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Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
December 2014
Revision 001
Document Number: 331704-001
Notice: This document contains information on products in the design phase of development. The information here is subject to change without
notice. Do not finalize a design with this information.
INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH INTEL PRODUCTS. NO LICENSE, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY ESTOPPEL OR
OTHERWISE, TO ANY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IS GRANTED BY THIS DOCUMENT. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN INTEL’S TERMS AND
CONDITIONS OF SALE FOR SUCH PRODUCTS, INTEL ASSUMES NO LIABILITY WHATSOEVER AND INTEL DISCLAIMS ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTY, RELATING TO SALE AND/OR USE OF INTEL PRODUCTS INCLUDING LIABILITY OR WARRANTIES RELATING TO FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE, MERCHANTABILITY, OR INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PATENT, COPYRIGHT OR OTHER INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.
A "Mission Critical Application" is any application in which failure of the Intel Product could result, directly or indirectly, in personal injury or death.
SHOULD YOU PURCHASE OR USE INTEL’S PRODUCTS FOR ANY SUCH MISSION CRITICAL APPLICATION, YOU SHALL INDEMNIFY AND HOLD INTEL
AND ITS SUBSIDIARIES, SUBCONTRACTORS AND AFFILIATES, AND THE DIRECTORS, OFFICERS, AND EMPLOYEES OF EACH, HARMLESS AGAINST
ALL CLAIMS COSTS, DAMAGES, AND EXPENSES AND REASONABLE ATTORNEYS' FEES ARISING OUT OF, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, ANY CLAIM OF
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INTEL OR ITS SUBCONTRACTOR WAS NEGLIGENT IN THE DESIGN, MANUFACTURE, OR WARNING OF THE INTEL PRODUCT OR ANY OF ITS PARTS.
Intel may make changes to specifications and product descriptions at any time, without notice. Designers must not rely on the absence or
characteristics of any features or instructions marked “reserved” or “undefined.” Intel reserves these for future definition and shall have no
responsibility whatsoever for conflicts or incompatibilities arising from future changes to them. The information here is subject to change without
notice. Do not finalize a design with this information.
Intel software products are copyrighted by and shall remain the property of Intel Corporation. Use, duplication, or disclosure is subject to
restrictions stated in Intel’s Software License Agreement, or in the case of software delivered to the government, in accordance with the software
license agreement as defined in FAR 52.227-7013.
The products described in this document may contain design defects or errors known as errata which may cause the product to deviate from
published specifications. Current characterized errata are available on request.
The code names presented in this document are only for use by Intel to identify products, technologies, or services in development that have not
been made commercially available to the public, i.e., announced, launched, or shipped. They are not "commercial" names for products or services
and are not intended to function as trademarks.
Contact your local Intel sales office or your distributor to obtain the latest specifications and before placing your product order.
Copies of documents which have an order number and are referenced in this document, or other Intel literature may be obtained by calling
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Intel processor numbers are not a measure of performance. Processor numbers differentiate features within each processor family, not across
different processor families. See http://www.intel.com/products/processor_number for details.
Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the US and other countries.
* Other brands and names may be claimed as the property of others.
Copyright © 2014 Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.
Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
2
December 2014
Document Number: 331704-001
Contents
1
2
3
4
5
6
Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................................... 5
1.1
BlueZ software stack ................................................................................................................................................................... 5
1.2
Software reference map ............................................................................................................................................................ 5
1.3
References ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 5
1.4
Terminology .................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
Bluetooth* Integration in Linux* .................................................................................................................................... 7
2.1
The bluetoothd daemon............................................................................................................................................................ 7
2.2
Configuration .................................................................................................................................................................................. 8
2.3
Application interface ................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Basic Bluetooth* Operation ............................................................................................................................................ 9
3.1
Enable and disable Bluetooth* on Intel® Edison ............................................................................................................ 9
3.2
Bluetooth* status control via connman ........................................................................................................................... 10
3.3
The bluetoothctl utility ............................................................................................................................................................ 11
3.4
Device Identification (DI) profile .......................................................................................................................................... 11
Scanning and Connecting Devices .............................................................................................................................. 13
4.1
Connecting from a peer device............................................................................................................................................ 15
Changing a Bluetooth* MAC address .......................................................................................................................... 16
Bluetooth Profiles on Intel® Edison ............................................................................................................................ 17
6.1
HID profile ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 18
6.2
PAN profile .................................................................................................................................................................................... 20
6.2.1
PAN test between Linux* host PC and Intel® Edison device ...................................................... 21
6.2.2
PAN test between two Intel® Edison devices .................................................................................... 25
Figures
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Intel® Edison to Broadcom BCM43340 connections ............................................................................................... 5
Help view of available commands ................................................................................................................................. 11
Show command ..................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Modalias change .................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Raw data from the event file using the “more” command ................................................................................. 19
PAN service networking models .................................................................................................................................... 20
Linux pairing successful ..................................................................................................................................................... 22
Tables
Table 1
Supported profiles ................................................................................................................................................................ 17
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Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
3
Revision History
Revision
Description
Date
001
Initial release.
December 17, 2014
§
Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
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December 2014
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Introduction
1
Introduction
The host processor on the Intel® Edison development board is connected to a Broadcom* BCM43340 combo chip
via UART (uart0 mapped to /dev/MFD0) as transport layer and uses additional GPIOs to handle power (on, reset,
etc.), OOB (out-of-band) signaling for UART to support low power mode.
Figure 1
Intel® Edison to Broadcom BCM43340 connections
1.1
BlueZ software stack
BlueZ, an open source project, is the official Linux* Bluetooth* protocol stack. The BlueZ package has a doc folder
that contains a DBUS API description text file with some other information related to supported features: settings,
storage, etc. The BlueZ stack sources divide into components in both the kernel and user spaces, which should be
compiled accordingly; the main component is the bluetoothd daemon, which exposes DBUS APIs to the application
layer for development. (DBUS APIs are interfaces exposed to develop application; they do not explain internal
working mechanisms.) We have modified the Yocto recipes to append the BlueZ5.24 version, not the default.
Note:
The Intel® Edison board currently runs with Linux* kernel 3.10 with a low-energy patch added to the kernel
to handle Random Address. . For more information on BlueZ, refer to their website at http://www.bluez.org.
1.2
Software reference map
Release-1
https://communities.intel.com/community/makers/edison/documentation
Software Downloads -> Rel-1-Maint-WW42 (is latest for Release-1)
Release-2
TBD (DEC2014)
1.3
References
Reference
Name
331188
Intel® Edison Board Support Package User Guide
331189
Intel® Edison Compute Module Hardware Guide
331190
Intel® Edison Breakout Board Hardware Guide
331191
Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino* Hardware Guide
331192
Intel® Edison Native Application Guide
329686
Intel® Galileo and Intel® Edison Release Notes
[GSG]
Intel® Edison Getting Started Guide
331438
Intel® Edison Wi-Fi Guide
331704
Intel® Edison Bluetooth* Guide
December 2014
Document Number: 331704-001
Number/location
W: https://communities.intel.com/docs/DOC-23147
M: https://communities.intel.com/docs/DOC-23148
L: https://communities.intel.com/docs/DOC-23149
(This document)
Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
5
Introduction
1.4
Terminology
Term
Definition
BNEP
Bluetooth Network Encapsulation Protocol. BNEP is an Ethernet interface created for each Bluetooth*
connection.
BT
Bluetooth
BT-LE
Bluetooth low energy
DBUSs
An interprocess communication protocol
DI
Device Identification
GPIO
General purpose input/output
HCI
Host controller interface
HID
Human interface device
MFD
Multifunction device
NAP
Network access point
OOB
Out-of-band
PAN
Personal area network
SDP
Service Discovery Profile
ssh
Secure shell
UART
Universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter
§
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Bluetooth* Integration in Linux*
2
Bluetooth* Integration in Linux*
Bluetooth* controllers are handled in Linux* via interfaces accessible by the rfkill and hci utilities (rfkill, hcidump,
hciconfig, hcitools, etc.). These utilities, which are provided in the BlueZ package, include the following:
•
rfkill: Turns the chip on/off.
•
hcitools: A series of utilities that manage controllers:
−
hcidump: Retrieves the trace of the HCI device.
−
hciconfig: Configures Bluetooth* devices.
−
hcitool: Configures Bluetooth* connections and sends commands to Bluetooth* devices.
−
hciattach: Attaches an HCI device to a dev interface, like USB or UART; usually it is used to download
patchram to the Bluetooth* controller.
In general, hciattach launches automatically whenever a Bluetooth* controller connects over USB. This occurs
when rfkill turns Bluetooth* on and the system calls hciattach with the proper patchram.
Since the Bluetooth* controller connects to the UART, hciattach does not launch automatically, even after starting
Bluetooth* with rfkill. To support the functionalities of hciattach, the Intel® Edison image has a built-in service
called Bluetooth_rfkill_event that starts at bootup and runs in the background, listening for Bluetooth* interface
rfkill events. If Bluetooth_rfkill_event identifies an event intended for BCM43340, it calls the Broadcom download
utility, which does the same job as hciattach (along with some Broadcom-specific functions). Whenever you are
enabling or testing Bluetooth* functionality, make sure Bluetooth_rfkill_event is running in the background.
2.1
The bluetoothd daemon
The bluetoothd daemon can be started even when the Bluetooth controller is not enabled; at startup, it loads,
initializes plugins, and listens to events from the kernel. As soon as the MGMT_EV_INDEX_ADDED management
indication is received for an HCI device, the daemon registers an adapter entity for the BT controller and initializes.
The plugin is a piece of software that implements features/profile. BlueZ comes with set of built-in plugins (to
support profiles like A2DP, AVRCP, networking/PAN, input/HID, GATT, and items like wiimote and hostname) that
are loaded and enabled at boot time (if not differently specified).
BlueZ also has the support to load and initialize custom plugins developed by third-parties and that are looked for
in init in the /usr/lib/bluetooth/plugins folder. Basically, a plugin lets you run some actions when the bluetoothd
daemon initializes (when the adapter is not already registered).
Typical actions performed at a plugin initialization include the following:
•
Defining directly the DBUS interfaces for application layer (like the hostname plugin).
•
Registering the adapter driver (btd_adapter_driver structure has a probe entry that is called when an adapter
is registered).
•
Register a profile (btd_profile structure has some “pointer-to-function” fields, between them an
adapter_probe entry that is called when the adapter is registered. (There are similar entries for device, where
device is the structure that handles a peer device when connected/paired etc.).
This mechanism allows plugin to be notified or do specific actions to be performed at init, when an adapter is
registered or when a device is paired/connected.
Note:
Registering a profile using the plugin mechanism doesn’t mean the profile is advertised to a peer device
since an application has to register the profile via DBUS interface so that SDP (Service Discovery Protocol)
can discover the service provided by it.
All settings are stored under a storage directory (by default /var/lib/bluetooth) that can be inspected for debugging
purposes; this folder structure is documented in the <bluez_package>/doc/settings-storage file.
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Bluetooth* Guide
7
Bluetooth* Integration in Linux*
2.2
Configuration
By default the bluetoothd daemon will load and initialize all built-in plugins, but it is also possible to directly enable
or disable a set of plugins with the –plugin and --noplugin command line options. When you disable a plugin,
the corresponding profile won’t be available, which means that no application will be able to register and advertise
this service. You can do this on an Intel® Edison device by modifying the systemd file for BlueZ
(/etc/systemd/system/bluetooth.target.wants/bluetooth.service) and adding command line arguments in ExecStart.
BlueZ also comes with conf files that let you specify some of the profile features (input.conf, network.conf, and
proximity.conf) plus a more generic conf file (main.conf) that lets you specify name, discoverable and pairable
timeouts, and other settings. These configuration files, which are located under /etc/bluetooth on an Intel® Edison
device, are loaded at the Bluetooth daemon’s boot time (when the bluetooth systemd service is started). If you
modify any of these configurations, you will need to stop and start the systemd Bluetooth service to activate the
changes.
[email protected]:~# ls
[email protected]:~# systemctl stop bluetooth
[email protected]:~# systemctl start bluetooth
2.3
Application interface
The application layer can use the Bluetooth service provided by the BlueZ stack using the DBUS API interface
registered by each profile/component. The <bluez_package>/doc folder contains a text file that describes these
DBUS API methods and properties.
The main components of this package include the following:
•
adapter: Lets you start or stop discovery; remove a paired device; or set/get info about name, alias, pairable
timeout, etc.
•
agent: Lets you register or unregister agent; set the default one or all methods related to pairing or
authorization, etc.
•
device: Lets you connect or disconnect; pair a device; connect or disconnect a profile on a device, etc.; set or
get info about trusted or blocked class of peer device.
•
profile: Lets you register a profile implementation.
The folder also contains a file called mgmt-api.txt, which describes the format of data used for communicating with
kernel using the so-called Bluetooth* management sockets. Profile-specific API documentation (like network, obex)
is also available.
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Basic Bluetooth* Operation
3
Basic Bluetooth* Operation
Before you can perform any Bluetooth operations, connect to the Intel® Edison device via ssh or minicom and call
rfkill to unblock the Broadcom* BCM43340 chip. The Bluetooth_rfkill_event service, which should be running in
background, will intercept the rfkill event, trigger a firmware patch download, configure the Broadcom* BCM43340
chip, and register the HCI device (hci0).
Note:
3.1
Whenever you are enabling or testing Bluetooth* functionality, make sure Bluetooth_rfkill_event is running
in the background. This utility downloads patches and registers HCI is brcm_patchram_plus. It operates
like hciattach but has more Broadcom-specific options.
Enable and disable Bluetooth* on Intel® Edison
To enable or disable Bluetooth, using the following commands respectively:
[email protected]:~# rfkill unblock bluetooth
[email protected]:~# rfkill block bluetooth
Once Bluetooth is enabled, rfkill will usually list the available interfaces. You can also use the rfkill list
command to show them. For instance, on the Intel® Edison board:
[email protected]:~# rfkill list
0: phy0: wlan
Soft blocked: no
Hard blocked: no
1: brcmfmac-wifi: wlan
Soft blocked: no
Hard blocked: no
2: bcm43xx Bluetooth: bluetooth
Soft blocked: no
Hard blocked: no
3: hci0: bluetooth
Soft blocked: no
Hard blocked: no
[email protected]:~#
The string “bcm43xx Bluetooth: bluetooth” is added by the power driver of the Bluetooth* controller, either
already included in the kernel or loaded as module; blocking or unblocking it via the rfkill block or rfkill
unblock command will power the chip off or on.
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Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
9
Basic Bluetooth* Operation
3.2
Bluetooth* status control via connman
Connman is a connection manager with a Bluetooth plugin (relying on the BlueZ DBUS interfaces). Connman
manages network connections over Bluetooth using PAN (with a PAN user role). Connman gets information about
connected/paired devices from BlueZ DBUS interfaces (through the PAN NAP/GN service, available on the peer
devices). You cannot use connman for all pairing and connection procedures. It does, however, let you
enable/disable technology (keeping track of the previous status) via the rfkill component.
1.
Because connman does not start automatically at boot time, start it manually.
[email protected]:~# systemctl start connman
[email protected]:~# connmanctl enable bluetooth
Enabled bluetooth
[email protected]:~# rfkill list
0: phy0: wlan
Soft blocked: yes
Hard blocked: no
1: brcmfmac-wifi: wlan
Soft blocked: yes
Hard blocked: no
2: bcm43xx Bluetooth: bluetooth
Soft blocked: no
Hard blocked: no
3: hci0: bluetooth
Soft blocked: no
Hard blocked: no
[email protected]:~#
The last item (3: hci0: bluetooth) is added when the serial device is attached to the BlueZ stack. If the kernel
already configures some _BT_ HCI_ driver entries (like CONFIG_BT_HCIBCM203X, CONFIG_BT_HCIBTSDIO), it will
already list an hcix: bluetooth interface.
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Basic Bluetooth* Operation
3.3
The bluetoothctl utility
This command line utility can be used to perform basic Bluetooth* operation, such as:
•
Register an agent,
•
Start or stop discovery,
•
Configure pairable or discoverable property of the adapter,
•
Pair and connect a device.
The utility interacts with the bluetoothd daemon via DBUS interfaces. Enter help to display the full list of available
commands (Figure 2).
Figure 2
Help view of available commands
3.4
Device Identification (DI) profile
The scope of the Device Identification (DI) profile is to provide additional information above and beyond the
Bluetooth class of device and to incorporate the information into both the Service Discovery Profile (SDP) record
and the Extended Inquiry Response (EIR).
A device can be identified by the following information:
•
VendorID Source: Indicates if the VendorID refers to Bluetooth or USB.
•
The allowed values are:
−
0x0001, which means that the VendorID is assigned by the Bluetooth SIG
(https://www.bluetooth.org/en-us/specification/assigned-numbers/company-identifiers)
−
0x0002, which means that the VendorID is assigned by the USB Group
(https://usb-ids.gowdy.us/read/UD/)
•
VendorID (16 bits)
•
DeviceId (16 bits)
•
Version (16 bits)
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Basic Bluetooth* Operation
The default BlueZ Device Information is:
•
VendorID Source = USB
•
VendorID = 0x1D6B (Linux Foundation)
•
ProductID = 0x0246 (BlueZ)
•
Version = 0x0512 (5.18)
You can retrieve this information from the local device with the bluetoothctl program’s show command (Figure 3).
Figure 3
Show command
You can modify this information by changing the /etc/bluetooth/main.conf file by uncommenting (and changing)
the line containing the DeviceID = ... line. For example, the following line will change the modalias, as shown
in Figure 4:
DeviceID = bluetooth:1234:5678:abcd
Figure 4
Modalias change
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Scanning and Connecting Devices
4
Scanning and Connecting Devices
To connect your Intel® Edison device to a Bluetooth network, do the following:
1.
Enable Bluetooth:
[email protected]:~# rfkill unblock bluetooth
2.
Enter the BlueZ command line utility bluetoothctl, which will find the Bluetooth controller:
[email protected]:~# bluetoothctl
[NEW] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:D6 BlueZ 5.24 [default]
[bluetooth]#
3.
Register an agent and set it as default. (An agent lets you handle actions such as pairing, when user
interaction is needed.) Options include KeyboardDisplay, DisplayOnly, DisplayYesNo, KeyboardOnly, and
NoInputNoOutput. These settings emulate different capabilities of the application developed by the enduser for Bluetooth using an Intel® Edison board.
[bluetooth]# agent KeyboardDisplay
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# default-agent
Default agent request successful
[bluetooth]#
4.
Perform a scan. You can stop the scan as soon as it reports the device you are looking for. [bluetooth]# scan on
Discovery started
[CHG] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:D6 Discovering: yes
[NEW] Device F3:18:29:E8:DA:61 Flex
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA NAGESWAX-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:86:72:54 TNGU25X-MOBL2
[bluetooth]# scan off
5.
Pair the device. (You will need to confirm the pairing from the peer device, so be sure to have an agent set
as described in step 3 above.)
[bluetooth]# pair 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA
Attempting to pair with 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: yes
Request confirmation
[agent] Confirm passkey 788684 (yes/no): yes
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA UUIDs:
00000002-0000-1000-8000-0002ee000002
00001000-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001104-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Paired: yes
Pairing successful
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: no
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: yes
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: no
[bluetooth]
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Scanning and Connecting Devices
6.
Trigger the connection step:
[bluetooth]# connect 10:68:3F:57:90:4F Attempting to connect to 10:68:3F:57:90:4F
[CHG] Device 10:68:3F:57:90:4F Connected: yes
Connection successful
Note:
7.
The Bluetooth connection is established at the profile level, so the involved devices have to
support profiles (and roles, if applicable) that let them connect. For HID, there is no need to
register the profile at the application layer. (The HID host is implemented at the kernel level.) So a
basic discovery + pair + connect to an HID peripheral device will lead to a connection.
You can check supported services on a peer device using the info command:
[bluetooth]# info 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA
Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA
Name: NAGESWAX-MOBL1
Alias: NAGESWAX-MOBL1
Class: 0x3e010c
Icon: computer
Paired: yes
Trusted: no
Blocked: no
Connected: no
LegacyPairing: no
UUID: Vendor specific
UUID: Service Discovery Serve..
UUID: IrMC Sync
UUID: OBEX Object Push
UUID: OBEX File Transfer
UUID: IrMC Sync Command
UUID: Headset
UUID: Audio Source
UUID: Audio Sink
UUID: A/V Remote Control Target
UUID: A/V Remote Control
UUID: Headset AG
UUID: PANU
UUID: Imaging Responder
UUID: Handsfree Audio Gateway
UUID: Phonebook Access Server
UUID: Video Sink
[bluetooth]#
8.
(00000002-0000-1000-8000-0002ee000002)
(00001000-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001104-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001105-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001106-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001107-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001108-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000110a-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000110b-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000110c-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000110e-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001112-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001115-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000111b-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000111f-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(0000112f-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
(00001304-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
When you are done, exit the utility:
[bluetooth]# exit
Agent unregistered
[DEL] Controller 98:4F:EE;01;FD;D6 BlueZ 5.24 [default]
[email protected]:~#
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Scanning and Connecting Devices
4.1
Connecting from a peer device
To connect your Intel® Edison device from a peer device, do the following:
1.
Follow steps 1 through 3 above.
2.
Set up the Intel® Edison device as “discoverable” in step 4:
[bluetooth]# discoverable on
Changing discoverable on succeeded
[CHG] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:D6 Discoverable: yes
[bluetooth]#
3.
Start the discovery from the peer device and pair the Intel® Edison device.
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Bluetooth* Guide
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Changing a Bluetooth* MAC address
5
Changing a Bluetooth* MAC address
Each Intel® Edison device has its own unique Bluetooth* MAC address, which is in /factory/bluetooth_address. The
steps below describe the process to change the Bluetooth* MAC address, by mounting /factory, editing the
/factory/bluetooth_address file, and rebooting the device.
[email protected]:~# mount –v | grep factory
/dev/mmcblk0p5 on /factory type ext4 (ro,nosuid,nodev,noatime,discard,
noauto_da_alloc)
[email protected]:~# mount –o remount,rw /dev/mmcblk0p5 /factory
[email protected]:~# vi /factory/bluetooth_address
[email protected]:~# reboot
Unmounting /home...
[ OK ] Stopped target Sound Card.
[ OK ] Removed slice system-systemd\x2dfsck.slice.
[ OK ] Stopped target Multiuser System.
Stopped the Edison status and configuration service...
Note:
We do not advise changing an Intel® Edison board’s Bluetooth* MAC address. If you do decide to change it,
however, presumably for testing purposes, first make sure to back up the unique MAC address that was
generated when the Intel® Edison board was first dispatched, and revert the MAC address back to what it
originally was (its unique MAC address) as soon as you are finished with your testing.
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Bluetooth Profiles on Intel® Edison
6
Bluetooth Profiles on Intel® Edison
Intel® Edison supports all BlueZ profiles, but we have only validated a subset of these profiles and features in the
current software (Release-1). For Release-2, we also intend to validate the items labeled “Yes” in the last column in
Table 1.
Table 1
Supported profiles
Validated in Release 1
Planned for Release 2 1
Provided by BlueZ
A2DP 1.3
Yes
AVRCP 1.5
DI 1.3
Yes
HDP 1.0
HID 1.0
Yes
PAN 1.0
Yes
SPP 1.1
–
–
Yes
GATT (LE) profiles
PXP 1.0
Yes
HTP 1.0
HoG 1.0
Yes
TIP 1.0
Yes
CSCP 1.0
Obex-based profiles (by obexd)
FTP 1.1
Yes
OPP 1.1
PBAP 1.1
MAP 1.0
Provided by the oFono project
HFP 1.6 (AG & HF)
Note:
Yes
For details on BlueZ profiles, visit the BlueZ website at: http://www.bluez.org.
The rest of this chapter explains how to use the two currently validated Bluetooth* profiles—HID and PAN—on the
Intel® Edison platform.
1
Intel’s stated intentions with regard to planned implementation of the features in this table are not to be construed as a
promise of delivery; we state our intentions here merely as a courtesy, to inform our customers.
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6.1
HID profile
The HID profile is validated in Intel® Edison Software Release-1; any HID device (mouse, keyboard, etc.) can be
connected directly without need to register any service on Intel® Edison; just follow these instructions:
[email protected]:~# rfkill unblock bluetooth
[email protected]:~# bluetoothctl
[NEW] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:E4 BlueZ 5.18 [default]
[bluetooth]# agent DisplayYesNo
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# default-agent
Default agent request successful
[bluetooth]# scan on
Discovery started
[CHG] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:E4 Discovering: yes
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Name: NAGESWAX-MOBL1
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Alias: NAGESWAX-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 5C:51:4F:9E:49:AD DSGAO-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 00:1F:20:42:27:12
[NEW] Device FC:F8:AE:1E:ED:98 XSDONGX-MOBL2
[NEW] Device 00:1B:DC:06:59:9C RJGUARIN-MOBL1
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 LegacyPairing: no
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Name: Bluetooth Laser Travel Mouse
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Alias: Bluetooth Laser Travel Mouse
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 LegacyPairing: yes
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:86:72:54 40:2C:F4:86:72:54
[NEW] Device B8:76:3F:AB:7E:D1 B8:76:3F:AB:7E:D1
[bluetooth]# pair 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Pair the devices and verify that the pairing is successful:
[bluetooth]# pair 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Attempting to pair with 00:1F:20:42:27:12
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Connected: yes
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Modalias: usb:v046DpB008d0318
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 UUIDs:
00001124-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001200-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Paired: yes
Pairing successful
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Connected: no
[bluetooth]# scan off
[CHG] Device B8:76:3F:AB:7E:D1 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:86:72:54 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:1B:DC:06:59:9C RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 5C:51:49:9E:49:AD RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA RSSI is nil
Discovery stopped
[CHG] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:E4 Discovery: no
[bluetooth]# pair 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Attempting to pair with 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Failed to pair: org.bluez.Error.AlreadyExists
[bluetooth]# connect 00:1F:20:42:27:12
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Use the connect command to connect the mouse as an input device to the Intel® Edison device:
[bluetooth]# connect 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Attempting to connect to 00:1F:20:42:27:12
[CHG] Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12 Connected: yes
[bluetooth]# [ 3144.632878] hid-generic 0005:046D:B008.0001: unknown...
Connection successful
[bluetooth]# info 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Device 00:1F:20:42:27:12
Name: Bluetooth Laser Travel Mouse
Alias: Bluetooth Laser Travel Mouse
Class: 0x002580
Icon: input-mouse
Paired: yes
Trusted: no
Blocked: no
Connected: yes
LegacyPairing: yes
UUID: Human Interface Device... (00001124-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
UUID: PnP Information
Modalias: usb:v046DpB008d0318
(00001200-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb)
[bluetooth]# more /dev/input/event1
Invlaid command
[bluetooth]# quit
[DEL] Controller 98:4F:EE:01:FD:E4 BlueZ 5.18 [default]
Check the kernel logs to verify that the device is correctly connected. The example below is for a Bluetooth mouse:
[15337.082135] hid-generic 0005:0A5C:2004.0001: unknown main item tag 0x0
[15337.083809] input: MoGo Mouse BT as
/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:04.1/tty/ttyMFD0/hci0/hci0:12/input1
[15337.086105] hid-generic 0005:0A5C:2004.0001: input,hidraw0: BLUETOOTH
HID v3.00 Mouse [MoGo Mouse BT] on 43:34:1b:00:1f:ac
When you make a connection, a /dev/input/eventX file is created. Use the more command to check this event file
(Figure 5) and verify that events are correctly received.
Figure 5
Raw data from the event file using the “more” command
To decode these incoming events, use this freedesktop utility: http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~whot/evtest. Either
compile the code for Intel® Edison, copy the binary to the Intel® Edison device, and then launch freedesktop; or
copy the freedesktop utility into the Intel® Edison device, and then launch it.
Note:
For compilation instructions, visit http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~whot/evtest/tree/INSTALL.
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[email protected]:~# ./evtest /dev/input/event1
Input driver version is 1.0.1
Input device ID: bus 0x5 vendor 0x1131 product 0x1616 version 0x410
Input device name: "Bluetooth Keyboard"
Supported events:
Event type 0 (Sync)
...
Event type 20 (Repeat)
Testing ... (interrupt to exit)
Event: time 1404754634.580274, type 4 (Misc), code 4 (ScanCode), value 70014
Event: time 1404754634.580274, type 1 (Key), code 16 (Q), value 1
Event: time 1404754634.580274, -------------- Report Sync -----------Event: time 1404754634.736606, type 4 (Misc), code 4 (ScanCode), value 70014
Event: time 1404754634.736606, type 1 (Key), code 16 (Q), value 0
Event: time 1404754634.736606, -------------- Report Sync -----------Event: time 1404754645.460014, type 4 (Misc), code 4 (ScanCode), value 7001a
Event: time 1404754645.460014, type 1 (Key), code 17 (W), value 1
After listing the mapping between events and character, freedesktop will listen for incoming events and trace them.
6.2
PAN profile
The personal area networking (PAN) profile describes how two or more Bluetooth-enabled devices can form a
network and access other networks through a network access point (NAP). The PAN profile defines how to use the
Bluetooth Network Encapsulation Protocol (BNEP) to provide networking capabilities for Bluetooth devices. PAN
profile roles include the following:
•
NAP: Network access point.
•
GN: Group ad-hoc network.
•
PANU: Personal area network user.
NAP and GN offer services for different networking requirements. NAP provides network services to each Bluetooth
device connected, while GN allows two or more devices to become part of an ad-hoc network (Figure 6).
Figure 6
PAN service networking models
Network access point (NAP)
Group ad-hoc network (GN)
For Intel® Edison Software Release-1, we have validated the PAN profile in NAP and GN. However, to perform a PAN
test, you will need to download test scripts that are part of BlueZ, but which are not included in the Intel® Edison
image. (You can find these test scripts at https://github.com/pauloborges/bluez in folder called test.)
•
Select the role with the -s option.
•
Compress and copy the BlueZ test package into the Intel® Edison board via scp.
•
Unzip and copy BlueZ test package into the Intel® Edison board.
•
Enable Bluetooth as described chapter 4 Scanning and Connecting Device.
After you have performed the above steps, you can perform the PAN test between a Linux* host PC and an
Intel® Edison device, or between two Intel® Edison devices.
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6.2.1
PAN test between Linux* host PC and Intel® Edison device
To perform the PAN test between a Linux* host PC and an Intel® Edison device, do the following:
1.
Start connman and enable Bluetooth* on both the Intel® Edison device and on the Linux* PC.
On the Intel® Edison device:
[email protected]:~# systemctl start connman
[email protected]:~# connmanctl enable Bluetooth
[email protected]:~# hciconfig
hci0:
Type: BR/EDR Bus: UART
BD Address: 00:11:22:33:55:77 ACL MTU: 1021:8 SCO MTU: 64:1
UP RUNNING PSCAN
RX bytes:41408 acl:308 sco:0 events:300 errors:0
TX bytes:31530 acl:270 sco:0 commands:65 errors:0
[email protected]:~#
On the Linux* PC, the “RSSI” line provides the Bluetooth* address of the PC.
[email protected]:~# bluetoothctl
[NEW] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:77 BlueZ 5.24 [default]
[NEW] Device 48:51:B7:15:D1:63 ubuntu-0
[bluetooth]# agent DisplayYesNo
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# default-agent
Default agent request successful
[bluetooth]# discoverable on
Changing discoverable on succeeded
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:77 Discoverable: yes
[bluetooth]# scan on
Discovery started
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:77 Discovering: yes
[NEW] Device E8:BE:82:BE:75:19 E8-BE-82-BE-75-19
[NEW] Device D5:B3:ED:7E:A5:83 D5-B3-ED-7E-A5-83
[CHG] Device D5:B3:ED:7E:A5:83 Name: Halitoshi
[CHG] Device D5:B3:ED:7E:A5:83 Alias: Halitoshi
[NEW] Device C8:F7:33:2C:A8:93 JSWALKEN-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 3C:15:C2:DC:E9:41 adaniele-mac01
[CHG] Device 48:51:B7:15:D1:63 RSSI: -35
[CHG] Device 48:51:B7:15:D1:63 UUIDs:
0000112d-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001112-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001234-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001700-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001701-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001708-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
[CHG] Device 48:51:B7:15:D1:63 Paired: yes
Pairing successful
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: no
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: yes
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA Connected: no
[bluetooth]
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2.
Pair the devices.
On the Intel® Edison device:
[bluetooth]# pair 00:11:22:33:55:77
Attempting to pair with 00:11:22:33:55:77
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 Connected: yes
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 UUIDs:
0000110c-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
0000110e-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001200-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001800-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001801-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
0000a004-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
feee74dc-a8de-3196-1149-d43596c00a4f
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 Paired: yes
Pairing successful
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 Connected: no
[CHG] Device E4:F5:9F:82:56:94 RSSI: -89
[bluetooth]# scan off
[CHG] Device E4:F5:9F:82:56:94 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 7C:7A:91:F2:6E:84 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:66 Discovering: no
Discovery stopped
[bluetooth]#
On the Linux* PC:
You will see that pairing is successful between the Intel® Edison device and the Linux PC when the right
pane of the Bluetooth window indicates that Paired equals Yes (Figure 7).
Figure 7
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3.
Create a bridge and configure its address on the Intel® Edison device:
[email protected]:~# brctl addbr br0
[email protected]:~# ip addr add dev br0
[email protected]:~# ip link set br0 up
[email protected]:~# ifconfig
br0:
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr e2:68:df:c3:6f:1f
inet addr:192.168.10.1 Bcast:0.0.0.0 Mask: 255.255.255.255
inet6 addr: fe80::e086:dfff:fec3:6f1f/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:18 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:0 (o.0 B) TX bytes:4284 (4.1 KiB)
Once the bridge has been created on the Intel® Edison device, you can check with the ifconfig command.
4.
Launch the PAN test script for NAP service; this will register the NAP service so a peer device will see this
service available. Use one of the following commands:
[email protected]:~/test-bluez# ./test-pan -s nap br0
[email protected]:~/test-bluez# ./test-nap br0
The bnep0 interface will be added to the br0 bridge (the same one created at step 0).
Note:
5.
This test script will only keep NAP registered for a few minutes then disconnect. If you need more
time, you will have to modify the script.
Connect to the peer device as a PAN user. Before you can do this from a Linux* PC, you will need to install
the BlueZ package (if you haven’t already) and use the pand command.
Note:
a.
b.
The pand service interface is available in BlueZ4 but not in BlueZ5.
To install the BlueZ package, enter the following: sudo apt-get install bluez-compat.
Use the pand command to connect. In this example, 122.122.122.10 is the Intel® Edison device’s
Bluetooth* address.
[email protected]:~/$ sudo pand -n --connect 122.122.122.10 --service NAP
pand[2990]: Bluetooth PAN daemon version 4.101
pand[2990]: Connecting to 00:11:22:33:55:77
pand[2990]: bnep0 connected
6.
If everything succeeds, the bnep interface will be added to the bridge in Intel® Edison; the bnep interface
will be listed on the Linux* PC as well. Enter the ifconfig command on each device to verify.
On an Intel® Edison device:
[email protected]:~# ifconfig -a
bnep0
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:43:34:b1:de:ad
inet6 addr: fe80::243f:34ff:feb1:dead/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:4 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:16 (16.0 B) TX bytes:64 (64.0 B)
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On a Linux* PC:
[email protected]:~/$ ifconfig -a
bnep0
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:43:34:b1:de:ad
inet6 addr: fe80::243f:34ff:feb1:dead/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:4 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:100 (100.0 B) TX bytes:2443 (2.4 KB)
eth0
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:43:34:b1:de:ad
inet addr:10.3.83.69 Bcast:10.3.83.255 Mask 255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::243f:34ff:feb1:dead/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:4 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:1307577 (1.3 MB) TX bytes:60367 (60.3 KB)
Interrupt:20 Memory:f7d00000- f7d20000
lo
Link encap:Local Loopback
inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask 255.0.0.0
inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:65536
Note:
7.
Metric:1
Sometimes bnep0 will not be visible in ifconfig until you execute the following command:
sudo ip link set bnep0 up
Configure both bnep interfaces with an IP address and try to ping them.
On a Linux* PC:
usb0
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 4a:32:d1:4f:c3:f7
inet addr:192.168.2.1 Bcast: 192.168.2.255 Mask 255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::4832:d1ff:fe4f:c3f7/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:4 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:127594 (127.5 KB) TX bytes:112815 (112.8 KB)
wlan0
Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 48:51:b7:15:d1:5f
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
inet6 addr: fe80::243f:34ff:feb1:dead/64 Scope:Link
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:4 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:0 (0.0 B)
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8.
With a connection established between the Intel® Edison device and the Linux* PC, you can ping the
Intel® Edison device from the Linux* PC (and vice versa).
Note:
Pinging the Access Point from the Linux* PC over Bluetooth to the Intel® Edison device provides
basic verification. Successfully accessing the web from the PC provides functional verification.
From the Intel® Edison device, pinging the Linux* PC (IP address: 192.168.10.10):
[email protected]:~# ping 192.168.10.10
PING 192.168.10.10 (192.168.10.10): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.10.10: seq=0 ttl=64 time=19.563 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.10.10: seq=1 ttl=64 time=11.526 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.10.10: seq=2 ttl=64 time=13.279 ms
...
From the Linux* PC, pinging the Intel® Edison device (IP address: 192.168.10.2):
[email protected]:~/$ ping 192.168.10.2
PING 192.168.10.2 (192.168.10.102) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.10.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=20.1 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.10.2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=22.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.10.2: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=7.08 ms
...
6.2.2
PAN test between two Intel® Edison devices
This section explains how to test PAN, using one Intel® Edison device as PANU and the second as PAN-NAP.
Note:
While you can use connman to connect a NAP service on a peer device, you cannot use connman to
discover, scan, or pair devices; you must use normal BlueZ tools beforehand for these basic operations.
To perform the PAN test between two Intel® Edison devices, do the following:
1.
Enable Bluetooth* on both Intel® Edison devices. (See Chapter 4 Scanning and Connecting Device.)
2.
Start connman and enable Bluetooth* on both devices using connmanctl.
[email protected]:~# systemctl start connman
[email protected]:~# connmanctl enable bluetooth
Enabled bluetooth
[email protected]:~#
3.
Use hciconfig to verify that Bluetooth* is enabled on both devices:
[email protected]:~# hciconfig
hcio:
Type: BR/EDR Bus: UART
BD Address: 00:11:22:33:55:77 ACL MTU: 1021:8 SCO MTU: 64:1
UP RUNNING PSCAN
RX bytes:41408 acl:308 sco:0 events:300 errors:0
TX bytes:31530 acl:270 sco:0 commands:65 errors:0
[email protected]:~#
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4.
Prepare the second device (PAN-NAP) for pairing:
c.
d.
If the second device does not have the ./bluez-test packages, download test-bluez-5.18.tar.gz to the
device using the scp command and untar it to create the test folder containing the test code.
In a console, enter the following to register the NAP service:
[email protected]:~# ./test/test-nap br0
Server for nap registered to br0
Press CTRL-C to disconnect
e.
Add a bridge using the brctl command and configure the bridge to use a static IP address:
[email protected]:~# brctl addbr br0
[email protected]:~# ifconfig br0 192.168.1.1
[email protected]:~#
f.
Launch the Bluetooth* controller utility, then set discoverable on and register an agent.
[email protected]:~# bluetoothctl
[NEW] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:77 BlueZ 5.24 [default]
[NEW] Device 00:11:22:33:55:66 BlueZ 5.24
[bluetooth]# discoverable on
Changing discoverable on succeeded
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:44:77 Discoverable: yes
[bluetooth]# agent DisplayOnly
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# default-agent
Default agent request successful
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:77 Discoverable: no
[bluetooth]#
5.
To pair the first device (PANU) with the second device (PAN-NAP), use bluetoothctl to register an agent:
[email protected]:~# bluetoothctl
[NEW] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:66 BlueZ 5.24 [default]
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:60:C1:02 MKODANDX-MOBL
[NEW] Device B4:B6:76:4F:60:F4 Edison-temp-2-0
[NEW] Device E4:F5:9F:82:56:94 Force
[NEW] Device 30:76:6F:50:DB:FC LGA340
[NEW] Device 7C:7A:91:F2:6E:84 GPHATAK-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 00:02:72:C9:5C:A4 ndg-leb-sys-0
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA NAGESWAX-MOBL1
[NEW] Device C6:22:DD:95:29:E1 tkr
[NEW] Device 00:1F:20:8E:7C:45 Dell Travel Mouse WM524
[NEW] Device 98:0D:2E:C8:BD:2C HTC One nag
[bluetooth]# agent DisplayOnly
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# default-agent
Default agent request successful
[bluetooth]#
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6.
Scan for the second (PAN-NAP) device:
[bluetooth]# scan on
Discovery started
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:44:66 Discovering: yes
[NEW] Device 40:2C:F4:DB:EF:AA NAGESWAX-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 5C:51:4F:9E:49:AD DSGAO-MOBL1
[NEW] Device 00:11:22:33:44:77 BlueZ 5.24
[NEW] Device FC:F8:AE:1E:ED:98 XSDONGX-MOBL2
[NEW] Device 3C:5A:37:4C:3A:11 3C:5A:37:4C:3A:11
[CHG] Device 3C:5A:37:4C:3A:11 LegacyPairing: no
[CHG] Device 3C:5A:37:4C:3A:11 Name: SHG-A777
[CHG] Device 3C:5A:37:4C:3A:11 Alias: SHG-A777
[CHG] Device FC:F8:AE:1E:ED:98 RSSI: -85
[CHG] Device FC:F8:AE:1E:ED:98 RSSI: -77
[CHG] Device 3C:5A:37:4C:3A:11 LegacyPairing: yes
[bluetooth]#
7.
Pair the devices:
[bluetooth]# pair 00:11:22:33:55:77
Attempting to pair with 00:11:22:33:55:77
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 Connected: yes
Request confirmation
[agent] Confirm passkey 804573 (yes/no): yes
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 UUIDs:
0000110c-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
0000110e-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001200-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001800-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
00001801-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
0000a004-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
feee74dc-a8de-3196-1149-d43596c00a4f
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 Paired: yes
Pairing successful
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 Connected: no
[CHG] Device E4:F5:9F:82:56:94 RSSI: -89
[bluetooth]# scan off
[CHG] Device E4:F5:9F:82:56:94 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 7C:7A:91:F2:6E:84 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device B4:B6:76:4F:60:F4 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:02:72:C9:5C:A4 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:55:77 RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device 40:2C:F4:D8:EF:AA RSSI is nil
[CHG] Device DA:0D:F3:BA:56:CB RSSI is nil
[CHG] Controller 00:11:22:33:55:66 Discovering: no
Discovery stopped
[bluetooth]# exit
Agent unregistered
December 2014
Document Number: 331704-001
Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
27
Bluetooth Profiles on Intel® Edison
8.
From the second (PAN-NAP) device, use the trust command to trust the first (PANU) device:
[email protected]:~# bluetoothctl
[NEW] Controller 00:11:22:33:44:66 BlueZ 5.18 [default]
[NEW] Device 00:11:22:33:44:77 BlueZ 5.24
[bluetooth]# trust 00:11:22:33:44:77
[CHG] Device 00:11:22:33:44:77 Trusted: yes
Changing 00:11:22:33:44:77 trust succeeded
[bluetooth]#
9.
From the first (PANU) device, connect to the second (PAN-NAP) device using the connmanctl utility:
[email protected]:~# connmanctl
connmanctl> services
BlueZ 5.24
bluetooth_001122335577_001122335566
connmanctl> connect bluetooth_001122335577_001122335566
/net/connman/service/bluetooth_001122335577_001122335566: connected
10. If the second (PAN-NAP) device does not trust the first device, you will have to authenticate the first
device:
connmanctl> config bluetooth_001122335577_001122335566 --ipv4 manual 192.168.1.10
11. At this point, each Intel® Edison device should have its own bnep interface, in a place where you can
configure and test it with ping or iperf. For example, on the first device (PANU):
[email protected]:~# ping 192.168.1.10
PING 192.168.1.10 (192.168.1.10): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.463 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.295 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.295 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.296 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=4 ttl=64 time=0.301 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=5 ttl=64 time=0.294 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=6 ttl=64 time=0.296 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=7 ttl=64 time=0.294 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=8 ttl=64 time=0.294 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=9 ttl=64 time=0.295 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=10 ttl=64 time=0.293 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=11 ttl=64 time=0.292 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=12 ttl=64 time=0.294 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=13 ttl=64 time=0.369 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: seq=14 ttl=64 time=0.296 ms
Note:
You can also use the ping command on the second Intel® Edison device for verification.
§
Intel® Edison
Bluetooth* Guide
28
December 2014
Document Number: 331704-001

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