reading Poetry Seminar
CW
360
Writers Reading Fiction Seminar
CW
440
Writing Contemporary Poetry
CW
450
The Use of Style in Writing Fiction
Advanced Breadth Courses (Take two)
CW
310
Creative Nonfiction
CW 330
Literary Publishing
CW
340
Introduction to Playwriting
CW 430
Special Topics in Creative Writing
Breadth Course in the Fine Arts (Take one)
(Some of these courses may have pre-requisites; refer to course
descriptions for details)
DANCE 150
DANCE 161
DANCE 200
Introduction to Dance Technique
Tap and Theatre Dance Styles I
Elementary Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation I
DANCE 220
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation II
MUSIC 170
Basic Musicianship
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
VARTS 231
Foundations of Sculpture
VARTS 241
Introduction to Printmaking
VARTS 261
Foundations of Photography
VARTS 281
Foundations of Painting
VARTS 301
Advanced Drawing: Process and Content
VARTS 351
Intermediate Concepts of Photography
VARTS 352
Advanced Photography: Process and Content
VARTS 381
Painting: The Figure
DSGN 100
Introduction to Design Communication
DSGN 110
Introduction to Typography
THEAT 110
Acting I
THEAT 120
Design for the Theatre I
THEAT 121
Design for the Theatre II
THEAT 210
Acting II
Thesis Courses (Take both)
CW 480
Creative Writing Senior Seminar I
CW 481
Seminar II – The Thesis
The Creative Writing Minor
CW
210
Form in Poetry
CW
220
Narrative in Writing the Short Story
One 200 Level English course
Take one Advanced Bridge Course
CW
350
Writers Reading Poetry Seminar
CW
360
Writers Reading Fiction Seminar
Take one 400 Level Advanced Bridge Course
CW
440
Writing Contemporary Poetry
CW 450
The Use of Style in Writing Fiction
Take one Advanced Breadth Course
CW
310
Creative Non-Fiction
CW
330
Literary Publishing
CW 340
Introduction to Playwriting
CW
430
Special Topics in Creative Writing
107
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Dance/Performance
DANCE 302
The Dance/Performance Major
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
The Department of Dance and Performance Studies develops
highly trained, creatively active, and professionally oriented
students with its unique curriculum. A Bachelor of Arts degree
is offered in dance/performance. An audition is required for
acceptance into the major program. The program allows for
individual attention from the faculty, all working professionals.
Courses are offered in technique (ballet, modern, jazz,
tap, ethnic and social forms), choreography, history, pedagogy,
movement analysis, kinesiology, and performance techniques.
Additionally, it is the only dance-based university program to
provide training in movement theatre in the United States.
Majors are expected to maintain a continuing level of technical
and creative development and are evaluated each semester by
the faculty. Students broaden their backgrounds in the related
arts, foster perceptive appreciation and develop a sense of
artistic discrimination.
Each year, the department welcomes to campus notable
guest artists for teaching and choreographic residencies and
performance collaborations. Artists have included Seán Curran,
Doug Elkins, Heidi Latsky, Carl Flink, Molissa Fenley, Billy
Siegenfeld, Margie Gillis, Creach/Koester, Arthur Hall, Meredith
Monk, Marty Beller, Emilie Plauché, Fred Curchack, Bill Evans,
Daniel Stein, Laura Glenn, Gilles Obermayer, and Claire Porter.
Selected students have an opportunity to compose,
perform, and produce their own works in studio performances.
Auditions are held each semester for The Dance Theatre, the
university dance company that presents major concert series
and mini-concerts, workshops, and presentations in the state
and region. Any interested dance student may participate in
the dance component of the London theatre program during
the junior or senior year.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The dance/performance major must satisfy University
Core Curriculum requirements. In addition, majors must
successfully complete the 42 credits listed below and sufficient
electives to total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to
apply electives toward a minor or second major. Majors are
also required to participate in a technique class every day
and maintain a satisfactory level of competence. Progress is
evaluated by faculty each semester.
Foundation Courses – Required – 9 credits
DANCE 101
The Creative Athlete
DANCE 290
Introduction to Choreography
DANCE 310
Dance History
Technique Studies Courses – Required – 15 credits
DANCE 210
Ballet I
and a minimum of 12 credits in Upper Level Technique courses
taken from the following:
DANCE 211
Ballet II
DANCE 220
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation I
DANCE 221
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation II
DANCE 301
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation III
108
320
321
401
402
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation IV
Advanced Technique and Improvisation I
Advanced Technique and Improvisation II
Advanced Technique and Improvisation III
Advanced Technique and Improvisation IV
A daily technique class in Modern, Jazz, and/or Ballet (credit or
audit) is required of all majors.
Note: Majors must complete a proficiency audition for placement
into technique and choreography classes.
Theory and Performance Studies Courses – 18 credits
Choose 6 out of the following 7 courses:
DANCE 131
Mime Workshop
DANCE 340
Performance Lab and Movement Analysis
DANCE 390
Advanced Choreography
DANCE 425
Kinesiology for Dancers
DANCE 435
The Performance Artist in Society
DANCE 440
Movement Theatre
DANCE 460
Teaching Techniques, Dance Pedagogy
and Musical Concepts
Note: Students completing Dance Teacher Certification are required
to take DANCE 161 and DANCE 460.
The PK-12 Dance/Education Dual Major
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing a dual major in Dance and education must
satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements, and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210, all education
requirements, the following 45 credits as specified and
sufficient electives to total 120 credits.
Foundation Courses – Required – 9 credits
DANCE 101
The Creative Athlete
DANCE 290
Introduction to Choreography
DANCE 310
Dance History
Dance Teacher Certification – Required 3 credits
*DANCE 161
Tap and Theatre Dance Styles I
Technique Studies Courses – Required – 15 credits
DANCE 210
Ballet I
and a minimum of 12 credits in Upper Level Technique courses
taken from the following:
DANCE 211
Ballet II
DANCE 220
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation I
DANCE 221
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation II
DANCE 301
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation III
DANCE 302
Intermediate Contemporary Modern
Technique and Improvisation IV
DANCE 320
Advanced Technique and Improvisation I
DANCE 321
Advanced Technique and Improvisation II
DANCE 401
Advanced Technique and Improvisation III
DANCE 402
Advanced Technique and Improvisation IV
A daily technique class in Modern, Jazz, and/or Ballet (credit or
audit) is required of all majors.
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
The Dance/Performance Minor
HIST 381
Critical Periods and Topics in Asian History**
POLSC 340
International Political Economy**
POLSC 346
Foreign Policies of Russia and China**
SOC 330
Globalization and Identity**
Humanities/Arts (select one)
COMM 380
Visual Media in Cultural Context**
ENG
320
Studies in Global Literatures (with special
topics focus in Asia)**
ENG 360
Studies in Ethnic American Literatures
(with special topics focus in Asia)**
MUSIC 312
World Culture Through Music (China
& Japan)**
PHIL 212
Eastern Philosophy*
THEAT 333
Asian Drama and Dance**
Capstone
ASIA
450
Colloquium in Asian Studies
DANCE 101
English Literature
Note: Majors must complete a proficiency audition for placement
into technique and choreography classes.
Theory and Performance Studies Courses – 18 credits
Choose 6 out of the following 7 courses: DANCE 460 required
DANCE 131
Mime Workshop
DANCE 340
Performance Lab and Movement Analysis
DANCE 390
Advanced Choreography
DANCE 425
Kinesiology for Dancers
DANCE 435
The Performance Artist in Society
DANCE 440
Movement Theatre
*DANCE 460
Teaching Techniques, Dance Pedagogy,
and Musical Concepts
Note: Students completing Dance Teacher Certification are required
to take *DANCE 161 and *DANCE 460.
The Creative Athlete
Four Dance Technique Classes or a total of twelve credits in
Dance Technique. (Placement made through consultation with
a member of the dance faculty)
and one of the following:
DANCE 290
Introduction to Choreography
DANCE 310
Dance History
DANCE 350
British Dance and Performance Art: London
DANCE 425 Kinesiology for Dancers
DANCE 435 The Performance Artist in Society
The East Asian Studies Minor
This minor directly supports RWU’s mission to “bridge the
world” by fostering a student body comprised of global citizens
who will explore the languages, cultures, histories, and
socioeconomic conditions of China, Japan and Korea. With
over five thousand years of civilization, more than a billion
people, and globally significant economies, East Asia plays
an essential role in the modern world. Balancing liberal arts
and professional approach, the minor will introduce students
to the region’s complex traditions, rich cultural resources,
and historical contributions, while fostering intercultural
relationships between the United States and East Asia.
Foundation requirement:
ASIA
100
Foundations of Asian Studies
*Study Abroad courses may be approved for substitution of this
requirement with the approval of the Asian Studies Minor Advisor.
Language requirements
Two semesters of an East Asian Language (Chinese
[Mandarin], Japanese, or Korean).
Elective Requirements
** Students must meet all prerequisites for all of the courses
listed below unless waived by the instructor.
Social Sciences/Professional (select one)
ANTH 356
World Cultures**
ECON 330
Economics of Developing Countries**
ECON 350
International Trade**
HIST 281
Survey of East Asian History**
HIST 317
Studies in Asian National History**
The English Literature Major
While the core of the English Literature major celebrates
the British and American canon, the program also offers
opportunities to explore authors and works from other
traditions. These include world literatures in translation and
literatures that focus on cultures, genres, periods, and themes
representative of non-western as well as western perspectives.
Studies occur in an environment marked by strong faculty
commitment to student-centered education. As a result,
students are actively engaged in achieving individual excellence
and are involved also in the larger life of formal and informal
program activities in and out of class. Social elements of the
program include a student mentoring program, a literature
society, and a chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the International
Honor Society. The faculty keeps office doors open, and
advisement is a keystone of the department. The academic
design of the curriculum fosters progressive intellectual
development; depth and breadth of knowledge of literature
and its many integrated contexts (especially philosophical,
psychological, historical, aesthetic, and cross-cultural); and the
assembly of critical thinking, analytical writing, argument and
defense, research, presentation, and related skills, all of which
advantage students for leadership roles, graduate studies, and
professional careers not only in teaching, but in many other
fields as well. All majors complete a capstone, year-long, senior
thesis of publishable quality and present their findings in
Senior Colloquium.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in English must satisfy
University Core Curriculum requirements and the College speech
requirement, COMM 210. In addition, majors must complete
the following 14 courses as specified and sufficient electives to
total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to apply electives taken
outside the major toward a minor or second major.
ENG
ENG
ENG
ENG
100
210
220
240
Introduction to Literature
Myth, Fantasy, and the Imagination
Literary Analysis
Early American Literature: Pre Columbus
Through the Civil War
109
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
ENG
ENG
260
270
American Realism, Naturalism and Modernism
British Literature I: From Beowulf to
Gothic Literature
ENG
290
British Literature II: From Romanticism
to Modernism
ENG350 Shakespeare
ENG
480
Senior Thesis I
ENG
481
Senior Thesis II
Elective Requirements:
and
a minimum of four English electives, three of which must be at
the 300/400 level.
The English Literature/Secondary Education
Dual Major
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing a dual major in English and secondary
education must satisfy University Core Curriculum
requirements, and the College speech requirement, COMM
210, all secondary education requirements, the following 14
courses as specified and sufficient electives to total 120 credits.
ENG
100
Introduction to Literature
ENG
210
Myth, Fantasy, and the Imagination
ENG
220
Literary Analysis
ENG
240
Early American Literature: Pre-Columbus
Through the Civil War
ENG
260
American Realism, Naturalism
and Modernism
ENG
270
British Literature I: From Beowulf to
Gothic Literature
ENG
290
British Literature II: From Romanticism
to Modernism
ENG350 Shakespeare
ENG
480
Senior Thesis I
ENG
481
Senior Thesis II
Elective Requirements:
and
A minimum of four English electives, three of which must be
at the 300/400 level.
The English Literature Minor
At Least two (2) English courses at the 100-200 level
At Least two (2) English courses at the 300-400 level
One English course at any level
and
ENG350 Shakespeare
English as a Second Language (ESL)
ESL courses are designed for those students whose native language
is not English and who need to gain and/or improve proficiency
in English. Courses are provided at four levels of instruction:
elementary, intermediate, high intermediate and advanced.
Students should enroll for three classes (listening/speaking,
reading, and composition) at the level determined by placement
test performance. Note: In the summer, three levels of instruction
are offered: beginning, intermediate and advanced.
110
Environmental Science
The Environmental Science Major
The environmental science major is an interdisciplinary
program designed to develop an understanding of
environmental processes and issues, and an awareness of our
role as humans within the environment. The environmental
science major encompasses several interrelated fields, including
biology, ecology, chemistry, resource management, policy
making, and natural science. Students graduating with this
degree can expect to either proceed to graduate level study or
enter the environmental workplace. A degree in environmental
science presents numerous opportunities in the fields of
resource management, ecological risk assessment, conservation
biology and environmental education.
Students who declare environmental science majors must
complete NATSC 103 and Lab with a grade of C- or higher in
order to continue in the program.
Environmental Science majors pursuing the Bachelor
of Science degree must complete two semesters of calculus
and one semester of Biostatistics. The Bachelor of Arts degree
requires MATH 250 and MATH 136 or above. A paper or other
evidence of the student’s ability to conduct investigations,
use library resources, and write a report following a standard
format is required in each advanced-level course. A 200 - level
Critical Writing course is prerequisite to advanced courses and
should be completed prior to the junior year.
Environmental Science majors must satisfy all University
Core Curriculum requirements and the College speech
requirement, COMM 210. In addition, environmental science
majors must successfully complete the following courses and
sufficient electives to total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged
to apply electives toward a minor or second major.
Foundation Requirements:
NATSC 103
Earth Systems Science and Lab
NATSC 203
Humans, Environmental Change
and Sustainability
NATSC 204
Principles of Oceanography
BIO
104
Biology II and Lab
CHEM 191, 192 Principles of Chemistry I and II and Labs
MATH 250
Introduction to Biostatistics
and
MATH 213, 214 Calculus I & II and Labs (B.S. degree)
or
MATH 136
Precalculus or above (B.A. degree)
Intermediate Level Requirements:
*BIO
240
Concepts of Ecology
*BIO
360
Limnology and Lab
CHEM 201, 202 Environmental Chemistry I and II and Labs
PHYS
201, 202 Principles of Physics I and II and Labs
(B.S. degree)
or
PHYS
109, 110 Physics I and II and Labs (B.A. degree)
and
Environmental Science Upper Level Electives: Select five
(5) courses chosen from list:
ANTH
222
Environmental Anthropology
BIO
230
Microbiology and Lab
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
BIO
312
Conservation Biology
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis
CHEM
434
Advanced Environmental Chemistry
ENGR 320Environmental Engineering
ENGR
405
Air Pollution and Control
ENGR
407
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
LS
200 Environmental Law
NATSC
301
Marine Resource Management
NATSC
305
Marine Geology
NATSC
310
Biogeochemical Cycling
NATSC
315
Meteorology and Climatology
NATSC
333
Environmental Monitoring and Lab
NATSC/BIO 375
Soil Ecology and Lab
NATSC
401
Environmental Toxicology and Lab
NATSC
469 Environmental Science Internship
and
Three (3) free electives for B.S.
*Note: Environmental Science majors may apply a maximum of
two (2) courses from the major requirements towards minors in
Biology or Marine Biology. Environmental Science majors may use
a maximum of two (2) upper-level electives towards the elective
requirements for majors in Biology or Marine Biology.
The Environmental Science Minor
Requirements for the Minor in Environmental Science
BIO
104
Biology II and Lab
NATSC 103
Earth Systems Science and Lab
NATSC 203
Humans, Environmental Change
and Sustainability
and
At least seven (7) credits from Environmental Science Upper
Level Electives:
(total of 18 credits)
ANTH 222
Environmental Anthropology
BIO
230
Microbiology and Lab
BIO
312
Conservation Biology
CHEM
312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis
CHEM
434
Advanced Environmental Chemistry
ENGR 320
Environmental Engineering
ENGR
405
Air Pollution and Control
ENGR
407
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
LS
200 Environmental Law
NATSC
301
Marine Resource Management
NATSC
305
Marine Geology
NATSC
310
Biogeochemical Cycling
NATSC
315
Meteorology and Climatology
NATSC
333
Environmental Monitoring
NATSC/BIO 375
Soil Ecology and Lab
NATSC
401
Environmental Toxicology and Lab
The Film Studies Minor
The Film Studies Minor explores cinema and its relationship
to broader social, cultural and political issues. The mission of
the program is to allow students to explore film as a unique art
form and as a medium that influences, and is influenced by,
the context in which it is produced. Using an interdisciplinary
framework, students within the minor have the opportunity
to investigate both the professional aspects of cinematic
studies—its evolution and the techniques of the filmmaking
process—as well as critical approaches to the field, such as the
relationship between cinema and other cultural productions,
the international dimensions of the medium, and the power
of visual culture in contemporary life. Therefore, the minor
introduces students to the major issues in cinema—history,
aesthetics, theory, and production—as grounded in the larger
cultural and international factors that inform film, other modes
of communication, and indeed our everyday lives. The goal is
to have students become informed viewers of visual culture,
equipped with critical skills that will be useful, not only in
media careers, but in other aspects of life as well.
REQUIREMENTS:
FILM
101
Introduction to Film Studies
FILM
400
Curation and Festival Production
And any four (4) electives from the following, at least one of which
is at 300-level or above, some of which have pre-requisites that must
be met outside of the minor.
Production oriented courses:
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
VARTS 362
Film, Animation and Video
MUSIC 311-314 World Cultures Through Music
Film Studies courses in the Humanities & Social Sciences:
COMM 380
Visual Media in a Cultural Context
ENG 351
Shakespeare on Film
FILM 270
Documentary Film
FILM 430
Special Topics in Film Studies
GER
210
Actors, Authors and Audiences
ITAL
210
Actors, Authors and Audiences
PHIL
181
Philosophy of Film
POLSC 309
Politics & Film
WTNG 230
Rhetoric of Film: Writing about Film
Foreign Languages
The Foreign Language Major
With television, telephone, E-mail, and the advent of the World
Wide Web, it only takes a split second to communicate with
anyone from around the world. Where once there was isolation
among nations, today we are interdependent as never before.
With this increasing global contact, however, comes a need to
be able to communicate effectively, and it is no understatement
to say that foreign language is a key that can open up the world
to you. Knowledge of a language unlocks great works of world
literature, enlarges our awareness of other cultures, and even
enhances our understanding and appreciation of English.
Students are assigned the appropriate course based upon
placement testing and previous language study. In addition
to classroom activities, students at all levels are also expected
to utilize the Language Lab for further training. It is the
expectation of the Department that all students who complete
the program will use their language proficiency in their future
careers or in graduate study.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in a language must satisfy
the University Core Curriculum requirements and the College
speech requirement, COMM 210. Specific requirements of the
language programs are outlined below. In addition, majors must
111
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
complete sufficient electives to total 120 credits. Majors are
encouraged to apply electives taken outside the major toward a
minor or a second major. The three programs of study offered
by the department are: Modern Language Studies, LatinAmerican Studies, and Classical Studies.
The Modern Language Studies major consists of at least 18
credits in the selected language, with 12 of those credits at the
300 level (or above) and two major electives to be chosen from a
specified list of alternatives. In addition, students are required to
pass a comprehensive examination during their final year and to
complete a senior thesis related to their course of study.
The Latin-American Studies major consists of the same
requirements as the Modern Language Studies major with the
following changes:
• Students must choose either Spanish or Portuguese for the
four 300 level course requirements.
• Students must complete at least one 300 level course in
both Spanish and Portuguese.
• Both major electives must be related to Latin-American studies.
• The Classics Concentration consists of the same
requirements as the Modern Language Studies major with
the following changes:
• Students must complete four courses at the 300 level (or
above) in Latin.
• Students must complete at least one 300 level course (or
equivalent) in German, French, or Italian.
• Both major electives must be related to classical studies.
• Students must complete two of the following courses:
PHIL 251, AAH 121, any ancient history course, or any
classical mythology course.
The Foreign Language/Secondary Education
Dual Major
Students pursuing a dual major in Language and Secondary
Education must satisfy the University Core Curriculum
requirements, all Secondary Education requirements, the
following Language requirements, and a sufficient number of
electives to total 120 credits.
• The Foreign Language and Secondary Education Dual Major
requires the completion of 30 credits of Language offerings.
• 12 credits must be completed in the target language at the
300-level or higher.
• Two Survey in Literature courses (338-339) must be
completed in the target language.
• Students must complete LANG 430: Senior Thesis and
satisfactorily complete a written and oral exit exam.
• 6 credits may be satisfied with elective courses (in
translation) related to the target language, provided those
credits are approved by the Department. For Modern
Language Majors, the Senior Thesis will count as one of
these two courses in translation, if the Senior Thesis is not
completed in the target language.
• Students must complete at least one course in linguistics.
This linguistic course will count as one of the two
elective courses (in translation) if it is not delivered in
the target language.
112
The Foreign Language Minor and Core Concentration
In order to gain a fundamental proficiency in a language while
pursuing a major outside of the Department, students may
choose to complete their Core Concentration or a minor in a
language. Both programs are open to all majors and both fulfill
the University Core Concentration requirements. In order to
complete a Core Concentration in a language, students are
placed at the appropriate level in their chosen language and
are required to complete a minimum of three courses in one
language with at least one course being at the 300 level (or
above). Students pursuing a minor must complete the Core
Concentration requirements and one additional course in the
same language at the 300 level (or above). Core Concentrations
are not permitted in a student’s native language.
The Chinese Minor
In order to complete a minor in Chinese, students are placed at
the appropriate level and are required to complete a minimum
of three courses in the Chinese language, with at least one
course being at the 300 level. Additionally students must
complete one course from the listing below.
Note – Minors are not permitted in a student’s native language.
Select one: Advanced Chinese Instruction
CHN
350
Advanced Chinese Topics
HIST
381
Critical Period and Topics in Asian History
PHIL
212
Eastern Philosophy
POLSC 430
Sp. Topics: China
Total of 18 credits
The Gender and Sexuality Studies Minor
The Gender and Sexuality Studies Minor provides students
with the opportunity to explore gender and sexuality from an
interdisciplinary perspective. As an interdisciplinary field of
study, Gender and Sexuality Studies bridges the methodological
traditions of feminist studies, gay and lesbian studies, gender
studies, and transgender studies. The aim of the minor is to
interrogate the social, cultural, and natural frameworks through
which societies create, resist, and revise normative standards
for the self, the body, and social relations in culturally and
historically specific ways. Key topics of inquiry include: the
complex interaction between gender and sexuality as they
intersect with other identity constructions such as race, class,
ethnicity, nationality, or religion; the ways that gender and
sexuality influence and are influenced by economics, medicine,
and the law; gender and sexuality as focal points for major
political contestation and struggle; and representations of
gender and sexuality in creative and imaginative work in art,
cinema, literature, and mass media. The minor links a common
introductory course with multi-disciplinary course offerings
throughout the curriculum so that students will develop critical
responses to social justice and civil discourse that are essential
to careers in a diverse global community.
REQUIREMENTS:
GSS
100
Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
GSS
420
Gender & Sexuality Studies Seminar
And any four (4) electives from the following, some of which
have pre-requisites* that must be met outside of the minor.
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
ENG 100 is waived for GSS minors enrolled in ENG 220; POLSC
100 is waived for GSS minors enrolled in POLSC 307.
AMST CJS ENG
POLSC PSYCH
PSYCH PSYCH SOC 370
402
220
307
215
220
230
316
Race, Gender, and Sexuality in America*
Women and the Criminal Justice System*
Literary Analysis*
Gender in American Politics*
Human Sexuality*
Psychology of Women*
Psychology of Men*
Sociology of Gender*
Graphic Design Communication
The Graphic Design Communication Major
The Graphic Design Communication major consists of a
contemporary blend of a Liberals Arts education and applied
technology. Graphic design students draw on their complete
educational experience to create images and visual messages that
are thought-provoking, well-researched, and technically excellent.
A degree in graphic design communication prepares
students for a career in a multitude of competitive creative
industries. Successful candidates complete a portfolio of work
that may be used as part; of an application for an advanced
degree or for career opportunities.
The graphic design major recruits students who are
creative, curious, and disciplined. Majors should be highly
motivated and inventive individuals who like to work with
technology but draw inspiration from a variety of academic,
social, and environmental sources.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design
Communication must satisfy the University Core Curriculum
requirements and the College speech requirement, COMM
210. Specific requirements of the program are outlined below.
In addition, majors must complete sufficient electives to total
120 credits. Majors are encouraged to apply electives taken
outside the major toward a minor or a second major.
There are twelve courses in the graphic design
communication major. Nine of the requirements are studio
courses in graphic design, which are hands-on courses taught
in the graphic design communication lab. A lecture course
on the history of graphic design, one internship, and a twocourse sequence in one of the following areas is also required:
anthropology, communication, computer information systems,
or marketing. Graduating seniors display their work in the
Senior Graphic Design Exhibition as part; of the Portfolio
course (DSGN 450) to complete the major.
Required levels of academic achievement include a B
average in all required graphic design courses.
Criteria for Admission
The requirement for entrance into the Graphic Design
Communication major is a portfolio.
For entering freshmen, the portfolio process is managed
through the Admissions Office. The options are a Standard
portfolio of 18-20 examples, while the Targeted portfolio should
consist of 10-15 examples including 3 assignments (all details may
be found in the admissions section of this catalog or available at
http://rwu.edu/academics/schools-colleges/fcas/degree-offerings/
graphic-design-communication). Multiple viewpoints are not
considered as individual examples. Portfolios should include the
student’s best work from a variety of mediums, not necessarily
exclusively digital media, that exemplify the applicant’s skills from
craftsmanship to aesthetics to problem-solving. When in doubt,
the Targeted Portfolio may be the best option. A student may opt
for an in-person interview to show his or her portfolio to a faculty
member which can be arranged through the Admissions office.
For students currently enrolled at RWU, application to
the major may happen with a portfolio after satisfactorily
completing the foundation courses – DSGN100 and DSGN110
– with at least a B-. Applications are accepted at the end
of each semester and will be posted and announced in the
labs. The requirements include examples of work (number
determined by course level completion), an application form
and a recommendation letter from a current or former graphic
design faculty member. Students who apply in or after their
sophomore year should be aware that the requirements for the
major may require additional time at the University because of
the sequential and progressive nature of the coursework.
Requirements for the Major
Graphic Design Courses:
DSGN 100 Introduction to Graphic
Design Communication
DSGN 110 Introduction to Typography
DSGN 200
History of Design Communication
DSGN 210 Advanced Design Communication
Choose 3-300 level or special topics courses:
DSGN 300 Web Design Communication
DSGN 310
Brand Identity
DSGN 320
Publication Design
DSGN 430 Special Topics in Graphic Design
Note – Students must fulfill all of the above requirements prior to
enrollment in DSGN 440
DSGN 440 Art Direction
DSGN 450 Portfolio
COOP460 Internship
Electives
Choose one of the two-course sequences below:
Computer Information Systems
CIS
206
Computers and the Web: A First Course
CIS
306
Computer and the Web: A Second Course
Marketing
MRKT 200
Principles of Marketing
And any 300-level marketing elective
Communication
COMM 101
Introduction to Mass Media
COMM 165
Introduction to Visual Communication
Anthropology
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
And any 200-level or above anthropology elective
The Graphic Design Communication Minor
DSGN 100
Introduction to Graphic
Design Communication
DSGN 110
Introduction to Typography
DSGN 200
History of Design Communication
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
113
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
History
History Electives:
Two Upper Level (300 or above) courses in European History
Two Upper Level (300 or above) courses in U.S. History
Two Upper Level (300 or above) courses in African, Asian and/
or Latin American History
Two Upper Level (300 or above) History courses
and
HIST
420
Senior Seminar
The History Major
Note: Upper-level American Studies courses may be used to satisfy
United States History degree requirements.
And two courses chosen from:
DSGN 210
Advanced Design Communication
DSGN 300
Web Design Communication
DSGN 310
Brand Identity
DSGN 320
Publication Design
DSGN 430
Special Topics in Graphic Design
The study of history increases our capacity to think critically
and to form independent judgments. Examination of various
ages and cultures helps students understand the present world
and intelligently anticipate the future.
The History Department encourages its majors to involve
themselves in off-campus programs of study and internships,
particularly the Department’s Great Cities Program, which
gives students the opportunity to experience directly and to
enjoy the history and culture of some of the great cities of
the world, such as London, Paris, Dublin, Jerusalem, Athens,
Rome, Quebec City, Seoul and Mexico City.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in history must satisfy
University Core Curriculum requirements and the College
speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, students
must successfully complete the 14 courses listed below and a
sufficient number of electives to total 120 credits. Majors are
encouraged to apply electives toward a minor or second major.
HIST
101
History of Western Civilization I
HIST
102
History of Western Civilization II
HIST
151
United States History I
HIST
152
United States History II
HIST
203
Dimensions of History and Lab
History Electives:
Two Upper Level (300 or above) courses in European History
Two Upper Level (300 or above) courses in U.S. History
Two Upper Level (300 or above) courses in African, Asian and/
or Latin American History
Two Upper Level (300 or above) History courses
and
HIST
420
Senior Seminar
Note: Upper-level American Studies courses may be used to satisfy
United States History degree requirements.
The History/Secondary Education Dual Major
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing a dual major in History and secondary
education must satisfy University Core Curriculum
requirements, and the College speech requirement, COMM
210, all secondary education requirements, and the following 14
courses as specified and sufficient electives to total 120 credits.
HIST
101
History of Western Civilization I
HIST
102
History of Western Civilization II
HIST
151
United States History I
HIST
152
United States History II
HIST
203
Dimensions of History and Lab
114
The History Minor
Any three of the following courses:
HIST
101
History of Western Civilization I
HIST
102
History of Western Civilization II
HIST
151
United States History I
HIST
152
United States History II
and three History electives at the 250 – level or above
International Relations
The International Relations Major
The international relations major seeks to promote
a sophisticated understanding of the trans-boundary
interactions of governments, organizations, cultures and
people – both in terms of how such interactions exist today
and how they can be improved in the future. In addition, the
major seeks to help students cultivate practical analytical and
communication skills that will foster professional excellence
and personal achievement.
Because it is difficult to understand our dynamic and
increasingly interdependent world through a single lens,
the major works across multiple academic disciplines, while
also providing students with the flexibility to focus upon
subjects and themes of greatest interest to them. The major
draws upon faculty and courses representing some twelve
academic programs at RWU, including political science, history,
economics, sociology, anthropology, communication, art and art
history, and languages, among others.
To study international relations is to celebrate human
endeavor, global diversity and new opportunities. At the same
time, our world is deeply troubled. From the persistence of
global poverty and disease to the threats posed by weapons of
mass destruction and regional conflicts in Asia and the Middle
East, global problems are many and often deeply disturbing.
The aim of the international relations major is to give students
the tools to flourish in the world while also encouraging
students to use these tools to help make the world more secure,
more prosperous, and more humane than it is at present.
Students are encouraged to understand the world, as it really
is, and also to engage themselves as global citizens working to
make a difference.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in international relations
must satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, majors
must complete five international relations foundation courses;
a two-course sequence intended to promote intercultural
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
negotiating skills; a minimum of eight thematically-related
courses in one of four tracks: Globalization Studies; Culture
and Identity; Area Studies: Europe; or Area Studies: NonWestern; and one final capstone course completing the major.
Majors must demonstrate minimum proficiency in a foreign
language, either by successful completion of courses at the
202-level or by test; and they must complete a sufficient
number of general electives to total 120 credits. Independent
study and study abroad are encouraged.
It is recommended that majors use core concentration
requirements to enhance their knowledge of a single discipline
or language—and to apply electives toward a related minor or
second major.
Note: Double counting courses is not permitted in meeting
requirements for the core concentration, a minor or a second major.
Foundation Requirements:
The following five courses are required of all majors and are
prerequisites for many of the more advanced courses in the major.
POLSC 110
The US in World Affairs
ECON 101
Macro Economics
HIST
102
History of Western Civilization II
SOC
100
Introduction to Sociology
POLSC 210
International Relations
Intercultural Negotiation Sequence:
All majors are required to take the following two courses. It is
recommended that they be taken in the sequence which follows.
COMM 250
Intercultural Communication
Note: COMM 100 and COMM 101 are waived for IR majors as a
prerequisite for COMM 250.
POLSC 335
International Negotiations
International Relations Tracks:
Majors are required to complete a minimum of eight thematicallyrelated courses from ONE of the following four tracks:
Track #1—Globalization Studies
The Globalization Studies track examines ongoing
transformations in international politics, economics and
culture. The study of globalization focuses especially upon
patterns of increasing interdependence and communication
across cultures, as well as emerging systems of global
governance and the roles of states, international organizations,
multinational corporations and transnational activist networks.
Courses are situated in fields such as political science,
economics, sociology, anthropology, management studies and
environmental science.
Note: Courses marked with an “*” may require a non-IR prerequisite.
Requirements for this track:
POLSC 340
International Political Economy
MGMT 340
International Management
SOC 330 Globalization and Identity
Select One:
POLSC 346
Foreign Policies of Russia and China
or
POLSC 348
Rogue States, Allies, Regional Powers
Electives: Select Four electives drawn from:
AAH
122
History of Art and Architecture II
BIO
240
Concepts of Ecology*
BIO
312
Conservation Biology*
COMM 330
International Communication
ECON 350
International Trade*
ECON 360
International Macro Economics
POLSC 215
Strategy and National Security Policy
POLSC 221
Comparative Politics in the Third World
POLSC 327
Politics of the Middle East
POLSC 330
Revolution and Social Change
POLSC 346
Foreign Policies of Russia and China
POLSC 348
Rogue States, Allies, Regional Powers
PSYCH 255
Social Psychology*
SOC 201
Social Stratification
SOC 350
Comparative Social Movements
Additional Elective Options are:
• Special topics courses and independent study with permission
• Participation in a Macro Seminar, Center for Macro
Projects and Diplomacy.
• Courses from Study abroad or relevant internship (a
maximum of two could be counted against any two elective
courses. Directly-related courses could, in addition, count
against other IR courses.)
• Courses from the other tracks (up to two courses).
Track #2 – Culture and Identity
The Culture and Identity track explores how myriad cultural
traditions around the globe have evolved and influenced each other
throughout history and also shaped the formation of personal
identity. While scholars today debate the possible emergence of
a universal global culture, global communication has reinforced
particular identities, attachments and allegiances along national,
ethnic, religious and tribal lines. Courses are situated in fields such
as anthropology, literature, sociology, communication, art and
architecture, political science, psychology.
Note: Courses marked with an “*” may require a non-IR prerequisite.
Requirements for this track:
ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
and
One Anthropology elective with International content (select one):
ANTH 220
Self, Culture and Society**
ANTH 356
World Cultures**
ANTH 380 Culture Change and Development**
**If a student selects either ANTH 220; ANTH 356 or ANTH 380,
the student may not take the same course to fulfill the electives
requirement below.
and
SOC 330 POLSC 321 and
Globalization and Identity
Politics and Ethnic Conflict
Electives:
Select four electives drawn from:
ANTH 220
Self, Culture and Society
ANTH 356
World Cultures
ANTH 380 Culture Change and Development
AAH 122 History of Art and Architecture II
AAH 311 History of American Art*
AAH 312 History of Modern Art
AAH 313 Art and Architecture of Africa
AAH 323 Art and Architecture in the Islamic World
115
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
COMM 330 COMM 380 ENG 290 International Communication*
Visual Media in a Cultural Context*
British Literature II: From Romanticism
to Modernism
ENG 301 Contemporary American Literature
ENG 320 Studies in Global Literatures*
ENG 360 Studies in Ethnic American Literature
MRKT 402 International Marketing*
PHIL 258 American Philosophy*
POLSC 302 Political Parties and Interest Groups*
POLSC 307 Gender in American Politics
POLSC 325 Modern European Politics
POLSC 327
Politics of the Middle East
POLSC 346
Foreign Policies of Russia and China
POLSC 348 Rogue States, Allies, Regional Powers
PSYCH 255 Social Psychology*
PSYCH 335 Social and Emotional Development*
SOC 201 Social Stratification
SOC 230 Population and Society
THEAT 331
Modern Drama
THEAT 332
British Theatre and Performing Arts
THEAT 333
Asian Drama and Dance.
Additional Elective Options are:
• Special topics courses and independent study with permission
• Participation in a Macro Seminar, Center for Macro
Projects and Diplomacy.
• Courses from Study abroad or relevant internship (a
maximum of two could be counted against any two
elective courses. Directly-related courses could, in
addition, count against other IR courses.)
• Courses from the other tracks (up to two courses).
Track #3--Area Studies: Europe
The European Area Studies track examines the history, politics,
economics, literature, arts and cultural traditions of Europe.
Particular attention is given to the pivotal role of Europe
in shaping modernity as well as prospects for Europeanbased international organizations, especially the European
Union, to serve as prototypes in strengthening channels of
global collaboration. The longstanding impact of Europe in
propelling economic capitalism and political liberalism is
examined alongside themes such as immigration and resurgent
nationalism. Courses are situated in fields such as economics,
history, political science, art and literature.
Note: Courses marked with an “*” may require a non-IR prerequisite.
Requirements for this track:
HIST
305
20th Century Europe
POLSC 120
Comparative Politics
POLSC 325 Modern European Politics
POLSC 346 Foreign Policies of Russia and China
Electives
Select four electives drawn from:
AAH 122 History of Art and Architecture II
ECON 360 International Macro Economics
ENG 320
Studies in Global Literatures
HIST 310
Studies in European History
HIST 331
19th Century Europe
PHIL 254
Contemporary Philosophy*
116
POLSC 326
Post Communist World
POLSC 340
International Political Economy
SOC 330
Globalization and Identity
Additional Elective Options are:
• Special topics courses and independent study with permission
• Participation in a Macro Seminar, Center for Macro
Projects and Diplomacy.
• Courses from Study abroad or relevant internship (a
maximum of two could be counted against any two elective
courses. Directly-related courses could, in addition, count
against other IR courses.)
• Courses from the other tracks (up to two courses).
Track #4--Area Studies: Non-Western
The Non-Western Area Studies track examines the history,
politics, economics, literature, arts and cultural traditions
of Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America. Special
attention is given to economic restructuring and political
transitions to democracy in the aftermath of colonialism
as well as communism. Courses are situated in fields such
as anthropology, history, political science, sociology and
management studies.
Note: Courses marked with an “*” may require a non-IR prerequisite.
Requirements for this track:
POLSC 120 Comparative Politics
POLSC 221 Comparative Politics in the Third World
POLSC 348
Rogue States, Allies, Regional Powers
Select one from:
HIST 381
Critical Periods and Topics in
Asian History**
HIST 382
Critical Periods and Topics in
African History**
HIST 383
Critical Periods and Topics Latin
American History**
**If a student selects either HIST381,HIST 382 or HIST 383,
the student may not take the same course to fulfill the electives
requirement below.
Electives
Select four electives drawn from:
ANTH 336
World Cultures*
ANTH 430
Special Topics: World Religions*
AAH 313
Art and Architecture of Africa
AAH 323
Art and Architecture in the Islamic World*
COMM 330
International Communication
ECON 360
International Macro Economics
HIST
381
Critical Periods and Topics in
Asian History***
HIST
382
Critical Periods and Topics in
African History***
HIST
383
Critical Periods and Topics Latin
American History***
***A student may select one of HIST 381,382 or 383 as an elective;
which is in addition to the one HIST course required for the NonWestern track.
PHIL 212
Eastern Philosophy*
POLSC 326
Post Communist World
POLSC 327
Politics of the Middle East
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
POLSC 330
Revolution and Social Change
POLSC 340
International Political Economy
POLSC 428
Mexican Politics
SOC 201
Social Stratification
SOC 330
Globalization and Identity
Additional Elective Options are:
• Special topics courses and independent study with permission
• Participation in a Macro Seminar, Center for Macro
Projects and Diplomacy.
• Courses from Study abroad or relevant internship (a
maximum of two could be counted against any two
elective courses. Directly-related courses could, in
addition, count against other IR courses.)
• Courses from the other tracks (up to two courses).
Capstone Course:
The capstone course is intended, in most cases, to reconnect
students to the general interdisciplinary study of international
relations; and to provide culmination—and real world context-for their personalized studies.
Note: Normally, to be taken second semester of senior year.
All majors are required to take either:
• A directed senior research project, independent study.
• Senior seminar, such as ANTH 460 Senior Seminar, HIST
420 Senior Seminar, or POLSC 460 Senior Seminar.
or
•
POLSC 386 International Law and Organization—covering
the management of international relations (including a
substantial research paper).
Language and Study Abroad:
All students are required to demonstrate at least minimum
proficiency in a foreign language, either by successful
completion of courses at the 202-level or by test.
Students entering the major without a language are
encouraged to use foreign language to meet the core
concentration requirement.
Study abroad is strongly encouraged—consideration to be given
with respect to substituting courses for the major, especially
with respect to the tracked courses.
Note: As listed above under track electives, any two courses taken
abroad or in a related internship could be used to count against
up to two elective courses in a student’s track provided they are
international in content--even if the content of these courses does
not substitute for the recommended electives.
Mathematics
The Mathematics Major
The mathematics curriculum provides preparation for graduate
study and for a variety of careers in industry and government.
There is enough flexibility in the program to allow a large
choice of electives, and the program, when combined with
further study in a second area, can provide an excellent
foundation for graduate or professional study in the physical
sciences, computer science, engineering, or business.
The major consists of 10 required courses, beginning
with a two-semester calculus sequence along with a course
in mathematical reasoning. These are followed by a fourcourse mathematics core and two major electives to be
chosen from a specified list of alternatives. The capstone
course of the program is a problem-solving seminar which
is designed to draw upon all courses in the foundation
and to develop the student’s abilities in mathematical
reasoning. Students are further advised to include courses in
discrete mathematics, computer science and the history of
mathematics in their studies.
Students wishing to teach mathematics at the secondary
level must follow the Dual Major with Secondary Education
and Mathematics. Students pursuing a double major in
elementary education and mathematics may take either of the
mathematics majors described below, but are encouraged to
take the Dual Major with Secondary Education.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing a Bachelor of Science in mathematics must
satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, they
must complete the following courses and a sufficient number
of electives to total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to apply
electives toward a minor or second major.
MATH 213
Calculus I and Lab
MATH 214
Calculus II and Lab
MATH 221
Discrete Mathematics
MATH 331
Linear Algebra
MATH 351
Calculus of Several Variables
MATH 371
Real Analysis
MATH 390
Abstract Algebra
MATH 421
Problem Seminar
and two electives selected from: MATH, 255, 301, 305, 315, 317,
330, 335, 340, 342, 370, 381, 431
The Mathematics and Secondary Education
Dual Major
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing a dual major for secondary education must
satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, they
must complete the following courses and a sufficient number of
electives to total 120 credits.
*Note that there are no electives among the mathematics courses
required for the double major with secondary education.
MATH
MATH MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH MATH
MATH
COMSC
213
214
221
315
331
335
340
351
390
110
Calculus I and Lab
Calculus II and Lab
Discrete Mathematics
Probability and Statistics
Linear Algebra
Topics for Secondary Mathematics Education
History of Mathematics
Calculus of Several Variables
Abstract Algebra
Introduction to Computer Science I and Lab
117
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
The Mathematics Minor
Military Science
MATH 213
Calculus I and Lab
MATH 214
Calculus II and Lab
and four Mathematics courses at the 200 level or above
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps
Engineering students who wish to pursue a math minor would
benefit by taking four of the following courses:
MATH 255
Introduction to Mathematical Software
MATH 305
Mathematical Modeling
MATH 315
Probably and Statistics
MATH 317
Differential Equations
MATH 331
Linear Algebra
MATH330 Engineering Mathematics
or
MATH 351
Calculus of Several Variables
MATH 342
Numerical Analysis
Business students who wish to pursue a math minor would
benefit by taking four of the following courses:
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
301
315
317
331
342
Linear Programming
Probability and Statistics
Differential Equations
Linear Algebra
Numerical Analysis
Science students who wish to pursue a math minor would
benefit by taking four of the following courses:
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
255
305
315
317
331
342
351
Introduction to Mathematical Software
Mathematical Modeling
Probability and Statistics
Differential Equations
Linear Algebra
Numerical Analysis
Calculus of Several Variables
Computer Science students who wish to pursue a math minor
would benefit by taking four of the following courses:
MATH 221
Discrete Mathematics
MATH 315
Probability and Statistics
MATH 331
Linear Algebra
MATH 342
Numerical Analysis
MATH 390
Abstract Algebra
The Computational Mathematics Minor
This Minor includes courses that emphasize practical
computational methods and use of technology applied to
problems in industry and the sciences. NOTE: Computational
Mathematics may not serve as a minor for a Mathematics major.
MATH 213 Calculus I and Lab
MATH 214
Calculus II and Lab
and four of the following Mathematics courses:
MATH 221
Discrete Mathematics
MATH 255 Introduction to Mathematical Software
MATH 301
Linear Programming
MATH 305 Mathematical Modeling
MATH 342
Numerical Analysis
MATH 317
Differential Equations
or
MATH 331 Linear Algebra
118
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) is offered by the
University and is available to all students. Physically qualified
American citizens who complete the entire four-year program
are eligible to be commissioned in the U.S. Army. Delayed entry
into active service for the purpose of graduate study is available.
Military science course work is designed to complement
other instruction offered at the University. Emphasis throughout
is on the development of individual leadership ability and
preparation of the student for future leadership roles in the Army.
Professional military education skills in written communications,
human behavior, history, mathematical reasoning, and computer
literacy are fulfilled through required University Core Curriculum
requirements and the military science curriculum.
There are three variations of ROTC available:
• The Four-Year Program: During the four-year program,
students participate in required military science courses
and activities. Attendance at a six-week advanced training
camp is required between the third and fourth years. The
eight courses required in this program are listed below.
• The Two-Year Program: The two-year ROTC program
begins with a six-week Camp Challenge summer training
session (with pay). After successful completion of Camp
Challenge, the student enters the third year of ROTC and
attends advanced camp during the next summer. Enlisted
members of the Army National Guard or Army Reserves
who have completed basic training can qualify for the twoyear ROTC Simultaneous Membership Program.
• The Three-Year Program: The third variation consists of a
three-year program for students who wish to enter ROTC
during their sophomore year or who intend to complete their
academic studies in three years. This program compresses the
requirements for the basic course into one year.
Significant scholarship opportunities are available to
students participating in the ROTC program. These scholarships
are based on performance and not on financial need.
The Minor in Military Science
MS
MS
MS
MS
MS
MS
MS
MS
101
102
201
202
301
302
401
402
Introduction to ROTC and the U.S. Army I
Introduction to ROTC and the U.S. Army II
Military Skills I
Military Skills II
Small Unit Leadership and Operations I
Small Unit Leadership and Operations II
Advanced Leadership and Management I
Advanced Leadership and Management II
Note: A student with previous military training may be excused from
MS 101 through and including MS 202.
Music
The Music Major
The Music Major at Roger Williams University offers a solid
foundation in music theory, and the principle musical styles in
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
western culture and an introduction to the music of various
world cultures. This study will lead to a Bachelors of Arts in Music
Students study the elements of music and explore their
application in various compositional formats. They have the
opportunity to study the evolution of popular music as well
as the classical forms that have characterized and helped
define western culture. A unique aspect of Roger William’s
Music Major, reflecting the mission of the university, is the
exploration of world culture through music. These courses will
focus not only on the music of various world cultures but also
on the ways in which music is a reflection of its culture.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Music must satisfy
University Core Curriculum requirements and the College
speech requirement, COMM 210. Music majors will be
required to pass an entrance examination (or pass MUSIC 170
Basic Musicianship with a C or better) demonstrating their
knowledge in basics of music theory. In addition, majors must
complete the following curriculum for a total of 42 credits.
Western Musical Tradition both required
(These 2 courses lay the formal and historical foundation for the
Western Classical Music)
MUSIC 211
Evolution of Musical Style
MUSIC 212
Great Personalities in Music
Music Theory all required
(These 3 courses lay the music theory and basic skills foundation
for Western Music)
MUSIC 270
Musical Theory and Composition I
MUSIC 370
Musical Theory and Composition II
MUSIC 470
Musical Theory and Composition III
World Culture Through Music: select three (3) courses
from the following
MUSIC 310
World Culture Through Music/
North America
MUSIC 311
World Culture Through Music/
Latin America
MUSIC 312
World Culture Through Music/China
& Japan
MUSIC 313
World Culture Through Music/India &
Middle East
MUSIC 314
World Culture Through Music/
Indigenous Peoples
Applied Music
Ensemble requirement (3 credits)
MUSIC141
Chorus
MUSIC 151
Instrumental Ensemble
Lessons requirement: (6 credits – at least 1 credit of piano
lessons and
at least 4 semesters in 1 instrument or voice)
MUSIC 231
Piano Lessons
MUSIC 232
Guitar Lessons
MUSIC 233
Voice Lessons
MUSIC 239
Other Instrument Lessons
Music Electives select (2) two courses from the following
MUSIC 310
World Culture Through Music/
North America
MUSIC 311
World Culture Through Music/
Latin America
MUSIC 312
MUSIC 313
MUSIC 314
World Culture Through Music/China
& Japan
World Culture Through Music/India &
Middle East
World Culture Through Music/
Indigenous Peoples
NOTE: Sections taken as electives must be in addition to the sections
taken to fulfill the “World Culture Through Music” requirement
ANTH 100
Introduction to Anthropology
AMST 100
Introduction to the American Experience
MUSIC 430
Special Topics in Music
Final Project required
Select one of the following courses. The Final Project must be
approved by Music faculty
MUSIC 480
Thesis, Composition or Recital
MUSIC460 Internship
The Music Minor
MUSIC 161
The Art of Rock and Roll
MUSIC 170
Basic Musicianship
MUSIC 211
Evolution of Musical Style
MUSIC 212
Great Personalities in Music
And one of the following:
MUSIC 121
Evolution of Jazz
MUSIC 270
Musical Theory and Composition I
MUSIC 299
Special Topics in Music
MUSIC 310
World Culture Through Music/
North America
MUSIC 311
World Culture Through Music/
Latin America
MUSIC 312
World Culture Through Music/China
& Japan
MUSIC 313
World Culture Through Music/India &
Middle East
MUSIC 314
World Culture Through Music/
Indigenous Peoples
And 3 credits from the following:
MUSIC 131
Piano Lessons
MUSIC 132
Guitar Lessons
MUSIC 133
Voice Lessons
MUSIC141
Chorus
MUSIC 151
Instrumental Ensemble
Philosophy
The Philosophy Major
The philosophy major develops skills in careful reading,
critical thinking, and clear, effective writing which enable the
student to engage in the activity of philosophy. This program
introduces students to the discipline, acquaints them with
the world’s major philosophic figures and the problems with
which they wrestled, and encourages majors to pursue their
own avenues of philosophic inquiry. Each student’s program
culminates with a senior thesis which demonstrates the
student’s ability to analyze and critically evaluate an important
philosophical issue.
119
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in philosophy must satisfy
University Core Curriculum requirements and the College
speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, philosophy majors
must successfully complete the 12 courses listed below and a
sufficient number of electives to total 120 credits. Majors are
encouraged to apply electives toward a minor or second major.
PHIL 200
Ethics
PHIL205 Logic
PHIL 251
Ancient Philosophy
PHIL
253
Modern Philosophy
PHIL
310
Special Studies in Philosophy
PHIL333 Epistemology
PHIL366 Metaphysics
PHIL
480
Senior Seminar I
PHIL
481
Senior Seminar II
and three Philosophy electives
The Minor in Philosophy
PHIL200 Ethics
PHIL205 Logic
PHIL
251
Ancient Philosophy
PHIL
253
Modern Philosophy
PHIL333 Epistemology
or
PHIL366 Metaphysics
One Philosophy elective
Physics Studies
Physics is an important component of both a liberal and a
technical education. Students of physics develop critical
thinking and analogical reasoning skills, and come to
appreciate the central role of physics in the development
of science. The courses taught in this area present a clearly
defined approach to science based on observation, quantitative
experiments, and mathematical theory.
There are two alternative sequences of physics courses
offered: PHYS 109 and 110, Physics I and II Algebra-Based, and
PHYS 201 and 202, Physics I and II with Calculus. Check the
requirements of your major to determine the required sequence.
Political Science
The Political Science Major
The study of politics at RWU covers the institutions, processes
and pre-dispositions by which human affairs are governed,
both nationally and internationally. The program offers
students a comprehensive and balanced selection of courses,
exposing them to the traditional subfields of the discipline:
American national politics, international relations, comparative
politics, political theory, public administration, and public
policy. Courses are designed to broaden student horizons and
to improve student proficiency in critical analysis. Courses
are also intended to provide a basis for intelligent citizenship,
increase capacity for community service, and orient
students toward a life-long interest in learning. Internships,
independent study, and study abroad are encouraged. The study
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of politics at RWU develops skills that are useful for law school
and legal careers, business careers, various international and
public policy careers, as well as for careers in politics per se.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in political science must
satisfy University Core Curriculum requirements and the
College speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, majors
must complete three political science foundation courses; nine
advanced courses, with at least four each from the American
National Politics/Political Theory category and the International
Relations/Comparative Politics category; plus a two-course
research sequence in political science; plus a sufficient number
of general electives to total 120 credits. Majors are encouraged to
apply electives toward a minor or second major.
The three courses listed below are required of all majors and
are prerequisites for advanced courses in the relevant subfields.
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
POLSC 110
The United States in World Affairs
POLSC 120
Comparative Politics
Nine other political science courses are also required. At least four
must be completed from each of the following two categories.
American National Politics
POLSC 200
The Constitution and American Politics
POLSC 202
Congress and the Legislative Process
POLSC 203
The American Presidency
POLSC260 Public Administration
POLSC 301
Campaigns and Elections
POLSC 302
Political Parties and Interest Groups
POLSC 303
Politics and the Media
POLSC 305
Judicial Politics
POLSC 307
Gender in American Politics
POLSC 308
Race and Ethnicity in American Politics
POLSC 361
State and Local Government
POLSC 362
Urban Politics
POLSC 380
Public Policy
POLSC 400
Washington Internship
POLSC 401
Washington Public Policy Seminar
POLSC 402
Washington Independent Research Project
POLSC 430
Special Topics (American National
Politics or Political Theory topic)
POLSC 440
Independent Research Project
International Relations/Comparative Politics/Political Theory
POLSC 210
International Relations
POLSC 212
Model United Nations
POLSC 215
Strategy and National Security Policy
POLSC 221
Comparative Politics in the Third World
POLSC 321
Politics and Ethnic Conflict
POLSC 325
Modern European Politics
POLSC 326
Post-Communist World
POLSC 327
Politics of the Middle East
POLSC 328
Politics of Latin America
POLSC 330
Revolution and Social Change
POLSC 335
International Negotiation
POLSC 340
International Political Economy
POLSC 346
Foreign Policies of Russia and China
POLSC 348
Rogue States, Allies, and Regional Powers
POLSC 350
Political Theory
POLSC 386
International Law and Organization
POLSC 428
Mexican Politics
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
POLSC 429
POLSC 430
Cultures in Contact: Mexico Today
Special Topics (International Relations or
Comparative Politics topic)
Independent Research Project
POLSC 440
and
a two course research sequence – examining in depth a topic
chosen by the student – completes the major:
POLSC 240
Research Methods in Political Science
POLSC 442
Senior Research Seminar
The Political Science Minor
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
one of the following:
POLSC 110
The United States and World Affairs
POLSC 120
Introduction to Comparative Politics
and
Any four (4) upper-level courses provided that at least one of
these is from the American National Politics category and one is
from the International Relations/Comparative Politics category.
The Professional and Public Writing Minor
This minor aims to prepare students to write confidently and
effectively in professional and public situations. Students can
choose to focus on professional writing, where they analyze
and produce genres required by employers; public writing,
where they study and engage in meaningful social action
through written texts; or a combination of courses tailored to
the student’s own interests. Students will write purposefully,
imaginatively, and persuasively in, across, and beyond their
college courses. In alignment with several of RWU’s Core
Values, this minor fosters preparation for careers and future
study, collaboration of students and faculty in research,
commitment to local and global communities, and the
promotion of civil discourse.
Requirements for the Minor in Professional and Public Writing
WTNG 102
Expository Writing
Two (2) WTNG courses at the 200 level or above
Two (2) WTNG courses at the 300 level or above
One (1) WTNG course at the 400 level
Selected from the following list of WTNG courses
WTNG 200
Critical Writing for the Humanities and
the Social Sciences
WTNG 220
Critical Writing for the Professions*
WTNG 230
Rhetoric of Film: Writing about Film*
WTNG 270
Travel Writing*
WTNG 299
Special Topics in Writing *
WTNG 300
Rhetoric in a Global Context*
WTNG 301 The Rhetoric of Narrative*
WTNG 303 Environmental Rhetoric*
WTNG 305 Writing the City*
WTNG 311 Technical Writing*
WTNG 320
Writing for Business Organizations*
WTNG 321 Multimodal Writing in Public Spheres*
WTNG 322
Advancing Public Argument*
WTNG 400 Writing for Social Change
WTNG 430 Special Topics
WTNG 470 The Writing Thesis/Portfolio
*This course meets the 200 level University writing requirements for
the Core Curriculum
Psychology
The Psychology Major
Psychology majors possess the methods and skills that enable them to
evaluate published research and think critically about their own ideas
and those of others. They are prepared to apply these methods to the
problems of community and of the larger society. They are capable of
tolerance for the views of others and able to appreciate the value of
diversity. The psychology graduate is well prepared for advanced study
in psychology and other fields. In addition, the psychology graduate
has the skills useful for a wide range of careers, including human
resources, management, marketing, and the mental health professions.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in psychology must satisfy
University Core Curriculum requirements, the College speech
requirement, COMM 210; a mathematics course at the level of
MATH 124 or above (MATH 124 is recommended); the courses
listed below, and a sufficient number of electives to total 120
credits. Majors are encouraged to apply electives to a minor or
second major.
PSYCH 100
Introduction to Psychology
PSYCH 240
Quantitative Analysis
PSYCH 340
Research Methods
PSYCH 371
History of Modern Psychology
PSYCH 440
Experimental Psychology with Laboratory
and
Two American Studies courses
and
Five Psychology electives, at least three of which must be 300
level or higher
Note: Students, with the help of their advisors, should select
electives that form a coherent sequence of courses. Students
may choose a sequence in clinical/ counseling, legal/forensic, or
developmental psychology. In addition, students and their advisors
may develop an individualized sequence of psychology electives.
And (select one of the following)
PSYCH 498
Research Practicum in Psychology
PSYCH 499
Applied Practicum in Psychology
PSYCH 451
Senior Thesis in Psychology
Note: Students completing a thesis in Psychology may substitute
credits from Senior Thesis in Psychology (PSYCH 451)for PSYCH
498. Students who are double majors in Psychology may be eligible
to have one Internship serve as their requirement for both majors.
Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis. Students should
consult with the Chair of the Psychology Department, as well as the
Dean or designee of the second major for final approval.
Psychology 4+1 Program; Master of Arts in Psychology (Forensic)
The 4+1 Program will allow qualified undergraduate psychology
majors the opportunity to begin advanced study during their senior
year, thus enabling them to complete advanced study in forensic
psychology in less time than would generally be required to complete
a comparable advanced degree. In this newly developed program,
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Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
undergraduate psychology majors will have the opportunity to begin
working on a master’s degree during their senior year and have those
credits count for both the BA and MA degrees. Students discuss their
plans to pursue this program with their advisor in their freshman
year. Application into the program takes place through the psychology
department with the assistance of the graduate program director
early in the student’s second year. During this time, admissions
requirements are discussed along with the timeline for completing the
GRE (typically in the student’s third year as an undergraduate).
Preferred psychology courses in the following areas, prior to
enrollment into the 4+1 Program are:
•
•
•
•
•
Personality
Abnormal
Forensic
Developmental
Counseling
The Psychology Minor
100
Introduction to Psychology
and five (5) additional Psychology courses, three of which must
be at the 300-level or above.
The Public Health Minor
The Minor in Public Health engages students in an interdisciplinary
exploration of Public Health and the field’s overarching goal to
protect and improve the health of individuals and communities.
Foundation courses in Biostatistics and Biological and Social
sciences provide students with an opportunity to examine Public
Health sub-fields. Public Health-specific courses facilitate student
understanding of public health assessment, policy development and
health promotion education, including associated activities such as
health status monitoring, health problem and environmental hazard
identification, citizen education, community mobilization and
evaluation of program effectiveness. Students pursuing the Minor
in Public Health complete a relevant field-based experience and
contextualize the experience with primary literature, gaining unique
perspectives on Public Health as a career.
Requirements for the Minor in Public Health
BIO
103 Biology I and Lab
Select one of the following courses:
BIO 250/MATH 250 Introduction to Biostatistics#
PSYCH 240
Quantitative Analysis#
and
ANTH 100
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 270 Global Health*
122
201 350 Public Health Essentials*
Applied Practicum in Public Health*
# The course has pre-requisite requirements that do not fulfill
requirements for the completion of the Minor in Public Health.
Some pre-requisites may be waived with the instructors’ permission
or by placement exam.
* These courses have pre-requisites that fulfill requirements for the
Minor in Public Health.
Theatre
The Theatre Major
Students will enroll in 12-15 credits of graduate courses during their
senior year, selected from the following list:
PSYCH 501
Research Design
PSYCH 502
Quantitative Methods I
PSYCH 503
Forensic Psychology
PSYCH 505
Introduction to Clinical Assessments:
Objective Tests
PSYCH 509
Methods of Psychotherapy I
PSYCH 520
Developmental Psychopathology
PSYCH 521
Adult Psychopathology
PSYCH
PH
PH
Theatre is unique in the range and breadth of its areas of study.
It has a rich history, literature, and body of critical theory as
well as a number of skill areas where knowledge is put into
practice. The sequence of courses in theatre is designed to
provide an understanding of each of these areas. The program
aims to provide each student with a well-rounded, general
mastery of all areas of the art of theatre. In addition, study of
the theatre opens a window to the history of our society and
culture in a variety of historical contexts. As its particular focus
and in keeping with the mission of Roger Williams University,
the Theatre Department offers a liberal arts theatre degree with
a strong emphasis on practical learning and professional skills.
The theatre program includes a major, a minor, and a
Core Concentration. Beyond their more general studies, many
students pursue specialization tracks through a series of courses
and production experiences in the areas of performance or
design. The tracks culminate in capstone experiences such as
Senior Projects in performance, design, production, research or
with professional internships.
From the beginning of their program, students’ mastery
of lessons learned in the classroom is supported by the
Department’s active production program. The Department
offers a number of public performances each semester
providing theatre students, the University community, and the
region beyond the University with an exposure to a wide range
of styles and types of theatre. During their four years at the
University students have the opportunity to work on and see
a broad sampling of our theatrical heritage, ranging from the
classics, such as Shakespeare and Greek tragedy, to plays drawn
from the modern repertory. Special emphasis is given to the
musical theatre.
Productions vary from student-directed one-act plays
and Senior Projects to the larger and more elaborate facultydesigned-and-directed full length plays. As part of their
program, students are expected to participate in all aspects
of the theatrical process: backstage, on stage, control booth,
publicity, and front of house.
While the production program is an integral part of the
theatre program, it is open to all students in the University
regardless of their major course of study. The same is true
of membership and participation in the Stage Company, the
student drama club.
An important element in the overall design of the program
is the semester-long London Theatre Program. Since 1971
theatre students have spent the fall semester of their junior year
in London under the direction of the Roger Williams theatre
Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
faculty and a group of English theatre professionals. They see
over 40 plays, concerts, dance events, and exhibitions, study
the practical workings of various professional theatres and meet
with a range of working theatre practitioners. The full schedule
of classes taken by students in London combines theatre studies
with courses that provide a broad background in the culture and
history of England and Europe. These include field trips to every
corner of London and many sites around England.
Many graduates of the theatre program pursue careers
in a wide range of the theatrical arts: film, television, and
the live theatre. Others have become educators. Theatre
graduates can be found teaching on all levels, from elementary
to university. Increasingly, those students interested in
professional or teaching careers continue their studies through
advanced academic and professional degrees in graduate
schools throughout the country. But as befits a liberal arts
program, many of our students take the research, analytical,
organizational, and communication skills that are fundamental
to the theatre arts and apply them to a wide variety of business
and creative pursuits. Regardless of their ultimate career paths,
theatre graduates take with them a deep appreciation of theatre
as an art and of its place in our culture.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in theatre must satisfy
all University Core Curriculum requirements and the College
speech requirement, COMM 210. In addition, the theatre
major must successfully complete 42 credits from the
requirements listed below and sufficient electives to total 120
credits. Majors are encouraged to apply electives toward a
minor or second major.
THEAT 110
Acting I
THEAT 120
Design for the Theatre
THEAT 122
Stagecraft
THEAT 130
The Art of the Theatre
THEAT 140
Musical Theatre Workshop (2 credits)
THEAT 141
Musical Theatre Workshop (1 credit)
THEAT 200
Theatre Practicum (1 credit, taken 3 times)
THEAT 230
Theatre History I
THEAT 231
Theatre History II
THEAT 300
Drama in Production
THEAT340
Directing
Three Dramatic Literature/History/Theory courses taken from:
THEAT 330
Theatre of Shakespeare
THEAT 331
Modern Theatre and Drama
THEAT 332
British Theatre and Performing Arts
THEAT 333
Asian Drama and Dance
THEAT 334
Contemporary Drama
THEAT 431
Drama Theory and Criticism
Two 3-credit Theatre electives.
Students may choose to use their elective credits to
concentrate in either the Acting or Design Track. The
requirements for these tracks are:
Acting Track
THEAT 210
Acting II
THEAT 310
Acting Studio
Design Track
THEAT 220
Intermediate Design
THEAT 320
Design Studio
The Theatre Minor
THEAT 110
Acting I
THEAT 120
Design for the Theatre
THEAT 122
Stagecraft
THEAT 130
The Art of the Theatre
one of the following courses
THEAT 230
Theatre History I
THEAT 231
Theatre History II
THEAT 330
Theatre of Shakespeare
THEAT 331
Modern Theatre and Drama
THEAT 333
Asian Drama and Dance
THEAT 334
Contemporary Drama
THEAT 431
Drama Theory and Criticism
and
Six (6) credits of Theatre electives
Theatre Minor – London Option
THEAT 130
The Art of the Theatre
One Theatre three-credit elective and four approved threecredit courses taken as part of the London Theatre Program.
The London Theatre Program
Instituted in 1971 to provide theatre students with an opportunity
to see the finest theatre in the world, the program serves a
limited number of students from other academic areas as well
and is offered in the fall semester of alternate academic years.
London is the ideal city for students of the theatre and drama.
Not only does London offer a greater quantity of productions
than one could experience elsewhere, but its theatre fare is also
panoramic, encompassing a broad range of periods and styles.
Attendance at a large number of events is a part of the program.
Courses build on the opportunities that the English site provides
with frequent field trips and guest speakers. In addition to their focus
on British theatrical arts, courses are multi-disciplinary, offering a
wide and varied experience of European history and culture.
University Writing Program
The University Writing Program, offered by the Department of
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, creates the intellectual
atmosphere in which students can acquire rhetorical knowledge and
strategies to write purposefully, incisively and ethically. Students and
faculty in the program read closely and critically, explore rhetorical
situations and cultural contexts, engage in inquiry, and study the
elements of well-reasoned, persuasive discourse.
The program sets appropriate performance-based standards
to ensure that students incorporate those skills integral to writing
cogent arguments. Incoming freshmen who need additional support
gaining academic literacy may be required to complete WTNG 100
– Introduction to Academic Writing, with a grade of C- or higher.
The University Core Curriculum writing requirement is fulfilled by
successfully completing the following: WTNG 102 (with a grade of
C- or higher) and a 200- or 300-level WTNG course.
In Expository Writing, students learn how to write wellstructured, well-developed arguments that demonstrate
proficiency in standard written English. In the 200- or 300level WTNG course, students’ understanding of the knowledge
introduced in WTNG 102 is deepened through the analysis and
production of academic, civic, and professional writing.
123
School of Education
School of Education
Mission Statement
The Roger Williams University School of Education seeks to
educate reflective leaders whose practice is grounded in a
commitment to social justice, civil discourse, global citizenship
and educational excellence for all students.
Undergraduate Programs
The School of Education at Roger Williams University
offers majors and certification programs in Elementary and
Secondary Education, and certificate to teach at the Middle
School level. Regardless of program, students in the School
of Education have opportunities to acquire a rich background
in educational history and philosophy, learning theory and
development, and in the art and practice of teaching.
The Elementary Education Program major prepares
students for a variety of possible career choices. Students may
pursue certification to teach in Grades 1-6, or they may select
the Educational Studies track. The Educational Studies track
is designed for students who are interested in education as a
discipline but not seeking certification.
Students in both the Elementary Certification and
Educational Studies tracks explore content, curriculum, and
pedagogy across a broad spectrum of disciplines. In addition to
the Elementary Education course sequence, Elementary majors
complete the University Core Curriculum requirements and
choose a Core Concentration. They also take required history,
science, and mathematics courses in the Feinstein College of
Arts and Sciences.
Undergraduates enrolled in the Secondary Education
Program double-major in Education and in the content area
they wish to teach. Secondary majors may earn certification
to teach grades 7-12 in one or more of the following areas:
English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Biology, General Science,
or Chemistry. The School of Education also offers, through the
secondary education program, a PK-12 certification in Foreign
Language and Dance Education. Unlike the Elementary
education majors, students in the Secondary program are not
required to complete a Core Concentration.
Students who are seeking certification at either the
Elementary or Secondary levels may elect to complete
the courses required for the Middle School Certificate
Program. In Rhode Island, a certificate to teach in a middle
school (grades 5-8) requires that individuals be certified to
teach at either the Elementary or Secondary level, complete
at least 18- 21 credit hours in the content area in which they
wish to teach, and complete the three courses required for
the Middle School Certificate.
Graduate Programs
Individuals holding a four-year degree and wishing to earn
certification to teach in grades 1-6 may apply to the evening
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) Program or the full-time,
12-month, intensive Teacher Residency Program at Gordon
School and Roger Williams University. Applicants must have
graduated with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and complete basic
124
skills and content knowledge testing requirements. M.A.T.
candidates follow a course of study that prepares them to
achieve the same outcomes as candidates in the undergraduate
Elementary program.
The Master of Arts in Literacy Program is a part-time,
cohort-based course of study for teachers pursuing advanced
certification as a Reading Specialist/Consultant. Applicants
must hold a valid, active teaching license.
Certification
All teacher education programs at Roger Williams University
are approved by the Rhode Island Department of Education.
Under the National Association of State Directors of Teacher
Education and Certification (NASDTEC) agreement, our
graduates are eligible for certification in Rhode Island and all
other states with the exception of Alaska, Iowa and Minnesota.
Testing requirements for each state vary.
School of Education Faculty
The Roger Williams University School of Education faculty
is composed of experienced academics and professionals
from diverse educational disciplines. Faculty backgrounds
in elementary, middle, and secondary education classrooms
contribute to their rich knowledge of subject matter and
contemporary approaches to teaching. The faculty’s dedication
to educational theory and practice is further exemplified
through varied research interests, numerous conference
presentations, workshops, and publications, and dedication to
professional development activities.
Professors
Alan Canestrari, Ed.D.
Bruce A. Marlowe, Ph.D.
Rachel L. McCormack, Ed.D
Susan L. Pasquarelli, Ed.D.
Margaret Thombs, Ph.D.
Associate Professors
Kelly A. Donnell, Ph.D.
Evgenia (Jenny) Tsankova, Ed.D.
Kerri A. Ullucci, Ph.D.
Ann G. Winfield, Ph.D
Li-Ling Yang, Ph.D.
Guiding Principles for Education
Curriculum Development
The teacher education programs at Roger Williams University
are designed to utilize current theories, research, and practice
in Elementary, Middle School and Secondary Education.
Curriculum development is guided by both core beliefs and
current state standards established for the preparation of
beginning teachers. Every year the faculty evaluates and revises
the curriculum based on student and faculty feedback, current
trends in education, and national and state educational standards.
Consequently, the professional education that students receive at
RWU reflects cutting-edge educational research and practice.
School of Education
Four core beliefs guide curriculum development in the
Education Programs at RWU:
• A commitment to social justice, civil discourse, global
citizenship, and educational excellence for all students;
• A commitment to a developmental approach to the
education of both K-12 students and prospective teachers;
• A belief that teacher preparation programs should
emphasize critical reflection with regard to learning
outcomes for K-12 students and the performance of real
teaching tasks;
• A belief that pre-service teachers learn about teaching
from discussions of theory, research, and pedagogy, as well
as from teaching experiences.
These core beliefs support a well-planned teacher education
curriculum that helps students gain the pedagogical knowledge
(knowledge of instruction), content knowledge (knowledge
of subject matter), and pedagogical content knowledge
(knowledge of discipline-specific teaching strategies) needed
to provide a complete educational experience for children/
adolescents. The curriculum allows students to design lesson
plans and units to demonstrate teaching and assessment
knowledge. Finally, it gives students school- and classroombased experiences throughout their teacher education program.
Rhode Island Professional Teaching Standards
The teacher education programs are designed to ensure
that students meet the Rhode Island Professional Teaching
Standards (RIPTS). As prospective teachers, students must
demonstrate knowledge and attainment of performance
standards that are appropriate for professional teachers. Eleven
standards serve as broad instructional and assessment goals for
the teacher education programs. These standards are consistent
with current theories and practices associated with high quality
teacher preparation and performance.
They are:
1. Teachers create learning experiences using a broad base of
general knowledge that reflects an understanding of the
nature of the communities and world in which we live.
2. Teachers have a deep content knowledge base sufficient to
create learning experiences that reflect an understanding
of central concepts, vocabulary, structures and tools of
inquiry of the disciplines/content areas they teach.
3. Teachers create instructional opportunities that reflect an
understanding of how children learn and develop.
4. Teachers create instructional opportunities that reflect a
respect for the diversity of learners and an understanding
of how students differ in their approaches to learning.
5. Teachers create instructional opportunities to encourage all
students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving,
performance skills and literacy across content areas.
6. Teachers create a supportive learning environment that
encourages appropriate standards of behavior, positive
social interaction, active engagement in learning and
self-motivation.
7. Teachers work collaboratively with all school personnel,
families and the broader community to create a
8.
9.
10.
11.
professional learning community and environment that
supports the improvement of teaching, learning and
student achievement.
Teachers use effective communication as the vehicle
through which students explore, conjecture, discuss and
investigate new ideas.
Teachers use appropriate formal and informal assessment
strategies with individuals and groups of students to
determine the impact of instruction on learning, to provide
feedback and to plan future instruction.
Teachers reflect on their practice and assume
responsibility for their own professional development
by actively seeking and participating in opportunities to
learn and grow as professionals.
Teachers maintain professional standards guided by legal
and ethical principles.
Performance Assessment of Prospective Teachers
Fall 2014 School of Education Admission Requirements
In order for RWU students to declare Education as a major,
they must present evidence of having met the basic skills
requirement as determined by the Rhode Island Department of
Education (R.I.D.E.).
The basic skills requirement can be met in the following ways:
TEST NAME
Core Academic
Skills for
Educators
PASSING SCORE – Fall 2014
150 Math
156 Reading
162 Writing
Composite Score of 468 with no test
score more than 3 points below the cut.
SAT
1150 Composite
530 Verbal; 530 Math
ACT
24 Reading
20 Math
GRE
1100 Composite (800 Scale Test)
With no less than 465 verbal and 584
quantitative
300 Composite (170 Scale Test)
With no less than 151 verbal and 147
quantitative
WAIVER:
Candidates applying to a traditional undergraduate program are
not required to retake the Core Academic Skills for Educators
exam if they have achieved a GPA of 3.0 or higher by the end of
their sophomore year and are within 3 points of the cut scores on
each section of the Core Academic Skills for Educators exams.
On-going Performance Assessment Requirements
The School of Education uses a Performance Assessment
System to monitor and evaluate student progress. As part of
that system, students develop and maintain an assessment
portfolio that is reviewed at each level of the curriculum:
Level I: Exploring the Profession – freshman year
Level II: Preparing to Teach – sophomore and junior years
Level III: Performing in the Classroom – senior year
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School of Education
The performance assessment is one of many measures the
School of Education uses to evaluate students’ progress toward
meeting the Rhode Island Professional Teaching Standards
(RIPTS). Matriculation in the program is contingent upon
successful performance assessment reviews.
Throughout their programs, students plan, develop and
experiment with instructional materials and strategies in both
the University classroom and public school settings. As students
proceed through coursework, they build their performance
assessment portfolios, self-assess their pedagogical knowledge
and skills, and set goals aligned with the RIPTS. Performance
assessment evaluations are used to determine whether students
are progressing toward meeting the standards and are used to
move students from one curriculum level to another. In addition,
education students must achieve a GPA of 3.0 or higher to enter
Curriculum Level III: Performing in the Classroom.
Field experiences are required in all courses. The
Elementary and Secondary programs include a minimum of
100 hours of Practicum and one full semester (14 weeks) of
Student Teaching. During Student Teaching, students also
enroll in a Student Teaching Seminar.
The State of Rhode Island requires all applicants for
certification in Elementary and Secondary Education to pass the
state licensure examination(s). Students typically take the licensure
examination(s) before they matriculate to Curriculum Level III.
PROGRAM OF STUDIES
Elementary Education Certification
Program Requirements
Level I: Exploring the Profession Coursework
EDU
200
Foundations of Education
EDU
202
Psychology of Learning and Development
Level II: Preparing to Teach Coursework
BIO
105/L
Life Science for Elementary Education
and Lab
NATSC 105/L
Earth Science and Physical Science for
Elementary Education and Lab
EDU
302
Literacy in the Elementary School I
EDU
303
Literacy in the Elementary School II
EDU
305
Classroom Applications of Technology at
the Elementary and Middle School Level
EDU
316
Classrooms as Communities
EDU
318
Educational Reform and Policy
EDU
330
Issues in Multicultural Education
EDU
332
Responding to Diverse Learners
EDU
341
Science in the Elementary School
EDU
342
Teaching Inquiry Science in the
Elementary School
EDU
349
Mathematics in the Elementary School I
EDU
350
Mathematics in the Elementary School II
EDU
355
Elementary and Middle School Level
Special Education Practice
EDU
370
Social Studies in the Elementary School
EDU
372
Issues in Elementary Health Education
Level III: Performing in the Classroom Coursework
EDU
375
Elementary Education Practicum
EDU
450
Student Teaching
EDU
451
Student Teaching Seminar
126
Additional Required Courses:
HIST
151
U.S. History I
MATH 115
Math for Elementary Education I
MATH 116
Math for Elementary Education II
MUSIC 171
Basic Musicianship for Elementary
Education and Lab
All students are required to have field experiences in a variety
of settings, including experiences in urban schools.
Secondary Teacher Education Certificate
Program Requirements
Level I: Exploring the Profession Coursework
EDU
200
Foundations of Education
EDU
202
Psychology of Learning and Development
Level II: Preparing to Teach Coursework
EDU
306
Classroom Applications of Technology at
the Middle and Secondary School Level
EDU
330
Issues in Multicultural Education
LING
101*
Introduction to Linguistics (required of
Foreign Language/Secondary Education
majors only)
EDU
356
Middle and Secondary School Level
Special Education Practice
EDU
363
Literacy Across the Curriculum
EDU
373
Issues in Middle and Secondary
Health Education
Three additional pedagogical content knowledge courses in the
certification area, the third of which is taken simultaneously with
Practicum, and is understood as belonging to Curriculum Level II:
Secondary Mathematics only:
EDU
390
Teaching Secondary Mathematics
through Inquiry
EDU
391
Teaching Secondary Mathematics:
Geometry, Data, and Trigonometry
EDU
414
Capstone: Mathematics Education
Secondary Science only:
EDU
392
Teaching Secondary Science through Inquiry
EDU
393
Standards-Based Science in the
Secondary School
EDU
411
Capstone: Science Education
Secondary English only:
EDU
394
Teaching Reading and Literature in the
High School
EDU
395
Teaching Writing in the High School
EDU
412
Capstone: Multicultural Adolescent Literature
Secondary Social Studies only:
EDU
396
Historical Thinking in Context
EDU
397
Historical Inquiry in Context
EDU
413
Capstone: Ways of Knowing – History and
Social Studies
PK-12 Foreign Language only:
EDU 398
Teaching Standards-based World
Languages and Culture
EDU 399
Teaching Literacy to World Language Learners
EDU
415 Capstone: Foreign Language Education
School of Education
PK-12 Dance only:
DANCE 460
Teaching Techniques, Musical Concepts,
and Rhythmic Analysis
EDU
388
Teaching Ethnology and History of Dance
EDU
416
Capstone: Applications in Dance
Methodology and Best Practices
Level III: Performing in the Classroom Coursework
EDU
376
Secondary Education Practicum
EDU
450
Student Teaching
EDU
451
Student Teaching Seminar
All students are required to have field experiences in a variety
of settings, including experiences in urban schools.
The Educational Studies Program
In the Educational Studies major, students are prepared for
productive careers and future study in a field committed to
serving the larger community. Students in the Educational
Studies major have a wide range of career and advanced
education options in non-profit, corporate, as well as
educational settings. An exciting element of the Educational
Studies major is the opportunity it provides students to
combine strong content background through required
coursework and a core concentration with flexibility in
participation in community service and internships, research,
and intercultural exploration through education and other
electives. For example, a student may choose the Foreign
Language and Culture Concentration which affords him
or her immersion in global and multicultural perspectives.
The student may also choose among electives in educational
research, content, pedagogy, and service that draw from a
range of interdisciplinary areas. Students are not prepared for a
teaching certificate in this major.
Required Courses
EDU
200
Foundations of Education
EDU
202
Psychology of Learning
EDU EDU
EDU
EDU
EDU
EDU
EDU
EDU
308
310
312
314
316
318
330
332
Technology and Education
Curriculum Studies
Introduction to Educational Research
Applied Internship in Education I
Classrooms as Communities
Educational Reform and Policy
Issues in Multicultural Education
Responding to Diverse Learners
Select 9 credits in EDU Electives
EDU
452
Applied Internship in Education II
EDU
453
Senior Thesis Seminar
The Educational Studies Minor
EDU
200
Foundations of Education
EDU 202
Psychology of Learning
EDU
308
Technology and Education
EDU
310
Curriculum Studies
EDU
330
Issues in Multicultural Education
and
One course from the following list
EDU
312
Introduction to Educational Research
EDU
314
Applied Internship in Education I
EDU
316
Classrooms as Communities
EDU
318
Education Reform and Policy
EDU
332
Responding to Diverse Learners
Middle School Certificate Course Requirements
Successful matriculation in an Elementary or Secondary
Education Program and the following coursework:
EDU
381/541 Young Adolescent Development
EDU
382/542 Middle School Curriculum and
School Organization
EDU
383/543 Applied Middle School Instruction
and Assessment
127
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Mission Statement
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
brings diverse individuals together into an educational
community dedicated to the creation and stewardship of the
built and cultural environments. We prepare students for
leadership in professional practice, service and individual
creative pursuits. We achieve this through multidisciplinary
educational programs set within a collegial environment
guided by the principles of inquiry, conscience and
tolerance espoused by the University’s namesake, Roger
Williams. The School exists to prepare students from many
backgrounds and experiences for a variety of roles within a
global society, with its continuing need for educated citizens
who have the knowledge, skills and commitment to improve
our surroundings.
Educational Philosophy
The School is committed to balance between creation and
conservation, aesthetic and technical pursuits, national
and international perspectives, individual exploration and
community involvement, classroom and lifelong learning.
We work to achieve this balance through a variety of
teaching situations – studios, lectures, seminars, internships,
study abroad, field work, tutorials, public forums, required
community service – which engage students, faculty, and those
active in the field in close relationships.
We serve a continuum of student groups, building from
a core of undergraduate, graduate and professional degree
programs to include High School and Career Discovery, postprofessional and continuing education opportunities. The
School extends itself most fully as a center for the study of
architecture, art and historic preservation by bringing people
together around topics and works of international significance
in public events, professional conferences and communitygenerated initiatives.
We view the worlds of knowledge and experience as
open-ended. Education in the School therefore encourages the
complementary pursuits of learning and practice, reflection
and action, of accessibility and flexibility; along with a sense
of perspective, adaptation, and transcendence. The skills
which best serve these values incorporate intuition, critical
thinking and problem solving; as well as abilities with spoken,
written, graphic and spatial media. In a world of continuous
technological change, which presents challenges to established
cultures, these timeless values and skills endure. They exist
as relevant tools for contemporary life and practice, and as a
means toward advancing the cause of a humane and civilized
environment for all.
Programs of Study
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
offers an array of undergraduate, graduate and professional
degree programs in Architecture, Visual Arts Studies,
Historic Preservation, and Art and Architectural History.
Undergraduate students in all majors pursue parallel
University Core Curriculum and Departmental Core studies
in foundation years, before expanding into optional tracks and
topical areas at advanced levels. Students are encouraged to
assume increasing responsibility for the choice and direction
of their inquiry and career path as they advance. Architecture
majors complete the Departmental Core in pursuing either
the four year Bachelor of Science degree, or the NAABAccredited Bachelor of Science/Master of Architecture
professional degree sequence, which is normally completed
in a 4+2 year advisement sequence, but other advisement
options are available. Art and Architectural History majors
complete a foundation of introductory and intermediate
courses, before pursuing optional concentrations in Art
History or Architectural History at the advanced level. They
can also pursue a 4 + 1 BA/MA in Art and Architectural
History advisement program. Historic Preservation majors
complete a departmental core before advancing into focused
studies in Field Training and Professional Practice, and can
also pursue a 4+1 BS/MS in Historic Preservation advisement
program. Visual Arts Studies majors can complete either
a Bachelor of Arts in Visual Arts Studies or a professional
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts Studies program, for
those interested in a more concentrated arts and studio
experience. Foundation requirements followed by optional
primary and secondary concentrations. All students in the
School are encouraged to pursue minors throughout the
University, and to select within the School from minors
available in each major area.
129
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Years
Study
Credits
Professional
Accreditation
4
5½-6
120
181
NAAB
1½-2
Varies
NAAB
Master of Architecture
3½
101
NAAB
ART
B.A. in Visual Arts Studies
BFA in Visual Arts Studies
4
4
120
120
Univ. Req., Portfolio
Univ. Req., Portfolio
HISTORIC PRESERVATION
B.S. in Historic Preservation
M.S. in Historic Preservation
4
1
120
32
M.S. in Historic Preservation
B.S./M.S. in Historic Preservation
J.D./M.S. in Historic Preservation
2
5
3-4
52
152
101-120
Univ. Req.
B.A. or B.S. in
Historic Preservation
Univ. Req.
Univ. Req.
See Graduate Req.
ART AND ARCHITECTURAL
HISTORY
B.A. in Art + Architectural History
M.A. in Art + Architectural History
B.A./M.A. in Art + Architectural History
4
1
5
120
36
150
Univ. Req.
Univ. Req.
Univ. Req.
MAJORS/DEGREE
ARCHITECTURE
B.S. in Architecture
B.S in Architecture/
Master of Architecture sequence
Master of Architecture
Facilities
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
is housed in Bristol in two facilities on the Roger Williams
University campus, with additional space off-campus for
advanced students in Visual Arts Studies. Architecture,
Art and Architectural History, and Historic Preservation
are located in an award-winning 45,000-square-foot
building that opened in 1987, that was expanded in two
phases by an additional 20,000 square-feet beginning
in 2005. Kite-Palmer Associates, Providence, R.I., were
selected to design the original building through a national
competition sponsored by the National Endowment for the
Arts, and William Kite Architects were again selected for
the expansion. The building includes the Samsung Design
Studio featuring 375 Architecture student workstations
equipped with Samsung monitors connected into the
University rCloud virtual desktop computing infostructure,
review and seminar rooms, Design Computing Laboratory,
Architecture Library, Photography Studio and Darkroom,
a Woodworking Studio/Model Shop, Exhibition Gallery, a
well-equipped Lecture Theater, seminar/classrooms and
review space, equipped with Samsung interactive touch
screens for presentations and work-in-progress, Building
Materials and Conservation Lab, Digital Manufacturing
Lab, and faculty offices. Art studios equipped for drawing,
painting, sculpture and printmaking are located in the Art
building. Lecture and classroom courses are held in shared
University facilities in Bristol. In 2010 an “Art Warehouse”
space was created in Bristol providing dedicated studio and
exhibition space for advanced Visual Arts students. Roger
Williams University Florence Study Abroad includes a
130
Admissions
Requirements
Univ. Req., Portfolio
Univ. Req., Portfolio
Mid-point review
B.A. or B.S. in
Architecture
B.A. or B.S. degree
dedicated Architecture Design Studio for 32 students at the
Palazzo Bangani, with classroom and design review space at
the Palazzo Rucellai, a landmark of the Renaissance.
Students have free access to software in computer labs
and from their own devices, and to plotting. Available software
packages in labs and on the rCloud include the complete
Autodesk Suite (AutoCAD, Revit, Maya, 3D Studio Max), the
Adobe Design Premium Creative Suite (Acrobat, Dreamweaver,
Flash, Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop, Form Z, Bonzai,
Sketchup, Rhino, Final Cut Pro, Arch GIS, Multiframe, Flovent
and CATT Acoustics packages for a variety of visualization,
lighting, acoustics, energy and structural analysis activities.
Students have access to video cameras, and mobile computing
and projection stations, which can be relocated around the
building in support of Design Studio Reviews, lectures,
and class presentations. The laboratory space is able to be
re-configured to accommodate individual seminar and design
studio presentations. The entire Architecture Design Studio is
networked for student laptop access from their desks, with the
new graduate studio featuring wireless access.
The Architecture Library collection includes more than
24,000 books and 60,000 slides, a digital collection comprising
over 80,000 images, and subscribes to over 200 periodicals
and journals. The Historic Preservation collection, considered
one of the best of its kind in New England, includes the H.R.
Hitchcock Collection of American Architecture books on
microfilm, the complete HABS photographic collection, and
international serials. The Woodworking Studio/Model Shop is
configured to accommodate studio and lab classes, and is wellequipped to serve individual student use over extended hours.
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Samsung Partnership
Thanks to a partnership with Samsung Electronics America, Inc.
and NVIDIA, Roger Williams University is on the cutting edge
of technology with industry-leading screen quality and a virtual
desktop infrastructure (also known as the rCloud) that mirrors –
and in some cases exceeds – the professional environment.
Available to students in the School of Continuing Studies
and School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation,
where each workstation is outfitted with a 27-inch LED
monitor and anytime access to critical design software and
advanced applications (including AutoCAD, Revit and Adobe
Creative Suite, among others) via the rCloud, the enhanced
technology is greatly improving design time and cohesion
among students. In addition, 65-inch interactive whiteboards
adorn meeting areas, yielding greater interaction among
students and faculty in both schools.
Roger Williams is one of the first universities nationwide
to implement this advanced technology program, and with
early outcomes proving positive, is expanding the initiative
campus-wide in 2014/15 in the University Learning Commons,
and for the rCloud in all academic areas.
School of Architecture, Art and Historic
Preservation Faculty
Stephen White, AIA, Dean and Professor of Architecture
Gregory Laramie, AIA, Assistant Dean
ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS
Majors include the four-year Bachelor of Science in
Architecture degree, the 4+1.5-2 Bachelor of Science/Master
of Architecture professional degree sequence, the Master
of Architecture sequence for those with pre-professional
degrees in Architecture from other institutions, and a
post-professional Master of Science in Architecture with
optional concentrations in the areas of Sustainable Design,
Historic Preservation, Digital Media and Urban Design. An
undergraduate minor is also available.
Distinguished Professor of Architecture and Historic Preservation:
Hasan-Uddin Khan
Professors:
Edgar G. Adams, Jr., Julian Bonder, Luis Carranza, Andrew
Cohen, Ulker Copur, Gail G. Fenske, Nermin Kura, Eleftherios
Pavlides, Jeffrey Staats, Mete Turan, Stephen White
Associate Professors:
Sara Butler, Patrick Charles, Robert Dermody, Gary Graham,
FAIA, Andrew Thurlow
Assistant Professors:
Anne Proctor, Jeremy Wells, Leonard Yui
ART AND ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY PROGRAMS
Majors include the Bachelor of Arts in Art and Architectural
History, with concentration options in either Art History
or Architectural History and the Master of Arts in Art and
Architectural History. Minors are available in Art and
Architectural History.
Professors:
Luis Carranza, Ulker Copur, Gail G. Fenske, Nermin Kura
Associate Professors:
Sarah Butler, Randall Van Schepen
Assistant Professor:
Anne Proctor
HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS
Majors include the Bachelor of Science in Historic Preservation,
and the Master of Science in Historic Preservation. Minors are
available in Historic Preservation.
Distinguished Professor of Architecture and Historic Preservation:
Hasan-Uddin Khan
Professor:
Philip Cryan Marshall
Associate Professor:
Sara Butler
Assistant Professors:
Anne Proctor, Jeremy Wells
VISUAL ARTS STUDIES PROGRAMS
Majors include the both the liberal arts Bachelor of Arts in
Visual Arts Studies, and the professional Bachelor of Fine Arts in
Visual Arts Studies. Primary media concentrations are available
within the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film, Animation and Video;
Painting, Drawing and Printmaking; Sculpture; or Photography
and Digital Media. Minors are available in Visual Arts Studies
in the concentration areas outlined above.
Professors:
Jeffrey Silverthorne
Associate Professors:
Elizabeth Duffy, Murray McMillan, Michael Rich, Anne Tait
Assistant Professor:
Anne Proctor
Special Programs
Degree programs in the School are supplemented by many
special programs:
Teaching Firm in Residence/Visiting Professor Program
Since 2007, the School has hosted a unique Architecture
Teaching Firm in Residence and Visiting Professor program,
bringing the highest quality educators and practitioners to the
Architecture Program. Teaching Firms and Visiting Professors
have included Gray Organschi Architecture, Charles Rose
Architects, Studio Luz, Ann Beha Architects, Perkins & Will,
Kallmann McKinnell Wood, Brian Healy Architects, Taylor Burs
Architects, Alex Anmahian Associates, designLAB; Paul Lukez
Architects, Sasaki; Tangram Architects Amsterdam; Hernan
Maldonado and Max Rohm, Buenos Aires.
Studio Critics and Lecturers
More than 250+ Visiting Critics and Lecturers attended
Architecture design studio reviews, Visual Arts Studies
critiques, and coursework across the school each year,
supported through donor gifts, and through the School’s
operational funds. The Visiting Critic program is by far the
most extensive professional-academic collaboration that takes
place at the School, and one of the most important.
Public Events Series
The series introduces students, professionals and the public
to the work and ideas of people celebrated in their fields, and
131
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
helps establish a standard of excellence for the School through
lectures, exhibitions and conferences.
Evening Lectures
Lecturers who have visited the School in the past several years
include architects, landscape architects, artists, historians,
critics and perservationists of national and international
achievement. These include Charles Rose, Florencia Rodriguez,
James O’Gorman, Tom Deininger, Michael Mills, Sally
Cornelison, Lone Wiggers, Vladimir Belogolovsky, Jose Ramon
Ramirez, Patricia Hillis, Sarah Walko, Anthony Piermarini,
Brian Healy, Kyu Sung Woo, Lawrence Speck, Karl Daubmann,
Kenneth Fampton, Shari Mendelson and Ilene Sunshine,
Robert Miklos, Eve Andre Laramee, Mark Tsurumaki, David
Burns, Natalie Kampen, Ciro Najle, Jess Frost, Suzanne Blier,
R. Shane Williamson, Mark Foster Gage, Bart Mispelblom and
Charlotte ten Dijke, Paul Lukez, Alan Organschi, Fernando
Lara, Marty Doscher, Hunter Palmer, Ken Yeang, Mary
Bergstein, Greg Pasquarelli, Jeff Talman, Nader Tehrani,
Marlon Blackwell.
Endowed Historic Preservation Events Series
A generous anonymous bequest has permitted the
establishment of an endowment to support public and special
events programs related to Historic Preservation. Additional
support from the Felicia Fund, the Newport Restoration
Foundation, the Amica Foundation, and individual donors
enhance the series. Since 2002, the fund has supported
the RWU International Fellows Summer Program, focusing
on interrelationships between regional and international
historic preservation and architecture issues, as well Historic
Preservation Endowed lectures, including Gustavo Araoz,
Jean Carroon, Scott Simpson, T. Gunny Harboe, David Perkes,
Michael Mills.
Exhibitions and Conferences
As part of the School’s ongoing exhibition program of
professional, alumni, and student work, many traveling
exhibitions are brought to campus, supplementing the annual
Student Academic Showcase and Visual Arts Studies Senior
Show. Recent exhibitions have included “All Natural — Charles
Rose Architects”, “New Portraits”, Tom Deininger, “The
Clown is in Session”, Kylie Wyman, “Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis
— Recent Work”, “SAAHP Architecture Faculty: Explorations
and Realizations”, “Be Brave”, Eve Andre Laramee, “The
Preservation Movement Then and Now”, “Finders Keepers:
Work by Shari Mendelson and Ilene Sunshine”, “Tangram
Works”, Amsterdam, “Supersymmetry”, Mark Foster Gage,
“Shaded Cities”, Charles Hagenah, “Building as a Radical
Act: Gray Organschi Architecture”, “In The Making”, William
Lamson Artist, “Movement” by Robert Siegel, “China Three
Rivers Project” by Joy Garnett, “Seeking Intersections: Hernan
Maldonado and Max Rohm, “Mouth to Mouth” by Jeff Talman,
“Firenze XP: RWU Architecture Florence Program”, “The Big
Blue” by Tayo Heuser. Recent conferences include “Directions
in 21st Century Preservation” co-sponsored by Historic New
England, and “The Tectonics of Teaching”, a conference of the
Building Technology Educators Society (BTES), co-sponsored
by NJIT.
Regional Resources
The nearby cities of Providence, Newport, Boston, and New
Haven are excellent laboratories of design, and the sites of
132
major works by 19th and 20th century architects and landscape
architects such as Alvar Aalto, Walter Gropius, Louis Kahn,
LeCorbusier, McKim Mead and White, Fredrick Law Olmsted,
H.H. Richardson, I.M. Pei, Steven Holl, Frank Gehry, and Jose
Lluis Sert. New England is an exceptional resource for the
arts with many cultural institutions and extensive collections,
and for preservation education as an extensively preserved
historic environment. These traditional and contemporary
environments are continually engaged by students in the School
in field activities integrated with student coursework.
International and National Travel Opportunities
The School supports many special short-term travel
opportunities for coursework each year to international
and national sites of important for the schools majors. In
recent years, this has included support for faculty-led trips to
Istanbul, Barcelona, Mexico City, Athens, Paris, Egypt, Chicago,
Washington DC and other sites.
Study Abroad Opportunities
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
sponsors undergraduate study abroad opportunities in
Florence through a semester long study Abroad for all SAAHP
majors, as well as an exchange with Yokohama National
University, Japan. Several three week Winter or Summer
session programs are available to undergraduate and graduate
students: in Art + Architectural History programs to Egypt,
Cambodia and Japan; in Architecture to the Netherlands
or Munich. Architecture semester long Graduate Study
Abroad is available in alternate Fall semesters to Universidad
Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires, and students may study
in Beijing, and Istanbul in concert with leading universities
and architecture firms in each location. Additionally, faculty
periodically lead shorter study trips to other international
sites as part of Roger Williams coursework.
Roger Williams University Semester Abroad in Italy Program
Beginning in Fall 1999, Roger Williams University established
an Italian study abroad program in Rome, and in 2001 added
a location in Florence. Students in the School’s majors in
Architecture, Visual Arts Studies, Historic Preservation, and
Art and Architectural History may study in Florence either for
a semester or a full year. The University program is based at the
Institute for Fine and Liberal Arts at the Palazzo Rucellai, designed
by Alberti. Facilities are supplemented for architecture students
by a dedicated design studio facility. A full variety of courses in the
arts and humanities, sciences, and social sciences is offered.
Summer Programs in Bristol
Summer Studies
Summer studies in each of the School’s major and minor areas
are aimed at enrichment, acceleration and special projects in
the interactive environment that characterizes summer study.
A program of studies is scheduled each summer for students
at the introductory, intermediate and advanced levels at the
Bristol campus, with study abroad opportunities each summer
as well.
Summer Academy in Architecture
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
offers an intensive four-week Summer Academy program in
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Architecture for high school students who have successfully
completed their junior year of study, and who are interested in
considering future college level studies. The program offers a
variety of studio, seminar and field experiences, extracurricular
activities and field trips. Students are advised on college
admission processes and portfolio development in preparation
for college applications. Supervised dormitory life, with student
activities programming on evenings and weekends, is included
in the program. Students receive college credit in ARCH 100,
Exploring Architecture (3 credits), for successfully completing
the Academy.
Summer Academy students study in the School’s awardwinning facilities alongside undergraduate and graduate
students enrolled in School’s Summer Programs. They are
encouraged to participate in our Summer Public Events
Series inclusive of Lectures and Exhibitions, and a major
summer event, the International Fellows Program, which
brings world-renowned practitioners and scholars to campus
for a two-day conference.
International Fellows Program
The SAAHP International Fellows Program has focused broadly
since its inception in 1999 on issues and practices dealing with the
contemporary built environment. The sessions are aimed at midcareer and senior professionals who work with a distinguished
international faculty. Fellows are drawn from the public and
private sector, as well as from academic institutions. The program
is purposely multi-disciplinary. One intensive session per year is
held over a one to two day period, some of which are conducted
in conjunction with other institutions add greater diversity
to the offering. Recent programs include Sustaining the Built
Heritage: International Preservation and Urban Conservation
(2001); Extreme Architecture: Conservation and Revitalization
(2002), International Architects: Asia featuring Charles Correa
(2003), Building the Future: Difference in International and Local
Urban Conservation and Development (2004), Value and Vision:
International Scenarios for Architecture, Urban Conservation and
Development (2005), Iconic Architecture and Places (2006), and
Sustainable Urban Conservation and Development (2008). The
next offering is anticipated in Summer 2015.
Architecture Programs
Architecture programs at Roger Williams University develop
the broadly educated person through exposure to the liberal
arts and humanities, while also offering rigorous professional
training at the undergraduate and graduate levels, culminating
in an accredited professional Master of Architecture degree.
Architecture is an integrative discipline that expresses
human values through the design of the built environment. It
considers a diverse range of issues at the scale of the region,
site, space and detail in a way that speaks to the past, present,
and possible sustainable futures. Architecture, as a profession,
engages nature and culture, art and technology, service and
practice, within both the local and global realms in a way that is
respectful to the diversity of our increasingly pluralistic society.
Students acquire the design and technical skills and
expertise needed to be effective as collaborators and leaders
working across disciplines. They develop the strategic thinking
and communication skills required to tackle the diverse
range of issues that influence architectural discourse and
practice, from those of sustainability and urbanism to historic
preservation. Students are challenged at each stage of their
education to consider the consequences of their actions in a
culturally and environmentally responsive manner.
Students expand their scope and knowledge through the
pursuit of minors at the undergraduate level and concentrations
at the graduate level. Study abroad opportunities, community
engagement, and close working relationships with faculty,
visiting critics, and regional and international practitioners,
enhance their education. The Roger Williams University
architecture program fosters a lifelong engagement with
critical issues, helping students to be active in enhancing their
profession, their communities, and society at large.
Programs
The Architecture program offers pre-professional, professional
and post-professional degree programs. The Bachelor of
Science in Architecture degree program melds a liberal arts
education with intensive pre-professional education leading
to a professional Master of Architecture degree or to advanced
studies in any number of related disciplines including Historic
Preservation, and Art & Architectural History. The Master of
Architecture program also accepts students from other preprofessional degree programs in Architecture. Students who
have attended architecture-related undergraduate programs
may also be considered for transfer credit in certain courses.
Professional Degree Program Accreditation
In the United States, most state registration boards require
a degree from an accredited professional degree program
as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural
Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized
to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture,
recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture,
the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture.
A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of
accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with
established educational standards. Doctor of Architecture and
Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate
degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited
professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is
not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.
Roger Williams University offers the following NAABaccredited degree programs:
M. Arch. (pre-professional degree + advanced undergraduate
credits+ 38 graduate credits)
Next accreditation visit: 2018
SPECIAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
Professional Degree Threshold Review: Mid-Point and
Advanced Reviews
Bachelor of Science/Master of Architecture 4+1.5-2
degree sequence
Students are required to have achieved a 2.67 cumulative
GPA, and completed all required coursework in published
program outlines, at the end of the five semester Architecture
Core in order to continue directly toward completion of the
Bachelor of Science/Master of Architecture professional
degree sequence.
133
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
At the end of the 7th semester of study, students must
successfully pass a Portfolio Review of Advanced Architectural
Design Studio work. The portfolio may include other
exemplary work from Architecture as well as other creative and
research work.
Students pursuing the professional degree sequence
subsequently complete all 500-600 level coursework at
graduate academic standards, which include achieving a
minimum passing grade of B- in any 500-600 level course, and
a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all 500-600 level courses. Students
with Senior Standing and who have achieved a 2.67 cumulative
GPA may register for graduate coursework with approval of the
instructor and the dean.
Re-application to Master of Architecture professional
degree programs
Eligible students choosing not to pursue the professional
degree, and those who are unsuccessful in meeting the above
requirements, work to complete the four-year Bachelor of
Science in Architecture degree, or pursue other options.
Students who do not initially meet Professional Degree
Threshold Review requirements may re-apply for admission
to the professional degree sequence, following completion of
additional coursework that improves their record, consistent
with GPA and Portfolio Review levels outlined above.
Special Academic Regulations
B.S. in Architecture / Master of Architecture 4 + 1.5-2 program
The following regulations supplement standard RWU Graduate
Academic Regulations.
Semester Course Load, Status and Aid Eligibility
To be classified as a full-time student, students must be
enrolled in coursework totaling at least 9 credit hours at the
graduate level per semester. To be eligible for financial aid,
students must be enrolled in a minimum of 6 credit hours
per semester. Bachelor of Science in Architecture/Master of
Architecture students may not enroll in coursework totaling
more than 17 credit hours per semester, with a normal
graduate load of 12-14 credits.
Students pursuing the 4+1.5-2 degree subsequently
complete all 500-600 level coursework at graduate academic
standards, which include achieving a minimum passing grade
of B- in any 500-600 level course, and a 3.0 cumulative GPA in
all 500-600 level courses.
Change of Major/Internal Transfer Requirements
Students who are undeclared or are majors in other programs
of the University interested in pursuing architecture must apply
for admission to the program as internal transfer candidates
in either Fall or Spring semester. Interested students should
contact the Dean’s Office for more information.
Grade Appeal-Studio Courses
A student may appeal a grade received in a studio course he
or she believes to be inaccurate by making a written request
to the Dean. The Dean then appoints a faculty panel, usually
consisting of three faculty members, to hear the appeal. The
panel consults with the student as well as the instructor. The
student may bring another student’s work for the panel to
consider for comparative purposes. The panel carries out its
deliberations in private, following discussion of the work by the
panel, student, and instructor. The panel has the authority to
134
maintain the grade, or to raise it. The panel’s decision is final
and is communicated to the student immediately.
Bachelor of Science in Architecture Degree Program
The four-year Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree serves
both as a non-professional liberal arts degree, and as preparation
for further graduate study in architecture and related fields.
Students completing a Bachelor of Science in Architecture
degree may apply to professional Bachelor of Architecture and
Master of Architecture and Doctor of Architecture professional
degree programs in order to fulfill their educational requirements
toward professional registration in architecture.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students pursuing the four-year Bachelor of Science in
Architecture degree program must successfully complete the
following required courses and electives, in addition to the
University Core Curriculum requirements.
Mathematics Requirement
MATH 136-Precalculus or MATH 213-Calculus I & Lab are
required for all architecture majors and are a prerequisite for
required courses in structures. Successful completion of one
of these courses also fulfills the University’s Core requirement
in mathematics. Students are encouraged to complete the
highest level of mathematics that they place into, in recognition
of the fact that some Roger Williams University minors and
graduate study options at other institutions may require
calculus. Students seeking to complete a Minor in Structural
Engineering must complete MATH 213 Calculus I and Lab.
Science Requirement
Architecture majors are required to complete PHYS 109-Physics
I-Algebra Based and Lab or PHYS 201-Physics I-Calculus
Based and Lab or ENGR 210, and either CORE 101 Science
or BIO 104-Biology II or NATSC 103-Earth Systems Science
and Lab. Both BIO 104 and NATSC 103 count toward the Core
Concentration and Minor in Sustainability Studies.
Design
Students are required to complete the five-course Architectural
Design Core Studio sequence, and one advanced architectural design
studio. The Core consists of five sequential semesters addressing
fundamental architectural design issues, and graphic and computer
communications skills. An advanced architectural studio or a topical
studio in urban issues completes the studio sequence.
ARCH 113
Architectural Design Core Studio I
ARCH 114
Architectural Design Core Studio II
ARCH 213
Architectural Design Core Studio III
ARCH 214
Architectural Design Core Studio IV
ARCH 313
Architectural Design Core Studio V
ARCH 413
Advanced Architectural Design Studio
or
ARCH 416
Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
History/Theory
The History/Theory sequence is a combination of required
introductory and intermediate courses, and advanced
elective options.
AAH
ARCH
ARCH
121-122 History of Art and Architecture I-II
325
History of Modern Architecture
322
Theory of Architecture
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
And one of the following Intermediate Level course options
ARCH 324
Evolution of Urban Form
ARCH 327
History of American Architecture
ARCH 328
Renaissance Architecture in Perspective
ARCH 329
History of Landscape Architecture
AAH 313
Arts and Architecture of Africa
AAH
321
Arts and Architecture in the Classical World
AAH
322
Arts and Architecture in the Medieval World
AAH
323
Arts and Architecture in the Islamic World
AAH
330
Topics in Art and Architectural History
HP
341
Pre-Industrial America
HP
342
Industrial America
Students may pursue advanced History/Theory electives from a
menu of Architecture Electives options.
Environment and Human Behavior
The Environment and Human Behavior sequence is a two-part
structure of required intermediate level courses, and advanced
elective options.
ARCH 321
Site and Environment
Students may pursue advanced Environment and Human Behavior
electives from a menu of Architecture Electives options.
Technical Systems
The Technical Systems sequence is intended to make
students aware of practical and theoretical aspects of the
interrelationships between materials, building systems, and
structures, an understanding of which is essential for both
functional and imaginative design.
ARCH 335
Structure, Form and Order
ARCH 231
Construction Materials and Assemblies I
ARCH 333
Building Systems: Equipment forBuildings
Students may pursue advanced Technical Systems courses from
a menu of Architecture Elective options.
Practice and Professional Development
ARCH 101
Foundations of Architecture
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
ARCH 287
Introduction to Computer Applications
in Design
Students may pursue Advanced Practice and Professional
Development courses from a menu of Architecture Elective options.
Architecture Electives
Completion of one Architecture Elective is required for
graduation. Architecture Electives complement required
coursework, providing an enhanced knowledge base in
areas of faculty expertise. Students are also eligible to
register for graduate level Architecture Electives during
their senior year.
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
430
461
477
478
Special Topics in Architecture
Introduction to Landscape Architecture
Architecture in Context
Dutch Architecture: The Enduring 20th
Century Legacy
ARCH 484
Construction Estimating and Scheduling
ARCH 487
Digital Modeling
ARCH 488
Computer Applications for
Professional Practice
300 level or above Historic Preservation Courses
500 level or above Architecture Electives (with permission)
Electives
Completion of two electives is required for graduation.
Students are advised to apply one of these electives to expand
the University Core Concentration into a minor.
Students are free to choose from the University’s course
offerings to satisfy this requirement. Pre-requisites for MATH
136 Precalculus (MATH 101 Principles of Algebra, Math
107 Intermediate Algebra, Math 117 College Algebra) and
prerequisites for WTNG 102 Expository Writing, (WTNG 100
Introduction to Academic Writing) will not count as electives
toward the Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree.
Bachelor of Science in Architecture /
Master of Architecture 4+1.5-2 Degree Sequence
The Bachelor of Science in Architecture/Master of Architecture
4+1.5-2 degree program is an NAAB-accredited Architecture
professional degree sequence. Students can expect to complete
the degree program sequence through a program of five and
one half or six years of study, though students may accelerate
through summer study.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Architecture/
Master of Architecture professional degree program must
successfully complete the following required courses and
electives, in addition the University Core Curriculum
requirements. Students complete a minimum of 10 500-600
level courses and 38 credits at the graduate level.
Mathematics Requirement
Math 136 Precalculus or MATH 213 Calculus I and Lab are
required for all Architecture majors, and are a prerequisite
for required courses in the structures sequence. Successful
completion of one of these courses also fulfills the University’s
Core requirement in mathematics. Students are encouraged to
complete the highest level of mathematics that they place into,
in recognition of the fact that some Roger Williams University
minors and graduate study options at other universities may
require calculus. Students seeking to complete a Minor in
Structural Engineering must complete MATH 213 Calculus I
and Lab.
Science Requirement
Architecture majors are required to complete PHYS 109-Physics
I-Algebra Based and Lab or PHYS 201-Physics I-Calculus
Based and Lab or ENGR 210, and either CORE 101 Science
or BIO 104-Biology II or NATSC 103-Earth Systems Science
and Lab. Both BIO 104 and NATSC 103 count toward the Core
Concentration and Minor in Sustainability Studies.
Design
The design studio sequence consists of core studios, advanced
undergraduate studios, comprehensive design studio, graduate
studios, and a final graduate thesis design studio. The Core
consists of five sequential semesters addressing fundamental
architectural design issues, and graphic skills. This is followed
by one semester of advanced architectural design studio and
one advanced topical studio in urban issues. At the graduate
level, students undertake comprehensive design studio, and
two additional graduate topical studios, before exploring a
thesis topic of their own choosing for the final semester of the
professional degree program.
135
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
113
114
213
214
313
413
416
513
515
Architectural Design Core Studio I
Architectural Design Core Studio II
Architectural Design Core Studio III
Architectural Design Core Studio IV
Architectural Design Core Studio V
Advanced Architectural Design Studio
Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
Comprehensive Project Design Studio
Graduate Architectural Design Studio
(two studios)
Graduate Thesis Design Studio
ARCH 613
History/Theory
The History/Theory sequence is a three-part structure of
required introductory and intermediate courses, and advanced
elective options. Students complete a two-course introductory
survey of Art and Architectural History, followed by a
History of Modern Architecture and Theory of Architecture
requirements, one intermediate course in the History of
Architecture chosen from a broad menu of options, and one
advanced elective option:
AAH
121-122 History of Art and Architecture I-II
ARCH 325
History of Modern Architecture
ARCH 322
Theory of Architecture
and one of the following Intermediate Level Course Options
ARCH 324
Evolution of Urban Form
ARCH 327
History of American Architecture
ARCH 328
Renaissance Architecture in Perspective
ARCH 329
History of Landscape Architecture
AAH 313
Arts and Architecture of Africa
AAH
321
Arts and Architecture in the Classical World
AAH
322
Arts and Architecture in the Medieval World
AAH
323
Arts and Architecture in the Islamic World
AAH 330
Topics in Art and Architectural History
HP
341
Pre- Industrial America
HP 342
Industrial America
and one of the following:
ARCH 478
Dutch Architecture: The Enduring 20th
Century Legacy
ARCH 530
Special Topics in Architecture
AAH
530
Special Topics (selected topics)
AAH 560
The Newport Seminar
ARCH 573
Modernism in the Non-Western World: A
Comparative Perspective
ARCH 575
Contemporary Asian Architecture
and Urbanism
ARCH 576
Theoretical Origins of Modernism
ARCH 577
The American Skyscraper
HP
351
History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
HP
391
Architecture and Historic
Preservation Abroad
HP 530
Special Topics in Historic Preservation
Environment and Human Behavior
Environment and Human Behavior coursework develops
student’s skills and understanding relative to environment,
social aspects and research methodology.
ARCH
ARCH
136
321
522
Site and Environment
Environmental Design Research
Technical Systems
The Technical Systems sequence gives students an essential
understanding of the practical and theoretical interrelationships
between the structural, environmental and enclosure systems of
a building, and introduces them to various building materials,
assemblies and services. Students complete seven required
courses, including a three course structures sequence and two
courses each in Construction Materials and Assemblies and in
Environmental Systems.
ARCH 335
Structure, Form and Order
ARCH 434
Design of Structures I
ARCH 435
Design of Structures II
ARCH 231-331 Construction Materials and Assemblies I
and II
ARCH 332
Acoustics and Lighting
ARCH 333
Building Systems: Electrical for Buildings
Practice and Professional Development
Practice and Professional Development coursework develops
students’ communication skills and understanding of the
role of architects within society and in relation to the various
participants in the building process. This sequence culminates
with the Graduate Thesis Seminar, where students are asked
to formulate an independent architectural investigation that
engages a set of issues that further their understanding of
Architecture as a cultural medium and as a profession.
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
ARCH 101
Foundations of Architecture
ARCH 287
Computer Applications in Design
ARCH 488
Computer Applications for
Professional Practice
ARCH 542
Professional Practice
ARCH 641
Graduate Thesis Research Seminar
Architecture Electives
In addition to the elective options outlined above in History/
Theory, the completion of four Architecture Electives is
required for graduation, with a minimum of three at the
Graduate Level.
Undergraduate Architecture Electives
ARCH 430
Special Topics in Architecture
ARCH 461
Introduction to Landscape Architecture
ARCH 477
Architecture in Context
ARCH 478
Dutch Architecture: The Enduring 20th
Century Legacy
ARCH 484
Construction Estimating and Scheduling
ARCH 487
Digital Modeling
ARCH 492
Writing About Architecture
300 Level or Above Historic Preservation courses
Graduate Architecture Electives:
Graduate electives are grouped in the areas of Sustainable Design,
Urban Design, Digital Media and Historic Preservation. In
addition, some multidisciplinary Core MS in Architecture courses
are available as Architecture Electives.
Sustainable Design: ARCH 521 Sustainable Design Seminar,
ARCH 593 Sustainable Paradigms, ARCH 594 Urban Ecology,
ARCH 533 Detailing the High-performance Envelope, ARCH
535 Introduction to Proactive Simulation, ARCH 536 Special
Topics in Sustainable Design.
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Urban Design: ARCH 572 Urban Design Theory, ARCH 594
Urban Ecology, ARCH 524 Evolution of Urban Form, ARCH
529 History of Landscape Architecture, ARCH 561 Landscape
Architecture, HP 682L Preservation Planning Workshop,
ARCH 537 Special Topics in Urban Design.
Digital Media: ARCH 587 Advanced Computer Applications
in Design, ARCH 586 Processing, ARCH 588 Digital
Manufacturing, ARCH 589 4-D (Four Dimensional), ARCH
535 Intro to Proactive Simulation, ARCH 538 Special Topics in
Digital Media.
Historic Preservation: HP 501 Fundamentals of Historic
Preservation, HP 502 Preservation Planning, HP 503 Principles
of Architectural Conservation, HP 525 Preservation Economics,
HP 530 Special Topics in Historic Preservation, HP 681L
Historic Rehabilitation Workshop, HP 582L Architectural
Conservation, HP 526 Preservation Law and Regulation, HP
682L Preservation Planning Workshop.
Core MSc in Architecture courses: ARCH 606 Field Research
Seminar, ARCH 616 Collaborative Workshop. Misc.
Graduate Architecture Electives: AAH 560 The Newport
Seminar, ARCH 574 Regionalism in Architecture, ARCH 581
Construction Contract Documents, ARCH 530 Special Topics
in Architecture.
Electives
Completion of two electives outside of the major is required for
graduation. Students are advised to apply one of these electives
to expand the University Core Concentration into a minor.
Students are free to choose from the University’s course
offerings to satisfy this requirement. Prerequisites for MATH
136 Precalculus (MATH 117 College Algebra) and prerequisites
for WTNG 102 Expository Writing (WTNG 100 Introduction
to Academic Writing) will not count as electives toward the
Bachelor of Science/Master of Architecture degree sequence.
Architecture Minor
Students wishing to explore the ideas and forms associated
with architecture, yet not wishing to embark on the major, may
elect to minor in this discipline.
ARCH
ARCH
AAH
101
Foundations of Architecture
113-114 Architectural Design Core Studio I and II
121-122 History of Art and Architecture I and II
Art and Architectural History
Roger Williams University offers an undergraduate Bachelor
of Arts in Art and Architectural History degree, along with
a Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts in Art and Architectural
History 4+1 Degree Program. A Master of Arts in Art and
Architectural History of one year duration is available
to students holding an undergraduate degree in historic
preservation, and of two year duration for those who have
completed an undergraduate degree in another field.
Mission Statement
The Art and Architectural History curriculum provides
students with a comprehensive background for
understanding both the visual arts and architecture in
relation to society, culture, and history. The program
employs a multidisciplinary approach to visual culture,
drawing from the programs within the School or
Architecture, Art, and Historic Preservation as well as from
subject areas of anthropology, psychology, philosophy, and
cultural studies. The synergy between these disciplines
promotes awareness of the interconnectedness of the arts
and of the close connection of materials and process with
meaning. In addition to its focus on the built environment,
the Art and Architectural History program provides an
opportunity for students to study the philosophical,
aesthetic, and social meanings of many other kinds of
visual cultural products throughout history and to develop
the intellectual tools necessary to engage in analytical and
critical study of works of art and architecture. The program
prepares students to pursue an academic or professional
career within the field.
The program makes use of the rich museum and gallery
environment of the region for course work as well as for
student internships. Art and Architectural History courses
offered through the Roger Williams University Florence
Study Abroad Program are an exciting and valuable option
in completing the major. Students majoring in Art and
Architectural History are also encouraged to take those courses
relevant to the history of cultures offered in the Feinstein
College of Arts and Sciences.
The Art and Architectural History major is
complementary to others offered in the School. Compact
major requirements also allow students to easily complete
a double major in any number of liberal arts fields, or
certification program in Elementary or Secondary Education.
The program prepares students for graduate study in Art
and Architectural History, Museum Studies, Education, and
careers in teaching, museum work, art conservation or the
commercial art world.
Bachelor of Arts in Art and Architectural History
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The program leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Art and
Architectural History is a 12-course, 36-credit major. The
courses build upon a two-course introductory sequence, a
seven-course intermediate level, two advanced seminars and
a senior seminar or thesis. This flexible program is tailored to
the particular interests and goals of each student who may,
beginning at the intermediate level, develop a six-course
concentration in either Art History or Architectural History.
Introductory Courses
AAH
121-122 History of Art and Architecture I-II
Intermediate Courses
AAH
305
Theory and Methods of Art and
Architectural History
And six from the following menu of options
AAH
311
History of American Art
AAH
312
History of Modern Art
AAH
313
Arts and Architecture of Africa
AAH
317
Giotto to Leonardo
AAH
318
Michelangelo to Vasari
AAH
319
History of Italian Renaissance Art
AAH 320
The Art of Buon Fresco
137
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
AAH
321
Art and Architecture in the Classical World
AAH
322
Art and Architecture in the Medieval World
AAH
323
Art and Architecture in the Islamic World
ARCH 324
Evolution of Urban Form
ARCH 325
History of Modern Architecture
ARCH 327
History of American Architecture
ARCH 328
Renaissance Architecture in Perspective
ARCH 329
History of Landscape Architecture
AAH
330
Topics in Art and Architectural History
HP
341
Pre-industrial America
HP
342
Industrial America
Advanced Seminars
Three of the following:
AAH
421
Issues in Contemporary Art
AAH
430
Special Topics in Art and
Architectural History
ARCH 478
Dutch Architecture: An Enduring 20th
Century Legacy
AAH
523
Nature and Art
AAH
530
Special Topics in Art and
Architectural History
AAH
560
The Newport Seminar
ARCH 573
Modernism in the Non-Western World
ARCH 575
Contemporary Asian Architecture
and Urbanism
ARCH 576
Theoretical Origins of Modernism
ARCH 577
The American Skyscraper
400 level courses in Art and Architectural History from the
Institute for Fine and Liberal Arts of the Palazzo Rucellai.
or
AAH
450
Senior Thesis
Optional Concentration
Students may elect to pursue a six-course concentration from
the intermediate courses and advanced seminars in either Art
History or Architectural History.
Art History Concentration: six from AAH 311, AAH 312, AAH
313, AAH 317, AAH 318, AAH 319, AAH 321, AAH 322, AAH
323, AAH 330 (relevant topics), AAH 421, AAH 423, AAH 430
(relevant topics)
Architectural History Concentration: six from ARCH 324,
ARCH 325, ARCH 327, ARCH 328, ARCH 329, AAH 321,
AAH 322, AAH 323, AAH 330 (relevant topics), HP 341, HP
342, AAH 423, AAH 430 (relevant topics), ARCH 475, ARCH
530 (relevant topics), ARCH 573, ARCH 575, ARCH 576,
ARCH 577
Bachelor of Arts in Art and Architectural History/
Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History
4+1 Degree Program
Students can expect to complete the degree program sequence
through a program of five and one half or six years of study, though
students may accelerate through winter intersession or summer study.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
For the Bachelor of Arts degree see Undergraduate Degree
Requirements above.
In addition to the undergraduate program, students in the
B.A./M.A. in Art + Architectural History 4+1 program must
138
complete the minimum of 36 RWU credit hours at the graduate
level and an internship through the SAAHP Career Investment
Program. These 500- and 600-level courses include three-credit
classes, a travel course (as an option) of three credits. See
Master of Arts degree requirements below.
All accepted Master’s students will, in conference with
their advisor, develop a personal degree program to include
electives from select, existing graduate-level offerings, as
needed, in SAAHP (art and architectural history, historic
preservation, and architecture) and related graduate programs
in the university.
Students accepted to the Master’s program who do not
have a Bachelor of Arts in art and architectural history will,
in conference with their advisor, develop a customized degree
program to include, as needed, select, existing undergraduatelevel courses that are already part of the B.A. in Art and
Architectural History curriculum and/or university offerings.
Undergraduate coursework or language course work
necessary to meet the graduate degree expectations will not
count toward the Master’s curriculum total. At least 30 graduate
credits must be taken at RWU.
Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Required Courses (3 credits)
AAH505 Art and Architectural History Theory and
Methods Seminar (3 cr.)
Elective Courses (33 credits)
Eleven from the following options:
AAH
520
Themes in World Arts and Architecture
AAH
521
Issues in Contemporary Art
AAH
522
Sacred Spaces
AAH
523
Nature and Art
AAH
530
Special Topics/Travel Course: Arts and
Architecture of Time and Place
AAH
531
Topics in Art and Architecture of the
Classical World
AAH
532
Topics in Art and Architecture of the
Medieval World
AAH
533
Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
and Architecture
AAH
534
Topics in Modern Art and Architecture
AAH
535
Topics in Art and Architecture of the Americas
AAH
536
Topics in Art and Architecture of Africa
AAH
537
Topics in Art and Architecture of Asia
AAH
538
Topics in Art and Architecture of the
Islamic World
AAH
560
The Newport Seminar
AAH650 Thesis
ARCH 573
Modernism in the Non-Western World
ARCH 576
Theoretical Origins of Modernism
ARCH 577
The American Skyscraper
Thesis Option
The thesis represents the culminating intellectual experience
in the Master’s program. This written essay of publishable
quality is produced over two semesters of seminar work in the
Research Methods and Thesis courses with an advisor in the
area of the student’s research interest. The end product will be
evaluated by at least two Graduate Faculty members. Detailed
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
guidelines for this research paper will be provided. Master’s
papers are presented at an end-of year, day-long public seminar
and are accessioned by the University library to form an
archive of collected student scholarly resources.
Course Distribution
All students must fulfill a distribution requirement. At least
one course must be taken in four of the following eight areas
of study with a minimum of one of the four in a region beyond
Europe and the Americas:
Ancient Greek and Roman Art and Architecture
Byzantine and Medieval Art and Architecture
Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture
Modern European Art and Architecture
Art and Architecture of the Americas
Art and Architecture of Africa
Art and Architecture of Asia
Islamic Art and Architecture
Concentration in Art History or Architectural History
For the optional Master’s degree concentration in art history
or in architectural history, students may elect to focus on one
of these two fields of study represented in the department.
They must complete six of their twelve graduate courses in
either Architectural History or Art History. The core course
and thesis requirements are the same as the MA in the more
integrated Master of Arts degree in Arts and Architecture.
Complementary Coursework
With the approval of their advisor, students may take courses
in the culture, literature, history, and philosophy of their
areas of interest. These courses, as well as language courses
and studio art courses do not count towards the degree. In
the second year of full-time study, or final year of part-time
study, students must register for one research methods thesis
course and one thesis seminar in which they work under the
close supervision of a faculty advisor, thus completing the 36
credit requirement.
Foreign Languages
In addition to completing the required course work,
each student must demonstrate mastery of intermediate
level reading proficiency in one foreign language related
to their research interests by completing two courses at
the intermediate level in that language or by equivalent
certification through examination.
Student Internship and Employment
Through the graduate program every student is required to
complete an Internship through the SAAHP Career Investment
Program which provides students with a supervised practical
environment in which to practice professional skills at a
governmental office or agency, nonprofit museum or gallery,
or private arts institution. This experience may lead to future
positions in the field.
4+1 Bachelor of Arts + Master of Arts Threshold Review:
Junior Year Review
Students are required to have achieved and maintained a 2.67
cumulative GPA through the end of the sixth semester in
order to enter directly into the 4+1 Bachelor of Arts/Master
of Arts in Art and Architectural History Degree Program. All
B.A. in Art and Architectural History students are reviewed
for achievement of these standards at this time, and notified
of their eligibility to continue with the 4+1 sequence.
Students must notify the school of their intention to pursue
this 4+1 track.
Students pursuing the 4+1 Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts in
Art and Architectural History degree sequence subsequently
complete all 500-600 level coursework at graduate academic
standards, which include achieving a minimum passing grade of
B- in any 500-600 level course, and a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all
500-600 level courses. Students with Senior Standing and who
have achieved a 2.67 cumulative GPA may register for graduate
coursework with approval of the instructor and the dean.
Graduate Course Grading, GPA and Graduation Requirements
The minimum passing grade in graduate-level courses is a B(2.67). The minimum GPA for M.A. in Art and Architectural
History graduate students is 3.0.
Duration of Study
Full-time students are expected to complete all
requirements for the MA degree in two years. Parttime completion of the MA is also possible; part-time
students typically complete the degree in three to five
years. With careful planning, undergraduate students
or incoming graduate students with advanced standing,
and in consultation with their advisor, can complete the
degree requirements in an accelerated time-frame. For
example, courses may be taken in winter sessions or as the
program develops, in summer mini-mesters, or summer
sessions. The program for all MA candidates is determined
in discussion with the student’s advisor and is a mix of
seminar and lecture courses.
The Art and Architectural History Minor
AAH
121-122 History of Art and Architecture I-II
Two Intermediate Courses from the Art and Architectural
History Major
Two additional courses from the Art and Architectural History
Major, a minimum of one at the 400 level or above.
Historic Preservation
Roger Williams University offers an undergraduate Bachelor of
Science in Historic Preservation degree, along with a Bachelor
of Science/Master of Science in Historic Preservation 4+1
Degree Program. A Master of Science in Historic Preservation
of one year duration is available to students holding an
undergraduate degree in historic preservation, and of two
year duration for those who have completed an undergraduate
degree in another field.
Students gain an understanding of the field in the greater
context of history; the built environment; cooperative
community engagement; work with allied professions; on-site
documentation, archival research, and design; philosophy,
standards and practice. The program introduces research
and documentation, architectural conservation, preservation
planning and heritage management. These are put into practice
through field-based workshops, assignments and internships—
all in partnership with area and national organizations and
firms. In recognition of the multi-disciplinary nature of the
field, historic preservation electives are offered across multiple
academic disciplines.
139
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Bachelor of Science in Historic Preservation
Degree Program
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Undergraduate majors successfully complete all
University Core Curriculum requirements, required
coursework in the major, and sufficient electives to total
a minimum of 120 credits. Students also complete a
non-credit internship to fulfill the University’s Feinstein
Service Learning Requirement.
Major requirements are divided into three program
areas: foundation courses; building styles, technology and
culture; and field training and professional practice. Required
foundation and upper-level courses are available from select
courses throughout the University.
Foundation Courses
ARCH 101
Foundations of Architecture
HIST
151
United States History I: From Colonial
Times to Reconstruction
HIST
152
United States History II: Reconstruction
to the Present
HP
150
Introduction to Historic Preservation
HP
175
Historic Building Documentation
HP
301
Principles of Architectural Conservation
HP
302
Principles of Preservation Planning
Building Styles and Technology
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
AAH
122
History of Art and Architecture II
HP
160
American Buildings in the Western Tradition
HP
341
Pre-Industrial America
HP
342
Industrial America
Field Training and Professional Practice
HP
324L
Archival Research
HP
351
History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
HP
382L
Architectural Conservation Lab
HP
384L
Preservation Planning Lab
HP
525
Preservation Economics
For Honors Students
HP 451 Senior Thesis Project
Bachelor of Science/Master of Science in Historic
Preservation 4+1 Degree Program
The Bachelor of Science/Master of Science in Historic
Preservation 4+1 program, totaling 150 credits, is also available
to qualified applicants.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Bachelor of Science and Master of Science students must
successfully complete all University Core Curriculum
requirements and all B.S./M.S. program requirements totaling
152 credits, a non-credit internship requirement to fulfill the
University’s Feinstein Service Learning Requirement, and a
non-credit internship at the graduate level.
Undergraduate major requirements are divided into three
program areas: foundation courses; building styles, technology
and culture; and field training and professional practice.
Required foundation and upper-level courses are available from
select courses throughout the University.
140
Foundation Courses
ARCH 101
Foundations of Architecture
HIST
151
United States History I: From Colonial
Times to Reconstruction
HIST
152
United States History II: Reconstruction
to the Present
HP
150
Introduction to Historic Preservation
HP
175
Historic Building Documentation
HP
301
Principles of Architectural Conservation
HP
302
Principles of Preservation Planning
Building Styles, Technology and Culture
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
AAH
122
History of Art and Architecture II
HP
160
American Buildings in the Western Tradition
HP
341
Pre-Industrial America
HP
342
Industrial America
Field Training and Professional Practice
HP
324L
Archival Research
HP
351
History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
HP
382L
Architectural Conservation Lab
HP
384L
Preservation Planning Lab
HP
525
Preservation Economics
For Honors Students
HP 451 Senior Thesis Project
Course offerings toward the Master of Science
in Historic Preservation component of the 4+1
Degree Program
Core Courses
HP
501
HP
524L
HP
525
HP
526
HP
542
Fundamentals of Historic Preservation
Archival Research
Preservation Economics
Preservation Law and Regulation
Professional Practices in
Historic Preservation
HP
551
History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
HP
569
Preservation Internship
HP
582L
Architectural Conservation Lab
HP
631
Preservation Graduate Thesis Seminar
HP
681L
Historic Rehabilitation Workshop
HP
682L
Preservation Planning Workshop
HP
651
Graduate Thesis in Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation Electives
In consultation with their advisor, students select three
graduate-level electives from the following:
ARCH ARCH
ARCH
530
542
572
ARCH
573
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
ARCH
576
576
577
581
Special Topics in Architecture (selected topics)
Professional Practice
Urban Design Theory from the Industrial
Revolution to the Present
Modernism in the Non-Western World: A
Comparative Perspective
Regionalism in Architecture
Theoretical Origins in Modernism
The American Skyscraper
Construction Contract Documents
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
ARCH
AAH
593
530
HP
LEAD LEAD
LEAD
530
501
502
503
LEAD
505
LEAD
506
LEAD
LEAD
LEAD
507 509 510 PA
501 PA
502 PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
503 504 505 506 511 512 514 516 Sustainable Paradigms
Special Topics in Art + Architectural
History (selected topics)
Special Topics in Historic Preservation
Leaders and the Leadership Process
Communication Skills for Leadership Roles
Data Management and Analysis for
Organization Leaders
Budgeting and Finance in
Complex Organizations
Human Resource Management for
Organizational Leaders
Strategic Leadership in a Globalized World
Negotiation Strategies
Stakeholders Relations in
Complex Organizations
Foundations of Public Administration:
Legal and Institutional
Foundations of Public
Administration: Theoretical
Quantitative Methods in Public Administration
Public Policy and Program Evaluation
Public Budgeting and Finance
Public Personnel Management
Public Organizations
Intergovernmental Relations
Urban Administration and Management
Grant Writing and Management
4+1 Bachelor of Science + Master of Science
Threshold Review: Junior Year Reviews
Students are required to have achieved and maintained a 2.67
cumulative GPA through the end of the sixth semester in order
to enter directly into the 4+1 Bachelor of Science/Master of
Science in Historic Preservation Degree Program. All B.S. in
Historic Preservation students are reviewed for achievement
of these standards at this time, and notified of their eligibility
to continue with the 4+1 sequence. Students must notify the
school of their intention to pursue this 4+1 track.
Students pursuing the 4+1 Bachelor of Science / Master
of Science in Historic Preservation degree sequence
subsequently complete all 500-600 level coursework at
graduate academic standards, which include achieving a
minimum passing grade of B- in any 500-600 level course,
and a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all 500-600 level courses.
Students with Senior Standing and who have achieved a 2.67
cumulative GPA may register for graduate coursework with
approval of the instructor and the Dean.
Graduate Course Grading, GPA and Graduation Requirements
The minimum passing grade in graduate-level courses is a B(2.67). The minimum GPA for M.S. in Historic Preservation
graduates is a 3.0.
Registration in Courses
Students pursuing the Master of Science in Historic Preservation
who are enrolled in graduate courses may also be enrolled in
undergraduate courses during the same semester. In their first
year and in consultation with the program director, students
in the two-year program select undergraduate and/or graduate
‘bridge’ courses from offerings in historic preservation. With
permission of the Dean, undergraduate students in the program
may take graduate courses that are part of the program.
Historic Preservation Minor
HP
HP
150
351
Introduction to Historic Preservation
History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
Four of the following courses (of which two must be HP 300
level or above):
HP
160
American Buildings in the Western Tradition
HP
175
Historic Building Documentation
HIST
151
United States History I: From Colonial
Times to Reconstruction
HIST
152
United States History II: Reconstruction
to the Present
HP 300/400/500-level courses
AAH
430/530 Special Topics in Art and Architectural
History (selected topics)
ARCH 430/530 Special Topics in Architecture
(selected topics)
Visual Arts Studies
The Visual Arts program at Roger Williams University prepares
students for future careers in the arts with an interdisciplinary spirit
and a global perspective. Uniquely located within a community of
architects, preservationists and historians, the Visual Arts program
plays an active role in bridging the disciplines of the school.
The Visual Arts faculty consists of active artists who share their
experience with students through lively and challenging discussions
and critiques. Media exploration is encouraged throughout the
program and culminates in the creation of a cohesive body of work
that reflects the individual student’s interests.
Emphasis of study is placed on historical as well as
contemporary theories in the arts so that students may better
place their own artwork within a larger context. Balancing
craft and conceptual agility, and new and traditional media,
the Visual Arts program positions graduates to engage in an
increasingly interdisciplinary world.
Degree Requirements
Roger Williams University offers both the Liberal Arts degree
Bachelor of Arts and the Professional degree Bachelor of Fine Arts
in Visual Arts Studies with an opportunity to develop an area of
media concentration within the Professional Degree. Students
pursuing the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Fine Arts in
Visual Arts Studies must satisfy the University Core Curriculum
requirements in addition to the major requirements. Bachelor of
Arts candidates must successfully complete the 17 courses required
for the major as well as sufficient electives to total the 120 credits
necessary for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Majors are encouraged
to apply electives toward a minor or second major. Bachelor of
Fine Arts candidates must successfully complete the 28 courses
required for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Visual Arts students
will have a portfolio of their work reviewed by a faculty committee
at mid-program and again at the end of the program in a Capstone
Review. Senior Visual Arts Studies majors must submit a written
thesis, participate in an exhibition and produce a portfolio of their
work during their last year at the University.
141
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Intersections Program
The Intersections program is an ongoing, weekly seminar,
required of all VARTS majors throughout their college career.
Designed to build a sense of community among the students,
the program provides a forum for lively discussion around
a range of issues in the arts. Lectures, demonstrations,
presentations or round-table discussions with students, faculty
and guest artists stimulate an ongoing dialogue meant to
complement the studio processes of the Visual Arts program.
The mandatory requirement of the Intersections program is
waived for students studying abroad.
Bachelor of Arts Major Program Requirements
Foundation Course Requirements, 4 courses, 12 credits
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
VARTS 231
Foundations of Sculpture
VARTS 261
Foundations of Photography
VARTS 281
Foundations of Painting
Intermediate Studios, 5 courses, 15 credits
The Intermediate Studio sequence is a two-part structure of 2
required courses + 3 intermediate studio options including at
least one advanced studio option. Students complete all five
required + elective studio courses:
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
Students select three (3) elective studios including at least one
VARTS studio course at the 400 level or above:
VARTS
VARTS
VARTS
Drawing The Figure
Renaissance Drawing Techniques
Renaissance Drawing Techniques: The
Human Figure
VARTS 232
Intermediate Concepts in Sculpture
VARTS 241
Introduction to Printmaking
VARTS 282
Oil Painting
VARTS 301
Advanced Drawing: Process and Content
VARTS 330
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 333
Advanced Sculpture: Process and Content
VARTS 351
Intermediate Concepts in Photography
VARTS 352
Advanced Photography: Process and Content
VARTS 362
Film, Video and Animation
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts In Digital Media
VARTS 364
Intermediate Concepts in Film,
Animation and Video
VARTS 381
Painting The Figure
VARTS 382
Renaissance Apprentice Workshop
VARTS 383
The Art of Buon Fresco
VARTS 430 Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 431
Topics in Sculpture
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/Digital Media
VARTS 469
VARTS Coop
VARTS 472
Visual Arts Thesis
VARTS 481
Topics in Painting/Drawing/Printmaking
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Arts
Seminars, 3 courses, 3 credits
VARTS 190
VARTS Intersections I
VARTS 290
VARTS Intersections II
VARTS 390
VARTS Intersections III
142
201
203
204
Advanced Studies, 3 courses, 11 credits
VARTS 471
Visual Arts Professional Practices
VARTS 491
Inter-media Workshop (4 credits)
VARTS 492
Senior Studio (4 credits)
History/Theory, 2 courses, 6 credits
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
AAH
122
History of Art and Architecture II
Bachelor of Fine Arts Major Program Requirements
Foundation Course Requirements, 4 courses, 12 credits
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
VARTS 231
Foundations of Sculpture
VARTS 261
Foundations of Photography
VARTS 281
Foundations of Painting
Intermediate Studios, 12 courses, 36 credits
Students complete twelve required + elective studio courses.
Two Required courses:
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
Concentration and Elective Studios
4 intermediate studios, including at least one advanced studio,
and 5 additional Visual Arts elective studios. To create the
optional media concentration, a sequence of 4 courses must
be in the same media area, i.e.: Film, Animation and Video;
Painting, Drawing and Printmaking; Photography and Digital
Media or Sculpture including at least one VARTS studio course
at the 400 level. Elective studios may be from any of the other
media areas.
Film, Animation and Video
VARTS 362
Film, Animation and Video
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts in Digital Media*
VARTS 364
Intermediate Concepts in Film, Animation
and Video
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/Digital Media*
Painting, Drawing and Printmaking
VARTS 201
Drawing The Figure
VARTS 203
Renaissance Drawing Techniques
VARTS 204
Renaissance Drawing Techniques: The
Human Figure
VARTS 241
Introduction to Printmaking
VARTS 282
Oil Painting
VARTS 301
Advanced Drawing: Process and Content
VARTS 381
Painting The Figure
VARTS 382
Renaissance Apprentice Workshop
VARTS 383
The Art of Buon Fresco
VARTS 481
Topics in Painting/Drawing/Printmaking
Photography and Digital Media
VARTS 351
Intermediate Concepts in Photography
VARTS 352
Advanced Photography: Process and Content
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts in Digital Media*
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/Digital Media*
Sculpture
VARTS 232
Intermediate Concepts in Sculpture
VARTS 333
Advanced Sculpture: Process and Content
VARTS 431
Topics in Sculpture
*May be applied to either the Film, Video and Animation or
Photography and Digital Media Concentrations
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
Additional Intermediate studio options may be applied to
all concentration areas:
VARTS 330
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Art
Seminars, 3 courses, 3 credits
VARTS 190
VARTS Intersections I
VARTS 290
VARTS Intersections II
VARTS 390
VARTS Intersections III
Advanced Studies, 5 courses, 17 credits
VARTS 469
VARTS COOP
VARTS 471
Visual Arts Professional Practices
VARTS 472
Visual Arts Thesis
VARTS 491
Inter Media (4 credits)
VARTS 492
Senior Studio (4 credits)
History/Theory, 5 courses, 15 credits
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
AAH
122
History of Art and Architecture II
Students select 2 History/Theory courses from the
following menu:
AAH
305
Theory and Methods of Art and
Architectural History
AAH
311
American Art
AAH
312
Modern Art
AAH
313
African Art
AAH
315
Art of Buon Fresco
AAH
317
Giotto to Leonardo
AAH
318
Michelangelo to Vasari
AAH
319
History of Italian Renaissance Art
AAH
320
The Art of Buon Fresco
AAH
321
Arts & Arch of the Classical World
AAH
322
Arts & Arch of the Medieval World
AAH
323
Arts+Arch Islamic World
ARCH 324
Evolution of Urban Form
ARCH 325
History of Modern Architecture
ARCH 327
American Architecture
ARCH 328
Renaissance Architecture
ARCH 329
Landscape Arch
AAH
330
Special Topics in Art and
Architectural History
FILM
101
Introduction to Film Studies
HP
341
Pre-Industrial America
HP
342
Industrial America
and:
AAH
421
Issues in Contemporary Art
Visual Arts Studies Minor
Visual Art Studies Minors are available in Concentration areas of
Film, Animation and Video; Painting, Drawing and Printmaking;
Photography and Digital Media and Sculpture. Film, a widely
interdisciplinary subject, is located in both the Communications
Program and the Visual Arts Studies Program. Both programs work
closely together to host a film curriculum that is both diverse and
focused. The Communications program emphasizes film culture and
history. The Visual Arts Studies Program emphasizes film production.
Requirements
Minor in Visual Art Studies: Film, Animation and Video
FILM
101
Introduction to Film Studies
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
VARTS 362
Film, Animation and Video
VARTS 364
Intermediate Concepts in Film, Animation
and Video
and two of the following:
VARTS 330
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts in Digital Media
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/ Digital Media
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Art Studies
COMM 380
Visual Media in Cultural Context
FILM
400
Curation and Festival Production
Minor in Visual Arts Studies: Painting/Drawing/Printmaking
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
VARTS 281
Foundations of Painting
and three of the following:
VARTS 201
Drawing The Figure
VARTS 241
Introduction to Printmaking
VARTS 282
Oil Painting
VARTS 301
Advanced Drawing: Process and Content
VARTS 330
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 381
Painting The Figure
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 481
Topics in Painting/Drawing/Printmaking
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Arts Studies
Minor in Visual Arts Studies: Sculpture
VARTS 101
Foundations of Drawing
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
VARTS 231
Foundations of Sculpture
and three of the following:
VARTS 232
Intermediate Concepts in Sculpture
VARTS 330
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 333
Advanced Sculpture: Process and Content
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics In Visual Art
VARTS 431
Topics in Sculpture
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Arts Studies
Minor in Visual Arts Studies: Photography/Digital Media
AAH
121
History of Art and Architecture I
VARTS 261
Foundations of Photography
VARTS 361
Introduction to Digital Media
and three of the following:
VARTS 330
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 351
Intermediate Concepts in Photography
VARTS 352
Advanced Photography: Process and Content
VARTS 363
Intermediate Concepts in Digital Media
VARTS 392
Mixed Media
VARTS 430
Special Topics in Visual Art
VARTS 451
Topics in Photography/ Digital Media
VARTS 530
Special Topics in Visual Arts Studies
143
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
Mission Statement
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business Faculty
In the liberal arts tradition, the Mario J. Gabelli School of
Business strives to develop independent thinkers, educated in
theory and practice, with an appreciation of global perspectives
who can communicate effectively, work in teams, and solve
problems in an ethical manner.
The faculty is composed of experienced academics and
professionals serving as experts to business enterprises,
government agencies and not-for-profit organizations. Dedicated
educators who have contributed to knowledge about business
theory and practice, they have authored papers in academic and
business practitioner publications and engage in scholarship
and professional development activities. Their practitioner
experiences contribute to and enhance classroom learning.
Administration:
Susan M. McTiernan, Ph.D., Dean
Edward C. Strong, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Associate
Professor of Marketing
Barbara L. Grota, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor
of Management
Professors:
Richard Bernardi, Accounting; Susan Bosco, Management; Lana
K. Brackett, Marketing; Mark Brickley, Computer Information
Systems; Benjamin N. Carr, Marketing; Alan Cutting, Computer
Information Systems; Jerry W. Dauterive, Economics; Diane M.
Harvey, Management; Maria Kula, Economics; Thomas Langdon,
Business Law; Brett McKenzie, Computer Information Systems;
David E. Melchar, Management; Michael Melton, Finance;
Kathleen S. Micken, Marketing; Priniti Panday, Economics;
Ferd Schroth, Computer Information Systems; Minoo Tehrani,
International Business and Management
Associate Professors:
Matthew Gregg, Economics; Rupayan Gupta, Economics;
Thomas Lonardo, Business Law; Scott P. Mackey, Finance;
John McQuilkin, Accounting; Robert Rambo, Accounting;
Lynn Ruggieri, Accounting; Elizabeth Volpe, Management;
Miao Zhao, Marketing
Assistant Professors:
Steven Andrews, Marketing; Farbod Farhadi, Management;
Sara Shirley, Finance; Mark Wu, Finance
Overview
The Mario J. Gabelli School of Business offers seven
business majors, each leading to a Bachelor of Science
degree: accounting, business law (3+3), economics, finance,
international business, management and marketing. The
business majors are accredited by AACSB International –
The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.
In addition, allied majors are offered in web development
and economics (BA). Minor programs of study are offered
in accounting, business, eBusiness, economics, finance,
management, marketing and web development.
The Mario J. Gabelli School of Business was named in
honor of Mario J. Gabelli, Wall Street investor and founder
of The Gabelli Funds, Inc., of Rye, N.Y in October 1995. Mr.
Gabelli is a member of the University’s Board of Trustees.
Classes in the Mario J. Gabelli School of Business facilitate
student learning through close and continuing interaction
with faculty. The faculty conducts classes using a variety of
pedagogical approaches: lecture, the Socratic (dialectical)
method, case analysis and discussion, team projects, executive
lectures, and student presentations. Faculty also provide
academic and career advising.
Opportunities for semester-long internships and the Small
Business Institute enable students to work with organizations
where they apply classroom learning to business situations and
gain practical experience. Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
students participate in a wide variety of learning opportunities
including company tours, visits to financial institutions, and
semester abroad programs.
The student business fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi, is a
co-educational, professional organization that fosters the study
of business and encourages scholarship and social activity.
The fraternity invites business leaders to speak on campus,
performs community service activities, and is represented
at regional and national fraternity conventions. Outstanding
junior and senior business scholars may be inducted into Beta
Gamma Sigma, the business honor society.
Facilities
The Mario J. Gabelli School of Business is housed in its own
building. Faculty offices, classrooms and computer labs are
located throughout the building; administrative offices can
be found on the first floor. The Robert F. Stoico FirstFed
Financial Services Center, a high-tech classroom/trading
room, is located near the building’s main entrance, and
available to all Gabelli students. The University maintains
state-of-the-art computing labs.
Special Academic Regulations
1. Graduation GPA Requirement: In addition to meeting
the overall University GPA of 2.0 required for graduation,
students majoring in one of the areas offered by the Mario
J. Gabelli School of Business must earn a cumulative GPA
of 2.0 in all Business Core courses and all courses taken in
Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Economics,
Finance, Management, and Marketing.
2. Restrictions for non-majors and non-minors: Students who
have not formally declared a major or minor in the Mario
J. Gabelli School of Business may only register for 100
or 200 level courses offered by the School. Exceptions to
this restriction are made for students who have formally
declared a major or minor which requires 300+ level
business courses.
3. Internal Transfer Policy: Students who are formally
admitted to Roger Williams University, but who have
declared a major other than one of the business majors
(Accounting, Economics (BS), Finance, International
145
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
Business, Management or Marketing) offered by the
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business or who have not yet
declared a major are welcome to apply. You must be
an enrolled Roger Williams University student in good
academic standing to be eligible for transfer to the School
of Business. The Mario J. Gabelli School of Business has
a selective internal transfer admission policy. A School
faculty committee reviews each application for evidence of
strong, consistent academic performance.
There are two admissions cycles each year as shown in the
table below:
CYCLE DEADLINE
NOTIFICATIONEFFECTIVE
Fall
1 December
15 January
Spring
Spring 1 May
15 June
Fall
Applicants are encouraged to take the following courses prior
to or during the semester they submit their application:
1. MATH 141, Finite Mathematics and/or MATH 124, Statistics
2. WTNG 102, Expository Writing
3. BUSN 100, Enterprise
4. ECON 102, Principles of Microeconomics, and/or ECON
101, Principles of Macroeconomics
5. CIS 102, Computer Applications in Business, and/or CIS
105, Spreadsheets, Database & Project Management
The Mario J. Gabelli School accepts students with strong
academic records and good recommendations, but may need to
deny admission because of enrollment limitations: The school
reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant.
The admissions decision may be positive (admission
granted), negative (admission denied), or, in a limited number
of instances, recommend reapplication. In the case of a
recommendation to reapply, the admissions decision letter will
spell out the steps the applicant should take to reinforce his
candidacy (e.g., take an additional business course or courses).
Application forms for transfer to a major in Accounting,
Economics (BS), Finance, International Business,
Management, or Marketing in the Mario J. Gabelli School of
Business are available in the Dean’s Suite, Room 109, School of
Business, or online at the school’s web site.
Course of Study
The common requirements for graduation with the Bachelor
of Science degree for all business majors include completion
of the Business Core requirements, the University Core
requirements and open electives as follows:
I. University Core Curriculum requirements: the fivecourse interdisciplinary Core (Core 101 - 105), three
skills courses (Business majors take MATH 141 or MATH
207 or an equivalent, WTNG 102, and WTNG 220)
the Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar, and a Core
Concentration of the student’s choice.
II. Business Core requirements (14 courses)
ACCTG 201
Accounting I: Financial
ACCTG 202
Accounting II: Managerial
BUSN100 Enterprise
BUSN
305
Legal Environment of Business I
CIS
102
Computer Applications in Business
CIS
105
Spreadsheets, Database and
Project Management
146
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
FNCE
301
Financial Management
MATH 124
Basic Statistics
MGMT 200
Management Principles
MGMT 330
Operations Management
MGMT 499
Business Policy
MRKT 200
Marketing Principles
III. International Dimension Course
In order to insure that School of Business graduates have
taken coursework focusing on the global business environment,
all business majors are required to take at least one of the
following courses:
ECON 330
Economics of Developing Countries
ECON 340
Economic Growth
ECON 350
International Trade
ECON 360
International Macroeconomics
FNCE
360
International Finance
IB
301
International Business: European Union
MGMT 340
International Management
MGMT 355
International Organizational Behavior
MRKT 340
International Marketing
This requirement is waived for students who have had a studyabroad experience for which the student earned 3 or more
college-level credit hours.
IV. All course requirements for at least one major - see listing
for each major on following pages.
V. Electives: A sufficient number of electives to bring the
total number of credit hours to at least 120. Students
are encouraged to apply electives toward a minor or a
second major.
The Accounting Major
The accounting major prepares students to become professional
accountants and begin careers in large or small businesses,
public accounting, government or private practice. The
accounting program has a practical orientation, and accounting
majors examine, in depth, the contemporary accounting
systems that are used to fulfill the information needs of
shareholders, managers, taxing authorities and others. All
accounting majors gain hands-on, real-world accounting
experience as interns. Accounting majors are encouraged to
pursue one or more professional accounting certificates (CPA,
CMA, CFM, CIA, CFE) after graduation.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to satisfying all University Core Curriculum and
Business Core requirements, accounting majors must complete
the following courses:
ACCTG 204
Cost Accounting
ACCTG 304
Intermediate Accounting I
ACCTG 305
Intermediate Accounting II
ACCTG 308
Federal Income Tax I: Individual
ACCTG 309
Federal Income Tax II: Partnerships and
Corporations
ACCTG405
Auditing
ACCTG 406
Advanced Accounting
ACCTG 469
COOP in Accounting
One 300/400 level Accounting (ACCTG) elective
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
The Economics Major
The International Business Major
A degree in economics enables students to deepen their
understanding of the national and world economies as
well as to develop economic analysis skills for careers in
business, banking, investments, law, and government. The
School of Business offers the choice of a BA degree or a BS
degree in Economics. The B.A. program (Liberal Arts track)
offers students the methodology and analytical techniques
appropriate for graduate work in economics and related
professions such as public administration, and law. It provides
a foundation for research and analysis in academic and
government institutions.
The B.S. program (Business track) is oriented toward
the techniques and background appropriate for the business
world. It prepares students for graduate work in Business
(M.B.A.) and economic analysis within the business
community. Students pursuing the B.S. program will
complete all core business classes in management, marketing,
accounting, and finance.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Both the BA and BS Economics majors must complete the
University Core Curriculum requirements, with WTNG 220
as their second WTNG course; both programs require two
mathematics courses (1) MATH 141 or equivalent and (2)
MATH 124.
The international business major’s vision is to prepare
students to become global business experts with cuttingedge expertise and knowledge for successful careers in
international business. Our mission is to provide students
with a unique curriculum in combination with applied skills
and a focus on the European Union marketplace as the largest
trade partner of the U.S.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum and
Business Core requirements, international business majors
must complete the following:
Required Courses
MRKT 340
International Marketing
MGMT 340
International Management
FNCE 360
International Finance
One of the following
ECON 330
Economics of Developing Countries
ECON 340
Economic Growth
ECON 350
International Trade
ECON 360
International Macroeconomics
The BS Program (Business Track) major requires students
to complete all courses in the Business Core, ECON
201, ECON 202 and ECON 303, and five 300-400 level
Economics electives.
The BA Program (Liberal Arts Track) major requires students
to complete ECON 101, ECON 102, ECON 201, ECON 202,
ECON 303, and five 300-400 level Economics electives.
Students following this track are encouraged to adopt a second
major or otherwise focus their open electives.
The Finance Major
This major will prepare students for a variety of positions in the
finance industry, including positions in insurance companies,
mutual fund firms, investment companies, brokerage houses,
and banks.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum and
Business Core requirements, finance majors must complete the
following courses:
FNCE
305
Risk Management and Insurance
FNCE
325
Principles of Investments
FNCE
360
International Finance
FNCE 401
Advanced Financial Management
Four 300/400 level Finance (FNCE) electives
FNCE majors may select one of the following courses to satisfy
one of the 4 required FNCE electives:
ECON 201
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON 202
Intermediate Microeconomics
ECON 303
Introduction to Econometrics
ACCTG 304
Intermediate Accounting I
Participation in a Roger Williams University Exchange/Summer
Program or IB 469 COOP in International Business
Elective Courses
A total of four additional courses must be completed.
(a) Three courses in subjects related to the European Union.
Specific courses fulfilling this requirement include:
IB 250
International Business: European Union
IB
303
Business in Emerging Markets
IB
306
International Business and Trade Disputes
IB
450
Multinational Corporations: European Union
IB
430
Special Topics (Studies in European Union)
(b) One course focusing on diversity or international topics.
Specific courses fulfilling this requirement include:
ANTH 356
World Cultures
COMM 250
Intercultural Communication
COMM 330
International Communication
FREN
220
Perspectives on Culture: The French
GER
220
Perspectives on Culture: The Germans
HIST
281
A Survey of East Asian History
HIST
281
Modern East Asian History
HIST
282
A Survey of Modern African History
ITAL
220
Perspectives on Culture: The Italians
POLSC 221
Comparative Politics in the Third World
POLSC 335
International Negotiation
POLSC 346
Foreign Policies of Russia and China
POLSC 348
Rogue States, Allies, Regional Powers
POLSC 386
International Law and Organization
POLSC 326
Post-Communist World
POLSC 428
Mexican Politics
POLSC 429
Cultures in Contact: Mexico Today
POR
220
Perspectives on Culture: The Portuguese
SOC
330
Globalization and Identity
SPN
220
Perspectives on Culture: The Spanish
Language Requirement
International Business majors are required to have competency
in a language other than English. Students may fulfill the
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Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
language requirement of the International Business Major
through one of the following methods:
a. Complete the requirements for a Core Concentration
in Language
b. Five language courses in one language (students prepared
for study at an advanced level are required to take three
courses, of which at least one is at the 300 level)
c. Demonstrated language proficiency as determined by
Department of Modern Languages, Philosophy, & Culture
d. Participate in an RWU Study Abroad Program which
has a foreign language immersion component. Students
participating in an RWU Study Abroad Program taking
language courses are required to obtain the approval of the
Department of Modern Languages, Philosophy, & Classics
before departure in order to select this option.
The Management Major
The Management program graduates students who view the
problems of enterprise management from a broad perspective
and who are sensitive to the impact that management decisions
have throughout an organization. The program integrates
courses from all critical functional areas. Graduates pursue
careers in a vast array of business organizations, large and
small, including their own entrepreneurial ventures.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum
and Business Core requirements, management majors must
complete the following courses:
MGMT 302
Organizational Behavior
MGMT 310
Human Resource Management
MGMT 469
Management Coop
Management Electives
four courses (any Management
(MGMT) courses, exclusive of
Business Core requirements)
Business/Non-Business
Electives
two courses (any ACCTG, BUSN,
FNCE, IB, MGMT or MRKT
course, exclusive of Business Core
requirements or any other course)
The Marketing Major
The Marketing major focuses on the many aspects of
marketing and the ways in which organizations administer
and control their resources to achieve marketing objectives.
Courses emphasize the dynamic nature of marketing in
a global economy and the need for organizations to be
consumer oriented.
Students are encouraged to register for at least one
marketing internship as part of their elective courses.
Internships and special topics courses may be repeated for
additional academic credit.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum and
Business Core requirements, marketing majors must complete
one of the following two tracks: Marketing Communications or
Marketing Analysis.
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Marketing Communication Track
MRKT 301
Advertising Principles
and
one of the following four courses:
MRKT 302
Advertising Campaigns
MRKT 360
Marketing on the Web (cross-listed as
CIS 360)
MRKT 402
Advertising Campaigns Practicum
MRKT 469
Marketing Internship
One of the following:
MRKT 401 Advertising Campaigns Research
MRKT 402
Advertising Campaigns Practicum
MRKT 420
Marketing Seminar
MRKT 469 Marketing Internship
BUSN 435
Small Business Institute
A Marketing Independent Study
Any four of the following:
MRKT and 300- or 400-level MRKT courses
CIS 350 Geographic Analysis of Data
IB 469 International Business Internship
BUSN
408 Business Ethics
BUSN
435 Small Business Institute
* Please note: Because the content varies each time, students
may count MRKT 469 Marketing Internship, MRKT 430
Special Topics, and Independent Studies multiple times as
MRKT Electives.
Marketing Analysis Track
MRKT 305
Marketing Research
and
MRKT 315
Qualitative Marketing Research
or
MRKT 401
Advertising Campaigns Research
One of the following:
MRKT 401 Advertising Campaigns Research
MRKT 402
Advertising Campaigns Practicum
MRKT 420
Marketing Seminar
MRKT 469 Marketing Internship
BUSN 435
Small Business Institute
A Marketing Independent study
Any four of the following:
Any 300 or 400 level MRKT courses
CIS 350 Geographic Analysis of Data
IB 469 International Business Internship
BUSN
408 Business Ethics
BUSN
435 Small Business Institute
* Please note: Because the content varies each time, students
may count MRKT 469 Marketing Internship, MRKT 430
Special Topics, and Independent Studies multiple times as
MRKT Electives.
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
The Web Development Major
The Web Development program is hands-on and project-based.
In our program students begin working on actual projects for
real clients in their sophomore year. This learning approach
not only provides a more natural and exciting learning
environment, it ensures that graduates have the knowledge
and expertise needed along with the “people skills” that often
define success in the real world. Students graduate with a
portfolio representing three years of real projects they have
completed for actual clients.
Web Development majors at Roger Williams University
learn how to develop Web sites using traditional as well as
cutting edge (Web 2.0) tools and techniques. Our projects
emphasize applying those techniques to solve real world
problems and create real world opportunities. The principles of
Responsive Web Design (RWD) are followed to create sites and
applications for mobile as well as wide screen displays. Search
engine optimization (SEO) and social media techniques are
used to maximize site traffic and Web analytics are employed
to measure and optimize the effectiveness of client websites.
In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum
requirements, Web Development majors must complete eight
CIS courses (three of which are electives) and at least two
courses from a list of options. Students must also elect to
complete a minor in one of the following areas: Marketing,
Business, Management, Economics, Accounting, Finance; or
complete a second major in any area.
Required Courses:
CIS
102 Computer Applications in Business
CIS
200 Introduction to Computer Programming:
Animation and Games
CIS
206 Introduction to Web Development
CIS 299 Web Development Center I
(3) CIS Electives at the 300 or 400 level.
CIS
469
Web Development Internship
At least two (2) of the following:
(*Courses marked with an asterisk have prerequisites)
* COMM 111 Writing for the Mass Media
COMM 165 Introduction to Visual Communication
* COMM 240 Electronic Communication: Technology,
Modes and Methods
* DSGN 110 Introduction to Typography
* DSGN 300 Web Design Communication
* JOUR 315 Introduction to Photojournalism
* JOUR 355 Digital Journalism I
MRKT 200 Marketing Principles
* MRKT 360 Marketing on the Web
MRKT 401 Advertising Campaigns Research
MRKT 402 Advertising Campaigns Practicum
VARTS 261 Foundations of Photography
VARTS 361 Introduction to Digital Media
1 or 2 CIS Elective(s) at the 300 or 400 level
Three-Plus-Three Business Law Program
The Three-Plus-Three Business Law Program is jointly
sponsored by the Mario J. Gabelli School of Business and
the Roger Williams University School of Law allowing
outstanding students to complete all requirements for
both a baccalaureate degree in business administration
and the Juris Doctor Degree in six years, as opposed to the
traditional seven-year period of study. The modified course
of study for the Three-Plus-Three Business Law Program
student continues to preserve the distinctive hallmarks
of Roger Williams University’s liberal arts approach to
education. The program requires students to declare
Business as their primary undergraduate major, and to take
the core business school courses common to all business
majors at the Mario J. Gabelli School of Business. Instead
of choosing a specific business discipline as a major and
taking business courses within that field, the student can
substitute first year law school courses and commit to take
law school electives in business related areas to meet major
and elective requirements.
Selection for the Three-Plus-Three Program
Students who are accepted into the Mario J. Gabelli School of
Business may apply for the Three-Plus-Three (3+3) program
during their third semester. Applications to participate in the
Program will be considered based on superior academic records
including performance on the SAT examination, secondary
school graduating class rank and scholastic achievement during
the student’s first two years at Roger Williams University. The
application includes the following:
a. a personal statement of the applicant expressing interest in
the Program and explaining scholastic achievement to date
as an undergraduate at RWU;
b. a signed statement by the applicant indicating that he or
she presents no serious character or fitness issues that
would prevent admission to the Three-Plus-Three Program
or admission to the School of Law;
c. a copy of the applicant’s high school transcript with
documentation stating the applicant’s SAT score and
secondary school graduating class rank; and
d. a current transcript of undergraduate courses completed.
During their third semester, interested students will be
required to submit an essay describing how their proposed
core concentration will fit into their overall plan of study and
how that core concentration will assist them in preparing for
graduate legal education.
Admission into the undergraduate component of the
Program will be determined by the University Pre-Law Advisory
Committee with the advice of representatives from the Mario
J. Gabelli School of Business, including the Mario J. Gabelli
School of Business Pre-Law Advisor. Transfer students who
have completed prior study at another higher education
institution are not eligible to apply to the Three-Plus-Three
Business Law program.
Satisfactory Progress in “Three-Plus-Three” Program
Roger Williams University undergraduate students admitted
into the Three-Plus-Three Program must demonstrate
superior academic performance in order to remain in good
standing in the Program. That performance must meet the
following criteria:
a. Achieve a minimum grade of B- in the following courses:
ECON 101, ECON 102, WTNG 102, WTNG 220, CORE
102, and CORE 104;
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Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
b. At the end of the sophomore year, students must have
earned a minimum of 56 credits with at least at 3.5
cumulative grade point average and must present no
serious character and fitness issues;
c. At the end of the junior year, students must have
earned a minimum of 90 credits, with at least a 3.5
cumulative grade point average, must have satisfied all
requirements of the Modified Undergraduate Course
of Study for the Program, must have taken the LSAT
during their junior year and, must present no serious
character and fitness issues.
Failure to maintain these criteria will result in the
inability to apply for, or result in the automatic removal
from the Program.
During their third year, students accepted into the ThreePlus-Three Business Law program are required to take three
undergraduate business electives. In selecting these courses,
students may use one of the following strategies:
1) Focus in one discipline
a) Take three 300-400 level courses in a single
functional area
b) The student would be responsible for any
prerequisites required by these courses.
2) Focus in International Business
a) Take the following courses which focus on
international business
i) MGMT 340
ii) MRKT 340
iii) FNCE 360
3) General Business
a) Take three 300-400 level courses in two or three
functional business areas.
b) Courses must be selected to fulfill a specific purpose,
such as industrial or career focus.
Students following the B.S./J.D. program will be
considered candidates for the B.S. degree following the
completion of the first year in law; i.e., the fourth year
of the program. Such candidates for the B.S. must file an
application for degree with the University Registrar before
registering for their fourth-year courses (first year Law
School courses).
Acceptance into Roger Williams University School of Law
Students enrolled in the Program must apply to the
School of Law during the fall of their junior year. It is
recommended that they sit for the LSAT during the
October administration but no later than the December
LSAT test administration of that year. Students enrolled in
the Program who satisfy all undergraduate requirements,
who achieve an LSAT score that is at or above the School
of Law’s median accepted score for the previous year, and
who present no serious character and fitness issues will
be guaranteed admission to the Roger Williams University
School of Law.
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Minors
The Accounting Minor
The Accounting minor is a specialized concentration
in the technical area of accounting. After gaining
competence in the fundamentals of financial accounting
and financial management, students can select from
a variety of elective courses that focus either on the
accounting information used in external reports to
shareholders or the accounting information used to
facilitate decision making within organizations.
Requirements
ACCTG 201
Accounting I: Financial
ACCTG 202
Accounting II: Managerial
FNCE
301
Financial Management
And three Accounting (ACCTG) electives
The Arts Management Minor
The Arts Management Minor is a multi-disciplinary
minor designed for art majors or business students who
are interested in a possible career in support of the arts.
Students from the arts programs would be introduced to
financial management of arts organizations, technology
applications, business management, and marketing. Students
with a business major will meet the arts focus through a core
concentration in the arts (VARTS, MUSIC, DANCE, THEAT,
CREATIVE WRITING or FILM STUDIES MINOR). All
students have the opportunity to apply learning and practice
through an internship or other project-based experience
at an arts organization. The capstone course will engage
all students with practitioners from performing and visual
arts organizations and provide grounding in issues common
to managing any arts institutions from smaller troupes or
galleries to larger civic venues and museums.
Required courses (Non-business majors):
ACCTG 209
Financial Management for the Art
MRKT 200
Marketing Principles
MGMT 200
Principles of Management
CIS
202
Technology for the Arts
COOP 469
Internship
BUSN 401
Arts Management Capstone
Required courses (business majors):
A declared Core Concentration in Visual or Performing Arts,
Creative Writing, or a minor in Film Studies
COOP 469 or BUSN 469 Internship
BUSN 401 Arts Management Capstone
The Business Minor
The Business minor is designed for students majoring in areas
outside the Mario J. Gabelli School of Business who wish to
enhance their academic experience by acquiring business
knowledge and skills. The minor consists of six courses in the
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business. Specifically, students must
complete these courses:
ACCTG 201
Accounting I: Financial
CIS
102
Computer Applications in Business
or
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
CIS
105
ECON101
or
ECON102
MGMT 200
MRKT 200
Spreadsheets, Database and
Project Management
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics
Management Principles
Marketing Principles
The sixth course may be any course offered by the Mario
J. Gabelli School of Business. At least three of the classes
required for the Business minor must be taken at Roger
Williams University.
The eBusiness Minor
The eBusiness minor is a hands-on program designed to
enhance a student’s ability to express ideas and conduct
business using the World Wide Web. Students learn how to
combine communications and marketing theory with Web
building technology and graphic design principles to create
Web sites that engage the visitor and effectively communicate
the intended message.
Requirements: Any six of the following:
CIS 206
Introduction to Web Development
CIS 306
Creating Expressive Websites
CIS 350
Geographic Analysis of Data: An
Introduction to GIS
A CIS elective at the 200-level or above
COMM 101
Introduction to Mass Media
DSGN 100
Introduction to Design Communication
MRKT 200
Marketing Principles
The Economics Minor
The Economics minor familiarizes students with the tools
of economic analysis and their application at the individual,
firm, national, and global levels. Coursework in the minor
emphasizes problem solving and analytical skills. An economics
minor is relevant for students desiring careers in all fields of
business and government and those seeking to further their
education in graduate and professional schools.
Requirements
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
ECON 201
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON 202
Intermediate Microeconomics
and two Economics (ECON) electives at the 300 or 400 level
The Finance Minor
The Finance minor provides students with background in
financial institutions, instruments, markets, and services.
Requirements
FNCE
301
Financial Management (Prerequisites:
MATH 124, MATH 141, ACCTG 201,
ECON 101)
FNCE
325
Principles of Investment
FNCE
360
International Finance
FNCE
401
Advanced Corporate Finance
and two Finance electives
The Management Minor
The marketing minor introduces students to marketing
concepts and the organization, analysis, strategy, tactics, and
resources required to apply that knowledge in profit and nonprofit situations. Six courses are required.
Requirements
MGMT 200
Principles of Management
Five MGMT electives (excluding MGMT 499)
The Marketing Minor
The marketing minor introduces students to marketing
concepts and the organization, analysis, strategy, tactics,
and resources required to apply that knowledge in profit and
non-profit situations. Six courses are required.
MRKT 200
Marketing Principles
and any five of the following:
MRKT any 300 or 400 level MRKT courses
CIS
350
Geographic Analysis of Data
IB
469
International Business Internship
BUSN
408
Business Ethics
BUSN
435
Small Business Institute
The Web Development Minor
The Web Development minor serves as a value-added
component for students whose major is in an area outside web
development. Students gain competence in basic computer
packages (spreadsheets, graphics, database, and programming),
the elements of business conducted via the Web, and select a
subset of the CIS courses that best enhance their education and
their professional prospects.
CIS
102
Computer Applications in Business
CIS
105
Spreadsheets, Database and
Project Management
CIS
206
Introduction to Web Development
and three Computer Information Systems (CIS) electives
Certificates
The Post-Baccalaureate Accounting Certificate
The Post-Baccalaureate Accounting Certificate is designed
for students who have completed an undergraduate degree
in a non-accounting discipline and desire either a career
in accounting or a career in a discipline (e.g. law, finance,
computer information systems) where a strong accounting
background can be advantageous. Courses can be arranged
to provide students with the subjects needed for taking
professional accounting exams such as the CPA (Certified
Public Accountant) and CMA (Certified Management
Accounting) exams. Most students possessing a nonaccounting baccalaureate in a business discipline should
expect to complete the certificate in 10 courses or 30 credit
hours. Students who have not taken introductory accounting
should expect to complete the certificate in 12 courses or 36
credit hours.
Certificate Requirements
• Completion of 150 credit hours of course work.
• Completion of a minimum of 21 post-baccalaureate credit
hours at Roger Williams University.
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Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
•
Completion of a minimum of 21 credit hours in
accounting courses.
• Fulfillment of certificate-required and elective courses.
• Required Course of Study
ACCTG
204
Cost Accounting
ACCTG
304
Intermediate Accounting I
ACCTG
305
Intermediate Accounting II
ACCTG
308
Federal Income Tax I: Individual
ACCTG 405
Auditing
ACCTG
406
Advanced Accounting
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Required Electives
A minimum of four electives must be taken, at least two of
which must be in accounting. Students may take a maximum of
two of the following three law courses:
PLS
221 Law of Contracts
PLS
340 Uniform Commercial Code
BUSN 305 Legal Environment of Business I
All other electives must be courses offered through the Mario J.
Gabelli School of Business.
Mario J. Gabelli School of Business
153
School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
Mission Statement
The mission of the School of Engineering, Computing and
Construction Management is to deliver the highest quality
undergraduate professional educational experience enabling
our graduates to excel in the practice of their professional
discipline or the pursuit of an advanced degree.
School Goals
In order to satisfy the mission, the faculty members of
the School of Engineering, Computing and Construction
Management have identified the following School goals:
• Deliver educational programs that are nationally
accredited, continuously assessed and improved, and
inspire excellence in students, faculty and staff.
• Maintain an atmosphere that enhances education
through student-oriented learning, effective content,
pedagogy and mentorship.
• Develop students who take responsibility for their
education, embrace professional development and develop
a global perspective on their profession.
• Develop a committed and diverse faculty who understand
and apply current and future trends in their disciplines.
• Maintain a work environment in which staff and faculty take
initiative and receive recognition for their achievements.
• Support the mission and core values of Roger
Williams University.
Overview
The School of Engineering, Computing, and Construction
Management (SECCM) offers three majors, each
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree: Computer
Science, Construction Management, and Engineering.
The Engineering major is accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board
for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The American
Council for Construction Education (ACCE) accredits the
Construction Management major.
The academic programs are designed to provide our
graduates with flexibility and competency in the pursuit of
their career goals. The curriculum reflects the needs of today’s
graduates. In today’s work place, successful professionals must
be able to adapt to rapid technological change, communicate
and interact effectively with diverse populations, and unite
post-graduate educational and professional experiences into
future vision. All of our programs incorporate the University
Core Curriculum, which assures students of an extensive and
effective background in the social sciences and humanities.
The Computer Science and Engineering programs augment
this Core with substantial requirements in mathematics, the
physical sciences, engineering science, and engineering design.
The Construction Management program adds a technical
core with courses in mathematics and science, business and
management, computer skills, and construction knowledge.
Even though the programs are highly structured,
some flexibility is possible through elective courses.
This is especially true in the Engineering Program
where, through appropriate elective course selection, a
specialization in civil, computer, electrical, or mechanical
engineering may be earned. In consultation with their
academic advisors, students may also design a Custom
Engineering program.
All three programs encourage students to participate in
an internship experience. Internships may be arranged during
an academic semester or during summer or winter breaks.
The University Career Center helps students find and obtain
intern opportunities.
In the SECCM, students have the opportunity and are
encouraged to belong to the Engineering Student Club and
the Construction Management Student Club. These clubs
maintain an affiliation with several professional societies to
include: the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE);
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME);
the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers
(IEEE); the Construction Management Association of
America (CMAA); the Associated General Contractors of
America (AGCA); the Mechanical Contractors Association
of America (MCAA); Sigma Lambda Chi, the Construction
Management honor society; the United States Green
Building Council (USGBC); and, the Society of Women
Engineers (SWE). These clubs participate in a wide
variety of activities that include student competitions,
community service, and interaction with local professional
organizations. In addition to the educational benefits
and networking opportunities, these clubs provide an
environment in which students interact socially outside of
the classroom with their fellow students and faculty.
Applicants for the SECCM programs should possess a
strong background in mathematics and science. All applicants
should have completed four years of high school mathematics
including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and analytical
geometry or pre-calculus. Two years of science, including
physics, should have been completed.
Facilities
The School of Engineering, Computing and Construction
Management is housed in a building near the center of the
campus. The building is equipped with modern facilities,
including classrooms, seminar and discussion rooms, an
auditorium, engineering and construction laboratories,
computer laboratories and special project rooms.
“Hawkworks”, our remote facility located in downtown
Bristol, provides space for engineering design project
fabrication and laboratory space for construction management
laboratory courses.
School of Engineering, Computing and
Construction Management Faculty
Robert A. Potter, Jr., Dean
Frederick E. Gould, Construction Management Program Coordinator
Linda A. Riley, Engineering Program Coordinator
Anthony S. Ruocco, Computer Science Program Coordinator
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School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
Professors:
Khalid Al-Hamdouni, Janet L. Baldwin, Frederick E. Gould,
Ram S. Gupta, Robert A. Potter, Jr., Linda A. Riley, Anthony S.
Ruocco, Matthew R. Stein
Associate Professors:
Chunyan Bai, Gilbert C. F. Brunnhoeffer, III, Gokhan Çelik,
Amine Ghanem, Charles R. Thomas
Assistant Professors:
Michael J. Emmer, Nicole M. Martino, Benjamin McPheron,
William J. Palm, Charles Thangaraj
Staff:
James Dorothy, Thom Perlmutter, Marygrace Staton
The Computer Science Major
The Computer Science major is designed to prepare students
for either professional employment in the computer science
and programming fields or for graduate study in computer
science. Students receive a thorough grounding in modern
computer science theory and learn how this theory can be
applied to the design of complex software systems.
The curriculum begins with a year-long introduction
to the art and science of computer programming, using the
Java language. This introduces concepts of object-oriented
programming, development and analysis of algorithms, and
principles of software design.
The student’s intermediate years involve the study of
how hardware is constructed and organized, the nature and
development of programming languages, the study of efficient
data structures and algorithms, and the theoretical study of the
computational process. Experience is gained using procedural,
functional, logic, and object-oriented programming languages.
At each stage, appropriate mathematics is used as a method of
describing and reasoning about computing systems.
The student’s final year is devoted to using this foundation
to design and engineer major software projects in areas such as
compiler and operating system design, computer graphics, or
artificial intelligence.
Incorporated into the major is a strong mathematics and
natural science component. Calculus, discrete mathematics,
and probability and statistics form the nucleus of a math
program that earns the graduate a core concentration in
mathematics. The program also includes a minimum of three
semesters of lab-based science. Students may elect to earn a
minor in mathematics (by taking a sixth mathematics course)
or to take a fourth science course.
While rigorous, three free electives permit the student to
pursue an interest in an unrelated discipline. With the addition
of two or three courses, most students would be able to earn a
minor in an additional field.
The Computer Science Program is designed to enable
graduates to anticipate and to respond effectively to the
uncertainties of a changing technological, social, political and
economic world. Specific program educational objectives and
outcomes include:
Program Educational Objectives
During the first few years after graduation, we expect our
graduates to:
156
1. Apply disciplinary knowledge and skill to analyze, design,
implement, and test solutions to applied problems
individually and in diverse teams. Present solutions using
the variety of media that best promotes understanding.
2. Continue to grow intellectually and professionally in the
computing sciences and appreciate the continuous pursuit
of knowledge in other areas of interest.
3. Use knowledge and draw on experiences relevant to
current and emerging needs in computing sciences and
recognize the social, ethical, and cultural impact of
technology in a global setting.
4. Serve as an exemplar and ambassador of the RWU
Computer Science program, strengthening its tradition of
excellence, by becoming active in professional societies and
organizations and by volunteering within your community.
Program Outcomes
We expect our graduating students to possess:
a. an ability to apply knowledge of computing and
mathematics appropriate to the discipline
b. an ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the
computing requirements appropriate to its solution
c. an ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computerbased system, process, component, or program to meet
desired needs
d. an ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a
common goal
e. an understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security
and social issues and responsibilities
f. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
g. an ability to analyze the local and global impact of
computing on individuals, organizations, and society
h. recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in
continuing professional development
i. an ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools
necessary for computing practice
j. an ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic
principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and
design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates
comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices
k. an ability to apply design and development principles in
the construction of software systems of varying complexity
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The major in computer science leads to the Bachelor of Science
degree. Students normally complete a minimum of 121 credits,
including satisfaction of all University Core Curriculum
requirements. The approved outline is as follows:
First Year (14 credits) - Fall
COMSC 110
Introduction to Computer Science I & Lab
(4 credits)
CORE
102
History and the Modern World (3 credits)
MATH 213
Calculus I & Lab (4 credits)
WTNG 102
Expository Writing (3 credits)
First Year (15 credits) - Spring
COMSC 111
Data Structures & Lab (4 credits)
MATH 214
Calculus II & Lab (4 credits)
School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
MATH 221
Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
Science course sequence & lab (first course) (4 credits)
(BIO103 or CHEM191 or PHYS201)
Second Year (17 credits) - Fall
COMSC 210
Principles of Computer Organization &
Lab (4 credits)
COMSC 335
Theory of Computation (3 credits)
CORE
103
Human Behavior in Perspective (3 credits)
WTNG 220
Critical Writing for the Professions (3 credits)
Science course sequence & lab (second course) (4 credits)
(BIO104 or CHEM192 or PHYS202)
Second Year (16 credits) - Spring
COMSC 230
Principles of Programming Languages
(3 credits)
COMSC 340
Analysis of Algorithms (3 credits)
CORE
104
Literature, Philosophy and the Ascent of
Ideas (3 credits)
MATH 315
Probability & Statistics (3 credits)
Additional science course with lab (CORE 101 is not
acceptable) (4 credits)
Third Year (15-16 credits) - Fall
COMM 210
Introduction to Public Speaking (3 credits)
COMSC 330
Software Design (3 credits)
COMSC 420 Principles of Operating Systems (3 credits)
CORE
105
The Artistic Impulse (3 credits)
Specialization Elective (3/4 credits)
Third Year (15-16 credits) - Spring
COMSC 440
Language Translation & Compiler Design
(3 credits)
Specialization Elective (3/4 credits)
Specialization Elective (3/4 credits)
Math Elective
200 Level or above (3/4 credits)
Free Elective
(3 credits)
Fourth Year (15-16 credits) - Fall
COMSC 490
Integrated Senior Design I (3 credits)
CORE
Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
(3 credits)
ENGR 455
Data Communication (3 credits)
Specialization Elective (3/4 credits)
Math Elective
200 Level or above (3/4 credits)
or
Science Elective
(3/4 credits)
Fourth Year (13 credits) - Spring
COMSC 401
Computer Science Senior Seminar (1 credit)
COMSC 492
Integrated Senior Design II (3 credits)
ENGR 465
Network Analysis & Design (3 credits)
Specialization Elective (3/4 credits)
Free Elective
(3 credits)
Total: 120-123 Semester Credits
Computer Science Specializations
The Digital Systems Specialization
The Digital Systems Specialization is only for students majoring
in Computer Science. This specialization is well suited to those
computer science majors who enjoy working with control systems
or with the interaction of software and electronic devices.
Required Courses:
ENGR 270
Digital Systems Design and Lab
And four courses from the following list, three of which must
be above the 300 level
ENGR 240
Circuit Theory and Lab
ENGR 260
Engineering Electronics and Lab
ENGR 424
Digital Systems Processing
ENGR 430
Special Topics in Electrical or Computer
Engineering (with permission of advisor)
ENGR 445
Dynamic Modeling and Control
ENGR 450
Mechatronics
The Custom Program Specialization
The Custom Specialization is only for students majoring in
Computer Science. This specialization is well suited to those
computer science majors who wish as broad an educational
experience as possible. It is also well suited to those who may
wish to focus their electives to pursue a minor in the network
security field. Students interested in a dual major of mathematics
and computer science should consider this specialization.
The student must select five advisor approved courses
from among those courses with COMSC, ENGR, SEC, CIS,
or MATH designations. All must be above the 200-level
and three must be above the 300- level. The mathematics
course(s) a student selects as electives cannot be used to
satisfy the Mathematics Core Concentration requirement or
the MATH/Science requirement.
The Construction Management Major
Construction management represents an industry that
organizes or brings together numerous independent
businesses and trades to create and build. The constructor
works closely with owners, engineers, architects and
sub-contractors throughout the construction process
to assure timely completion of a project. Our program
provides education in technical aspects, such as graphics,
equipment, materials, planning and estimating techniques;
extensive computer applications exposure; and, the
fundamentals of business management techniques. Upon
completion of the plan of study, all students will have also
earned a Minor in Business.
Construction careers are broadly diversified. Graduates
of this program find employment in many parts of the
construction industry, including residential, commercial,
and industrial sectors, as well as infrastructure and
heavy construction. Typical careers include supervising
construction projects, estimating and cost control,
scheduling, and project management.
Roger Williams University is a member of the Associated
Schools of Construction, an organization devoted to the
development and enhancement of construction education.
The Construction Management Program is accredited by the
American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). Specific
program educational objectives and outcomes include:
Program Educational Objectives
During the first few years after graduation, we expect our
graduates to:
157
School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
1. Demonstrate exemplary technical knowledge and skills while
achieving success as a practicing constructor and leader and
always displaying the highest standards of ethical conduct.
2. Value the concept of life-long learning and continue
to grow intellectually while keeping informed of new
concepts and developments in the construction process.
3. Advance the construction management profession by
becoming actively involved in professional associations
and societies, serving in professional and community
volunteer positions, and acting as a role model for the
future generation of constructors and the Roger Williams
University Construction Management students.
Program Outcomes
We expect our graduating students to possess:
a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and science
to typical Construction Management tasks
b. effective research and problem solving skills applied to
typical Construction Management tasks
c. an ability to plan, organize and control a construction project
d. an ability to lead and/or function as a member of a team
e. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
f. an ability to communicate effectively
g. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of
construction in a global, environmental and societal context
h. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in
lifelong learning
i. a knowledge of contemporary issues.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The major in construction management leads to the Bachelor
of Science degree and normally consists of 130 credits,
including satisfaction of all University Core Curriculum
requirements. The approved outline is as follows:
First Year (16 credits) - Fall
CNST
100
Introduction to Construction
Management (3 credits)
CNST
116
Computer Applications for Construction
(3 credits)
CORE
102
History and the Modern World (3 credits)
MATH 136
Pre-Calculus (4 credits)
WTNG 102
Expository Writing (3 credits)
First Year (16 credits) - Spring
CNST
130
Plans, Specifications and Building Codes
(3 credits)
CNST
200
Construction Methods and Materials &
Lab (4 credits)
CORE
103
Human Behavior in Perspective (3 credits)
MATH 207 Applied Calculus (3 credits)
WTNG 220
Critical Writing for the Professions (3 credits)
Second Year (17 credits) - Fall
ACCTG 201
Accounting I: Financial (3 credits)
CHEM 191
Chemistry I & Lab (4 credits)
CNST
201
Advanced Construction Methods and
Materials & Lab (4 credits)
COMM 210
Introduction to Public Speaking (3 credits)
CORE
104
Literature, Philosophy and the Ascent of
Ideas (3 credits)
158
Second Year (16 credits) - Spring
CNST
250
Construction Equipment (3 credits)
CNST
260
Construction Estimating and Scheduling
(3 credits)
CORE
105
The Artistic Impulse (3 credits)
ECON 102
Microeconomics (3 credits)
PHYS
109
Physics I Algebra based and Lab (4 credits)
Third Year (16 credits) - Fall
CNST
302
Surveying and Lab (4 credits)
CNST
321
Advanced Building Estimating (3 credits)
ENGR 210
Engineering Statics (3 credits)
MGMT 200
Management Principles (3 credits)
Core Concentration #1 (3 credits)
Third Year (18 credits) - Spring
CNST
304
Applied Structures (3 credits)
CNST
450
Construction Planning and Scheduling
(3 credits)
CORE
Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
(3 credits)
MATH 124
Basic Statistics (3 credits)
MRKT 200
Marketing Principles (3 credits)
Core Concentration #2 (3 credits)
Fourth Year (16 credits) - Fall
CNST
445
Construction Project Management and
Safety & Lab (4 credits)
CNST
475
Construction Project Control (3 credits)
LS 220 Fundamentals of Contract Law (3 credits)
or
BUSN 305Legal Environment of Business I (3 credits)
Core Concentration #3 (3 credits)
Core Concentration #4 (3 credits)
Fourth Year (15 credits) - Spring
CNST
455
Mechanical/Electrical Design (3 credits)
CNST
480
Capstone Project, Ethics and New
Technology (3 credits)
Construction Management Elective (3 credits)
Business Elective (3 credits)
Core Concentration #5 (3 credits)
Total: 130 Semester Credits
The business elective must be selected from one of the
following courses: ACCTG 304; ENGR 335: FNCE 301:
MGMT 336: and MRKT 335.
The Engineering Major
The purpose of the Engineering major is to develop in students
the necessary knowledge and analytical skills for professional
engineering practice or for successful graduate studies.
The Engineering program is characterized by breadth but
permits study in depth, to include attaining a specialization
in civil, computer, electrical, or mechanical engineering.
The Engineering major also provides for flexibility to address
the unknown challenges of the 21st century. In consultation
with an academic advisor, students may design a Custom
Specialization to prepare for emerging fields not immediately
definable with traditional specializations.
Engineers apply the principles of mathematics and the
laws of natural science to analyze, design, develop and devise
School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
improvements that benefit humanity. The Engineering program
consists of a course of study in mathematics, science, and
engineering fundamentals during the first two years of study.
Students then tailor their program to their own specific needs
by selection, with the assistance of their advisor, of appropriate
elective courses constituting a specialization. The resulting
curriculum is designed to achieve a balance between science
and engineering, to provide an understanding of the economic
and social implications of engineering activity, and to develop
creative talents. This program includes the necessary topics
found on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.
The Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board
for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Specific program
educational objectives and outcomes include:
Program Educational Objectives
During the first few years after graduation, we expect our
graduates to:
1. Possess an inquisitive mind, demonstrate excellence
in technical knowledge and skills, achieve success as a
practicing engineer or graduate student, and apply the
highest ethical standards in all pursuits.
2. Value the concept of, and demonstrate through practice,
activities and actions that contribute to continual
intellectual growth.
3. Advance the engineering profession by becoming actively
involved in professional associations and societies, serving
in professional and community volunteer positions, acting
as a role model for the future generation of engineers, and
assisting the SECCM Engineering Program in achieving its
mission and goals.
Program Outcomes
We expect our graduating students to possess:
a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science,
and engineering
b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to
analyze and interpret data
c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to
meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as
economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health
and safety, manufacturability and sustainability
d. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
e. an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems
f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
g. an ability to communicate effectively
h. an understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in
a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in
lifelong learning
j. a knowledge of contemporary issues
k. an ability to use the techniques, skills and modern
engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The major in Engineering leads to the Bachelor of Science
degree. Students normally complete a minimum of 124 credits,
including satisfaction of all University Core Curriculum
requirements and meeting the requirements of one of the
available Engineering Specializations. The approved outline is
as follows:
First Year (16 credits) - Fall
COMM 210
Introduction to Public Speaking (3 credits)
CORE
102
History and the Modern World (3 credits)
ENGR 110
Engineering Graphics and Design (3 credits)
MATH 213
Calculus I & Lab (4 credits)
WTNG 102
Expository Writing (3 credits)
First Year (17 credits) - Spring
CORE
103
Human Behavior in Perspective (3 credits)
ENGR 115
Computer Applications for Engineering
(3 credits)
MATH 214
Calculus II & Lab (4 credits)
PHYS
201
Physics I & Lab (4 credits)
WTNG 220
Critical Writing for the Professions (3 credits)
Second Year (17 credits) - Fall
CHEM 191
Chemistry I & Lab (4 credits)
CORE
104
Literature, Philosophy and the Ascent of
Ideas (3 credits)
ENGR 210
Engineering Statics (3 credits)
MATH 317
Differential Equations (3 credits)
PHYS
202
Physics II & Lab (4 credits)
Second Year (17 credits) - Spring
CHEM 192
Chemistry II & Lab (4 credits)
CORE
105
The Artistic Impulse (3 credits)
ENGR 220
Engineering Dynamics (3 credits)
ENGR 300
Mechanics of Materials & Lab (4 credits)
MATH 315
Probability & Statistics (3 credits)
Third Year (16-17 credits) - Fall
ENGR 240
Circuit Theory & Lab (4 credits)
ENGR 320
Environmental Engineering (3 credits)
ENGR 330
Thermodynamics (3 credits)
Mathematics elective 300 Level or above (3 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Third Year (13-16 credits) - Spring
ENGR 305
Fluid Mechanics & Lab (4 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Fourth Year (15-17 credits) - Fall
CORE Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar
(3 credits)
ENGR 335
Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credits)
ENGR 490
Engineering Design I (3 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Fourth Year (13 - 16 credits) - Spring
ENGR 401
Engineering Senior Seminar (1 credit)
ENGR 492
Engineering Design II (3 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Engineering Elective (3/4 credits)
Total: 124-133 Semester Credits
Engineering electives must be selected to meet the requirements
of one of the available Engineering Specializations.
159
School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
Mathematics elective requirement excludes the following
courses: MATH 335; MATH 340; MATH 450; and, MATH 451.
The Civil Engineering Specialization
The Civil Engineering Specialization (including focused study
in Structural Engineering and Environmental Engineering) is
only for students majoring in Engineering.
Required Courses:
ENGR 313
Structural Analysis
ENGR 409
Structural Design
ENGR 412
Water Resources Engineering & Lab
ENGR 414
Geotechnical Engineering & Lab
ENGR 415
Water and Wastewater Treatment
ENGR 420
Transportation Engineering
ENGR 430
SpTp: Construction Engineering
and two courses from the following list:
ENGR 405
Air Pollution and Control
ENGR 407
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
ENGR 413
Advanced Structural Analysis
ENGR 430
Special Topics (with permission of advisor)
ARCH 287
Introduction to Computer Applications
in Design
CHEM 201
Environmental Chemistry & Lab
CNST
302
Surveying & Lab
The Computer Engineering Specialization
The Computer Engineering Specialization is only for students
majoring in Engineering.
Required Courses:
COMSC 110 Introduction to Computer Science I & Lab
COMSC 111
Data Structures & Lab
ENGR 260 Engineering Electronics & Lab
ENGR 270 Digital Systems Design & Lab
And five courses from the following list:
COMSC 210 Principles of Computer Organization & Lab
COMSC 230 Principles of Programming Languages
COMSC 340 Analysis of Algorithms
COMSC 420 Principles of Operating Systems
ENGR 424
Digital Systems Processing
ENGR 430 Special Topics (with permission of advisor)
ENGR 450 Mechatronics
The Electrical Engineering Specialization
The Electrical Engineering Specialization is only for students
majoring in Engineering.
Required Courses:
ENGR 260
Engineering Electronics & Lab
ENGR 270
Digital System Design & Lab
ENGR 424
Digital Systems Processing
ENGR 430
SpTp: Electromagnetic Theory
ENGR 445
Dynamic Modeling and Control
And four courses from the following list:
ENGR 340
Sustainable Energy Systems
ENGR 430
Special Topics (with permission of advisor)
ENGR 430
SpTp: Signals and Systems
ENGR 433
Heat Transfer
160
ENGR ENGR ENGR
450
455
465
Mechatronics
Data Communications
Network Analysis and Design
The Mechanical Engineering Specialization
The Mechanical Engineering Specialization is only for students
majoring in Engineering.
Required Courses:
ENGR 310 Material Science
ENGR 332
Machine Design
ENGR 350
Theory and Design of
Mechanical Measurements
ENGR 433
Heat Transfer
ENGR 445 Dynamic Modeling and Control
Select any four courses from the following list:
ENGR 260
Engineering Electronics & Lab
ENGR 340 Sustainable Energy Systems
ENGR 431 Mechanical Vibrations
ENGR 430
SpTp: Acoustics
ENGR 430
SpTp: Finite Element Analysis
ENGR 430 Special Topics (with permission of advisor)
ENGR 442 Biomechanics
ENGR 450 Mechatronics
The Custom Program Specialization
The Custom Program Specialization is only for students
majoring in Engineering.
Nine courses are required, at least five of which are at
the ENGR 300/400-level. A student must form a committee
of three engineering faculty who will review and approve of
the program plan no later than first semester of the student’s
third year.
Minors Offered by the School of Engineering,
Computing and Construction Management
The Computer Science Minor
The Computer Science minor is designed to provide students
with an in-depth familiarization with the computer science
domain. Students will learn high-level programming skills
and the basic theory associated with the discipline. The minor
is well-suited for students majoring in mathematics and
education. Graduates can apply this minor as an underpinning
for exploiting technology as it pertains to their primary degree.
Required Courses:
MATH 221
Discrete Mathematics
COMSC 110
Introduction to Computer Science & Lab
COMSC 111
Data Structures & Lab
COMSC 210
Principles of Computer Organization & Lab
COMSC 230
Principles of Programming Languages
Select one:
COMSC 335
Theory of Computation
COMSC 340
Analysis of Algorithms
School of Engineering, Computing and Construction Management
The Construction Management Minor
The Engineering Environmental Focus Minor
The Construction Management minor is a six-course
program particularly appropriate for students whose major
is architecture or business. The courses in the minor are
designed to provide students with the skills and basic
knowledge required to move into an entry-level professional
construction industry position. Estimating, scheduling, and
project management are some of the courses that make up
the minor.
Required Four Courses:
CNST
130
Plans, Specifications and Building Codes
or
ARCH 287
Introduction to Computer Applications
in Design
and
CNST
200
Construction Methods and Materials & Lab
or
ARCH 231
Construction Methods and Assemblies I
and
CNST
260
Construction Estimating And Scheduling
CNST
445
Construction Project Management and Safety
Select two:
CNST
250
Construction Equipment
CNST
302
Surveying & Lab
CNST
321
Advanced Building Estimating
CNST
450
Construction Planning and Scheduling
The Engineering Environmental Focus minor exposes students
to most areas of environmental engineering, including water
and wastewater treatment, hydrology, and air pollution. This
minor supplments the learning in other related majors,
such as environmental science, biology, marine biology, and
sustainability. It provides the student with an engineering
background to enhance their career options.
The Environmental Engineering Focus minor consists of
six courses and is for non-engineering majors only:
Required Courses*
ENGR 210
Engineering Statics
ENGR 305
Fluid Mechanics and Lab
ENGR 320
Environmental Engineering
ENGR 405
Air Pollution and Control
ENGR 412 Water Resources and Lab
ENGR 415 Water and Wastewater Treatment
*Some of these courses have additional prerequisites
The Engineering Biomechanics Focus Minor
The Engineering Biomechanics Focus minor is intended
for non-engineering majors. It provides an introduction
to solid and fluid mechanics, materials science, and data
acquisition theory and practice, and then applies these
topics to biomechanical problems such as human and animal
movement, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and the
design and analysis of prosthetics. The minor is well-suited for
Biology and Marine Biology majors who wish to understand
the physical origins of anatomy and physiology, for pre-med
students interested in orthopedics, or for anyone seeking an
engineering perspective on biology.
The Biomechanics Focus minor consists of six courses and
is for non-engineering majors only:
Required Courses*:
ENGR 210 Engineering Statics
ENGR 300
Mechanics of Materials and Lab
ENGR 305 Fluid Mechanics and Lab
ENGR 310
Materials Science
ENGR 350 Theory and Design of
Mechanical Measurements
ENGR 442
Biomechanics
*Some of these courses may require additional prerequisites
The Engineering Robotics Focus Minor
The Engineering Robotics Focus minor consists of six courses
and is intended for non-engineering students desiring some
technical experience in the area of robotics. The minor
builds prerequisite skills in mechanical design, electronics
and computer programming and culminates in a senior-level
Mechatronics course where students design, build and program
a robot to perform an assigned task autonomously.
Required Courses*
ENGR 110 Engineering Graphics and Design
ENGR 115 Computer Applications for Engineering
COMSC 110 Introduction to Computer Science & Lab
ENGR 240 Circuit Theory & Lab
ENGR 260 Engineering Electronics & Lab
ENGR 450 Mechatronics
*Some of these courses have additional prerequisites
The Structural Engineering Minor
The structural engineering minor consists of five courses
emphasizing engineering principles and their applications
in buildings. This minor is especially well suited for students
majoring in architecture who desire a stronger technical
understanding of structural design. Engineering majors are not
permitted to pursue this minor.
Required Courses:
ENGR 210
Engineering Statics
ENGR 300
Mechanics of Materials & Lab
ENGR 313
Structural Analysis
ENGR 409
Structural Design I
Select one:
ENGR 413
Advanced Structural Analysis
ENGR 414
Geotechnical Engineering & Lab
161
School of Justice Studies
Mission Statement
School of Justice Studies Faculty
The School of Justice Studies is dedicated to providing
students with a top-quality education that will prepare them to
successfully meet the challenges facing modern justice system
professionals. The faculty and administration of the School of
Justice Studies are committed to academic and professional
excellence. Our goal is to develop one of the very best
programs for justice system education in the United States.
Stephanie P. Manzi, Ph.D., Dean
Robert W. McKenna, M.S., J.D., Associate Dean and Assistant
Professor of Criminal Justice, Director, Justice System Training &
Research Institute
Professors:
Kathleen Dunn, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice
Robert Engvall, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice
Jeffrey A. Jenkins, J.D., Ed.D., Criminal Justice
P. Christopher Menton, Ed.D., Criminal Justice
Yolanda M. Scott, Ph.D., Criminal Justice
Doug White, CISSP, CCE, Ph.D., Forensics, Networking and
Security, Director of FANS
Thomas E. Wright, J.D., Legal Studies
Associate Professors:
Julie Coon, Ph.D., Criminal Justice
Michael Hall, Ph.D., Public Administration, Director of Master of
Science in Public Administration & Leadership
Lisa L. Newcity, J.D., Legal Studies, Director of Legal Studies Program
Melissa Russano, Ph.D., Criminal Justice
Thomas Londardo, J.D., Security Assurance Studies
Tricia Martland, J.D., Legal Studies
Sean Varano, Ph.D., Criminal Justice
Assistant Professor:
Michael Fowler, Ph.D., Forensics, Networking and Security
Katrina Norvell, Ph.D., Public Administration
Objectives:
1. The members of the School of Justice Studies are
committed to excellence in teaching in order to prepare
students to assume leadership positions in the U.S.
justice system;
2. The faculty and administration of the School are
committed to professional excellence and advancing the
state of knowledge in the Criminal Justice discipline
through commitment to the dissemination and publication
of original research;
3. The members of the School of Justice Studies recognize
that the disciplines represented in the School are applied
social sciences. Therefore, the School is responsive to the
needs of the professional justice system community and
has developed a positive relationship with justice system
agencies throughout the region. This will enable students
to gain a variety of professional experiences as an essential
part of their education.
Overview
The School of Justice Studies offers Bachelor of Science
degrees in Criminal Justice, Forensic Science, Legal Studies,
Forensics, Networking and Security, a Bachelor and Security
Assurance Studies, the Three Plus Three Program, the Four
Plus One Program, minors in Criminal Justice, Digital
Forensics, Legal Studies, and Forensics, Networking and
Security, and an undergraduate certificate in Digital Forensics.
Master of Science degrees are offered in Criminal Justice,
Cybersecurity, Leadership, and Public Administration.
The School also offers graduate certificates in Digital
Forensics, Leadership, Public Management and Health Care
Administration and the Joint Master of Science in Criminal
Justice/Juris Doctorate. The final component of the School the
Justice System Training and Research Institute, is a resource
for applied research and provides training programs for
members of the justice system community.
Facilities
The School of Justice Studies is located in the Feinstein College
of Arts and Sciences building, which houses the Dean’s office,
faculty offices, and classrooms. The graduate programs in
public administration and leadership are offered on the Metro
Campus. The University maintains a state-of-the-art computing
facility, which includes access to the Internet, CD-ROM data,
color printers, color scanners, and laser printers.
The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
The Criminal Justice program introduces students to the theory
and practice of the United States criminal justice system. The
goals of the program include:
• Providing a professional education combined with an
integrated liberal arts curriculum that teaches critical
thought, analytical reasoning, and scholarly writing;
• Preparing students who wish to pursue careers which
include federal, state, and municipal law enforcement,
professional human services, including counseling,
probation and parole, corrections, and the legal profession;
• Providing students the opportunity to develop intellectual
skills that will enable them to pursue lifelong learning;
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in criminal
justice must satisfy the University Core Curriculum
requirements, 11 required criminal justice courses, 3 additional
criminal justice electives, 8 required courses from other
departments, and a sufficient number of electives to total
at least 120 credit hours. Students are encouraged to apply
electives toward a minor or second major.
Requirements in the Major
CJS
105
Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJS
106
Applied Concepts in Justice Studies
CJS
150
Policing in America
CJS
201
Substantive Criminal Law
CJS
204
Constitutional Law
CJS
254
Research Methods for Criminal Justice
163
School of Justice Studies
CJS 308Criminology
CJS
320
Criminal and Civil Procedure in the US Courts
CJS
330
Corrections in the United States
CJS
403
Juvenile Justice
CJS 420
Justice Studies Capstone
Elective Requirements
Any three additional Criminal Justice courses
Requirements in Other Departments
NATSC 226
Forensic Science
COMM 210
Introduction to Public Speaking
Two of the following:
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
PSYCH 100
Introduction to Psychology
SOC
100
Introduction to Sociology
Two courses from one of the following areas:
Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology
Two additional courses from the College of Arts and Sciences
(Required skills courses, or their prerequisites, and other
required support courses for the major, cannot be used to
satisfy this requirement).
The Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies
In recognition of the fact that the law has a profound effect our
everyday experiences as members of a democratic society, the
Legal Studies program at Roger Williams University is designed
to provide students with education in the law and the American
justice system. The undergraduate study of law provides students
with the foundation necessary to engage in the democratic
process and political debate, to understand and appreciate the
significance of our liberties, and to engage in civil discourse
about the changing circumstances and challenges that face our
society and our world.
The academic focus in this program is on the development
of a student’s capacity for critical thought, analytical reasoning,
and scholarly writing. The Legal Studies degree prepares students
who are interested in entering the legal field immediately upon
graduation with the skills and knowledge that would be of benefit
to any number of employers in the public and private sector.
The Legal Studies program also provides students with the kind
of analytical skills, writing proficiency, and academic discipline
necessary to future success in law school or in pursuing a
graduate degree.
The goals of the program include:
• Incorporating an interdisciplinary approach to the
undergraduate study of the law through a dual major
requirement within the College of Arts and Sciences, and
through “required support courses” from other academic
disciplines within the University;
• Preparing students for further graduate study by creating a
centralized and structured program that provides education,
advisement, and guidance to law school candidates;
• Prepare students wishing to pursue careers in the
legal profession or other related occupations such
as arbitrator, mediator, patent agent, title examiner,
legislative assistant, lobbyist, political office holder,
corporate executive, journalist, educator, abstractor,
claims examiner, compliance and enforcement inspector,
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•
occupational and safety health worker, social worker,
legal psychology expert, and jury consultant;
Enhancing and enriching the total educational experience
by helping students from all academic disciplines develop
critical thinking and reasoning abilities, a sense of justice,
and an appreciation for the role of the law as an important
tradition in Western thought.
The Legal Studies Program incorporates a secondary major
requirement within the Bachelor of Arts program, which
ensures an interdisciplinary approach to the study of law at
the undergraduate level. Undergraduates who wish to earn a
Bachelor of Arts in Legal Studies must complete the University
Core Curriculum, the Legal Studies course sequence, and the
course sequence for a second major of their choice within the
College of Arts and Sciences. Students who are planning to
pursue law school are strongly advised to discuss their choice
of second major with their advisor. Students currently earning
an undergraduate degree may enroll in the program as a Legal
Studies major at the discretion of the appropriate deans.
The Legal Studies Program offers many innovative approaches
to legal education, including:
• the use of computers and computer databases including
Westlaw, Lexis, and CD ROM collections;
• internship programs with law firms and government agencies;
• participation in the Mock Trial program using the
University’s law school facilities;
• membership in the RWU Pre-Law Chapter of Phi Alpha
Delta, International Law Fraternity;
• participation in community service projects promoting service
to others and commitment to promoting access to justice.
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in Legal
Studies must satisfy the University Core Curriculum
requirements, 11 required major courses, three required courses
from other departments and the requisite courses for a second
major in the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences.
Requirements in the Major
LS
101
The American Legal System
CJS
204
Constitutional Law
LS
209
Legal Methods I
LS
215
Legal Methods II
CJS
320
Crim./Civ. Proc. In U.S. Courts
LS
425
Senior Thesis in Legal Studies
Elective Requirements
Any three additional Legal Studies courses
Any two additional Legal Studies or Criminal Justice courses
Requirements in Other Departments
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
PHIL205 Logic
Any 300+ level writing course
Requisite Courses for Second Major in the Feinstein College of
Arts and Sciences.
Note: The Legal Studies Major is not approved by the American
Bar Association and is not intended to prepare students to work
as Paralegals.
School of Justice Studies
Note: The Legal Studies Program is not affiliated with the Paralegal
Studies Program offered through the University’s School of
Continuing Studies. Continuing Studies students in the Paralegal
Studies Major cannot satisfy Program degree requirements by
taking Legal Studies Program courses in the day division.
The Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science
Forensic Science is an interdisciplinary degree program which
provides students the opportunity to select either a track
in biology or chemistry while pursuing courses in criminal
justice. This approach provides both the applied and theoretical
knowledge for our students so that they are qualified and
prepared to pursue a variety of careers in forensics.
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in
Forensic Science must satisfy the University Core Curriculum
and Interdisciplinary Core requirements, the required major
courses based on track selection (biology or chemistry), a 2
semester math sequence, and a sufficient number of electives
to total at least 120 credit hours.
Requirements in the Major – Biology Track
(Students in this track cannot declare a double major, minor or
core concentration in Biology)
BIO 103/L & BIO 104/L Biology I & II and Labs
BIO 200
Genetics and Lab
BIO 215/L & BIO 216/L Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II
and Labs
BIO 230 Microbiology and Lab
BIO 340 Biotechnology and Lab
CHEM 191/L & CHEM 192/L Principles of Chemistry I & II and Labs
PHYS 109/L & PHYS 110/L Physics I & II and Labs
CJS 105
Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJS 210 Law of Evidence
CJS 320 Criminal and Civil Procedure in
the Courts
CJS 405 Criminal Investigations
NATSC 226 Forensic Science and Lab
and
a minimum of five (5) Forensic Science Electives which may
include FSI 430 – Special Topics in Forensic Science
Requirements in Other Departments
Select one (1) of the following statistics courses:
Math 124 or Math 207 or Math 315
and complete
Math 213/Lab
Calculus I and Lab.
Requirements in the Major – Chemistry Track
(Students in this track cannot take CHEM 450 as the CHEM elective)
(Students in this track cannot minor in Chemistry or double major
with the B.A. in Chemistry or the B.A. in Environmental Chemistry)
CHEM 191/L & CHEM 192/L Principles of Chemistry I & II and Labs
CHEM 301/L & CHEM 302/L Organic Chemistry I & II and Labs
CHEM 311 Analytical Chemistry and Lab
CHEM 312
Instrumental Methods of Analysis
and Lab
CHEM 390 Biochemistry and Lab
CHEM elective
PHYS 109/L & PHYS 110/L Physics I & II and Labs
BIO 103/L
Biology I and Lab
CJS 105
Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJS 210 Law of Evidence
CJS 320 Criminal and Civil Procedure in the Courts
CJS 405 Criminal Investigations
NATSC 226
Forensic Science and Lab
and
a minimum of five (5) Forensic Science Electives
which may include FSI 430 – Special Topics in Forensic Science
Requirements in Other Departments
Select one (1) of the following statistics courses
Math 124 or Math 207 or Math 315
and complete
Math 213/Lab
Calculus I and Lab.
The Bachelor of Science in Forensics, Networking
and Security
NETSEC is a degree program, designed by faculty and industry
professionals, which provides students with the opportunity
to study aspects of computing and technology related to TCP/
IP networking, telecommunication, and computer security. In
particular, this program allows for a broad background in both
technology security as well as basic networking skills during
the first three years of study and then allows the students to
develop a focus area which serves as a major. The focus area
serves to provide the student with specific skills in a variety of
suggested areas which will lead to a range of diverse careers
using technology and security in industry.
This program focuses on hands-on knowledge of computers,
routers, switches, and other technologies as a basis for study and
adds a security focus to provide insight into the technology needs
of modern corporations who deal with both hacking, internal
threats, error and audit as part of the IT specialization.
The program is IT oriented but security driven and
should provide students with a diverse resume suitable to
jobs such as network administration, IT security specialist,
firewalling support, penetration testing, packet analysis, and
other IT support roles within the networking, security, or IT
departments of the organization.
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in
Forensics, Networking and Security must satisfy the University
Core Curriculum requirements, 10 required major courses, a 12
credit focus area of courses at the 300 and 400 level, a 2 semester
math sequence, 5 requirements in other departments, and a
sufficient number of electives to total at least 120 credit hours.
Requirements in the Major
SEC
100
Introduction to Personal Computer Hardware
SEC
200
Introduction to Computer Security Techniques
SEC
230
Networking and Telecommunications
SEC
231
Advanced Networking
SEC
300
Security Techniques II
SEC
320
Digital Forensics I
SEC
330
Penetration Testing I
SEC
340
Code, Codemakers and Codebreakers – A
Beginning Class for Cryptography
SEC
350
Law for Networking and Security Professionals
SEC
432
Network Analysis
SEC
450
Law for Networking, Security and
Forensic Professionals
SEC
469
Internship in Networking and Security
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School of Justice Studies
Required Focus Area
Students must select a 12 credit focus area of SEC courses at
the 300 level or above. Examples of focus areas include digital
forensics, general networking, networking and security, or
security audit. Other technology courses may be considered in
discussion with the student’s advisor.
Requirements in Other Departments
COMM 210
ECON 101 or ECON 102 or ACCT 201
BUSN 408 or SEC 451
COMSC 110/Lab
COMSC 111/Lab
SEC 205 or SEC 210
One of the following MATH sequences:
MATH 136 and MATH 213 /Lab or
MATH 136 and MATH 207 or
MATH 213/Lab and MATH 214/Lab
The Bachelor of Science in Security
Assurance Studies
The Security Assurance Studies major is designed to develop
security professionals capable of making sound decisions,
lifelong learning, and the ability to deal with the global,
national, and local issues which are a dynamic function of
many different components of civilization. Security is an
area which can take on many forms. Traditionally, the idea
of security referred specifically to areas of law enforcement
or government service in the protection of secrets and
personnel. Today, security transcends all these areas to
encompass many disciplines as well as to provide many
avenues to career success.
This major allows students to focus on the area of study which
interests them most. The major’s mission is two-fold:
i. To prepare students for a career in security, where the
preparation is sufficiently broad to allow choices and
opportunities as to which direction the study may take.
ii. To prepare students for specialized work through focus in
a particular area of security with advanced coursework.
This major is interdisciplinary in nature. In this program,
students will complete an inter-disciplinary study of security
and a 4-course focus in an approved area of security assurance
(e.g. Foreign Languages, Computer Science, etc). Students
will study a variety of disciplines to provide a broad exposure
to the many different areas of security assurance: business,
justice studies, ethics, logic, political science, psychology,
communications, and technology.
Degree Requirements
In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum
requirements (WTNG 210 or 220 is specified as the second
required Writing course), security assurance studies
majors must complete the mathematics requirement, a set
of major courses, and five focus study courses (including
an internship):
Mathematics Requirement
Successful completion of two courses in Mathematics is
required of all majors.
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Students may select from one of the following sequences:
MATH 136 and MATH 213 /Lab or
MATH 136 and MATH 207 or
MATH 213/Lab and MATH 214/Lab
Major Courses:
COMM 210
Introduction to Public Speaking
PHIL205 Logic
PHIL200 Ethics
ECON 101 or ECON 102
SEC 450 Law for Networking, Security and
Forensic Professionals
Political Science
POLSC 110
The United States in World Affairs
POLSC 210
International Relations
Security Assurance Studies
SEC
100
Introduction to Personal Computer Hardware
SEC
200
Introduction to Computer Security Techniques
SEC
320
Digital Forensics I
SEC
499
Senior Colloquium
Criminal Justice and Legal Studies
CJS 105 or LS 101
CJS
201
Substantive Criminal Law
CJS
210
Law of Evidence
CJS 320
Civil and Criminal Procedures in U.S. Courts
CJS
424
Securing the Homeland
Psychology
PSYCH 100
Introduction to Psychology
PSYCH 240
Quantitative Analysis
PSYCH 250
Introduction to Theories of Personality
PSYCH 320
Forensic Psychology
PSYCH340
or
CJS 254
Students will also complete the following:
• a Focus Study consisting of four classes that will be
proposed to an advisor for approval. This set of four
courses is arranged between the advisor and student. At
least 3 of the courses must be upper division.
• an internship in security which complements the Focus
Study area.
The Minor in Criminal Justice
The criminal justice minor is designed to provide students with
a basic understanding of the criminal justice system and to
allow students to develop an appreciation of criminal justice as
a social science. This minor is not available to students enrolled
as legal studies or criminal justice majors.
Requirements in the Minor
CJS
105
Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJS 308Criminology
CJS 320
Criminal and Civil Procedure in the US Courts
Any three additional criminal justice courses
The Minor in Digital Forensics
The minor in Digital Forensics allows students the option
to pursue study in the area of professional Digital Forensic
School of Justice Studies
examinations which includes both acquisition of evidence,
analysis of pc based evidence, mobile device evidence, and legal
issues related to Digital Forensics.
Requirements in the Minor
SEC
320
Digital Forensics I
SEC 400 Advanced OS and Hardware
SEC 420
Digital Forensics II
SEC
421 Digital Forensics III
SEC 450
Law for Networking, Security and
Forensic Professionals
and
One additional 200 level or above SEC or COMSC course
The Minor in Legal Studies
The legal studies minor is designed to provide students with
exposure to the study of law. This minor is not available to
students enrolled as legal studies or criminal justice majors.
Requirements in the Minor
LS
101
The American Legal System
LS
209
Legal Methods I
CJS
320
Criminal and Civil Procedure in the US Courts
Any three additional legal studies courses at the 200 level
or above
Note: The minor in legal studies is not approved by the American
Bar Association and is not intended to prepare students to work
as Paralegals.
The Minor in Networking and Security
The networking and security minor is available to all students.
Requirements in the Minor
SEC
100
Introduction to Personal Computer Hardware
and
SEC 210 Linux Shell Scripting
or
COMSC 111
Data Structures and Lab
and
SEC
300
Security Techniques II
SEC 450 Law for Networking, Security and
Forensic Professionals
Any two additional SEC; Networking and Security courses at
the 300 or 400 level.
Certificate in Digital Forensics
This certificate is open to day and continuing study students.
Day school students shall receive the certificate with their
degree upon graduation.
Requirements in the Certificate in Digital Forensics
SEC 320
Digital Forensics I
SEC 400
Forensic Hardware and Acquisition
SEC 420
Digital Forensics II
SEC 421
Digital Forensics III
SEC 450
Law for Networking, Security and
Forensic Professionals
Criminal Justice 4 + 1 Program
This program allows exceptional undergraduate, criminal
justice majors the opportunity to earn six graduate
credits during their senior year and the remainder of
the requirements for the Master’s of Science in Criminal
Justice in a single, post-graduate year. This is an accelerated
program for students who intend to study criminal justice
full-time at the graduate level. Application to the program
takes place in the student’s junior year. It is strongly
recommended that students who are interested in this
program speak with the graduate director of the Master’s of
Science in Criminal Justice in their freshman or sophomore
year to discuss admission requirements.
Three-Plus-Three Program
Outstanding students who qualify for this special program may
be able to complete all requirements for a baccalaureate degree
and the Juris Doctor degree in six years.
Full-time students who matriculate at the University in
their freshman year and who maintain superior academic
records with outstanding academic averages and superior
scores on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) may apply
to the Roger Williams University School of Law at the end
of their junior year, substituting the first year of work in
the School of Law for up to 30 credits of free electives for
the bachelor’s degree. Students who apply must meet the
following conditions:
• A student must have earned at least 90 credits in three
years of study at Roger Williams University before
beginning at the School of Law.
• All Core Curriculum requirements and major requirements
must be met within those 90 credits.
• The student’s cumulative grade-point average must be at
least 3.0 with no grade lower than a C (2.0).
• The student must score significantly above the 50th
percentile on the LSAT.
In completing the first year of work in the School of Law,
a student in the Three-Plus-Three program must pass all law
courses with a grade-point average of at least 2.0. It is mandatory
that all non-law academic work toward the combination degree
be completed before any work in law is undertaken.
Those interested in pursuing the Three-Plus-Three
Program must contact the Dean of Admissions at the School of
Law and the Dean of the School of Justice Studies, no later than
the end of the freshman year. This program is not available to
transfer students.
Study Abroad Programs
The School of Justice Studies also offers two study abroad
programs. The first is a full semester abroad experience at the
University of Westminster. The second is a two course summer
abroad program in Europe. More detail can be found in the
Study Abroad section of this catalogue or through the Study
Abroad Office.
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School of Continuing Studies
Mission Statement
The School of Continuing Studies (SCS) is committed to
providing lifelong learning educational opportunities for
part-time adult and continuing education students interested
in degree completion, career enhancement, and personal
enrichment. It provides a variety of degree and certificate
programs through several delivery formats to students located
both locally or at a distance. The SCS seeks to meet the
diverse educational needs of its students and to ensure that
its offerings reflect the high quality and learning outcomes
promoted by the University.
Overview
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Accelerated Degree Completion. The SCS offers accelerated
degree completion for students seeking a degree or the
completion of a certificate program through the many
sources of “advanced standing” credit and the variety
of course delivery options available to eligible students.
Generally, students can pursue their programs with
minimal interference to their employment, family, and
personal commitments.
Credit from many Sources. Academic credit may be awarded to
eligible students for prior college attendance, military training
and experience, CLEP or other standardized exams, nontraditional learning experiences, and credit documentation.
Bachelor and Certificate Programs. The SCS offers a wide
variety of courses, certificate programs and programs
leading to baccalaureate degrees.
A ‘TriFlex’ Schedule. The SCS’s course delivery options
allow students to choose from three different types of
course offerings: Classroom courses (which meet on a
regular weekly basis scheduled either late afternoons,
evenings, or Saturdays), Directed Seminars (which
meet 4-6 times per semester and normally use online
instruction between classroom meetings), and Online
courses (which have no class meetings and provide
comprehensive online instruction).
Convenient Scheduling of Classes. Classes are scheduled at
convenient times and locations, the Providence Campus,
the Newport Naval Base, and main campus is Bristol.
Distance Learning Options. The SCS offers many distance
learning courses and bachelor degree programs to
distant students. These options serve students who are
geographically removed from the campus and who are
unable to spend long periods of time in residential study.
Continuous Advisement. Academic advisement is available
throughout the year. The SCS advisement process
establishes a working relationship between each student
and an assigned academic advisor.
The Advisor and the Advisement Process
Each student is assigned an academic advisor and must meet with
(or communicate with) his or her advisor to complete a variety of
activities, as they relate to admissions, registration, and enrollment.
Students are urged to meet with their advisor to discuss their
educational and career interests and goals. Advisors review and
explain the requirements for a degree or certificate; determine how
much eligible credit may be granted through such program options
as transfer credit, CLEP exams, military training and experience,
and credit documentation; and estimate how many courses and
how long it might take to complete degree programs.
The advisor will assist with the formation of a degree plan
and complete an assessment of the student’s status including
a listing of requirements already completed and those which
need to be completed.
The advisor is responsible for guiding the student through the
stages of the academic program and identifying the appropriate
courses and learning experiences. The advisor has primary
responsibility for the student, from the formulation of the
student’s degree plan to its completion. Advisors also assist
students by: arranging learning experiences through which the
student can achieve his or her goals; verifying that a student’s
records are kept current; communicating with instructors and
adjunct faculty and others involved in the student’s program;
recommending the assignment of credits and the awarding of
the degree; and discussing career goals.
Meetings with advisors take place on any of the University’s
campus or at appropriate off-campus sites and/or by electronic
communication. The SCS offers continuous advisement
throughout the year.
Prior Learning Assessment Credit Documentation
Students in the SCS are eligible to receive credit for life and
work experiences which align to college-level learning, applied
skills, and competencies which can be properly documented
and verified. Through the credit documentation process, it is
possible to earn as many as 90 credits. Such credit becomes
a permanent part of a student’s record upon completion of at
least 30 credits at Roger Williams University as a SCS student.
Students who wish to pursue prior learning credit are assisted
by the Director for Credit Documentation. Some eligible
credit may be granted through the University’s recognition of
standardized non-collegiate learning experiences. Students
should consult with their academic advisor and follow up with
the Director of Credit Documentation to learn more about this
program. Guidelines and student instructions about all forms of
Credit Documentation are available from the Director of Credit
Documentation. Please note all credit documentation must be
submitted a year prior to expected graduation date.
Students may be awarded up to 90 credits toward their degree
using one or more of the following:
• Transfer Credit: As much as three years of applicable college
credit (90 credits) may be transferred from work completed
previously at other accredited colleges or universities, with
a grade of C or higher; up to 60 credits may be transferred
from institutions that only offer associate degrees. Students
169
School of Continuing Studies
•
•
•
transferring in with a conferred Associates degree may
transfer in up to 66 credits.
Military Training: As much as three years of college
credit (90 credits) may be granted for military training
and/or experience.
Credit Documentation: As much as three years of college
credit (90 credits) may be granted for job and work
experience, personal enrichment, or participation in
conferences and workshops. Only a grade of “P” (pass) will
be awarded to a course that has been documented. Please
refer to the transfer admissions policy section of catalog.
College Level Examination Program: As much as three
years of college credit (90 credits) may be granted
for successful completion of CLEP tests and/or other
standardized exams recognized by the American Council
on Education. A wide variety of subjects can be tested.
To qualify for CLEP credit, students must have been
out of high school for at least three years and must not
have earned equivalent course credit at RWU or another
institution of higher education. Students need to achieve
the scores recommended and published by the American
Council on Education.
Academic Requirements and General
Requirements for a Degree
All degree programs require the successful completion of a
minimum of 30 credits as an enrolled student at the University,
and all baccalaureate degree programs require a minimum of 120
credits through any combination of study and learning experiences,
including credit for previous college work, Credit Documentation,
CLEP or other exams, and military training and experience.
University Catalog. All students should read the University
catalog carefully for additional information, requirements, and/
or policies which may apply to them.
Matriculation. Students wishing to pursue a program leading
to a degree offered by the University must follow application
procedures and be considered by the University as a
matriculating student admitted to a specific degree program.
Non-Matriculation. Students may enroll in courses offered by
the University even though they are not pursuing a degree.
Non-matriculating students may earn college credit if they have
followed proper application and registration procedures, but
they cannot be considered for a degree unless they matriculate.
Declaration of a Major. All matriculating students are required
to declare a major. Students wishing to change the major in
which they are enrolled must consult an academic advisor and
file a Curriculum Declaration form.
Declaration of a Minor. Bachelor degree candidates may, at their
option, declare a minor after consultation with an academic
advisor at the time of their initial registration. Students
wishing to change the minor in which they are enrolled must
consult with an academic advisor; this should be done prior to
the submission of a Degree Application form.
Rate of Progress. Students taking courses through the SSCS
must pass at least 50 percent of those courses taken during
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each academic year (September 1 through August 31). Students
not meeting these requirements will be placed on probation
following the first semester of unsatisfactory performance.
Students returning after a minimum of one semester absence
under this policy will be on probation. They must pass all
courses attempted and achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 in order
to continue.
Semester Course Limit (Part-Time and Full-Time Study). Students
should regulate their academic loads according to the amount
of time available and required for class attendance, outside
preparation, and successful course completion. Depending upon
the program and the number of credits taken, students may be
considered full-time and charged the appropriate tuition rates.
Transfer of Credits after Matriculation. Matriculating students
wishing to take courses at other institutions and transfer credit
to Roger Williams University must obtain permission of an
academic advisor, file a Request to Attend another College form
with the SCS, and submit an official transcript upon course
completion. Credit for courses completed successfully with
a grade of C or better will be posted to the student’s record.
Grades earned will not be recorded and will not affect the
student’s GPA.
Incompletes. With faculty approval, students have up to 1-1/2 years
(3 full semesters, not including summer) to complete a course for
which a grade of an incomplete (I) was assigned.
All students should become familiar with the academic
requirements which apply to them and their chosen program
of study. Students should read the University catalog carefully
and consult with their academic advisors regarding all of the
requirements which may apply to them. All students seeking
a degree should be given a degree plan listing requirements
which have been satisfied as well as requirements which need
to be completed.
The Educational Process
Enrollment takes place within the University’s regular Fall and
Spring Semesters, as well as the Summer Sessions, providing
enrollment opportunities throughout the entire year. Students
in the SCS are eligible to enroll in many of the University’s day
and evening classroom course offerings on the main campus,
at other satellite or University locations, or online. Through
the TriFlex schedule, students may be offered such enrollment
options as traditional classroom courses; directed seminars
and online courses. In some cases, students may also enroll in
internships and independent study courses. Course offerings
may include direct faculty meetings and interactions with
students; online instruction using the University’s Bridges
online learning management system; guided instruction
via telephone, mail, E-mail, and other technological
communication; packaged course and study guides; cooperative
education; supervised field work; instructional packages; the
use of video or audio tapes, or some combination, etc.
Students are not required to complete an on-campus residency.
In addition to the other academic and program requirements
which may apply to a specific program, degree or major, all
students in the SSCS are required to complete a minimum
School of Continuing Studies
enrollment requirement of thirty (30) credits at the University,
although these credits do not need to be completed in the
classroom or on campus.
Steps in the Educational Process
• Student review of information and programs from the
School Continuing Studies.
• Submission of the SCS application and application fee.
• Meeting (communication) with an academic advisor.
• Selection of program of study.
• Development of a degree plan.
• Program enrollment and course registration.
• Completion of courses as outlined on the degree plan.
• Completion of other requirements as outlined on the
degree plan.
• Degree Completion/Graduation.
General Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree
All students seeking a baccalaureate degree must complete:
• A minimum of 120 credits (through any combination
of study and learning experiences, including credit for
previous college work, credit documentation, CLEP or
other exams, and military experience);
• A minimum enrollment requirement of 30 credits taken at
the University.
• A major academic program or concentration.
• A 2.0 average in all courses carrying a letter grade.
• A 2.0 average in all required major courses.
• A 2.0 average in all required minor courses (if minor is
included in a student’s program).
• SCS general education requirements.*
• All financial requirements must be met.
Transfer students should consult with an advisor to
determine how the transfer guidelines apply to the general
education requirements.
The general education requirements consist of courses
from the arts, humanities, sciences, mathematics, and the
social sciences. The University’s degree programs, including
general education, provide students with communications
skills; the ability for critical and logical analysis, scientific
and quantitative reasoning; and the capability for continuing
education. The general education requirements are designed
to assure that all students have an awareness of and breadth
of exposure to the disciplines and fields of study associated
with communications skills, and the traditional liberal arts and
general education areas and domains within higher education.
All SCS students are required to complete a minimum of onefourth of their degree requirements in general education (e.g.,
the equivalent of thirty semester hours in a bachelor degree
program, or the equivalent of fifteen semester hours in an
associate degree program). General Education requirements
may be satisfied by credits granted for students’ prior college
attendance, CLEP examinations, military training and
experience (as recommended by the American Council on
Education), and credit documentation. Students transferring
with a baccalaureate degree shall be considered as having met
the general education requirements.
Based on University guidelines, advisors determine which
transfer courses may be considered equivalent to general
education courses. After assessing the general education
requirements which may be satisfied through their various
sources of advanced standing, students who need general
education courses are advised to enroll in courses designated
as the University’s General Education courses (skills and
interdisciplinary core courses) whenever they are scheduled
or available in the SCS as classroom or online course offerings.
In addition to RWU’s skills and interdisciplinary core courses,
courses may also be taken from the categories associated
with the examinations of the College Board’s College-Level
Examination Program (CLEP) to satisfy general education
requirements. These categories include materials and subjects
commonly taught during the first two years in many of the
nation’s colleges and universities, and they include English
Composition, Mathematics, Science, Humanities/Fine Arts,
and Social Sciences/History. These areas correspond to the
University’s general education curricular categories as reflected
in the skills and interdisciplinary core courses.
The general education requirements shall include the
following: two writing courses (including Expository Writing
and a second writing course, e.g. Critical Writing for the
Professional); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Social Science.
Students who have attended accredited institutions may
transfer credits for successfully completed courses (C or better
and courses with Pass or Satisfactory grades if such grades are
equivalent to C or better). Advisors determine the application
of transfer credit to degree and program requirements. Such
determinations may be based on comparability of depth and
content to courses offered at the University, as well as other
considerations. Transfer students must consult a SCS adviser
to determine how the transfer guidelines apply to the Skills
and General Education requirements. Students who have not
successfully completed college-level courses in expository
writing or post-algebraic mathematics may be required to
take placement tests in writing and/or mathematics prior to
enrollment in such courses.
Graduation with Honors
Students should note that honorary distinctions at
graduation are available only to qualified students who have
successfully completed a minimum of 54 semester credit
hours of study through residency or course enrollment at
Roger Williams University. Accordingly, degrees with honors
are as follows:
• Honors (cum laude), awarded to those students who have
attained a GPA of not less than 3.4
• High Honors (magna cum laude), awarded to those
students who have attained a GPA of not less than 3.6;
• Highest Honors (summa cum laude), awarded to those
students who have attained a GPA of not less than 3.8.
171
School of Continuing Studies
Financial Aid & Scholarships
Students in the SCS who take a minimum of six (6) credits per
semester are eligible for all traditional forms of financial aid which
are normally associated with adult and continuing education
students. In addition, various forms of military tuition assistance
are usually available to service members.
Adult Education Scholarships
The School Continue Studies makes several scholarships
available each academic year to eligible students enrolled
in the SCS. The amount of each scholarship may vary from
one year to another. This scholarship program is based on
a combination of financial need and academic promise;
however, prior academic experience and community
service will be taken into consideration. Applications
for these scholarships may be obtained through the
administrative offices of the SCS at times announced
throughout the year.
Registration
In order to register for classes, it is necessary for students to
contact their academic advisors. Although online registration
options exist, advisor contact is essential to initiate a student’s
online registration.
DEGREES OFFERED
The School of Continuing Studies offers the
following undergraduate degrees. (Campus Based)
Bachelor of Science in:
Criminal Justice
Forensics, Networking & Security
Management
Paralegal Studies**
Public Administration
Bachelor of General Studies in:
Community Development
Health Care Administration
Humanities
Individualized Concentration
Industrial Technology
Psychology
Social and Health Services
Social Science
Technology Leadership and Management
Theatre
The School of Continuing Studies offers the
following Online undergraduate degrees.
Bachelor of Science in:
Criminal Justice
Management
Paralegal Studies**
172
Bachelor of General Studies in:
Community Development
Health Care Administration
Industrial Technology
Psychology
Social and Health Services
Social Science
Technology Leadership and Management
**A minimum of 10 semester credits of legal specialty courses must
be taken in a traditional classroom setting (face-to-face).
Note: None of the Paralegal Studies offerings are affiliated
with the Legal Studies Program offered by the University’s
day division. Only the Paralegal Studies degree and certificate
programs are ABA approved.
Online Certificate Programs
Case Management
(undergraduate level)
Community Development
(undergraduate level)
Health Services Administration
(undergraduate level)
Municipal Management
(undergraduate level)
Nurse Paralegal*
(post baccalaureate level)
Paralegal Studies*
(post baccalaureate level)
*A minimum of 10 semester credits of legal specialty courses must be
taken in a traditional classroom setting (face-to-face).
Certificate Programs (Campus Based)
The following certificate programs are available through the
School of Continuing Studies for campus-based students.
Case Management
(undergraduate level)
Community Development
(undergraduate level)
Environmental, Occupational
Safety and Health
(undergraduate level)
Health Services Administration
(undergraduate level)
Municipal Management
(undergraduate level)
Nurse Paralegal*
(Paralegal Medical Assisting)
(postgraduate level)
Paralegal Studies*
(post graduate level)
School Nurse Teaching
(undergraduate level)
*A minimum of 10 semester credits of legal specialty courses must be
taken in a traditional classroom setting (face-to-face).
ASSOCIATE DEGREES
Associate degrees are normally available to eligible students
enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs within the
University’s continuing education programs. Students
interested in an associate degree options should speak with
their advisors regarding specific requirements and eligibility.
Associate degrees recipients are not recognized at the May
commencement, but they are recognized at a ceremony
conducted by the SCS.
Associate Degree Programs
Associate of Arts
Associate of Science
Associate of Science in:
Criminal Justice
Paralegal Studies
School of Continuing Studies
BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
This program is designed for people working in criminal justice or
law enforcement or those who seek employment in such areas.
Total Major Credits....................................................42 credits
Required Courses (33 credits)
CJS
105
Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJS
106
Applied Concepts in Justice Studies
CJS
150
Policing in America
CJS
201
Substantive Criminal Law
CJS
204
Constitutional Law
CJS
254
Survey of Methods for Criminal Justice
CJS 308Criminology
CJS
320
Criminal and Civil Procedure in the
US Courts
CJS
330
Corrections in the United States
CJS
403
Juvenile Justice
CJS 420
Justice Studies Capstone
Major Electives (9 credits)
Any three additional Criminal Justice courses.
Requirements in Other Departments.........................24 credits
COMM 210
Two of the following:
POLSC 100
PSYCH 100
SOC
100
Introduction to Public Speaking
American Government and Politics
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Two courses from one of the following areas: Political Science,
Psychology, or Sociology
Three additional courses from the College of Arts and Sciences
(Required skills courses, or their prerequisites, and other
required support courses for the major, cannot be used to
satisfy this requirement).
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing
and Critical Writing); Basic Statistics; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Social Science; and
additional liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.....................................................................23 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of Science in Forensics, Networking
and Security
NETSEC is a degree program, designed by faculty and industry
professionals, which provides students with the opportunity
to study aspects of computing and technology related to TCP/
IP networking, telecommunication, and computer security.
In particular, this program allows for a broad background in
both technology security as well as basic networking skills
during the first three years of study and then allows students
to develop a focus area which serves as a major. The focus area
serves to provide the student with specific skills in a variety of
suggested areas which will lead to a range of diverse careers
using technology and security in industry.
This program focuses on hands-on knowledge of
computers, routers, switches, and other technologies as a basis
for study and adds a security focus to provide insight into the
technology needs of modern corporations who deal with both
hacking, internal threats, error and audit as part of the IT
specialization. The program is IT oriented but security driven
and should provide students with a diverse resume suitable
to jobs such as network administration, IT security specialist,
firewalling support, penetration testing, packet analysis, and
other IT support roles within the networking, security, or IT
departments of the organization.
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree
in Forensics, Networking and Security must satisfy the
University Core Curriculum requirements, 10 required major
courses, a 12 credit focus area of courses at the 300 and 400
level, a 2 semester math sequence, 5 requirements in other
departments, and a sufficient number of electives to total at
least 120 credit hours.
Required Courses
SEC
100
Introduction to Personal Computer Hardware
SEC
200
Introduction to Computer Security Techniques
SEC
230
Networking and Telecommunications
SEC
231
Advanced Networking
SEC
300
Security Techniques II
SEC
320
Digital Forensics I
SEC
330
Penetration Testing I
SEC
340
Code, Codemakers and Codebreakers – A
Beginning Class for Cryptography
SEC
350
Law for Networking and Security Professionals
SEC
432
Network Analysis
SEC
469
Internship in Networking and Security
Required Focus Area
Students must select a 12 credit focus area of SEC courses at
the 300 level or above. Examples of focus areas include digital
forensics, general networking, networking and security, or
security audit. Other technology courses may be considered in
discussion with the student’s advisor.
Requirements in Other Departments
COMM 210
ECON 101 or ECON 102 or ACCT 201
BUSN 408 or SEC 451
COMSC 110/Lab
COMSC 111/Lab
SEC 205 or SEC 210
One of the following MATH sequences:
MATH 136 and MATH 213 /Lab or
MATH 136 and MATH 207 or
MATH 213/Lab and MATH 214/Lab
Three additional courses from the College of Arts and Sciences
(required skills courses, or their prerequisites, and other
required support courses for the major, cannot be used to
satisfy this requirement).
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
173
School of Continuing Studies
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Social Science; and
additional liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 20 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Management
(See Management section of the catalog)
Bachelor of Science in Public Administration
This program prepares students for government service
on the federal, state, or local level, for employment in
nonprofit organizations, and for careers which require
various administrative skills. Its courses focus on such areas
as budgeting, personnel and financial administration, the
management of organizations, public services, law, political
and government institutions, ethics, and global awareness.
Total Major Credits....................................................36 credits
Required Courses (27 credits)
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
PA 201
Public Administration
PA
202
Studies in Public Administration
PA 305
State and Local Government
PA
306
City Management
PA 340
Public Policy
PA
362
Public Personnel Administration
PA 363
Public Financial Administration
PA
364
Organizational Theory and Management
Major Electives (9 credits)
Select three courses in public administration, political science,
or other approved areas.
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository
Writing or the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course;
and at least one approved course from each of the
following categories: Natural Science, Humanities, Fine
Arts, and Social Science; and additional liberal arts
electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.....................................................................54 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Minor in Public Administration
This program requires the completion of the following six
(6) courses:
POLSC 100
American Government and Politics
PA
201
Public Administration
PA
202
Studies in Public Administration (or
approved substitute)
Any three additional courses in Public Administration
Total Minor Credits ...................................................18 credits
Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies
The Paralegal Studies program is a practice-oriented course of
study designed to prepare students as paralegals. As the legal
industry experiences transformation due to economic and
174
technological changes, opportunities for accomplished and
technically-savvy paralegals have increased significantly. Paralegal
students receive education in many different facets of law,
including the use of computers, legal databases and alternative
dispute resolution. The Paralegal Studies Program combines
academic rigor with legal and technical competencies to
develop well-rounded legal professionals. Our graduates pursue
successful careers as paralegals in legal, corporate, non-profit, or
government organizations, and many continue to law school.
In 1998, the Paralegal Studies program was approved
by the American Bar Association (ABA). Some courses are
available via distance education, but in accordance with ABA
requirements, a minimum of 10 semester credits of legal
specialty courses must be taken in a traditional classroom
setting (face-to-face). Paralegals are prohibited from the
practice of law except when allowed by law or court rule.
Total Major Credits................................................... 46 credits
Required Courses (37 credits)
PLS
100
Introduction to Law and Legal Studies
PLS
101
Criminal Law for the Paralegal
PLS
110
Emerging Technologies and the
Legal Environment
PLS
120
Law in Contemporary Society
PLS
210
Legal Research and Writing I
PLS
211
Legal Research and Writing II
PLS
221
Law of Contracts
PLS 222
Law of Business Organizations
PLS 310
Litigation I
PLS
311
Litigation II
PLS
400
Legal Ethics (1 Credit)
PLS
401
Paralegal Internship
PLS 420
Legal Capstone Course
Major Electives (9 credits)
Select three courses in Paralegal Studies course electives.
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including Expository Writing
and Critical Writing for the Professional); a Mathematics skills
course; Intro to Speech Communications and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Social Science; and two
additional liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.....................................................................45 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate .......................... 121 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in
Community Development
This concentration is designed for practitioners in community
development to upgrade their skills and enhance their
professional expertise, or for those wishing to enter the field of
community development or a related area.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (15 credits)
PA
220
Elements and Issues in
Community Development
PA
350
Housing and Development Skills
PA
351
Sustainable Economic and
Community Development
School of Continuing Studies
PA PA
352
440
Non-Profit Management
Public Administration Practicum
(The practicum may be satisfied through either the
documentation of community development employment
experience or through learning experiences acquired by
placement. Since the program was designed in partnership with
the Housing Network of Rhode Island, students are expected
to satisfy the requirements of the internship with the Housing
Network or an affiliated community development organization.)
Major Electives (9 credits)
Select three courses from the areas of leadership and non-profit
management, housing, planning and development skills, and
community economic and social development, with advisor approval.
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science, and speech;
and additional liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in Health
Care Administration
This program is intended for students employed in positions
associated with health care administration or who seek
employment in such areas. Aside from other requirements for
the baccalaureate degree, students pursuing the health care
administration program must complete the core curriculum, the
following 8 courses, and sufficient electives to total 120 credits.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (18 credits)
SHS
405
Introduction to Public Health
SHS
413
Moral and Ethical Issues in Health Care
SHS
415
Health Care Administration I
SHS
415
Health Care Administration II
SHS
452
Social and Health Services Policy
SHS
454
Social and Health Services Research
Methods
Major Electives (6 credits selected from Social and
Health Services courses Core Curriculum......(30 credits)
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science; and additional
liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in Humanities
This program is intended for students with an interest in
more than one field of study within the Humanities. Aside
from other requirements for the baccalaureate degree,
students pursuing the Humanities program must complete the
core curriculum requirements, the following 8 courses, and
sufficient electives for a total 120 credits.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (24 credits)
Courses must be selected from at least two but no more than
three areas in the humanities. There cannot be more than four
courses from a single discipline.
Four (4) courses at the 100 or 200 level
Four (4) courses at the 300 or 400 level
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science; and additional
liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in
Industrial Technology
This concentration is designed for people with technical and/or
managerial backgrounds who are employed in manufacturing or
service industries, or who seek employment in such industries.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (18 credits)
IT
119
Manufacturing Processes
IT
255
Studies in Technology
IT
455
Production Planning
IT
457
Workplace Safety and Health Management
IT 458
Quality-Control
IT
472
Senior Seminar
Major Electives (6 credits)
Select two courses in industrial technology, with the approval
of an advisor.
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science, and speech; and
additional liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in Social and
Health Services
This program is intended for students employed in social
service agencies and health care facilities, or those seeking
employment in such areas. Aside from other requirements
for the baccalaureate degree, students pursuing the social and
health services program must complete the core curriculum
requirements, the following 8 courses, and sufficient electives
to total 120 credits.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
175
School of Continuing Studies
Required Courses (9 credits)
SHS
400
Foundations of Social & Health Services
SHS
452
Social and Health Services Policy
SHS
454
Social and Health Services
Research Methods
Major Electives (15 credits)
Select five courses in Social and Health Services.
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science; and additional
liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives................................................................... .66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in Social Science
This program is intended for students with an interest in more than
one area within the social sciences. Aside from other requirements
for the baccalaureate degree, students pursuing the Social Science
program must complete the core curriculum requirements, the
following 8 courses, and sufficient electives for a total 120 credits.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (24 credits)
Courses must be selected from at least two but no more than
three areas in the social sciences.
There cannot be more than four courses from a single discipline.
Four (4) courses at the 100 or 200 level
Four (4) courses at the 300 or 400 level
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including, Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science; and additional
liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in Technology
Leadership and Management
This concentration is designed for people with technical
and/or managerial backgrounds who are employed in
manufacturing, service, or technology-related industries, or
who seek employment in such industries. The program will
provide students with a foundation of leadership, strategic, and
technology management skills. Because of the available electives,
this program allows students the opportunity to focus on specific
industries such as technology management, manufacturing,
healthcare, environment and safety, or public administration.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (24 credits) At least five courses must be
completed at RWU
IT
255
Studies in Technology
IT
342
Total Quality Management (Six Sigma)
176
IT
430
Special Topics (Ethics in Science
and Technology)
IT
430
Special Topics (Lean Manufacturing)
IT
455
Production Planning
IT
457
Workplace Safety and Health Management
IT
472
Senior Project
Major Electives (3 credits)
Select one course in Technology Leadership and Management
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (Expository Writing, Critical
Writing for the Professions); a Mathematics skills course;
Intro to Speech Communications; and at least one approved
course from each of the following categories: Natural Science,
Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science; and additional liberal
arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies in Theatre
This program is intended for students with an interest
in dramatic arts. Aside from other requirements for the
baccalaureate degree, students pursuing the Theatre program
must complete the core curriculum requirements, the following
8 courses, and sufficient electives for a total 120 credits.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
Required Courses (9 credits)
THEAT 110
Acting I
THEAT 120
Design for Theater I
THEAT 230
Theater History I
Major Electives (15 credits)
Select one course in Theatre at the 100 or 200 level, and 4
courses at the 300 or 400 level.
Core Curriculum....................................................... 30 credits
Includes two writing courses (including Expository Writing or
the equivalent); a Mathematics skills course; and at least one
approved course from each of the following categories: Natural
Science, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social Science; and additional
liberal arts electives for a total of 30 credits.
Electives.................................................................... 66 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate...........................120 credits
Bachelor of General Studies
(Individualized Concentration)
This program is intended for students with an interest in
pursuing an individualized and personalized program of
studies not available in other degree programs. Admission to
an Individualized Concentration is limited to students who
are at least 21 years of age and who have not been enrolled at
RWU as a full-time student within the prior academic year.
Such programs must constitute a cohesive grouping of courses
reflecting an academic rationale or focus. At least half of such
courses must be completed at RWU and at least half must be at
the 300 level or above.
Total Major Credits....................................................24 credits
School of Continuing Studies
Required Courses (24 credits)
With the assistance of one or more advisors, students select
eight courses from various areas of study, half of which must be
at the 300 level or above.
Associate in Arts/Associate in Science
Students must complete
• A minimum of 60 credits, 15 of which must be taken at
the University, through any combination of study and
learning experiences, including credit for previous college
work, credit documentation, CLEP or other exams, and
military experience,
• Successful completion of the Skills Courses (Expository
Writing and Critical Writing for the Professional, or an
advanced second writing course, and the Mathematics
course requirement) and two of the five Core
Curriculum courses,
• Sufficient electives to total 60 credits, which for the
Associate in Arts degree should include courses from the
arts and ,sciences and for the Associate in Science degree
should include courses from the professional studies,
• A 2.0 average in all courses carrying a letter grade,
• All financial requirements must be met.
Associate of Science in Paralegal Studies
The Paralegal Studies program is a practice-oriented
course of study designed to prepare students as paralegals.
As the legal industry experiences transformation due
to economic and technological changes, opportunities
for accomplished and technically-savvy paralegals
have increased significantly. Paralegal students receive
education in many different facets of law, including the
use of computers, legal databases and alternative dispute
resolution. The Paralegal Studies Program combines
academic rigor with legal and technical competencies to
develop well-rounded legal professionals. Our graduates
pursue successful careers as paralegals in legal, corporate,
non-profit, or government organizations, and many
continue to law school.
In 1998, the Paralegal Studies program was approved by
the American Bar Association (ABA). Some courses are
available via distance education, but in accordance with
ABA requirements, a minimum of 10 semester credits
of legal specialty courses must be taken in a traditional
classroom setting (face-to-face). Paralegals are prohibited
from the practice of law except when allowed by law or
court rule.
Total Major Credits....................................................25 credits
Required Courses (22 credits)
PLS
100
Introduction to Law and Legal Studies
PLS
101
Criminal Law for the Paralegal
PLS
110
Emerging Technologies and the
Legal Environment
PLS 210
Legal Research and Writing I
PLS
221
Law of Contracts
PLS 222
Law of Business Organizations
PLS 310
Litigation I
PLS
400
Legal Ethics (1 Credit)
Major Electives (3 credits)
Select one course in Paralegal Studies course electives.
Core Curriculum........................................................21 credits
Includes two writing courses (Expository Writing and Critical
Writing for the Professional) a Mathematics skills course;
Introduction to Public Speaking; Social Science; one liberal arts
electives and at one of the following approved courses from the
following categories: Natural Science, Humanities, Fine Arts for
a total of 21 credits.
Electives..................................................................... 15 credits
Total Credits required to Graduate ............................61 credits
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Case Management
This program provides knowledge and skills relevant to the
provision of case management services in a variety of health
care settings. The program is designed for individuals who
are employed in the field of case management and who are
in the process of obtaining certification in case management.
The required courses prepare students to sit for certification
examinations. Students in this program may matriculate into
the Social and Health Services program if they wish to apply
these courses toward the Bachelor of Science.
Required Courses
S&HS
413
Moral and Ethical Issues in Health Care
S&HS
428
Crisis Intervention
S&HS
438
Introduction to Biostatistics
or
PLS
250
Workers’ Compensation
S&HS
457
Seminar in Case Management
S&HS
459
Seminar in Managed Care
Community Development
This professional certificate program is designed for
practitioners in community development to upgrade their skills
and enhance their professional expertise. The program focuses
especially on the interactions of public policy, affordable
housing advocacy, finance and government regulation. It is also
designed to prepare students who may be interested in careers
in housing and community development.
Required Courses (5 courses)
PA
220
Elements and Issues in
Community Development
PA 352
Non-Profit Management
or
PA 350
Housing and Development Skills
or
PA 351
Sustainable Economic and
Community Development
and
Three (3) Electives chosen by the student and an Advisor from
the areas of leadership and non-profit management; housing,
177
School of Continuing Studies
planning and development skills; and community economic
and social development.
The program was designed in partnership with the Housing
Network of Rhode Island. Students are expected to satisfy
the requirements of an internship with the Housing Network
or an affiliated community development organization. This
requirement may be satisfied through the documentation of
community development employment experience or through
learning experiences acquired by placement.
Environmental and Occupational Safety
and Health
This program provides individuals with the technical and
professional knowledge and skills required to improve
health and safety practices in the workplace. The program is
designed to increase the knowledge and expertise of personnel
associated with the field of occupational safety and health.
Enrollment in a degree program is not required for enrollment
in the certificate program. However, students interested in
pursuing a degree may apply the credits earned through this
certificate program to selected baccalaureate degree programs.
Required Courses (12 credits)
IT
215
Hazardous Materials Safety Management
IT
275
Principles of Industrial Hygiene
IT
357
Occupational Safety and Health
Regulatory Issues
IT
457
Workplace Safety and Health
Electives (6 credits)
IT
241
Introduction to Environmental Studies
IT
325
Methods and Materials of Occupational
Safety & Health Education
IT 328
Ergonomics
IT
242
Introduction to Solid and Hazardous
Waste Management
IT
411
ISO 14000 Series of International
Environmental Standards
PLS
250
Workers’ Compensation
Health Services Administration
Designed for adults working (or seeking to work) in health
services, public health, health education, or health care
administration fields, in either the private sector or the public
sector (federal, state, or local government or non-profit
organizations) who need to upgrade skills or attain additional
credentials. A baccalaureate degree is not required, and
prospective students may pursue the certificate alone or both the
certificate and the BGS degree in Social and Health Services.
Required Courses (5 courses)
S&HS
400
Foundations of Social & Health Services
and
Select four (4) of the following:
S&HS
405
Introduction to Public Health
S&HS
411
Grant Writing
S&HS
413
Moral and Ethical Issues in Health Care
S&HS
415
Health Care Administration I
S&HS
416
Health Care Administration II
178
Municipal Management
Designed for adults working (or seeking to work) in municipal
and local government settings who need to upgrade skills,
acquire new skills, or attain additional credentials. Prospective
students may be interested in both the certificate and an
undergraduate degree. Many may already have college degrees
but which may not be appropriate to their employment duties
and responsibilities.
Required Courses (5 courses)
PA
201
Public Administration
PA
305
State and Local Government
PA
306
City Management
PA
430
Special Topics (topics in local government
budgeting and finance, urban planning,
human resource management, program
evaluation and service delivery, etc.)
And one of the following:
PA
411
Grant Writing
PA
360
Communication in Organizations
POST BACHELORETTE CERTIFICATES
Nurse Paralegal
This program is designed for registered nurses interested in
training in performing legal tasks and the application of nursing
knowledge to legal services. It is open to registered nurses who
have previously earned 60 hours of credit or a baccalaureate or
associate degree, and who have at least 4000 hours of nursing
experience. Ten courses are required for the certificate. Studies
for this certificate program may be combined with courses in
the bachelor degree programs in Paralegal Studies or Social and
Health Services. This program is approved by the American Bar
Association. Paralegals are prohibited from the practice of law
except when allowed by law or court rule. A minimum of 10
semester credits of legal specialty courses must be taken in a
traditional classroom setting.
Required Courses
PLS
100
Intro to Law and Legal Studies
PLS
210, 211 Legal Research and Writing I, II
PLS 235Torts
PLS
236
Medical and Legal Malpractice
PLS
310, 311 Litigation I, II
S&HS
413
Moral & Ethical Issues in Health Care
S&HS
415
Health Care Administration I
And one of the following:
PLS
250
Workers’ Compensation
S&HS
416
Health Care Administration II
Paralegal Studies
This program is open to students who have previously earned
a baccalaureate degree. Under exceptional circumstances, this
requirement may be waived. The applicant must petition the
Paralegal Studies Department and submit supporting documents
which must include evidence of a significant combination of
college achievement and law-related work experience.
Of the following requirements, half must be completed at
the University. New students may begin during any semester.
School of Continuing Studies
This program is approved by the American Bar Association.
Paralegals are prohibited from the practice of law except when
allowed by law or court rule. A minimum of 10 semester
credits of legal specialty courses must be taken in a traditional
classroom setting.
PLS
100
Intro to Law and Legal Studies
PLS
210
Legal Research and Writing I
PLS
211
Legal Research and Writing II
PLS
221
Law of Contracts
PLS
222
Law of Business Organizations
PLS 235Torts
PLS
310
Litigation I
PLS
311
Litigation II
PLS
400
Legal Ethics (1 credit)
and
Two PLS Electives
Note: None of the Paralegal Studies offerings are affiliated
with the Legal Studies Program offered by the University’s
day division. These include the bachelor and associate degree
programs as well as the certificate programs. Continuing
Studies students in the Paralegal Studies programs will not
satisfy degree or certificate requirements by taking Legal
Studies Program courses. Only the Paralegal Studies degree and
certificate programs are ABA approved.
School Nurse Teaching
The courses in the courses in school nurse teaching provide
knowledge and skills relevant to school teaching services. The
courses also meet the requirements of Section I, E (Temporary
Provisional Certificate) of the ‘Rhode Island Requirements for
the School Nurse Teacher.’
The courses in school nurse teaching are designed for
licensed, registered nurses who 1) are completing (or have
already completed) a Bachelor’s degree; 2) have three years of
professional nursing experience; and 3) need to complete the
course work specified under Section I, E of the Rhode Island
Requirements for the School Nurse Teacher. Students enrolled
in these courses may matriculate into the Social and Health
Services program if they wish to apply these courses toward the
Bachelor of Science.
Admission requirements include previous college
course work and/or relevant work experience, completion
of an approved program for professional nursing, an
admissions interview, a completed application form and
paid application fee.
Required Courses:
EDU
200
Foundations of Education
PSYCH 216
Educational Psychology
S&HS
408
Counseling Theory and Skills
S&HS
409
Methods and Procedures in School Nursing
S&HS
410
Methods and Materials in Health Education
S&HS
434
Principles of Program Design: Health Education
S&HS
435
Organization and Administration of School
Health Programs
S&HS
436
Education of the Exceptional Child
Note: Completion of a certificate program at Roger Williams
University does not imply the completion or fulfillment of any state
licensing or certification requirement, unless specifically noted.
A student may transfer a maximum of three credits toward an
undergraduate certificate comprised of fifteen or fewer credits
and a maximum of six credits toward a certificate of sixteen
credits or more.
Note: about course availability and location: Not all courses
required for graduation in some of the campus-based programs
will be offered at each of Roger Williams University’s campuses
or locations. In some cases, the degree selected will dictate which
location and which method of delivery the student will elect (e.g.,
classroom courses, directed seminars, on line courses). Some
programs offered through the School of Continuing Studies may
require enrollment in day classes. (See advisors for details.)
Note: about other programs and course descriptions: Program
requirements and course descriptions not found in the School of
Continuing Studies section of the catalog can be located under
listings in other appropriate sections.
179
Graduate Study
Our graduate programs are designed to prepare advanced
students for independent thought and critical thinking, and to
foster team-building and collaborative skills. Thus, graduate
education at Roger Williams University enriches the lives of
students seeking life-long learning experiences, and provides
opportunities for stimulating study and a focus on creativity
and critical analysis.
Our programs are designed for both full and part-time
students, and courses are available at a wide variety of times
and in many different formats. Roger Williams University
prides itself on outstanding library resources, excellent
computing facilities, and small classes taught by world-class
professors. Research is obviously an important component of
graduate education, and our students have the opportunity to
participate in independent investigation and mentored studies
and research projects with experienced faculty, all of which
can lead to presentations and publications. In short, Roger
Williams University seeks to provide limited graduate study
of an exemplary nature in selected disciplines for especially
capable, professionally-oriented students.
Graduate Admissions
All applicants for graduate programs must hold an earned
bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited university.
Candidates holding degrees from institutions outside the
United States will be evaluated on an individual basis at the
discretion of Roger Williams University. All applicants must
submit official transcripts of all previous undergraduate
coursework, a personal statement discussing relevant past
experiences and educational and/or career goals, a completed
and signed application, and the $50 application fee, in addition
to any program-specific requirements, which may include two
or three letters of recommendation, an entrance examination
such as the GRE or Praxis I, an admissions interview, or
portfolio. Please refer to the individual program documents to
learn the specific requirements for your program. In certain
circumstances, a credential may be waived with approval from
the appropriate dean.
Levels of Graduate Admission
There are two levels at which an applicant may be admitted to
a graduate degree program at Roger Williams University: full
admission, and non-matriculated admission. To achieve full
admission, all application materials must have been submitted
to and acted upon by the appropriate dean. RWU reserves the
right to require students to take undergraduate prerequisites
and to successfully complete them at a prescribed minimum
grade in their initial semester or semesters of enrollment as a
condition of continued participation in the program.
Special Types of Graduate Admission
Provisional Acceptance Status: Upon the recommendation of
the appropriate dean, applicants who have not satisfied all
admissions criteria, but who show potential for succeeding
at the graduate level, may be offered provisional admission.
Provisionally-accepted applicants may register for no more than
a total of nine credits of graduate course work over no more
than two consecutive semesters, provided all required course
work toward an earned bachelor’s degree has been completed.
Students must receive a grade of “B” or better in each of the
dean-approved courses in order to be re-considered for full
admission. Under no circumstance will undergraduate degree
requirements be waived. Provisional acceptance status may
not be continued for more than one year, and is subject to the
terms set by the graduate admissions committee.
Conditional Acceptance Status: Upon the recommendation of
the appropriate dean, applicants who have not submitted all
required credentials for graduate admission, but who meet
the requirements for admission, may be offered conditional
admission. Conditionally-accepted students will not be
allowed to register for graduate course work until all required
documentation has been submitted to the Office of Graduate
Admission. Under no circumstance will undergraduate degree
requirements be waived. Conditional Acceptance Status may
not be continued for more than one year and is subject to the
terms set by the graduate admissions committee.
Non-Matriculating Admission: Students who do not plan to
pursue a graduate degree, or who are unable to complete the
full graduate application by the deadline, may apply to take
graduate courses as a non-matriculated graduate student.
Please note that the programs in Architecture, Clinical
Psychology, Construction Management, Forensic Psychology,
as well as the Gordon School Teacher Residency Program,
do not permit non-matriculating students to take courses.
The program in Criminal Justice allows students to take one
course, the programs in Education allow students to take up
to two courses, and the programs in Leadership and Public
Administration allow students to take up to three courses while
in non-matriculated status. To apply, complete the “Graduate
Non-Matriculated Application” and submit a copy of the final
transcript showing an earned bachelor’s degree. Roger Williams
University reserves the right to refuse non-matriculated
graduate admission and/or to require undergraduate bridge
or prerequisite courses. Non-matriculated students who wish
to pursue a full degree program must complete the regular
application form and provide all supplemental materials before
a full admission decision will be made. Students admitted to
non-matriculated status are not eligible for federal financial aid.
Enrolling in a Graduate Course as an RWU Undergraduate
Registered full-time Roger Williams University undergraduate
students must petition the appropriate dean in writing if they
wish to enroll in a graduate course. A completed graduate
Graduate Study
The Roger Williams University community recognizes that,
in today’s global society, there is an increasing need for
knowledge and skills beyond the baccalaureate level in many
fields and disciplines. As a result, graduate education at Roger
Williams University seeks to provide advanced preparation and
continuing educational opportunities for students in a select
number of academic fields.
181
Graduate Study
course cannot replace a degree, major, or core undergraduate
course requirement. The decision of the dean is final. If
students subsequently apply to the program in which the
course was taken, at the time of application they must petition
in writing the appropriate dean for a waiver of that course. The
decision of the dean is final. If a waiver is granted, the total
number of credit hours required for the master’s degree is not
reduced. Notification of the waiver will be sent in writing from
the dean to the Registrar.
TOEFL (Test Of English as a Foreign Language)
Admissions Process for International Students
Note: this report must be an original (not a copy) and must
be sent directly from IELTS (cannot be sent by the applicant).
Original IELTS Score Report with results greater than or equal
to 6.5 bandwidth.
International students are eligible to apply to graduate
programs if they have successfully completed the equivalent
of a United States bachelor degree program and have the
appropriate diplomas and/or satisfactory results on transcripts
or examinations. In addition to general and program-specific
graduate admission requirements, international students are
required to submit:
ORIGINAL and FINAL Undergraduate Transcripts
All applicants must submit ORIGINAL college/university
scholastic records.
• Transcripts must show completion of a U.S.-equivalent
Bachelor’s degree
• Transcripts must be originals with school seal and
signature from a school official. Copies (with or without a
school stamp), emails, and faxes of transcripts in any form
are not acceptable
• Transcripts must be sent directly to RWU from the
institution of attendance in a sealed and stamped
envelope. Transcripts sent directly from the applicant will
not be accepted
• Submission of falsified documents is grounds for denial of
admission or dismissal from the University.
Official Foreign Transcript/Credential Evaluation
Graduate Study
182
Applicants with non-U.S. credentials are required to submit
a course-by-course evaluation of their transcripts, completed
by a professional foreign credential evaluation company such
as World Education Services (WES), although applicants may
use any foreign credential service that is a member of NACES
(http://www.naces.org/members.htm). The applicant must
also arrange for an official sealed transcript to be sent from
the university registrar directly to the Office of Graduate
Admission at Roger Williams University. International
applicants who completed a Bachelor’s degree in the U.S.
are not required to submit a transcript evaluation, but are
required to have original transcripts from each college that
awarded credit toward a Bachelor’s degree sent to the Office
of Graduate Admission.
English Proficiency Requirement
International applicants are required to be proficient in English
as a condition for admission. Applicants who attended at least
three years of undergraduate study in the U.S., completed their
degree in the U.S., completed their degree in an English-based
curriculum outside of the U.S., or are from a country where the
official language is English are exempt from this requirement.
Proof of English proficiency can be submitted using one of the
options below.
Note: this report must be an original (not a copy) and must be
sent directly from ETS (cannot be sent by the applicant). Original
TOEFL Score Report with results greater than or equal to:
85
iBT (internet-Based Test)
225
CBT (Computer-Based Test)
565
PBT (Paper-Based Test)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System)
As of February 1, 2011, a Certificate showing completion of Level 112 at
an ELS center is not acceptable as proof of English language proficiency.
Financial Aid
To be considered for financial aid, graduate students must
submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to
the Federal Processor after January 1st – the suggested deadline
is March 15th. The Roger Williams University Title IV code #
is 003410. Students are strongly urged to complete the FAFSA
online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Online applications are processed
much more quickly than paper applications.
Students receiving federal financial aid must complete a FAFSA
form each year of study, and may also be asked to provide
the Financial Aid Office with copies of the previous year’s
tax returns, including all schedules. All graduate students
are considered to be of independent status. Parents’ financial
information is not considered when determining eligibility
for federal student aid. Students must have completed and
submitted the following to the Office of Financial Aid to be
considered for aid:
1) FAFSA - www.fafsa.ed.gov
2) RWU Data Sheet (submit to Office of Financial Aid)
3) Copy of letter indicating full acceptance into a Master’s
degree program at RWU
Student Loans
Student loan programs provide the majority of funding for
graduate students. There are three types of loans that allow you
to borrow up to your cost of attendance and enter repayment
six to nine months after graduation.
1) Federal Direct Subsidized Loan Program - provides
students with an attractive, low interest loan. A graduate
student is eligible for up to $20,500 annually in Stafford
Loan funds. Students must submit a Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine eligibility. The
Federal Direct Graduate Plus Loan is available to fill the
gap between the Federal/Direct Stafford Loans and the
total cost of attendance. This is a credit based loan and
students must have a satisfactory credit history to qualify.
2) Private loans such as those offered by Rhode Island
Student Loan Authority, and Sallie Mae are also meant to
fill the gap between the Federal Stafford loans and total
Graduate Study
Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures
Catalog Policy
Graduate degree requirements for the catalog year in which a
graduate student matriculates to a graduate degree program
apply to his or her graduation, provided that the student
has maintained active status. The University reserves the
right to modify requirements, policies and procedures for
admission and graduation, to change the graduate program of
study, to amend any regulation affecting the student body, to
increase tuition and fees, and to dismiss from Roger Williams
University any graduate student at any time, if it is deemed by
the University to be in the best interest or the University of
the student to do so. Nothing in a University publication may
be considered as setting forth terms of a contract between a
student or prospective student and Roger Williams University.
Transfer of Graduate Credit
Subject to approval by specific graduate programs, graduate
students may in some instances transfer graduate credit for
courses taken at other institutions into their graduate degree
programs at Roger Williams University. A minimum grade of
“B” is required for transfer. A student may transfer a maximum
of six credits toward a master’s degree or three credits toward a
graduate certificate. Under no circumstances can any student
transfer more than six credits in this manner. Further, the credits
must have been earned within the past three years, and must
come from an accredited institution. Specific graduate program
areas are free to adopt more stringent policies with respect to
transfer credit at the graduate level. Transferred credits are not
calculated into the student’s grade point average.
Time to Complete Master’s Degree Requirements
All master’s degree program requirements must be satisfied
within 60 months from the first day of the first semester of
matriculation. When required, comprehensive examinations,
language examinations, thesis requirements, etc. must also
be successfully completed within this time frame. Degree
candidates must register for all terms during which they are
pursuing the degree, including terms after classroom course
work is completed.
Students may petition for an extension of time to complete
graduate degree requirements. Such petitions are granted
only when a documented exigency prevails. In no case shall
an extension be approved for more than one academic year.
To request an extension to complete degree requirements,
students must petition in writing the appropriate dean. This
petition must document the reason(s) for the request and must
include a report of work completed to date and a timetable
for completing all requirements. A separate statement from
the student’s academic advisor must address the timetable,
assessing the quality of the student’s work and verify remaining
requirements including qualifying examinations, all elements
of the thesis process, etc. must accompany this petition. This
statement and the petition are forwarded to the appropriate
dean whose decision is final.
Deadlines for Non-Classroom Graduation Requirements
Students must adhere to deadlines for comprehensive
examinations, submission of all elements of the thesis process,
and any other program requirements.
Advisement
Before registering for classes, all matriculated graduate students
must meet with their graduate faculty advisor to review
academic progress and select courses. Only members of the
Graduate Faculty may serve as graduate student advisors.
Registration for Courses
Students may begin registering for courses in November for the
Spring Semester and each April for Summer Sessions and the
Fall Semester. Students may register online using the myRWU
student portal, or may register in person at Registrar’s Office.
Before attending any class, students must officially register and
satisfy all financial obligations to the University. The University
reserves the right to deny admission to class to any student who
has not registered or remitted full payment of tuition and fees.
Add/Drop Procedure
Adding a Course
All graduate courses added after the first week of classes must be
approved by the course instructor using the Add/Drop form. The last
day to add a course is noted in the University Academic Calendar.
Dropping a Course
Courses dropped during the add/drop period are deleted from
the student’s academic record. Dropping a course may, in some
instances, impact financial aid awards. The last day to drop a
course is noted in the University Academic Calendar.
Withdrawal from a Course
After the add/drop period has ended, graduate students may
officially withdraw from a course by submitting an Add/Drop
form before the date designated in the University Academic
Calendar for the semester or session involved. A grade of W is
recorded, and students are responsible for all tuition and fees.
Credit is not assigned.
Cancellation of Courses
Courses available each semester are printed in the University
Course Schedule. The University reserves the right to cancel
sections and to change course offerings, instructors, locations,
and meeting times.
Calendar Policy
Graduate programs follow the University’s Academic Calendar,
which is maintained by the Office of the University Registrar.
Variable Content Courses
Variable content courses rotate topics on a regular basis.
Although the course number remains the same, variable
content courses may be retaken provided that the topic is not
repeated. A course that is re-numbered or re-titled but retains
its original content is not considered a variable content course,
and may not be repeated for duplicate credit.
Graduate Program Grading System
Graduate programs at Roger Williams University employ the
grading system and GPA calculations as prescribed in the RWU
General Catalog. Minimum passing grade in any graduate level
Graduate Study
cost of attendance. Each program has different terms and
eligibility requirements, but a satisfactory credit history
is essential to qualify for private loans. Students must be
taking a minimum of 6 credits in a term to be eligible.
183
Graduate Study
work is B-. Individual Schools or Colleges may require a higher
minimum passing grade. For details refer to relevant sections
of the RWU University Catalog.
Grade
Description
Grade Points
A Excellent
4.00
A-
Very Good
3.67
B+ Good
3.33
BAverage 3.00
B-
Fair2.67
FFailure 0.00
The following designations may be applied but are not
calculated in the GPA:
P
Pass NS
Not Submitted by Instructor
I
Incomplete L
Lab Participant
WWithdrawal T Transfer
AUAudit
Culminating Projects, Examinations and Theses
All graduate degree programs will include both graduate
level course work and some sort of culminating intellectual
experience. The exact nature of this culminating experience
will obviously vary from program to program, but all
graduate degree programs must have such a component. The
culminating work could be an exhibition, a research study, a
comprehensive examination, a research thesis, or a project,
depending on the needs and expectations of the graduate
degree program. The end product must be evaluated by at least
two Graduate Faculty members. Individual programs / schools
may issue their own detailed regulations in addition to these
general guidelines.
Incompletes
If a student is unable to complete assigned classroom work
by the end of the semester due to documented extenuating
circumstances, faculty may assign a grade of Incomplete (I)
if the quality of work completed warrants an extension and
provided that the student is able to complete the remaining
work. In all cases, faculty stipulate work remaining and the
duration of the extension in writing. Such extension shall not
exceed one semester.
Graduate Study
184
Faculty must submit a Change-of-Grade form by the conclusion
of the next regular semester. An Incomplete (I) is automatically
converted to an F unless the Registrar receives a Change-ofGrade before the conclusion of the next regular semester.
A student who is unable to complete assigned work in a nonclassroom course may request from faculty an extension not
to exceed one additional semester. If a Change-of-Grade form
has not been submitted before the end of the second semester,
the Incomplete (I) will be converted to an F. Beyond a second
semester, change-of-grade requests must be appealed to the
college or school Academic Standards Committee.
Other than Incompletes (I), course grades may not be changed
beyond one semester after the course is completed, except with
the approval of the appropriate college or school Academic
Standards Committee.
Repeated Courses
A course may be repeated for credit with permission of the
dean if a grade of B- or less is received on the first attempt. If
a student receives as second grade of B- or less in the repeated
course, the course may be repeated only once more. The grade
for the repeated course is calculated in the GPA in place of
the initial grade(s) provided that the course is taken at Roger
Williams University and the grade in the repeated course
is higher than the previous grade(s). The previous grade(s)
remains on the record, but neither the previous grade(s) nor
the credits are calculated. Students who repeat courses for a
higher grade must expect to do course work in the summer to
ensure minimum rate of progress and timely graduation.
All applicable tuition and fees are charged and must be
paid for all repeated courses. A course may not be repeated for
credit if a grade of B- or higher or Pass was assigned.
Right of Grade Appeal
A graduate student may appeal a final course grade if he or
she believes the grade to have been determined in error. The
initial appeal is to the course instructor. If the course instructor
agrees with the student, he or she will file a grade change.
If the instructor does not agree, the student has the right
to appeal the grade to the appropriate Academic Standards
Committee. Such an appeal must be lodged within two weeks
of the issuance of the written disapproval, and must be in
written form with appropriate supporting documentation.
The Academic Standards Committee will review the student’s
written appeal, and make a recommendation to the appropriate
Dean, who will then make a final determination in the matter.
The graduate student will be notified within three weeks of
the final decision. The Dean’s decision in such matters is final.
For details of grade appeals in the case of architectural design
studios and visual arts studio courses refer to relevant section of
the RWU University Catalog.
Semester Grades
Final Semester grades for each course in which students are
officially registered are available on-line via myRWU soon
after the close of each semester. All financial obligations must
be met before grades are submitted. Grades are not reported
by telephone.
Leave of Absence
There are two kinds of leave of absence for graduate students:
non-medical leaves of absence, and medical leaves of absence.
Each is explained below.
Students requesting non-medical and medical leaves of
absence must be in satisfactory academic standing and have
no outstanding debts to the University. A student on leave may
apply only once for an extension of his or her leave of absence,
which may not exceed one additional semester. If a leave is
extended, the appropriate Dean must notify, in writing, the
student, the Provost, the Registrar, and the Bursar. The granting
of a leave of absence does not relieve the graduate student of
the requirement to complete the graduate degree program
within the allotted period of time.
Non-Medical Leave of Absence
Students may petition the appropriate Dean for a non-medical
leave of absence from the University for one full semester, or
in the case of some graduate programs, one year. This request
must be received before the beginning of the semester. When a
leave is granted, the petition and the Dean’s authorization are
forwarded to the Registrar. A leave of absence is noted on the
graduate student’s permanent record.
Graduate Study
In the event that a student must repeat a course in order to
meet the Academic Standards policy, only the higher grade will
be calculated in the cumulative grade point average. Students
may repeat a course no more than once. Performance in all
courses is, however, reflected on the transcript.
Failure to meet the Academic Standards policy in any semester
will result in academic probation.
Dismissal
Graduate students who fail to attain satisfactory academic
standing within two semesters will be administratively
withdrawn from the graduate program, unless an exemption
is granted by the Dean of the appropriate College or School.
Such an exemption may not be granted more than once for any
particular graduate student. Only the Dean of the appropriate
College or School can administratively withdraw an enrolled
graduate student. Common grounds for dismissal of a graduate
student from the University include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Academic dishonesty or breech of academic integrity;
Evidence that degree requirements will not be met within
the stated time limits;
Unsatisfactory academic standing;
Failure to meet deadlines for or completion of nonclassroom graduate requirements; or
Violation of any University policy.
Conduct inconsistent with the standards of behavior
or performance established by the accrediting body of
that program.
Graduate Programs
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Initial Certification Programs
Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)
Elementary Education
Roger Williams University offers two Elementary Education
programs leading to the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT).
The first is a campus-based program that working adults
generally complete in two years. The second is a residency
program offered in partnership with the Gordon School in East
Providence. Both programs lead to certification as a grade 1-6
teacher in Rhode Island and all as participants in the Interstate
Certification Compact (ICC).* Individuals preparing to enter
the teaching profession through either program should be highperforming students who are eager to investigate the challenges
of collaborating with colleagues and partnering with families
to teach all students in America’s diverse classrooms to high
standards, and to ensure that all students achieve at high levels.
Campus-based Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)
Elementary Education
The campus-based Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)
Elementary Education Program is standards-based and provides
a rich background in educational history, research, philosophy,
developmental and learning theories, and the art and practice of
teaching. All learning experiences are guided by the Rhode Island
Professional Teaching Standards and provide candidates with
opportunities to build connections between theory and practice.
Currently it is a 49-credit program and includes 13 courses, clustered
into three Curriculum Levels, and arranged in a developmental
sequence: Level I, Exploring the Profession; Level II, Preparing to
Teach; and Level III, Performing in the Classroom.**
In Level I, candidates develop a knowledge base and participate
in field experiences in three introductory courses. In Level II,
candidates develop expertise in instructional and assessment
practices that are critical to their roles as elementary teachers.
In Level III, candidates use the broad-based knowledge
developed in the first two levels while they prepare to assume
and carry out their roles as elementary classroom teachers.
MAT students are assessed by the RWU Teacher Education
Performance Assessment System. The guiding principles of
performance assessment suggest that all students should be
evaluated on their highest performance in a given area. During
Graduate Study
Medical Leave of Absence
A graduate student requesting a medical leave of absence must
first contact the Office of Student Affairs. Graduate students
requesting a medical leave of absence must complete the
appropriate paperwork.
Petition for Reinstatement
Graduate students in good standing, who have not registered
for a University graduate degree program for one or more
semesters, and who wish to resume a graduate degree
program must petition the appropriate Dean in writing and
request readmission to the University and to the graduate
degree program. The petition must be evaluated on the
basis of: (1) the semester in which the graduate student will
return; (2) remaining graduate program requirements; (3)
a realistic time frame for completing all remaining graduate
program degree requirements; and (4) evidence that the
student is in satisfactory academic standing. Copies of the
Dean’s written decision are forwarded to the student, the
Provost, and the Registrar.
Application for Degree
To become a candidate for graduation, the student must file the
Degree Application before registering for the final semester.
The degree application must be submitted to and reviewed by
the appropriate dean who then forwards the application to the
Office of the Registrar. Degrees are conferred in December,
May, and August. Commencement and hooding ceremonies for
degree candidates occur only in May. Only students who will
have satisfied all degree requirements by the end of the Spring
Semester and have the cumulative grade-point average in the
semester before graduation of 3.0 or higher, may participate in
the Hooding Ceremony and Commencement. Responsibility
for satisfying all degree requirements rests with the student.
Academic Standards Policy
Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of
3.0 or higher to remain in satisfactory academic standing.
However, no more than 20% of credits for course work
attempted that carries a grade below B will be applied toward
graduation requirements. Receiving more than two grades of
Incomplete or failing to complete degree requirements within
the specified period constitutes grounds for dismissal from
the program.
185
Graduate Study
course work, MAT students are continually evaluated in the
context of preparation to perform real teaching tasks. In addition
to the materials they have submitted for program admission,
MAT candidates complete a Preparing to Teach Portfolio that
includes evidence, selected by the candidate from Level I and
Level II coursework, of their progress in meeting the Rhode
Island Professional Teaching Standards (RIPTS). Evaluation at
Level III consists of an oral presentation in which the candidate
reviews his or her preparation to enter student teaching, and a
Performing in the Classroom Portfolio containing evidence of
the candidate’s progress in practicum and student teaching, and
of his or her readiness to be recommended to the Rhode Island
Department of Education for certification to teach in grades 1-6.
Because the Portfolio specifications undergo periodic revision,
candidates are referred to the School of Education’s website for
the most recent documents.
Applying to the Campus-based MAT Program
To be considered for admission applicants must hold an earned
Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university.
Applicants must submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and
graduate coursework.
2. Personal statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
explaining why you want to become an elementary
school teacher.
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school and to work with children.
4. Current resume or CV.
5. Evidence of basic skills, set by the Rhode Island
Department of Education (RIDE).
6. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results.
7. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee.
Graduate Study
186
The School of Education also requires a personal interview
as part of the admissions process. After submitting your
completed application to the Office Graduate Admission,
contact the office of the Dean of the School of Education at
401-254-3309 to schedule an interview.
Requirements for the Campus-based Master of Arts in
Teaching: Elementary Education
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
Curriculum Level 1: Exploring the Profession
EDU
501
Foundations of Educational Research
EDU
503
Research in Learning and Development
Curriculum Level 2: Preparing to Teach
EDU
507
Introduction to Elementary Literacy
Practices I
EDU
508
Multicultural Education/Urban Education
EDU
509
Standards-based Science in the
Elementary Classroom
EDU
511
Standards-based Mathematics in the
Elementary Classroom
EDU
513
Contemporary Issues in Health Education
(1 credit)
EDU
515
Introduction to Elementary Literacy
Practices II
EDU
517
Introduction to Special Education
Research and Practice
EDU
521
Thematic Curriculum: Social Studies
and Literacy
Curriculum Level 3: Performing in the Classroom
EDU
601
Graduate Practicum in Student Teaching
EDU
603
Graduate Student Teaching in Elementary
Education (12 credits)
EDU
604
Graduate Student Teaching Seminar
Teacher Residency Program at the Gordon School
and Roger Williams University:
Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)
Elementary Education
The Teacher Residency MAT program is a jointly offered, full
time, 12-month immersion program in which graduate students
work as Teaching Residents with experienced teachers during
school hours, and enroll in courses taught by RWU on the
Bristol campus, and Gordon faculty on-site in East Providence,
throughout the summer and regular academic year. The
program is designed to enable Teaching Residents to integrate
theory, research, and practical experience in a classroom and
school community that values and practices multicultural
education and teaching for social justice. Additionally, it
provides opportunities to work intensively with elementary
students in Providence Schools during the Summer and Winter
Intersession terms.
Students in the Teacher Residency Program are assessed by
a modified version of the RWU Teacher Education Performance
Assessment System. The guiding principles of performance
assessment suggest that all students should be evaluated on
their highest performance in a given area. During course work,
Teaching Residents are continually evaluated in the context
of preparing and performing real teaching tasks. In addition
to the materials they have submitted for program admission,
candidates complete assessments in Internship and Seminar
I (Fall) and Internship and Seminar II (Spring). They present
their Portfolios orally towards the conclusion of the program.
Applying to the Teacher Residency MAT Program
To be considered for admission, applicants must hold an earned
Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university.
Applicants must submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework.
2. Personal statement (two-three pages) describing why you
have chosen to become a teacher and how the Teacher
Residency Program will help you achieve your specific
goals. Reflect on how your previous educational, personal,
or professional experiences have led you to this important
point in your professional journey.
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your abilities
in some of the following areas: communicate effectively
orally and in writing; work with children, especially in
groups; receive and use feedback; work collaboratively in
teams; flexibility, adaptability, and ability to improvise and
respond to the spontaneity and messiness of learning; and/
or willingness to be questioned, observed, and challenged.
Graduate Study
4. Current resume or CV.
5. Evidence of basic skills, set by the Rhode Island
Department of Education (RIDE).
6. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results.
7. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee.
Applying to the Middle School Certificate
To be considered for admission to the Middle School Certificate
sequence, applicants must submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework.
2. Completed “Non-matriculated Graduate Application.”
The Teacher Residency Program also requires personal
interviews and a school visit as part of the admissions process.
After submitting your completed application to the Office
of Graduate Admission, contact the Director of the Teacher
Residency Program at the Gordon School, 401-434-3833 to
schedule an interview and visit.
Requirements for the Teacher Residency Master of Arts in
Teaching: Elementary Education
EDU
502
Foundations in Educational Research:
Perspectives in Social Justice
EDU
504
Psychology of Development and Learning
EDU
507
Introduction to Elementary Literacy
Practices I
EDU
509
Standards-based Science in the
Elementary Classroom
EDU
511
Standards-based Mathematics in the
Elementary Classroom
EDU
512
Fieldwork in an Urban Community
EDU
515
Introduction to Elementary Literacy
Practices II
EDU
518
Research and Practice in the Inclusive
Classroom: A field-based Experience
EDU
520
Studio Experience: Methods and Materials
in Art Education
EDU
521
Thematic Curriculum: Social Studies
and Literacy
EDU
522
Multicultural Children’s Literature
EDU
526
Internship and Seminar I
EDU
606
Internship and Seminar II
The Roger Williams University Master of Arts in Literacy
Education is a 31-credit program, leading to certification as a
PK-12 Reading Specialist/Consultant in Rhode Island and in
member states of the Interstate Certification Compact (ICC).
Middle School Certificate
The Middle School Certificate is a three-course sequence
for licensed teachers leading to endorsement in the state of
Rhode Island as a middle school teacher (grades 5-8) in one of
the following content areas: Mathematics, English, Science,
Social Studies, or Foreign Languages. Teacher candidates
in Elementary or Secondary education at both the graduate
and undergraduate levels, as well as certified Elementary or
Secondary school teachers are eligible for this program and
the resulting certification. Candidates must have completed at
least 21 semester hours in the content areas of Mathematics,
English, Science, or Social Studies.
The program consists of nine credits of course work and a
supervised field experience in a middle school:
1) EDU 541: Young Adolescent Development
2) EDU 542: Middle School Curriculum and School Organization
3) EDU 543: Applied Middle School Instruction and Assessment
The program is part-time, and graduate students take at least
one course each fall, spring, and summer semesters and
travel in cohort groups. A new cohort group begins each fall
with students matriculating in EDU 610: Introduction to
Literacy Research. All learning experiences are guided by the
National Standards for Reading Professionals as set forth by the
International Reading Association.
The program includes nine courses, clustered into three
Curriculum Levels, and arranged in a developmental sequence:
Level I, Explorations; Level II, Investigations; and Level III,
Professionalism. In Level I, Explorations, candidates develop
a knowledge base and participate in field experiences in two
introductory courses. In Level II, Investigations, candidates
develop expertise in instructional and assessment skills that
are critical to their roles as literacy professionals. In Level III,
Professionalism, candidates build on the broad based knowledge
they developed in the first two phases and prepare to assume and
carry out leadership roles as literacy professionals.
Applying to the Master of Arts in Literacy Program
To be considered for admission to the Master of Arts in Literacy
degree program, applicants must hold an earned Bachelor’s
Degree from an accredited college or university and a current
valid teacher’s license. To apply, submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework.
2. Personal statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
explaining why you want to become a literacy specialist.
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school and to work with children.
4. Current resume or CV.
5. Copy of current teacher’s certificate or license.
6. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results.
7. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee.
The School of Education also requires a personal interview as
part of the admissions process.
Requirements for the Master of Arts in Literacy Education
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
Curriculum Level 1: Explorations
EDU
610
Introduction to Literacy Research
EDU
616
Research-Based Literacy Practices I:
Writing Across the Curriculum, K-12
Graduate Study
Advanced Certification Programs
Master of Arts in Literacy Education
187
Graduate Study
Curriculum Level 2: Investigations
EDU
618
Literature for Children and Young Adults
EDU
620
Research-Based Literacy Practices II:
Reading Across the Curriculum, K-12
EDU
622
Research-Based Literacy Practices III:
Preparing Strategic Readers, K-12
EDU
634
Assessment of Reading and Writing
Difficulties
EDU
638
Clinical Experience in Literacy Education
(6 credits)
Curriculum Level 3: Professionalism
EDU
650
Leadership for Literacy Professionals
EDU
654
Advanced Literacy Research Seminar
(4 credits)
SCHOOL OF JUSTICE STUDIES
Master of Science in Criminal Justice
Graduate Study
188
The Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice program
(36 credit hours) prepares graduates to formulate justice
system policy and serve effectively as administrators
to United States justice system agencies. The master’s
program permits students to explore the fields of
Criminology, examining the nature and causes of crime,
and Justice System Management, which focuses on
modern administrative theory, legal issues in personnel
administration, and the management of criminal justice
agencies. Students must complete a series of core courses,
which provide a solid foundation in modern justice system
theory and practice. By the time students have completed
the core requirements, they must choose one of two tracks:
Thesis or Non-Thesis. This choice will impact the number
of electives they take and whether they enroll to take the
Comprehensive Examination or Thesis hours. Students
may enroll either on a full-time or part-time basis in these
degree programs.
Applying to the Master of Science in Criminal
Justice Program
To be considered for admission to the Master of Science
in Criminal Justice degree program, applicants must hold
an earned Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or
university. To apply, submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework.
2. Personal statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
describing your interest in Criminal Justice, relevant past
experiences and career goals.
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school.
4. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results.
5. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee.
Note: Applicants with an overall GPA below 3.00 (B) are strongly
encouraged to take either the GRE or MAT; applicants for the Joint
M.S./J.D. must apply separately to the School of Law, and must
submit an LSAT score.
Course Requirements for the Master of Science in
Criminal Justice
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
Thesis Option:
CJS
501
Criminal Justice System Overview
CJS
503
Survey of Research Methods
CJS
505
Legal Issues in the U.S. Justice System
CJS
509
Crime and Public Policy
CJS
511
Criminological Theory
CJS
513
Analysis of Criminal Justice Data
CJS
605
Thesis (up to 6 credits)
CJS Electives (4-6 courses)
Non-Thesis Option:
CJS
501
Criminal Justice System Overview
CJS
503
Survey of Research Methods
CJS
505
Legal Issues in the U.S. Justice System
CJS
509
Crime and Public Policy
CJS
511
Criminological Theory
CJS
513
Analysis of Criminal Justice Data
CJS Electives (6 courses)
Comprehensive Exam (no credit given)
Joint Master of Science/Juris Doctor
Offered with the RWU School of Law. Full-time
enrollment required.
Drawing on the strengths of the Roger Williams University
School of Law as well as the School of Justice Studies, RWU
offers a concentrated joint degree program for students
interested in criminal justice. The dual degree program allows
matriculated students to complete the Juris Doctor (JD) and the
Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) in an accelerated
period of study. To earn the degree students must complete
78 credits at the School of Law and 24 credits in the School of
Justice Studies. The School of Law and the School of Justice
Studies will each accept 12 transfer credits from the other. The
effect of these credit transfers between the School of Law and
the School of Justice Studies would be to reduce the overall
time needed to complete both degrees from four and a half
years to three and a half years, assuming full-time study.
Note: Applicants applying for the Joint M.S./J.D. degree must
apply to and earn acceptance into the Graduate School of Justice
Studies and the School of Law separately. Applicants who intend
to pursue the joint degree must so indicate on the application
for admission. Applications should be submitted sufficiently in
advance of the application deadline to assure adequate processing
time at both Schools. Ordinarily, applications to each school
would be filed simultaneously, even if the student will not be
taking courses at both schools during the first year of study.
However, a student matriculated in either the M.S. or J.D.
program could apply to the other school in order to pursue the
joint degree prior to the end of the first year of study.
Transferable Course Requirements for the Joint M.S./J.D.
Degree Program:
The four Justice Studies courses that are transferable to the
School of Law are:
1) CJS 503 Survey of Research Methods
2) CJS 509 Crime and Public Policy
Graduate Study
4) A LAW elective from one of the following: LAW 631
Administrative Law, LAW 681 Advanced Evidence, LAW 860
Criminal Defense Clinic, LSM 890 Seminar in Domestic Violence
the most up-to date transcript is acceptable. Applicants do not
need to hold a degree from a computer science-related field,
however, applicants must have a minimum level of knowledge
(See the program director for details). Applicants must also
submit two letters of recommendation which can be academic
or professional. All applicants to the M.S. in Cybersecurity
are required to have a BCI check (criminal background
check) completed from their state of residence as part of the
application process. A copy of the BCI is all that is required to
be submitted. Students who need assistance with this process
should contact RWU.
Master of Science in Cybersecurity
Graduate Digital Forensics Certificate
The four School of Law courses that are transferable to Justice
Studies are:
1) LAW 623 Criminal Law
2) LAW 627 Criminal Procedure - Investigation
3) LAW 682 Criminal Procedure - Adjudication
This program works to provide students with a thorough
grounding in the technology and practice of cybersecurity.
The program focuses on development of career professionals
wishing to document their skillset, develop their skills in
this arena, or improve on their security skill set related to
technology. Ideal candidates have some technical background
or are willing to pursue study prior to beginning the program
to develop their technology background. The program is
designed around industry certs and standards and shall provide
a diverse background leading to entry level careers (for those
transitioning from other areas) and career advancement (for
those with prior background in technology). The program is
taught online using virtual environments to support simulation
and analysis of operating systems. Theory and practice are both
considered critical components of the program. Students shall
complete a limited on site matriculation for a capstone project
and a thesis demonstrating research capabilities.
Applying to the Master of Science in Cybersecurity Program
Students should submit an application to the University which
includes copies of transcripts (which include: clear indication
of the receipt of an undergraduate degree; indication of
completion of 2 computer programming courses and two
networking courses within the last 10 years or a plan to
complete these courses as a deficiency; and a copy of a local
BCI (or equivalent document; BCI documents can normally be
obtained from a local police agency or other State of Federal
institution, assistance from RWU may be obtained for this
portion of the application if necessary).
Course Requirements for the Master of Science in Cybersecurity
CJS 542
Digital Forensics I
CJS
545
Law for Forensics Professionals
SEC
600
CyberSecurity Essentials I
SEC
605
Auditing of Networking, Security
and Technology
SEC615Intrusion Detection: Firewalling and Defense
SEC
620
Malware: Analysis and Malicious Software
SEC
625
Pen Testing and Incident Response
SEC
630
CyberIntelligence and Cybersecurity
One Elective from SEC 500 or 600 courses (or other
approved elective)
SEC
650
Cybersecuriy Research and Thesis
Applying to the Master of Science in Cybersecurity
Applicants must hold an earned bachelor’s degree in any field
from an accredited four-year college or university, and must
submit an official transcript showing a conferred degree. If an
undergraduate degree is still in progress, an official copy of
The study of digital forensics is a growing field for both law
enforcement as well as corporate employees. Within this five
course certificate students will understand NTFS and FAT
Operating Systems, be able to develop sound evidence for
presentation in court and be able to manage evidence in a safe
and acceptable fashion.
Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited college or university in order to be eligible for
Graduate Certificate Admission.
Admission requirements are:
1. Application Form
2. Official transcripts for all previous undergraduate and
graduate work
3. All University required fees
Required Courses:
CJS
540
Digital Forensics Hardware and Acquisition
CJS
542
Digital Forensics I
CJS
543
Computer Forensics II
CJS
544
Computer Forensics III
CJS
545
Law for Forensics Professionals
Graduate Cyberspecialist Certificate*
This certificate allows individuals with a technical background
to expand their cybersecurity skillset with technical coursework
in the program.
Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited college or university in order to be eligible for
Graduate Certificate Admission.
Applicants must have completed two networking and two
programming courses within the last 10 years.
Other admission requirements are:
1. Application Form
2. Official transcripts for all previous undergraduate and
graduate work
3. All University required fees
Required Courses:
SEC
615
Intrusion Detection: Firewalling and Defense
SEC
620
Malware Analysis and Malicious Software
SEC
625
Pen Testing and Incident Response
Graduate Study
3) CJS 511 Criminological Theory
4) CJS 513 Analysis of Criminal Justice Data
189
Graduate Study
Graduate Cybersecurity Certificate*
This certificate allows individuals the opportunity to explore
cybersecurity without the technical requirement commitment.
Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited college or university in order to be eligible for
Graduate Certificate Admission.
Other admission requirements are:
1. Application Form
2. Official transcripts for all previous undergraduate and
graduate work
3. All University required fees
Required Courses:
SEC
600
CyberSecurity Essentials I
SEC
605
Auditing of Networking, Security,
and Technology
SEC
630
CyberIntelligence and Cybersecurity
*A student may be awarded the Master of Science in
Cybersecurity after the successful completion of the three
certificates, Digital Forensics, Cyberspecialist, and Cybersecurity.
Master of Science in Leadership (M.S.)
Graduate Study
190
The Master of Science in Leadership is a 36-credit
hour program designed for individuals who seek to
acquire or update dynamic leadership skills that can
create high performance organizations. The program is
designed to prepare students to address the challenges
that organizations are likely to face in the globalized,
technological world of the 21st Century. Students will
apply new paradigms, techniques and methods to promote
creativity, innovation, improvisation and adaptation.
Leadership skills acquired from the curriculum include
communication, negotiation, the leadership process,
accountability, inclusive excellence leadership, and strategic
leadership. The Master of Science in Leadership program
seeks to create the following competencies:
• A clear understanding of the political, social, economic,
and cultural environments in which a leader must operate
• An awareness of personal leadership strengths and
weaknesses and strategies to improve deficits
• Strategic planning using resource allocation, sound
research, data analysis and innovation
• Insight into international perspectives through the use of
case studies of non-U.S. developed and developing countries
• The ability to make leadership decisions which are ethical,
efficient, and informed by research, evaluation, and
diagnoses of situations
• Effective leadership of diverse groups through the accurate
use of supportive organizational mechanisms and the
ability to identify and address forces that detract from
effective diversity leadership
• The ability to apply leadership skills and behaviors to build
the human, social, intellectual, and financial capital for
the sustainability of their organizations
•
The skills to lead groups and organizations in the design
and implementation of new paradigms, effectively utilizing
leadership to enhance the reputation of organizations in
domestic and global contexts
Courses within the curriculum cover the leadership process,
communication skills, diversity management, research,
budgeting, organizational performance and conflict resolution.
The 12-course sequence provides students with leadership
principles as a foundation and adds skill areas important
for leading complex organizations in global and community
contexts. Students pursue critical thinking and analysis skills to
add to the leadership principles. The students will complete the
Leadership program with leadership analysis projects requiring
self-assessment and research skills.
Applying to the Master of Science in Leadership
To be considered for admission to the Master of Science in
Leadership degree program, applicants must hold an earned
Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university. To
apply, submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework.
2. A career statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
describing your interest in leadership, career goals, and
anticipated contributions to the Master of Science in
Leadership at Roger Williams University.
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school.
4. A current resume.
5. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results.
6. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee.
Course Requirements for the Master of Science in Leadership
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
Required Courses:
LEAD
501
Leaders and the Leadership Process
LEAD
502
Communication Skills for Leadership Roles
LEAD
503
Data Management and Analysis for
Organizational Leaders
LEAD
504
Inclusive Excellence and the Leadership Role
LEAD
505
Budgeting and Finance in
Complex Organizations
LEAD
506
Human Resources Management for
Organizational Leaders
LEAD
507
Strategic Leadership in a Globalized World
LEAD
508
Developing Creative High
Performance Organizations
LEAD
509
Negotiation Strategies
LEAD
510
Stakeholder Relations in Complex Organizations
LEAD
511
Organizational Dynamics
LEAD
599
Capstone in Leadership
Elective Coursework:
LEAD
530 Special Topics in Leadership
Certificate in Leadership:
Students interested in exploring graduate study in leadership
through a shorter course of study should consider a Graduate
Graduate Study
Admission into the Graduate Certificate program will not be
granted to those without a complete application including
an appropriate bachelor’s degree. Roger Williams University
reserves the right to refuse admission and/or to require
undergraduate bridge or prerequisite courses.
The Leadership Certificate is composed of five courses
selected from the following list:
LEAD 501
Leaders and the Leadership Process
LEAD 502
Communication Skills for Leadership Roles
LEAD 503
Inclusive Excellence and the Leadership Role
LEAD 597
Strategic Leadership in a Globalized World
LEAD 510
Stakeholder Relations in
Complex Organizations
LEAD
530
Special Topics in Leadership
Master of Public Administration (MPA)
The Master of Public Administration program (MPA) is a
36-credit hour program designed for individuals employed
or interested in service in federal, state, local, regional, and
international government, non-profit and non-governmental
organizations. Non-profit organizations include museums,
membership associations, and other 501 (c) (3) institutions.
Non-profit organizations also include hospitals, clinics, and
nursing homes. The curriculum is based on the standards
of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and
Administration (NASPAA). The MPA Program seeks to create
competencies for the student in line with those of NASPAA.
At the completion of the degree students should be
competent to:
1. manage in public organizations
2. participate in and contribute to the policy process
3. analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve problems, and
make decisions
4. communicate and interact with diverse groups and in
diverse settings
The degree program will also emphasis the following public
service values:
1.Accountability
2.Transparency
3. Respect for citizen privacy
4. Ethical actions and values
5. Participatory process
Courses within the curriculum are grouped into four areas:
core courses, areas of concentration, research/internship,
and capstone experience. The six-course core sequence
provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to
become effective public managers. Students then pursue a
greater depth of study in a four course concentration in either
public management or health care administration. Following
the core course sequence and the chosen concentration,
students complete either an internship (pre-service students)
or a research course (in-service students). The 36-credit
hour curriculum is completed with a capstone project of
the student’s own design guided by faculty advisement. As
students’ progress through the Program they are encouraged
to draw on the full array of research opportunities available
through the MPA and allied resources as they consider their
capstone project.
Applying to the MPA Program
To be considered for admission to the Master of Public
Administration degree program, applicants must hold an earned
Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university. To
apply, submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and
graduate coursework.
2. Career statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
describing interest in Public Administration/Management,
career goals, and contributions to the Master’s Program in
Public Administration at Roger Williams University.
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school.
4. Current resume.
5. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results.
6. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee.
Course Requirements for the Master of Public Administration
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
Required Courses:
PA 501 Foundations of Public Administration:
Legal and Institutional
PA 502 Organizational Dynamics
PA 503 Data Management and Analysis
PA 504 Public Policy and Program Evaluation
PA 505 Public Budgeting & Finance
PA 506 Public Personnel Management
Choose an area of specialization and complete four courses. Either:
Public Management Concentration Courses (complete four (4) of
the eight (8) courses)
PA
512 Intergovernmental Relations
PA 513 Public Administration and Public Law
PA 514 Urban Administration and Management
PA 515 Ethics in Public Administration
PA 516 Grant Writing and Management
PA 517 Computer Applications for Public Managers
PA 518 Program Evaluation
Graduate Study
Certificate program in Leadership. Students may earn a
Certificate in Leadership to complement their professional
credentials. A separate application process is required.
Applying to the Graduate Certificate Program in Leadership
Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited college or university in order to be eligible for
Graduate Certificate Admission. Admission requirements are:
1. Admissions application;
2. Official transcripts for all previous undergraduate and
graduate work;
3. Proof of undergraduate bachelor’s degree from a regionally
accredited college or university;
4. Possible admissions interview depending on the
background of the student;
5. Any required application fees
191
Graduate Study
PA 0r:
530 Special Topics in Public Administration
Health Care Administration Concentration Courses (complete all
six (6) courses)
PA 530 Special Topics in Health Care
Administration
PA 550 Health Care Administration
PA 551 Public Policy and Politics in Health Care
Administration
PA 552 Trends and Issues in Health
Administration
PA 553 Economics of Health and Medical Care
PA
554
Health Informatics
Internship/Research Requirement and Directed Study
Requirement
PA 580 Internship in Public Administration
PA 590 Research in Public Administration
PA 599 Directed Study in Public Administration
Certificates in Public Management and Health
Care Administration:
The student may earn an MPA and a certificate. Students enrolled in
the MPA may take a fifth course in either of the two concentrations
and apply for a certificate in the chosen concentration.
Certificate in Leadership:
Students in the MPA may add a Leadership Certificate to
complement their MPA and selected concentration. The
Leadership Certificate is composed of five additional courses.
The Leadership Certificate is described under the Master of
Science in Leadership.
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology
Graduate Study
192
A two year full or part time program, the Master of Arts in
Clinical Psychology is designed to prepare students, to provide
clinical services, assessment and treatment, in a clinical
or counseling setting such as a community mental health
or in-patient facility. Students may also prepare for further
training at the doctoral level. Students will be trained in
psychological testing, treatment, treatment planning, research
methodology and psychopathology.
Academic Program
The Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology curriculum is
arranged in two tracks: (1) Non Thesis/Practitioner (for
students seeking specialized training in psychology prior
to entering the work force as a master’s level clinician)
and (2) Thesis (for students seeking master’s level training
in psychology as preparation for future study toward a
doctoral degree in psychology). The nine-course core
curriculum provides students with the breadth and depth
needed in both the theoretical foundation as well as
the research and skills necessary to become clinicians.
Students then select four electives from various areas
within clinical psychology. Finally, students take six
credits of Thesis or Practicum according to their track for
a minimum of 45 credits. All Practicum students who seek
the Practitioner model must also successfully complete a
comprehensive examination in lieu of the Thesis as part of
the graduation requirements.
Career Settings for Students Graduating with a Master of
Arts in Clinical Psychology
The Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology seeks to:
• Prepare graduate students for careers in mental health
systems as clinical specialists
• Prepare graduate students for further academic training at
the doctorate level in psychology
• Provide students with training in graduate research and
statistical design
• Provide students with training in the areas of clinical
assessment and evaluation
• Provide students with internship/practicum experiences
that will promote and develop the professional skills
required in the specialty areas of applied psychology
• To provide students with the requisite skills to prepare, plan,
and carry out competent research designs in psychology
Applying to the Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology Program
Applicants should have an undergraduate degree in Psychology,
Criminal Justice, or related field, and must have satisfactorily
completed undergraduate courses in Statistics and Research
Methods. To apply, applicants must submit the following items
to the Office Graduate Admission:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate records
2. Personal statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
describing your interest in Clinical Psychology, career
goals, and how you can positively contribute to the
graduate program at Roger Williams University
3. Official report of Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
scores sent directly by the Educational Testing Service
(ETS). The ETS School Code for Roger Williams University
is 3729
4. Three letters of recommendation attesting to your
academic accomplishments and potential to succeed in
graduate school
5. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results
6. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee
Applications are accepted for Fall start only; the application
deadline is March 15th.
Course Requirements for the Master of Arts in Clinical
Psychology Program
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
A. Required courses: 27 credits
PSYCH 501
Research Design
PSYCH 502
Quantitative Methods I
PSYCH 505
Introduction to Clinical Assessment:
Objective Tests
PSYCH 509
Methods of Psychotherapy I
PSYCH 515
Introduction to Group Counseling
PSYCH 532
Cross Cultural Psychology
PSYCH 550
Professional Ethics in Psychology
An additional assessment course (choose from the following)
PSYCH 506
Assessment in Criminal Law
PSYCH 507
Assessment Issues in Civil Law
PSYCH 512
Child Assessment
A psychopathology course (choose from the following)
PSYCH 520
Developmental Psychopathology
PSYCH 521
Adult Psychopathology
B. Advanced Electives: 12 credits selected from the following:
PSYCH 508
Forensic Report Writing
PSYCH 510
Quantitative Methods II
PSYCH 511
Children, Adolescents, and the Law
PSYCH 513
Vocational Counseling
PSYCH 515
Introduction to Group Counseling
PSYCH 519
Methods in Psychotherapy II
PSYCH 530
Special Topics in Psychology
PSYCH 531
Family Violence
PSYCH 533
Law and Mental Health
PSYCH 534
Advanced Developmental Psychology
PSYCH 535
Group Dynamics: Methods & Design
PSYCH 540
Advanced Personality Psychology
C. Thesis/Practicum: 6 credits selected according to the
student’s track:
Pre-service students take: PSYCH 598: Practicum twice for
total of 6 credits
Thesis students take:
PSYCH 597
Thesis and PSYCH 598 Practicum
or
PSYCH 597
Thesis twice for total of 6 credits.
(Minimum of 45 credits)
Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology
A two-year, full-time program, the Master of Arts in Forensic
Psychology is designed to prepare students to provide
assessment and treatment services in a forensic setting or
further training at the doctoral level. Students will be trained
in psychological testing, treatment, research methodology
and psychopathology.
Internships and practica are available at a variety of
forensic sites. Experiences include the areas of group
psychotherapy, sex offender treatment, individual
psychotherapy, psychological testing, and specialized
assessment techniques. Research-based internships are
also available.
Academic Program
The Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology curriculum
is arranged in two tracks: (1) Non-Thesis/Practitioner
(for students seeking specialized training in psychology
prior to entering the work force as master’s level forensic
practitioners), and (2) Thesis (for students seeking master’s
level training in psychology as preparation for future study
toward a doctoral degree in psychology). The nine-course
core sequence provides students with the breadth and
depth needed in both the theoretical foundation as well
as the research and skills necessary to become forensic
psychologists. Students then select four electives from various
areas within Forensic Psychology. Finally, students take six
credits of Thesis or Practicum according to their track, for a
minimum of 45 credits.
Career Settings for Students Graduating with a Master of
Arts in Forensic Psychology
The Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology seeks to:
• Prepare graduate students for careers in civil and criminal
justice systems as forensic specialists
• Prepare graduate students for further academic training at
the doctorate level in psychology and forensic psychology
• Provide students with training in graduate research and
statistical design
• Provide students with training in the areas of forensic
assessment and evaluation
• Provide students with training in preparation as
legal/forensic consultants and evaluators in the
areas of forensic assessments, custody issues, suicide
evaluation, expert testimony, jury selection, program
evaluation, injury assessments, and Social Security
Disability requirements
• Provide students with internship experiences that will
promote and help to develop the professional skills
required in the specialty areas of forensic psychology
• Provide students with the requisite skills to prepare, plan,
and carry out competent research designs in psychology.
Applying to the Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology Program
Applicants should have an undergraduate degree in Psychology,
Criminal Justice, or related field, and must have satisfactorily
completed undergraduate courses in Statistics and Research
Methods. To apply, students must submit the following items to
the Office of Graduate Admission:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate records
2. Personal statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
describing your interest in Forensic Psychology, career
goals, and how you can positively contribute to the
graduate program at Roger Williams University
3. Official report of Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
scores sent directly by the Educational Testing Service
(ETS). The ETS School Code for Roger Williams University
is 3729
4. Three letters of recommendation attesting to your
academic accomplishments and potential to succeed in
graduate school
5. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results
6. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee
Applications are accepted for Fall start only; the application
deadline is March 15th.
Requirements for the Master of Arts in Forensic
Psychology Program
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
Graduate Study
Graduate Study
193
Graduate Study
A. Required Courses: 27 credits
PSYCH 501
Research Design
PSYCH 502
Quantitative Methods I
PSYCH 503
Forensic Psychology
PSYCH 504
Psychology and the Law
PSYCH 505
Introduction to Clinical Assessment:
Objective Tests
PSYCH 532
Cross Cultural Psychology
PSYCH 550
Ethics in Professional Psychology
An additional assessment course (choose from the following)
PSYCH 506
Assessment in Criminal Law
PSYCH 507
Assessment Issues in Civil Law
A psychopathology course (choose from the following)
PSYCH 520
Developmental Psychopathology
PSYCH 521
Adult Psychopathology
PSYCH 525
Psychology of Criminal Behavior
Graduate Study
194
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, ART &
HISTORIC PRESERVATION
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)
The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation offers
the Master of Architecture professional degree program for
entering graduate students who hold a pre-professional B.A.
or B.S. in Architecture degree. Our goals include preparing
students to enter the profession of architecture, to prepare for
licensure, to provide for a sufficient depth of understanding
of the components of architectural practice and to understand
the diverse nature and variety of roles for architects in relation
to other fields. The program encourages the mastery and
skillful integration of environmental, social, historical, artistic,
technical and philosophical concerns into carefully scaled
designs that enhance their context.
Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology 4+1
Students develop design, visual and digital communication skills;
knowledge of building techniques; and an understanding of
human problems in a variety of local, regional and international
contexts. In a world of continuous technological change, these
timeless values and skills exist as relevant tools for contemporary
life and practice, and as a means toward advancing the cause of a
humane and civilized environment for all.
Applying to the Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) Program
Applicants must hold a B.A. or B.S. (*) in Architecture
degree program with a GPA of 3.0 or higher from a school of
architecture that offers this degree as part of the accredited
professional degree program sequence(**). Applicants
from other undergraduate programs may be considered for
admission, but would be expected if admitted to complete
coursework inclusive of coverage of all Student Performance
Criteria outlined in the NAAB Conditions of Accreditation. To
apply, submit the following:
1. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework
2. Personal statement (two double-spaced pages maximum)
explaining your interest in obtaining the Master of
Architecture degree
3. Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school
4. Portfolio containing examples of your work (see below)
5. If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOEFL or IELTS results
6. Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee
The 4+1 Program will allow qualified undergraduate
psychology majors the opportunity to begin advanced study
during their senior year, thus enabling them to complete
advanced study in forensic psychology in less time than would
generally be required to complete a comparable advanced
degree. In this newly developed program, undergraduate
psychology majors will have the opportunity to begin working
on a master’s degree during their senior year and have those
credits count for both the BA and MA degrees. Students
discuss their plans to pursue this program with their advisor
in their freshman year. Refer to the Undergraduate Psychology
section of this catalog for the application and admission
process, as well as degree requirements.
The portfolio may include exemplary work from Architecture
as well as other creative and research work, and in total
should convince the review committee that you are capable
of producing independently conceived studio work at a high
level of achievement. The portfolio should be in a compact
format, no larger than 8.5” x 11”, either in a notebook,
portfolio binder or a bound document. Portfolios should
contain at least four to six representative Architecture studio
projects that should demonstrate:
• developed degree of competence in architectural design
• ability to organize programmatic content
• commitment to professionalism in the studio
B. Advanced Electives: 12 credits selected from the following:
PSYCH 508
Forensic Report Writing
PSYCH 509
Methods of Psychotherapy I
PSYCH 510
Quantitative Methods II
PSYCH 511
Children, Adolescents and the Law
PSYCH 512
Child Assessment
PSYCH 513
Vocational Training
PSYCH 515
Introduction to Group Counseling
PSYCH 519
Methods of Psychotherapy II
PSYCH 530
Special Topics in Psychology
PSYCH 531
Family Violence
PSYCH 533
Law and Mental Health
PSYCH 534
Advanced Developmental Psychology
PSYCH 535
Group Dynamics: Methods and Design
PSYCH 540
Advanced Personality Psychology
PSYCH 550
Professional Ethics in Psychology
C. Thesis/Practicum: 6 credits selected according to the
student’s track:
Pre-service students take: PSYCH 598: Practicum twice for
total of 6 credits
Thesis students take:
PSYCH 597
Thesis and PSYCH 598 Practicum
or
PSYCH 597
Thesis twice for total of 6 credits.
(Minimum of 45 credits)
Graduate Study
(*) Placement in the Master of Architecture program’s
Architectural Design Studio sequence is subject to review
of academic transcripts from the applicants’ B.A. or B.S.
degree, and portfolio submittal. Accepted students may
expect to complete a minimum of 4 Architectural Design
Studios at Roger Williams University, depending on the
number of undergraduate Architectural Design Studios
completed previously.
(**) Placement in the Master of Architecture program
coursework is subject to review of academic transcripts
from the applicant’s B.A. or B.S. degree. Accepted students
must complete all student performance criteria for the
accredited degree as outlined in the National Architectural
Accrediting Board (NAAB) Conditions of Accreditation.
This may include completion of additional coursework
that is listed as undergraduate coursework at Roger
Williams University. For specifics, please refer to the
B.S. in Architecture/Master of Architecture 4+2 program
requirements listed previously.
Course Offerings towards the Master of Architecture Degree
ARCH 413
Advanced Architectural Design Studio
ARCH 416
Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
or
ARCH 516
Graduate Topical Design Studio: Urban
ARCH 434 Design of Structures I
ARCH 435 Design of Structures II
ARCH 488
Computer Applications for
Professional Practice
ARCH 513 Comprehensive Project Design Studio
ARCH 515 Graduate Architectural Design Studio
(two required)
ARCH 522 Environmental Design Research
ARCH 542 Professional Practice
ARCH 641 Graduate Thesis Research Seminar
ARCH 613 Graduate Thesis Studio
Electives: One Advanced History/Theory Elective, and four
Architecture Electives, with three minimum at the graduate level
Architecture Elective Options
History/Theory Advanced Level Course Options:
ARCH 475 Frank Lloyd Wright: A Life’s Work
ARCH 478 Dutch Architecture: The Enduring 20th
Century Legacy
ARCH 530 Special Topics in Architecture
ARCH 573 Modernism in the Non-Western World: A
Comparative Perspective
ARCH 575
Contemporary Asian Architecture & Urbanism
ARCH 576 Theoretical Origins of Modernism
ARCH 577 The American Skyscraper
AAH 430
Special Topics in Art and Architectural
History (selected topics)
AAH 530
Special Topics in Art and Architectural
History (selected topics)
HP 351 History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
HP 391 Architecture and Historic Preservation Abroad
Graduate Architecture Electives: Four Required (a
minimum of three at the graduate level):
Students are encouraged to look at these electives as a means
to explore various concentrations available within the MS in
Architecture program. Graduate electives are grouped in the
areas of Sustainable Design, Urban Design, Digital Media and
Historic Preservation. In addition some Integrative Core MS
in Architecture courses are available as Architecture Electives.
Students from other pre-professional programs may apply
one undergraduate Architecture Elective to this requirement;
otherwise all four should be taken at the Graduate level.
Sustainable Design: Arch 521 Sustainable Design Seminar,
Arch 593 Sustainable Paradigms, Arch 594 Urban Ecology,
Arch 533 Detailing the High-performance Envelope, Arch 535
Introduction to Proactive Simulation, Arch 536 Special Topics
in Sustainable Design.
Urban Design: Arch 572 Urban Design Theory, Arch 594 Urban
Ecology, Arch 524 Evolution of Urban Form, Arch 529 History
of Landscape Architecture, 561 Landscape Architecture, HP
682L Preservation Planning Workshop, Arch 537 Special Topics
in Urban Design.
Digital Media: Arch 587 Advanced Computer Applications in
Design, Arch 586 Processing, Arch 588 Digital Manufacturing,
Arch 589: 4-D (Four Dimensional), Arch 535 Intro to Proactive
Simulation, Arch 538 Special Topics in Digital Media.
Historic Preservation: HP 501 Fundamentals of Historic
Preservation, HP 502 Preservation Planning, HP 503 Principles
of Architectural Conservation, HP 525 Preservation Economics,
HP 530 Special Topics in Historic Preservation, HP 681L:
Historic Rehabilitation Workshop, HP 582L Architectural
Conservation, HP 526: Preservation Law and Regulation, HP
682L Preservation Planning Workshop.
Core MS in Architecture courses: ARCH 606 Field Research
Seminar, ARCH 616: Collaborative Workshop.
Graduate Architecture Electives: Arch 574 Regionalism in
Architecture, Arch 581 Construction Contract Documents, Arch
530 Special Topics in Architecture.
Graduate Course Grading, GPA and Graduation Requirements
The minimum passing grade in SAAHP graduate level
courses is a B- (2.67). The minimum GPA for Master of
Architecture graduates is a 3.0 in 500 and 600 level courses.
Students continuing from the RWU undergraduate program
graduate with Bachelor of Science in Architecture and
Master of Architecture degrees, awarded simultaneously.
Students entering Roger Williams University after completing
undergraduate studies at other institutions graduate with the
Master of Architecture degree.
Registration in Graduate Courses
Students pursuing the Master of Architecture program who
are enrolled in graduate courses may also be enrolled in
undergraduate courses during the same semester, due to the
nature of the continuity between undergraduate and graduate
levels of study in many US professional degree programs
in architecture. Students are encouraged to complete all
undergraduate course requirements as soon as practicable,
but not at the expense of interrupting Architecture program
curriculum sequences.
Graduate Study
Placement decisions will be communicated to accepted
students as part of the Graduate Admissions Review process,
along with a projected outline of studies toward graduation.
195
Graduate Study
Professional Degree Program Accreditation
In the United States, most state registration boards require
a degree from an accredited professional degree program
as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural
Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized
to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture,
recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture,
the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A
program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of
accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with
established educational standards. Doctor of Architecture and
Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate
degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited
professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is
not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.
Roger Williams University offers the following NAABaccredited degree programs:
M. Arch. (pre-professional degree + 38 graduate credits)
Next accreditation visit: 2018
Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History (M.A.)
Graduate Study
196
In our increasingly interconnected world, where the skills
of visual literacy and the critical analysis and stewardship
of our environment become ever more important, the
Master of Arts degree program in Art and Architectural
History offers a dynamic curriculum focusing on the
communicative power of the arts and architecture and a
celebration of the local and the global creative achievements
of humankind. This program allows students to pursue
critical integrative studies of art and architecture spanning
the globe and throughout time. Uniquely situated in the
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation, the
faculty with expertise in regional, national and international
subject areas, bring together visual culture, studio arts,
history, architecture and historic preservation into an
integrated humanist learning environment. This programbased experience is enriched by the larger context of the
University’s fine and performing arts, with connections
to related academic fields and dynamic area studies on
the University’s Bristol campus and abroad. And the rich
cultural resources of the New England region coupled with
the University’s global engagement and robust world-wide
partnerships encourages connections between near and far,
across commonalities and differences.
Students achieve an advanced ability to understand,
explain, interpret, and teach the meaning and communicative
power of art, architecture and other fields of visual culture.
They pursue classroom study, travel, and practical internships
as integral facets of the program. They have the opportunity
to complete their studies in two years, in an accelerated timeframe or on a part-time basis. Students enrolling with an
earned Bachelor’s degree from another institution enroll in the
two-year program.
The Master’s degree in Art and Architectural History
prepares students for two primary career paths. One is advanced
scholarship. Upon completion of the M.A., students interested
in a life of scholarship will be able to enroll in Ph.D. programs
to pursue academic careers. A second career path is professional
and would enable M.A. recipients to pursue curatorial positions
in museums, art galleries, and private collections, as well as
provide expertise in institutions such as art auction houses,
architectural and design agencies and historic sites.
The Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History is
comprised of a minimum of 36 graduate credits. including one
required foundational three-credit class, eleven three-credit
seminars, and one internship. (12 courses/36 credits, language
proficiency, internship) At least 30 credits must be taken at RWU.
Applying to the Master of Arts in Art and Architectural History
Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
college or university. To apply to the M.A. in Art and
Architectural History Program, submit the following to the
Office of Graduate Admission:
• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate
course work
• Personal Statement (two-double-spaced pages, maximum)
describing your interest in art and architectural history,
career goals and how you can positively contribute to the
Master’s Program in Art and Architectural History at Roger
Williams University
• Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school
• Current résumé
• If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOFEL or IELTS results
• Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee
Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.
Course offerings toward the Master of Arts degree in Art
and Architectural History
Required Courses (3 credits)
Students complete the following required courses:
AAH
505
Art and Architectural History Theory and
Methods Seminar
Elective Courses (33 credits)
Eleven from the following options:
(All courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated)
AAH
520
Themes in World Arts and Architecture
AAH
521
Issues in Contemporary Art
AAH
522
Sacred Spaces
AAH
523
Nature and Art
AAH
530
Special Topics/Travel Course: Arts and
Architecture of Time and Place
AAH
531
Topics in Art and Architecture of the
Classical World
AAH
532
Topics in Art and Architecture of the
Medieval World
AAH
533
Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
and Architecture
AAH
534
Topics in Modern Art and Architecture
AAH
535
Topics in Art and Architecture of the Americas
AAH
536
Topics in Art and Architecture of Africa
AAH 537
Topics in Art and Architecture of Asia
AAH
538
Topics in Art and Architecture of the
Islamic World
Graduate Study
Program which provides students with a supervised practical
environment in which to practice professional skills at a
governmental office or agency, nonprofit museum or gallery,
or private arts institution. This experience may lead to future
positions in the field.
Graduate Course Grading, GPA and Graduation Requirements
The minimum passing grade in graduate-level courses is a B(2.67). The minimum GPA for M.A. in Art and Architectural
History graduate students is 3.0.
Duration of Study
Full-time students are expected to complete all requirements
for the MA degree in two years. Part-time completion of the
MA is also possible; part-time students typically complete
the degree in three to five years. With careful planning
undergraduate students or incoming graduate students with
advanced standing, and in consultation with their advisor,
can complete the degree requirements in an accelerated timeframe. For example, courses may be taken in winter sessions or
as the program develops, in summer mini-mesters, or summer
sessions. The program for all MA candidates is determined in
discussion with the student’s advisor and is a mix of seminar
and lecture courses.
Master of Science in Historic Preservation (M.S.)
Building on its three-decades-old undergraduate program,
Roger Williams University now offers a Master of Science
in Historic Preservation. A two-year, 52-credit program
is available to qualified students holding a bachelors
degree. A one-year (minimum), 32-credit program is
available to students holding a bachelor’s degree in historic
preservation. A least 30 graduate credits must be taken at
Roger Williams University.
The mission of the Historic Preservation Program is to
provide an education that empowers individuals to work
with and to help others while realizing their own personal
and professional potential. Classes, community-based
work and field experience specific to preservation are
coupled with a strong liberal-arts education. To mirror the
environment we help preserve and to prepare students for
diverse careers, the program couples a multi-disciplinary
approach with a rigorous core of field-based professional
preservation offerings.
Students gain an understanding of the field in the greater
context of history, the built environment, cooperative
community engagement, work with allied professions;
documentation and research, and design, philosophy, standards
and practice. The program includes preservation history and
philosophy, planning, law and regulation, economics and
heritage management. Studies are placed into practice through
field-based workshops, assignments and an internship—all in
partnership with area and national organizations and firms.
Applying to the Master of Science in Historic
Preservation Program
Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
college or university. To apply to the M.S. in Historic
Preservation Program, submit the following to the Office of
Graduate Admission:
Graduate Study
AAH
560
The Newport Seminar
AAH650 Thesis
ARCH 573
Modernism in the Non-Western World
ARCH 576
Theoretical Origins of Modernism
ARCH 577
The American Skyscraper
Thesis Option
The thesis represents the culminating intellectual
experience in the Master’s program. This written essay
of publishable quality is produced over two semesters of
seminar work in the Research Methods and Thesis courses
with an advisor in the area of the student’s research
interest. The end product will be evaluated by at least
two Graduate Faculty members. Detailed guidelines for
this research paper will be provided. Master’s papers
are presented at an end-of year, day-long public seminar
and are accessioned by the University library to form an
archive of collected student scholarly resources.
Course Distribution
All students must fulfill a distribution requirement. At
least one course must be taken in four of the following
eight areas of study with a minimum of one of the four in
a region beyond Europe and the Americas:
Ancient Greek and Roman Art and Architecture
Byzantine and Medieval Art and Architecture
Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture
Modern European Art and Architecture
Art and Architecture of the Americas
Art and Architecture of Africa
Art and Architecture of Asia
Islamic Art and Architecture
Concentration in Art History or Architectural History
Students may wish to concentrate in either Art or Architectural
History. For such a concentration students must complete six
of their twelve graduate courses in either Architectural History
or Art History. The core course and thesis requirements are the
same as the MA in the more integrated Master of Arts degree
in Arts and Architecture.
Complementary Coursework
With the approval of their advisor, students may take courses in
the culture, literature, history, and philosophy of their areas of
interest. These courses, as well as language courses and studio
art courses do not count towards the degree. In the second
year of full-time study, or final year of part-time study, students
must register for one research methods thesis course and one
thesis seminar in which they work under the close supervision
of a faculty advisor, thus completing the 36 credit requirement.
Foreign Languages
In addition to completing the required course work,
each student must demonstrate mastery of intermediate
level reading proficiency in one foreign language related
to their research interests by completing two courses at
the intermediate level in that language or by equivalent
certification through examination.
Student Internship and Employment
Through the graduate program every student is required to
complete an Internship through the SAAHP Career Investment
197
Graduate Study
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate
course work
Personal Statement (two double-spaced pages, maximum)
describing your interest in preservation, career goals and
how you can positively contribute to the Master’s Program
in Historic Preservation at Roger Williams University
Scholarly research paper, 10 pages minimum, with sources
cited employing a conventional style
Two letters of recommendation attesting to your potential
to succeed in graduate school
Current résumé
If your first language is not English, an official report of
TOFEL or IELTS results
Completed application form accompanied by the $50
application fee
Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.
Course offerings toward the Master of Science in
Historic Preservation Degree
Graduate Study
198
Core Courses
Students complete the following required courses:
HP
501
Fundamentals of Historic Preservation
HP
524L
Archival Research
HP
525
Preservation Economics
HP
542
Professional Practice in
Historic Preservation
HP
526
Preservation Law and Regulation
HP
551
History and Philosophy of
Historic Preservation
HP
569
Preservation Internship
HP
582L
Architectural Conservation
HP
631
Historic Environment Research Method
HP
681L
Historic Rehabilitation Workshop
HP
682L
Preservation Planning Workshop
HP
651
Preservation Graduate Thesis
Historic Preservation Electives
In consultation with their advisor, students select three
graduate-level electives from the following:
ARCH 530
Special Topics in Architecture (selected topics)
ARCH 542
Professional Practice
ARCH 572
Urban Design Theory from the Industrial
Revolution to the Present
ARCH 573
Modernism in the Non-Western World: A
Comparative Perspective
ARCH 576
Regionalism in Architecture
ARCH 576
Theoretical Origins in Modernism
ARCH 577
The American Skyscraper
ARCH 581
Construction Contract Documents
ARCH 593
Sustainable Paradigms
AAH
530
Special Topics in Art + Architectural
History (selected topics)
HP
530
Special Topics in Preservation
LEAD 501
Leaders and the Leadership Process
LEAD
502
Communication Skills for Leadership Roles
LEAD
503
Data Management and Analysis for
Organization Leaders
LEAD
505
LEAD
506
LEAD
LEAD
LEAD
507 509 510 PA
501 PA
502 PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
503 504 505 506 511 512 514 516 Budgeting and Finance in
Complex Organizations
Human Resource Management for
Organizational Leaders
Strategic Leadership in a Globalized World
Negotiation Strategies
Stakeholders Relations in
Complex Organizations
Foundations of Public Administration:
Legal and Institutional
Foundations of Public
Administration: Theoretical
Quantitative Methods in Public Administration
Public Policy and Program Evaluation
Public Budgeting and Finance
Public Personnel Management
Public Organizations
Intergovernmental Relations
Urban Administration and Management
Grant Writing and Management
Graduate Course Grading, GPA and
Graduation Requirements
The minimum passing grade in graduate-level courses is a B(2.67). The minimum GPA for M.S. in Historic Preservation
graduates is a 3.0.
Registration in Courses
Students pursuing the Master of Science in Historic
Preservation who are enrolled in graduate courses may also be
enrolled in undergraduate courses during the same semester. In
their first year and in consultation with the program director,
students in the two-year program may select ‘bridge’ courses
from undergraduate and/or graduate offerings. With permission
of the Dean, undergraduate students in the B.S./M.S. in
Historic Preservation program may take graduate courses that
are part of the program.
Joint Juris Doctor/Master of Science in
Historic Preservation
Offered with the School of Law. Full-time enrollment required.
The Joint Juris Doctor (J.D.)/Master of Science (M.S.) in
Historic Preservation program is designed to provide an
accelerated path to a J.D. degree and an M.S. in Historic
Preservation degree through an electives credit-swapping
structure that allows for 3 law courses (9 credits) to count
toward the M.S. degree and 4 to 5 M.S. in HP courses (12
to 17 credits) to count toward the J.D. degree, depending
on whether or not a student has a prior B.S. in Historic
Preservation. Other than changes in allowable electives,
which are detailed below, the existing requirements for the
J.D. and M.S. programs described in the University Catalog
and School of Law Catalog remain the same. Students
who enter the joint-degree program with a B.S. in Historic
Preservation can potentially complete the joint degree in
three years (with winter/summer coursework) and in four
years otherwise.
Note: Applicants applying for the Joint J.D./M.S.H.P. degree must
apply to an earn acceptance into the School of Architecture, Art
and Historic Preservation and the School of Law separately.
Applicants who intend to pursue the Joint degree must so
indicate on the application for admission. Submit applications
sufficiently in advance of the application deadline to assure
adequate processing time at both schools. Applications to each
school normally need to be filed simultaneously, even though
students will normally only be taking courses in the School of
Law for the first year. (This sequence is required due to School
of Law prerequisites for electives.) Students who are currently
matriculated into the B.S. in Historic Preservation program in the
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation must notify
the Dean and Program Director by the end the junior year to
indicate their intent to enroll in the Joint J.D./M.S.H.P. program,
contingent on maintaining a 2.67 average or greater.
Three-year Joint J.D./M.S. in Historic Preservation
The joint degree can be completed in three years for
students matriculated into the J.D. and M.S.H.P. programs
who also have a B.S. in Historic Preservation from an
accredited National Council for Preservation Education
(NCPE) member institution, with the assumption that
coursework would need to be taken in the summers and/
or winters as well as the normal fall and spring semesters.
The School of Law accepts 12-14 M.S.H.P. program credits
towards J.D. program requirements and the School of
Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation accepts 9 J.D.
program credits towards the M.S.H.P. program for a total of
101-103 combined credits instead of 122 if the degrees were
pursued separately.
Four-year Joint J.D./M.S. in Historic Preservation
If a student is not entering the program with a B.S. in
Historic Preservation, it is still possible to complete the
joint degree in an accelerated timeframe of four years, with
the assumption that coursework would need to be taken in
the summers and/or winters as well as the normal fall and
spring semesters. The School of Law accepts 15-17 M.S.H.P.
program credits towards the J.D. program and the School of
Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation accepts 9 J.D.
program credits towards the M.S.H.P. program for a total of
118-120 combined credits instead of 142 if the degrees were
pursued separately.
Applying to the Joint Juris Doctor/Master of Science in
Historic Preservation Program
Each program requires a separate application. Refer to the
application requirements for each individual program in the
University Catalog and the School of Law Catalog. When
applying for the J.D. and M.S.H.P. programs concurrently the
application fee for the M.S. program will be waived (only the
application fee for the J.D. program is required).
Students who are currently matriculated in the J.D.
program or the 2-year M.S.H.P. program and are in their
first year of coursework are eligible to apply to the program
in which they are not matriculated for consideration for the
Joint J.D./M.S.H.P. program. Students who are currently
matriculated in the 1-year M.S.H.P. program cannot apply to
the Joint J.D./M.S.H.P. program.
Allowed electives for credit swap between the Juris Doctor
and Master of Science in Historic Preservation programs
The following courses will count toward both the J.D. and M.S.
H.P. program elective requirements.
School of Law courses that satisfy M.S.H.P. degree elective
requirements (choose 9 credits):
• Law 631 Administrative Law (3)
• Law 673 Environmental Law: Natural Resources (3)
• Law 728 Human Rights (3)
• Law 770 International Law (3)
• Law 743 Land Use Planning (3)
• Law 747 Legal Drafting: Commerce Real Estate
Development and Finance Law (3)
School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation
courses that satisfy a portion of the J.D. degree elective
requirement (12-17 credits will be applied to J.D.
elective requirements depending on whether or not
the student is matriculated into the 1-year or 2-year
M.S.H.P. program)
• HP 501 Fundamentals of Historic Preservation (3)
• HP 525 Preservation Economics (3)
• HP 542 Preservation Professional Practice (3)
• HP 526 Preservation Law and Regulation (3)
• HP 551 History and Philosophy of Historic Preservation (3)
• HP 681L Historic Rehabilitation Workshop (4)
• HP 682L Preservation Planning Workshop (4)
Required coursework sequence for various degree entry points
• Students who are not previously matriculated in the
J.D. program or the 2-year M.S.H.P. program and are
then matriculated into the Joint J.D./M.S.H.P. program
take required first-year law courses for the J.D. program
for their first year and thereafter complete another two
or three years of mixed law and historic preservation
coursework. The second year of students’ coursework
consists entirely of historic preservation courses with
subsequent years consisting of mixed historic preservation/
law coursework.
• Students matriculated into the Joint J.D./M.S.H.P.
program who have a B.S. in Historic Preservation from an
accredited NCPE member institution and are in their first
year of the J.D. program take mixed historic preservation/
law courses for the next two years.
• Students who are already matriculated in the 2-year
M.S.H.P. program and are in their first year of coursework
and are then subsequently matriculated into the Joint
J.D./M.S.H.P. program spend the next year completing the
first year course sequence required by the J.D. program.
The final three years thereafter consists of mixed law and
historic preservation coursework.
Shared requirement for M.S. program thesis and J.D.
writing project
The thesis required for the M.S. program satisfies the J.D.
program’s writing requirement. The student is required to have
at least one thesis reader from the School of Law faculty.
Shared internship/public service requirement
Students who complete the 140-hour internship required of the
M.S.H.P. program that focuses on historic preservation and law
and incorporates at least 50 hours of non-remunerated activities
satisfies the internship requirement of the M.S. program
and the public service requirement of the J.D. program.
(Reimbursement of expenses is allowed.)
Graduate Study
Graduate Study
199
Graduate Study
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTING
AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
Master of Science in Construction Management
The Master of Science in Construction Management builds
on the resources of an ACCE-accredited undergraduate
Construction Management program as well as the extensive
interaction with the construction industry’s most vibrant
companies. The MS in CM Program is designed for
experienced construction management working professionals
with high potential for advancement into executive roles.
Courses in the program will be taught by faculty drawn from
across the university and from industry.
Enrolled as a cohort, students will follow a sequential, twoyear course of study. This innovative program will employ a
blended learning model that incorporates on-line, classroom
and residential instruction, including two short-term, intensive
practica consisting of lectures, computer-based simulation, and
team problem-solving that will encourage and promote student
interaction with peers in the program.
The program is results-oriented, emphasizing the development
of strong student competencies in financial and planning
expertise for complex construction projects; optimizing
change in the global marketplace; managing interdisciplinary
teams; and research and problem-solving skills appropriate for
executive level construction management responsibilities.
Developed in collaboration with leading construction
companies, this program is designed to meet the current and
emerging needs of the global construction industry.
Mission and Vision
The mission of the MS in CM Program is to provide a superior
post-graduate educational experience that will enhance the
graduate’s ability to contribute to the construction enterprise at
the highest levels.
Graduate Study
200
The vision for the MS in CM program is to be nationally
recognized as the premier post-graduate program for
construction professionals.
Program Educational Objectives
During the first few years after graduation, we expect our
graduates to:
1. Demonstrate exemplary technical and leadership
knowledge and skills while achieving success as a
construction executive within a design, construction
or owner organization, always displaying the highest
standards of ethical conduct.
2. Value the concept of life-long learning and continue
to grow intellectually while keeping informed of new
concepts and developments in the construction industry.
3. Assume a leadership role in the advancement of the
construction management profession and community
outreach activities, while serving as a role model for the
future generation of constructors and the Roger Williams
University Construction Management students.
Program Outcomes
We expect our graduating students to possess:
a. the ability to optimize the value of change in a global
construction marketplace.
b. the skill to command multiple interdisciplinary teams,
on multiple projects through the preconstruction,
construction, and close-out stages of a project.
c. the disciplinary and interpersonal expertise required
to execute construction projects in an economic,
environmental and societal context.
d. excellent research and problem solving skills applied to
construction executive level tasks.
Eligibility Requirements
While some of the students applying for the MS in CM program
will be recommended and sponsored by their employers in
the construction industry, the program does accommodate
recent graduates from construction management, engineering,
business and architecture programs. In addition to a
baccalaureate degree in one of the disciplines mentioned above
(or a baccalaureate degree in a related discipline and extensive
experience in the construction industry) prospective candidates
should have:
• Experience in the construction industry.
• Demonstration of adequate mathematics skills evidenced by
satisfactory course work in calculus, probability and statistics
and engineering economics or operations research/systems
analysis or performance on the GRE Exam.
• Personal statement describing your career goals and the
support expected from your current employer for your
participation in the program.
Degree Requirements
Graduate study in Construction Management program leads
to the Master of Science degree. The program consists of 36
credit hours or 12 each, 3-credit courses. The program will be
completed in a two-year period with students (operating as a
cohort) beginning in the fall semester by taking two courses;
an on-line course and a classroom course. The typical course of
study is illustrated below.
First Year (6 credits) – Fall
CNST
510
Modeling and Simulation Techniques for
Construction Management – 3 credits (on-line)
CNST
540
Sustainable Construction – 3 credits (on-line)
First Year (3 credits) – Winter
CNST
515
Project Enterprise Management and
Control I – 3 credits (residential practicum)
First Year (6 credits) – Spring
CNST
525
Pre-Construction Planning and Project
Delivery – 3 credits (on-line)
CNST
555
Advanced Construction Law – 3 credits
(on-line)
First Year (3 credits) – Summer
CNST
565
Customer Development and Winning the
Construction Project– 3 credits (on-line)
Second Year (6 credits) – Fall
CNST
520
Construction Negotiation – 3 credits (on-line)
CNST
545
Construction Organization, Control and
Logistics – 3 credits (on-line)
Graduate Study
Second Year (3 credits) – Summer
Choose from one course below:
CNST
550
Special Topics in Construction
Management – 3 credits (on-line)
CNST
580
Advanced Construction Safety & Risk
Management – 3 credits (on-line)
CNST
585
Topics in International Construction – 3
credits (on-line)
CNST
595
Research Project (required for Master’s
Thesis) – 3 credits (on-line)
Total: 36 semester credits
Graduate Study
Second Year (3 credits) – Winter
CNST
560 Enterprise Management and Control II –
3 credits (residential practicum)
Second Year (6 credits) – Spring
CNST
530
Personnel Management and Law – 3
credits (on-line)
CNST
570
Financial Planning for Construction
Projects – 3 credits (on-line)
or
CNST
590
Master’s Thesis Research – 3 credits
(on-line)
CNST
595
Research Project – 3 credits (on-line)
201
MISSION AND GOALS OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW
The mission of the School of Law is to promote justice and the
rule of law through education, scholarship, and service.
In furtherance of its mission, the School of Law seeks to:
1. Provide an excellent legal education to men and women
who aspire to the practice of law or to other occupations
in which both they and society-at-large will benefit from
their understanding of and dedication to the law. An
excellent legal education teaches not only legal doctrine,
policy, history and theory, but also how to think critically
about justice and the law.
2. Make meaningful contributions to legal scholarship.
Meaningful contributions are those that provide original
analysis, insights or information to those who are
interested in justice and the law, including lawyers, judges,
legislators, policy-makers, scholars, journalists and the
public-at-large.
3. Provide service to the legal profession and the wider
community in ways that advance justice and the rule of law.
Overview
At the Roger Williams University School of Law, we train
future lawyers to uphold the responsibilities of the profession,
so that their integrity and passion join with scholarship,
creativity and diligence in the practice of law to make a
positive impact in the community.
Rigorous academic discussion led by nationally known
scholars, exposure to lawyering skills, unique learning
opportunities with leaders of the bench and bar, and service
to the community create a solid foundation for nurturing
intellectual curiosity and practical achievements. The School of
Law emphasizes personal mentoring and hands-on experience
with practicing professionals, in a cooperative atmosphere of
spirited debate.
Graduates of the School of Law join the ranks of alumni
in positions serving the bench and advising private clients in
firms large and small, as well as practicing law with private
corporations, public and social service organizations, or in
government agencies.
Regardless of your area of practice interest, the Roger
Williams University School of Law provides the tools needed
to succeed professionally, honor the profession and contribute
to society. If you are willing to engage your passion, mind and
heart, you are ready to join the Roger Williams Law community.
Admission to School of Law
For information on admissions, call the School of Law Admissions
Office at (401) 254-4555 or 1-800-633-2727 and ask for the catalog.
The catalog is also available online at http://law.rwu.edu.
All candidates for admission must take the Law School
Admission Test (LSAT). For examination dates and sites, call
the Law Services of the Law School Admission Service in
Newtown, Pa., at (215) 968-1001.
Students and Faculty
The law school boasts an outstanding faculty of dynamic
teachers, noted scholars, and accomplished lawyers. Our faculty
have practiced law with large firms in major metropolitan
cities; with small firms in rural county seats; in legal aid
societies; with the U.S. Department of Justice and the United
Nations. They have debated legal issues on national television,
been quoted in a broad range of print and electronic media
(both in the U.S. and abroad), and briefed cases in the U.S.
Supreme Court. Their wide-ranging scholarship has been
published by major presses and law reviews and cited by other
scholars and courts at all levels, including the U.S. Supreme
Court. The faculty is also active in prestigious law reform
organizations on the national level, such as the American Law
Institute and American Society of Comparative Law, as well as a
range of state law-reform activities.
School of Law
School of Law
Library and Facilities
The law school occupies a modern, multi-million dollar facility,
located on a beautiful waterfront campus and built specifically
for legal instruction. All academic and administrative activities
for law students are centralized in this four-level building:
from the naturally lit law library to the trial and appellate
moot courtrooms and classrooms, from the registrar to faculty
offices, from the student organization complex to the Bistro
and lounge. Law students learn, study, and socialize in a
comfortable and professional environment specifically suited to
their needs.
The 35,000-square-foot Law Library contains
approximately 300,000 volumes in print and microform
and 3,500 serial titles. Library holdings include federal and
state reports, statutes, and session laws for all fifty states; an
extensive collection of legal periodicals; U.S. Supreme Court
records and briefs; and selected government documents. The
library also subscribes to a variety of online and web-based
databases including LexisNexis and Westlaw. Electronic
resources can be accessed from three separate computer labs or
from personal computers.
The School of Law also maintains a complete suite of
offices housing its clinical program at the University’s Metro
Center in Providence, Rhode Island, close to the courthouses in
which the law students represent clients as student-attorneys.
Law Clinics and Foreign Study
The law school offers a variety of specialized programs designed
to enhance learning. Advanced students provide legal services
203
School of Law
School of Law
204
to those in need who cannot afford counsel. Students assist
clients in the Criminal Defense Clinic, Immigration Legal
Clinic and the Mediation Clinic under the close supervision
of nationally known educators. Students prepare cases for
trial, negotiate settlements, and try cases before courts and
administrative agencies. In addition, because Roger Williams
School of Law is the only law school in the state, students have
many distinctive opportunities to learn practical skills through
externships with a broad range of state and federal law offices.
The law school’s Marine Affairs Institute is a focal point
for the exploration of legal, economic, and policy issues raised
by the development of the world’s oceans and coastal zones.
The Institute sponsors a variety of programs of interest to both
students and members of the profession, and – through the
Sea Grant Legal Program – students research and present to
environmental groups in Rhode Island and across the country.
Students interested in deepening their education may
pursue joint degree programs leading to the award of a Juris
Doctor from the School of Law or a Master of Marine Affairs, or
a Master of Science in Labor Relations and Human Resources,
from the University of Rhode Island. Roger Williams University
also offers a joint Juris Doctor and Master of Science in
Criminal Justice.
The law school is proud of its unique summer program
in London, England. The London Advocacy Program, directed
by an English barrister, provides classroom instruction on the
English legal system, as well as internships in the chambers of
leading barristers, solicitors and judges and places students in
the chambers of leading lawyers and litigators.
School of Law
School of Law
205
Course Descriptions
ACCOUNTING
ACCTG 201 – Accounting I: Financial
A study of the fundamentals of accounting, with an emphasis on
the use of economic data in the decision-making process. Topics
covered include: forms of business organizations, financing
options, and financial statement analysis. The ability to analyze
financial statements is the overall goal of this course. Topics include
inventory, property (plant and equipment/natural resources/
intangibles), liabilities, stockholder equity, investments, statement of
cash flows. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ACCTG 202 – Accounting II: Managerial
Prerequisite: ACCTG 201
Continuation of ACCTG 201(101), with an emphasis on the
application of accounting principles to specific problem areas in
managerial accounting as well as accounting for manufacturing
operations, and cost-volume-profit analysis. (3 credits) Fall
ACCTG 204 – Cost Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCTG 202 or consent of instructor
Emphasizes basic concepts involving cost accumulation, costs for
planning and control, and cost-based decision analysis. Covers job
order, process and standard costs, as well as an introduction to costvolume-profit analysis and relevant costs. (3 credits) Fall
ACCTG 209 – Financial Management for the Arts
Fulfills a requirement in the Arts Management Minor for students on the
arts track.
This course will not substitute for any of the Accounting courses required
by business students.
This is a one-semester course intended for non-business students
minoring in Arts Management. This course is a study of the
fundamentals of accounting and finance with an emphasis on the use
and presentation of economic data in the decision making process in
arts organizations. Topics covered include: cash and internal controls,
receivables, property, liabilities, investments, cash flows and cash flow
budgets, cost-volume-profit and break-even point analysis, capital
budgets, financing options and financial statements for both profit
and not-for-profit arts organizations. (4 credits) Spring, Alternate Years
ACCTG 304 – Intermediate Accounting I
Prerequisite: ACCTG 201
A deeper study of financial accounting principles, technical principles,
and procedures of financial accounting. Topics include accounting
principles and professional practice; information processing and
the accounting cycle; revenue and expense recognition: income
measurement and reporting; financial statements and additional
disclosures; future and present values of cash flows; cash and shortterm investments; receivables; inventories; cost and flow assumptions;
inventories; special valuation methods; plant assets; depreciation;
intangible assets. (3 credits) Fall
ACCTG 305 – Intermediate Accounting II
Prerequisite: ACCTG 304 or consent of instructor
Topics include long-term investments; long-term debt; contributed
capital, retained earnings; dividends; current liabilities and
contingencies, other elements of stockholder equity; treasury stock
and EPS. (3 credits) Spring
ACCTG 307 – Accounting Information Systems
Prerequisites: ACCTG 202, CIS 101, CIS 102
Study and use of computerized general ledger, receivables, payables,
payroll, and inventory systems. Topics include the examination of a
variety of system design, implementation and control issues faced by
contemporary business organizations. (3 credits) Fall
ACCTG 308 – Federal Income Tax I: Individual
Prerequisite: ACCTG 202
Introduction to and survey of the Federal tax laws and the Federal
revenue system as they apply to individual taxpayers. Topics include
calculation of gross income, exclusions, deductions, credits, and
computations. (3 credits)
ACCTG 309 – Federal Income Tax II: Partnerships and Corporations
Prerequisite: ACCTG 308
Applies concepts and skills of the first semester to the special problems
involved in business tax returns. Topics include capital gains taxation,
partnership, corporate, and specially taxed corporations. Introduction
to “hands-on” tax research in the library. Students complete complex
tax returns. (3 credits) Spring
ACCTG 405 – Auditing
Prerequisite: ACCTG 305
Examines auditing theory and real-world practice. Topics include generally
accepted auditing standards, internal control, statistical sampling, as well
as audit objectives, reporting and procedures. (3 credits) Spring
ACCTG 406 – Advanced Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCTG 305
Coverage of accounting for partnerships; introduction of the concepts
of non-profit accounting, including governmental, schools, and other
forms; fiduciary situations; business segments; installment sales;
consignments; troubled debt restructuring; and corporate dissolutions.
(3 credits) Fall
ACCTG 411: Ethics in Accounting and Auditing
Prerequisite: ACCTG 201 and 202
The course is a one-semester course. The course is a study of
the impact of ethics on accounting and auditing. Topics covered
include: ethical problems, codes of ethics, audit risk and
materiality, international auditing standards, evidential matter,
fraud considerations, auditor independence, a profession in crisis,
whistle-blowing, ethics and politics, ethics and tax accounting,
international ethical issues in accounting, gender differences in
ethical perceptions, and the composition of boards . (3 credits) Fall,
Alternate Years
ACCTG 429 – Community Partnerships Center Accounting Studies
This course involves a project selected by the Community Partnerships
Center and the Business School Dean as an Accounting project.
The students will work with a professor and possibly students from
other disciplines to fulfill a task requested by a regional company,
organization, or governmental unit. Specific project details vary and
will be announced prior to preregistration for each semester. (3 credits)
ACCTG 430 – Special Topics in Accounting
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Selected topics in areas chosen by students in consultation with their
instructor. This experience is intended to provide an advanced level of
course work or research in accounting. (3 credits) Special Offering
207
Course Descriptions
ACCTG 469 – Accounting Coop
Prerequisites: Senior standing in accounting and consent of instructor
Designed to grant academic credit to students who work on a
part-time basis in selected positions, usually without financial
remuneration. Students may select from a wide variety of positions
offered at local businesses, accounting firms, consulting firms, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. By arrangement.
AMERICAN STUDIES
AMST 100 – Approaches to the Study of American Society and Culture
Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Core Concentration
This course serves as an introduction to the field of American
Studies by examining the ways that transnational borders, global
interconnectedness, and intersections of identity affect people’s
experiences in America. Using a variety of sources, such as popular
culture, material culture, and the built environment, and viewing
them through diverse lenses, such as race, class, gender, sexuality,
and religion, students begin to learn and apply the skills of retrieval,
evaluation, analysis and interpretation of written, visual, and aural
evidence in the construction of well-argued narratives. (3 credits)
Fall, Spring
AMST 201 – American Studies Research Methods
Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major and minor
Prerequisite: AMST 100 or consent of instructor.
This course trains students in the theory and practice of American Studies
research methods. It focuses on collection, evaluation, analysis and
synthesis of written, aural, and visual primary sources, and the application
of interdisciplinary methodologies in creating and presenting topics of
inquiry from diverse perspectives. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
AMST 301 – Junior Community Colloquium
Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major.
Prerequisite: AMST 100, AMST 201, at least Junior standing or consent of
the instructor.
Students engaged in community based service projects will analyze
their service within the context of a common group of readings that
explore contemporary social issues in the United States and their
relationship to community stewardship and grassroots organizing.
Students will complete their service project and attend weekly
colloquium meetings throughout the semester. Exact readings/topics
addressed in the course may vary depending on the nature of the
service projects that are undertaken. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
AMST 370 – Topics in Race, Gender, and Sexuality in America
Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Major, Minor, and
Core Concentration
Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100
This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
of race, gender and/or sexuality in American life and culture, past
and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic
and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
a single topic only once. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
AMST 371 – Topics in Ethnicity, Class and Region in America
Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Major, Minor, and
Core Concentration
Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100
This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
of ethnicity, class and/or region in American life and culture, past
and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic
and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
208
content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
a single topic only once. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
AMST 372 – Topics in American Material and Popular Culture
Fulfills a requirement in the American studies major, minor and
core concentration
Pre or Co-requisite: AMST 100 or consent of instructor.
This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
of material and/or popular culture in American life and culture, past
and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic
and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
a single topic only once. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
AMST 373 – Topics in American Ideas and Institutions
Fulfills a requirement for the major, minor, or core concentration
Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100
This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
of various ideas and institutions; for example, transcendentalism,
education, or religion, in American life and culture, past and
present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/
or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
a single topic only once. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
AMST 420 – Senior Seminar I
Fulfills a requirement for the major, minor, or core concentration
Prerequisite: AMST 100, AMST 201, and Senior standing or consent of
the instructor.
In this course, students will prepare to complete their program in
American Studies through a) revisiting their coursework in the
program, as well as any other coursework they choose to include,
in order to synthesize the interdisciplinary connections across their
undergraduate program, and b) read and analyze advanced common
readings to provide further context and breadth of understanding of
the field and their work in it. Students will demonstrate their mastery
in both written and oral form. (3 credits) Fall
AMST 421: –Senior Seminar II
Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major.
Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or higher) of AMST 420
Students will complete an original research project on a topic of their
choosing (in consultation with the instructor). Completion of this
significant piece of scholarship will reflect the student’s mastery and
understanding of American Studies as a field and will contribute new
insight into the nature of American life and culture. Students will be
required to present and defend their final project at a senior showcase.
(3 credits) Spring
AMST 318 – Movies and Moviegoing in American Culture
Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Core Concentration
An examination of movies and the process of moviegoing in American
life historically and in the present. This course will consider the
way the United States has been and is currently being portrayed, to
Americans as well as those outside the country, on film. A variety of
genres will be considered as we endeavor to understand the way our
culture is portrayed and the significance of this portrayal in American
history and its impact on contemporary life and culture. (3 credits)
Special Offering
AMST 331 – Culture and Gender
Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Core Concentration
A cross-cultural analysis of gender expectations as these are
articulated in different human societies. Focuses on the various
views of human nature that organize social practices and the
Antthropology
resulting differences in adult male/female relationships and in the
assignment of temperament, activities, functions, status, and power.
(3 credits) Special Offering
AMST 340 – Ethnic Cultures in America
Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Core Concentration
This course will examine the development and impact of the ethnic
cultures in the United States. There will be an historical component
of the course as we consider how the current array of ethnic cultures
in the U.S. developed, but the majority of the course will be focused
on contemporary ethnic cultures in America as well as the collective
impact of “the ethnic” on Americans and American culture in general.
(3 credits) Special Offering
AMST 430 – Topics in American Studies
Forum for experimenting with new ideas, topics, and themes; topics
or themes developed and studied by interested majors in conjunction
with faculty. (3 credits) Special Offering
ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 100 – Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Fulfills a course requirement in the Graphic Design Core Concentration
Cultural Anthropology examines the diversity of beliefs, values,
structures and practices in the vast range of human social life in
the contemporary world. This course introduces the principal
concepts, methods and ethics that anthropologists employ to study
culture and cross-cultural diversity by engaging ethnographic case
studies, films and practical research exercises. Specific topics may
include economic adaptation, political organization, kinship, gender,
ethnicity, language, art religion and issues in applied anthropology.
(3 credits) Fall, Spring
ANTH 200 – Native North Americans
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
A survey of native North American peoples. One group from each of
the ten subculture areas is considered ethnographically. Topics may
include Kwakiuti of the Northwest Coast, the Cheyenne of the Plains
and the Iroquois of the Eastern Woodlands. The course introduces
contemporary social problems related to the reservation system and
urban migration. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ANTH 205 – Religious Diversity in Global Perspectives
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration.
This course is a cross-cultural exploration of religious belief, myth,
and ritual. The course emphasizes anthropological research and
perspectives, but also draws on interdisciplinary sources. Specific
topics include the origins and functions of religion in society, diverse
interpretations of the supernatural, the symbolic meanings of myth
and ritual, the roles of religious specialists, and religious experience.
Assignments examine religious belief and practice within particular
cultural contexts as well as in comparison to other cultures in the
global context. (3 credits) Fall
ANTH 212 – Studies in Anthropology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Field methods: offered in conjunction with pre-approved study abroad
programs. Emphasizes methodologies for collecting data. (3 credits)
Special Offering
ANTH 220 – Self, Culture and Society
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Study of the role of culture in the formation of personality and
the problems of individual adjustments to the demands of culture.
(3 credits) Fall
ANTH 222 – Environmental Anthropology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Explores the principles through which non-human environments
shape human cultures and cultures in turn affect their environments.
Students will become familiar with how a range of societies comes
into relation with their environments both through their material
transformations of ecosystems and the ideological and symbolic
frameworks through which peoples envision human-nature
interactions. Topics will include indigenous environmental knowledge,
sustainable development, interspecies relations, environmental
governance regimes, gender relations, and the global environmental
movement. (3 credits) Alternate Fall
ANTH 230 – Political Anthropology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
An overview of questions of power and politics through an
anthropological perspective, with special attention on inequality
and violence in the non –Western world. Anthropologists have long
been concerned with how different cultures organize themselves
politically; in this course, we build from classical topics towards an
investigation of how differences in power and political inequalities
manifest themselves in the daily lives of people throughout the
world. The course material blends a broad range of theoretical
approaches to studying power with the close detail of ethnographic
case studies. (3 credits) Spring
ANTH 240 – Ethnology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Ethnology is a study of human cultures from a comparative
perspective. This course surveys global diversity by examining cultural
differences and similarities in a variety of societies across the world.
Through systematic cross-cultural comparisons of specific dimensions
of society (e.g. family structure, gender roles) students will gain an
understanding of the role culture plays in shaping human thought,
behavior and social organization. (3 credits) Special Offering
ANTH 244 – The Anthropology of Sport
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
This course is an introduction to anthropology of sport. In the
first third of the course students will learn about history of
the anthropology of sport and see how each of five subfields of
anthropology examines sport. During the rest of the course students
will examine a variety of case studies through books and films, not only
about North American sports and culture but also outside our borders,
including Europe, South America and Asia. (3 credits) Fall
ANTH 260 – The Anthropological Lens
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
How do anthropologists investigate culture? What makes anthropology
unique as a social science? The aim of this course is to provide
an overview of perspectives and trends in cultural and social
anthropology. Students will be introduced to some of the major
theories that inspire and inform anthropological analysis and discover
what makes anthropology distinctive among the social sciences. While
the course is historical and chronological in organization, our central
concern will be with how anthropologists have defined the field, the
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Course Descriptions
kinds of questions they have asked, and the methods used to attempt
to answer those questions. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ANTH 270 – Global Health
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Fulfills a course requirement in the Public Health minor
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
The public health subfield of Global Health examines illnesses that
affect human populations across national boundaries. This course
introduces the subfield and emphasizes social science perspectives on
the social, cultural, and political-economic forces that influence global
health problems. Specific topics include longstanding health problems
such as malaria and tuberculosis as well developing issues such as
emerging infectious diseases and climate change. (3 credits) Spring
ANTH 299 – Special Topics in Anthropology
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Examines topics from the subfields of cultural anthropology.
Initiated by student demand, interest of instructor, or timelines of
offering. (3 credits) Special Offering
ANTH 300 – Reading Ethnographies
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Ethnography has always been the distinctive characteristic of cultural
and social anthropology. The focus of this class will be on reading
ethnographies to learn about different types of ethnography, as well
as explore the writing process for ethnography. It is a seminar style
course which will raise questions concerning research, writing, data
collection, ethics, the role of researcher, effects on the researched
community and contributions to the professional field. The class will
include relevant analytical experiences based on reading, research,
and writing (3 credits) Alternate Fall
ANTH 310 – Applied Anthropology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
This course focuses on the advocacy and intervention components of
anthropology. Students will enhance their assessment skills through
an in-depth analysis of problems and solutions for particular cultures.
Readings will address issues such as identifying local needs, promoting
culturally appropriate responses to change, and protecting the rights
of marginalized people. (3 credits) Alternate Spring
ANTH 351 – Cultures of Latin America
Prerequisite: Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology
Core Concentration.
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
This course introduces students to anthropological work on and
ethnographic practice in Latin America. It covers a wide range of
topics and aims to provide a solid background to the array of analytical
perspectives anthropologists have drawn upon in their scholarly
engagement with the region. Course includes a broad historical
overview of the cultural and historical diversity of the region, as
well as contemporary case studies of cultural transformations within
specific countries. (3 credits) Alternate Spring
ANTH 356 – World Cultures
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100
Survey of world cultures designed to develop understanding of the
ways in which diverse people around the world view their own
worlds. Focus will depend on faculty expertise and student interest.
(3 credits) Alternate Spring
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ANTH 370 – Medical Anthropology
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisite: ANTH 100; recommended SOC 300.
This course examines the ways that culture shapes the meaning of
health and illness in everyday life by engaging the study of Medical
Anthropology. This vast subfield of cultural anthropology encompasses
the investigations of the cultural construction of health and illness,
mind-body interaction, the social relations of healing, and the politicaleconomy of health care, among other more specific topics. The course
material merges theoretical and applied approaches to explore research
of both Western biomedical and non-western medical traditions as
they shape diagnosis, treatment and the experience of suffering.
Assignments incorporate instruction in the qualitative methods used
in this subfield of cultural anthropology. (3 credits) Alternate Years
ANTH 380 – Culture Change and Development
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisites: ANTH 100
Focuses on change that is inherent in all cultures. This course will
examine how anthropologists have explained the ways cultures
change, by theorizing, for example, processes of evolution, diffusion,
and domination, and addressing the long-term positive and negative
implications. (3 credits) Alternate Fall
ANTH 430 – Special Topics
Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
Prerequisites: ANTH 100
Study of special topics in anthropology. Topics determined by student
needs and the availability of appropriate instruction. (3 credits)
Special Offering
ANTH 454 – Qualitative Methods
Prerequisites: ANTH 260 ( C- or higher ) and SOC 260; ( C- or higher); Open
to Anthropology + Sociology majors; senior standing or consent of instructor
An overview of anthropological and sociological research methods.
Provides an introduction to research design beginning with the
concepts and principles of social research. Includes instruction in the
development of research questions, sampling, measurement validity
and reliability, hypothesis testing, and data collection and analysis
with an emphasis on ethnographic techniques. Students will engage in
fieldwork as part of the requirements for this class. (3 credits) Fall
ANTH 460/SOC 460 – Senior Seminar
Cross-Listed as SOC 460
Prerequisite: ANTH 454 (C- or higher)
This course is designed to foster a deeper understanding of
anthropology and sociology. Students will be required to produce
research suitable for presentation at a student-research conference
and/or publication in either anthropology or sociology student-level
research journals. Topics will be determined by the expertise of the
instructor and student interest. (3 credits) Spring
AQUACULTURE AND AQUARIUM SCIENCE
AQS 260 – Principles of Aquatic Animal Husbandry and Lab
A survey of the captive fish and invertebrates encountered in the trade
of marine ornamentals and the conservation issues surrounding their
use. Care and Maintenance focusing on the compatibility, propagation
potential, captive breeding, culture challenges and advancements in
technology will be examined. Course will cover important aspects
of species acquisition, collection and transfer, as well as special
husbandry needs of selected organisms. The laboratory will focus
aquatic animal health issues as they relate to holding animals in
captivity. (4 credits) Fall
Architecture
AQS 262 – Aquarium System Design and Life Support and Lab
There is a strong and broad-based need from many education,
research and commercial organizations for information on the
planning, design, construction and operation of seawater systems.
Unfortunately, an understanding of biology or engineering alone is
not likely to result in a practical, working system design. Biologists
generally do not understand the mechanical and hydraulic aspects
of design, while engineers do not typically appreciated the biological
considerations. This course is intended to provide the technical
knowledge and practical experience that will enable students to
design successful systems on a variety of scales. Lecture portion will
focus on design issues, while laboratory will concentrate on water
quality and toxicity as part of the need to provide life support to
seawater systems. (4 credits) Spring
AQS 306 – Principles of Museum Exhibit Development
This course will introduce students to the basic aspects of successful
exhibit design and methods for conveying educational information
to the general public in an aquarium or museum setting. The
course will include an introduction to commonly used materials
and techniques; the incorporation of good graphic design; and
the distillation of educational concepts into interesting and
informative materials. This course will be led by the design team
at the New England Aquarium, and will involve the creation of
exhibits for actual use in a public setting. It is anticipated that the
communication and design skills acquired in this course will be
applicable to a wide variety of not-for-profit environmental and
educational organizations. (3 credits) Spring
AQS 314 – Field Collection Methods (Bahamas)
This three credit course is organized as a ten day off-campus
program offered through the New England Aquarium. Each Spring,
the Aquarium organizes a field identification and collecting trip
to Cay Sal bank in the Bahamas. For this course, the trip will
be timed to coincide with the RWU Spring Break, and one of
the RWU Faulty will accompany the students. Up to 15 students
can sign up to work alongside Aquarium professionals as the
collect and identify reef fish and invertebrates. The trip includes
accommodations and up to 5 dives/day abroad the R/V Coral Reef
II, meals and beverages, and a dive in the Aquarium’s Giant Ocean
Tank. Students will increase their fish identification skills, learn
about conservation efforts in the Bahamas, and participate in
on-going reef conservation studies. (3 credits) Spring
AQS 346 – Principles of Hatchery Management and Lab
The aquaculture industry relies on hatcheries – production facilities
that nurture young aquatic organisms to the point where their survival
is assured. Hatcheries include facilities dedicated to the production
of almost any fresh or saltwater aquatic species including: shellfish,
tropical marine fish, trout, abalone, and seaweed. This course is
intended to support an education in aquaculture and give students
practical experience in the operation of all aspects of hatchery. The
content of this course will depend on the instructor, but will focus on
either shellfish or marine ornamental production as these are the two
main production facilities that currently operated at the university.
This course will be very hands-on and include important aspects of
animal husbandry and production. (4 credits) Spring
AQS 352 – Public Aquarium Management
This course will instruct students in all aspects of the management
of a large public aquarium facility. This includes how to maintain
a healthy life support system for display organisms as well as an
overview of the management of staff, interns and volunteers, financial
considerations, corporate structure, regulatory requirements,
permitting, marketing and all aspects of operating a large not-forprofit organization. This will be accomplished through examination
of the operations and management structure of the New England
Aquarium and will rely on tours of the facility and a series of seminars
offered by the key departmental heads at the facility. It is anticipated
that the skills acquired in this course can be applicable to a wide
variety of not-for-profit environmental and educational organizations.
(3 credits) Spring
AQS 420 – New England Aquarium Internship
Prerequisites: Junior-level in good standing; Overall GPA of 2.8 of higher;
Acceptance to the NEAq internship program
Registration for this course is limited to students who have been
accepted for a semester long internship at the New England Aquarium
(NEAq) in Boston, Ma. Internships at NEAq offer college students
experience in areas ranging from veterinary services and animal
husbandry to communications and program development. Each
Internship will include: 1) an active research component that requires
15-20 hours per week in a laboratory setting under the direction
of a research scientist at the New England Aquarium (NEAq) and
2) an animal husbandry experience of 15-20 hours per week at the
NEAq with responsibilities that will familiarize students with the
daily operation and maintenance required in running a large public
aquarium. The duties of this experience may include feeding animals,
cleaning tanks and equipment, and providing treatment for diseased
animals. (8 credits) Fall, Spring, Summer
AQS 430 – Topics in Aquarium Science and/or Lab
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor
Advanced-level topics of importance in aquarium science. (1-4 credits)
Special Offering
AQS 450 – Research in Aquaculture/ Aquarium Science
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
Original independent research in aquaculture and/or aquarium science.
Research projects are chosen in consultation with a faculty research
advisor. May be repeated for credit (1-3 credits) Offered on demand
ARCHITECTURE
ARCH 100 – Exploring Architecture
Enrollment limited to high school students who have completed their junior
year and high school students who have completed their sophomore year
with permission at the time of application.
A four week introduction to architectural issues, concepts, and
basic design methodology for high school students interested in
understanding architecture as a possible area of college study and
career. Course instruction is via workshops and individualized studio
critique emphasizing freehand drawing, design exercises, field trips,
lectures and portfolios. The grade is based on overall performance with
special emphasis on the quality of a major project. (3 credits) Summer
ARCH 101 – Foundations of Architecture
A classroom-based introduction to the nature of the architectural
endeavor, and the means used to make architecture. Lectures and
explorations of issues of public and private space, architectural
composition, and the multiple responsibilities architects face in society
in relation to a diversity of users and clients, the site, and the public
realm will form the basis for classroom discussion, and written and
graphic assignments. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 113 – Architectural Design Core Studio I
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of architecture and
design utilizing iterative exercises grouped around nine design topics
developed and presented in two and three-dimensional media.
Repetition reinforces the mastering freehand drawing, drafting and
model making skills. Lectures introduce formal principles underlying
each project group: geometric composition, scale and proportion,
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Course Descriptions
architectural elements, space definition, analytical diagramming,
color, and solar orientation to study light and shadow. The emphasis is
on abstract design but the course ends with the design of a scaled and
inhabited space. Minimum passing grade average of “C” required in
ARCH 113-114. (5 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 114 – Architectural Design Core Studio II
Prerequisite: ARCH 113
This course continues the first semester’s focus on elemental design
principles and visual communication, but initiates a departure
from the abstract realm of design into the tangible world of built
architectural form. The projects and their supporting lectures
examine the language of architecture through exercises exploring
fundamental architectural design principles: spatial organizations,
circulation and movement, simple structural and enclosure systems,
spatial articulation, site response and solar orientation. To ensure
clarity and understanding, all building programs are simple but
evocative, and project sites vary from rural to urban and from flat to
sloped. Minimum passing grade average of “C” required in ARCH
113-114. (5 credits) Spring, Summer
ARCH 213 – Architectural Design Core Studio III
Prerequisite: ARCH 114
Core Studio III concentrates on the exploration of a rational
design methodology through the process of analysis, synthesis and
transformation. Through a series of short exercises and comprehensive
projects, students are encouraged to develop a conceptual basis for
their work, with an emphasis on site, climate and the environment,
along with the principles of organization, including spatial hierarchy,
circulation and structure, as determinants of architectural form.
Students will quickly generate multiple viable solutions for each
project and will present their work in a variety of formats from
quick conceptual sketches and models to carefully crafted drawings.
There will be a concentration on the design of space in section
and an ongoing study of the quality of light. Students explore the
potential of the sites they visit through in-depth inquiries and are
introduced to design in an urban context. There is an emphasis on
three-dimensional visual communication skills and the start of the
integration of computer drawings into the studio. A series of theme
based faculty lectures will augment the studio work. Students are
required to present a digital portfolio at the middle and end of the
semester. Minimum passing grade of “C” is required. (5 credits) Fall
ARCH 214 – Architectural Design Core Studio IV
Prerequisite: ARCH 213, MATH 136 or higher
This studio continues to develop the students’ design process and
explores the concepts and strategies that have the capacity to
significantly determine building form. Particular emphasis will
be placed on the relationship of design to program, structure and
materials through the study of dwellings. Special attention will
be paid to an understanding of human scale and its impact upon
design. Short sequential exercises enable students to develop an
understanding of the use of different materials and their structural
implications. Bearing wall, columnar (including free-plan) and
modular building systems will be studied. These shorter problems
will be followed by a longer assignment that uses different urban
sites in a variety of locations as the catalyst for an investigation into
how the fundamental human need for shelter is affected by regional
and cultural precedents and particular climatic conditions. Students
are asked to address basic environmental issues by considering
passive strategies for heating and cooling. The development of
graphic, computer and three-dimensional communication skills
development are also continued. Faculty lectures will be integrated
into the semester and a digital portfolio will be required. Minimum
passing grade of “C” required. (5 credits) Fall
212
ARCH 231 – Construction Materials and Assemblies I
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
This course is an introductory overview to the “art of making
buildings.” The student shall survey materials and methods used in
building construction for foundation, wall, floor, roof, enclosure &
interior finish systems and their employment in the design process
for traditional, nontraditional and sustainable building environments
with emphasis on architectural expression. The major physical
systems found in buildings and design constraints that influence
them will be examined in the context of wood and masonry
construction. The course also dedicates a substantial portion of its
time to the examination of building envelope concepts as the locus
of design resolution between technical and architectural realms.
The course engages ARCH 214 Architectural Design Core Studio IV
as a means to integrate materials and assemblies in students’ design
thinking. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 287 – Introduction to Computer Applications in Design
Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing
An introduction to computer systems – software and hardware, and
their application in architecture. Emphasis is placed on learning how
the computers can assist in the design process by modeling, visualizing
and analyzing building designs. Introduction to drafting and threedimensional modeling. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 313 – Architectural Design Core Studio V
Prerequisite: ARCH 214
The focus of this studio is upon the integration of building form,
structure as space-generator, construction materials & assemblies
and sustainability themes in architectural design. The studio
also engages the continued refinement of four broad areas of
architectural design education: (1) development of a theory
base; (2) development of design methods and studio skills; (3)
urban issues; and (4) development of a fuller appreciation for the
understanding of construction technology and its function as a
medium for architectural design. Minimum passing grade of “C”
required. (5 credits) Fall, Summer
ARCH 321 – Site and Environment
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
This course presents an overview inventory of all the factors/systems
that may be encountered in any analysis of site conditions. The
student will be presented with a general description of how each factor
operates and procedures to maintain or improve the quality of the site
environment. This course promotes a value system based upon the
preservation of both natural and cultural ecology. Value and meaning
flow from a concept of sustainability at all levels of cultural and
environmental interaction. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 322 – Theory of Architecture
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122, ARCH 325
The intention of this course is to familiarize students with a
variety of historical, theoretical and methodological issues that
have structured contemporary understanding and criticism of
architecture. The class introduces students to the polemics and
debates of the post-war period, the developments and influence of
non-Western modern architecture, post-modernism, the theoretical
investigations centered around structuralism and post-structuralism,
the development of the various schools of architectural theory in
the 1970s and 1980s, and contemporary theoretical and critical
positions. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 324 – Evolution of Urban Form
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or URBN 100
Cross-Listed with ARCH 524
Examines and analyzes the evolution of urban form, from neolithic
villages to cities of the emerging modern era. Addresses why cities
Architecture
have taken the forms they have, and their formal, physical, and
spatial elements. Students consider urban structure and dynamics
relative to architectural expression, building types, and urban open
spaces. (3 credits) Annually
realms. Detailing issue includes optimization of the building’s thermal
performance. The course engages with ARCH 313 Architectural Design
Studio Core V as a means to integrate materials and assemblies issues
in the student’s design thinking. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 325 – History of Modern Architecture I: The
Enlightenment to the Avant-Garde
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or URBN 100 or permission of instructor
This course on modern architecture examines buildings, cities,
and landscapes in relation to the visual arts, culture, politics, and
technological and social change. It begins with the origins of modern
architecture in Western Europe, continues with an exploration of key
19th-century architects and theorists. It highlights the 20th-century
avant-gardes and concludes with the crystallization of modern
architecture in the West and around the world. The course seeks to
explain the modern not only as a visual phenomenon, but also as an
intellectual, philosophical, and cultural idea. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 332 – Acoustics and Lighting
Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course addresses three of the many form generators in architecture,
the acoustical, day lighting and artificial lighting environment. It also
addresses the soft and hard technologies that support the creation
of these environments using “rules of thumb”, analytical calculations
and modeling. The course provides an introduction and conceptual
understanding of these subjects. Sustainability is embedded in the nature
of the subjects with a particular emphasis on energy conservation,
integration of natural and artificial systems; the affect on contemporary
practice, and the emerging roles of architectural careers and consultants
in these disciplines.
The course is subdivided into three equal offerings: acoustical
principles and practical applications in buildings that affects site
selection and evaluation of buildings and their orientation on a site
and shaping of space for sound control, all done in conjunction
with case studies. The second and third parts deal with natural or
day lighting and artificial lighting with an emphasis on the their
integration through design. Basic principles are introduced, design
procedures outlined, calculating methods reviewed, case studies and
the use of physical and computer modeling investigated. The students
will gain a sufficient basic understanding of acoustical, day lighting
and artificial lighting design in order to feel confident in making these
concerns an inherent part of their design process. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 327 – History of American Architecture
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or permission of instructor
Examines American Architecture and architectural thought from 1800
to the 1960s. The course is organized around a series of key themes.
Special emphasis will be placed upon architecture as a force within,
and a manifestation of American culture at large. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 328 – Renaissance Architecture
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or permission of instructor
A detailed exploration of the architecture of Italy from c. 1400 to 1580
within the context of the institutions, values and ideals that emerged
during the civilization of the Renaissance, as well as analysis of how
and why various aspects of Renaissance architecture influenced
buildings, designs, and theories up to the 20th century. The course
will focus upon accounting for the evolving motivations and goals that
embodied the spirit of the ages to be examined. Architectural theory,
as reflected in surviving treatises by Renaissance and Renaissanceinspired theorists, shall be analyzed not only for their architectural
content, but also as the primary documents that reflect the changing
attitudes and applications of Renaissance humanism and the revival of
Classical antiquity. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 329 – History of Landscape Architecture
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or permission of instructor
Co-Listed with ARCH 529
History of Landscape Architecture is a survey of the development
of man’s relationship to and shaping of the land. This course will
survey the landscape and gardens from the beginnings of civilization
until contemporary times, although the primary emphasis will
be on the Italian Renaissance, the gardens of France in the age of
Louis XIV, and the English garden. The course will also include
contributing cultures, such as China, India and Japan, as well as
study the growth of parks in the 19th century, particularly in the
United States. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 331 – Construction Materials and Assemblies II
Prerequisite: ARCH 231
This continuation of Construction Materials and Assemblies I
provides students with the awareness and understanding necessary
for the selection of materials, components and assemblies for the
design and construction of buildings. The course explores traditional
and non-traditional building techniques, methods and materials
selection with particular emphasis on steel, concrete, and glass in
relation to fabrication and assembly methods, historical influences,
function, sustainability, and architectural expression. Issues of
materials’ embodied energy as well as recyclability and disassembly
are also considered. The course also dedicates a substantial portion
of its time to the examination of building envelope concepts as the
locus of design resolution between technical and architectural design
ARCH 333 – Building Systems: Equipment for Buildings
Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course provides a basic study of the mechanical, sanitary, water
supply, sewage disposal, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, fire
protection and electrical equipment and systems used in buildings.
The student learns the basics of active and passive heating, cooling
and ventilating systems, load calculations, life safety ventilation,
psychometrics, plumbing, storm drainage, fire protection systems,
and electrical, energy codes and management with discussion of
energy conservation and construction budgeting as well as M & E
construction documents.
Particular emphasis is given to systems integration. First is the
recognition that buildings consist of seven component systems; space
planning, structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing (including fire
protection); enclosure, and fitments (fixtures and furniture). Second
is the need to consider these systems as early in the design process as
possible. Design considerations such as points of origin, generating
equipment, distribution devices, delivery mechanisms, control systems
and energy usage are studied. Sustainability is embedded in the nature
of these subjects with a particular emphasis on energy conservation
and efficient design practices. Where possible “rules of thumb” sizing
and diagramming techniques are examined and technical design
development are explored from the point of view of, energy efficiency,
the architect’s design and the engineering consultant’s criteria.
Classroom lectures, case studies (on hard and soft technologies) and a
field trip are used to expand on the reading assignments and to provide
a general introduction and overview of the subject. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 335 – Structure, Form and Order
Prerequisites: MATH 136 or 213 and PHYS 109, 201 or ENGR 210
Introduces the fundamental concepts of structural form and behavior
through a combination of lectures and studio exercises. Basic
structural forms and their taxonomy will be studied in nature and
through history, using visual presentations, readings, and hands-on
experiments. Load paths and basic load tracing through common
structural systems will be investigated. An introduction to vector
based force representation will also be covered as a continuation of
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Course Descriptions
topics covered in Physics. In addition the students’ studio projects will
be utilized for assignments. The development of a strong structural
vocabulary will also be stressed. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 413 – Advanced Architectural Design Studio
Prerequisite: ARCH 231,313, 325, 335;
Pre/Co-requisite: ARCH 322
Students may select from a number of thematically focused directed
studios in order to fulfill the Advanced Architectural Design Studio
requirement for the Bachelor of Science and BS + Masters of
Architecture degree programs. Students completing a Bachelor
of Science are required to take either an Advanced Architectural
Design Studio or an Advanced Topical Design Studio. Minimum
passing grade of “C” required. (5 credits) Fall, Spring, Summer
ARCH 416 – Advanced Topical Design Studio: Urban
Prerequisite: ARCH 231,313, 325, 335
This advanced design studio examines the role of Architecture
as a critical component of the larger built environment and
of the public realm. As such, the projects engaged within this
studio focus on issues and concerns impacting local and/or global
communities. This studio also explores the role of architecture
in relation to allied disciplines such as Urban Design, Historic
Preservation, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and in relation
to the various formal and informal constituencies that influence
the shape of the urban fabric. This course is Cross-Listed with Arch
516 Graduate Topical Design Studio: Urban Minimum passing
grade of “C” required. (5 credits) Fall, Spring, Summer
ARCH 430 – Special Topics in Architecture
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Junior Standing
Variable content course dealing with significant aspects and themes
in Architecture, in the areas of history/theory of architecture,
environmental and behavior; technical systems, and professional
practices. (3 credits) Special Offering
ARCH 434 – Design of Structures I
Prerequisites: ARCH 335
A numeric and graphical approach to the design and analysis of basic
structural systems. Basic principles of mechanics: forces, equilibrium,
geometric properties of areas, material properties, support conditions,
stress strain relationships will be presented. The selection and
configuration of efficient structural systems for common building
types will be emphasized. Projects requiring the design and analysis of
simple funicular structures will be assigned. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 435 – Design of Structures II
Prerequisites: ARCH 434
A qualitative and quantitative analysis of structural materials,
structural members, and structural assemblies. Emphasizes
the fundamental design principles of wood, steel and concrete
structures. Foundation and lateral load resisting systems will be
studied. Case studies of significant architectural structures will be
assigned to develop design and analytical skills, including the use
of structural analysis software. The integration of the structural
system with other systems within the building and its relationship
to the enclosure system will be addressed. Advanced structural
technologies, such as tensile, shell, and high-rise systems will be
introduced. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 461 – Landscape Architecture: Theory and Practice
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: ARCH 313, ARCH 321, and junior standing
Co-Listed with ARCH 561
Introduces the theoretical underpinnings and design processes of
landscape architecture as a discipline and as a contemporary practice.
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Modes of interpreting, inventorying, and working with the landscape
and the materials used in landscape construction will be examined.
Class lectures, case study research and simple design exercises
will look at landscape design at multiple scales. The central role of
landscape design as an integral component of sustainable development
practices will also be examined (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 477 – Architecture in Context
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Junior standing
Through a variety of study and documentation techniques, students
examine the architecture and urbanism of the Study Abroad setting
as important cultural manifestations of a people and their history.
Readings and lectures by University and local faculty provide historical
or theoretical background for students’ on-site observations. The
current practice of architecture will likewise be illuminated by
visits with local practitioners and tours of their work. Through an
appreciation of the range of issues, which can influence architectural
and urban form in the study abroad setting, it is hoped that students
will be able to reflect more objectively on their own culture,
environment and creative processes. (3 credits) May be offered Fall,
Spring, Summer as part of Study Abroad programs.
ARCH 478 – Dutch Architecture: The Enduring 20th Century Legacy
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: ARCH 325, junior standing
Dutch architecture of the 20th century provides a unique grounding
for the study of modern architecture’s ideas, development and
buildings. Dutch architecture of the last century may be seen
as a laboratory for the examination of a contemporary society’s
environment and social advancement. Topics will explore and examine
the thematic evolution of 20th century architectural ideals in Holland
as expressed by significant architects’ writings and buildings. A lectureseminar format promotes the idea that themes of the past century
continue to be advanced in contemporary Dutch architectural theory
and practice. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 484 – Construction Estimating and Scheduling
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: ARCH 231, ARCH 331
An introduction to the fundamentals of construction estimating and
scheduling. Conceptual, square foot, systems and unit price estimates
will be studied along with basic CPM scheduling theory to include bar
charts and network schedules. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 487 – Digital Modeling
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: ARCH 287 and completion of the Architecture Core Program
This course will emphasize the development and use of architectural
computer models as various phases within the design process, from
conceptual sketches through design realization. Students will learn
modeling, lighting and rendering applications using significant
architectural and design works as references. A variety of programs
will be investigated. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 488 – Computer Applications for Professional Practice
Prerequisites: ARCH 287 and completion of the Architecture Core program
The course is structured to explore new modes of contemporary
practice, specifically Integrated Project Design/Delivery, and the role
of B.I.M. (Building Information Modeling) as it pertains to design
and decision-making in contemporary architectural practice. This
course will explore the use of B.I.M. and related analytical tools
to get immediate feedback on buildings systems and sustainability
alternatives that can inform the design process. We will focus on
developing proficiency in the use of B.I.M. software while at the same
time looking at how this tool and related computer technologies are
changing the way that information is generated and utilized within the
Architecture
practice environment. Collaborative Projects with other disciplines
explore how information, including cost, scheduling and building
material usage, is shared among the various parties involved in the
design and construction process. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 490 – Cultures in Contact (A Study Abroad Seminar)
(Offered in several programs; see advisor or Dean of the college or school
which is appropriate for your major)
Prerequisite: Junior standing
Cultures in Contact is designed as a companion course to those
off-campus study programs offered by a variety of majors at Roger
Williams University. Students learn how to focus their observations of
another culture in order to deepen and expand their understanding
of the country and culture in which they are studying and to reflect
critically upon their own cultures as well. (3 credits) Special Offering
ARCH 501 – Elements and Principles of Architectural Design
Co-requisite: ARCH 511 Graduate Core Design Studio I
This course is a companion to ARCH 511 Graduate Core Design Studio
I. It is and introduction to the essential elements of architecture
and the basic principles of its composition. Design and conceptual
thinking skills will be developed through lectures, diagramming and
case study analysis of important architectural precedents. These
assignments will further skills development work being conducted
within the companion studio course. (3 credits) Summer
ARCH 511 – Graduate Core Architectural Design Studio I
Co-requisite: ARCH 501 Elements and Principles of Architectural Design
This course is an intensive introduction to architectural design and
the basic skills needed to analyze and communicate architectural
design intentions using 2d and 3d representational techniques.
The course will introduce principles of two and three-dimensional
composition within the context of basic architectural issues of shelter,
space and tectonics. Compositional issues of scale, proportion,
organization, hierarchy, movement, color and light will be developed
through lectures, sketch assignments and fully rendered architectural
explorations. Issues of site, shelter and tectonics will be explored
through a variety of abstract conditions from urban to rural and level
to sloping sites. (5 credits) Summer
ARCH 512 – Graduate Core Architectural Design Studio II:
Prerequisite: ARCH 511 Graduate Core Architectural Design Studio I
This studio course builds on Graduate Studio I by introducing more
complex notions of site, climate and culture while also integrating
more complex programmatic and tectonic responses to user needs.
More complicated notions of building organization, spatial hierarchy,
circulation, structure and enclosure will be explored in plan and in
section. A variety of sites will serve as the catalyst for an investigation
of how the fundamental need for shelter and material expression are
affected by regional and cultural traditions and particular climatic
conditions. The urban site is explored through a focus on the buildings
relationship to the public realm and to the varied programs that
animate it in plan and are elaborated on in the sectional development
of the building. Faculty lectures will be integrated into the semester
and a digital portfolio will be required. (5 credits) Fall
ARCH 513 – Comprehensive Project Design Studio
Prerequisite: ARCH 331, 332, 333, 413, 416, 435
This studio will provide the opportunity for advanced students
working individually and/or in small groups, to bring all
components of their architectural education together to focus on
an architectural design problem/project. Students will fully assess
an architectural problem, designated site and relevant precedents
in order to establish appropriate design criteria. Advancing
the problem/project through conceptual, schematic and design
development stages students will respond to programmatic,
structural and environmental systems, accessibility and life-
safety issues. They will advance their design resolution from site
response, building materials and assemblies selection and attention
to sustainable design criteria to the detailed development key
spaces. Each individual or group will prepare construction contract
documentation, drawings and outline specifications, for key
components of the design project. Students will prepare a project
assessment to evaluate the appropriateness of their problem/project
design response to the architectural program and related cultural and
environmental issues. (5 credits) Fall, Spring, Summer
ARCH 515 – Graduate Architectural Design Studio
Prerequisite: Completion of ARCH 413, ARCH 416, ARCH 331, 332, 333, 434
Students may select from a number of directed studios in fulfilling
the Graduate Architectural Design Studio requirement for the Master
of Architecture degree. Offerings at this level are enriched by studios
focusing on topics such as urban design, housing, sustainable design,
contemporary technologies, interior architecture, historic preservation
and others. (5 credits) Fall, Spring, Summer
ARCH 516 – Graduate Topical Design Studio: Urban
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the MS in Architecture program or permission
of instructor
This graduate design studio examines the role of Architecture as
a critical component of the larger built environment and of the
public realm. As such, the projects engaged within this studio take
on issues and concerns impacting local and/or global communities.
This studio also explores the role of architecture in relation to allied
disciplines such as Urban Design, Historic Preservation, Planning
and Landscape Architecture, and in relation to the various formal and
informal constituencies that influence the shape of the urban fabric.
As the graduate offering of Arch 416 lectures and reviews are shared;
however, grading criteria, assignments and the quality of design /
research will reflect graduate level coursework and achievement
expectations. (5 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 521 – Sustainable Design Seminar
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Senior standing w/ permission of the instructor
This seminar covers core concepts of sustainable building,
development and land use. Topics will include trends in green building
legislation on local and national levels; researching sustainable
products, materials, systems and technologies; case studies of high
performance buildings and architectural design; integration of
architecture and MEP systems; the U.S. Green Building Council’s
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design building rating
program (LEED); the relationship between ‘green’ building in context
and transportation and land use; indoor air quality, daylight and
natural ventilation; tools for sustainable design analysis; existing
building assessment and improvement; balancing the costs and
benefits of sustainable design. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 522 – Environmental Design Research
Prerequisite: Senior standing
Environmental Design Research introduces diverse theoretical
approaches and research methods, for assessing inhabited
environments with cultural, social and energy sustainability criteria.
Readings include contributions from environmental psychology,
anthropology, sociology, and cross-cultural studies as well as energy
assessment literature. A semester long fieldwork project is undertaken
to observe, conduct interviews and report to local architects and their
clients how their buildings are used and experienced by diverse groups
of inhabitants. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 524 – Evolution of Urban Form
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or permission of instructor
Cross-Listed with ARCH 324
Examines and analyzes the evolution of urban form, from Neolithic
villages to cities of the emerging modern era. Addresses why cities
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Course Descriptions
have taken the forms they have, and their formal, physical, and
spatial elements. Students consider urban structure and dynamics
relative to architectural expression, building types, and urban open
spaces. As the graduate offering of Arch 324 lectures are shared;
however, grading criteria, assignments and quality of independent
research will reflect graduate level coursework and achievement
expectations. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 536 – Special Topics in Sustainable Design
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Architecture or Senior standing w/
permission of the instructor
Special Topics in Sustainable Design is a variable content course
dealing with significant aspects of Sustainable Design in Architecture.
(3 or 4 credits) Special Offering
ARCH 529 – History of Landscape Architecture
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 and Senior Standing w/ permission of instructor
or dean
Cross-Listed with ARCH 329
History of Landscape Architecture is a survey of the development of
man’s relationship to and shaping of the land. This course will survey
the landscape and gardens from the beginnings of civilization until
contemporary times, although the primary emphasis will be on the
Italian Renaissance, the gardens of France in the age of Louis XIV, and
the English garden. The course will also include contributing cultures,
such as China, India and Japan, as well as study the growth of parks
in the 19th century, particularly in the United States. As the graduate
offering of Arch 329, lectures are shared; however, grading criteria,
assignments and quality of independent research will reflect graduate
level coursework and achievement expectations. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 537 – Special Topics in Urban Design
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Architecture, or Senior standing w/
permission of the instructor
Special Topics in Urban Design is a variable content course dealing a
significant aspect and themes in Urban Design such as Urban Ecology,
Community Development, Planning or Landscape Architecture. (3 or 4
credits) Special Offering
ARCH 530 – Special Topics in Architecture
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in B.S./ M. Arch. Program, or Senior
standing with permission of the instructor
Variable content course dealing with significant aspects and themes
in Architecture, in the areas of history/theory of architecture,
environmental and behavior; technical systems, and professional
practices. (3 or 4 credits) Special Offering
ARCH 542 – Professional Practice
Prerequisite: Senior standing
Introduces students to architectural business and practice
management; codes, regulations and laws; administration of the
construction contract; and emphasizes the architect’s professional
and legal responsibilities. Also addresses the traditional arrangements
for project design and construction, and difference in relationships
with the client between the design and construction phases. Lectures,
discussions, and assignments address each subject in order to develop
an understanding of the moral, legal and general responsibilities of the
design professional. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 533 – Detailing the High-Performance Building Envelope
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in M.Sc.in Arch. or M.Arch programs or
Senior Standing w/ permission of the instructor or Dean
The course examines the issues associated with designing highperformance building enclosures both at a conceptual level and at
a detailed level. Concepts of advanced building envelopes that are
integrated with other building systems are examined. Tools and
methods for assessing the life cycle of an assembly, for choosing
materials and for optimizing façade configurations to achieve
satisfying internal comfort, thermal, light, and acoustic performance
are studied. Modes of assembly that minimize heat loss are evaluated
using computational tools. Field trips to fabrication facilities and
construction sites cast light on production processes. The dynamics of
the interaction between architect and façade consultant and specifier
are also investigated. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 535 – Introduction to Proactive Simulation
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Senior standing w/ permission of the instructor
The elective course is an introduction to building performance
simulation (BPS) methods and tools. It is concerned with the
proactive integration of BPS within the design process. The course
will introduce the students to the workings of several software
tools that complement each other in the area of energy, bulk air
flow, and lighting simulation. The course also brings Integrated
Project Delivery concepts and methods to bear and critically
examines the role of project data management into emerging design
methodologies. The course prepares students to think strategically
when approaching modeling as a well as developing an ability to
examine critically modeling outputs. The course is grounded in
reality by also introducing on-site data acquisition and building postoccupancy evaluation techniques. (3 credits) Spring
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ARCH 538 – Special Topics in Digital Media
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Architecture, or Senior standing w/
permission of the instructor
Special Topics in Digital Media is a variable content course dealing
with a significant aspect or theme in Digital Media as it relates to
architectural design, theory, or practice. (3 or 4 credits) Special Offering
ARCH 561 – Landscape Architecture: Theory and Practice
Architecture Elective
Cross-Listed with Arch 461
Prerequisites: ARCH 321, and senior standing
Introduces the theoretical underpinnings and design processes of
landscape architecture as a discipline and as a contemporary practice.
Modes of interpreting, inventorying, and working with the landscape
and the materials used in landscape construction will be examined.
Class lectures, case study research and simple design exercises
will look at landscape design at multiple scales. The central role of
landscape design as an integral component of sustainable development
practices will also be examined. As the graduate offering of Arch 461
lectures are shared; however, grading criteria, assignments and the
quality of independent research will reflect graduate level coursework
and achievement expectations. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 572 –Urban Design Theory from the Industrial Revolution
to the Present
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Senior standing
The Industrial Revolution brought about the radical transformation of
of the traditional city. We will examine the changes that brought about
the rise of the Industrial City, and look at the wide array of reactions
to it –utopian and otherwise- including the modern movement. We
will then consider the legacy of the modern movement and the postmodern critique. Finally we will consider the dynamic processes
that continue to shape the contemporary city and have caused the
more recent restructuring of our metropolitan regions and fostered
the growth of “Global Cities”. Challenges such as urban sprawl,
the decline of the public realm, and the degradation of the natural
Architecture
environment will be considered in the light of “The Edge City”,
“The Informational City”, “Sustainable Urbanism” and “Landscape
Urbanism”. Theories of Urban Design will be examined not purely
as formal operations, but also as products of a particular historical,
social, political and economic context. Special attention will be given
to the identification of those urban ideas or values whose persistence,
in the face of tremendous change, place them at the core of any future
consideration of the form of the city and the role of architecture
within it. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 573 – Modernism in the Non-Western World: A
Comparative Perspective
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: ARCH 325 or AAH 323, Senior standing
Provides an in-depth examination of modern architecture in the
non-Western world, i.e., outside the United States and Europe.
The major thrust of the course is to investigate critically how
modernism has disseminated and/or articulated in the nonWestern world. Discusses the works of predominant urban
designers and architects, key theoreticians, Western and nonWestern, in different parts of the world as manifested from the
times of its emergence during the Colonial period to the present
time. Elaborates upon varied perceptions of and theoretical
approaches to modernity, bringing students up to date on present
responses to global architecture. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 574 – Regionalism in Architecture
Architecture Elective
Prerequisite: Senior standing
Provides the necessary theoretical framework to examine
the processes that result in the regional particularization of
architecture as well as substantive knowledge of architectural
context and architectural practice in various regions of the world.
Addresses the value and significance of the way local conditions
contribute to the formation of architecture, and critically
distinguishes between the various ways architects have tried to
express regional identity. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 575 – Contemporary Asian Architecture & Urbanism
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: Senior Standing in the B.S. / M.Arch or Urban Studies CORE
concentration and minor
Twentieth-Century architecture in Asia, from the Middle-east to
Indonesia has gone through several stages; from modernism and
nationalism, and in the latter half, to issues of regionalism, historicism,
“Islamic architecture” and a synthesis of all these. In the 21st century
globalization is reflected in new buildings and cities, and notions of
cultural and environmental sustainability have come to the forefront.
The seminar examines the influences and frameworks – both societal
and personal – that form the architectures, architects and their work,
and the milieu within which urban places are conceived. The seminar
assists in the difficult task of interpreting and understanding current and
emerging urban development and building design in rapidly changing
societies. Given that the 21st century might well be the century of India
and China this discourse is of great relevance to architecture worldwide.
(3 credits) Fall
ARCH 576 – Theoretical Origins of Modernism
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: ARCH 325, Senior standing
This course introduces students to some of the key theorists who
laid the philosophical groundwork for modern architecture, among
them Laugier, Durand, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Morris, Wagner, and
Loos. It emphasizes close readings of original theoretical texts and
evaluation of subsequent critical assessments. It analyzes thematically
the concerns of modern thinkers as they emerge and then transform
across time – rationalism, the artist as romantic individualist,
architecture as an agent of social reform, the craft ideal, organicism,
the questions of ornament and style. Lectures and discussions explore
the theorists’ pivotal ideas, their influence on the contemporary world
of architectural practice, and their relation to the intellectual, social,
and political predicaments of the day. (3 credits) Alternate Spring
ARCH 577 – The American Skyscraper
Prerequisite: Senior standing in the B.S./M.Arch. program or in the Urban
Studies Minor
The course explores the American skyscraper in historical perspective,
beginning with mid-19th century developments in technology and
urbanization and ending with the late 20th-century phenomenon
of the skyscraper as an American export abroad. Key stages in the
development of the skyscraper are examined in light of technological
innovations, economic change, and the workplace. As a modern
building type bound up with the culture of cities, the skyscraper
serves as a compelling lens through which to assess architecture’s
engagement with the experience of modernity—in light of literature,
the fine arts, photography, and film. (3 credits) Annually
ARCH 586 – Processing
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in M.Sc.in Arch. or M.Arch programs or
Senior Standing w/ permission of the instructor and introductory CAD
experience (ARCH 287) or its equivalent
The course explores Algorithmic Design and Associative Modeling in
Architecture. Computational Geometry is explored using Generative
Algorithm-based methodologies, or Parametric Design. Investigations
into form generation using parametric variables to understand
the behavior of multiple architectural systems, such as assembly
logics, material characteristics and manufacturing constraints
in the definition of simple components are then proliferated
into larger systems and assemblies. Instead of drawing objects,
Generative Algorithmic modeling employs numbers, mathematics
and calculations as base data to generate form with infinite results.
Hundreds of formal variations can be made by adjusting basic
geometrical parameters. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 587 – Advanced Computer Applications in Design
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: ARCH 287 and Graduate standing or permission of instructor
and Dean
Advanced computer aided design using high-end interactive threedimensional software, with particular emphasis on animation,
modeling, dynamic and rendering techniques, as they relate to
architectural design and production processes. (3 credits) Fall
ARCH 588 – Digital Manufacturing
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: ARCH 287 and Graduate standing or permission of instructor
or Dean
Advanced CAD-CAM (Computer Aided Design – Computer Aided
Manufacturing), Rapid Prototyping and Reverse Engineering techniques
are explored as Digital Manufacturing techniques, in relationship to
architectural design and production processes. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 589 – 4D
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in M.Sc.in Arch. or M.Arch programs or
Senior Standing with permission of the instructor and introductory CAD
experience (ARCH 287) or its equivalent.
The course explores Digital Cinematography using Animation
principles and toolsets in a time-based 3-D modeling software. In
addition to Turntable, Motion Path, Motion Trail, Animation Snapshot
& Sweeps, Keyframe, non-linear and advanced animation editing tools
(Graphing, Trax, Dope Sheet, Blends & Expressions) are explored.
Project investigations center on 4-D (fourth dimension), or time-based
space (the spatialisation of time) using parametric variables to control
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Course Descriptions
and understand the behavior of multiple architectural logics in the
definition of a scripted narrative, or storyboard. Cinematic techniques
are analyzed and applied to a filmic short authored to DVD, including
Titles, Direction (Choreography), CG, MoCap (Motion Capture)
/ Chroma key, Post Production, Sound and Credits sequencing.
Advanced experience with Modeling is assumed. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 593 – Sustainable Paradigms
Architecture Elective
Prerequisites: Senior standing
Sustainable Paradigms is a graduate architectural elective seminar/
lecture course that primarily focuses on the interdependencies
of ecological, social, cultural, economic and technological issues
pertaining to architectural/urban/landscaped environments. It views
them in a holistic manner and examines existing values/paradigms
on sustainability and focuses on emerging conditions to rethink,
reevaluate and update our relationship with nature and resources
while appropriating innovative sustainable technologies and
renewable means for attaining a better quality of life. The course
explores how sustainable principles are applied to both integrated
design and construction, as well as to the assessment of existing
built environments, including building envelope and technical
building systems. Its primary goal is to demonstrate, through cases,
how sustainability issues can be part of planning efforts, from macro
(global, regional social and cultural in urban and suburban contexts)
to micro scale (local; as part of community, at home or work place).
The course will also investigate and develop research methodologies
to evaluate local/regional environments using sustainability criteria.
(3 credits) Fall
ARCH 594 – Urban Ecology
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Senior standing w/ permission of the instructor
Urban Ecology focuses on issues of sustainable urbanism and
examines the interdependencies of social, cultural, ecological,
economic and technological variables that pertain to the planning
and design of sustainable communities in urban spaces. The
course holistically explores how several nested scales of design
interventions can synergistically produce more livable and
ecologically viable urban environments. The course investigates
and develops research methodologies to evaluate local / regional
environments including global contexts using sustainability criteria
to help the designer tackle brown / grey field redevelopment and
retrofit / restructure existing urban environments according to
sustainability standards. (3 credits) Spring
ARCH 601 – Graduate Colloquium
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in M.Sc. in Architecture
The colloquium is a required course for all Master of Science in
Architecture students. The course introduces the program, its
peoples and their research interests in diverse concentration areas.
It is aimed at orienting students within an environment of broad
intellectual inquiry . The student begins to chart a research agenda
and explore potential research agendas/interests with advisors.
Preceded with assigned readings prior to class start and followed by a
final paper, the course unfolds as an intensive two-week long seminar
in which ideas, viewpoints, and methods of inquiry across areas of
concentration are discussed. As common core course, it prepares the
student for graduate-level inquiry in the area of concentration, while
also situating their investigation within a broader collaborative and
interdisciplinary framework. The course balances time spent with
students and faculty in all concentrations and time with faculty and an
advisor in the student’s concentration area. (3 credits) Summer
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ARCH 606 – Field Research Seminar
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in M.Sc.in Arch. or M.Arch programs or
Senior Standing w/ permission of the instructor
The Field Research Seminar takes students in the field (locally,
regionally, nationally or abroad) to meet with professionals, visit
and document existing state of the art projects. As a common core
course in the Master of Science in Architecture, it helps the student
to become acquainted with precedents, buildings, technologies,
design methods, and actors in the area of concentration, while
also acknowledging the interdisciplinary context around the area
of concentration. Some site and office visits are common across
several areas of concentration while others are unique to one area
of concentration. Students prepare a document synthesizing their
research. Non-resident students can take the course has a hybrid
online course with limited on-site presence and independent field
research. (3 credits) Summer
ARCH 613 – Graduate Thesis Design Studio
Prerequisite: ARCH 513, 515, 641
Arch 613 is focused on the development of a thesis project in the
design studio from the proposition put forward and developed in
the research seminar, and its subsequent documentation through
the production of a thesis project document. The thesis is more than
simply the student’s final project- It is a final project that demonstrates
competence at integrating building systems and materials, social,
formal and urbanistic concerns into the design of a building, yet goes
beyond this to make a speculative proposition about what architecture
should be. (5 credits) Fall, Spring
ARCH 616 – Collaborative Workshop
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in M.Sc.in Arch. or M.Arch programs or
Senior Standing w/ permission of the instructor
In this course, students from diverse areas of concentration work
collaboratively on a design problem with multiple dimensions
(ecological, urban, architectural, etc) rooted in the reality of a
community (local, domestic or abroad). Under the guidance of a
faculty in her/his area of concentration, each student contributes
to the collaborative effort from the particular point of view of her/
his area of concentration. The workshop uses data collected in the
Field Research Seminar (ARCH 606). The workshop produces a
coherent design proposal that capitalizes on the synergistic integration
of the various viewpoints and methodologies found in each area of
concentration. Students learn to work in multidisciplinary teams and
learn leadership skills in complex, reality-based, multidimensional
design problems. Each student contributes to the, research and design
effort and to the preparation of the workshop’s final report and graphic
documentation. (4 credits) Summer
ARCH 633 – Independent Graduate Research Thesis
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in M.Sc. in Arch., ARCH 641 Graduate
Research Seminar
This course is tailored for Master of Science in Architecture students
who do not desires to do a studio-based design thesis but are interested
in doing a written thesis under the guidance of an advisor in their area
of concentration. Students engage in thorough research over at least a
semester and prepare a written document synthesizing their research.
The thesis should clearly relate to the area of concentration. Student
can also work with a second advisor in the same or another discipline
or area of concentration to broaden the scope of their inquiry. Dualdegree M.Arch./MSc. in Arch. students must complete this course
concurrently to their design-based M.Arch. thesis (ARCH 613).
Dual degree students should refer to the directives on requirements
to complete the written thesis with the M.Sc. in Arch. program
coordinator. (3 credits) Spring
Art and Architectural History
ARCH 641 – Graduate Thesis Research Seminar
Prerequisite: Completion of two ARCH 413 studios
A graduate research seminar which investigates through readings,
discussions, and faculty and student presentations, issues which
should be at the core of the development of an independent thesis
project proposal, and which are critical for full engagement with the
profession of Architecture and the pursuit of lifelong learning:-Ideas/
Values: Theoretical, Philosophical and Ethical Concepts; -Site: The
Physical and Cultural Context; -Use/Habitation: Programming, Project
definition and Project Planning; -Materials/ Technology: Integration
of Concepts and Properties; -Creativity/ Communication: Design
Thinking, Visual and Verbal Communication. (3 credits) Fall, Spring
ART AND ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY
AAH 121 – History of Art and Architecture I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
An introduction to the visual cultures of the ancient and medieval
worlds, including Africa, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and
Asia. Key issues and monuments focus the discussion, and works of
art, including painting, sculpture and architecture, are examined in
relation to their political, religious and social contexts. (3 credits) Fall,
Spring, Summer
AAH 122 – History of Art and Architecture II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121
A continuation of History of Art I, this course introduces the visual
cultures of Africa, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Asia
beginning with the Renaissance and ending with our own modern day.
Using key issues and monuments as the focus of discussion, the works
of art covered include painting, photography, film, sculpture and
architecture. Emphasis is placed on the political, religious and social
contexts of the object, as well as the artistic process. (3 credits) Fall,
Spring, Summer
AAH 305 – Theory and Methods of Art and Architectural History
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
Cross-Listed with AAH 505
This course will deepen the students’ understanding of the modes
of analysis in the history of the arts and architecture and their
philosophical bases, including connoisseurship, iconography, theories of
the evolution of art, psychoanalysis, the psychology of perception, issues
of gender and ethnicity, and theories of art criticism. Critical discussion
of readings and writing will be stressed. (3 credits) Annually
AAH 311 – History of American Art
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
Survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and the “minor
arts” in the United States to show how these arts have expressed
American ways of living and how they have been related to
American ideas. (3 credits) Spring
AAH 312 – History of Modern Art
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
A survey of modern art from 1863-1963 that examines the major
movements of the historical avant-garde in painting, sculpture, and
photography. Major themes include the construction of gender,
the notion of the primitive, expression, approaches to abstraction,
responses to the city, art and politics in the 1930s, and the post-World
War II cultural shift from Europe to America. Aspects of modernism as
an international phenomenon will be addressed by reference to work
from the urban centers of Europe, central Europe and Russia, the USA,
South America, and Asia. (3 credits) Fall
AAH 313 – Arts and Architecture of Africa
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
A survey of the arts of Sub-Saharan Africa, including painting,
sculpture, textiles, architecture and performance arts. Special
emphasis is placed on these arts in the context of ritual. We will
discuss perceptions and ideologies which have shaped the study
of African Art and influenced our present understanding of the
continent. (3 credits) Alternate Spring
AAH 319 – History of Italian Renaissance Art
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
The major artists who created the Italian Renaissance style in
painting, sculpture and architecture are considered in their cultural
context. Topics include the formation of the Renaissance style, the
significance of subjects and forms based on Classical Antiquity, the
development of the High Renaissance by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael
and Michelangelo, and the interconnectedness of Renaissance art
forms. (3 credits) Spring
AAH 321 – Art and Architecture in the Classical World
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
An in-depth investigation of Classical arts within the context of
the institutions, values, and ideas that emerged in the civilizations
of Ancient Greece and Rome. Analyzes special topics in ancient
architecture such as the art and architectural theory and practice of
antiquity, with the intent of accounting for the goals and aspirations
of specific cultures, societies, and patrons. Topics investigate how
Classical societies interacted with each other and with other cultures
outside the sphere of Western civilization. Geographical areas of
examination include mainland Greece and the Mediterranean islands,
Asia Minor, Italy, North Africa, and Western Europe; the time frame
spans from circa 750 BC to circa 500 AD. (3 credits) Annually
AAH 322 – Art and Architecture in the Medieval World
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History
Core Concentration
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122
An in-depth investigation of the arts of the Middle Ages within the
context of the institutions, values, and ideas that emerged in the
civilization of the Early Christian, Byzantine, and Western Medieval
era. Analyzes special topics in Medieval art