Mayor picks Hannum for county panel - The Daily Times

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All-County Volleyball served up. 4B
Neighborhood
Barre sets
up shop in
Maryville. 8A
YOUR LIFE. YOUR TIMES. SINCE 1883
TUESDAY
December 23, 2014
Maryville, TN
$1.00
thedailytimes.com
A grown-up Christmas wish
Mayor picks
Hannum for
county panel
Non-elected nominee would
serve on budget committee
BY JOEL DAVIS
Sharon
Hannum
[email protected]
TOM SHERLIN | THE DAILY TIMES
JOANNIE MAE DEAN (LEFT), who is confined to a wheelchair with polio, wants to get out and see the area’s Christmas lights.
Neighbor and former elementary school classmate Willie Mae Hannum (right) is trying to help make her wish come true.
Woman confined with polio yearns to see holiday lights
BY IVA BUTLER
[email protected]
After 14 years basically
confined at home due to
polio, Alcoa native Joannie Mae Dean yearns to
see the Christmas lights
again,
Neighbor and former
elementary school classmate Willie Mae Hannum is trying to help
make that happen.
When Dean was a
young woman, she
recalls getting in her
car and driving around
to see area houses and
‘The older I get, the
more limited I am in
what I can do.’
Joannie Mae Dean
businesses decorated
with multi-colored
lights and Christmas
characters like Santa,
Rudolph and Frosty.
However, as she ages,
the polio she contracted
when she was 4 years
old has progressed and
she relies more and
more on a wheelchair.
Dean lives in a house
at 123 Newcomen St.,
Alcoa, on the same lot
as the home where she
was born.
Four children of her
parents (James and
Alberta Dean) were
affected by the illness
in 1952. Brother George
Arthur, 6, died. Sister
Patricia, 11 months, and
brother James Boyd Jr., 7,
also contracted the disease, along with Dean.
Polio is a contagious
airborne viral illness
that in its most severe
form causes paralysis,
difficulty breathing and
sometimes death.
The disease has confined Dean to a wheelchair since age 11. As
she aged, the negative
aspects of polio became
more evident.
“I have a lot of pain,”
Dean said. “It weakens
bones. You can break
your bones just turning over in bed. That
has not happened to me
yet. The older I get, the
more limited I am in
County Mayor Ed Mitchell
is looking outside the ranks
of the Blount County Commission to find a replacement for outgoing Blount
County Budget Committee member Commissioner
Steve Samples.
Mitchell confirmed Monday that he intends to submit community leader Sharon Hannum’s name to the
Blount County Commission
in January as his choice to
replace Samples, who has
decided to step back after
serving on the panel for
more than 15 years in total.
“I’m very honored at being
nominated and honored
that they think I could have
some positive contributions to add to that august
body,” Hannum said. “It’s
an awesome responsibility
to serve on that particular board. I was shocked,
actually. I consider it to be
a huge honor and a huge
responsibility.”
Among its other financial
duties, the Budget Committee recommends yearly
budgets to the full County
Commission for approval.
Under the County Budgeting Law of 1957, the budget committee is composed
Community
leader would be first
African-American to
serve on the panel.
Ed
Mitchell
Blount County
mayor is looking
outside of the
elected arena.
Tona
Monroe
Commissioner
takes issue with
nomination.
of the county mayor and
four other members, whom
the mayor appoints with
the approval of the county’s
governing body. It is not
very well-known but state
law does not require the
members of the committee to serve on the County
Commission.
Currently, the committee
is made up of Mitchell and
Commissioners Mike Lewis, Jerome Moon, Samples
and Tom Cole.
SEE HANNUM, 5A
SEE POLIO, 5A
Health officials say local flu outbreak
less intense than last year — so far
BY JOEL DAVIS
[email protected]
DARRON CUMMINGS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A SIGN LETS CUSTOMERS KNOW they can get a flu shot in a Walgreens store
Sept. 16 in Indianapolis. Health officials are continuing to encourage residents
to get vaccinated.
Blount Records . . . . 4A
Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5B
Classified . . . . . . . . . 6B
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . 8B
Crossword . . . . . . . . . 9B
Daily Calendar. . . . 10A
Dear Abby . . . . . . . . . 9A
Deaths . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Local medical officials remind
county residents of the importance of getting flu shots as the
season ramps up.
The Tennessee Department of
Health (TDH) is noting a steady
increase in influenza activity in
the state and warns the 2014-2015
flu season could be severe. TDH
urges everyone to protect themselves and their families by getting a flu shot now.
Senior infection control coordinator Ann Henry said that Blount
Horoscope . . . . . . . . 9B
Lottery . . . . . . . . . . . . 2A
Money & Markets . 7A
Nation & World. . . .11A
Newsmakers . . . . . . 9B
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . 6A
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B
Sudoku . . . . . . . . . . . . 9B
County has already been seeing
cases of the flu, although less than
the previous year.
“Between Oct. 1, 2013, and Dec.
31, 2013, Blount Memorial admitted eight patients who had tested
positive for the influenza virus.
During that same time period
in 2014, we have admitted only
four patients who have tested
positive for the influenza virus,”
she said.
“Typically, we see an increase in
influenza admissions in January
and February, which tend to be
our prime months for influenza
admissions.”
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SEE FLU, 5A
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email box every day with a digital
subscription at TheDailyTimes.com.
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Beginning Oct. 1 and running
through last Thursday, Blount
Memorial has tested 391 people
for the flu and 13 tested positive.
“The test has a 63 percent sensitivity rate, which means there’s
a 37 percent chance of having a
false negative,” Henry said. “I’m
told we have had very few admissions for flu patients to the hospital, though I do not have numbers
for cases that came through the
emergency department.”
However many cases of flu seen
so far, Henry said local residents
THE DAILY TIMES
2014
2A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Historian uncovers
photographs from
Louisville’s past
BY KELVIN RAY BOYD
Daily Times Correspondent
Louisville Mayor Tom
Bickers discussed a historical find and future
projects for the town at
the Board of Mayor and
Aldermen meeting held
Tuesday at Town Hall.
Louisville historian
Phil Mummert recently uncovered numerous
photos from Louisville’s
past. “Phil discovered a
treasure trove of photos
taken by Tennessee Valley
Authority,” Bickers said.
TVA completed Fort
Loudoun Dam in September 1943. It took two weeks
for the river to come up
and cover an estimated
70 percent of Louisville.
The pictures discovered
show Louisville before the
flooding.
“People kept noticing
images of Louisville before
the dam,” Bickers said.
“We didn’t know where
the pictures were coming
from. The images were
from the federal government in TVA archives.
“We are going to work
on a project concerning
the photos and preserving
Louisville’s history. We
are going to have some of
our elderly residents to sit
down with us and watch
(the big screen) as we go
through the images. We
hope our senior citizens
can identify the pictures,
as most of the people and
things in the images are
gone.”
The project will be done
for the sake of posterity.
“Some people living in
Louisville do not know
much about the history
BRIEFS
Little River Trading,
Cycology Bicycles set
electronics recycling
Little River Trading Co. and Cycology
Bicycles, 2408 E. Lamar
Alexander Parkway,
Maryville, are hosting
an electronics recycling
day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
Knoxville-based eCycle, a licensed electronic recycle business,
will be accepting all
electronic, computer
and metal waste including printers and appliances.
eCycle uses militarygrade data erasure software to completely
erase all data from recycled media.
For more information,
call 681-4141.
of the town,” Bickers said.
“We have a few pictures
on the wall from the early
20th century. At the end
of the project, we want
to have several more
photos on the wall. If we
have enough, we might
switch them out every so
often.”
A special census will
be conducted in Louisville. “We hope to have
this done by the middle
of 2015,” Bickers said.
“This will help us to get
an accurate count, which
will help with tax revenue.
Our community is growing, and I believe the census will show that.”
The Town Hall office
will be closed for the
holidays, from Dec. 25
through Jan. 1. Once the
doors open back up, the
hours of operation will
increase at Town Hall.
“Effective after the first
of the new year, Town
Hall will be open Monday through Friday, eight
hours each day,” Bickers
said. “There is a constant
flow of people here, and
plenty of phone calls.”
Vice Mayor Angie Holley was named as the
board’s representative
on the Louisville Planning Commission. “The
mayor can serve, or have
a representative,” Bickers
said. “I recommended and
approved her (Holley) for
another four-year term.”
It was reported at the
meeting that the Poland
Creek Campground is
showing a profit of $8,000
for the year. The final
total for the year will be
announced in the immediate future.
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY
From The Daily Times
on Dec. 21, 1989:
There were 229 pornographic video tapes, 86
brass hashish pipes, 53
water bongs, 46 roach
holders, 31 knives and
11 handguns destroyed
at the Blount County
Sheriff’s garage.
Mom enters plea in
death of daughter
GREENEVILLE —
The mother of an
8-month-old girl who
died in 2012 has pleaded guilty to aggravated
child neglect.
Prosecutors originally
charged Pooja Jennings,
25, with murder in the
death of Abby Jennings
in 2012.
The baby’s father, Stephen Jennings, 25, still
faces charges of murder.
TOM SHERLIN | THE DAILY TIMES
MIDDLESETTLEMENTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER Abbey Sims (right) serves a bowl of chili to Olivia Pate. Staff provided chili and
hot dogs to students and their families.
School, church in partnership
Middlesettlements Elementary serves families in ‘different ways’
BY MATTHEW STEWART
[email protected]
Middlesettlements Elementary
School is serving families in a different way this holiday season.
Staff and volunteers recently
hosted the school’s annual holiday
celebration. It is offered at no cost
to the school through a partnership
with St. Marks United Methodist
Church’s United Methodist Women unit.
Staff and volunteers served chili
and hot dogs to students and their
families. They provided families
with a new book and photos of
their children with Santa Claus.
Guidance counselor Thomas
Baxter also made hospitality bags,
which are filled with items such as
shampoo and soap, for each family invited to the event. Baxter purchased the items through St. Marks
United Methodist Church’s donations.
“As a school, we look to serve
families in different ways,” said
Principal April Herron. “The holidays are a time to bless others with
service, and it’s a nice heartwarming event that strengthens the
bonds between our school and our
families.”
Middlesettlements Elementary
School started organizing the holiday celebrations about five years
ago, Herron said. They have grown
the program each year through
donations and volunteers.
Staff made hospitality bags for 10
children in the program’s first year,
she said. They provided 25 bags
this year.
“Our No. 1 priority is caring for
our students and their families,”
MIDDLESETTLEMENTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S GABBY MEADOWS tells Santa Claus what
she wants for Christmas at last week’s holiday celebration.
Herron said. “We want families to
partner with us. We want them to
feel more connected with teachers,
administrators and front office staff.
“Academic expectations are
so high nowadays that it would
be hard to reach them without a
strong school community. We’re
fortunate to work with families that
are invested in our school. Invested
families are more likely to help students at home and communicate
with their parents. It’s critical to
our mission: Providing excellence
to every child every day. We’re
here to set them up for success in
elementary school, middle school,
high school and beyond.”
St. Marks United Methodist
Photo Store
TENNESSEE LOTTERY NUMBERS
Cash 3 Evening
7-0-7, Lucky Sum: 14
(seven, zero, seven; Lucky
Sum: fourteen)
Cash 4 Evening
6-3-7-5, Lucky Sum: 21
(six, three, seven, five;
Lucky Sum: twenty-one)
Cash 3 Midday
9-0-3, Lucky Sum: 12
(nine, zero, three; Lucky
Sum: twelve)
Cash 4 Midday
2-0-3-7, Lucky Sum: 12
(two, zero, three, seven;
Lucky Sum: twelve)
Cash 3 Morning
2-1-1
(two, one, one)
Cash 4 Morning
2-0-3-7
(two, zero, three, seven)
THE DAILY TIMES
Blount County’s only daily newspaper,
serving our readers
since 1883.
Your Life. Your Times.
Vol. 71 No. 267
The Daily Times
(USPS# 332-320)
is published daily by
Blount County
Publishers LLC,
307 E. Harper Ave., Maryville,
TN, 37804. Periodical postage
paid at Maryville TN 37804.
Send correspondence to:
The Daily Times
P.O. Box 9740
Maryville, TN, 37802-9740
Church’s United Methodist Women
unit is proud to be part of this effort,
said member Marcella Emrick.
“Middlesettlements (Elementary
School) does a wonderful job. So
many people don’t realize what
these children are going through.”
The unit is able to provide donations that help Middlesettlements
Elementary purchase backpacks,
clothing, hospitality bags and
shoes, Emrick said.
“It’s amazing to see how much
children and their families appreciate this help. Our church has had a
long relationship with Middlesettlements (Elementary School), and
our unit is honored to be a part of
that effort.”
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Check us online for updates throughout the day: thedailytimes.com
BLOUNT COUNTY | 3A
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Empty Pantry Fund
nears ‘paid in full’
BY LINDA BRADEN ALBERT
CHECK IS HOLIDAY MUSIC TO FRIENDSVILLE’S EARS
HOW TO HELP
[email protected]
The Empty Pantry Fund
distributes food baskets to 1,400 needy
Blount County families
at Christmas. To help,
send your check to The
Empty Pantry Fund, P.O.
Box 9740, Maryville, TN
37802-9740, bring it to
the offices at The Daily
Times, 307 E. Harper
Ave., Maryville, or visit
the website at www.
emptypantryfund.com.
The Empty Pantry
Fund is within $20,000
of its goal of stamping
“Paid in full” on the bills
for food purchased for
needy Blount County
families for Christmas
thanks to an additional
$4,340 contributed as of
Dec. 19.
Empty Pantry Fund
President Lon Fox said,
“We buy the food on
a leap of faith that the
good people of Blount
County will not let us
down, and through
their generosity, provide enough funds to
pay for all of the food.
Every year, we order the
food, pack the food and
even distribute the food
before we have collected
all of the money to pay
for it. This year has been
no different.”
To contribute, mail
donations to The Empty
Pantry Fund, P.O. Box
9740, Maryville, TN
37802; leave donations at
The Daily Times reception desk at 307 E. Harper Ave., Maryville; or
visit the EPF website at
www.emptypantryfund.
com.
Food baskets were
delivered Sunday along
with boxes of toys provided through Junior
Service League of
Maryville’s Toys for
Blount County.
In honor of Patty Robbins,
$25
Broadway United Methodist
Church Upper Parlor Sunday
School Class, $50
Rick Walker, $25
Fred and Sophia Metz, $100
Polly and Earl Morgan, $50
In memory of Tommy Walker
and Ullin Bivens by Charlie
and Linda Rogers, $75
In memory of Tristen Keller,
$25
Edna Hubbs, $50
Patricia Reeves, $100
Francis and Norma Garner,
$250
Kenneth and Peggy Hoy,
$100
James and Peggy Payne, $50
Donald and Patricia Castle,
$50
C.W. and B.J. Peabody, $50
Louise Tindell, $25
Glenna Semmer, $25
Wagon Wheelers, $100
Terry Williams, $120
Stephens and Wanda Patterson, $25
Mel and Gloria Scroggin, $25
James and Susan Curtiss,
$100
Timothy and Linda Richards,
$35
In memory of Homer Shumer,
Ada and Gene Caylor, $25
In honor of Betty Shumer
and our parents, Jeff and
Terri Taylor, $25
Jeff and Teresa Caylor, $50
In memory of my parents,
James and Margaret Johnston, and my brothers, Jim
and Don Johnston, by Gwen
Beem, $50
In honor of our grandchildren Jordon, Tyra, Thomas,
Haylee, Emily, Maddie,
Jase, Gracie, Jake, Rachel,
Mason and Merynn by
Gwen and Richard Beem,
$50
James and Janice Bowen, $10
In memory of Paul Madison,
$50
Pat and Linda Martin, $25
Anonymous, $500
Kay and Doug Overbey, $100
June McAllister, $100
PJ, $200
TOTAL — THANK YOU,
$72,165.76
DONATIONS
Donations to date
include:
BALANCE FORWARD,
$67,825.76
Harper Lane, 3 years old, piggy bank collection, $20
PJ, $200
Jerry and Rose Mary Hall,
$100
In memory of Ruby Angel,
$50
In memory of Harold Howarter, $50
In memory of Dwayne Flynn,
$50
In Jesus Love from Gene and
Pat Evans, $200
Ed and Kye Hughes, $200
Dean and Neal Stone, $100
In memory of our mothers,
$100
In honor of ALCOA Community Advisory Board, $250
Max and Mary Whitehead,
$100
Sylvia Caldwell, $250
Debra and Larry Poston, $30
In honor of Steve Wildsmith
from Jan and Dan McCoy,
$50
TOM SHERLIN | THE DAILY TIMES
FRIENDSVILLE ELEMENTARY’S FOURTH GRADE chorus performs Dec. 16 at the school.
FRIENDSVILLE VICE MAYOR MIKE BAILEY (right) presents music
teacher Kevin Miller (center) a check for $353.80 to support
Friendsville Elementary School’s Honor Chorus at a performance
on Dec. 16. Principal Stan Painter applauds at left. The community
contributed $103.80 through donation boxes at the Citizens for
Community Improvement Tree Lighting ceremony and Friendsville
City Commission voted to give the chorus $250.
Tenn. joins multistate immigration suit
BY ERIK SCHELZIG
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE — Tennessee is joining a multistate lawsuit seeking to halt
President Obama’s executive action
on immigration, state Attorney General Herbert Slatery said Monday.
Slatery notified the parties in the
lawsuit that Tennessee will become
the 25th state to join the legal challenge filed in federal court in Texas,
saying the state “cannot sit on the
sidelines of this case, when unlawful
directives of this magnitude grant lawful presence and other rights like work
permits to such a large number.”
“Asking a court to review this issue
Authorities fail in attempt to capture
loose black bear in Phoenix suburb
The Associated Press
MESA, Ariz. — Authorities called off
the search Monday for a black bear that
caused a stir when it was spotted running
through an alfalfa field on the eastern edge
of metropolitan Phoenix.
Still, officials plan to relocate the young
bear to a more suitable habitat if they come
across it in the future. “The best-case scenario is that we tranquilize it and move it,”
said Amy Burnett, a spokeswoman for the
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
The encounter in Mesa marks a rarity for
a metro area that officials say has a bear
sighting reported once every two years.
Phoenix and its suburbs are considered
a poor food source for bears.
TV news helicopters that captured vid-
FIRST-GRADERS AT FRIENDSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL dress like
reindeer during a special music performance at the school on
Dec. 16.
is the prudent choice, especially when
state resources will be taxed under
the directives to provide benefits
like unemployment compensation
and health care,” Slatery said in a
statement.
Obama traveled to Nashville earlier this month to tout his decision to
extend deportation relief and work
permits to 4 million immigrants in the
U.S. illegally. His action would affect
those who have been here more than
five years and have children.
Stephanie Teatro, the co-executive
director of the Tennessee Immigrant
and Refugee Rights Coalition, called
the decision “a step backward” for
the state.
“An estimated 50,000 Tennesseans
will be able to apply for deferred
action, allowing them to work legally, increase their earnings, and pay
more in taxes,” Teatro said.
Slatery became Tennessee’s first
Republican attorney general since
Reconstruction when he took office
last month. His decision contrasts
with predecessor Bob Cooper’s refusal to join a multistate lawsuit over
Obama’s health care law, saying it
would “not have been a wise use of
state money.”
Cooper argued the only reason to
join the suit would have been “to
make a partisan political statement
on a divisive national issue.”
FIND
eo of the bear running across rows of
green fields had helped push the animal
toward a game warden bearing a tranquilizer gun. The warden wasn’t able to get
a good shot.
In the end, the animal proved elusive. He
ran into a former General Motors test site
that contained fields, shrubbery and trees
and is too big of an area to track.
Wildlife officials cautioned that the bear
is a wild animal but also said that it wasn’t
acting aggressively. Instead, it was running away from people.
“It’s not an aggressive bear. It seems to
want to run away from people, so that’s
good,” said Mesa Police Department
spokesman Steve Flores.
It wasn’t known where the bear came
from or how long it has been in the area.
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4A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
BLOUNT RECORDS
COURT RECORDS
RECORDS POLICY
Cases filed Dec. 19 in Blount
County Chancery Court:
Rodney Lee Tipton vs.
Elizabeth Jean Marshall, et
al., miscellaneous
Information contained in
Blount Records is compiled from official public
records available for
inspection at city/county
governmental and public
safety offices, as well as
the various judicial offices. Births are provided by
area hospitals.
™
Cases filed Dec. 22 in
Blount County Chancery
Court:
Cora Annette Farris Ridge
vs. Stacey Scott Ridge,
divorce
™
Cases filed Dec. 19 in the
Equity Division of Blount
County Circuit Court:
Peter Noel Hickok vs. Melissa Marie Hickok, divorce
™
™
™
Linda Sue Gregory vs. Wallace Gene Gregory, divorce
Terrence Donald Mull vs.
Delilah Kay Mull, foreign
judgment
Case filed Dec. 19 in Blount
County Probate Court:
Regarding: Zygfried S.
Glowaski, estate
™
Case filed Dec. 22 in Blount
County Probate Court:
™
Regarding: Barbara W.
Pate, estate
ARRESTS
™
Lauren Elizabeth Pfeifer,
Lafollette Drive, Alcoa, was
arrested at 4:43 p.m. Dec. 21
by Alcoa Police on charges of
possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a legend
drug, and an active warrant
from Blount County for violation of seat belt law.
Arrested for contempt of
court:
Kendra Mackenzie McCroy,
24, Lodwick Road, Louisville
™
CITATIONS
™
Cardale A. Rivers, Airport
Highway, Alcoa, was cited
at 10:11 p.m. Dec. 21 by Alcoa
Police officers on charges of
simple possession of drugs
and not wearing a seat belt,
following a traffic stop.
™
Jessie James Hale, Mimosa
Circle, Maryville, was cited
at 10:11 p.m. Dec. 21 by Alcoa
Police officers on charges of
simple possession of drugs
and drug paraphernalia, no
seat belt and no proof of
insurance, following a traffic
stop.
™
Debra Kay Hackler, 43,
Watson Drive, Alcoa, was
cited at 11:54 a.m. Dec. 21 by
Maryville Police for theft less
than $500. A loss prevention
officer at Kroger, 800 Watkins
Road, said Hackler concealed
and tried to leave without
paying for two shirts, total
value $42.99.
THEFTS
Alcoa
Larry Rathbone, McCarty
Road, Louisville, reported at
12:52 a.m. Dec. 22 that someone took his grandson’s Nyjah
Huston Rise Up skateboard,
worth about $150, from his
unlocked vehicle while parked
™
in the Walmart parking lot,
1030 Hunters Crossing Dr.,
Alcoa.
Blount County
Gambell L. Funston, of Farragut, reported at noon Dec.
20 that someone came on
property he owns on Airport
Road, Louisville, between
Dec. 17-20 and took an Edel
Brock chrome intake and an
EFI distributor, worth about
$1,300, off a motor he had
beside the garage. A tarp had
been placed over the motor
to conceal it. Funston said he
noticed the tarp was off the
motor and realized the parts
were missing.
™
™
Robert R. Bobrowski,
Wilson Road, Maryville,
reported at 8:20 p.m. Dec. 20
that someone broke into his
vehicle and took a TomTom
GPS Unit, worth $289, from
his vehicle.
VANDALISM
Blount County
Kacey L. Hunter, Lambert
Road, Greenback, reported
at 8:17 p.m. Dec. 19 that she
had heard something hit the
exterior of the house at about
8 p.m. When she went outside
to check, she saw what appeared to be two green paintball rounds on the aluminum
siding. According to the Blount
County Sheriff’s Office report,
she said this was the second
time this had happened. The
paint washed off, but it left
small dents in the siding,
causing $30 in damages.
™
™
Lacey A. Anderson, Lambert
Road, Greenback, reported at
8:17 p.m. Dec. 19 that someone
had shot three green paintball
rounds on the siding of her
home as well as the front
screen door and garage door.
Damage was estimated at
$50.
Maryville
Kyrie Dunn, of Maryville,
reported at 10:21 a.m. Dec.
19 that she found obscene
words written on her vehicle
when she went outside that
morning.
™
FIRE
Maryville
Maryville Fire Department
responded to an apartment
fire at 211 High St. at 2:54 a.m.
Dec. 21. Five units and 11 men
from Maryville, supported by
two units and four men from
Alcoa, arrived at 2:57 a.m. and
had the blaze under control by
3:08 a.m. Firefighters said the
fire was limited to the room
of origin. No one was injured
in the incident; the American
Red Cross provided temporary
™
housing for the occupants.
BIRTHS
Blount Memorial Hospital
Dec. 11
Jessica Cherea Hatcher
and Robert Daniel Finger,
Maryville, boy, Aiden Ryley
Finger
™
Dec. 12
Christine Marie Edwards
Bradley and Johnathon
Shawn Bradley, Sevierville,
girl, Emarie Amanda Bradley
™
™
Susan Marie Wakefield
Humphreys and Adam Garrett
Humphreys, Kingston, girl,
Ava Shade Humphreys
Dec. 14
Carrie Ellis Wakefield and
Thomas Glenn Wakefield,
Madisonville, girl, Kinley Rose
Wakefield
™
Dec. 15
Rebba Reseda Dean
Watson and Marvin Tarrell
Watson, Alcoa, girl, Mariah
Ariana Watson
™
Dec. 16
Angel Lee Dixon and
Charles Franklin Dell,
Louisville, girl, Sophia Faith
Dell
™
™
Ashley Nicole Teaster
Dixon and Kevin Ray Dixon,
Maryville, girl, Kristina Nicole
Dixon
™
Elise Marie Bodner
McKinley and Jeffrey Paul
McKinley, Maryville, girl,
Adalyn Ann McKinley
Dec. 17
Emily Ann Borrego Marsh
and Christopher James Marsh,
Maryville, boy, Knox Carter
Marsh
™
™
Brittany Nicole Pack
Littleton and Jeremy Bishop
Littleton, Maryville, boy,
Sanford Lamar Littleton
™
Daisy Mable Williams,
Madisonville, girl, Autumn
Grace Williams
Dec. 18
Courtney Cheyenne Miracle
Lambert and Dawson Lee
Lambert, Friendsville, boy,
Waylon Ray Lambert
™
™
Jessica Lea Campbell
Houston and Casey Lynn
Houston, Maryville, boy,
Tristan Jeffery Houston
Dec. 19
Jessica Ann Morrison
Thompson and Brian Patrick
Thompson II, Maryville, girl,
Kyla Rose Kay Thompson
™
™
Ashley Nicole Thresher
Brooks and Nathan Charles
Brooks, Maryville, boy, Lucas
Wyatt Brooks
Dec. 20
Lisa Marie Kelly Garrett and
Harley Lynn Garrett, Maryville,
boy, Mason Lynn Garrett
™
™
Whitney Hope Martin
Merriman and Avery Todd
Merriman Jr., Maryville, girl,
Olivia Marie Merriman
DEATHS
PAT T E R S O N , C H A R L E N E
HAMIL, 87, of Friendsville, died Sunday, Dec.
21, 2014, at Asbury Place.
Funeral arrangements
are incomplete and will
be announced later by
McCammon-AmmonsClick Funeral Home.
WILLIAMS, JESSIE SELLERS,
84, of Robbinsville, N.C.,
died Friday, Dec. 19, 2014,
at Graham Health Care
and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter, Robbinsville, N.C. Survivors include sons, Roy
Williams of Gatlinburg,
Tenn., Noah Williams of
Meadow Branch, N.C.,
Onley Williams, Tuskegee, N.C., Joe Williams of
Knoxville, Johnny Williams of Robbinsville,
N.C.; daughters, June
Eller of Charlotte, N.C.,
Isla (Harold) Inman of
Walland; grandchildren
and great-grandchildren;
JOY KIMBROUGH | THE DAILY TIMES
BLOUNT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICER Kevin Clendenen investigates an accident on Happy Valley
Road Monday afternoon.
and one sister, Ethel Orr of
Robbinsville, N.C. Funeral services will be 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014, at
Townsend-Smith Funeral Home, Robbinsville,
N.C. Family will receive
friends from noon until 2
p.m. prior to service. Burial will follow in the Lower
Yellow Creek Cemetery.
Townsend-Smith Funeral
Home is in charge of the
arrangements.
OBITUARY POLICY
A funeral notice in The Daily Times costs 55 cents per word plus $18 for a photo. The notice will
appear in both our print and online editions.
For anyone who does not wish to purchase a funeral notice, The Daily Times will run a free
death notice as a public service, containing basic information such as survivors and funeral
arrangements.
All information is verified through the funeral home handling arrangements.
For more information, call 981-1166.
Seat belt saves Tallassee
woman when SUV rolls
From Staff Reports
A seat belt saved a Tallassee resident
from serious harm when her SUV
careened out of control and rolled
on Happy Valley Road Monday afternoon.
Mary Margaret Kelley, 52, Bell Branch
Road, Tallassee, was taken to University
of Tennessee Medical Center after the
accident. Her condition was unavailable Monday evening, although her
injuries were not believed to be lifethreatening.
According to Blount County Sheriff’s
Office reports, Kelley was moving west
in the 5800 block of Happy Valley Road
in a 2004 Ford Explorer when she lost
control on a curve.
Reports said she ran off the right side
of the road, corrected, then veered off on
the left. Her vehicle rolled twice across
the oncoming lane of traffic and came
to rest on the left side of the road.
Blount County Fire Department Lieutenant Johnny Leatherwood said the
Explorer landed such that it hung over a
bank, one end perched on a stump; Kelley wasn’t pinned, but she was trapped
nonetheless.
“It was real unstable,” Leatherwood
said. “We had to stabilize it before we
could get her out.”
Kelley was wearing her seat belt, but
her airbag didn’t deploy, reports said.
“I’m sure she would have been hurt
much worse if she hadn’t been wearing
it,” Leatherwood said.
Leatherwood said Kelley’s SUV was
likely totaled.
Momentum gaining to raise state
gas tax for first time in 25 years
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE — Momentum is mounting for a possible proposal to raise the
state’s gas tax for the first
time in 25 years.
Gov. Bill Haslam told The
Tennessean that he thinks
a legislative proposal on
the issue is close, and could
be introduced in the next
General Assembly, which
convenes in January.
“At some point and time
soon, either this year or
next year, I think there will
be a bill about gas tax,” he
told The Tennessean editorial board.
“It’s incumbent upon us
as the administration to
show here’s what we would
do with that money if you
increased the fuel tax, and
then it’s also I think important for all of us not to just
increase it so that ... three
years from now we’re back
in the same position.”
The push comes as a
group representing 40
mayors in Middle Tennessee sent a letter urging
Haslam and state lawmakers to find new sources of
revenue to pay for transportation needs. Chambers
of commerce also are pushing the idea of increasing
the gas tax.
In addition, the Tennessee Farm Bureau no longer
lists opposition to a gas tax
increase as among its legislative priorities.
Still, the newspaper
reports any proposal to
increase the tax would
face hurdles and lacks
support from some state
Democrats.
Currently, residents
pay a total of 39.8 cents
tax on each gallon of gas
purchased — 21.4 cents is
state tax and 18.4 cents is
federal tax.
Haslam isn’t pushing for
an increase, but says the
issue must be addressed.
Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey,
R-Blountville, has said he
might support an increase
as part of a larger comprehensive measure.
FUNERAL NOTICES
EDGAR PARKER JR.
Edgar Parker Jr., born Dec.
18, 1921, passed away Dec.
21, 2014, at his home in
Maryville. He was preceded in death by his
wife of 64 years, Marion
Parker, on Nov. 23, 2014.
They lived most of their
lives on Long Island, N.Y.,
before moving to Erie, Pa.,
for 18 years, and then to
Maryville. Ed loved choral
music, sailing and hiking.
Marion was an avid reader and quilter. They both
loved being outdoors by
water or mountains. They
are survived by three sons,
Gregg, David, and Christopher; as well as four
grandchildren, Melanie,
Terence, Ruthmabel and
Olivia. There will be a
memorial service at the
First United Methodist
Church in Maryville at 4
p.m. Dec. 30, 2014. In lieu
of flowers, please make
donations to the Great
Smoky Mountains Asso-
ciation’s Legacy Fund, P.O.
Box 130, Gatlinburg, TN
37738. Arrangements by
Cremation By Grandview,
806-8170, www.cremation
bygrandview.com
JAMES F. ROBERTS
James F. Roberts, age
86, of Maryville, passed
away Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014.
Funeral service will be at
10 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 23,
2014, in the Trinity Chapel.
Interment will follow at
Grandview Cemetery. The
family will receive friends
prior to the service from 9
a.m. until 10 a.m. at Smith
Trinity Chapel. Smith
Funeral and Cremation
Service, Maryville, 983-
1000, www.SmithFuneral
andCremation.com
MILLER FUNERAL
HOME
“The Business That Service Built”
Pre-Arrangement Funeral Planning
www.millerfuneralhome.org
915 W. BROADWAY
65061817
982-6041
BLOUNT COUNTY | 5A
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Thief returns stolen Habitat for Humanity trailer
BY MIKE GIBSON
[email protected]
Christmas is the season of peace on earth
and goodwill toward men, and apparently
that spirit spread to a local trailer thief.
Or maybe it was the proverbial fear of
God that made an unidentified man return
a purloined hydraulic trailer to Maryville’s
Habitat ReStore Sunday night.
Whatever the case, employees at the
store — a low-cost home improvement
store and donation center operated by the
nonprofit Habitat for Humanity — were
both heartened, and curious, when they
learned of the trailer’s return.
“It was definitely interesting,” said Assistant Manager Christina Jenkins. “The man
who called and returned it, he just said that
it wasn’t him, that it wasn’t his normal per-
‘The man who called and
returned it, he just said that
it wasn’t him, that it wasn’t
his normal personality to do
something like that’
Christina Jenkins
assistant manager
sonality to do something like that. I think
it was a desperation kind of situation.”
The 8-foot-long black trailer, used by
Habitat ReStore to collect scrap metal
for resale to benefit Habitat for Humanity, was taken from its parking space in
FLU: Still time to get a flu vaccination
FROM 1A
need to protect themselves. “The important thing for people to
remember is to get vaccinated. There is still
time to get a flu shot and
take the steps necessary
to protect yourself and
your family.”
The TDH urges the
same. “Early indications
suggest this could be a
more severe flu season
than we have had for
some time,” said TDH
C o m m i s s i o n e r Jo h n
Dreyzehner, M.D. “Vaccination is likely to reduce
the risk of severe illness
even if not all strains are
matched to the vaccine
throughout the season.
Because a flu vaccine is
still the best protection,
get it now if you have not
done so.”
E a rly t re a t m e n t i s
essential to preventing more severe illness
if someone contracts
the flu, said Tennessee
Immunization Program
Director Kelly Moore,
M.D. “Influenza can be
especially dangerous
to the elderly, pregnant
women and very young
children because their
immune systems are different from the normal,
healthy adult. We recommend annual flu vaccination for everyone over
the age of 6 months.”
Flu vaccinations are
the first line of defense
against the disease, which
the rear of the outlet on North Foothills
Plaza Drive on Dec. 9. Store video showed
that around 10:10 that night, a white dually
pickup truck pulled up next to it, and the
driver hooked up the trailer and towed it
off the lot.
The theft was reported on local media,
including a Knoxville TV news program.
Police also issued a be-on-the-lookout
alert and filed the serial number with
the National Crime Information Center
database.
Motivated by fear, or maybe just a change
of heart, a man called Habitat Restore
Thursday, saying he wanted to return the
trailer. Jenkins said she talked to the man
when he first called, and referred the caller
to the store manager, her boss.
“From what I understand, he kept (her
boss) on the phone for a long time,” she
North Korean websites back
online following shutdown
The Associated Press
DAVID PROEBER | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SUE CARROLL, HEAD of the microbiology section in the laboratory at Advocate BroMenn Regional Medical Center, Normal,
Ill., examines a small amount of precipitate from a patient
sample recently after measuring the sample for the presence
of flu virus using immunoflourescent technology.
‘Vaccination is likely
to reduce the risk of
severe illness even
if not all strains
are matched to the
vaccine throughout
the season.’
John Dreyzehner, M.D.
TDH commissioner
kills about 36,000 people in the U.S. per year.
On average, more than
200,000 people are hospitalized because of the
flu, according to the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control. Symptoms include
fever, headache, fatigue,
dry cough, sore throat,
runny or stuffy nose and
muscle aches.
Flu shots are approved
for use in people older
than 6 months, including
healthy people and people with chronic medical
conditions. Each flu vaccine contains three types
of influenza viruses, based
each year on projections
about what types and
strains of viruses will circulate. About two weeks
after vaccination, antibodies that provide protection against influenza
virus infection develop in
the body.
Flu season can begin as
early as October and last
as late as May.
said. “It seemed to be that there was some
remorse,” she said. “Or maybe it was that
he saw the spot on TV.”
She said the man had first planned to
return the trailer last week, but he eventually decided to leave it late Sunday night in
the parking lot across the street from Habitat ReStore, near Faith Promise Church
and Fowler’s Furniture on North Foothills
Plaza Drive.
Store employees discovered the missing
trailer upon coming to work Monday morning. “I think he decided it was best to do it
when no one was around,” Jenkins said.
The trailer, valued at $7,000, was on loan
to Habitat ReStore from Maryville resident Jorge Hernandez, a “friend of Habitat” who had allowed the charitable outfit to use his equipment to raise funds in
times past.
SEOUL, South Korea — Key North Korean websites were back online Tuesday after
an hours-long shutdown that followed a
U.S. vow to respond to a cyberattack on
Sony Pictures that Washington blames
on Pyongyang.
The White House and the State Department declined to say whether the U.S.
government was responsible for the shutdown in one of the least-wired countries
in the world.
Internet access to the North’s official
Korean Central News Agency and the
Rodong Sinmun newspaper were working normally Tuesday after being earlier
inaccessible, South Korean officials said.
Those sites are the main channels for
official North Korea news, with servers
located abroad.
U.S. computer experts earlier said North
Korea experienced sweeping and progressively worse Internet outages. One said
the country’s online access was “totally
down.”
President Barack Obama said Friday the
U.S. government expected to respond to
the Sony hack, which he described as an
expensive act of “cyber vandalism” that
he blamed on North Korea. Obama did
not say how the U.S. might respond, and
it was not immediately clear if the Internet connectivity problems represented
the retribution.
The U.S. government regards its offensive cyber operations as highly classified.
North Korea has denied it was responsible for hacking into Sony. But the country has also called the attack a “righteous
deed” and for months condemned the
“The Interview.” Sony canceled plans to
release the movie after a group of hackers
made terroristic threats against theaters
that planned to show it.
North Korea has promoted the development of science and technology as a
means of improving its moribund economy. But access to the global Internet
is severely restricted. Mobile phones
used on the state-authorized network
cannot make overseas calls. The North’s
Intranet gives access to governmentsanctioned sites and works with its own
browsers, search engine and email programs, according to South Korea’s Unification Ministry.
POLIO: Help sought to fulfill holiday wish
FROM 1A
what I can do. “I can do
anything I want to do sitting down. I just can’t stand
to do anything,” she said.
In the U.S., the last case
of naturally occurring
polio happened in the
U.S. in 1979.
According to the Mayo
Clinic web site, postpolio syndrome is a cluster of disabling signs
and symptoms that
affect some people several years — an average of 35 years — after
they had polio. Dean said
East Tennessee Human
Resources Agency
(ETHRA) provides an
specially equipped van to
transport her to the doctor, and she needs such a
vehicle to see the Christmas lights at night.
Anyone who can help
provide Dean transportation to see the Christmas
lights can call her at 6813116 or Hannum at 9836524.
HANNUM: Precedent cited for nomination
FROM 1A
‘She’ll do an
excellent job.’
If approved, she would be
the first African-American
to serve on the committee, but not the first mem- Steve Samples
ber who is not a county county commmissioner
commissioner, according to County Clerk Roy 7-B County CommissionCrawford, who has been er Tona Monroe has diswith the county almost 40 tributed an open letter to
years.
Mitchell, alleging discrimi“A.B. Goddard, attorney nation against the three
for the county judge back sitting female commissionin the 1970s, Clyde McMa- ers, herself included.
“Some Democrats say
han, served on the Budget Committee,” Crawford that there is a Republisaid. “I believe that (now can war against women,”
former County Mayor) Jer- she wrote. “Unfortunatery Cunningham, when he ly, this appears to be the
was county attorney for case regarding the ladies
County Executive Bob elected by the people to
Davis, was also on the Bud- serve on the commission.
get Committee.”
I hope that you will prove
Neither would Hannum the Democrats wrong by
be the first female. Dur- ending your discriminaing former County Mayor tion against the elected
Beverly Woodruff ’s ten- women commissioners
ure, then-County Com- serving on the Budget
missioner Donna Dowdy Committee and the Purserved on the commit- chasing Commission.”
In a blog post concerntee. Also, during a period
when the county operated ing the matter on www.
under the Financial Man- bcpublicrecord.com, Monagement Act of 1981, for- roe alleged other motivamer School Superinten- tions for Mitchell’s choice:
dent Mae Owenby served “His nomination will be
on the Financial Manage- his friend, Sharon Hanment Committee, accord- num. Mitchell is trying
to save face by doing this,
ing to Crawford.
Hannum‘s nomination but the thinly veiled dishas Samples’ support. “I crimination against the
have known Sharon for three women serving on
many years, and I think the commission continshe is a fine person, and ues. Mitchell will control
an upstanding community Hannum like a puppet on
leader,” he said. “She’ll do a string, which is exactly
what he wants.”
an excellent job.”
Samples said he felt it was
‘PUPPET ON STRING’
time for some new ideas
Support for Hannum is on the Budget Committee.
not be unanimous. District “I simply wanted to scale
back a little on my time
and realizing that starting in January the Budget
Committee would be very,
very busy for the next six
months as it planned next
year’s budget, I just felt it
was maybe time to back
away and maybe let some
new people be a part of the
Budget Committee.
“I have the utmost respect
for Mayor Mitchell, and
I consider it an honor to
have served through his
first term and even into
this second term as well
as under former Mayor
Cunningham and the late
County Executive Bill
Crisp.”
HANNUM’S SERVICE
As a community leader,
Hannum has served on the
board of Youth Leadership
Blount, the Blount County
Jail Inspection Committee, and the Board of Trustees for the Pellissippi State
Community College Foundation.
Hannum retired in 2007
as senior maintenance
planner for Central Services at ALCOA Inc. When
hired in the 1970s, she was
one of the first female,
African-American supervisors in the company.
She has also chaired the
Blount Chamber Foundation, the Alcoa City Schools
Foundation, the Blount
County Library Board of
Trustees, and the Martin
Luther King Jr. Celebration Planning Committee.
Hannum was also named
Blount County’s second
Athena Leadership Award
winner.
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ON THE WEB: Editorials, letters and other
opinions, archived for your review.
www.thedailytmes.com/opinion
Scan this QR code to go to the Web page.
6A
THE DAILY TIMES
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2014
OUR VOICE
It’s great to have
1/230th Air Cavalry
back in Tennessee
W
elcome home soldiers! We’re proud of you!
Every one of the more than 70 members of 1st
Squadron, 230th Air Cavalry of the Tennessee Army
National Guard who were deployed this year to Afghanistan is home.
Most importantly, they’re all back safe and sound. Another plus, their equipment made it back intact, too.
There was no guarantee of that back in February, when
members of the unit — most
are based in Alcoa, some in
Jackson — left Tennessee for
training at Fort Hood, Texas,
before heading for Afghanistan.
The mission, as outlined by
Lt. Col. Mel Clawson, commander of 1/230th Air Cav,
was to assist troops on the
ground. The No. 1 priority
was to protect the operating
base where the Tennessee troops were stationed. They
also provided combat security for units operating outside the base, Kandahar Airfield in southern Afghanistan.
Here’s the sad irony of the mission. This is not the first
time that the 1/230th deployed to the Middle East. Remember Iraq? Hard to forget that U.S. troops left that divided
nation at the behest of a corrupt and incompetent government with ISIS now on the march.
But this is likely be the last time the 1/230th is asked to
defend America from the sky. It certainly will be the last
time the unit will fly helicopters to complete its mission,
if the Department of Defense gets its way — as it certainly
will.
The Army plans to eliminate its entire fleet of OH58D Kiowa Reconnaissance helicopters, including those
assigned to the 1/230th.
Top Tennessee National Guard brass, along with the
governor and other elected state officials, have urged
the Army to replace the Kiowas with another helicopter.
The AH-64 Apache was a possibility, but the Army apparently has decided to assign all of those aircraft to the
active-duty force. Some Black Hawk helicopters could
be assigned to the Guard to replace much of the Guard’s
Lakota fleet that would be used for training by regular
Army soldiers.
But the chances of replacing the 1/230th’s Kiowas with
any other helicopter seem about as desolate as the rugged
terrain where the Tennessee soldiers have just finished
serving.
The Army had plans to develop an armed aerial scout to
serve as a new generation of reconnaissance helicopter
but — to use a cliché — that never got off the ground. So
the future of the 692 soldiers of the 1/230th and its 113 fulltime positions is — another cliché — up in the air.
It takes more than caissons rolling along to equip the
modern Army. It takes the skills and patriotism of America’s civilian soldiers to maintain a 21st century, missionready combat force. It would be short-sighted to let the
professionalism and talent exemplified by the soldiers of
the 1/230th — who just completed a successful mission
in a war zone — go to waste. That’s no cliché. That’s just
common sense.
That said, we repeat: Welcome home soldiers! We’re
proud of you! Have a Merry Christmas!
This is likely be the
last time the 1/230th
is asked to defend
America from the sky.
OTHER VOICES
Overdue Purple Hearts
T
he victims of Maj. Nidal Hasan’s terrorism-inspired
shooting rampage at Fort Hood five years ago wore
U.S. Army uniforms, but until now they’ve been just
another group of workplace violence casualties.
That’s regrettable, because the people Hasan killed and
injured deserved Purple Hearts and the benefits that
accompany heroic sacrifice.
Thanks to the U.S. House and the leadership of Sen. John
Cornyn in the Senate, Congress has approved the belated
Purple Heart designation for the Fort Hood victims.
The provision is part of the 2015 defense authorization
bill, which the president is expected to sign. We salute the
sacrifices made at Fort Hood — and Congress for correcting this wrong.
The Dallas Morning News
TODAY’S BIBLE VERSE
SUBMITTED BY JOE BRANNON, FRIENDSVILLE
Make haste, O God, to deliver me; make haste to help me, O
Lord.
Psalms 70:1
THE DAILY TIMES
Blount County’s only daily newspaper, serving our readers since 1883
Published by Blount County Publishers LLC
Gregg K. Jones
President
Carl Esposito
Publisher
Frank Trexler
Managing Editor
Richard Dodson
News Editor
Dean Stone
Editor
Melanie Tucker
LifeTimes Editor
Robert Norris
City Editor
Larry Aldridge
Executive Editor
Marcus Fitzsimmons
Sports Editor
Daryl Sullivan
Photo Editor
A global conspiracy of health
I
n the category of stunning, heartening, woefully under-reported good news: In 2000, an
estimated 9.9 million children around the
world died before age 5. In 2013, the figure was
6.3 million. That is 3.6 million fewer deaths, even
as population increased by about 1 billion.
Shout it from the rooftops. Or, more topically, paste it to the posterior of a celebrity. Put
Dianne Feinstein in charge of keeping it a secret.
There are a variety of reasons for increased
child survival, including improved prevention
of malaria and HIV. But according to a recent
report in The Lancet,
about half of these gains
came from reductions
in pneumonia, diarrhea
and measles — diseases
addressed by vaccination. We are seeing the
continuation of what is
perhaps the single greatest scientific contribution to human wellbeing: the artificial preparation of the immune
system to ward off bacteria and viruses.
The provision of vaccines is a particularly
clear instance of what economists call a global
public good. A tetanus shot, for example, is a
very good thing for the individual getting it; he
or she doesn’t end up with lockjaw. But it is not,
strictly speaking, a public good. Only the treated person benefits. The broad provision of the
pneumococcal vaccine, in contrast, creates herd
immunity and reduces anti-microbial resistance. The circulation of pneumonia in children
is diminished, helping protect the elderly as
well. Once this public good is produced, everyone can enjoy it without reducing anyone else’s
share.
What is exceptional about this particular public good is how much of it has been generated by
a single source. The Internet loves speculation
about shadowy, menacing global institutions —
the Bilderberg Group, the Trilateral Commission. But there is a little-known global institution
based in Geneva — Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance —
that supports vaccination for nearly 60 percent
of the world’s children. It is a global conspiracy
of health.
Gavi provides heavy but eventually diminishing subsidies for immunizations in poor countries. It also acts as a sort of purchasing co-op,
helping nations get better prices on vaccines.
And it amounts to a guaranteed market for vaccines that would not otherwise be profitable to
research and produce.
The provision
of vaccines is a
particularly clear
instance of what
economists call
a global
public good.
This organization has gathered recent attention during the Ebola crisis. Two Ebola vaccines
are currently in testing and may be available
(God and the science willing) by the middle of
next year. Gavi is raising
funds (from governments
and development banks) to
purchase millions of doses.
Perhaps more importantly,
it guarantees a market for
the development of second-generation Ebola vaccines that will have a longer shelf life and work on a
broader variety of strains.
In addition, Gavi will help
Ebola-affected countries
play catch-up on other
childhood vaccinations
neglected during the crisis.
But the prospect is broader. Gavi has begun an
ambitious push to fund its next five-year period,
with the target to provide 2.7 billion vaccine doses that will immunize 300 million children. This
would prevent 5 million to 6 million deaths. The
outcomes of few other development interventions are so precisely measurable. Gavi has a 3
percent overhead rate. The results with a given
level of inputs can be specified with incredible
accuracy.
And this, in all likelihood, will be the highest
level of resources Gavi will ever need. The program requires even the poorest countries to pay
a portion of the cost of purchasing vaccines. Participating nations are then given five years to
take over the full cost — which they generally do
on schedule (barring coup or crisis). This graduation model means that during the next five-year
funding period — following the one currently
being planned — only 2.1 billion doses will be
required. And downward from there.
There is serious debate about the effectiveness of certain types of development assistance.
Advocates must be able to account for the lack
of economic results, say, from decades of foreign aid in Haiti. But the value of vaccination as
a global public good is hard to question. Gavi is
rigorous, dramatically effective — and temporary.
The Obama administration and other governments are in the process of determining their
commitments to Gavi. America is generally
hesitant to make large, multiyear development
pledges. This should be a big, bipartisan exception.
MICHAEL
GERSON
MICHAEL GERSON’S email address: michaelgerson@
washpost.com
YOUR VOICE
Letters to the Editor reflect the opinions of the writers and are not necessarily those of The Daily Times.
Jackie Hill’s planters
are fully appreciated
Dear Editor;
Bravo to Ms. Jackie Hill and
the members of the HallOldfield communities! What
a delight to drive along Hall
Road through Alcoa and see
the beautiful seasonal planters along the intersections. The
individual planters that are
changed with each season are a
delight to see, but the beautiful
garden that was established in
memory of Jackie’s mother is a
work of art.
The Christmas display is such
a wonderful treat, and I have
enjoyed taking my grandchildren by to see her handiwork.
corner of Montvale Station and
Sandy Springs roads was tastefully developed with a pavilion,
boardwalk, and explanation
plaques to display the effects of
nature.
However, nature took over
as trees began to grow in the
area and dry up the wetlands.
It was decided, apparently,
that nature’s trees must be cut
Carolyn Forster to return the land to its dis1046 Nina DeLozier Road play of nature (wink). So, with
Maryville, TN 37804 man’s help, maybe nature can
be trained to do what it is supposed to do. What a phenomInteresting phenomena
ena!
What a wonderful labor of love.
Thanks to Jackie and this
community for the years of
dedicated time and talent of
providing such lovely displays
that they have shared with all
those who pass through. You
are to be commended for your
giving spirits!
Sincerely,
seen on Pistol Creek
Dear Editor:
Pistol Creek Wetlands at the
Doc Beale
2104 Spalding Drive
Maryville, 37803
VOICE YOUR OPINIONS
Letters to the editor are welcome. All letters must be
signed and include your address and a telephone number where the writer may be reached. Those longer than
300 words normally will not be considered for publication. Address letters: Editor, The Daily Times, P.O. Box
9740, Maryville, Tenn., 37802-9740.
Letters may be submitted via email to
[email protected] with verification included. In
addition, a signed copy of the email must be forwarded
to the above postal address.
We do not accept letters via fax or by comments
posted to our websites or Facebook page.
| 7A
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
S&P 500
2,078.54
p
NASDAQ
4,781.42
+7.89
Today
Acquisition update?
p
+16.04
p
+154.64
J
A
S
O
N
2014
Source: FactSet
AP
The stock market closed at a
record high Monday; pharmaceutical and tech stocks were
among the big risers. Shares in
energy companies fell sharply
as oil prices fell yet again. Trading volume was lighter than
usual, due to the holiday-shortened week.
Ocwen Financial
OCN
Close: $16.01 -5.89 or -26.9%
The subprime mortgage servicer’s
executive chairman will resign in a
settlement that also provides $150
million to homeowners.
$30
25
20
15
S
O
N
52-week range
$15.04
D
$56.82
Vol.: 23.8m (6.4x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $2.01 b
PE: 13.7
Yield: ...
TICKER CLOSE CHG
Alcoa
AllegTch
AlumChina
ArcelorMit
Cameco g
CarpTech
CentAl
FrptMcM
Gerdau
Nucor
POSCO
RelStlAl
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SthnCopper
StlDynam
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Tenaris
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TurqHillRs
USSteel
AA
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ACH
MT
CCJ
CRS
CENX
FCX
GGB
NUE
PKX
RS
SID
SCCO
STLD
TCK
TS
TX
TRQ
X
15.74
33.87
11.63
11.05
16.21
47.02
24.94
22.55
3.56
48.94
64.97
59.64
2.18
27.33
19.16
12.85
29.76
17.59
2.87
26.19
-.20
+.51
+.08
-.36
-.23
-.94
+.21
-.85
-.02
-.46
-.47
+.47
+.07
-.53
-.60
-.40
-.99
-.69
+.01
-2.40
YTD
+5.11
-1.76
+2.93
-6.79
-4.56
-15.18
+14.48
-15.17
-4.28
-4.44
-13.03
-16.20
-4.02
-1.38
-.38
-13.16
-13.93
-13.71
-.43
-3.31
30-YR T-BONDS
2.74%
q
-.01
CRUDE OIL
$55.26
4 37.48
2 39.30
4 76.28
6 4.62
8 17.75
0 51.67
4 11.12
9 173.14
0 45.68
0 119.06
0 55.10
0 620.56
7 41.04
0 18.03
0 37.82
1 21.45
0 11.48
0 152.94
0 134.84
0 51.06
2 74.89
0 91.89
5 25.75
4 135.10
0 68.42
0 57.49
0 57.16
0 37.46
0 34.20
2 82.00
9 69.76
8 125.17
0 20.30
4 90.55
4 70.66
3 18.16
0 89.96
4 104.76
0 13.46
4 69.87
6 19.77
5 28.09
0 106.80
2 56.73
2 15.17
9 73.59
0 102.00
0 101.75
0 12.45
0 84.80
3 15.91
0 77.84
9 55.73
0 64.13
0 42.82
1 6.85
0 194.24
0 67.27
5 5.50
5 17.51
3 68.43
5 37.73
0 37.46
0 150.74
3 58.76
2 79.38
5 11.03
0 50.58
4 21.80
3 11.30
3 13.68
9 27.92
9 33.12
9 39.40
7 19.38
6 12.67
8 80.41
7 11.54
1 3.00
4 8.57
8 43.22
0 42.94
1 49.16
0 42.13
1 50.77
8 44.24
0 23.68
0 123.61
0 75.43
7 30.97
4 3.85
8 69.50
9 88.09
9 37.13
0 36.70
0 193.78
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s
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s -16.4 -20.7
t +48.1 +61.1
s +30.8 +37.4
s
-6.7
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s +44.2 +53.3
s +34.8 +29.7
s +22.0 +25.4
s +20.1 +26.2
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s
+3.8
+7.4
s +13.7 +12.6
s +30.1 +35.8
t -41.5 -33.5
s +40.3 +39.5
s +28.1 +30.3
s +35.3 +35.6
s
+8.2 +12.7
t -16.9 -13.6
s +13.9 +17.2
t
+0.4
+5.7
t -10.3
-4.9
s
+4.8 +11.4
s +10.1 +14.3
s +14.1 +18.9
s
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s +39.7 +49.4
t
-5.7
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s +20.0 +25.4
s +35.4 +42.5
t
-5.2
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r -10.8
-6.7
s -20.4 -18.4
s +39.6 +50.0
t
-7.8
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s +15.9 +19.1
t
+8.9 +14.4
s
-2.2
-0.7
s
-8.3
-3.0
s +28.0 +32.6
t -18.6 -10.8
t -20.6 -22.7
s +17.8 +21.1
s +25.7 +29.8
s +10.8 +16.2
s
+8.6
+8.6
s
+9.3 +11.3
t
-6.4
-3.6
s +41.9 +46.8
s +12.0 +15.1
s +62.5 +61.9
s +22.2 +23.6
t -31.6 -37.3
s +32.1 +38.7
s +36.9 +39.9
s
+2.6 +11.9
s
+7.7
+9.3
t -23.0 -19.3
t -14.8 -12.8
s +16.1 +18.2
s +32.8 +38.0
t
-8.3
-2.9
t -25.2 -22.0
s -13.5 -10.4
s +137.8 +138.6
t
-4.1
+6.7
t -29.8 -17.2
s -20.8 -21.8
t +39.5 +49.7
s
+4.8
+7.4
s +16.3 +21.3
s
+5.9 +22.2
s
+6.4 +16.0
s
+2.4
+6.3
s
+6.3 +10.8
t -58.7 -58.0
s
-8.5
-6.5
s
+8.9 +17.7
s +119.0 +117.4
t -25.5 -21.5
s +14.5 +18.1
t
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+3.4
s +22.5 +19.7
s +80.0 +63.5
s +43.3 +46.6
s +18.8 +25.0
s +16.3 +31.4
t +11.6
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s +11.2 +17.2
s
+9.8 +12.7
s +28.6 +30.6
s +15.6 +19.0
s +21.3 +25.5
q
-1.26
EURO
$1.2224
Interestrates
q
GOLD
$1,179.70
-.0001
TREASURIES
3-month T-bill
q
-16.20
NET
1YR
YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO
.04
0.03 +0.01
s s s
.06
10 1.88f
6-month T-bill
.13 0.10 +0.03 s s s
.08
dd
...
.13
52-wk T-bill
.25 0.24 +0.01 s s s
14 1.10
0.18e
2-year
T-note
.66
0.64
+0.02
s
s
s
.38
The yield on the
25 0.12
5-year T-note
1.66 1.65 +0.01 s s t 1.68
23 2.08 10-year
34 0.40 Treasury held at
10-year T-note
2.16 2.16
... s t t 2.89
26 3.16f 2.16 percent
30-year T-bond
2.74 2.75 -0.01 t t t 3.82
28 0.24f Monday. Yields
39 1.36 affect rates on
NET
1YR
18 1.56f mortgages and
BONDS
YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO
19
... other loans.
14 0.96
Barclays LongT-BdIdx 2.60
2.62 -0.02 s t t 3.63
17 0.20
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.30
4.30
... r t t 5.13
26 0.50f
25 0.20
Barclays USAggregate 2.26
2.28 -0.02 s s t 2.44
PRIME FED
cc
...
Barclays US High Yield 6.70
6.77 -0.07 t s s 5.69
RATE FUNDS
18
...
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 3.77
3.80 -0.03 s t t 4.57
60 2.60a
YEST 3.25 .13
6 0.50
Barclays CompT-BdIdx 1.92
1.92
... s s t 1.83
14
... 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13
Barclays US Corp
3.13
3.15 -0.02 s s s 3.23
1
YR
AGO
3.25
.13
22 1.00
18 0.95
10 4.28
6MO. 1YR.
26 0.80
Foreign
MAJORS
CLOSE CH. %CH. AGO AGO
18 0.90
Exchange USD per British Pound 1.5594 -.0042 -.27% 1.7011 1.6332
18 0.90
cc 1.00 The dollar
Canadian Dollar
1.1642 +.0045 +.39% 1.0754 1.0661
16 0.42 gained versus
USD per Euro
1.2224 -.0001 -.01% 1.3593 1.3670
17 2.04 the Japanese
Japanese Yen
120.01
+.50 +.42% 102.13 104.06
47 0.40 yen, euro and
16 0.24
14.6291 +.0257 +.18%12.9940 12.9835
the pound. The Mexican Peso
25 0.68
12 1.60f ICE U.S. Dollar EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel
3.9045 -.0237 -.61% 3.4461 3.5036
21 1.88f index, which
27 0.70 compares the
Norwegian Krone
7.4208 +.0484 +.65% 6.1246 6.1626
15 3.32 dollars value to South African Rand 11.5631 -.0000 -.00%10.6846 10.3440
12 2.76 a basket of key
Swedish Krona
7.7936 +.0523 +.67% 6.7245 6.5895
15 0.20 currencies,
Swiss Franc
.9844 +.0002 +.02% .8957 .8956
13 1.32 rose.
dd
...
ASIA/PACIFIC
18 0.92f
Australian Dollar
1.2288 +.0007 +.06% 1.0654 1.1213
24 2.30
Chinese Yuan
6.2225 +.0032 +.05% 6.2245 6.0715
2.46e
Hong Kong Dollar
7.7556 +.0017 +.02% 7.7515 7.7545
...
12 1.64f
Indian Rupee
63.245 -.050 -.08% 60.246 61.935
24 1.88
Singapore Dollar
1.3184 +.0039 +.30% 1.2498 1.2668
19 2.07f
South Korean Won
1099.96
+.12 +.01%1020.59 1062.69
21 0.16
Taiwan Dollar
31.57
+.05 +.16% 30.02 29.90
28 0.80
dd
...
19 2.72
16 1.60f
FUELS
CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
20 0.74f Commodities
Crude Oil (bbl)
55.26
56.52
-3.31
-43.9
24 2.04 The price of oil
Ethanol (gal)
1.62
1.62 +0.50
-15.5
dd
... fell Monday on
Heating Oil (gal)
1.95
1.96
-0.55
-36.6
20 6.00f expectations of
Natural Gas (mm btu)
3.14
3.46
-9.24
-25.7
27 0.92 a further inUnleaded Gas (gal)
1.54
1.56
-1.57
-44.9
cc
...
crease in sup5
...
METALS
CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
14 1.40 plies both in the
Gold (oz)
1179.70 1195.90
-1.35
-1.9
... U.S. and from
24 0.68 OPEC producSilver (oz)
15.65
15.99
-2.14
-19.1
17 2.80 ers. In metals
Platinum (oz)
1182.10 1197.00
-1.24
-13.8
24 1.49f trading, gold,
Copper (lb)
2.90
2.91
-0.15
-15.6
15 1.08 silver and copPalladium (oz)
815.25 805.10 +1.26
+13.6
23
... per each closed
31
... lower.
AGRICULTURE
CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
dd 0.75
Cattle (lb)
1.62
1.61 +0.68
+20.3
dd
...
Coffee (lb)
1.72
1.75
-1.46
+55.5
...
Corn (bu)
4.12
4.11 +0.30
-2.4
22 1.08
Cotton (lb)
0.62
0.61 +1.89
-26.7
17 1.12f
Lumber (1,000 bd ft)
339.10 340.60
-0.44
-5.8
21 1.28
q 1.56a
Orange Juice (lb)
1.42
1.43
-0.46
+4.1
q 1.08
Soybeans (bu)
10.38
10.31 +0.75
-20.9
17 0.88
Wheat (bu)
6.26
6.32
-1.03
+3.4
13 0.20
58
...
dd
...
25 0.88
PERCENT RETURN
FUND
CAT NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR
24 0.24 FAMILY
13
...
American Funds GrthAmA m
LG 42.91 -.03 +9.9 +11.6 +21.1 +13.7
14 0.80
IncAmerA x
MA 21.76 -.22 +8.7 +10.1 +13.1 +11.3
7 0.40
InvCoAmA m
LB 41.07 -.11 +13.2 +15.1 +20.3 +13.5
14 0.40f
GrowA m
LG 41.09 +.18 +9.2 +10.7 +16.7 +11.9
dd
... Calamos
NYVentA m
LB 37.02 +.18 +7.1 +9.3 +17.6 +11.7
22 2.00 Davis
IntlStk
FB 42.57 +.16 +1.2 +3.5 +15.9 +8.3
25 1.28f Dodge & Cox
39
... Dupree
TNTxFInc
SI
11.70
... +8.3 +8.3 +4.2 +4.7
dd
... Fidelity
Contra
LG 99.01 +.33 +10.7 +12.3 +20.2 +15.3
48 0.24
DivrIntl d
FB 34.80 +.11 -2.2 +0.3 +13.7 +7.0
18 1.92
IntlSmCp d
FR 21.51 +.06 -6.0 -3.2 +15.2 +10.3
23 1.30a
Magellan
LG 93.10 +.26 +14.8 +16.5 +22.4 +12.8
27 1.16
Nicholas
Nichol
MG 71.34 -.23 +15.7 +17.8 +24.0 +19.0
20 3.00
Oppenheimer
CapApA m
LG 59.91 -.21 +16.2 +17.9 +19.7 +13.0
Dividend footnotes: a- extra dividends were paid, but are not included b- annual rate plus stock c- liquidating dividend e- amount
GlobA m
WS 77.04 +.18 +3.4 +5.8 +16.7 +10.9
declared or paid in last 12 months f- current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i- sum of div- PIMCO
HiYldA m
HY
9.15
... +2.4 +2.7 +7.6 +7.9
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Thrivent
BalIncPlsA m
MA 12.93 +.03 +5.8 +6.9 +12.8 +10.1
Close: 2,078.54
Close: 4,781.42
2,020
4,660
Change: 7.89 (0.4%)
Change: 16.04 (0.3%)
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10 DAYS
OpIncPlsA m
MU 10.26 +.02 +3.2 +3.3 +3.3 +5.2
2,100
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Vanguard
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GI 11.37
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4,400
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Prmcp x
LG 104.39 -6.59 +20.5 +22.2 +24.8 +16.5
1,850
4,200
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
REITIdx
SR 27.34 +.45 +32.2 +32.3 +16.7 +17.2
HIGH
LOW
CLOSE
CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
SmCapIdx
SB 55.78 +.24 +7.2 +9.0 +20.2 +16.7
TotBdMkInv x
CI 10.87 -.02 +5.7 +5.3 +2.6 +4.2
DOW
17962.78
17812.25
17959.44
+154.64
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s
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NYSE NASD
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LG 30.16 +.04 +14.0 +15.8 +22.4 +15.3
DOW Trans.
9092.09
8995.76
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3,283 1,660 DOW Util.
615.72
610.95
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Welltn
MA 41.20 +.11 +10.6 +11.8 +14.4 +11.4
NASDAQ
4781.93
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4781.42 +16.04 +0.34% s s s +14.48%
WndsrII
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1829 1678
S&P 500
2078.76
2069.28
2078.54
+7.89 +0.38% s s s +12.45%
Declined
1341 1064 S&P 400
AdvCoBdAd
CI 12.78
... +5.7 +5.4 +3.3 +4.9
1455.42
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205
152 Wilshire 5000 21814.00
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47 Russell 2000
1201.88
1193.57
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SpMdCpValIv
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22382
532
1928
17039
17011
8392
47
3675
213
827
252
217
2726
69625
242
18287
9
5781
731
885
2711
324
3513
9244
344
18888
3199
2328
854
438
22
422
2761
1379
2643
147
1954
17092
1371
229
219
34607
369
4116
15
195
5104
2502
3
418
352
382
1803
3430
189
38
1091
4251
80
118
1601
2140
1309
1189
2839
1647
122
27
578
10267
308
1909
18032
247
318
76
512
7944
7
912
44
6600
9894
2678
2261
4037
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3117
864
53
31
1234
4336
867
4130
665
MutualFunds
StocksRecap
Industrial Metals 20
NAME
p
+.03
Stocks of Blount Interest
AT&T Inc
T
31.74
Acxiom Corp
ACXM 16.04
Albemarle Corp
ALB
51.35
Alcatel-Lucent
ALU
2.28
Alcoa Inc
AA
9.83
Altria Group
MO
33.80
Am Softwre
AMSWA 8.26
Amgen
AMGN 108.20
Arkansas Bst
ARCB 29.88
Ashland Inc
ASH
88.76
ATMOS Energy
ATO
44.16
AutoZone Inc
AZO 465.34
BB&T Corp
BBT
34.50
Bank of America
BAC
14.37
Bank of the Ozarks
OZRK 27.51
Barrick Gold
ABX
10.26
Bear State Financial BSF
6.31
Berkshire Hath B
BRK/B 108.12
Boston Prop
BXP
99.55
Brunswick Corp
BC
38.17
Cameron Intl
CAM
44.43
Carlisle Cos
CSL
71.51
CenterPoint Energy
CNP
21.07
Chevron Corp
CVX 100.15
Clarcor Inc
CLC
52.70
Comcast Corp A
CMCSA 47.74
Comcast Spl
CMCSK 47.21
ConAgra Foods
CAG
28.09
Cooper Tire
CTB
21.90
Cullen Frost
CFR
67.46
Deltic Timber
DEL
58.05
Dillards Inc
DDS
82.75
Duke Realty Corp
DRE
14.48
Eastman Chem
EMN
70.38
Eye on the economy
Emerson Elec
EMR
57.76
Economists anticipate that the
Ennis Inc
EBF
12.53
U.S. economy grew 4 percent in
Entergy
ETR
60.40
the third quarter.
Exxon Mobil Corp
XOM
86.19
The U.S. economy has been
Fst Horizon Natl
FHN
11.00
GATX
GMT
50.80
gaining strength this year after a
GenCorp
GY
15.11
dismal start due to severe winter
GE
23.69
weather. It grew at an annualized Gen Electric
Genuine Parts
GPC
76.50
pace of 4.6 percent in the
41.29
April-June quarter after falling 2.1 GlaxoSmithKline PLC GSK
Grupo Simec
SIM
8.50
percent in the first three months of
Hanover Insurance
THG
52.86
the year. The Commerce DepartHome Depot
HD
73.96
ment reports its latest estimate of Honeywell Intl
HON
82.89
growth for the July-September
HopFed Bancorp Inc HFBC 10.97
period today.
Hunt, JB Transport
JBHT 69.33
iStar Financial
STAR 12.30
GDP
Integrys Energy
TEG
52.08
seasonally adjusted annualized percent
Intl Paper
IP
44.24
change
4.6 est.
Kroger Co
KR
35.13
4.5
4.0
LTC Prop
LTC
34.77
4%
3.5
Lo Jack
LOJN
2.20
Lockheed Martin
LMT 144.69
2 1.8
Lowes Cos
LOW
44.13
Martha Stewart Liv
MSO
3.40
Modine Mfg
MOD
10.79
-2.1
0
Murphy Oil Corp
MUR
43.57
NCR Corp
NCR
22.83
Newell Rubbermaid
NWL
28.27
-2
Northrop Grumman
NOC 109.17
Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3
Nucor Corp
NUE
46.39
2013 2014
Oceaneering Intl
OII
56.58
Source: FactSet
Omnova Solutions
OMN
5.15
PAM Transp
PTSI
17.83
Homebuilding pickup?
Parkway Properties
PKY
16.95
Penney JC Co Inc
JCP
4.90
The Commerce Department
Pep Boys
PBY
8.36
reports its latest data on sales of
Pepco Holdings Inc
POM
18.53
new homes today.
Pfizer Inc
PFE
27.51
Sales edged up to a seasonally
Piedmnt Nat Gas
PNY
32.12
adjusted annual rate of 458,000 in
Pimco Corp &Inco Opp PTY
16.08
October, led by a big jump in
Pimco Income Strat
PFL
11.21
activity in the Midwest. That gain
Regal Beloit
RBC
62.15
offset declines in the South and
Regions Fncl
RF
8.85
West. Economists predict that
Reliv Intl
RELV
1.14
sales of new homes grew
Ruby Tuesday
RT
5.14
modestly in November versus the Simmons Fst Natl
SFNC 32.01
Swst Airlines
LUV
18.60
previous month.
Sthwstn Energy
SWN
27.62
New home sales
Suntrust Bks
STI
33.97
seasonally adjusted annual rate
Trinty Inds
TRN
26.10
Tyson Foods
TSN
33.03
480 thousand
est. USA Truck
USAK 11.95
460
458
Union Pacific Corp
UNP
81.52
453 455
VF Corp
VFC
55.14
Vascular Solutions
VASC 18.42
430
Virco Mfg
VIRC
2.00
Vulcan Matl
VMC
54.10
409
WalMart Strs
WMT
72.27
399
Weingarten Rlty
WRI
27.21
Weyerhaeuser
WY
27.48
380
Whirlpool
WHR 124.39
J
6-MO T-BILLS
.13%
52-WK RANGE
YTD 1YR
VOL
TICKER LO
HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR CHG%RTN (Thous) P/E DIV
NAME
Walgreen’s latest financial results
could provide insight into its
expectations for takeover target
Alliance Boots.
The drug store chain, due to
report fiscal first-quarter earnings
today, is buying the European
health and beauty retailer in a deal
that shareholders are scheduled to
vote on later this month. Investors
also will be listening for an update
on how Walgreen is managing the
impact of lower prescription
reimbursements and rising prices
for generic drugs.
DOW
17,959.44
Money&Markets
Automobiles & Parts
Travel & Leisure
NAME
TICKER CLOSE CHG
AmAirlines
Carnival
CarnUK
Chipotle
DeltaAir
Hilton
LVSands
MarIntA
McDnlds
MelcoCrwn
Priceline
RylCarb
Ryanair
SwstAirl
Starbucks
StarwdHtl
UtdContl
Wyndham
Wynn
YumBrnds
AAL
50.84
CCL
44.86
CUK
44.26
CMG 667.66
DAL
47.41
HLT
26.00
LVS
56.56
MAR
78.46
MCD
93.89
MPEL 23.88
PCLN 1149.38
RCL
81.60
RYAAY 68.10
LUV
41.26
SBUX 80.54
HOT
80.12
UAL
64.00
WYN 84.71
WYNN 147.48
YUM
72.46
+.13
+.07
-.03
+16.24
+.03
-.18
+.12
+1.03
+.67
-.05
+39.93
+1.01
-.56
+1.00
+1.10
+.49
-.14
-.05
-2.64
+1.29
YTD
+25.59
+4.69
+2.81
+134.88
+19.94
+3.75
-22.31
+29.11
-3.14
-15.34
-13.02
+34.18
+21.17
+22.42
+2.15
+.67
+26.17
+11.02
-46.74
-3.15
NAME
TICKER CLOSE CHG
Autoliv
BorgWarn
DanaHldg
DelphiAuto
FordM
GenMotors
Gentex
GenuPrt
Goodyear
HarleyD
Honda
JohnsnCtl
LKQ Corp
LearCorp
MagnaInt g
TRWAuto
TeslaMot
Toyota
Visteon
WABCO
ALV
BWA
DAN
DLPH
F
GM
GNTX
GPC
GT
HOG
HMC
JCI
LKQ
LEA
MGA
TRW
TSLA
TM
VC
WBC
YTD
105.14 +.34 +13.34
54.86 +.04 -1.05
21.26 +.11 +1.64
73.71 +.20 +13.58
15.22 +.19
-.21
33.23 +.42 -7.64
36.41
-.19 +3.57
106.46 +.58 +23.27
28.10 +.02 +4.25
65.31 +.52 -3.93
30.20
-.13 -11.15
48.50 +.28 -2.80
27.70 +.09 -5.20
97.05 +1.26 +16.08
106.76 +.10 +24.70
102.72
-.08 +28.33
222.60 +3.31 +72.17
126.64
-.37 +4.72
105.85
-.19 +23.96
104.69
-.22 +11.28
considering
a buyout
American Apparel (APP)
Monday’s close: $1.14
52-WEEK RANGE
Price-earnings ratio: Lost money
$0.46
AP
American Apparel
buyer. Sunday it said it
Company adopted a shareholder rights
confirmed that it received
Spotlight plan, also known as a poison
a buyout offer for the
company. Shares of the
pill, which goes into effect if an
retailer rose 7 percent following
investor acquires 10 percent or
the news.
more of the company.
The Los Angeles company said
The offer comes after the
it was offered between $1.30 and
company fired founder Dov
$1.40 per share. That's as much as Charney last week and named
a 31 percent premium from Friday's fashion executive Paula Schneider
close of $1.07.
as its next CEO as it seeks to
American Apparel said it will
turnaround its business. Charney
evaluate the offer, but did not
was ousted as CEO in June
disclose the name of the potential
following allegations of misconduct.
1.45
Price change YTD
APP
-7.3%
3-yr*
5-yr*
15.5
-18.0
(Based on past 12 month results)
*annualized
Source: FactSet
SANTA ANSWERS QUESTIONS FROM READERS IN THIS WEEK’S KID SCOOP. 12A
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2014
THE DAILY TIMES
Raising the barre
DARYL SULLIVAN | THE DAILY TIMES
NEIGHBORHOOD BARRE MARYVILLE is set to open in January. Free classes will be offered Jan. 3 and 4. The owner is Erin Keene, who has been dancing since the age of 2, and
teaches classes for Neighborhood Barre in Knoxville.
New exercise studio comes to Maryville
BY MELANIE TUCKER
[email protected]
A new business is coming
to downtown Maryville,
one that will definitely be
intriguing to those wanting
to change up their everyday workout routine.
Erin Keene, a native of
Knoxville who’s been
dancing since the age of 2,
is opening Neighborhood
Barre Maryville in the
downtown space formerly
occupied by Masterpeace
Yoga.
Neighborhood Barre
started in Knoxville where
it now has two locations,
on Northshore Drive and
also Western Plaza. Another franchise just
opened in Birmingham with
another set to
open its doors in
Nashville soon.
A barre
workout,
Keene
explained,
combines
the ele-
A DANCER HER
ENTIRE LIFE, Erin
Keene said she
finds a lot to
love about barre
classes. The elements of dance,
yoga and pilates
are combined into
one routine.
ments of dance, ballet,
yoga and pilates. Keene
started out in studio ballet
and jazz and then moved
into modern dance as she
got older. She has competed over the years and was a
studio art major at the University of Tennessee.
WORK IT OUT
“What you do in the
workout is work your muscles to fatigue using isometric movements,” Keene
said. “At the end of each set
of movements you stretch,
which lengthens your muscles, giving you a dancer’s
physique. We work the
thighs, your seat, abs and
arms.”
The barre class lasts 55
minutes. Keene said this
is the only workout many
attendees do because
it combines so many
elements. Because the
movements are low
impact, barre is great
for all ages and levels of fitness.
“It is really easy
on your joints,”
this instructor
said.
“It is
really low
impact so
we have pregnant
women who are
able to participate
right up until their
ninth month. We
also have plenty of
people who have
had injuries due to
running, as well as
people with back problems
and knee issues.”
Keene said she can modify any of the movements to
accommodate these physical limitations.
That’s part of the reason
it’s become so popular in
‘We have also had
quite a few athletes
who have injured
themselves and use
barre classes as a way
to help in their
recovery process since
it is so low impact and
safe on joints.’
Erin Keene
instructor at Neighborhood Barre
the last three years, she
said. That, and the fact the
classes are different each
time so attendees don’t get
bored and stay home.
WHO BENEFITS?
Athletes are a group that
can definitely benefit from
a barre workout, Keene
said.
The isometric movements are working smaller muscles that are not
typically worked in most
sports or in weight training
at the gym, she said.
“Our classes also help
improve overall posture
and balance which will in
turn help athletes in their
sports/training,” Keen said.
“We have also had quite
a few athletes who have
injured themselves and
use barre classes as a way
to help in their recovery
process since it is so low
impact and safe on joints.”
Keene, who is 25 and the
mother of a preschooler,
said she hopes her downtown Maryville location will be appealing to
Maryville College students, as well as those at
INSTRUCTOR ERIN KEENE DEMONSTRATES some of the moves during
a barre exercise class.
Maryville High School.
It’s close and convenient
to people who work at
Blount Memorial Hospital
as well, Keene pointed out.
She has kept in shape
through dancing competitively, but doesn’t anymore.
That’s why Keene said she
initially got into barre as a
workout routine.
“I wanted a workout that
is close to the dance technique I was used to,” she
said. “I don’t like to run. I
love this.”
After taking classes, she
then started teaching at
Neighborhood Barre in
Knoxville. That was a year
ago.
When the owner of Masterpeace Yoga decided to
close, Keene decided to
bring Neighborhood Barre
Maryville here. She’s had
SEE BARRE, 10A
8A
LIFE | 9A
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Man on verge of divorce can’t seal the deal
DEAR ABBY: I am three years into
a relationship with Harold, a man
who is separated but not divorced.
We both have grown children. Harold was separated when we got
involved. He has since moved in
with me and is an active bill-paying member of the home.
I was also separated from a
brief marriage when we met, and
divorced shortly after we started
dating. My assumption was that
Harold would also be divorcing.
As of now, the paperwork remains
partially filled out, but no legal
proceedings have begun.
I hate this. I have talked to him
about it many times, so he knows
my feelings. I’m at the “do it or
leave” point, but can’t seem to get
over the hump. I do not plan on
marrying — I just want him to be
divorced. What should I do? — LOOKING FOR LEGALITY IN WASHINGTON
DEAR LOOKING: When you became
involved with Harold, did he TELL
you he was planning on divorcing
his wife? There could be reasons
why he hasn’t gone through with
finalizing it. One of them could be
religious; another might be financial. A third, the fear that his relationship with his children — and
grandchildren, if there are any —
will be permanently damaged. Or,
that marrying you wasn’t his objective in the first place, and your
saying you didn’t want to remarry
made you more attractive to him.
If remarriage isn’t your goal,
why is his finalizing his divorce so
important to you? Before you issue
an ultimatum, it’s crucial that you
understand
the answer to
this question.
After that,
you will know
what — or
what not — to
do.
DEAR ABBY:
I have an
11-month-old
son. When
I was pregnant, I felt I had a great relationship with my mom. She seemed
excited about becoming a grandma for the first time, but once my
son was born she stayed away for
two weeks. When she finally came
over, it was only because she happened to be in town for a meeting.
When we met for lunch, she
seemed uncomfortable around the
baby. I feel hurt that she doesn’t
seem “into” him or being a grandma. I’m sad she’s missing out on so
much, but I don’t know if I should
tell her how I feel. I don’t want
her to change only because I said
something. I’d like her to WANT
to visit.
DEAR
ABBY
Should I say something to her,
or let it be and continue feeling
resentment toward her? — DISAPPOINTED NEW MOM
DEAR DISAPPOINTED: Please try to
curb your resentment until after
you have discussed this with your
mother, which is necessary in light
of the fact that you have always
had a good relationship with her.
In the weeks after your son was
born, she may have been trying to
give you space and time to bond
with your newborn. She may also
be busy, or uncomfortable around
babies and toddlers who can’t yet
communicate. Believe it or not,
some people — even grandparents
— feel that way, although they are
hesitant to admit it.
READERS: Abby shares more than
100 of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: “Abby’s Favorite Recipes” and “More Favorite Recipes
by Dear Abby.” Send your name
and mailing address, plus check or
money order for $14 (U.S. funds)
to: Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)
DEAR ABBY is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and
was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
Students to travel to Ky. for competition
F
uture Cities is a
national engineering
competition to create
a city based in the future.
According to its website, “Future City is your
chance to dream about
your future.
What kind of city do
you want to live in, what
can be done better in
your future city? You and
your teammates are in
charge of coming up with
ideas and making them
happen.
You’ll have support
from your teacher and
mentor, but ultimately
it is all about your ideas,
vision, and work.”
The national competition begins in state
regions. Because Tennessee does not have a
Future Cities competition
CLAYTONBRADLEY
ACADEMY
SARAH GARRIS
region, Clayton-Bradley
Academy will travel to
Lexington, Ky., on Jan. 19,
2015.
We hope to establish a
Future City state region
in Tennessee.
The steps in making a
Future City is, first, create a virtual representation of your city. Consider the taxes and type
of government needed.
What resources does
the city need? Trade and
transport need to be
decided.
Next is the research
paper. The research
paper differs every year.
This year, the paper’s
theme entails deciding a
single protein and a single vegetable to feed the
city. Why did they chose
that protein and vegetable?
Following the research
paper, the team builds a
model to represent the
city. Lastly, the team presents their Future City to
the competition judges
for grading. Judges grade
each step to make a final
score.
The team that wins the
state region competition
gets elevated to nationals. The winner meets
President Barack Obama
and goes to NASA space
camp.
The seventh grade and
eighth grade of ClaytonBradley Academy participates in this competition.
These grades consist
of 8th graders Elizabeth Hall, Max Thomas, Rachel Cheek, John
D. Cobb, Jack Thomas,
and seventh-graders,
Kristofer Kenley, Max
Fields, Cobey Compton,
Z Wilson, Brandt Weller,
AJ Camacho, Andrew
Cook, and Baker Tankersley.
WBHS student council collects over 200 toys
T
he Governors at William Blount High
School have completed all of their finals
and are currently enjoying a well-deserved holiday break.
In the spirit of the holidays, William Blount’s
Student Council collected over 200 items for
Toys for Tots just before
leaving for the holidays.
Also in spirit of the holidays, William Blount’s
Band participated in the
Gatlinburg Parade on
Dec. 5 and the Maryville
Parade on Dec. 13.
In the Maryville
Parade, William Blount
played their own
arrangement of “White
Christmas” alongside
WILLIAM
BLOUNT HIGH
RAIHA
ABBAS
the Alcoa and Maryville
Bands. At the Gatlinburg
Parade, William Blount
was one of nine bands,
and they played their
own arrangement of
“White Christmas” there
as well.
William Blount High
School would like to
congratulate Governors
Kaylin Bailey, Collin
Bentley and Foster Harris for becoming QuestBridge Scholars and
receiving full scholarships to the University
of Pennsylvania, Yale
University and Haverford College respectively. This is a prestigious
scholarship that was
only awarded to 501 students across the country,
three of them from William Blount.
The Governors would
also like to congratulate their Junior Varsity
History Bowl team for
placing second at the
Regional History Bowl
held at Farragut High
School on Nov. 22.
The team was composed of sophomores
Raiha Abbas, Daniel
Burns, Grace Cochrane,
and Vance Davis, and
they look forward to
attending further competitions throughout the
year.
The Students of the
Month are Sara Bell and
Suriana Antonio. The
Student of the Month
for the CTE building is
Nicolas Bailey.
The Governors would
like to wish everyone
Happy Holidays and a
Happy New Year!
Overseas holiday shopping easier
BY MAE ANDERSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK — This
holiday season, it’s almost
as simple to shop on the
other side of the world as
it is to buy from a store
down the block.
International online
payment services like AliPay and PayPal are trying to ensure that a South
Carolina fashionista can
buy a faux fur vest from
China with just a few
clicks on her computer
and a New Zealand biker
can use his smartphone
to pick up a rare part
from a Colorado company.
These services come
as shoppers and retail-
ers alike have a growing appetite to buy items
from any country, regardless of distance and regulations. In fact, a PayPal
report estimates that by
2018, about 130 million
shoppers will be spending over $300 billion a
year across the border, up
from $105 billion in 2013.
“The reality is pretty
much nothing in a store
is locally produced, so 99
percent of what you’re
buying is already a crossborder transaction. We’re
cutting out the middleman,” said Anuj Nayar,
senior director of global initiatives at PayPal,
which is being spun off
by eBay Inc.
Companies are work-
ing on fixing the biggest
hurdles for international
shopping: The perception that it costs a lot and
takes a long time. They’re
handling the conversion
of currency behind-thescenes and giving shoppers the prices in their
own currency.
They’re including tariffs and customs duties
in the overall price of an
item. And they’re being
transparent about shipping times and enabling
shoppers track packages
online.
Daniel McGaha, 24, a
youth and college minister from Greenwood, S.C.,
ordered a baseball jersey
for himself and some tassels for jewelry making
and a faux fur vest for
Christmas presents at
AliExpress.com, which is
owned by Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba.
McGaha was happy that
he got free shipping and
that he was able to track
his packages online.
Online retailers are benefiting from the interest in overseas shopping. About 25 percent
of PayPal’s transactions,
for example, are international, with about 2,000
cross-border transactions
per minute.
And some retailers that
work with PayPal have
opened warehouses in
countries like the U.S.
and U.K to keep up with
demand from overseas.
Christmas spirit
evident with recent
progams
A
fter finishing up
classes on Dec. 10,
the high school students of Blount Home
Education Association
ushered in the Christmas season with several
events.
As a special conclusion to the “Monday
Fun” enrichment classes
semester, several classes
showcased their work
on Monday, Dec. 8, at
the BHEA Christmas
Program.
The program, organized by Sara Martin,
included praise dancing,
clogging, sign language
and several show choir
pieces.
On Saturday, Dec.
13, BHEA teens ages
13-18 donned unsightly
Christmas sweaters and
brought tacky gifts for
the annual Ugly Christmas Sweater/White
Elephant Gift Exchange
Party.
In addition to the
sweater contest and
trading of silly gifts, the
group played several
festive games, sung carols and consumed many
holiday treats.
Finally, many teens put
their gift-wrapping skills
BLOUNT HOME
EDUCATION
LYDIA
HARRISON
to the test on Monday,
Dec. 22, for their second
year volunteering with
the Habitat for Humanity Gift Wrapping at
Foothills Mall.
Mall patrons came to
the station and gave a
donation for the gifts to
be wrapped; all donations will go towards
building more Habitat
homes in Blount County.
High school students
will be returning to
classes on Jan. 7, but in
the meantime, BHEA
wishes you “a Merry
Christmas and a Happy
New Year!”
BRIEFS
Medic blood center
at Monte Vista today
Medic Regional Blood
Center will be accepting donations from 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. today at
Monte Vista Baptist
Church, located at 1735
Old Niles Ferry Road in
Maryville.
All donors will receive
a free movie ticket and
Medic T-shirt.
Learn more about
Master Gardener
The Blount County
Master Gardener Association and the University of Tennessee
Extension Office of
Blount County will host
an information session
at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 6, 2015,
at the Blount County
Public Library.
The purpose is to
provide details on the
upcoming 2015 Master Gardener training
course.
The session is open to
the public.
Registration deadline
to sign up for the Master Gardener program
is Jan. 16, 2015. The
course will be limited
to the first 30 people
who register.
The 2015 classes will
be held in the evenings, from 5:30 to 9
p.m. Complete details
will be provided at the
meeting on Jan. 6. For
more information, call
982-6430.
Rooster’s Rumble
slated at Heritage
Rooster’s Rumble, a
wrestling tournament
to benefit the Skyler
“Rooster” Boring Wrestling Foundation, will
be held Saturday at
Heritage High School,
3741 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Maryville.
Weigh-ins will start at
8 a.m. and the tournament starts at 10 a.m.
Area high schools will
participate.
For more information,
call 206-6501 or visit
www.skylerrooster
boringfoundation.org.
Choral Society
to hold auditions
The Knoxville Choral Society will hold
auditions for all voice
parts from 6 to 8 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 8.
Auditions will include
assessment of vocal
quality, sight-reading
and tonal memory
drills.
No prepared piece is
required.
For more information
about the group or to
download an audition
form, visit www.knox
villechoralsociety.org.
Call 312-2440 to
schedule an audition
time.
Knoxville Zoo offers
buy one, get one
Knoxville Zoo is offering Buy One, Get One
Free admission tickets
during the month of
December to encourage
guests to discover why
winter is a great time
to visit.
Visitors to the zoo
this time of year will
see animals on days
when the temperatures
are below 40 degrees
including red pandas
and river otters. Many
of the animals will also
be available for indoor
viewing.
Half-price admission tickets can be purchased as the zoo ticket
window during regular
zoo hours and online
at knoxvillezoo.org.
Discounted admission
tickets must be used by
Feb. 28, 2015.
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10A | LIFE
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Hermanto wins
Alcoa Middle School
spelling bee
T
he weeks preceding
Christmas break are
always busy at Alcoa
Middle School. The
schoolwide spelling bee
took place on Tuesday,
Dec. 9. Sarina Hermanto, who won the eighth
grade spelling bee, also
won the school bee with
the word “obstreperous”.
This school bee included students from the
fifth, sixth, seventh, and
eighth grades.
Hermanto will be representing Alcoa Middle
School at the 2015 News
Sentinel Southern Appalachian Regional spelling bee at the University
of Tennessee on March
14, 2015. This includes
both a written test and
an oral bee.
As Alcoa has shown
many times before, it is a
school that cares greatly
about its music.
The middle school
band concert was held
on Monday, Dec. 8, in
the Ronald and Lynda Nutt Theater at the
Clayton Center for the
Arts on the Maryville
College campus.
The AMS chorus preformed at the Clayton
Center on Dec. 2. They
also performed at the
McGhee Tyson Airport.
In addition to music,
Alcoa Middle School
takes great pride in its
athletics.
The middle school
boys varsity basketball
team placed second at
Eagleton Middle School
in the Tip-Off Tourney.
ALCOA
MIDDLE
SCHOOL
JOHANNAH BAY
Eighth-graders Joseph
Hendricks and Mikael
Ayl were chosen to be
on the All Tournament
team.
The boys junior varsity team, made up of
sixth- and seventhgraders, took first in the
Junior Varsity Jaycee
Tournament.
Despite all the good
things that have happened at Alcoa, sickness has been a major
problem throughout the
entire Alcoa school system.
The system took Friday, Dec. 12, off due to
an immense number of
illnesses, from the flu to
the stomach bug.
However, now that
break has begun, everyone seems to be recovering well.
School may be “actionpacked,” but the students, teachers, and staff
are all ready and very
excited for the Christmas holiday.
GET IN C LUB NEWS!
Submit your club news to Sunday Life Editor Linda Albert at
[email protected] by 4 p.m. Tuesdays.
Only e-mailed submissions will be accepted and should be
300 words or less. The Daily Times reserves the right to edit
for our style, content and space constraints.
Call 981-1168 for more information.
DARYL SULLIVAN | THE DAILY TIMES
THE STUDIO AT NEIGHBORHOOD BARRE is ready to hold classes. Instructor is Erin Keene, who has been teaching for a year in Knoxville. She is a young mom who said all ages can benefit from this technique.
BARRE: Classes become routine for many who attend
classes, Keene has also
hired two instructors to
teach yoga, Bobbi Swann
and Mary Grace Taylor.
They previously taught
at Masterpeace.
FROM 8A
positive response even
before opening the
doors.
MARYVILLE
NEIGHBORS
COME ON IN
To get to know her
neighbors, Keene said
she is joining the Downtown Maryville Association and will be participating in some of its
events, like Last Friday
Art Walk. To get Blount
County residents familiar with barre, she is
offering free classes on
Jan. 3 and 4. Sign ups are
available at the website,
www.neighborhood
barre.com.
The studio can fit 18-20
people comfortably. The
equipment is set up and
ready, and so is Keene.
A new year is fast
approaching and that’s
when a lot of people
assess their fitness or
APPAREL WILL ALSO BE AVAILABLE to class members of Neighborhood Barre Maryville.
TRY FIRST CLASS FREE
Neighborhood Barre Maryville will be opening in January.
It is located at 111 E. Broadway in downtown Maryville at the
former location of Masterpeace Yoga. Free classes are being
offered Jan. 3 and 4. For more information, visit neighbor
hoodbarre.com. Owner and instructor is Erin Keene.
lack thereof and want
to make changes. Keene
invites both men and
women, young and old,
to come see what barre
is all about.
This might end up
being all that some people need to get their
bodies in shape, she said.
“This is all I’ve done
for two years and it’s
enough.”
In addition to the barre
The best way to determine if this is for you
is to come and see for
yourself, Keene said.
The first class is always
free.
“A majority of the people who come to check
it out end up staying,”
Keene said.
She will be offering
things like student discounts and different
packages to suit all busy
lifestyles. Sign-ups can
also be done online.
Results will be noticed
pretty quickly, the
instructor said. “If you
come at least three times
a week, after 10 classes your body will start
changing,” Keene said.
DAILY CALENDAR
PLAYTIME
“GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER”
AT THE TENNESSEE THEATRE: If
you haven’t quite had your
fill of the great holiday ballet
“The Nutcracker,” there’s
one more we suggest you
check out, and you have
two opportunities to do
so today. Moscow Ballet’s
“Great Russian Nutcracker”
is a production that evolved
out of the “International
Glasnost Festival Tours,”
which began in 1988 and
featured soloists from the
Bolshoi Ballet, Kirov/Mariinsky Ballet, National Ballet
of Czechoslovakia and more
companies of Russian Federation countries. The tours
were overtures for international peace and worldwide
cooperation, and it was
so well received that over
the next several decades,
the tours have featured
a number of internationally famous ballerinas. The
company’s staging of the
classic tale follows classical composer Tchaikovsky’s
complete “Nutcracker Suite”
score, maintaining the classic tradition and storyline
in the first act but diversing
in the second, when Masha
— aka Clara — and the Prince
travel to the Land Of Peace
and Harmony instead of
visiting the Sugar Plum Fairy.
You can go see it at 3 and 7
p.m. today at The Tennessee
Theatre, 604 S. Gay St. in
downtown Knoxville; tickets
range from $30 to $90.
CLASSES OFFERED
BEGINNER BELLY DANCE CLASSES:
Are being held at 6 p.m.
Tuesdays and also at 10:30
a.m. Saturdays at a location
just off Alcoa Highway. Call
Alexia at 898-2126 or email
[email protected]
CLUBS,
ORGANIZATIONS
ALCOA KIWANIS CLUB: Meets
at noon each Thursday at
Airport Hilton. For more
information, visit www.
alcoakiwanis.org.
AMERICAN LEGION POST 13:
Meets at 7 p.m. the third
Thursday of every month at
the American Legion, 224
Waters Road, Maryville. The
Auxiliary meets at 6 p.m.
the same day. For more
information, call the American Legion at 984-0233 or
Auxiliary President Sandy
Whitehead at 254-1110.
JOHN J. DUNCAN SR. MEMORIAL
VFW POST NO. 10855: Meets at
7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at First
United Methodist Church,
804 Montvale Station Road,
across from Maryville Middle
School. All former veterans
of foreign wars in Blount
County are invited to join.
Bring a copy of D.D. 214, or
orders for current active
military personnel, on any
meeting night. For information call Jim Hoffman at
202-5456.
BLOUNT COUNTY SCOTTISH RITE
CLUB: Meets at 6:30 p.m.
the third Thursday of every
month at New Providence
Lodge in Maryville.
FOOTHILLS KIWANIS CLUB: Meets
at noon the second and
fourth Wednesdays of each
month at the Chocolate Bar
in Townsend.
THE FOOTHILLS QUILTERS: Will
meet at 10 a.m. the first
and third Thursdays of each
month at Maryville Church
of The Nazarene, 1610 E.
Broadway, Maryville.
BETRAYED RETIREES
ORGANIZATION: Meets at 11
a.m. each Wednesday at
the United Steelworkers of
America Local 309 Union
Hall, lower level, Hall Road,
Alcoa. For information write
to P.O. Box 427, Alcoa, TN
37701, call 207-4184 or fax
977-9510.
BLOUNT COUNTY CIVIL WAR
ROUNDTABLE: Meets at 7
p.m. the last Thursday of
the month at Sam Houston
Historic Schoolhouse, Old
Sam Houston School Road,
Maryville.
FOOD EVENTS
THE WELCOME TABLE: New
Providence Presbyterian
Church, located at 703 W.
Broadway in Maryville offers
a free meal to the community from 5 to 6 p.m.
each Tuesday. The Welcome
Table is also offered from
5 to 6 p.m. each Thursday
at Maryville First United
Methodist Church, 804
Montvale Station Road. All
are welcome.
GREENBACK SENIOR CITIZENS
FELLOWSHIP CLUB: Will meet
on the third Friday of each
month at the Greenback
Community Building for a
potluck and program. New
members, both men and
women, are welcome. For
more information, contact
Sandra Sowders at 8562355.
MUSIC, DANCING
KARAOKE: Is held at 6:30 p.m.
on Thursdays and Saturdays
at Alnwick Community
Center in Maryville.
SENIOR CITIZEN DANCE: Will be
held Wednesdays at Everett
Senior Center, 702 Burchfield St., Maryville. Free
ballroom dance instructions
865-983-9919
GIFT OF GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP:
Meets the third Thursday
of each month at 7 p.m. at
Monte Vista Baptist Church
in Maryville. For more
information, call the church
office at 982-6070.
HAVEN HOUSE: Offers an educational class for victims
and survivors of domestic
violence and community
members who are interested in learning about the
cycle of violence and how
they can help loved ones.
For more information, contact the outreach office at
983-6818. A 24-hour crisis
hotline is also available at
982-1087.
EDITOR’S NOTE: For a listing of
Alcoholics Anonymous, AlAnon and Al-Ateen meetings, please see this section
every Wednesday.
NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL
ILLNESS (NAMI): Meets the
fourth Thursday of each
month from 6:30 to 9 p.m.
at St. Paul Lutheran Church,
429 Sandy Springs Road,
Maryville. For more information, call Jackie at 9959933 or Kim at 579-5165.
BLOUNT MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL’S CAREGIVERS
SUPPORT GROUP: Meets from
6-7 p.m. Wednesdays on
the hospital’s 3-east floor.
The group is a free service
for any adult who cares
for elders. For information
call 977-5744 or visit www.
blountmemorial.org.
DIVORCECARE AND DIVORCECARE
FOR KIDS: Meets 6:30 p.m.
Wednesdays at First Baptist
Church of Maryville. For
information contact John
Lee at 310-0728.
Welcoming New Patients
Over 31 Years Combined Dentistry Practice
60022081TDT
Holiday loans of all kinds!
612 W. Lamar Alexander
Pkwy, Maryville
SELF HELP,
SUPPORT GROUPS
DAY PASSES &
MEMBERSHIPS MAKE
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFTS
Talk to us today about the right solution
to meet your holiday spending needs.
Call the
friendly staff at...
will be from 1 to 2 p.m. and
ballroom dancing will be
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Anyone
who has ever danced or
would like to learn is welcome.
904 West Broadway, Maryville, TN 37801
www.olympiaathleticclub.com
984-8300
865-233-7640
Flexible hours! Open Monday-Friday with flexible
scheduling 7:00 am and noon appointments available.
NATION&WORLD | 11A
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
BRIEFS
NY mayor calls for
stall in protests until
after officer funerals
NEW YORK — New
York City Mayor Bill de
Blasio called Monday
for a pause in protests
over police conduct as
he faced a widening rift
with those in a grieving
force who accuse him
of creating a climate of
mistrust that contributed to the execution of
two officers.
“I think it’s a time for
everyone to put aside
political debates, put
aside protests, put aside
all of the things that we
will talk about in all due
time,” de Blasio said in
a speech Monday at the
Police Athletic League.
De Blasio’s relations
with the city’s police
unions have tumbled to
an extraordinary new
low in the aftermath
of Saturday’s shooting
in which the gunman
claimed was retaliation
for the deaths of black
men at the hands of
white police.
Officers Wenjian Liu
and Rafael Ramos were
ambushed Saturday
afternoon by a 28-yearold who vowed in an
Instagram post that he
would put “wings on
pigs.” The suspect, Ishmaaiyl Brinsley was
black; the slain New
York Police Department
officers were Hispanic
and Asian.
Teenager may have
died over shoe envy
CINCINNATI — A
mall shopper shot and
killed a 16-year-old boy
who attempted a robbery on the sidewalk
outside, possibly in pursuit of a pair of limitededition athletic shoes,
police in southwest
Ohio said Monday.
A Miami Township
police official said the
slain teenager and two
other youths went to
the Dayton Mall on Saturday morning for a
shoe sale, but the teens
apparently got there too
late to buy the shoes
they wanted.
Police said the three
juveniles from Middletown then approached
two men outside and
demanded their merchandise. They said one
juvenile showed a gun,
and one of the adults
who had a permit to carry a concealed weapon
then fired his own gun.
It wasn’t clear whether
the adults actually had
the shoes the youths
were seeking.
The Montgomery
County coroner’s office
identified the victim as
Jawaad Jabbar.
Ex-headmaster guilty
in child porn case
WILMINGTON, Del.
— The former headmaster of an elite Delaware
prep school faces at
least 50 years in prison
after being convicted
Monday of dealing in
child pornography.
Christopher Wheeler,
54, was found guilty on
all 25 counts. Wheeler
is a former headmaster
at Tower Hill school,
where he was paid more
than $300,000 a year and
where tuition exceeds
$25,000 a year. Graduates of the school, founded by members of the
du Pont family, include
DuPont Co. CEO Ellen
Kullman, U.S. Sen. Chris
Coons and television
personality Dr. Oz.
Wheeler waived his
right to a jury trial
after the judge denied a
defense motion to suppress evidence seized
by police.
The judge tentatively
set Wheeler’s sentencing for March.
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Pope targets Vatican bureaucrats
BY NICOLE WINFIELD
The Associated Press
VATICAN CITY — To the
Catholic Church’s “seven
deadly sins,” Pope Francis
has added the “15 ailments
of the Curia.”
Francis issued a blistering indictment of the Vatican bureaucracy Monday,
accusing the cardinals,
bishops and priests who
serve him of using their
Vatican careers to grab
power and wealth, of living “hypocritical” double
lives and forgetting that
they’re supposed to be joyful men of God.
Francis turned the traditional, genteel exchange of
Christmas greetings into a
public dressing down of the
Curia, the central administration of the Holy See
which governs the 1.2-billion strong Catholic Church.
He made clear that his plans
for a radical reform of the
structures of church power
must be accompanied by
an even more radical spiritual reform of the men
involved.
Ticking off 15 “ailments of
the Curia” one by one, Fran-
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A CHILD PRESENTS POPE FRANCIS with a drawing depicting a Pope’s
portrait and a writing which reads “Merry Christmas,” during an
audience Monday with the Holy See’s employees in the Paul VI
hall at the Vatican.
cis urged the prelates sitting stone-faced before him
in the marbled Sala Clementina to use the Christmas season to repent and
atone and make the church
a healthier, holier place in
2015.
Vatican watchers said
they had never heard such
a powerful, violent speech
from a pope and suggested
that it was informed by the
results of a secret investigation ordered up by Emeritus
Pope Benedict XVI in the
aftermath of the 2012 leaks
of his papers.
Benedict tasked three
trusted cardinals to probe
deep into the Vatican’s
back-stabbing culture to
root out what would have
prompted a papal butler to
steal incriminating documents and leak them to a
journalist. Their report
is known only to the two
popes.
Francis had some zing-
ers: How the “terrorism
of gossip” can “kill the
reputation of our colleagues and brothers in
cold blood.” How cliques
can “enslave their members and become a cancer
that threatens the harmony
of the body” and eventually kill it off by “friendly
fire.” How some suffer from
“spiritual Alzheimer’s,” forgetting what drew them to
the priesthood in the first
place.
“The Curia is called on
to always improve itself
and grow in communion,
holiness and knowledge to
fulfill its mission,” Francis
said. “But even it, as any
human body, can suffer
from ailments, dysfunctions, illnesses.”
Francis, who is the first
Latin American pope and
never worked in the Italiandominated Curia before he
was elected, has not shied
from complaining about
the gossiping, careerism
and bureaucratic power
intrigues that afflict the
Holy See.
H i s 20 1 3 C h r i s t m a s
address cast a spotlight on
such sins.
British rocker Cocker dies of lung cancer at 70
BY DAVID BAUDER
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Joe Cocker, the
raspy-voiced British singer known
for his frenzied cover of “With a
Little Help From My Friends,” the
teary ballad “You Are So Beautiful”
and a contorted performing style
uncannily parodied by John Belushi
on “Saturday Night Live,” has died.
He was 70.
His London-based agent, Barrie
Marshall, said Cocker died Monday
of lung cancer in Colorado, where he
has lived for the past two decades.
Cocker, an interpreter more than a
writer, became a star through his dazzling transformation of the Beatles’
“With a Little Help From My Friends.”
Featuring a gospel-styled arrange-
ment and furious call
and response between
Cocker and the backup singers, the song
became a No. 1 hit in
England and the highlight of his characteristically manic set at the
Joe
Woodstock festival in
Cocker
1969.
In a statement Monday, Paul McCartney remembered
hearing Cocker’s cover of the song he
and John Lennon co-wrote for Ringo
Starr and finding it “just mind blowing,” a “soul anthem.”
“I was forever grateful for him for
doing that,” McCartney said. “I knew
him through the years as a good mate,
and I was so sad to hear that he had
been ill and really sad to hear today
that he had passed away.”
Cocker’s “Mad Dogs & Englishmen” tour and travelling party of
1970, featuring Leon Russell and
numerous top session musicians,
produced a film and a recording
that went gold. But future success
was more sporadic, and Cocker suffered from both drug and financial
problems.
He had a top 10 hit in 1975 on “You
Are So Beautiful,” his voice cracking
on the final, emotional note, and won
a Grammy Award in 1983 for his “Up
Where We Belong” duet with Jennifer
Warnes, the theme of the movie “An
Officer and a Gentleman.”
Cocker is survived by his wife, Pam;
a brother; a stepdaughter and two
grandchildren. A private memorial
is planned.
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12A |
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
© 2014 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 31, No. 2
magine you had a chance to interview Santa
Claus! What would you ask? What would
Santa say? Here are some ideas from some
Kid Scoop readers, who came up with the
questions and the answers for today’s page.
I was a smart, cheerful child. When
my parents died, I was heartbroken. I cried,
not out of self-pity, but out of true love. One
of my tears dropped into the snow and froze to
make an ice marble. When I held it, it glowed
and took me to the North Pole. I met the elves
and they needed my help.
After I grew up with them I
took on the greatest task of
all—delivering presents.
The ice marble gave me
the
powers I have today.
Imagine you are a newspaper
reporter. What question would
you ask an elf, a Christmas
tree and a snowman? Write
your question, then write what
you think the answer might be.
I like whole
milk best, but Mrs. Claus
put me on a diet so I
have to drink non-fat.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension:
Follow one-step written directions.
Pretend Santa has
to buy all of his
Christmas presents
from the stores
advertising in your
newspaper. Help
him by selecting a
gift for everyone
in your class using
ads in the paper.
Don’t spend more
than $500.
I don’t buy them; Mrs. Claus grows
them. On Christmas Eve I come back with a
sleigh full of soil instead of an empty sleigh.
We grow food in our greenhouse and eat
fresh veggies and fruit everyday.
Standards Link:
Math/Number Sense: Solve
addition problems using
money amounts.
Standards Link: Investigation: Identify similarities and differences in
common objects.
As long as my heart is __________ and my
belly is ___________, I reckon I’ll want to be!
No, and I _______ that never __________.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension:
Follow simple written directions.
INTERVIEW
MARBLE
SANTA
ANSWERS
POUNDING
FRUIT
REFLECTION
CLASS
POLE
MILK
CLAUS
CHEERFUL
SNOW
BELLY
DIET
Find the words in the puzzle,
then in this week’s Kid Scoop
stories and activities.
P H A P M Y L L E B
P O U N D I N G A P
C W L Y S D L M A A
L D I E T W A K T T
A W E I V R E T N I
U Y S A B N T R A U
S S A L C W O N S R
C H E E R F U L A F
N O I T C E L F E R
Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical
words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.
Find five to ten quotes in articles in today’s
newspaper. On a separate piece of paper,
write the question you think each quote
answers.
ANSWER: I’ll have a boo Christmas without you.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Analysis of media
communications.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension:
Interpret information from text.
This week’s word:
INTERVIEW
Interview as a verb means to
have a conversation between a
reporter and a person who will
be the subject of the report.
The newspaper reporter
interviewed the mayor,
asking her many questions.
Use the word interview
today when talking with
your friends and family.
Imagine that you could
interview Santa Claus. What
would you ask him? What do
you think his answer would be?
Write one question and make
up an answer for the question
as if Santa had answered it.
Sponsored by:
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Drug arrest
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arrested. 9B
ALL-COUNTY VOLLEYBALL TEAM NAMED. 4B
COLLEGE FOOTBALL 5B | CLASSIFIED 6B | COMICS 8B | WEATHER 9B
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2014
THE DAILY TIMES
1B
Memphis tops BYU 55-48 in Miami Beach Bowl
Quarterback Lynch leads Tigers to overtime win
BY TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer
MIAMI — Paxton Lynch
accounted for seven touchdowns including a scoring
pass to Roderick Proctor in
the second overtime, Jake
Elliott made a 54-yard field
goal to force that extra session and Memphis topped
BYU 55-48 in the inaugural Miami Beach Bowl on
Monday.
Lynch threw for four
scores and ran for three
more for Memphis (10-3),
in a game marred by a postgame brawl that involved
many players from both
teams after BYU’s Christian
Stewart was intercepted by
the Tigers’ DaShaughn Terry on the final play.
The game was back-andforth, and that continued
— in ugly fashion — after
it ended. Players from both
teams spilled onto the field,
punches being thrown by
both sides as coaches from
Memphis and BYU tried to
break up the mess before
it got any worse.
‘NOT WHO WE ARE’
“That’s not who we are,”
Memphis coach Justin
Fuente said.
There was no immediate
word on any disciplinary
action from either team.
It was Memphis’ first bowl
triumph since 2005, and the
Tigers finished a season
with ten victories for the
first time since 1938.
Keiwone Malone caught
two touchdown passes for
the Tigers, including one
with 45 seconds left in regulation.
Stewart threw for 349
yards and three touchdowns for BYU (8-5).
Paul Lasike ran for two
scores and Zac Stout ran
back an interception for
another touchdown midway through the fourth
quarter for BYU, which
twice rallied from 10-point
deficits.
The Cougars were a play
away from winning twice,
but Lynch found Malone for
the tying score on 4th-and-4
from the BYU 5 late in regulation, then Elliott connected on his long field goal to
end the first overtime.
The teams combined for
four touchdowns in the
first eight minutes and
Memphis led 24-14 early in the second quarter,
WILFREDO LEE | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEE MEMPHIS, 5B
MEMPHIS LINEBACKER JACKSON DILLON (34) sacks Brigham Young quarterback Christian Stewart (7)
during the first half of the in the inaugural Miami Beach Bowl football game Monday in Miami.
‘Turning a corner’
Baulkman has big night; UT beats Mercer
BY DARGAN SOUTHARD
[email protected]
KNOXVILLE — Josh
Richardson remembers
the early days. And they
weren’t pretty.
“At the beginning of the
year,” Richardson said,
“he couldn’t hardly dribble without bobbling the
ball.”
A little more than a
month later, it’s safe to
say that Tennessee guard
Devon Baulkman has
mastered the dribbling
part.
Now it’s time to score.
And as top-scoring
options Richardson and
Kevin Punter limped their
way to just 17 total points
in Monday’s nonconference showdown with
Mercer — they averaged
27.5 combined coming in
— Baulkman’s offensive
prowess became all but
a necessity.
The junior guard
poured in a team-high
22 points — a singlegame best for any Volunteer player this season — helping send UT
into the holiday reprieve
with a 64-54 win over
the Bears at ThompsonBoling Arena.
“I just came into the
game positive and
focused,” Baulkman said.
“Just on a mission.”
One the Vols (6-4) are
more than happy to see.
After producing just 14
total points in his first
six games this season,
the victory over Mercer
(6-6) marked his third
straight contest where
he’s churned out a double-digit scoring performance.
A solid portion of those
increased scoring figures have arrived via the
3-pointer as Monday’s
performance boosted
Baulkman’s December
shooting numbers to 60
percent (9-for-15) from
beyond the arc.
“He was a scorer in
junior college — that’s
what he did,” UT head
coach Donnie Tyndall
said. “He had a lot of big
games in a really good
junior college league.
“I read (Baulkman’s)
Vols break for holiday
with Iowa in mind
BY PAUL FORTENBERRY
VolQuest.com Staff Writer
KNOXVILLE — With a
Tennessee team that’s in
uncharted waters as the
Vols head to a bowl game
for the first time since the
2010 season, each week
brings new challenges and
new obstacles.
This week’s obstacle
won’t be on the field,
though. It comes in the
form of a four-day break
lasting from Monday afternoon until Saturday morning, the time when the
young Tennessee team will
spend its time with their
families and loved ones
during Christmas.
But for a team that’s never been through this experience before, a month of
extra bowl practices split by
the Christmas holiday, Tennessee coach Butch Jones
said they have reminded
the squad to enjoy the
break, but remember the
business trip on the other
side.
“You constantly try and
educate them and they
have been in uncharted
waters, not just the entire
bowl preparation, but the
entire season,” Jones said.
“But, again, you have to rely
MORE ON VOLQUEST
™Kdahadd`^c\ for even
more pass rush
™Ild"B^cjiZ9g^aa/ UT
ready for brief break
™Fj^X`=^ih/ Vols’ workout in Neyland
on your maturity and also
the ability to play on center
stage on Jan. 2 in the TaxSlayer Bowl. They’ve had
a great week — about 10
days of preparation for this
great bowl game — now it’s
what you do with it when
you go home.
“But, it’s also very deserving, them going home and
getting to be with their
family and their relatives
over the holidays.”
Jones has tried to remind
his team that what they do
on the break affects the outcome when they return.
“Coach said with everything we do think about
how we would play in the
bowl game,” freshman
defensive end Derek Barnett said. “So when we eat,
eat right. He said to go
SEE VOLS, 3B
Ice Bears trade Tolles
to Huntsville for Good
[email protected]
TOM SHERLIN | THE DAILY TIMES
TENNESSEE’S DEVON BAULKMAN GLIDES to the basket for a layup against Mercer Monday night
in Tennessee’s 64-54 win.
NCAA MEN
TENNESSEE 64, Mercer 54
UT GAME STORY. 3B
quote from a couple of
days ago that he’d been
praying. I told him, ‘I’ve
been praying for (you)
too.’ Looks like the
prayers were answered
tonight.”
While Baulkman’s previous mentions of anticipation and nervousness
may have been a red flag
at other programs, Tyndall believed his 6-foot5, 200-pound junior col-
lege transfer just needed
a little time.
In fact, he’s basically
right on schedule.
“I always say with junior
college guys, it takes
about a semester,” Tyndall said. “Usually these
guys start turning a corner about January. Kevin Punter’s probably an
exception because he’s
such a professional in
everything he does.
“But D.B.’s turning a corner, and that’s obviously
going to help our team.”
There wasn’t a more
evident stretch of that
than in the second half,
‘I just came
into the game
positive and
focused. Just on
a mission.’
Devon Baulkman
UT basketball player
where Baulkman quickly
halted Mercer’s oncoming rally — essentially by
himself.
SEE BAULKMAN, 3B
KNOXVILLE — Ice Bears
head coach Mike Craigen
announced Monday the
team had traded defenseman Joe Tolles to Huntsville in exchange for forward Mitchell Good.
Mitchell Good (6-foot-1,
200 pounds) spent parts
of three seasons with the
Pensacola Ice Flyers, which
included two SPHL Championships.
The Wellesley, Ontario
native played four years at
Wilfrid Laurier University
in Canada prior to turning professional in 2013.
Recently, Good was traded
from Pensacola to Huntsville on Dec. 17.
“We had an opportunity
to add a player who will
help our style of play at the
Civic Coliseum and felt like
ICE BEARS TRADE
™>XZ7ZVgh get Huntsville
forward Mitchell Good.
™=VkdXget Ice Bears
defenseman Joe Tolles
it was a necessary move
to make,” Craigen said in
a press release. “Mitchell
Good is a powerful forward
who should fit in very well
with our group. As usually
is the case with trades, you
have to give up a valuable
asset to get one in return
and Joe Tolles was the player required to get the deal
done.
“Joe is as likable and genuine an athlete as I’ve
ever worked with and I
hope he finds some success with a great organization down the road in
Huntsville.”
FOLLOW US: @TDT_Sports
for scores, links, delays, thoughts
WRITE US: [email protected]
YOUR SPORTS. YOUR TIMES
2B
THE DAILY TIMES
ON THE AIR
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Boca Raton (Fla.) Bowl
6 p.m. . ..........Marshall vs. N. Illinois .................................................. ESPN
Poinsettia Bowl
9:30 p.m. ......Navy vs. San Diego St.................................................. ESPN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m. ......Diamond Head Classic at Honolulu .......................ESPNU
4:30 p.m. . ....Diamond Head Classic at Honolulu ...................... ESPNU
7 p.m. ............Stanford at N. Texas ................................................. ESPN2
7 p.m. ............CS Northridge at Louisville...................................... ESPNU
7 p.m. ............NJIT at Villanova .............................................................. FS1
9 p.m. . ..........Diamond Head Classic at Honolulu ...................... ESPN2
9 p.m. . ..........South Point Holiday Hoops Classic at Las Vegas...... FS1
11:30 p.m. . ....Diamond Head Classic at Honolulu ...................... ESPNU
11:30 p.m. . ....South Point HOliday Hoops Classic at Las Vegas ..... Fs1
6 p.m. . ..........Marshall vs. N. Illinois .................................................. ESPN
NHL
8 p.m. . ..........St. Louis at Colorado ................................................ NBCSN
25 YEARS AGO FROM TIMES HISTORY
From the Dec. 21, 1989, edition of The Daily Times: Frank
Sadler, who ran Tennessee-Chattanooga’s offense from 197781 was hired as the school’s new offensive coordinator by
football coach Buddy Nix.
ODDS
GLANTZ-CULVER LINE
NCAA FOOTBALL
Tonight
Boca Raton (Fla.) Bowl
FAVORITE ....... OPEN .. TODAY .O/U ..UNDERDOG
Marshall ............... 11 ...... 10 ..... (67) ............ N.Ill.
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego St. .... Pk ....... 3...... (54) ........... Navy
Tomorrow
Bahamas Bowl
At Nassau
W. Ky .................. 11⁄2 ....... 3...... (671⁄2) ....... Cent.
Mich
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Rice.......................+2 21⁄2(591⁄2)Fres. St.
Friday
Heart of Dallas Bowl
Louisiana Tech ....4 ....... 6...... (58).........Illinois
Quick Lane Bowl
At Detroit
North Carolina ....3 ....... 3...... (661⁄2) .Rutgers
St. Petersburg (Fla.) Bowl
UCF .........................3 ....... 2...... (491⁄2) ..... NCSt.
Saturday
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Cincy ................. 31⁄2 .....21⁄2.... (51)....... Va.Tech
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Arizona St............ 9 ..... 71⁄2.... (65 1⁄2)...... Duke
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Miami .................. Pk .....31⁄2.... (61) ...............S.C.
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Boston Co. ....... 21⁄2 .....21⁄2.... (40)......PennSt.
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Southern Cal........4 ....... 7 ...... (611⁄2)Nebraska
Monday
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
W.Va .................. 31⁄2 .....31⁄2.... (67) TexasA&M
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Oklahoma ......... Pk .....31⁄2.... (53) .... Clemson
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Arkansas...............5 ....... 6...... (451⁄2) ......Texas
Dec. 30
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
LSU .....................71⁄2 ..... 71⁄2.... (521⁄2).........Not.
Dame
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Georgia..................7 ....... 7 ...... (56 1⁄2)Louisville
Foster Farms Bowl
At Santa Clara, Calif.
Stanford ............. 13 ...... 14 ..... (48)...Maryland
Dec. 31
Peach Bowl
At Atlanta
TCU.........................3 .....31⁄2.... (56 1⁄2) ......Miss.
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Ariz. ................... 41⁄2 ....... 3...... (681⁄2) BoiseSt.
Orange Bowl
At Miami Gardens, Fla.
Miss. St. .............71⁄2 ....... 7 ...... (611⁄2)..Ga. Tech
Jan. 1
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Auburn ............. 51⁄2 .....61⁄2 ... (63) ..Wisconsin
Cotton Bowl Classic
At Arlington, Texas
Baylor .....................1 ....... 3...... (71 1⁄2)..Mich.St.
Citrus Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Mo. ........................ 6 ....... 5...... (47 1⁄2) Minn.
Rose Bowl
Playoff Semifinal
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon ................. 8 ....... 9...... (72) .........Fla.St.
Sugar Bowl
Playoff Semifinal
At New Orleans
Alabama .......... 91⁄2 .....91⁄2 ... (58 1⁄2) .OhioSt.
Jan. 2
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Pittsburgh ............2 ....... 3...... (531⁄2).Houston
TaxSlayer Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Tennessee ............3 .....31⁄2.... (51 1⁄2)........Iowa
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
UCLA ..................... + .....21⁄2.... 1(59 1⁄2) Kan. St.
Cactus Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Wash. ....................5 .....51⁄2.... (56 1⁄2)Okla. St.
Jan. 3
Birmingham (Ala.) Bowl
Florida ...................7 .....61⁄2 ... (56 1⁄2) ..E.Caro.
Jan. 4
GoDaddy Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Toledo ....................1 .....31⁄2.... (67) ........ Ark.St.
———
NFL
Sunday
FAVORITE ....... OPEN .. TODAY .O/U ..UNDERDOG
at Green Bay ....71⁄2 ..... 71⁄2.... (47 1⁄2) .. Detroit
at Houston ...... 91⁄2 ...... 10 ..... (40 1⁄2) .........Jax
at Pittsburgh . OFF .... OFF ... (OFF)Cincinnati
Indy ........................7 ....... 7 ...... (46 1⁄2) at Tenn.
at Baltimore ....... 9 ....... 9...... (42 1⁄2) ................
Cleveland
at New England101⁄2 101⁄2... (47 1⁄2) . Buffalo
at Miami ............... 6 .....41⁄2 ... (42) ...... N.Y.Jets
at Atlanta ........ 31⁄2 .....31⁄2.... (47 1⁄2) Carolina
at Minnesota .......7 ....... 7 ...... (45) ......Chicago
at Kansas City .....3 .....21⁄2.... (43) ..San Diego
at N.Y. Giants ... 11⁄2 .....21⁄2.... (52) .......... Philly
Dallas ....................5 .....61⁄2 ... (49 1⁄2)at Wash.
New Orleans ... 31⁄2 .....31⁄2.... (47) .....at T. Bay
at Seattle .......131⁄2 ...... 13 ..... (41) ......St. Louis
at San Francisco .4 .....41⁄2 ... (37) ...... Arizona
at Denver ........ OFF .... OFF ... (OFF) ..Oakland
Off Key
Cincinnati played Dec. 22
Denver needs win Dec. 22 to clinch first
round bye
———
NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE .................. LINE ................ UNDERDOG
at BYU ........................... 9 ......................... UMass
at Arizona St................10 ....................... Detroit
at Hofstra ......................2 .......................La Salle
at Santa Clara ........... 41⁄2 .................... Cal Poly
at Louisville ................ 26 ..........CS Northridge
at Wright St. .............. 61⁄2 ........ George Mason
at Texas ...................... 91⁄2 ...................Stanford
at NC State....................5 ......... Louisiana Tech
at Dayton ................... 61⁄2 ...........Georgia Tech
Arizona ........................ 91⁄2 .................... at UNLV
at Richmond ..............171⁄2 ........................ IUPUI
at Cleveland St. ..........13.....................E. Illinois
at Siena ......................... 8 ........................ Cornell
at Niagara ................... Pk .............Arkansas St.
at Memphis ..................16 ...................W. Illinois
Wyoming ......................12......... at Montana St.
at Utah ..........................17............. S. Dakota St.
———
NBA
FAVORITE ..............LINE.... O/U ..........UNDERDOG
at Orlando ............ 21⁄2 ... (200)............ Boston
at Washington ........ 4 ... (196 1⁄2) ......Chicago
at Indiana ...............Pk ... (196 1⁄2) .............New
Orleans
at Cleveland .......141⁄2 ... (207) ......Minnesota
at Brooklyn .............. 3 ... (201) ..............Denver
at Miami ....................11 ... (192 1⁄2)Philadelphia
L.A. Clippers.............. 1 ... (206 1⁄2) at Atlanta
at Oklahoma City ... 5 ... (202) .........Portland
at Milwaukee .......41⁄2 ... (200 1⁄2) ..Charlotte
Dallas ........................ 3 ... (212 1⁄2) . at Phoenix
Golden State ..... 101⁄2 ... (209 1⁄2)... at Lakers
———
NHL
FAVORITE ..............LINE.... UNDERDOG .........LINE
at N.Y. Rangers ...-150 ... Washington .... +130
at Detroit ........... -300 ... Buffalo ............ +240
at Tampa Bay .... -140 ... Pittsburgh ....... +120
St. Louis ...............-150 ... at .....Colorado + 130
at Edmonton .......-115 ... Arizona .............. -105
at Chicago ..........-230 ... Winnipeg .........+190
BASEBALL
TRANSACTIONS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Assigned RHP
Casey Coleman and OF Moises Sierra outright to Omaha (PCL).
MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with
RHP Phil Hughes on a five-year contract.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms
with 1B Chris McGuiness and RHPs Sean
O’Sullivan and Kevin Slowey on minor
league contracts.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms
with RHP Sergio Romo on a two-year contract.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Signed
INF Frank Salerno.
LAREDO LEMURS — Released LHP Estevan
Uriegas and C Danny Taveras.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Signed INF Curt
Smith.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Signed RHPs
John Straka, Geoff Broussard and Gerardo
Sanchez.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed LHP Brendan Lafferty.
FRONTIER LEAGUE
FLORENCE FREEDOM — Signed 3B Steve
Carrillo to a contract extension.
ROCKFORD AVIATORS — Signed INF Kenny
Bryant and RHP Matt Frahm to contract
extensions.
BASKETBALL
USA TODAY TOP 25 POLL
The top 25 teams in the USA Today
men’s college basketball poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Dec. 21, points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one
point for a 25th-place vote and previous
ranking:
Record
1. Kentucky (30)
2. Duke (1)
3. Arizona (1)
4. Louisville
5. Virginia
6. Wisconsin
7. Villanova
8. Gonzaga
9. Texas
10. Kansas
11. Wichita State
12. Iowa State
13. Washington
14. Utah
15. Maryland
16. Notre Dame
17. West Virginia
18. Ohio State
19. St. John’s
20. Oklahoma
21. North Carolina
22. Baylor
23. San Diego State
24. Northern Iowa
25. Colorado State
12-0
10-0
12-0
10-0
11-0
10-1
11-0
11-1
10-1
9-1
8-1
9-1
10-0
8-2
11-1
11-1
10-1
9-2
9-1
7-3
8-3
9-1
8-3
10-1
11-0
Pts
798
761
743
673
668
639
617
568
547
536
451
413
389
361
322
281
268
206
205
192
159
106
97
86
70
Pvs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
16
14
18
21
20
12
23
15
24
—
17
—
—
Others receiving votes: Georgetown 40,
California 35, TCU 29, VCU 27, Minnesota
18, Miami 17, Michigan State 13, Arkansas
11, Seton Hall 9, Old Dominion 8, Indiana
7, Oklahoma State 7, Florida 6, LSU 5,
Butler 4, Illinois 4, Penn State 3, Saint
Mary’s 1.
AP Sports Writer
CINCINNATI — Dre
Kirkpatrick returned Peyton Manning’s third interception for a touchdown
in the closing minutes on
Monday night, completing
a fourth-quarter rally that
gave the Cincinnati Bengals a 37-28 victory and a
spot in the playoffs.
Kirkpatrick’s 30-yard
Minnesota fans won’t
forgive Love for leaving
AP Basketball Writer
The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press’ women’s college basketball poll,
with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Dec. 21, total points based
on 25 points for a first-place vote through
one point for a 25th-place vote and last
week’s ranking:
Record
1. South Carolina (24) 12-0
2. UConn (6)
8-1
3. Texas (4)
10-0
4. Notre Dame
11-1
5. Texas A&M
11-1
6. Baylor
10-1
7. Louisville
11-1
8. Tennessee
9-2
9. North Carolina
11-1
10. Duke
8-3
10. Oregon St.
10-0
12. Kentucky
10-2
12. Nebraska
10-1
14. Georgia
11-0
15. Maryland
9-2
16. Stanford
6-4
17. Rutgers
9-2
18. Oklahoma St.
9-1
19. Mississippi St.
14-0
20. Michigan St.
8-3
21. West Virginia
9-1
22. Syracuse
8-3
23. Iowa
9-2
24. Green Bay
9-2
25. Arizona St.
10-1
Pts
840
809
792
735
709
652
599
576
559
517
517
467
467
418
405
320
284
253
248
234
174
109
99
84
36
Prv
1
2
3
5
4
9
10
11
6
13
16
8
12
15
14
7
17
19
21
18
22
19
23
—
—
Others receiving votes: DePaul 31, Princeton
31, California 18, W. Kentucky 13, Chattanooga 11, Washington 9, James Madison 7,
Washington St. 7, Florida St. 5, Arkansas 4,
Northwestern 4, St. John’s 4, Seton Hall 2,
Indiana St. 1.
at Boston.............-150 ... Nashville .......... +130
at New Jersey .....-155 ... Carolina .............+135
at Dallas ..............-155 ... Toronto .............+135
at Minnesota ..... -180 ... Philadelphia ...+160
at N.Y. Islanders -140 ... Montreal .......... +120
return with 2:41 left capped
a game of big plays — long
runs, big kick returns and
two interceptions run
back for scores. Kirkpatrick picked off Manning
again with 67 seconds left
to clinch it.
The Bengals (10-4-1)
clinched a playoff berth
for the fourth consecutive
season, a franchise record.
They’ll play in Pittsburgh
next Sunday night, with
MARK DUNCAN | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS’ KEVIN LOVE (0) rebounds against Memphis Grizzlies’ Jon Leuer (30) on
Sunday in Cleveland.
BY JON KRAWCZYNSKI
THE WOMEN’S TOP 25
Bengals beat Broncos
37-28 to reach playoffs
BY JOE KAY
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23 , 2014
the winner taking the AFC
North title.
Manning rallied the Broncos (11-4) to three touchdowns and a lead in the
third quarter, but ended
up with a season-high four
interceptions. The loss
gave home-field advantage
to New England throughout the playoffs. The AFC
West champions failed in
their attempt to clinch a
first-round bye.
MINNEAPOLIS — When the Minnesota Timberwolves walk into Quicken
Loans Arena on tonight to face the Cleveland Cavaliers, they will be staring their
former franchise player right in the face
for the first time since he was traded
last summer.
Kevin Love has moved on after six
frustrating seasons in Minnesota, and
Timberwolves president and coach Flip
Saunders said he harbors no grudges
against him for asking to be traded. But
Saunders can’t say the same for Timberwolves fans.
“Minnesota people are pretty loyal.
You turn on Minnesota, they don’t forgive you,” Saunders said after practice
on Monday. “So I think people probably
appreciated him while he was here. But
you leave under the terms that he did, just
the way Minnesota people are, they’re not
pretty forgiving along those lines.”
Love made three All-Star teams in six
seasons with the Wolves, including being
voted a starter last year. He worked tirelessly to change his body and improve
his game and became a pillar in the community by reaching out to fans and organizing a coat drive every winter.
But things started to sour in 2012 when
previous president of basketball operations David Kahn declined to offer him a
full, maximum five-year contract extension. An infuriated Love signed a four-year
deal with an opt-out after three seasons
and never forgave Kahn or Timberwolves
owner Glen Taylor for the slight.
Saunders replaced Kahn in 2013 and spent
all last season trying to convince Love to
stay. But the damage was already done.
“He was pretty much set in stone the
minute he got his four-year contract,”
Saunders said. “At least that’s what he
says.”
Love wanted to play for a winner after
six straight seasons of missing the playoffs.
When LeBron James decided to return
home to Cleveland, the Cavaliers engaged
in a deal that sent the No. 1 overall picks
from the two previous drafts — Andrew
Wiggins and Anthony Bennett — to Minnesota team Love with James and Kyrie
Irving in a formidable new trio of stars.
The Wolves also received Thaddeus
Young from Philadelphia in the threeteam deal and were determined to use a
mixture of veterans and dynamic youngsters to try to at least equal the 40 victories they had last year in Love’s final
season. But the team’s three best players — Ricky Rubio, Nikola Pekovic and
Kevin Martin — have played in 23 combined games due to injuries. So the young
Wolves (5-21) have sunk to the bottom
of the Western Conference.
Wiggins has shown flashes of jaw-dropping ability on both ends of the court
and is the front-runner for rookie of the
year now that Milwaukee’s Jabari Parker
is out with a knee injury. But he has also
frustrated Saunders at times with inconsistent effort in games, and the coach is
trying to coax higher energy out of the
prized piece of the Love haul.
“Our young guys have probably hit the
wall a little bit with the way our schedule’s been and how much they’ve had to
play and the responsibility they’ve had
to play with,” Saunders said. “They’re
probably as mentally drained as they
are physically.”
The Cavaliers have been mostly healthy,
but are having their own issues. At 16-10
and fifth in the lackluster Eastern Conference, they have not jelled as quickly as
anticipated under first-year head coach
David Blatt. Love’s averages of 16.8 points,
10.5 rebounds and 12.5 shots per game are
his lowest since his second year in the
league as he gets used to life as a supporting actor in James’ movie.
BRIEFS
Alcoa grad named volleyball coach
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke announced that Ellen McGill, an
eight-year college coaching veteran and a 2002 graduate of Alcoa High School,
has been named the school’s ninth volleyball head coach.
McGill heads to Pembroke from Trinidad, Colo., where she coached a successful program at Trinidad State Junior College. She also served a two-year stint as
an assistant coach at Western Carolina.
CORRECTION
Green Meadow Country Club was misidentified in Monday’s All-County golf
story on 1B. We apologize for the error.
SPORTS | 3B
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Baulkman, defense spark UT over Mercer 64-54
Tennessee overcomes early deficit to win
going away in NCAA tournament rematch
BY STEVE MEGARGEE
AP Sports Writer
KNOXVILLE — Devon
Baulkman scored a careerhigh 22 points off the bench
Monday as Tennessee held
Mercer without a basket
for an 11-minute stretch in
the Volunteers’ 64-54 victory.
After trailing 13-8 with
9:49 left until halftime,
Tennessee (6-4) ended the
first half on a 19-2 run and
scored the first basket of
the second half to grab a
14-point advantage.
Mercer (6-6) cut the
margin to four later in the
second half, but Baulkman
scored seven points in a
10-1 run that sealed the victory. Baulkman, a juniorcollege transfer, hadn’t
scored more than 10 points
in a game all season before
Monday.
Ike Nwamu scored a
career-high 30 points and
shot 6 of 11 from 3-point
range for Mercer.
This early-season matchup pitted two teams who
faced each other in the last
two postseasons. Tennessee beat Mercer 83-63 in
last year’s NCAA tournament after losing to the
Bears 75-67 in the 2013
NIT.
Both teams have changed
quite a bit since their last
meeting. Tennessee guard
Josh Richardson was the
only player on the floor
Monday who started in
last season’s NCAA tournament matchup. The
Vols also have changed
coaches since then, with
Donnie Tyndall arriving
from Southern Mississippi
after California hired away
Cuonzo Martin.
After relying on second-half surges for much
of the season, Tennessee
grabbed a halftime lead for
just the second time in 10
games because of Mercer’s
inability to give Nwamu
any help.
Nwamu made 4 of 8 shots
for 11 points in the first half.
His teammates were 0 of 14
for two points.
The game turned on one
sequence late in the half.
Tennessee led 19-15 with
1:19 left in the first half when
Willie Carmichael scored
inside and drew a foul. A
technical foul was called
on Mercer’s bench immediately after the play, and
Richardson made the two
ensuing free throws. When
Armani Moore converted
a putback off Carmichael’s
missed free throw, Tennessee had scored six points
off one possession.
Mercer trailed 29-15
before Darious Moten sank
a jumper with 18:45 left, a
play that marked the Bears’
first basket by someone
other than Nwamu.
Mercer clawed back from
there and had reduced
the deficit to 43-39 when
Richardson was fouled
with 7:44 remaining.
Richardson made the first
free throw, and when he
missed the second shot,
Carmichael’s offensive
rebound led to a Baulkman 3-pointer.
Baulkman later converted a layup off a steal and
provided a putback to get
the Vols back up by double
digits.
TIP INS
M e rc e r : T h e B e a r s
entered the night having made at least seven
3-pointers in four straight
games.
Tennessee: The Vols started their seventh different
lineup in 10 games. Freshman guard Detrick Mostella made his first career
start alongside Richardson,
Kevin Punter, Moore and
Carmichael.
UP NEXT
Mercer plays at Georgia
on Saturday.
TOM SHERLIN | THE DAILY TIMES
Tennessee will host Ten- TENNESSEE’S JOSH RICHARDSON ATTEMPTS to drive to the basket defended by Mercer’s Phillip Leonnessee State on Saturday. ard Monday night at Thompson-Boling Arena.
BAULKMAN: Tennessee player gets past torn ligament VOLS: Sutton says leaders
to make sure Tennessee
ready to get back to work
FROM 1B
FROM 1B
WORK PAYS OFF
“He can score with anybody. It’s good to see his
hard work start paying
off.”
But before that could
begin, Baulkman — like
many collegiate athletes —
was forced to sidestep an
early injury, which initially
kept him in street clothes
during practice and glued
to the UT bench during
games.
After transferring north
from Florida’s Gulf Coast
State College, Baulkman
reinjured his left shoulder while lifting weights
— a problem he originally encountered during his
TOM SHERLIN | THE DAILY TIMES
final year at GCSC.
The injury, which Baulk- TENNESSEE’S DEVON BAULKMAN GOES up for a shot Monday night against Mercer.
man classified as a torn
0, Reese 1-4 0-2 2, Baulkman 7-9 4-4 22.
TENNESSEE 64, MERCER 54
l i g a m e n t t h a t w o n ’ t der problem — and the
Totals 23-43 12-18 64.
be repaired until sea- constant treatment that MERCER (6-6): Leonard 0-4 2-4 2, Nwamu Halftime: Tennessee 27-15. 3-Point Goals:
son’s end, caused him to tags along — “wasn’t a 9-18 6-11 30, Hallice 1-5 5-6 7, Moten 3-9 1-1 7, Mercer 7-20 (Nwamu 6-11, Bryan 1-6, Moten
Bryan 1-6 3-4 6, Panaggio 0-0 0-0 0, Moore
0-1, Strawberry 0-1, Leonard 0-1), Tennessee
miss UT’s 2014 opener big deal.”
0-0 0-0 0, Lewis 0-0 0-0 0, Strawberry
6-15 (Baulkman 4-6, Punter 2-4, Hubbs III
“I just went out there and 1-3 0-0 2, Jelks 0-1 0-0 0, Rivers 0-0 0-0 0-1, Mostella 0-2, Richardson 0-2). Fouled
against Virginia Comhad the same mindset,” 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, Ney 0-0 0-0 0. Totals Out: Punter. Rebounds: Mercer 30 (Hallice
monwealth.
17-26 54.
7), Tennessee 29 (Reese 7). Assists: Mercer
But as the Bainbridge, Baulkman said. “Prayed 15-46
TENNESSEE (6-4): Punter 2-5 0-0 6, Rich(Leonard 5), Tennessee 12 (Richardson
Ga., native nonchalant- to God, sat in the training ardson 4-9 3-4 11, Moore 3-4 0-1 6, Mostella 10
6). Total Fouls: Mercer 14, Tennessee 23.
ly put it after Monday’s room trying to get it bet- 0-2 0-0 0, Carmichael III 3-4 2-3 8, Hubbs III Technicals: Mercer Bench, Richardson.
3-6 3-4 9, Chiles 0-0 0-0 0, Owens 0-0 0-0
ATT.: 13,093.
career night, the shoul- ter.”
Navy, San Diego State set to run in Poinsettia Bowl
BY BERNIE WILSON
AP Sports Writer
SAN DIEGO — Navy
is back in a Navy town,
ready to take on San Diego
State in what’s essentially
another home game for the
Aztecs.
And Rocky Long will be
in his element during Tuesday night’s Poinsettia Bowl
at Qualcomm Stadium.
As a quarterback at New
Mexico, Long ran a tripleoption offense. As San
Diego State’s defensiveminded coach, he’ll use
his 3-3-5 alignment to try
to stop junior quarterback
Keenan Reynolds and the
rest of the Midshipmen.
“If you’re a football purist
this will be the best football
game you have ever seen,”
Long said Monday.
“It’s the best offense
ever designed,” Long
added. “Veer, wishbone
— there are about six different options they have
off that.
I have no idea how to
stop it. You can stop it on
the grease board. Now it’s
about execution.
‘’We do know how to line
up. But what it comes down
to is if we can handle it as
a team.”
Navy leads the nation
with 345.1 yards rushing
per game and San Diego
State’s defense allows 145.6
yards rushing.
The Midshipmen will
have their hands full, too.
San Diego State sophomore
Donnel Pumphrey has 1,755
yards, needing 88 to break
SDSU’s single-season rushing record of 1,842 set by
George Jones in 1995. Pumphrey ranks fourth in the
nation with 146.25 yards
rushing per game.
home and have some good
time with our families, but
also think about football
while we are there.”
Throughout the season
Tennessee’s young team
showed maturity beyond
its years and it seems to be
showing that at this time
of year as well.
Sophomore cornerback
Cameron Sutton noted
that the team leaders
plan to take responsibility of making sure the
team returns from the
break ready to get back
to work.
“The leaders are constantly talking to guys at
their position, even guys
outside their position, just
making sure guys are doing
the right things — taking
care of their bodies, eating
right, getting the rest and
recovery they need leading up to the bowl game,”
Sutton explained.
“We monitor each other
and we monitor ourselves.
This is a bond and a family
and a brotherhood and we
take care of each other.”
If that isn’t enough, Jones
added that the coaching
staff will be reminded
throughout the early part
of the week.
“They’ll get constant
reminders,” Jones said.
“They’ve done a great job
and it leads me to believe
they’ll be mature when
they go home as well. But,
they’ll have some constant
reminders.”
GUN SHOW
DEC. 26-28
FRI. 1-6, SAT. 9-5,
SUN. 9-4
‘We monitor
each other and
we monitor
ourselves. This
is a bond and
a family and a
brotherhood and
we take care of
each other.’
Cameron Sutton
Vols cornerback
There’s no doubt Tennessee is excited about
playing in its first bowl
in years, but they’re also
excited to see their families for a few days to clear
their minds before getting a chance to finish
the season with a winning record.
“Last time I went home
was our first bye week,”
Barnett said. “I can’t
wait to get home and get
some good food from my
mom.”
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Following a missed free
throw from Richardson, Willie Carmichael
snatched away the offensive rebound and located
a wide-open Baulkman,
who knocked down one
of his four 3-pointers on
the evening.
The play sparked a personal 7-0 run, where Baulkman single-handedly morphed UT’s teetering 5-point
lead back into a comfortable 11-point advantage
with 5:33 remaining.
“Devon’s a guy I’ve
always known could score
in bunches,” Richardson
said, “so it doesn’t surprise
me at all.”
THE DAILY TIMES
ALL-COUNTY VOLLEYBALL
4B
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2014
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SPORTS | 5B
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Marshall, N. Illinois to play
in first Boca Raton Bowl
BY STEVEN WINE
‘It’s a huge
blessing, and
not only for me.
We have 30-plus
guys on our team
from Florida.’
AP Sports Writer
WILFREDO LEE | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEMPHIS WIDE RECEIVER KEIWONE MALONE (RIGHT) celebrates a touchdown pass with quarterback
Paxton Lynch during the first half of the in the inaugural Miami Beach Bowl against Brigham
Young Monday in Miami.
MEMPHIS: BYU comes back but loses in OT
FROM 1B
before BYU rallied with
two scores in the final 4:55
to take a 28-24 lead at intermission.
Memphis opened the
second half with a 13-play,
71-yard march capped
by Lynch’s third rushing score of the day to
reclaim the lead, and the
Tigers extended the edge
to 38-28 after Alan Cross
caught a 17-yard pass from
Lynch with 3:45 left in the
third.
But back came BYU again,
with a field goal from Trevor Samson and — after the
Cougars stripped the ensuing return away from Memphis’ Joe Craig for a fumble
— Lasike’s second touch-
down tied it at 38-all with
10:52 left.
Stout’s interception
return for a score came
three minutes later, stepping in front of a pass from
Lynch at the Memphis 18
and going untouched into
the end zone.
The Tigers, though, had
the final answer in the
game.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL FBS BOWL GLANCE
Saturday, Dec. 20
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 16,
Nevada 3
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Utah State 21, UTEP 6
Las Vegas Bowl
Utah 45, Colorado State 10
Famous Idaho Potato
Bowl
At Boise
Air Force 38, Western
Michigan 24
Camelia Bowl
At Montgomery, Ala.
Bowling Green 33, South
Alabama 28
Monday, Dec. 22
Miami Beach Bowl
Memphis 55, BYU 48, 2OT
Tuesday, Dec. 23
Boca Raton (Fla.) Bowl
Marshall (12-1) vs. Northern Illinois (11-2), 6 p.m.
(ESPN) Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Navy (7-5) vs. San Diego
State (7-5), 9:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Wednesday, Dec. 24
Bahamas Bowl
At Nassau
Western Kentucky (7-5) vs.
Central Michigan (7-5),
Noon (ESPN)
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Rice (7-5) vs. Fresno State
(6-7), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 26
Heart of Dallas Bowl
Illinois (6-6) vs. Louisiana
Tech (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Quick Lane Bowl
At Detroit
Rutgers (7-5) vs. North
Carolina (6-6), 4:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
St. Petersburg (Fla.) Bowl
UCF (9-3) vs. N.C. State
(7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Virginia Tech (6-6) vs.
Cincinnati (9-3), 1 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Duke (9-3) vs. Arizona State
(9-3), 2 p.m. (CBS)
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Miami (6-6) vs. South Carolina (6-6), 4 p.m. (ESPN2)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Boston College (7-5) vs.
Penn State (6-6), 4:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (9-3) vs. Southern
Cal (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Dec. 29
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis
West Virginia (7-5) vs. Texas
A&M (7-5), 2 p.m. (ESPN)
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Clemson (9-3) vs. Oklahoma (8-4), 5:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Texas (6-6) vs. Arkansas (6-6), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 30
Music City Bowl
At Nashville
Notre Dame (7-5) vs. LSU
(8-4), 3 p.m. (ESPN)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Louisville (9-3) vs. Georgia
(9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Fosters Farm Bowl
At Santa Clara, Calif.
Stanford (7-5) vs. Maryland (7-5), 10 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Dec. 31
Peach Bowl
At Atlanta
Mississippi (9-3) vs. TCU
(11-1), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Boise State (11-2) vs. Arizona (10-3), 4 p.m. (ESPN)
Orange Bowl
At Miami Gardens, Fla.
Mississippi State (10-2) vs.
Georgia Tech (10-3), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 1
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Wisconsin (10-3) vs. Auburn
(8-4), Noon (ESPN2)
Cotton Bowl Classic
At Arlington, Texas
Michigan State (10-2) vs.
Baylor (11-1), 12:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Citrus Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Minnesota (8-4) vs. Missouri (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Playoff semifinal: Oregon
(12-1) vs. Florida State (130), 5 p.m. (ESPN)
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Playoff semifinal: Alabama
(12-1) vs. Ohio State (12-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday,
Jan. 2
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Houston (7-5), Noon (ESPN)
TaxSlayer Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Iowa (7-5) vs. Tennessee
(6-6), 3:20 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
UCLA (9-3) vs. Kansas State
(9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Cactus Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Oklahoma State (6-6) vs.
Washington (8-5), 10:15
p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 3
Birmingham (Ala.) Bowl
Florida (6-5) vs. East Carolina (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN2)
GoDaddy Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Toledo (8-4) vs. Arkansas
State (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 10
Medal of Honor Bowl
At Charleston, S.C.
American vs. National, 2:30
p.m.
Monday, Jan. 12
College Football
Championship
At Arlington, Texas
Sugar Bowl winner vs. Rose
Bowl winner, 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 17
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m.
(NFLN)
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
At Carson, Calif.
National vs. American, 4 p.m.
(ESPN2)
Saturday, Jan. 24
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m.
(NFLN)
BOCA RATON, Fla. —
Marshall quarterback
Rakeem Cato took a
knee when he learned the
Thundering Herd were
bound for the inaugural
Boca Raton Bowl.
And then he said a prayer
of thanks.
“It’s a huge blessing, and
not only for me,” Cato said
on the eve of tonight’s
game against Northern
Illinois. “We have 30-plus
guys on our team from
Florida.”
Ten Northern Illinois
players hail from the Sunshine State. For the Floridians, the game means a
chance to finish the season in front of lots of family and friends.
Cato, for example, said
the crowd will include
more than 20 of his relatives and dozens of friends
from his native Miami.
“It’ll be a lot — sisters,
brothers, coaches, pastors,
my daughter, my grandfather, my cousins,” he said.
“Everybody.”
Cato threw for 3,622
yards and 37 touchdowns
to lead Marshall (12-1) to
its first Conference USA
title. Northern Illinois (112) won the Mid-American
Conference for the third
time in four years, and
reached the 11-win mark
for the fifth season in a
row.
Here are things to know
regarding the matchup of
league champions:
› HOMECOMING: C a t o
will play his final college game less than an
hour up Interstate 95
from his hometown. He
has thrown at least one
touchdown pass in each
of his past 45 games, a
Football Bowl Subdivision record.
“He can run it, he can
throw it, he can run the
offense and he makes the
players around him bet-
Rakeem Cato
Marshall quarterback
ter,” Northern Illinois
coach Rod Carey said.
“Those are pretty much
all the qualities you look
for in a great quarterback.
I don’t know that you can
stop him. I think you can
try to do some things to
slow him down and confuse him, but then again
he’s a senior and has seen
it all.”
Cato broke numerous
school records set by Marshall predecessors Chad
Pennington and Byron
Leftwich.
“Now he has won a championship, and he can be
talked about in the same
breath as the other two,”
coach Doc Holliday said.
“I’m glad he’s our quarterback.”
›RECRUITING TOOL: Both
programs want to keep
their Florida pipeline
going, and the bowl game
will help with recruiting,
despite restrictions on
contact with prospects
at this time of year, Carey said.
“People can come see the
game, but you can’t talk to
them,” the Huskies coach
said. “It has been weird.
But it’s good. I think we
have a great name down
here, and it’s important
just to keep our name out
there.”
The Huskies played
in the Orange Bowl two
years, losing to Florida
State.
› FINISH LINE: For the first
time, Northern Illinois
senior tackle Tyler Loos
will take the field in the
year’s final game.
Loos’ first three seasons
were curtailed by serious
leg injuries. Last year, after
he broke his left leg and
dislocated his ankle, he
wasn’t sure whether he
would play again.
“I’ve had a rough time,”
Loos said. “I thought
about calling it quits,
but I decided to come
back, and I’m really glad
I did. I got to play in my
first MAC championship,
and now my first bowl
game.”
Carey said he’s proud of
Loos and happy for him.
“I can’t talk about it a
whole lot. I get a little
too emotional,” the coach
said. “But he’s a big reason
we’re playing as well as
we are.”
› IN THE TRENCHES: Loos
and rest of Northern Illinois’ offensive line has 166
career starts, while Marshall’s defensive line has
totaled 154 games. Both
groups are talented.
“That’s where the game
is going to be won,” Carey said.
Marshall totaled 35 sacks
to rank 28th in the country.
Northern Illinois allowed
only 13.
› SCHNELLENBERGER’S
VISION: The game will be
played in Florida Atlantic’s
stadium, which delights
Howard Schnellenberger. He was hired in 1998
to start the FAU program
and oversaw the fundraising campaign to build the
stadium.
“What I was talking
about at the very beginning, about football in
paradise with a stadium on campus, all those
things have come together so wonderfully,” Schnellenberger said. “And
to have a bowl game of
this quality, people can
say, ‘Oh my gosh, coach
knew what he was talking about.”’
Daily Bridge Club
Seeing isn’t believing
By FRANK STEWART
Tribune Content Agency
Cy the Cynic says that for every
kid who believes in Santa Claus,
there is an adult who believes in pro
wrestling.
One reason for Cy’s cynicism is
that he constantly falls victim to
deceptive plays. As West, Cy led a
club against four hearts, and South
had a problem to wrestle with. He
saw what might happen if he took the
jack and led a trump. Cy would win
and, knowing the club position, lead
another club. East might ruff, lead a
diamond to Cy’s ace and ruff another
club. Down one at least.
ANSWER: No direct heart raise is
descriptive. A raise to three hearts
would (or might, depending on your
system) invite game but would
suggest better support. Your best
action is a “negative double” (similar
to North’s in today’s deal) to show
values and a spade suit. You can
support the hearts later.
West dealer
N-S vulnerable
NORTH
A J 9 4
K 8 7
K 5
9 5 4 3
SECOND CLUB
So South won the first club with
the KING and led a trump. Cy saw no
cause to lead a second club when
East clearly had the jack left. Cy tried
underleading his ace of diamonds,
but South put up dummy’s king, drew
trumps and lost a spade finesse. He
later threw his jack of clubs on a high
spade in dummy — as the Cynic
turned purple. Making four.
“Can’t believe everything you see,
much less hear,” Cy growled.
South’s ruse might not have
worked but had nothing to lose.
DAILY QUESTION
You hold: A J 9 4 K 8 7
K 5 9 5 4 3. Your partner opens
one heart, and the next player bids
two diamonds. What do you say?
WEST
10 8 2
A
A 7 6 2
Q 8 7 6 2
EAST
K 7 6 3
6 4 2
Q 10 9 8 3
10
SOUTH
Q 5
Q J 10 9 5 3
J 4
A K J
West
Pass
2 (!)
Pass
All Pass
North
Pass
Dbl
3
East
Pass
Pass
Pass
South
1
2
4
Opening lead — 6
(C) 2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
6B | CLASSIFIEDS
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Public Notices
Public Notices
NOTICE OF BIDS
Blount Co., TN is accepting sealed
proposals for Employee Health &
Benefit Consultant. RFP No. 20142322 will be received until 2:00 p.m.
January 20, 2015 and will be opened
publicly. For a copy of the proposal
call 865-273-5740, or go to
www.blounttn.org/purchasing/select.asp and register online. This invitation is made December 19, 2014, in
accordance with TCA 5-14-101 et.
seq. Blount Co. Govt. does not discriminate based on race, color or national origin in federal or state sponsored programs, pursuant to Title VI
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42
U.S.C. 2000d).
_________________________
Teresa Johnson, CPPB
December 23, 2014
Public Notices
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01200
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01209
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Samuel E. Kirk, I, late of
Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on December 4, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of Samuel
E. Kirk, I, deceased, who died on
November 1, 2014 were issued to the
undersigned by the Probate Clerk of
Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This 4th day of December, 2014
Samuel E. Kirk, II
Personal Representative
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
December 16, 23, 2014
Monterey Mushrooms is seeking Class A
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IN THE JUVENILE COURT OF BLOUNT COUNTY, TENNESSEE
STATE OF TENNESSEE
DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN'S SERVICES,
Petitioner,
v.
ANTHONY MCLEMORE, Putative Father
Respondent
No. 28721
IN THE MATTER OF:
COLTON RAY TEASTER, d.o.b. 6/8/2014
CHILDREN UNDER EIGHTEEN (18) YEARS OF AGE
ORDER FOR PUBLICATION
It appearing to the Court from the allegations of the Petition in this cause and
the affidavit of the Petitioner that the whereabouts of the Respondent are unknown and that ordinary process of law cannot be served upon ANTHONY
McLEMORE, it is, therefore, ordered that Respondent be served by publication
of the following notice for four (4) consecutive weeks in the The Daily Times
and The Jackson Sun, a newspaper published in the Tennessee county of
Blount.
ANTHONY McLEMORE
The State of Tennessee, Department of Children's Services, has filed a Petition
for Temporary Legal Custody and Ex Parte Order against you regarding the
child COLTON RAY TEASTER, d.o.b. 6/8/2014, removing the child into state
custody. It appears that ordinary process of law cannot be served upon you because your whereabouts are unknown. You are, therefore, ordered to respond
by filing an Answer to the Petition filed against you. A copy of the Petition may
be obtained at the office of the Juvenile Clerk, Juvenile Court of Blount County,
Tennessee, at 391 Court Street, Maryville, TN 37804. This notice will be published for four consecutive weeks. The last date of publication will be January
6, 2015. Your Answer must be filed within five (5) days after that. If no Answer
is filed, a Default Judgment will be taken against you on January 20, 2015 at
9:00 a.m. and a hearing will be set without further notice to you.
ENTER this the 11 day of December, 2014
D. LASHMITT
JUDGE/MAGISTRATE
PREPARED FOR ENTRY:
Amy R. Ishee, Esq., BPR #025699
Assistant General Counsel
Department of Children's Services
305 Home Ave.,
Maryville, TN 37801
865-981-5906
December 16, 23, 30, 2014 and January 6, 2015
Public Notices
Public Notices
Public Notices
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01214
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01204
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01201
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of JANET ANN BUSKEY, late
of Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on December 3, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of JANET
ANN BUSKEY, deceased, who died
on October 28, 2014 were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
Estate of ERSA KIRKLAND, late of
Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on December 1, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of ERSA
KIRKLAND, deceased, who died on
August 31, 2014 were issued to the
undersigned by the Probate Clerk of
Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
Estate of Atlas Hyder Patterson,
late of Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on
November 20, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of Atlas Hyder Patterson, deceased, who
died on June 10, 2014 were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This 3rd day of December, 2014
st
This 1 day of December, 2014
This 20th day of November, 2014
Michael C. Gregory
Personal Representative
Jarvis Lynn Kirkland
Personal Representative
Wilma Sue Patterson
Personal Representative
Matthew Haralson
Attorney for the Estate
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
December 16, 23, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01206
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Verna Ruth Freeman, late
of Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on December 5, 2014, Letters Administration in respect to the Estate of Verna
Ruth Freeman, deceased, who died
on March 21, 2014, were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This the 5th of December, 2014
Verna Sue Mathey
Personal Representative
Trey Jackson
Attorney for the Estate
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
December 16, 23, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01196
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Rebecca Sue Libbey, late
of Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on
November 14, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of
Rebecca Sue Libbey, deceased, who
died on August 29, 2014 were issued
to the undersigned by the Probate
Clerk of Blount County, Tennessee.
All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk
of the above named court on or before the earlier of the dates prescribed
in (1) or (2), otherwise their claim will
be forever barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
December 16, 23, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01203
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of BARBARA GILLESPIE
JARRETT, late of Blount County,
Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on December 1, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of BARBARA GILLESPIE JARRETT, deceased, who died on October 30,
2014 were issued to the undersigned
by the Probate Clerk of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident
and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate
are required to file the same with the
clerk of the above named court on or
before the earlier of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2), otherwise their
claim will be forever barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
December 16, 23, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01211
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Harvey P. Schell, late of
Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on
November 26, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of
Harvey P. Schell, deceased, who died
on October 17, 2014 were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This 26th day of November, 2014
This 1st day of December, 2014
Matthew C. Haralson
Personal Representative
Michael L. Whitlock
Personal Representative
Matthew Haralson
Attorney for the Estate
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
December 16, 23, 2014
December 16, 23, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P-01207
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Betty Abell Gregory, late
of Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on December 2, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of Betty
Abell Gregory, deceased, who died
on October 30, 2014 were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This 2nd day of December, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DOCKET NO. P01210
(As required by section 30-2-306 of
the Tennessee Code Annotated)
Estate of Helen E. Southwood, late
of Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on
November 25, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of
Helen E. Southwood, deceased, who
died on June 25, 2014 were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
th
This 25 day of November, 2014
Estate of Mildred Yearout, late of
Blount County, Tennessee.
Notice is hereby given that on
November 20, 2014, Letters Testamentary in respect to the Estate of
Mildred Yearout, deceased, who died
on November 1, 2014 were issued to
the undersigned by the Probate Clerk
of Blount County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the estate are required to file
the same with the clerk of the above
named court on or before the earlier
of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2),
otherwise their claim will be forever
barred:
(1)(A) Four (4) months from the date
of the first publication (or posting as
the case may be) of this notice if the
creditor received an actual copy of
this notice to creditors at least sixty
(60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of the first
publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty
(60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice
to creditors if the creditor received the
copy of the notice less than sixty (60)
days prior to the date that is four (4)
months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)
(A); or (2) Twelve months from the
decedent's date of death.
This 20th day of November, 2014
Janet L. Stinnett
Personal Representative
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
December 16, 23, 2014
Lost and Found
FOUND BACK PACK Pink & clear,
found on Montvale Rd. Call 865-9831465 to identify.
FOUND DOG Male English Bulldog
mix. Found on December 10th. Wearing collar. Call 865-388-0188.
LOST GOLD & diamond tennis
bracelet in Alcoa area. Reward offered. Call 865-984-8225.
MISSING PET?
Be sure to check with the
local animal shelter.
Maryville Animal Shelter
865-681-2241
Blount County Animal Shelter
865-980-6244
Garage / Yard Sales
COME DO LAST MINUTE
CHRISTMAS SHOPPING at The
Bear Necessities (a new store) at
the intersection of 411 & Calderwood Hwy. (Hwy. 129). We have
loads of gifts & stocking stuffers
under $10. Fishing lure, tactical
knives & survival gear for the guys.
A full line of RADA Cutlery for the
gals & Paracord bracelets to fit all
sizes. Hours: 8am-8pm, Tues. &
Wed. Call 865-254-7107 for more
information.
Adult Care
FOR 10 YEARS, our trained,
bonded and insured CAREGivers
have provided home care services
for local seniors. Call us.
Home Instead 865-273-2178.
House Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE –
Honest and dependable. Reasonable
rates. Call 865-243-1241.
General Help Wanted
COPY EDITOR/PAGE DESIGNER
The (Maryville, TN) Daily Times, an
award-winning seven-day morning
newspaper just outside of Knoxville,
is in search of a copy editor/page
designer to become part of our
Newsroom production team. The
preferred candidate will have keen
news judgment, excellent grammatical and writing skills, as well as excellent knowledge of software and
processes related to newspaper design, including but not limited to
Adobe InDesign, InCopy and Photoshop, as well as basic knowledge of
Web-related technologies. The preferred candidate will have a bachelor's degree in communications or
an equivalent degree. He or she will
be deadline conscious, objective
and able to accept constructive criticism. Send non-returnable PDFs of
a cover letter, resume and samples
of your work to [email protected] The Daily Times is an
equal-opportunity employer.
HUFFMAN BUS school bus driver
needed for Blount County Schools.
Call 865-233-6609
NOW HIRING Cashier, day & night
shift. Exp. a plus. Apply at Rite Stop,
102 Calderwood Hwy., 865-977-0124
ROOFERS NEEDED, pay DOE. Must
have own transportation & valid DL.
Call 865-577-7701.
Medical / Dental
JOIN OUR AWESOME TEAM
Michael C. Gregory, David R. Gregory
and Wallace G. Gregory
Personal Representative
John E. Southwood
Personal Representative
1 year Assisted Living/Memory Care
experience preferred.
Robert L. Libbey
Personal Representative
William Gribble, II
Attorney for the Estate
P. Andrew Sneed
Attorney for the Estate
*PRN LPN positions all shifts.
*FT, PT & PRN CARE ATTENDANT
positions all shifts.
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
By Stephen S. Ogle
Blount County Probate Clerk
Maryville, TN 37804
Bring all pertinent documentations
such as IDs, certificates & licenses to:
Williamsburg Villas, 3020 Heatherton
Way, Knoxville, TN 37920.
This 14th day of November, 2014
December 16, 23, 2014
December 16, 23, 2014
December 16, 23, 2014
Must pass drug & background
screens.
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Houses For Rent
Apartment / Duplexes
RE/MAX FIRST
612 Crawford St.
Maryville, TN 37804
(865) 981-1004
www.maryvillerentalproperties.com
2363 SKYVIEW DR (HOUSE)
3Bd, 2Ba $1250/mo., $1250 dep.
546 LONGHOLLOW RD (MH)
2Bd, 1Ba $500/mo., $500 dep.
3030 ELLEJOY RD (MH)
3Bd, 2Ba $675/mo., $675 dep.
528 FRANCE LANE (HOUSE)
3Bd, 1Ba $875/mo., $875 dep.
Mobile Manufactured
Home Rentals
WHY RENT when you can own? Small
down payment, no banks. Newly remodeled. 3BR/1.5BA in Rockford. 865548-2021
WHY RENT when you can own?
Small down payment, no banks.
2BR/1BA in Walland. 865-548-2021
Mobile/Manufactured
Home Sales
I BUY OLDER
MOBILE HOMES
Any size, age considered.
Call 865-207-8825
$34.99 DAILY; $150 WEEKLY; $549
(4) weeks., 1 person. Budget Inn,
865-251-2525 or 865-300-2855.
$345 - $450 GREAT VALUE,
RIVERSIDE MANOR, Alcoa Hwy.
865-970-2267 1, 2 & 3 BR's
riversidemanorapts.com
1 & 2 BR, C/H/A, W/D conn., referencess & lease, no pets. Starting at
$275/mo. + deposit. 982-6446
1-2 BR APTS.
$325-$395, No Dogs.
865-977-4300
1BEDROOM in city. W/D included. 1
year lease & references req'd. No pets.
$450/mo. + dep. Russ 865-705-3903
2BR, 1BA, very clean, 1 level, lg.
rooms, patio, all appl., W/D conn., No
pets/smoking, $600. 977-7831
FOREST HILL APARTMENTS
2 BR $525 & 3 BR $600, $300 dep.
No pets. Call 865-740-1745
Houses For Sale
FOR SALE 3.2 acres, house & duplex. 4719 Old Knoxville Hwy.
$300,000 865-717-2434
Mobile/ManufacturedHome Lots
LOT FOR RENT Maximum size,
14x60. Garbage pick up included.
No outside pets. $150/mo. 982-5222
MOBILE HOME LOTS $200
www.edgeotownmhc.com
Or 865-719-1467
Mobile Manufactured
Home Rentals
Antiques
Tune In To
TRADIN' TREASURES
on AM 1470
Saturdays
9am to 10am
To Hear YOUR Ad!
Appliances
ELECTROLUX CANISTER Vacuum
Cleaner with attachments. Works
good, $50. Call 865-789-9398.
M&D APPLIANCE Paying $20-$30.
Kenmore, Whirlpool, Roper Washers, Dryers, Ranges, Fridges.
Steve 253-6172 or Ernie 659-9198.
7FT ANTIQUE channel back sofa &
matching chair, $750. 2 occasional
chairs, $200 each. All 4 pieces
match. All for $1000. Phone pictures
available. 865-789-5339
TERRY'S FURNITURE & AUCTION
A Family Tradition since 1958
We are a consignment auction,
accepting new consignments daily!
We buy antiques, used furniture,
glassware & estates.
(865) 681-7228 or (865) 973-4577
TFL# 2485
SOLID MAPLE BUFFET Lighted, 4
glass doors, 4 drawers, 2 small cupboards. Beautiful Christmas present,
$450. Solid cherry full size crib, $150.
Maple wash stand/file cabinet, $125.
Sofa, cranberry print, $225. Sears
Elite dishwasher, 8 years old, $250.
865-977-0566
PAYING CASH
CABLE'S RECYCLING
Good Things
To Eat
Mon-Fri. 9a-5:00p & Sat, 9a-3p
*Cans .60/lb., *Batteries $10/$13
*Computer Towers $2 ea.,*Alum. .45/lb.
*Scrap Metal $7/$8. Now Buying Gift
Cards, Cell Phones & Catalytic Conv.
HOMEMADE DRIED Apple Stack
Cakes, Coconut, Fresh Strawberry,
Italian Cream, German Chocolate.
865-448-6417.
WE BUY Used Furniture, Antiques,
Estates. Hall's Furniture & Auction
865-983-1598 or 865-983-2465
Miscellaneous
12PC. PLACE SETTING of China,
serving dish, creamer & sugar, teapot,
$500. Call 865-380-6591.
Domestic Pets
AUTO HEADLINERS
Replaced at your location.
865-681-1852
LOOKING FOR A LAST
MINUTE CHRISTMAS GIFT?
SPACIOUS LAKESIDE LIVING! 2BR
Garden Style Apts., off Alcoa Hwy.
New Saltwater pool, Basketball &
Tennis courts, dock for fishing. Call
for more details. 865-982-9678.
Houses For Rent
3BR/2 BA Double Wide $5000
down (Why rent when you can
own). Owner Finance with monthly
payments.
2BR, 1BA HOUSE, Howe St., Alcoa.
$600 mo., $600 dep. No pets. Call
865-207-5778.
2BR, 2BA, LR & den, FP, 2 car gar.,
w/unfinished bonus room above.
$950/mo. + dep. Call 865-254-4918.
3BR/2BA “Great Community
near Walmart” $3,000 down &
own it in 5 yrs.
3BD NICE HOME, John Sevier
Schools, 1 level w/jacuzzi tub &
garage. $1250/mo., $1000 deposit. No
pets and no smoking. 865-216-0357
**YOU CAN Rent It or YOU CAN Buy
It!** “WE FINANCE” Regardless of
Credit! Many Available 865-696-2571
3BR, 2BA near Heritage. Full basement. No pets, no smoking. $900 mo.
+ dep. & credit check. 865-679-8947
2 or 3 BR, $400-$550 mo.
Rent to own, Friendsville.
No pets. Call 865-995-2825.
5 ROOM HOUSE plus garage. 143
Park Dr. $750/mo. 865-255-7491.
2BD, 2BA, private lot in Chilhowee
View area. $550/mo., $550 damage
deposit. 865-982-0522
MOBILE HOME PARK located off
Hwy 411 S. 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes.
$400-$500 month. Call 865-856-0639.
“Hope Lives Here” t-shirts in
smoky gray with orange text &
graphics. Currently available in
Small, Medium & 3XL. Only $10.
All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Call 865981-1170 or stop by The Daily
Times at 307 E Harper Ave.
MEN'S COAT John Weitz heavy,
lined, double breasted, brushed
camel, knee length, size 44 reg. New,
never worn. $40 Call 865-984-0848.
MEN'S HAT Billy Jack style in doe
brown suede w/patterned headband &
feather, size XL. New, never worn,
$35. Call 865-984-0848.
Electronics
10+ OLD PAGERS $100 865-6806945
2 OPEN FACE Cellphone, $16. Must
sell. Call 865-336-6399.
9” TV WITH VCR, Broksonic. $15
OBO. Working condition. Ideal for
dorm or camper. 865-336-6399,
please don't hang up. Must sell.
Firewood
HARDWOOD $60 a rick, delivered &
stacked. Call 865-635-6609.
FOR SALE high speed, Dot Matrix
Printers by GENICOM for information
processing, distribution networks.
business computing systems, mail
processing, bar codes, labels, and
forms.
Model 4840e: Out of working order;
good for parts $65
Model 5000 Series 500 LPM printer.
Out of working order; good for parts
$75. Greeneville, Tennessee, 423359-3151 or 423-359-3172.
KERO-SUN portable Kerosene heater,
23,000 BTU's, $55. Call 865-995-2476.
PILATES EXCERCISER Like new,
$300. 2 sofas with 2 matching wing
back chairs, $800 for all. 982-0208
PRESSURE WASHER 5 hp Briggs &
Stratton engine, needs work. $50
865-680-6945
STAMP COLLECTION, 3 or 4 sets,
$100. Call 865-985-1369.
TALKING SCALES, $20. Call 865336-6399.
Sporting Goods
MARLIN MODEL 57, 22 mag, rare;
Browning 30.6; Marlin 3030; Barnett
Crossbow. Everything is real nice.
Call 865-661-2501 or 865-856-7425.
S & W 30.06 RIFLE with scope, model 1500, hand checked wood stock,
collectible, $650. Call 865-386-3868.
TRIFLEX Exercise Vibration Machine.
Like new. Sells for $1800, asking
$1000. 865-983-2168
$2000
You Know Better
JUNK CARS
Call for best
CASH offer.
Free Pick up!
865-216-5052
JEEP LIBERTY rear cargo cover, fits
2002-2007, $50. Call 865-995-2476.
We buy scrap cars.
2 ELECTRIC HEATERS, $40 for
both. Call 865-985-1369.
ASSORTED flatware, glassware &
dishes. $50 for all. 865-680-6945
$3000
JUNKERS &
CLUNKERS!
18” PORCELAIN DOLL Gorham Petticoats & Lace Collection. Beautiful
doll with dark brown hair, eyes & pink
ruffled/ribboned dress/hat. Stand incl.,
excellent cond. $50 865-984-0848
2 REMOTE CONTROLLED CAR &
Toy Robot for kids, almost new, $50
obo. Call 865-951-8748.
Automotive Parts /
Accessories
865-556-8812 or 865-556-8845
CKC REG. Mini Dachshunds, vacc.,
dewormed, M & F, short & med. haired.
Blk., red & dapple,$150-$300. 232-8243
FOUND – BLONDE, female Chihuahua in Westmoreland Subd. Call
865-740-5645.
GIVE AWAY to a good home 10 mo.
old male Pit Bull. Neutered & up to
date on all shots. Call 865-567-2057.
HIGHEST price
paid in East TN!
WE ALSO BUY
YOUR OLD
CLUNKER!
865-856-4590
SET OF CHEVY Alloy Wheels, 16 in.
$50 OBO 865-789-9398
Farm Equipment /
Supplies
COKE DISHES, 15 place settings
with platter & serving bowls. $75 for
all. Call 865-789-9398.
MONTVALE APT. 2BR, 1BA, stove,
refrigerator, DW, no W/D conn. No
pets. $535 mo., $250 dep. 982-5222
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Why rent when you can own?
No money down & under $850
1-800-899-4057 ID#1052
Want To Buy
BEAUTIFUL SWAP MEET merchandise: displays, shelves, tables, sport
memorabilia, home decor. All or part,
call for appt. 865-983-6716.
LAKEMONT 2BR, $500/mo, $250 deposit. No pets, no W/D hookup. Call
865-518-1200.
2BD, 1BA Maryville. Stove, refrigerator, W/D connection. $625/mo., $600
deposit. 984-8923
Furniture
Clothing
Grayson Apartments in Alcoa.
2 BR, $575 mo., 3 BR, $675 mo.
Housing accepted. 865-982-3427
2200 SF LOG HOME, 3BR, 2.5BA,
unbelievable privacy. $1600 mo. +
dep. Call 865-254-4918.
CLASSIFIEDS | 7B
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
TRAILER HITCH w/receiver, DrawTite Class II, $25. Call 865-995-2476.
Autos - Imports
100 PLUS cars $5,995 or less.
DougJustus.com New location:
Airport Motor Mall.
Midland Plaza
2001 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GT, silver with black interior, all available options. $3700 obo. 865-983-1665
984-6385
watersmotorsinc.com
3019 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy.
A short drive to Waters Motors
will save you money!
Tractor Parts,
Accessories &
Farm Antiques
Hay, Feed, Grain
Just Cut - HAY ROLLS, $25 ea.,
Square bales, $3/bale & Construction
Hay, $3/bale. Call 865-235-2357.
Automotive Parts /
Accessories
DON'T GET
PLAYED
GET PAID!
SUVs / Jeeps
JEEP 2007 Grand Cherokee Laredo.
Leather, loaded. 125,000 miles.
$10,500 865-386-3868
Buying Repairable
or Runable Autos.
NO JUNK OR
SCRAP
865-237-2773
Air Conditioning
Excavating
Home Improvements
Lawn Maintenance
SUTTON'S AIR COMFORT
MURPHY'S BOBCAT
KENNY'S HOME REPAIR
& REMODELING
JETT LAWN CARE
Its Fall! Service & Sales of most
name brands. Also, Mobile Home
parts and some mixed matches.
R-22 equipment.
Call us for questions.
Call 865-216-5028.
TENNAIR – 1 HEATING/AIR
Fast, reliable service. Installations.
Professional duct cleaning.
We service all brands.
865-983-1384 or 865-995-9660
Car Wash /
Detailing
AUTO CLEAN & SHINE
Complete Auto Clean-up
10% off full detail with this Ad.
™LVming ™7uffing ™Hhining
™+time Readers Choice Linner
™777 Accredited
Your complete excavating
and hauling company.
No job too big or small.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
865-389-7231
Fencing
RC CALDWELL & SON
The Fence Specialist
™6luminum Fence
™Galvanized and Vinyl Coated
Chain Link Fence
™Kinyl Picket and
Privacy Fence
865-850-1289
WWW.FENCEPROS.COM
Teds Auto Detailing
2532 E. Broadway Ave
865-982-3600, owner Ted McKee
Handy Man
Concrete Services
1. HONEY DO HANDYMAN
™Painting ™Pressure Washing ™Odd
Jobs™Light Carpentrn™Landscaping
Free Estimates, Gutter Cleaning.
Army Vet. Call Mike at 865-724-6817
BILL'S CONCRETE SERVICE
Grade, Form, Pour, Finish,
30 Years Experience
Bill Correll 865-856-8632
STORY CONCRETE
Form, grade and finish, driveways,
slabs, parking lots, etc. 25 plus
years' experience. 865-977-4373
Drywall
ALL DRYWALL REPAIRS,
patching, finish, texturing. Small
jobs OK. Rocky Top Drywall
865-335-4877 or 865-771-0812
Excavating
FARMERS EXCAVATING
*Bobcat *Backhoe *Tractor
*Bushhog *Dump Truck
*Tree/Stump Removal
No Job Too Small, Reasonable
Rates, Licensed & Insured
865-661-2565 or 865-705-5403
20 YEARS MAINTENANCE EXP.
No Job Too Small!
Free Estimates, Vietnam Vet.
865-388-0029
ONE MAN HANDYMAN
Painting, flooring, baths, kitchens &
more. Very experienced, take pride in
workmanship. Call 865-320-7267.
Home Improvements
*HELP IS A PHONE CALL AWAY
Carpentry, screening, painting,
plumbing, pressure washing
& miscellaneous repairs.
Honesty & Integrity, Lic. & Ins.
The Handi-Helper
865-681-8298
Painting, drywall, tile, flooring, all
carpentry & much more. Quality
work, reliable contractor. Lic. & Ins.
Call 865-268-9854.
Located in Friendsville, TN
SLANSKY BUILDERS
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
(865) 983-6144
*Decks *Screen/Sun Rooms
*Kitchens *Bathrooms *Flooring
*ADA compliant and Custom
Tile Showers
*Small Projects Welcomed!
No money down. FREE Estimates
Family owned and operated in
Blount Co. since 2001.
TN Contractor, licensed, & insured
to $1,000,000.
Call now to speak to a live person.
www.slanskybuilders.com
Lawn Maintenance
AFFORDABLE LAWN SERVICE Mowing, Trimming, Mulching. Leaf clean-up
& any other lawn care services needed.
Free Estimates. Call 865-455-4014
BLOUNT LAWN SERVICE, LLC
All lawn care, All landscape.
Licensed General Contractor
Irrigation Specialist
Free estimates, Lic. and Ins.
(865)805-4572 or 805-1147
www.blountlawnservice.com
FULL SERVICE LAWN CARE,
LLC. Licensed & Insured,
Free Estimates.
Trust us for all your
lawn care needs.
Call Taylor or Josh
865-776-5791 or 865-776-7328
[email protected]
™;VaaLeaf8aean-up
™Holiday Lighting
™PreshjgZWashin\
™Landscaping
865-661-6872 or 865-414-4510
Rob's Lawn &
Handyman Service
Free Estimates,
No Job Is Too Small
Call Rob or Randy
865-255-8699 or 865-304-7413
Miscellaneous
MURPHY'S
BOBCAT
Fill dirt and gravel. Year round
dry topsoil. Mushroom Compost
by scoop or dump truck load.
865-389-7231
Plumbing
SANDS PLUMBING
Dedicated to excellence
& service!
™Free:htimateh
™DraicCleaning
™HomeGepaigh
™GZh^dentialCommercial
™LicZchZYInhured
™Caaa24/7
CdJdWIddSmall/TodBig
865-209-5195
Remodeling
BUILD DECKS & REMODELING
Best carpenter in town. Hire the
best, not the rest. Terry Morton
865-661-1015 & 865-984-5059.
ROBERT BREHM REMODELING,
PAINTING AND PLUMBING.
40 years' experience. References.
Licensed and Insured. 865-556-1738.
COLONIAL PAINTING
& WATERPROOFING
PAINTING – Interior & Exterior,
Pressure Washing. 40 yrs. exp.
Terry Morton 865-661-1015
or 865-984-5059.
CLASSIFIEDS WORK!
!! BUBBA'S !!
TREE & STUMP REMOVAL
Licensed and Insured.
Proudly serving Blount
County for 20 yrs.
Specializing in all types
of tree work.
No tree too tall, No limb
too small, We do it all!
Local References.
24 hr. Emergency Service
865-977-1422
GOT STUMPS?
™Hmall $5 and up
™Bedium $25 and up
™AVg\Z$40 and up
Job minimum $50.
865-984-8815
Roofing
Painting
Interior, exterior, residential, commercial. Quality, creative, affordable, solutions for your home and
business needs. 30 years exp.
Free Estimates. US Navy Vet.
Ken Bear ™ 865-982-8840
Tree Services
As low as Zero % Financing
available on all home
improvements.
Free Estimates! Call 865-233-5888
TERRY MORTON
™Hhingles ™Betal Roofing
™Eressure Washing
Free Estimates
38 yrs. experience
References on request.
865-661-1015 or 865-984-5059
Its Pruning Season. We have 2
Certified Arborist on staff to help
you. We have Workers Comp...
do they? 865-980-1820
JIM'S TREE SERVICE
and LANDSCAPING
™Igee gZmoval
™8lean up™Ig^mm^cg
™;^gewood
;gee Esi^mates, Ins. & Ref.
865-233-4212 or 865-209-3864
In print and online.
Siding
AFFORDABLE SIDING
AND GUTTERING
Call James Stinnett
at 865-977-9092
Call 981-1160
to subscribe
8B | COMICS
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
BETWEEN FRIENDS
WUMO
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
PEANUTS
[email protected]
THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN
SHOE
THE DUPLEX
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
PICKLES
PRICKLY CITY
MALLARD FILLMORE
BEETLE BAILEY
DUSTIN
BABY BLUES
SNUFFY SMITH
HI AND LOIS
B.C.
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
WEATHER, PUZZLES | 9B
THE DAILY TIMES
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
www.thedailytimes.com
Today
Wednesday
Rain, chance of
storms
Showers, a few
storms
Thursday
Saturday
Friday
Partly cloudy
Partly cloudy
Chance
showers
-# +,1,- ',(*+ $*$--$)(!)+ ,-!)+())(-)1 '* +-.+ )&)+(,+ -)13,*+ $- #$"#,
Billings
38/26
H
H
San
Francisco
65/51
LL
Los
Angeles
73/54
Anchorage
25/13
Juneau
36/22
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--$,-$,+ -#+)."#'1 ,- +1
Washington D.C.
46/43
')%$ ,)) &+ ")
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- $ "&!
1075' 1043.0'
0.4'
# +)% 1002'
952.2'
0.1'
)."&,
1710' 1650.5'
0.4'
)(-(
808.4'
0.5'
)+-).).( 813'
0.3'
$/,, 1526' 1482.3'
794.3'
0.2'
&-)($&& 795'
1020'
996.8'
0.2'
)++$,
'
0'
(- -&# 1941'
Atlanta
54/45
Houston
64/41
LL
Miami
82/73
Honolulu
77/63
PRECIPITATION
24 hours ending 6 p.m..................... Trace
Month-to-date................................... 1.79"
Normal month-to-date................... 3.28"
Year-to-date................................... 39.22"
Normal year-to-date.................... 46.64"
Kansas City
40/28
DFW
Metroplex
53/38
HUMIDITY
*'-)1 53%
New York
52/47
Detroit
46/41
Chicago
46/36
Denver
34/19
$(",,)!*'1 ,- +1
TEMPERATURES
,- +1#$"#&)/ 60°/43°
Normal high/low......................... 48°/31°
Record high...............................73° (2013)
Record low ................................. 2° (1989)
6050 6536 45 31 5436 5236
Minn. St. Paul
35/28
offthemark
NEWSMAKERS
'++ *+ 87° at Immokalee Regional Airport, FL
''$ *+ 10° at Mt. Washington, NH
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*
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Key: 0/ -# +,.,.((1!+!$+**+-&1&).1&&).1#2#2 !"!)",#,#)/ +,++$(2+$22& -,-#.( +,-)+',,(,()/,!4.++$ ,$$ ,& -)+!+ 2$("+$(/$/$(1'0/$(- +1'$0+$((,()/
'0 '%'))'.
#+0
#'/ #'/
Jacksonville
76/58/ts
75/51/ts
Las Vegas
63/41/s 60/44/pc
Los Angeles
73/54/s 70/53/pc
Louisville, KY
58/40/sh 51/36/sh
Miami
82/73/pc 84/67/pc
Myrtle Beach
66/60/r 70/55/ts
New Orleans
69/43/ts 55/38/pc
New York City
52/47/r
56/50/r
Orlando
82/66/pc
81/61/ts
Philadelphia
50/47/r
61/48/r
Raleigh
43/43/r
68/51/ts
San Francisco
65/53/s 61/49/pc
St. Louis
50/34/cd 38/32/sn
Washington, DC 46/43/r
61/47/r
Skies will be cloudy over the state
today with rain and areas of fog. A
few thunderstorms may develop.
'0 '%'))'.
#+0
#'/ #'/
Bristol
59/48/sh 66/36/sh
Chattanooga
55/46/ts 62/36/ts
Crossville
59/43/ts 60/34/sh
Gatlinburg
63/53/sh 66/36/ts
Jackson
58/36/sh 46/32/sh
Johnson City
60/48/sh 66/36/sh
Kingsport
60/48/sh 66/36/sh
Knoxville
61/46/sh 65/36/ts
Memphis
58/36/sh 46/33/sh
Nashville
61/43/ts 55/36/sh
'0 '%'))'.
#+0
#'/ #'/
Atlanta
54/45/ts 62/52/ts
Atlantic City
51/47/r 63/46/ts
Baltimore
45/42/r
59/47/r
Birmingham
64/45/ts 59/38/sh
Boston
46/43/r 52/50/ts
Charleston, SC 65/59/ts
72/51/ts
Charlotte
43/43/r 63/38/ts
Chicago
46/36/r 40/32/sn
Cincinnati
55/41/sh 55/34/ts
Dallas
53/36/sh 50/34/pc
Denver
34/19/pc 47/29/pc
Destin
70/54/ts 68/45/ts
Houston
64/41/ts 55/38/pc
HOROSCOPE
Trivia Fun by Wilson Casey
The Stars Show the Kind of Day
You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive;
3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult
* ,&*
............ 3
12 - 15"
........... 9
19 - 45"
.......... 11
25 - 30"
...........11
14 - 42"
GOOD
#&'$$,+&+ PM2.5
'0 good
7:42
a.m. 5:27 p.m.
8:50 a.m. 7:37 p.m.
Dec. 28
First
Jan. 4
Full
Jan. 13 Jan. 20
Last
New
Surveys say what is the best gift, if pushed for time, that you can give someone? Family newsletter,
Money, Sincere hug, Treat out for dinner
Surveys say what is the greatest Christmas movie of all time? It’s A Wonderful Life, Fitzwilly, Miracle
on 34th Street, Christmas Vacation
Surveys say what is the worst gift you can give someone? Lawn ornaments, Fruitcake, gift
certificate, Cheese gift bag
More teasers? Comments? [email protected] — See answers below Sudoku
404 Greenbelt Dr., Maryville, TN 37804
www.waterfrontmaryville.com
LUNCH SPECIALS
Smoking Restaurant. Must be 21 to enter
Non-Smoking Section Available
MONDAY - FRIDAY
681-1212
CRYPTOQUOTE
TRIVIA ANSWERS: Money, Christmas Vacation, gift certificate
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014:
This year you will note a considerable difference in your priorities.
You no longer will sit on situations until you obtain the results
you desire. You will keep your eye
on the big picture. If some area
of your life has not been working,
you might want to consider letting it go.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
★★★★ Take charge. Today
might be the last day for a while
that you’ll have enough cooperation from others. You might note
that you have not heard from
someone at a distance.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
★★★★★ Start making calls to
those at a distance to wish them a
Merry Christmas. You might feel as
if you have less resistance from a
loved one than in the recent past.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
★★★★★ Deal with someone
directly. You could be in a situation
where you want to change some
part of your life. Your creativity
surges as you seek answers.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
★★★★ You could be changing
your focus because of the impending arrival of Christmas, and perhaps also because of a slight difference in a loved one’s attitude.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
★★★★ What has weighed you
down in the past will no longer be
a problem. On some level, you will
feel as if you have been freed up.
You also might notice a change
in how you deal with others, and
vice versa.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
★★★ You might need to slow
down some. Doing so will put you
in a lighter mood, especially if you
have a discussion about how to
proceed in the next few days.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
★★★★ You could be overwhelmed by a change of pace.
Communication seems to take
on a more intense quality than in
the past.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
★★★★ Use the daytime hours
to make calls, deliver presents and
do whatever is a high priority. As
the planets shift, you will be more
jubilant and feel freer than you
have in quite some time.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21)
★★★★ Clear out as much
as you can tonight, because by
tomorrow, you will feel as if you
have had enough. Understand
what is going on with a child or
loved one. Also, note what is happening within your circle of friends.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
★★★★ Use the daylight hours
to the max. You will accomplish
a lot more than you had thought
possible and still have time to
visit. Give up being so detailed at
this point, and get into the swing
of the moment.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
★★★★ You’ll race around with
so much to do that you could
feel overwhelmed and worn out.
Decide on a cutoff point so you
can relax and let go of having to
run around.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
★★★★ You know what you
want to do -- just know that
you’ll have a limited number of
hours to do it. Understand what is
happening within a special
relationship.
'+#'&
-&$(.+"
**&#$(
-&))# %$ #
China indicts Chan’s
son on drug charge
BEIJING — Chinese
prosecutors on Monday indicted the son of
Hong Kong action film
star Jackie Chan on the
charge of
sheltering
others to
use drugs,
more
than four
months
after
he was
Jaycee
detained.
Chan
If convicted,
singer-actor Jaycee
Chan could be jailed for
up to three years.
Chan, 32, was among
a string of celebrities
detained over the summer for vices such as
drug use and hiring
prostitutes, as Beijing
vowed to clean up social
morals.
Chan’s case has been
particularly embarrassing for his more famous
father, who was named
by Beijing as an anti-drug
ambassador in 2009.
Beijing police detained
the younger Chan at his
Beijing apartment in
August along with Taiwanese movie star Ko
Kai. Police said Chan
and Ko both tested positive for marijuana and
admitted using the drug,
and that 100 grams of it
were taken from Chan’s
home.
Brokaw reports news
good on his cancer
NEW YORK — Tom
Brokaw says his cancer
is in remission.
The veteran NBC
newsman announced
Sunday that, after
months of chemotherapy, he soon will begin a
drug maintenance program.
Sharing with colleagues what he called
“very encouraging
news,” Brokaw’s internal memo noted that a
year ago his future was
“more uncertain than I
cared to acknowledge.”
Last February, he
revealed that six months
earlier he was diagnosed
with multiple myeloma,
a cancer affecting blood
cells in the bone marrow, and was undergoing treatment.
He called the past year
“a challenge,” but added
gratefully he met it in
“world-class hospitals
with brilliant physicians.”
10B | CLASSIFIEDS
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
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01 Dodge Ram
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98 Ford Ranger XLT
Reg Cab
Auto, 4x4, Local Trade #7290
5-Speed, 2WD, Air #7378
Auto, 6 cyl, 2WD, Local
Trade, PL-PW, Air #7382
$ 4 ,9 9 5 $8,995
$ 4 ,9 9 5 $5,995
$5,995
03 Mazda B 3000
$6 ,9 9 5
01 Dodge Ram
Reg Cab
06 Ford Ranger
6 cyl, 2wd, Good Tires, 61k #7293
#C1111
$ 7 ,9 9 5 $8,995
$8,995
07 Mazda Sport
Truck
6 cyl, 2wd
03 Ford F150 Ext Cab
Camper Top, Auto, 101k,
2wd, Running Boards #7081
Auto, 87k, 2WD #7132
$ 7 ,9 9 5 $9,995
$9 ,4 9 5
$9 ,9 9 5
$11,995
05 Chevy Silverado
04 Dodge Ram
Ext Cab, 2WD, PL-PW
Auto, 2wd, 81k, Air,
PL-PW #7264
#6837
$1 2 ,4 9 5
$1 0 ,9 9 5 $13,995
$12,995
MANAGERS SPECIAL
Nismo, PL-PW, 6 cyl, CD,
115k, 4WD #7322
91k, Auto, 2WD #7255
$1 2 ,9 9 5
06 Ford F250
Superduty Ext Cab
07 Ford F250 Ext Cab
09 Chevy Silverado LT
4x4, PL-PW, 6 Speed, Power Stroke
Diesel #7309
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4
#7320
$2 1, 9 9 5
$22,995
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4, Leather,
$1 8 ,4 9 5
$19,995
$2 3 ,9 9 5
02 Ford Taurus
#7371
$3,995
$2 ,9 95
$16,995
06 Chevy Silverado
Auto, 4x4, Lariat, PL-PW
Auto, Leather, PL-PW,
101k Miles, 4x4 #7365
$1 8 ,4 9 5
$25,995
$2 3 ,9 9 5 $26,995
03 PT Cruiser
04 Cadillac Deville
07 Nissan Sentra
Air, Auto, Leather, PL-PW,
Sunroof, 81k Miles #7219
Leather, Sunroof, PL-PW, Air
Auto, PL-PW, Air
#703
#7216
$4 ,4 95
$5 ,9 95
$6,995
$6,995
Auto, V8, PL-PW, 4x4, 5.7
Hemi, Leather #7277
$1 9 ,9 9 5
$20,995
14 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab 1500
12 Dodge Ram Crew Cab
Auto, 4x4, 22k Miles
#7364
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4, 4k, Lift Kit,
Chrome Rockstar Wheels #7270
$2 9 ,9 9 5
$32,995
$5 ,9 95
$6,995
04 Volvo S560 TL
09 Chrysler PT Cruiser
Touring
Auto, Leather, PL-PW
Auto, PL-PW, Air #7083
$6 ,4 95
#C9999
$7 ,9 95
$9,995
08 Ford Focus SES
Leather, Auto, PL-PW,
2 Door #7236
Auto, 126k, PL-PW
$8 ,0 00
#7086
$10,995
$8 ,9 95
08 Buick Lacrosse
09 Toyota Camry XLE
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Leather
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 129k
#7254
#7260
$1 1, 4 95 $12,995
08 Chevy Malibu
05 Ford 500 Limited
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Local
Trade #7172
08 Honda Civic
07 Volkswagen Bug
Auto, 68k, Leather, Pl-PW, Air
Auto, 96k, PL-PW
11 Chevy HHR
Auto, Leather, Sunroof #7376
Auto, 4 cyl, PL-PW, Air, 78k
#7054
$1 1, 99 5
08 Infiniti 35-S
$1 5 ,4 95
$16,995
$1 1, 99 5
$13,995
03 Ford Expedition
2 Door, Auto, 4x4
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 2wd
#7313
#7344
06 Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air,
6 cyl #7291
05 Ford Expedition
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
4x4
#7283
$1 0 ,9 9 5 $12,995
$11,995
05 Porsche
Cayenne
Auto, Leather, PL-PW-PS,
Power Sunroof, 93k, V6
#c6767
$17,995
$1 5 ,4 9 5
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
Rear Air, Third Seat,
Captain Chairs #C9999
$17,995
06 Ford Escape
Auto, PL-PW, Air
$6,495
02 Jeep Wrangler
5 Speed, 6 cyl, 4x4
#7328
$1 1, 9 9 5 $11,995
09 Buick Enclave CXL
$1 2 ,4 95
#7211
$16,995
$1 5 ,9 95
$1 0, 99 5 $12,995
09 Nissan Altima
09 Honda Accord
Auto, 4 cyl, PL-PW, 83k
Auto, 52k Miles, 2-Door, Air
#7183
#7358
$13,995
04 Chevy Corvette
08 Audi A4 2.0T
$1 0, 4 95 $11,995
46k, PL-PW, Air, Black Leather, 6-Speed
#C1122
$2 3, 99 5
$24,995
$1 2 ,9 95
03 BMW X5 AWD
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
Power Sunroof, 3.0, Extra
clean #c9595
$9,995
$7 ,9 9 5
07 Ford Explorer
XLT
V6, Auto, PL-PW, Air,
4x4 #7200
$1 0, 4 95 $12,995
$1 1, 9 9 5
06 Ford Explorer
03 Chevy Tahoe
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air
Auto, Leather, V8, PL-PW,
#7253
4x4, Air, Third Seat #7302
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air,
New Tires, Local Trade
$8 ,9 9 5 $9,995
$9,995
$8 ,9 9 5
08 Ford Explorer
07 Chevy Tahoe
07 Ford Edge
Auto, Eddie Bauer, 3rd Row,
Auto, Leather, 3rd Seat,
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
2wd #7195
4x4, PL-PW, Air #7128
AWD #7377
#7198
#7208
$13,995
$1 2 ,9 9 5
Leather, PL-PW, Air, V8,
Running Boards #7357
Auto, PL-PW, 73k, 4x4,
V8 #7361
Auto, Third Seat, Leather,
4x4, PL-PW #7355
$24,995
$2 1, 9 9 5
05 Kia Sedona
05 Ford Freestyle
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
$1 7 ,9 9 5 $18,995
Trade #7174
Third Seat #8978
$7,995
$6 ,9 9 5 $8,995
06 Dodge Grand
Caravan
Auto, Stow & Go Seats,
PL-PW, Air, 75k #6670
$7 ,9 9 5 $8,995
$9 ,9 9 5
10 Ford Escape
99k, Auto, PL-PW, Air
Auto, 68k, PL-PW, Local
#7298
$10,995
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 94k
$1 7 ,9 9 5
$1 3 ,9 9 5
$15,995
$1 4 ,9 9 5 $15,995
$1 3 ,9 9 5 $15,995
$15,995
$1 4 ,9 9 5
07 Chevy Tahoe LT
14 Ford Escape
09 Jeep Wrangler
07 Jeep Wrangler
4 cyl, PL-PW, Leather, 17k
Auto, 67k Miles, 4x4, Air
5 speed, 78k Miles, 4x4, Air
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Third
#C4444
#7356
#7345
Seat, Leather, 4x4, CD #7259
$19,995
$1 8, 9 9 5
$20,995 $1 9 ,9 9 5 $20,995
$1 9 ,9 9 5 $22,995
$2 0 ,9 9 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
MANAGERS SPECIAL
08 Chevy Suburban
LTZ
$3 0, 99 5
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 2WD
07 Ford Explorer
Track Limited
$1 6 ,9 9 5 $18,995
55k, Leather, Sunroof
#7276
$31,995
08 Honda CR-V
07 Ford Explorer
Track Limited
#C3131
$8 ,9 9 5
$9,995
09 Mercedes CL 550
03 Chevy Tahoe
2WD, PL-PW, Air #C3555
$8 ,4 9 5
$8,995
09 Toyota
Highlander
$1 6 ,9 9 5 $17,995
135k, Leather, Sunroof,
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Local
Trade #7217
$1 3, 99 5
SLASHED PRICES
06 Ford Explorer
05 Mercury
Mariner
#7249
$14,995
25k, Auto, PL-PW, Leather #C7777
$31,995
$1 0, 99 5
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 62k
10 Chevy Camaro SS ZL427
$2 8, 99 5
#7030
10 Dodge Charger
$1 3, 5 00
$14,995
SUVs & VANS
#7343
$6 ,4 9 5
$2 ,9 9 5 $7,995
$3,995
#7214
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air
LOW, LOW RATES
95 Chevy Tahoe
10 Nissan Sentra
$13,995
#7042
$9 ,9 95 $10,995
Auto, 4 cyl, PL-PW, Air, 34k
Auto. PL-PW, Air, Leather, 88k
Auto, 4 Door, PL-PW, Leather, Power
Sunroof, Heated Seats #C8888
$16,995
$10,995
06 Chevy Monte Carlo SS
07 Chrysler 300-C
$1 4 ,9 95
#7246
$9 ,9 95
$10,995
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Navigation, 85K
#7100
$7 ,9 95
$9,995
MANAGERS SPECIAL
99 Mercedes SL 500
$12,995
$3 4 ,9 9 5
$35,995
MANAGERS SPECIAL
$9,995
$1 9 ,9 9 5
$20,995
LOW, LOW RATES
Auto, PL-PW, Air
$4,995
$2 4 ,9 9 5
$1 6 ,9 9 5
08 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab
76k, 4x4, PL-PW, Air #7295
CARS
00 Buick LeSabre
#7363
$17,995
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 109k, 4x4
#7178
Auto, 4x4, Leather, PL-PW,
8.1, Air, Crew Cab #7263
$1 6 ,9 9 5 $17,995
06 Ford F150
Crew Cab
08 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab 2500
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, 4x4
04 Chevy Silverado
2500
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4 WD,
Diesel Powerstroke 6.0 #7319
$1 8 ,9 9 5
$19,995
05 Ford F350 Dully
Crew Cab Lariat
$2 3 ,9 9 5
$25,995
$1 5 ,9 9 5
03 Ford F350 Dully
#7368
04 Ford F250 Crew
Cab FX4
4x4, Auto, 122k
$1 4 ,9 9 5
$19,995
Leather, PL-PW, Air, 4x4,
Navigation, Sunroof #7199
WE GIVE YOU MORE FOR LESS
Auto, 6 cyl, PL-PW, Air
#7028
#7366
07 Ford F150 Crew
Cab FX4
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, 4x4,
Powerstroke Diesel, Air #7370
$25,995
4x4, Auto, PL-PW, Air #7346
Sunroof, 87K #7166
06 Ford F350 Dully
Crew Cab
$2 2 ,9 9 5
$23,995
07 Ford Explorer Trac
$1 7, 99 5
$18,995
05 Ford F150 Sport
$1 4 ,9 9 5 $15,995
$15,995
Auto, Leather, V8, 4x4,
Sunroof #7315
$1 7 ,9 9 5
$18,995
$1 3 ,9 9 5
04 Toyota Tundra
Crew Cab Limited
06 Ford F150
$1 6 ,9 9 5
#7121
$14,995
Auto, 111k, PL-PW, Air, 4x4,
Crew Cab #6953
Auto, Powerstroke Diesel, 4x4,
New Tires #7305
$17,995
$1 3 ,9 9 5
$14,995
Auto 2WD, 4-Door, Local
Trade, PL-PW, Air #7381
2-Wheel Drive, PL-PW, Air
04 Dodge Ram
Crew Cab
07 Dodge Grand
Caravan
89k, Auto, Third Seat,
PL-PW #7339
$6 ,9 9 5 $9,995
09 Volkswagen
Routan
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Third
Seat #7338
$8 ,9 9 5 $11,995
All prices include $250.00 doc fee. Not included TT&L.
$1 0 ,4 9 5
08 Nissan Quest
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 92k,
Local Trade
10 Chrysler Town
& Country
Auto, 3rd Seat, PL-PW, Air
#7161
$13,995 $1 2 ,4 9 5 $14,995
Not Actual Colors Shown in pictures above.
#7294
09 Honda Odyssey EXL
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Power
Sunroof, Power Doors & Hatch, 82k,
DVD #7017
$1 3 ,9 9 5 $18,995
$1 6 ,9 9 5
45026149DT
$14,995
06 Dodge Ram Crew
Cab Diesel
10 Dodge Dakota
Crew Cab
05 Nissan Frontier
Ext Cab
11 Ford F-150 Long Bed
Reg Cab

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