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New coach, new plan
Bruce Barnum takes over at Portland State — SEE SPORTS, B12
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Underdog activist makes bid
for PPS school board seat
New blood may
change voting bloc,
leadership culture
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
Mike Rosen, a Portland Public Schools parent, watchdog
and volunteer of 15 years, announced to the Tribune this
week that he’s running for the
Portland School Board in May.
His candidacy — plus up to
three potentially new board
members in other races — has
the potential to bring a major
power shift to the seven-member
board.
A new dynamic could significantly alter the culture of the
board, as well as the policy and
budget decisions the board
makes for the next four years.
All board members are volunteers and represent the geographic zone in which they live.
Rosen, 54, whose children
graduated from and attend Cleveland High School, is running for
the Zone 7 position in Southeast
Portland.
The incumbent, Greg Belisle,
has not declared whether he’ll
run for re-election, and did not
return an email from the Tribune
by press time.
Either way, Rosen says he has
a strong base of supporters from
his advocacy work over the years,
and has been talking with people
during the past six weeks to hear
about what they expect from
See ROSEN / Page 2
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Longtime schools activist Mike Rosen will run for the Portland School
Board in May, hoping to unseat incumbent Greg Belisle.
City, others burn
with ideas to raise
cash for fire bureau
Medical services
among offers, but none
save 26 firefighter jobs
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Traditional Christmas displays and music attract thousands of people to The Grotto’s Festival of Lights.
RELIGIOUS YES,
Survey challenges
Oregon’s reputation
as ‘unchurched’
CHURCHGOERS NO
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
Overtly religious signs of
the holiday season are everywhere this time of year.
They include public displays of
Nativity scenes and Hanukkah
menorahs, performances of
Handel’s Messiah and gospel music, and an exhibit of the painting
“Holy Family with Saint Mary
Magdalen” by El Greco at the
Portland Art Museum.
The amount of such faithbased imagery and events runs
counter to Oregon’s national
reputation as the most un-
churched state in the nation.
Although “unchurched” might
be an exaggeration, a 2013 survey
by the Barna Research Group
found Portland has the secondhighest percentage of adults who
have not been to a worship ceremony in the past six months — 43
percent compared to the 44 percent in San Francisco.
But, the Catholic shrine in
Northeast Portland known as
The Grotto annually hosts what
is thought to be the largest
Christmas choral festival in the
world. The Festival of Lights,
which runs from the Friday after
Thanksgiving to Dec. 30, attracts
thousands of people every night.
Five indoor concerts are scheduled each evening in the 600-seat
chapel, which is internationally
known for its cathedral quality
acoustics. The Grotto Carolers
also perform traditional favorite
Christmas carols throughout the
evening.
Father Jack Topper, the former
director and now rector at the
Grotto, believes the popularity is
related to the purity of the Christmas message.
“No one is preaching or trying
to convert anyone. It’s all about
the meaning of Christmas, which
is peace and joy on Earth. In today’s work, with all the violence,
that means something to a lot of
people. And many of our visitors
Portland Tribune
Inside
The number of
those
worshipping at
the First
Congregational
Church in
downtown
Portland has
declined over the
years, but most
Oregonians
consider
themselves
religious or
spiritual.
Doctors won’t do house
calls, but what about a firefighter trained as a paramedic?
That’s one of many innovative
ideas being floated at City Hall as
the Portland Fire & Rescue bureau drums up ways to earn
money from its emergency medical services.
“I can’t believe that in five
years the Portland fire bureau
will be the only uncompensated
player in the medical system,”
Mayor Charlie Hales said at a
Portland City Council work session last week on money-raising
ideas for the bureau.
Hales was referring
to city firefighters who
ferry many residents to
hospital emergency
rooms after they call
9-1-1; the city gets nothing for the service while
private ambulances
charge more than $900.
Hales and others see
new possibilities for
Portland Fire & Rescue
to earn money for its
emergency medical services as the fast-evolving health care system
seeks ways to cut costs
and reduce needless
hospital stays. There’s
also a greater urgency
for the fire bureau to
raise money now, because it faces the loss of
26 firefighters “laid off” by Hales
in the 2013-14 budget. Their jobs
were spared when the city landed a two-year, $4.5 million federal
grant, but the money dries up
next December, so Hales must
plug some money into his next
budget to save those positions.
Fire Chief Erin Janssens pre-
sented a laundry list of moneyraising ideas last week to the
City Council, including plans to
transport 9-1-1 callers to clinics
instead of hospital ERs, and asking paramedics to visit frail seniors in their homes or even senior care facilities.
One of the most intriguing
ideas was to beef up fire bureau
paramedic staffing so that American Medical Response could
trim its staffing levels. The ambulance company has talked
about sharing $1 million a year of
its resulting savings with the fire
bureau.
Commissioner Dan Saltzman,
who oversees the bureau, said
the city could spend $150,000 a
year to get back $1 million a year
from AMR, and he seemed eager
to do that deal as soon as possible.
Not so fast
But the AMR deal, as with
other ideas floated by Janssens,
could take several years
to put into practice. In
some cases, Janssens
said, the bureau must
use pilot tests to demonstrate “proof of concept,” showing that its
innovative practices will
save money for hospitals, medical insurers
and the federal Medicare system. Then, it
must convince those entities to share some of
the savings with the fire
bureau.
Thus, any savings
may come too late to
spare the 26 firefighters
whose jobs are on the
line.
“There’s no low-hanging, quick-to-pick fruit,”
said Randy Lauer, the Oregon
general manager for American
Medical Response.
Other fire bureaus across the
nation have been experimenting
with new roles for firefighters,
particularly their EMS pro-
The pilot
test that’s
the most
far along
involves
diverting
9-1-1 callers
from costly
ERs to visit
their
doctor or
an urgentcare clinic
instead.
See FIRE / Page 3
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
are touched by that,” Topper
says.
The popularity of the Festival
of Lights illustrates some findings in a comprehensive survey
conducted by Portland-based
DHM Research.
Although many Oregonians
are suspicious of religion, most
nevertheless consider themselves religious or spiritual. Four
in 10 identify themselves as moderately religious, while two in 10
identify themselves as very religious. And nearly half of all Oregonians feel religion is very im-
portant in their daily lives.
Dr. Will Deming, a theology
professor at University of Portland, says the meanings of the
terms religion and spirituality
have changed in recent years.
“Religion used to mean mainstream institutional religions,
mostly Christianity, and spirituality was thought to be a personal
trait,” sayd Deming, who has
taught at the North Portland university for 22 years. “But now
religion has taken on a social
See RELIGION / Page 2
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
American Medical Response would shrink its payroll — and share some
of the savings with the Portland fire bureau — under one proposal
announced last week.
FEAST ON THIS
— SEE LIFE, PAGE B1
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
OWNER & NEIGHBOR
A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Religion: Prejudic e doesn’t reign in O regon
■ From page 1
justice meaning, which more
people find acceptable. And,
thanks to the Internet, it’s easy to
see that a lot of people are spiritual seekers.”
That does not mean everyone
regularly attends church or goes
to a synagogue or mosque, however. More than six in 10 say they
seldom or never attend religious
services. Only three in 10 say
they attend religious services
monthly or more often.
That leaves a large percent of
Oregonians — about half — who
say religion is not important in
their daily lives. And nearly three
in 10 say they have no religious
identity at all.
But a surprising number of Oregonians — about 40 percent —
feel it would be desirable for religion to become more important.
Only 28 percent believe that
would not be desirable.
At the same time, most Oregonians don’t believe that’s going to
survey shows most religious Oregonians belong to mainstream
religions. According to the December 2014 survey, 27 percent of
respondents identify with such
Protestant beliefs as Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist, Episcopal, or
Presbyterian. Nine percent describe themselves as Evangelical,
6 percent describe themselves as
Catholics, 2 percent describe
themselves as Jewish, 2 percent
describe themselves as Mormon,
and 12 percent describe themselves as “other.”
Of those who claim no religious affiliation, 13 percent describe themselves as agnostic, 9
percent describe themselves as
atheist, and 21 percent choose
“none.”
The new survey also reveals
significant demographic differences among Oregonians on religious matters.
For example, the overall importance placed on the role of religion in everyday lives is higher
among Republicans (81 percent)
than Democrats (30 percent) and
happen anytime soon. Only 18
percent believe religion and spirituality will become more important over the next 10 years. Half
feel it is unlikely, and 27 percent
are neutral.
Those figures are based on the
2103 Oregon Values and Beliefs
Project survey that DHM Research conducted for a variety of
partners, including The Oregon
Community Foundation, Oregon
Health & Science University, Oregon Public Broadcasting and
Oregon State University.
Religious boundaries
Unusual religious and spiritual
movements generate a fair
amount of interest. People still
talk about when the Bhagwan
Shree Rajneesh and his followers
moved to rural Central Oregon in
the 1980s. More recently, so-called
atheist churches received some
local media coverage, as did the
short-lived conservative Mars
Hill Church in liberal Southeast
Portland.
But a recent DHM Research
Independents (48 percent). Republicans are five times more
likely than Democrats to say they
find religion “very” important in
their lives (54 percent vs. 11 percent).
There also is a geographic divide, with more Willamette Valley respondents (64 percent) saying religion is important in their
lives than respondents in the tricounty area (50 percent) and the
rest of the state (43 percent). Both
Republicans and Willamette Valley residents also attend religious
services at a higher rate than
their counterparts.
The survey found that most
Oregonians believe religion has
positive benefits, as 72 percent
agreed with the statement that
belief in God or a higher power
mostly brings people comfort and
peace. And 53 percent think people with such beliefs are more
charitable and giving.
At the same time, most Oregonians are not prejudiced against
those who shun religion. A full 93
percent are willing to trust peo-
ple who do not believe in God or a
higher power. Seventy-seven percent believe atheists can live
moral lives, even though they do
not fear God’s judgment. And 64
percent do not believe that a person must believe in God or a higher power to live a moral life.
At the same time, many Oregonians see a downside to religion.
A majority, 59 percent, think belief in God or a higher power
mostly brings people fear and
shame. And respondents are
evenly split (49 percent to 48 percent) on whether people with
such beliefs tend to be judgmental and bigoted.
“There’s a difference between
my religion and the religion of
other people, which I might approve of,” Deming says.
Politically, Oregon is about as
far from a conservative Bible
belt state as possible. But for
those who say religion is important in their lives, those beliefs
help shape their opinion on several high-profile political issues.
The most-recent survey asked
those people how much their beliefs influence their views on 16
issues ranging from same-sex
marriage to public transportation. The issues that are influenced more than average: samesex marriage, poverty, abortion
and assisted suicide.
Abortion is the most polarizing issue, with those for whom
religion is “very important” in
their lives influenced the most
by their beliefs.
There are some demographic
differences, however. For example, younger people (ages 18-34)
say their beliefs influence their
view on same-sex marriage
more than do older people (35
and up). The same is true for Republicans and Willamette Valley
residents.
Some 59 percent think belief
in God or a higher power mostly
brings people fear and shame; 36
percent disagree.
And, religious beliefs also influence younger people and
Willamette Valley residents in
poverty.
Rosen: ‘W ill’ to mak e c hanges k ey f or PPS
■ From page 1
their school board. He knows
he’ll have to raise a lot of money
to beat an incumbent, and will
start fundraising in the coming
weeks.
On many issues, Rosen says,
the public — and he — believes
the board must be more aligned
with “student-focused” decision
making. He says he’d work to
make the board more transparent, accountable and independent from PPS’ central administration.
“I really feel like the school
board is tone deaf,” says Rosen,
cofounder of a grassroots group
called the Portland Parents Coalition. “They’ve lost touch with
what the community expects.”
Rosen is referring in this case
to the board’s controversial decision in August to approve a 28
percent pay raise for Superintendent Carole Smith.
The board voted 5-2 in favor of
the raise, prompting a Facebook
petition a few days later that collected 500 signatures in protest.
They called the raise “shameful”
in light of struggling families
across the district.
Smith, who has led PPS for
seven years, now earns $247,000.
Rosen says he would have
joined board members Steve
Buel and Tom Koehler in rejecting the pay bump, since he
doesn’t believe the board paid
enough attention to performance
measures.
“If (Smith) meets them or exceeds (the standards), then her
breaks because the schools
weren’t staffed to offer instruction for the entire school day.
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Cleveland High School parent Mike
Rosen is cofounder of the Portland
Parents Coalition, which has
fought for more high school
instruction time.
raise is commensurate to that,
like anyone else,” Rosen says.
Besides the salary bump itself,
Rosen says, the action alienated
many in the community at a time
when the district can’t afford that
to happen.
“The blowback they got for her
raise was pretty significant,” he
says.
Where’s the will?
Portland’s high school graduation rate has been the district’s
top priority, yet Rosen questions
why the district still does not offer a full school day for all high
school students.
Last year, Rosen and other parents of high schoolers formed a
group called the Portland Parents
Coalition to fight PPS’ practice of
mandating “late arrivals,” “early
releases,” and two-hour-long
“Barely 50 percent of the high
school population goes to school
full-time,” he says. “There aren’t
enough teachers assigned.”
District leaders have pointed
to the teachers union’s contract
language, but Rosen says he’s
tired of laying the blame elsewhere.
“We have enough money in
PPS to do this,” he says. “The will
doesn’t exist.”
Historically, the Portland Association of Teachers has had a
tenuous relationship with the district. In February, the 2,900-member union narrowly averted a
strike after 10 months of tense
contract negotiations.
“I see much more potential for
the PAT to be an effective partner
with the district,” Rosen says.
Rosen and other cynics especially rolled their eyes at PPS’ announcement last January and
again in the fall that it found a total of $37 million in the budget.
Yet there was no “meaningful
discussion” in the community
about how to get dollars into the
classroom, Rosen says.
“With a recovering economy
and boost in state education
funds ... they have the means to
budget more efficiently and provide these services, including
school days,” he says. “Their excuse is they have to open the contract. Stop using teachers as an
excuse for their ineffective management of their resources. It’s
Portland Public Schools Board
Three other seats on the
board also expire in 2015.
There are no term limits.
Bobbie Regan, who represents Zone 3, tells the Tribune
she will run for a fourth term.
After years of cuts, “we’ll be
able to look up and finally
breathe, and make targeted
investments in what I believe
will accelerate what’s happening,” she says.
Two-term board member
Ruth Adkins, in Zone 1, says
she’ll decide in the new year
whether she’ll run for re-election.
The other two board members whose seats are expiring
after one term did not return
emails from the Tribune by
press time: Matt Morton, in
Zone 2, and Greg Belisle, in
Zone 7.
just a contrivance.”
History of involvement
In 2003, when his children were
in grade school, Rosen became a
team leader for the nonprofit
Stand for Children’s neighborhood chapter, Sellwood-Moreland. He then became the Portland chapter chairperson for the
organization.
With a PhD in environmental
science and engineering and a
bachelor of arts in chemistry, he
moved to Portland 25 years ago
from his native New York to work
in environmental engineering.
Since 2003, he’s been the watershed division manager for the
North Portland schools activist Paul Anthony has
announced his intention to run
for the Zone 2 seat.
The Portland School Board
special election is May 19.
Candidates have until March
19 to file.
In Portland School Board
election history, it’s rare for an
outsider to unseat an incumbent. It’s happened just once in
recent memory, when Steve
Buel won the seat held by
Martin Gonzalez in 2012.
It hadn’t happened since
1998, a Multnomah County
elections official says. Yet Buel
has other experience with
incumbents, having unseated
one during his first run for
school board in 1979, then
being ousted during his reelection bid in 1983.
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services.
For 10 years, Rosen worked to
mobilize parents to school funding rallies, lobby for smaller class
sizes, and to close the achievement gap.
“I’ve canvassed, phone banked,
testified, rallied, organized and
lobbied to improve our schools
and secure more funding for our
schools,” he says.
In 2003, Rosen also joined
forces with the city’s most
active school advocates, who
called themselves Help Out
Public Education.
They helped pass the Multnomah County tax measure,
which provided $128 million annually for three years for a full
school year and smaller class
sizes.
Throughout his statewide advocacy, he’s been a PTA president, site council chair and classroom volunteer at Llewellyn Elementary School, volunteer at
Sellwood Middle School and
Cleveland High, and PTA legislative chair at Cleveland.
In the past few years, Rosen
helped get out the vote for both of
the PPS bond measures — the
one that failed in 2011 and the
$482 million bond measure that
passed in 2012 after being restructured.
“The public wasn’t on board
with the district on the first bond
measure,” he says. The second
time around, Superintendent
Smith “spent a lot of time in the
community, listening to them.”
After the win, Rosen complained that the bond’s oversight
committee was not large enough
and representative of the community. He feels his requests
were ignored, but he’s monitoring the bond projects closely.
He knows the school board
must have the public’s trust in
hand in 2016 when the bond renewal vote comes up.
“Will (voters) step up?” he
says. “The need exists. That’s
where transparency comes in.”
In his free time, Rosen is a
huge comic book fan and enjoys
biking and kayaking with his
family.
On Twitter @jenmomanderson
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©2014 Portland Tribune
NEWS A3
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
P
ortland promotes itself as the hippest city
in the country, if not
the world. But Fortune
magazine reports that Nike
chief information officer Anthony Watson, one of the few
openly gay top
executives in a
Fortune 500
company, recently quit this
month because Portland is so boring.
According to Fortune, now a
source close to the situation
has told Fortune the precise
reason for Watson’s departure: Though he was happy
with his job, he was unhappy
with the social scene (or lack
thereof) in Portland. “As a single gay guy from London,” the
source says, Watson “underestimated what it would be like.
It was a culture shock. And
there’s no point in having
a great job if you feel
unhappy with your
surroundings.”
According to
Fortune, the decision to quit
Nike jelled when
Watson was in London
with his family over the
Thanksgiving break.
Maybe craft beers and flannel shirts aren’t everything in
the global economy after all.
SOURCESSAY
Partisanship heats up
Do Democrats in the Ore-
Nike CIO has a
boring reason for
leaving Portland
gon Legislature really want to
hurt working families and
small businesses? That’s what
state Senate Republican Leader Ted Ferrioli said in a Dec. 8
news release criticizing the
House Revenue Committee for
introducing more than 40 bills
he said would increase taxes
that day.
“The Democrat regime has
a spending fever, and their only prescription is more taxes,”
the John Day Republican said.
The release is one more indication the 2015 session that
starts in January will be more
partisan than the past few. Ferrioli notes Democrats are now
a super majority in the state
Senate, meaning they won’t
need a single Republican vote
to raise taxes. In fact, one bill
eliminates the required twothirds majority to increase taxes.
Other issues Democrats are
expected to push over Republican objections next session include mandatory background
checks on all gun sales, a tax
on carbon-based fuels, and
paid sick leave requirements
for most businesses.
Minimum wage, maximum
debate
Another issue gaining Democratic support is the $15 minimum wage.
Two labor-backed advocacy
groups spent three days at the
state Capitol last week finding
sponsors for one bill to raise
Oregon’s minimum to $15 an
hour and another bill to repeal
the existing law that prevents
cities from setting minimum
wages.
According to 15 Now Portland and Portland Jobs with
Justice, 10 legislators have
signed onto the first bill, which
is sponsored by state Sen. Chip
Shields (District 22), and an additional two have agreed to cosponsor the second bill, which
is being introduced by Shields
and state Rep. Alissa KenyGuyer (District 46).
All of the sponsors are
Democrats and most are
from Portland, indicating the
partisan and geographic
splits shaping up over the
legislation.
Fire: AMR deal could take years Ambulance service
■ From page 1
grams, Janssens said after the
work session. “But by and large,
we’re at the leading edge of this
type of work.”
The pilot test that’s the most
far along involves diverting 9-1-1
callers from costly ERs to visit
their doctor or an urgent-care
clinic instead. In the initial pilot,
only 30 callers were diverted in
this way. But the city now is embarking on an expanded second
phase of its Alternative Destination, Alternative Transportation
pilot.
“It saves the health care system money,” Janssen told city
commissioners. The trick will be
to get health industry players to
reward the city for its role in saving them money.
AMR deal raises eyebrows
The money-sharing deal with
AMR, first announced at last
week’s work session, raised keen
interest from Saltzman and others.
Portland Fire & Rescue’s part
would be to beef up crews at four
fire stations that have two crews,
only one of which is staffed with
trained paramedics.
AMR would get more lenient
requirements in two ways. It
would be obligated to respond to
medical emergencies within 10
minutes instead of eight minutes,
and it could employ one paramedic and one emergency medical technician in each ambulance
instead of two paramedics.
Multnomah County is the lone
local jurisdiction that requires
two paramedics in each ambulance; neighboring jurisdictions
allow one paramedic and one
emergency medical technician.
AMR could reduce the number of ambulances at any one
time, and save money because
EMTs earn $20,000 to $30,000
less than paramedics.
In Clackamas County, when
the required ambulance response time was extended from
eight minutes to 10 minutes,
firefighters learned to get 9-1-1
callers to the hospital sooner,
Lauer said. “It doesn’t delay
getting a trauma patient to the
hospital,” he said.
But there are other hurdles.
Lauer said it would take an
estimated five to eight years to
scale back his local ambulance
staff via attrition, so he
wouldn’t have to lay off staff or
replace paramedics with lowerpaid EMTs.
Janssens said she hopes that
could be done sooner, perhaps
in one to two years.
The move also would require
Multnomah County to renegotiate its ambulance contract
with AMR; the current contract
lasts through 2018.
Alan Ferschweiler, president
of the Portland Firefighters Association, says his union comrades in the Teamsters Union,
who represent AMR, aren’t
likely to favor the idea.
Ferschweiler estimates AMR
could save more than $4 million
a year under the deal, so saving
$1 million with the city leaves
them sitting pretty.
But he’s concerned the deal
won’t come in time to spare the
26 firefighters.
Home visits?
Janssens also is evaluating
ideas to use firefighter paramedics to schedule home visits to
seniors or other frail citizens
who call 9-1-1 frequently. Staff
could receive more training as
“community paramedics,” she
said. That could help keep people from over-reliance on hospitals, Janssens said. Hospitals get
lower reimbursements when
some patients wind up back in a
hospital within 30 days of being
discharged, she said, so medical
insurers might help pay the
costs of the home visits.
City Commissioner Amanda
Fritz, an experienced nurse, was
skeptical of the idea. Firefighters
aren’t skilled in medical care,
she said, and they can’t write
prescriptions. “Why are we the
right people to do that?” she
said.
Dr. Jon Jui, the medical director for Multnomah County’s
EMS program, seemed keen on
the potential there for paramedics.
Firefighter paramedics have
some advantages over traditional health care personnel because
they are on duty 24/7, have specially equipped vehicles, and understand public safety issues
when entering peoples’ homes.
They also are relatively welltrusted by seniors and other frail
citizens. Some could be trained
to do minor sutures in the field,
thus eliminating the need for
someone to go to the hospital.
Jui said hospitals are starting
to use telemedicine, and he envisions paramedics using iPads,
Facetime or Google Glass to interview patients when they arrive via 9-1-1 calls, and relaying
the video to doctors and hospitals.
Jui also would like to establish
a nurse triage service at the
city’s 9-1-1 center, where a
trained nurse could handle certain medical calls. That’s “very
doable” in the next year, Jui told
city commissioners.
Reno, Nev., adopted a nurse
triage line at its 9-1-1 center, said
Commissioner Steve Novick.
Since October 2013, Reno has diverted 1,400 people from ERs into other more suitable medical
settings, Novick said. He’d like to
try the same here — and get
health insurers to reimburse the
city.
Though none of the ideas presented by Janssens may earn
the city money in the next several months, Hales praised the
effort. “The pace of technological
change can easily exceed that of
government,” Hales said, alluding to the city playing catch-up
with the likes of Airbnb and
Uber, the home-sharing and doit-yourself taxi services.
The city needs to do more
“R&D” like the ideas proposed
by the fire bureau, Hales said.
[email protected]
twitter.com/SteveLawTrib
takeover unlikely
Fire chief concludes
idea would cost too
much in long run
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
One innovation the Portland fire bureau is unlikely
to pursue is taking over local
ambulance service.
Mayor Charlie Hales supported the idea of Portland Fire &
Rescue taking over ambulance
duties back in 1993, and his staff
said in August that the mayor
wanted to take another look at
it.
The plum dangling before
supporters of the idea is the
$900-plus fee that American
Medical Response charges for
local ambulance service.
But a closer look showed the
idea doesn’t pencil out.
It would require considerable
startup costs, such as acquiring
ambulances. City firefighters
get paid more than AMR employees and have richer benefits, especially pension and
health care plans.
Rather than making money,
taking over the ambulance system could wind up being a money-loser for the city, Fire Chief
Erin Janssens concluded.
“I think that that looks very
risky for the taxpayer,” Janssens said. “That could end up
being a liability.”
Randy Lauer, Oregon general
manager for AMR, said city officials now believe what he’s
been telling them, that declining reimbursement rates by insurers and Medicare make the
ambulance service a lot less lucrative than some presumed.
“They’ve learned through
this process that they’d lose a
lot of money,” Lauer said.
Indeed, Lauer fears the current reimbursement model for
ambulances is unsustainable.
Medicare and many insurers
pay far less than $900-plus, and
many uninsured people don’t
pay anything for the service.
That’s one reason Lauer thinks
his staff might go along with the
idea of reducing the number of
ambulances and staff via attrition, and having more emergency medical technicians in place
of more highly skilled and highly paid paramedics.
The city also seems to have
dropped its pressure on Dr. Jon
Jui, medical director for Multnomah County’s emergency
medical service. The City Council had passed a budget note
last year threatening to supplant Jui with a city medical officer.
But Janssens praised Jui at
last week’s Portland City Council work session.
Having one medical director
for the county allowed the community to develop an Ebola response protocol earlier than
many peers, Janssens said.
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A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Extra! Extra! Street Roots goes weekly
COURTESY: DEAN BAKER
Marlon Crump was the Vendor of the Year for Street Roots.
Street Roots is 15 years old,
and it’s coming of age.
On Jan. 2, the alternative
newspaper will begin weekly
publication. It’ll be coming out
twice as often as it has been, offering deeper and broader news
coverage and doubling the income of many of its street corner
vendors.
The paper’s current twicemonthly press run of 10,000 copies will become 7,000 each week,
said Israel Bayer, the newspaper’s 37-year-old executive director.
Sold one paper at a time for $1
or more an issue, Street Roots is
more than a business; it’s a nonprofit social-improvement engine. Individuals and foundations invest in the paper to give
down-and-out folks a chance to
sell their way out of poverty.
“We probably gain or lose
more major donors than any
other nonprofit in Portland, just
A path to better things
“For most people, selling
Street Roots is not a destination;
it’s a stepping stone to better
things,” Bayer said. “These are
folks with physical and mental
disabilities. Old timber cats, war
vets, folks who aren’t able to
work in the work force — they
tend to stay with us. Others are
with us for a shorter time, and
find ways to improve their quality of life.”
Working the street corners,
Bayer said, the vendors add safe-
COURTESY: DEAN BAKER
Israel Bayer, executive editor of
Street Roots.
ty and stability to the city. If a
vendor is on the corner, drug
dealers and panhandlers tend to
move along and leave doorways
clear for customers or other pedestrians.
“I found out that selling Street
Roots helps me because it gives
the music a boost,” said 57-yearold Rain Bojangles, peddling papers and playing his homemade
dulcimer in front of New Seasons
Market at Southeast 41st Avenue
and Hawthorne Boulevard. Instead of playing just for tips, he
sells papers as well, and makes a
living while spreading good
words and tunes together.
Many vendors gain self-respect after struggling with mental health issues or addictions.
For a small investment, vendors
can get a foothold in business,
make contacts, and move into
housing or get better jobs, Bayer
said. They find a home and community gathering in the newspaper office at 211 N.W. Davis St.
“I make friends, and that’s
golden,” said Marlon Crump, 36,
the Street Roots vendor of the
year. He said he has no greater
ambition than selling the papers
from his regular spot at the Standard building, 900 S.W. Fifth Ave.
He arrived in Portland three
years ago from San Francisco,
where he said police mistook
him for a convenience store robber, burst into his hotel room,
handcuffed him, and held him for
a half-hour before witnesses
pointed out he looked nothing
like the robber they were seeking.
“I had to get out of San Francisco,” he said. “I couldn’t handle
the hassle. Someone told me
about Portland, and I love it
here.”
After some months homeless,
he now lives in an apartment
above the Street Roots office, and
pays 30 percent of his profits as
rent. How much is that? He
doesn’t say. “I don’t have an average,” he said.
But diligent vendors can make
$100, $200 a week or more, some
say.
Street Roots offers vendors a
stack of papers for 25 cents each;
they sell them for a cover price of
$1. Many buyers pay more because they believe in the cause
and the vendor.
“The average price the vendors receive is about $2 an issue,”
Bayer said. “At holiday times, it’s
not usual for buyers to give more
— $5, $20, even a $50 or a $100-dollar bill.”
Business, not charity
The fee that vendors pay will
rise to 35 cents with the new edition to pay extra printing costs,
Merkel said.
Street Roots is one of 120
street newspapers worldwide.
They join together and share
stores as the International Network of Street Papers. The INSP
includes papers in 40 countries,
claiming a combined readership
of 6 million per edition, Bayer
said.
The papers include Real
Change in Seattle, Street Sense
in Washington, D.C., Street Sheet
in San Francisco, and 38 other
papers in North American cities.
Street papers are independent
publications that allow individual vendors and writers to work
themselves out of homelessness.
Along the way, their goal is to
work for a more just world.
“I hope next time people see a
Street Roots vendor, they give
pause what that man or woman
is trying to do,” said Joanne
Zuhl, the Street Roots managing
editor. “This is not a charity. This
is a serious newspaper, and that
man or woman is proud of it, and
so are we. Pick up a copy, and
read it.”
She notes that Street Roots
has been in the forefront of the
struggle of income equality in
Portland.
The paper was a major backer
for the creation of Dignity Village, the cooperative homestead
for the formerly homeless. The
paper has broken stories on addiction, failure of the Social Security system to support some disability clients, homelessness, affordable housing, climate
change, veterans’ and women’s
issues, and prison reform.
“We have a great team of people, and our philosophy is we
cover stories that are important
to the community, and the reporters are passionate about
what they are doing. And that is
not always the case in every
newspaper. Maybe we’re blessed
by having that chemistry here,”
Zuhl said.
Relying on freelance writers,
the paper recently hired a fulltime reporter, Emily Green, who
in the latest issue delivered an
investigative piece on men and
women soldiers who say they
were poisoned by toxic chemicals at the Army’s Fort McClellan.
Many social activists and
members of the paper’s editorial
committee write for the paper, as
well.
Zuhl herself came to Street
Roots in 2003 from a mainstream
media job at the Post-Crescent, a
55,000-circulation weekly in Appleton, Wis. She said she came to
dislike corporate journalism after Gannett Co. bought the paper
and laid off some of her colleagues and mentors. Bayer said
he came off a hardscrabble life of
addiction and wandering that began with his dropping out of
school in 10th grade. With no formal training in journalism, he
arrived at Street Roots about the
same time Zuhl did in 2003, and
learned newspapering from the
ground up.
Backed by hundreds of volunteers, Zuhl and Bayer have built
credibility with social service
and government agencies as
well as the public.
“It has been a pleasure watching Street Roots grow in
breadth and depth over the past
15 or so years,” said the Rev.
Kate Lore, social justice minister at First Unitarian Church in
Portland.
“They’ve gone from being a
small production giving voice
to folks on the margins to becoming a major force for housing justice and advocacy in the
Portland metro area.
“There are few of us who
don’t encounter Street Roots
vendors on a regular basis these
days,” Lore said. “We’ve had a
vendor outside our church doors
for too many years to recall. It is
reshaping how we understand
homelessness. I celebrate the
fact that they will now be printing with more frequency. If we’re
going to turn the tide on the
growing numbers of people
without homes, we need them
now more than ever.”
In addition to extending the
reach of the newspaper, Street
Roots on Jan. 2 will upgrade its
news website.
“We want to extend our
reach, and help people understand what that vendor on the
street is doing,” she said.
“Working in poverty is a both
beautiful and tragic thing,” Bayer said. “We see the strength of
the human spirit, and the idea
that people can band together
and overcome poverty. We joke
we are a group of rugged individualists who come together
with the community and do
great things.”
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By DEAN BAKER
For the Tribune
because we are a newspaper, and
we don’t shy away from tough issues,” Bayer said. Telling the
truth sometimes offends, he explained.
Still, he said, “We’re not a ‘gotcha’ organization, but we want to
tell the story of humanity in a
way that offers perspective to the
larger community. We are proud
of the investigative journalism
that we do, but we are not out to
ruin people’s lives.”
At any one time, about 70 to
100 vendors sell the newspaper
throughout the city, said Cole
Merkel, 26, the paper’s vendor
coordinator. Vendors come and
go; some 400 vendors are employed throughout any one year,
he said.
500092.121614
N ewspaper’s street
vendors earn c ash,
gain self - esteem
NEWS A5
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
How could food carts, strip clubs, politics be boring?
A
ccording to Fortune
magazine, a highranking Nike executive quit his job and
left Portland because he
thought the Rose City was a
“boring backwater hick-town
with no social scene.” Geez, so
not everyone thinks food carts
and the tram are cool?
•••
We would have been No. 1 if
they also included the number
of citizens actively involved in
daily protest marches downtown.
•••
Mark&Dave
UP IN THE AIR
Guess what? The Portland
City Council has decided to
postpone a street fee vote until
sometime after the first of the
year. Maybe we should all just
take a cue from Uber and ignore them.
•••
the show because that is how
much time he has to plead his
case with each call girl. He’s in
the wrong city. In 8 minutes, he
could encounter hundreds of
hookers on Sandy Boulevard.
•••
Why isn’t this based in Portland? A new reality show on
A&E features a retired Orange
County vice cop turned pastor
who hooks up with prostitutes
and tries to persuade them to
give up their deviant ways. “8
Minutes” is the working title of
According to the fine folks at
WalletHub, Portland is the second-best city for an active lifestyle. Among other things,
their study was based on the
number of sports clubs, swimming pools, public parks and
basketball hoops per capita.
For once, Blazer fans agree
with Magic Johnson. He said
he hopes the Lakers lose every
game this season. His logic: If
you’re going to be bad, be the
worst and get something out of
it. We just like to see the
mighty Lakers struggle — it
feels good.
•••
It’s a flight they won’t soon
forget. A San Francisco-toPhoenix airline passenger gave
birth midair. Luckily a doctor
and nurse were on board to
help with the delivery. The pilot announced the arrival of the
otherwise healthy baby boy as
passengers broke into applause. Then the baby started
kicking the seat in front of him.
•••
Donald Trump is rumored to
be considering a run for the
White House. Not sure if he’d
make a good president, but
pretty sure his hair was mentioned in the Senate torture report.
•••
A Salem man didn’t help
himself last week when he
showed up at the Marion County Courthouse facing drug
charges with heroin in his
pocket. He didn’t make it past
security where deputies found
hypodermic needles and cotton
balls with heroin on him. His
explanation — he thought he
left them in the car. We’re sure
his family is proud.
•••
Congratulations to Marcus
Mariota on winning college
football’s highest honor. His
Heisman Trophy acceptance
speech was heart-warming and
reminded us there are athletes
in Eugene with character who
have respect for their community and the people around
them. He made all of Oregon
proud.
•••
Remember that Rosetta
probe sent deep into space to
examine comets? Well it has
discovered water. Some scientists believe Earth got its water
from comets 4 billion years ago.
How long do you think it will
take before drought-stricken
California tries to get water
from that comet?
•••
Facebook is considering adding a “dislike” button to give us
more options when communicating online. The current
“like” button is great when
someone announces the arrival
of a new baby or a job promotion, but it never seemed right
when the news was about Nana
dying or a horrible medical diagnosis. Let’s hope they get to
work on that third category for
the pictures of your fresh-outof-the-oven bundt cake, ongoing political rants, or a repost
of how Bill Gates wants to give
you money. What we need is an
“I don’t really care” button.
•••
Pope Francis is in the news
again, this time for telling a
young boy that dogs go to heaven. He was trying to comfort
the kid, whose dog recently
died. We hope it made the boy
feel better, but it should scare
the rest of us. Do you really
want to spend eternity taking
care of every pet you’ve ever
owned? No thanks!
Listen to Mark and Dave 3 to 6 p.m.
weekdays on AM 860 KPAM. Follow
them at www.facebook.com/
themarkanddaveshow.
Lawmakers consider incentives to replace older wood stoves
By HILLARY BORRUD
Pamplin Media Group
SALEM — Oregon’s environmental agency could
soon explore options to reduce pollution from older,
dirtier wood stoves, if lawmakers move ahead with
draft legislation introduced
last week.
For three decades, the state
has required homeowners to
switch out older stoves when
they sell their properties. A
Senate committee introduced
draft legislation that could help
accelerate the process.
State Sen. Michael Dembrow,
D-Portland, said he wants the
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to study incentives the state could offer
people who switch to newer,
cleaner wood stoves or other
home-heating devices. Dembrow is chairman of the Senate
Committee on Environment
and Natural Resources and
worked with the committee to
write the wood stove legislaTRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
tion it introduced Monday.
A Senate committee has introduced draft legislation that would provide incentives for people to replace
“We need to figure out a way older woodstoves.
to make it easier for people to
do those conversions so that that don’t produce as many and said he learned from the main a big, big problem.”
Legislators are meeting in an
they’re converting from their particulates,” Dembrow said. Department of Environmental
older wood stoves to new pellet Dembrow has been involved in Quality and others working on interim session this week, and
wood stoves or other things efforts to improve air quality the issue that “wood stoves re- they have started to introduce
bills for the 2015 session. The
proposed wood stove bill would
direct the Oregon Department
of Environmental Quality to
study alternatives and propose
legislation by Sept. 15, 2016 to
encourage people to transition
to cleaner wood stoves or “other cleaner home heating options.” Lawmakers will not
take any action on the proposal
until January, when they will
assign bills to committees for
the 2015 legislative session.
Oregon has regulated wood
stoves since 1983, when lawmakers passed the legislation
that requires wood stoves to
meet the emissions standards.
When people sell their homes,
they must remove any older
wood stoves that are not certified to comply with emissions
rules in place at the time they
were manufactured. The U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency later used Oregon’s
law as a model for nationwide
wood stove standards, according to the Department of Environmental Quality.
Fine particles in wood smoke
can cause health problems because they are small enough to
get into the lungs, and smoke
can also contain toxic substances such as benzene.
The draft bill calls for any
HEADACHES
RELATED TO YOUR NECK?
DEQ recommendations to encourage the use of biomass,
which includes wood scraps
and other materials that can be
burned to generate heat and
power. Dembrow said Oregon
used federal stimulus money to
help some people replace older
wood stoves, but the state used
up that money and now the
challenge is how to finance a
similar assistance program.
“This bill does not have the
answers to that,” Dembrow
said. “But it directs DEQ to
come up with some answers
and at the same time, to see if
there’s not a way that this can
be beneficial to our biomass efforts in this state, in the rural
communities in particular.”
Palmer Mason, legislative coordinator for the Department
of Environmental Quality said
that although the agency was
not involved in writing the
draft legislation, the agency
has gathered data on pollution
from wood stoves.
“We have data that show
wood stoves contributing fine
particulates in some places (in
Oregon) at levels that exceed
the federal air quality standards, and in other areas that
wood stoves are a major source
of air toxics,” Mason said Monday.
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Sustainable Life, the monthly special section
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A6 INSIGHT
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
School budget gives, then takes away
T
he 2015-17 budget proposed by
Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber
shows the importance of both
addition and subtraction.
The plan, released earlier this month,
raises some important, and quite familiar, questions about this state’s K-12 education system: How much money is
enough? When do statewide “reforms”
simply become distractions from classroom learning? And who knows best
how to spend billions of dollars in
K-12 funding — local educators or state officials?
Kitzhaber’s proposed budget offers up
$6.9 billion in school spending as a starting point for legislators, who come into
session in January. That number is a 3.4
percent increase over what was provided to K-12 schools in the current biennium — which is undeniably an addition.
However, it also comes with a number of
caveats and those aforementioned reforms — and that’s where the proposed
school budget begins to appear subtractive.
Kitzhaber proposes to prioritize earlychildhood education, including full-day
kindergarten, which is a worthwhile
goal. However, his budget does this at
the expense of students making their
way through the upper grades. Kitzha-
OUROPINION
Portland
Tribune
FOUNDER
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
MANAGING EDITOR
Vance Tong
DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR
Kevin Harden
VICE PRESIDENT
Brian Monihan
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Christine Moore
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
Kim Stephens
CREATIVE
SERVICES MANAGER
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SYSTEMS
MANAGER/WEBMASTER
Alvaro Fontán
NEWS WRITERS
Jennifer Anderson,
Peter Korn, Steve Law,
Jim Redden, Joseph
Gallivan, Kendra Hogue,
Peter Wong, Shasta Kearns
Moore
FEATURES WRITER
Jason Vondersmith
SPORTS EDITOR
ber’s budget also would impose new
ways of divvying up the money, potentially creating winners and losers
among school districts. The governor’s
proposal carves out dollars for other
specific causes, and when taken together, these changes could mean less money overall — not more — for your neighborhood school.
Fortunately, the governor’s budget is
merely the first step in a long process.
Kitzhaber’s initial spending blueprint is
likely to undergo major changes before
the Legislature approves a final 2015-17
budget. That’s good, because our local
lawmakers have a more direct connection to schools than does the governor’s
office — and they will be in a better position to decide how K-12 dollars should
be allocated.
When legislators talk with our local
educators, they likely will hear that superintendents, principals and teachers
would welcome just a little stability in
their schools before they are required to
make more changes. Already, Oregon is
introducing new statewide assessments
— the Smarter Balanced tests — that
will challenge students like they’ve never been before. These tests are directly
tied to the state’s adoption of the Common Core, which is still in progress.
The ever-increasing academic stan-
dards follow a time of financial insecurity for schools that only began to be corrected with the state’s current budget.
Meanwhile, the demands on teachers
and administrators only increase. As
one metro-area superintendent noted,
Oregon’s educators feel as if they are
constantly running after a moving target.
That’s why they may not be cheering
for even more changes envisioned in the
governor’s budget. One proposal is to alter the funding formula for English Language Learners students. Instead of allocating state revenue based on the
number of ELL in each district, the governor suggests distributing those dollars based on how quickly the ELL students become non-ELL students.
This concept has support from education reformers in Oregon, but it’s not
something easily implemented. The end
result could mean pushing students out
of ELL before they are ready, or punishing districts with large immigrant populations. Legislators should move slowly
with this type of reform, as unintended
consequences will abound.
Legislators also should examine
whether the state can afford the entirety of the governor’s focus on earlychildhood learning. Additional money
is targeted specifically for services to
enable preschoolers to be ready to enter school, for full-day kindergarten in
all districts, and for extra help so that
95 percent of third-grade students will
read at that level or better in five years.
Kitzhaber is correct in saying that investments made upstream in education
will pay off handsomely when those
children get to high school and college.
But the question is whether the shift in
funding puts the upper grades at risk.
The governor’s budget also shortchanges community colleges and the
university system, so legislators will
want to consider additional funding —
if it becomes available — for the years
beyond high school.
The governor’s budget isn’t robust in
the area of education — and when you
consider the portions earmarked for
specific initiatives, it actually falls below current funding levels. The Confederation of Oregon School Administrators estimates that the state education
budget would have to jump to $7.5 billion to pay for Kitzhaber’s reforms and
keep existing programs at their current
levels.
For most parents, and communities,
taking a step backward won’t be acceptable. And that means the state’s
legislators must work to make the
budget better.
READERS’LETTERS
More apartments? That’s not the answer
S
aying multifamily housing and apartments will
take care of most of the
needs of residents of the
Portland metro area is ridiculous, and Metro is writing a narrative to fit its beliefs (i.e., wanting to reduce pollution, since
farmland is not their main concern). Money and control is its
concern (Planning for Portland’s
future, editorial, Dec. 4).
The market has not built up to
the levels that will be needed in
the near term, and there has to
be a way for honest discourse
and policy discussion publicly
with quick reaction. But let the
facts and trends dictate future
moves, not bureaucrats pushing
an agenda.
Stop wasting money on pet
projects, and put money to work
on roads and sidewalks. The
need to look at upcoming trends,
like the need for single-level
housing for baby boomers, is paramount to improving availability
without negatively affecting affordability.
Complete communities ought
to be a focus with large parcels,
and there are plenty of large urban tracts where parking lots
can be turned into residential/
mixed use, as mentioned previ-
ously. There has got to be a way
to incentivize land owners to sell
lots, and also ways for cities and
local jurisdictions to have more
control and influence.
Nathan Neubauer
Beaverton
Our neighborhoods
need attention
There will be plenty of existing
single-family detached housing
stock for those millennials and
maybe some high schoolers to
raise a family within the existing
urban growth boundary — think
resale and remodeling (Planning
for Portland’s future, editorial,
Dec. 4).
Meanwhile, there is a fundamental failure on the part of
some suburban communities and
county boards of commissioners
to recognize that our inner
neighborhoods need revitalization to remain healthy and sustainable.
What we don’t need, though, is
upzoning in the heart of singlefamily neighborhoods, as allowed
in at least one jurisdiction (Clackamas County’s unincorporated
areas), to meet 80 percent of the
highest-yield density in the zone.
This is not a Metro mandate, but
a friendly developer gift by the
local jurisdiction to the homebuilding industry by politicians
and hearing officers, and which
is not accountable to voters.
This has been ludicrous and
really upsets our community
planning organization leaders
and neighbors, yet there is plenty
of land available for quality residential or mixed use along our
corridors. Southeast McLoughlin
Boulevard between Milwaukie
and Oregon City comes to mind,
littered with used-car lots, lowdensity lot coverage, and excessive, empty parking lots.
Furthermore, the Clackamas
Regional Central is only slated to
accommodate 228 dwelling units
in the next 20 years? How many
hundreds of millions of dollars in
public infrastructures have we invested in this area since the mid1970s?
Pat Russell
Milwaukie
Seeing into future is
tricky proposition
The Tribune’s contribution to
this ongoing discussion continues to be a rhetorical question in
place of an argument, “Is this
what (current) residents of the
region really want?”, with corollary poll results on local housing
desires (Planning for Portland’s
future, editorial, Dec. 4).
The answer to the question is
“no.” The current housing supply
is what the current residents demanded, which is why they
bought it, whereas the future
housing supply may or may not
be what future residents demand, which is the relevant question. That relevant question of
consumer demand cannot be answered in a poll of current residents’ desires, or even of future
residents’ desires, because housing demand is determined by location, services, schools and
price, and not whether I tell a
telephone pollster that I’d rather
have a big, big house than a small
house, condo or apartment.
The conversation won’t proceed until these points are engaged and digested.
Adam Leyrer
Northeast Portland
Home-building costs
are soaring, too
As a developer, I really wish
it was the case that our profits
are soaring. However, we too
have been bitten by the “supply and demand” bug (Expert:
Growth plan too costly, Dec. 2).
In this case, there is no supply of buildable land, so the
costs of procuring land are
outrageous. When you couple
in the huge system development charge fees that each
municipality enforces, the
land cost coupled with the
fees put new homes into a
very expensive realm.
Our costs to construct here
in Portland are not that much
different than some place like
Atlanta because we use the
same lumber, concrete and
materials in the building of
the home. However, I can tell
you with certainty that the
land and the SDC fees
charged to construct homes
there would be drastically different.
As long as the supply of
buildable land remains low,
the costs for that land will be
high, and therefore housing
prices will be high. I just wish
our margins would rise correspondingly. Sadly, they do not.
Wayne Pykonen
Southwest Portland
Steve Brandon
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DESIGN
Keith Sheffield
Brittany Maynard made a moral choice
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B
rittany Maynard, a terminally-ill woman who
moved from California
to Oregon to avail herself of Oregon’s Death with Dignity law, took her own life on
Nov. 1.
How we die has been a difficult issue for people of faith.
The Roman Catholic Church
has long opposed Oregon’s law,
twice re-affirmed by voters and
a series of court decisions.
Roman Catholics are not
alone in their discomfort with
Death with Dignity. As a minister in the United Church of
Christ and as a voter in Oregon,
I have had to wrestle with this
issue in direct ways. My deepest concern when this issue
was first debated was that people of limited economic means
would feel pressure to commit
suicide if the law were enacted.
Why burden your family with
mounting medical bills and
debt if there is a fast and easy
way out?
Oregon’s law was carefully
crafted, however, with many
safeguards in place. Two verbal
requests must be made to your
physician separated by 15 days.
A written request must also be
made.
Only those with a documented terminal illness may use the
law. A consulting physician, in
addition to your own, must certify that you are eligible to use
the law. The two physicians
must be in agreement that the
patient is “capable of making
and communicating health care
decisions for him/herself,” according to the “Compassion
and Choices” website.
The majority of people taking advantage of this law are
not poor and without means,
but highly educated and insured, which opens another
question: Are those without access to education and health
care being presented with every humane treatment option
available? This is the opposite
of my original concern.
The reality is that we cannot
always control pain. As a pas-
tor, I have watched some deaths
where pain management was
ineffective. We have, in recent
years, made important strides
in pain management, but some
deaths will be terrible, and the
reality is that such suffering
never has to happen.
Archbishop Alexander Sample of the Roman Catholic
Archdiocese of Portland recently said, “Assisted suicide offers
the illusion that we can control
death by putting it on our own
terms. It suggests that there is
freedom in being able to choose
death, but it fails to recognize
the contradiction.
“Killing one’s self eliminates
the freedom enjoyed in earthly
life. True autonomy and true
freedom come only when we
accept death as a force beyond
our control. Our lives and our
deaths belong in the hands of
God, who created and sustains
us. Through the suffering,
death and resurrection of His
Son, Jesus, we know that death
is not the final word. Eternal
life awaits all those who entrust
themselves to God.”
Death with Dignity is not
about freedom, at least not in
the way Archbishop Sample understands it. We cannot escape
death. There is no freedom to
change the reality of human existence. Too often we try to pretend there is by tying ourselves
to machines and medicines that
prolong both life and suffering.
Unimaginable human suffering need not precede eternal
life. Jesus sought to end suffering. It is difficult to hear a
Christian extol suffering as a
virtue.
Several years ago, a couple
came to the church I was then
serving. They had been married in that church, and now
the husband was dying from a
very painful disease. He had
decided that when he was close
to losing full control, and thus
the ability to control and communicate his pain and fear, he
would end his life under Oregon law.
They asked, with fear, if I
would perform his memorial.
Churches fighting Oregon’s
Death with Dignity law have
suggested or outright asserted
that eternal life is not available
for those who end their own
life, regardless of the circum-
stance.
I told this man and his wife
not to be afraid. God is a God of
love, compassion and healing.
Death is the natural end of life.
Oregon’s Death with Dignity
law is not about the freedom to
choose death; it is about recognizing the reality that death
comes, and that we can take
medically appropriate steps to
make that death as painless
and dignified as possible. Our
churches ought to put more
faith in the moral agency of our
parishioners to make difficult
decisions about life and death.
Of course, I conducted the
service. After all, I voted for the
law twice. It is good that this
man’s suffering ended when he
died.
Would I use it myself? As a
cancer survivor, I say it is hard
to imagine. Many who are terminally ill support the law but
do not use it. The choice, however, should be available.
The Rev. Chuck Currie is an
ordained minister in the United
Church of Christ and director of the
Center for the Peace and Spirituality
at Pacific University in Forest Grove.
Portland Tribune editorial board
Submissions
■ J. Mark Garber – president, Portland Tribune
and Community Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714; [email protected]
■ Kevin Harden – digital media editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5167; [email protected]
■ Vance Tong – managing editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5146; [email protected]
The Portland Tribune welcomes essays on topics of public interest. Submissions should be no longer than
600 words and may be edited. Letters should be no longer than 250 words. Both submissions should include your
name, home address and telephone number for verification purposes. Please send submissions via e-mail:
[email protected] You may fax them to 503-546-0727 or send them to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605 S.E. Lake Road, Portland, OR 97222.
NEWS A7
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Soldier missing since Conviction
’09 turns himself in
Lawrence Franks of
Damascus gets four
years for fleeing Army
Pamplin Media Group
When Lawrence Franks
disappeared March 30, 2009,
his family — as well as the
Damascus community —
had no idea what had happened.
Franks is a 2008 graduate of
West Point and was stationed
at Fort Drum in New York. On
that day in March, he didn’t
report for duty. His father, Dr.
Larry Franks, had spoken
with his son March 29, 2009
and received no indication of
the mystery that would shortly ensue. Shortly after his disappearance, the New York
State Police determined he
had flown to Zurich, Switzerland. That was the last the
Franks family had heard of
their son — until recently.
Franks had enlisted in the
French Foreign Legion under
the name Christopher Flaherty, according to an article
by The New York Times. That
name was given to him by the
Legion, as is done with other
recruits. He elected to turn
himself in this year and was
sentenced Monday in New
York to four years in prison on
charges of conduct unbecoming of an Army officer and desertion with the intention to
shirk duty. He also was dismissed from the U.S. Army.
During his sentencing,
Franks said he left due to suicidal urges that only grew
with his arrival at Fort Drum
in 2009. He said he thought
only a life-changing decision
would save him.
In an interview with The
New York Times last week,
Franks reportedly said he
wanted to go to war, but the
year remaining until his deployment was too long to wait
and, coupled with his suicidal
urges, led to his decision to
flee the county.
“I needed to be wet and cold
and hungry,” Franks said. “I
needed the grueling life I
could only find in a place like
the Legion.”
He continued that he feels
bad about the pain he caused
not only his family but his unit
— who reportedly searched
for his body when he disappeared.
Before making the decision
to join the Legion, Franks decided he could not put his family through suicide. What he
described to The New York
Times as an epiphany left him
invigorated.
“I was really excited about
something,” he said. “For the
first time in years I wasn’t
thinking about killing myself.”
Brig. Gen. Stephen Xenakis,
a retired Army psychiatrist,
testified at Franks’ sentencing.
“He knew he was deserting
the Army and would be
charged, but killing himself
was a bigger sin,” Xenakis
said.
Within the Legion, Franks
dropped from a lieutenant in
the U.S. Army to a legionnaire
second class. Despite the poor
conditions — including being
deprived of sleep and food —
Franks said it helped him heal.
“Slowly, the depression
went away,” he told The
Times. “I wasn’t thinking of
killing myself anymore.”
He signed a five-year contract that ended in March
2014. That’s when Franks
turned himself into the Army
in Germany.
“To turn myself in was the
happiest moment in my life,”
he told The Times. “Now I was
coming home to my family and
to take responsibility for what
I had done.”
His father told The Times
that while they understood the
sentencing, they had hoped
Franks would be returned to
duty.
“It just seems like a waste
not to make the most of someone who is so strong and gifted
and generous,” Larry Franks
said. “Still, my hat is off to my
son. He thought this was the
best choice at the time, and he
saved his own life.”
At the time of his son’s disappearance in 2009, Larry
Franks said in a letter to the
editor published in the Gresham Outlook that he had hoped
for something positive to come
from the situation.
doesn’t put end to
conspiracy theories in ’8 9 case
asked him to bring a gun. Kellcy says he agreed and saw Natividad receive an envelope
from men in a car with official
Oregon government license
plates. In the affidavit, Kellcy
By JIM REDDEN
says the envelope contained
The Tribune
$20,000. Kellcy also says one of
the men in the car was Hoyt
The 1989 murder of the Or- Cupp, the warden of the Oreegon Department of Correcgon State Penitentiary, who
tions Director Michael
has since died.
Francke is the state’s version
Kellcy’s story sounds fantasof the Kennedy assassinatic, but it is not the first time he
tion.
has blown the whistle on corSince the case officially was ruption in the state prison sysclosed with the conviction of tem. In 1986, his last name was
petty Salem criminal Frank Johnson and he was one of the
Gable in 1991, the number of informants who triggered an
alternative suspects and con- Oregon State Police investigaspiracy theories has multi- tion into corruption at the peniplied. Although a Marion Coun- tentiary and its Farm Annex in
ty jury decided Gable stabbed Tillamook. A report commisFrancke to death during a sioned after Francke’s death
botched car robbery outside concluded the investigation unthe corrections headquarters, covered evidence of crimes
some now swear Gable was not committed by corrections offithe lone knifeman.
cials, but did not root out all of
The most recent perthem.
son to officially go on
Even more remarkrecord is Gregory Allen
ably, Francke personalKellcy, a career criminal
ly met with Kellcy to
now serving time for
discuss the investigarobbery. He has signed
tion before he was
an affidavit suggesting
killed. In his affidavit,
that a Salem drug deal- AN ONGOING Kellcy said he had no
REPORT
er named Timothy Naidea Natividad intendtividad was paid to kill
ed to kill Francke, but
Francke by corrupt corhad known Natividad
rections officials. Kellcy’s affi- for years and often acted as an
davit is included in the appeal enforcer for him on drug deals.
recently filed on Gable’s behalf
Natividad was shot and
by the Federal Public Defend- killed by his wife during a doer’s Office in the U.S. District mestic fight two weeks after
Court in Oregon.
the killing.
In his affidavit, Kellcy says
he drove Natividad to the cor- Others name Natividad
Three other affidavits filed
rections headquarters on Jan.
17, 1989, the night of the killing. with the appeal link Natividad
Kellcy says he dropped Nativi- to the killing.
One was signed by his exdad off and picked him up in
the area about an hour later. wife, Elizabeth Godlove. It says
When Natividad got back in that Natividad came home at 3
the car, Kellcy said he appeared a.m. on a night in mid-January
shaken and had blood on his 1989 with wounds to his leg and
clothes. When Kellcy asked Na- head. He explained them by
tividad what happened, Nativi- saying he had been in a fight. A
dad told him to keep his mouth couple days later, in the course
shut or they could both be of threatening Godlove, Natividad said that he had killed a
dead.
Kellcy also swears that a few man.
A short time after that, Nadays later, Natividad asked to
be taken to receive a payoff. tividad showed Godlove a large
Kellcy says Natividad did not sum of money and told her he
say what the payoff was for, but wanted to take a trip to Hawaii
Gable appeal reveals
more affidavits filed,
implicating others
TRIB
SERIES
COURTESY: MICHAEL FRANKE FAMILY
Timothy Natividad is a former Salem drug dealer who some think killed
Oregon Corrections Director Michael Francke.
or move away from Salem.
According to Godlove, after
the Francke killing, Natividad
began acting more paranoid
and violent and took knives to
his brother to have them
cleaned and sold. Godlove’s sister confirmed that Godlove told
her family that Natividad had
come into a large amount of
money and wanted to take her
and their son out of Oregon.
Affidavits also were signed
by two of Natividad’s friends,
Vince Taylor and Wayne Alvis.
Both said Natividad was dealing drugs in the prison system
prior to the killing and made
statements indicating Natividad intended to kill a highranking corrections official.
Taylor says Natividad told him
that he intended to “take care
of someone” who was learning
too much about what was going
on.
Alvis said that a few days before the killing, Natividad said
he planned on “taking care of
business” at the corrections
headquarters by “tak[ing] out”
a “big guy” who posed a threat
to “Tim and his.” When he
heard the news about Francke’s
death, Alvis says he assumed
Natividad had killed him.
According to the appeal, rumors about Natividad’s involvement in the killing surfaced
before the start of Gable’s trial
in May 1991. In June 1989, an
inmate told state investigators
that Natividad attempted to
hire him in late 1988 to kill
someone in “corrections,” but
he declined. The story was confirmed by the inmate’s wife.
In the fall of 1990, Godlove
told Gable’s defense attorneys
that she believed Natividad
was involved in the murder.
State investigators confirmed
the statement and interviewed
Natividad’s family, who provided access to his clothing and
numerous knives.
A short time later, defense
attorneys sought discovery regarding Natividad, citing due
process. The trial court denied
the request. The state later
moved to exclude evidence related to third-party guilt, including evidence related to Natividad. The defense never
sought to introduce any evidence regarding Natividad during the trial.
Gable was convicted of killing Francke at the end of the
trial in June 1991 and sentenced to life in prison without
parole. The appeal asks that
Gable either be granted a new
trial or be made eligible for parole. The Oregon Department
of Justice is preparing its response to the appeal.
Oregon’s largest
source of local news.
Multnomah Days
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Identical twins turn 100
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— See SPORTS, Page 14
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One last
patrol for
a retired
sheriff
Glass half full
Local author publishes e-memoir about life,
death and love
By DREW DAKESSIAN
The Connection
Chastity Glass is beautiful.
Her blonde hair falls in waves, just barely grazing her
tanned shoulders. She wears glasses, sometimes, and her unlined face is rarely without a small, comforting smile. She
looks like she could be a surfer, or possibly a librarian.
What sets her apart from the scores of other blonde, tan
and happy 30-somethings from California is a poem tattooed on her right forearm:
“i am scared
of being scared…
and so,
I am not
even if i am.”
She was 27 years old, living in Hollywood and recently
dumped when she met Anthony Glass, a handsome video
editor who worked at her office. They were instantly attracted to each other, exchanging poetic and increasingly flirtatious emails and quickly falling in love. Just a few months
after they started dating, their love story, a story of what she
calls “that young 20s love when you start making plans,” was
unexpectedly and indelibly altered.
He was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer.
When he told her, she didn’t think twice about whether to
stay with him: they were in this together
VOLUME 28, ISSUE 36 • $1.00 / 35 CENTS HOME DELIVERY
Q With new control tower in works, airport boosts local job market
Bill Bell gets visit from
police K-9 unit, ride-along
with Wilsonville police
This DC-3 was
restored by
Aerometal
International, a
company
dedicated to
rebuilding
vintage aircraft
to FAA
standards.
By JOSH KULLA
The Spokesman
Back in 1971, law enforcement technology
did not include much, if anything, that could
remotely be considered digital.
That’s the world of policing inhabited by Bill
Bell, who served as sheriff of Wasco County from
1968 to 1971. Today, Bell is retired and lives in Wilsonville. And the tools used by current police officers are replete with technology only hinted at in
1960s cinema.
“Everything from the concept of a computer in
the car that automatically reads license plates and
talks to you, that’s ‘Star Trek’ stuff,” said Sgt.
˜Ãˆ`iÊ̅ˆÃÊi`ˆÌˆœ˜\ÊThe Buckeroo final standings
Local filmmakers rush for contest
Aurora airport becoming an
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Vol. 108 No. 49 Two sections, 24 pages
Wednesday, August 14, 2013
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Crash critically
injures chief of
J.C. ambulance
By Holly M. Gill
News Editor
Susan Matheny/The Pioneer
Debris is strewn across U.S. Highway 97 on Aug. 8, at the scene of a crash that critically injured
Madras resident Don Heckathorn, chief of Jefferson County Emergency Medical Services.
The chief of the Jefferson County Emergency Medical
Services, Don Heckathorn, 64, was critically injured Aug.
8, when his motorcycle was struck by a car on U.S. Highway 97, at Dover Lane.
Heckathorn, who has managed JCEMS since March
2007, was northbound on the highway around 3 p.m.,
when an eastbound 1996 Cadillac, driven by Gerald Scott
Green, 36, of Prineville, failed to stop at the stop sign on
Dover Lane, and collided with Heckathorn's motorcycle.
According to Oregon State Police, which is investigating the crash, Heckathorn, who was riding a 2012 Harley
Davidson motorcycle and wearing a helmet, sustained
life-threatening injuries, and was transported by Lifeflight
to St. Charles Bend. Green was not injured.
No citations had been issued as of Monday.
The Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, JCEMS, Jefferson County Fire Department, and Oregon Department of
Transportation assisted at the scene. The highway was
closed for nearly an hour, and investigators remained at
See Ambulance on page 3
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A 19-year-old Molalla man
injured Sunday, June 30,
while trying to rescue his
drowning friend on the
Molalla River is asking for
help to find his backpack that
floated away on an innertube
during the ordeal.
Kyle Sauvageau had a
standard black
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strapped to his
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Inside this edition: Canby’s annual 3-on-3 basketball tournament,
Nothing but Net, filled up the streets around Wait Park Saturday. —
See stories and photos on page 12, 13 and 15
Canby Herald
SERVING CENTRAL OREGON SINCE 1881
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50 CENTS
Downtown
parking
issues get
exposure
■ Among all 36 counties
the local weekly wage
ranked fourth in the
Fourth Quarter 2012
BY RAY HUGHEY
[email protected]
Members of the Canby business
community met July 23 as the
Downtown Parking Task Force to
address parking issues in the city’s
core.
“We invited downtown business
owners and managers to come together
to discuss some potential parking
changes,” said Jamie Stickel, manager
of the city’s Main Street program.
Stickel led the session attended by
about 15 business people. Mayor Brian
Hodson also participated in the meeting held in the police department community room.
READ: PARKING, Page 18
PRINEVILLE, OREGON, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013
VOL. CXXXI — NO. 71
Crook County’s average weekly wage
Walden
confident ranks higher than most of the state
about
Bowman
legislation
Jason Chaney
Central Oregonian
Crook County may have one of
the highest unemployment rates
in Oregon, but those who earn an
TRAINING
income make more on average
than most the state’s other counties.
A recent report compiled by the
U.S. Department of Labor’s
Bureau of Labor and Statistics
revealed that Crook County ranks
fourth in weekly wage among all
36 counties for Fourth Quarter
2012, and second out of the 31
counties with fewer than 75,000
residents.
Washington County tops the
state at an average of $1,101 per
week, while Multnomah County
averages $988, Benton County
$918, and Crook County $908. All
four counties exceed the state
average wage of $871 per week,
but three of them fall short of the
$1,000-per-week national average.
Crook
County
Economic
Development Manager Russ
Deboodt attributes the higher
See WAGES, page A7
RUSS
DEBOODT
FIRED UP ABOUT
FIRE COVERAGE
to be ready to take care of
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A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Memorial Tributes
Celebrating The Lives Of Local Residents
In Loving Memory
Jean Gordon Mitchell
Service Directory
In Loving Memory
Elmer (Gene)
Henderson
Portland
832 NE Broadway
503-783-3393
August 17, 1928
- December 6, 2014
Milwaukie
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503-653-7076
Tualatin
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503-885-7800
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Jean Gordon Mitchell of Newberg, Oregon, died on December 7,
2014.
She was born Jean Kane Gordon on
November 4, 1923, in Prineville, Oregon. Jean was the
second of three children born to Eric Henry Gordon
and Marion Kane Gordon. Jean’s siblings included her
older brother, Wallace and younger sister, Mary.
The Gordon family moved to Dufur, Oregon, in
April 1924 when Jean’s father took a job as District
Ranger for the Barlow District of the Mt. Hood National Forest. It was in this capacity that Eric Gordon
named Jean Lake after his eldest daughter in what is
now known as the Badger Lake Wilderness Area in
Mt. Hood National Forest.
Jean graduated from Dufur High School in 1941.
She attended Eastern Oregon College as a freshman
prior to transferring to Oregon State College. In 1946,
Jean graduated from OSC with a degree in Home Economics and subsequently completed a post-graduate
internship in hospital dietetics at Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital.
In 1948, Jean started her professional career as Director of Meal Services for Pacific University in Forest
Grove, Oregon. It was in that capacity Jean met her future husband, James Rice McDonnell. The couple married in Forest Grove on August 14, 1949.
Jim and Jean had three children: Mark Gordon McDonnell, born November 22, 1951, David James McDonnell, born August 15, 1955, and Gordon Rice McDonnell, born May 26, 1965.
Jean and her family moved to Newberg in 1956
where Jim was hired as a teacher and varsity basketball
coach at Newberg High School. Jean also took a position as a home economics teacher at the high school.
After teaching and coaching for 18 years, Jim McDonnell passed away in 1974. The Newberg High School
baseball diamond is named in Jim’s honor.
In 1972, Jean McDonnell was hired as Program Coordinator at Portland Community College for adult and
post-secondary classes in Newberg, Sherwood, and
Tigard. Jean served the college for fifteen years prior
to her retirement in 1987.
In February 1988, Jean married Benson Mitchell, Jr.
Jean and Ben were married for 18 years until Ben’s
passing in September of 2006. Together they lived between Newberg and Surprise, Arizona. Jean and Ben
frequently travelled together across the United States
visiting family, friends and Ben’s Air Force buddies.
Jean also enjoyed trips to Europe with friends and family members.
In addition to belonging to several bridge groups,
Jean was active in PEO, Delta Delta Delta Sorority,
Newberg F.I.S.H. food bank, Newberg Methodist
Church, and Dandy Dancers. Jean was also famous for
her annual Christmas Irish Coffee party.
In addition to her sister, Mary Wilson, Jean is survived by her eight children, fifteen grandchildren,
three great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and
nephews. Family members include: Susan Mitchell,
Ben and Kayda Mitchell, Mark and Lynn McDonnell,
Mary Rietze, David and Brenda McDonnell, Margaret
and Bob Reed, Will and Denise Mitchell, Gordon and
Jill McDonnell. Grandchildren include Erin and Eric
McDonnell, Kelsey McDonnell Coulter, Katie Mitchell
Severeid, Libby and Harry Rietze, Jim and Elizabeth
McDonnell, Emily Reed Putney, Abby and Austin
Reed, Jack and Kate McDonnell, Molly and Megan
Mitchell. Great-grandchildren include Sophia and
Caitlin Severeid, and Madeline McDonnell.
A memorial service will be held at the First United
Methodist Church on December 18 at 11:00 a.m. A reception at the church will follow. Jean’s remains will
be interred at Willamette National Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, remembrance donations may be made to the
PEO Chapter DX scholarship program. Checks may be
mailed c/o First United Methodist Church, 1205 Deborah Rd., Newberg, Oregon 97132.
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In Loving Memory
Tonya Ann Davis
Gene Henderson was born
to Elmer Graden and Anna
Henderson in Guthrie, MO. He
passed away in Oregon City due to COPD. He
was 86 years old. Mr. Henderson enlisted in the
Army and served during the Korean conflict. He
retired from Greyhound as a bus driver.
He is survived by his wife, Rose, of 60 years
and daughter Sandi King of Lincoln City, sons
Stephen Henderson of St. Helens and Larry
(Faith) Henderson of Oregon City as well as 9
grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by his parents and four sisters.
No service will be held per his request. In
lieu of flowers, please give to the charity of your
choice.
November 10, 1972 November 27th, 2014
Tonya Ann Davis, 42 died tragically on
November 27th, 2014 at her home in Sherwood, OR.
She was born November 10th, 1972 in Bangor,
ME; daughter of Barbara Davis-Fitzpatrick and
Lawrence A. Davis. Tonya attended schools in Dexter,
ME and Ayer MA prior to moving to Oregon in 1988
with her mother Barbara and Sister Tina; later moving
to Sherwood, Oregon in 1999.
Tonya fulfilled her lifelong dream of starting her
own Accounting Firm known as “Premier Financial
Services” (PFS) where she was a professional
bookkeeper for over 20 years and employed her niece
Chelsi Davis. She also owned an online business
known as “The Western Boutique” selling Western
Handbags and Clothing. Her love for her two dogs
“Romeo” and “Kodi” as well as her late dog “Sunny”
encouraged her to become a member of online groups
such as “Rover” and “DogVacay” where she took care
of other family dogs for extended periods of time.
For those who didn’t know Tonya, she was very
strong-willed and always had a friendly and funny
disposition. The time she spent with friends & family
meant the world to her.
Tonya loved to travel to Lincoln City, renting
vacation homes to spend time with her family walking
on the beach collecting agates and shells. Fogarty
Beach & Siletz Bay were among her favorites. She
loved nature and enjoyed hummingbirds, taking care
of the birds in her yard. She also loved to take long
drives in the countryside.
Tonya is survived by her Mother Barbara DavisFitzpatrick; niece Chelsi Davis; sister Tina Flock;
nephew Cameron Flock; extended family and close
friends; as well as her two dogs “Romeo” and “Kodi”.
She was predeceased by her dog “Sunny.”.
Hedi Huber
December 21, 1942 to November 27, 2014
Hedwig “Hedi” Huber
passed away peacefully at her
home in San Juan Capistrano,
Calif. on Nov. 27, 2014,
concluding her final battle with
cancer. Born Hedwig Dorothea
Greissinger on Dec. 21, 1942 in
Forchheim, Germany, she was
the youngest of seven children.
At age 17 she immigrated
to the United States, settling
in Akron, Ohio with her
brother and his family. A few years later Hedi
moved to Tacoma, Wash. to attend the University
of Washington. In 1964, she married Robert Huber.
They lived in Bellevue, Wash., Lake Oswego, Ore.,
and Charlotte, N.C. Their last move was to San
Juan Capistrano, Calif., to be close to their son Eric,
daughter-in-law Andrea, grandchildren Alexandria
and Stefan and great-grandson Logan, who were all at
her side in the final days.
She loved to cook and entertain and, as the perfect
hostess, people were drawn to her, making friends
everywhere she went. Her big smile, generosity and
love will be missed.
A mass and celebration of life will be held at
Mission Basilica Catholic Church in San Juan
Capistrano, Calif. at 10 a.m. Jan. 7, 2015.
CelebrateTheir Life
Placing an obituary is a final keepsake of a loved
one and provides a memorial tribute to their life.
The Pamplin Media Group offers both paid tributes and death notices as a
service to the community.
To place a tribute, please go online to any of our newspaper websites and fill
out our easy to use tribute form.
You can also email your tribute and photo to the appropriate newspaper.
Please feel free to contact any of our newspaper representatives with any questions.
487976.090414
498502.121714
November 4, 1923 – December 7, 2014
NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
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■ Annual intergalactic battle helps Red Cross save lives Hales
tiptoes
toward
big ideas
Will mounted
patrol ride off
into the sunset?
Nonprofit group takes to TV to buck
Novick plan to cut police horse unit
One year in office,
mayor puts priority
on revenue, parks
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
That’s a real Portland police car behind
“Grimm” actor David Giuntoli. When it
comes time to knock down a door or make
an arrest on the show, Portland police are
often used as consultants. Local cops say
they sometimes watch the show just to
see familiar faces and places, and for an
escape from reality.
COURTESY OF SCOTT GREEN/NBC
WATCHING
THE DETECTIVES
STORY BY
PETER KORN
S
ure, in TV shows like “Law &
Order”, art imitates life. But
Portland police detective Sgt. Joe
Santos says sometimes on the job,
life imitates art.
A while back, a lieutenant was telling
him about a case that immediately brought
to mind a Morgan Freeman/Brad Pitt movie, Santos says.
“A brother killed his sister, and she was
rotting in the bathroom,” Santos says.
“And the brother was basically walking over her
decaying body for two
weeks to go to the bathroom. He was an obese
guy and laying on the
bed, and they went in to
clear the house and he
said, ‘I’m sorry.’
“And I was thinking,
‘Man, that really happened. That’s exactly like
— Brian the movie ‘Se7en.’ ”
Another case two
Schmautz,
ex-Portland weeks ago had Santos
police officer thinking about the popular Showtime series
“Dexter.” He was searching “the nastiest house in North Portland.” Garbage was strewn everywhere,
he says. “I’m walking into the kitchen and
stepping on pizza boxes full of rotting
pizza that’s green and slimy and moldy.
With every step I’m slipping around. I get
to the basement and there’s no power and
we find the bad guy hiding in a closet pretending to be asleep.
“It reminds me of every TV show I’ve
“You get
juries that
think, ‘Why
didn’t they
take DNA
on that car
prowl?’ ”
■ Cops find something to love, hate
in lineup of police TV programs
Mayor Charlie Hales included
the agreement in the 2013-14
budget summary his office reSupporters of the Portland leased after the council approved it.
Police Mounted Patrol are
The Friends’ group had
pushing back against two developments that threaten the raised the first $200,000 and was
in the process of transferring it
future of the horse unit.
to the city when
First, CommissionNovick made his proer Steve Novick proposal in a Feb. 3 memo
posed eliminating the
to the other council
unit in next year’s
members.
budget.
Then the Portland
“We didn’t know
Development Comanything about Commissioner Novick’s
mission declared the
stable area at Centenproposal and the
nial Mills unsafe, forcproblems with Cening the horses to be
tennial Mills before
relocated to a farm in
they were announced.
Aurora. The unit has
It’s put us in a holding
been housed at the agpattern until we can
ing former flour mill
meet with him and
on Northwest Naito
Mayor Hales and
Parkway and Ninth
learn more about
Avenue since the PDC
what they’re thinkbought it in 2001.
ing,” says Bob Ball, a
The one-two punch
real estate developer
came as a surprise to
— Bob Ball, and reserve Portland
the Friends of the
police officer who
Friends of the
Mounted Patrol, a
serves on the Friends’
Mounted Patrol board
nonprofit organizaboard of directors.
of directors member
tion that thought it
Ball says he was
had struck a deal with
caught off guard by
the City Council that
Novick’s proposal beguaranteed the unit would con- cause of the council agreement.
tinue at least through the next
“I testified before the council
fiscal year.
and thanked them for agreeing
When the council considered to continue the unit for two
eliminating the unit in the cur- years, and nobody said they
rent budget, the Friends’ group weren’t agreeing to anything at
promised to raise $400,000 to that time,” Ball says.
keep it going over the next two
See HORSES / Page 13
years — $200,000 each year.
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
“The mounted
patrol is very
popular and
versatile.
People love
the horses. ...
Why would the
council want
to get rid of a
program that
connects so
well with the
public?”
Darth Vader and his Imperial Stormtroopers stop holiday shoppers in their tracks outside Macy’s (above).
Jedidiah Maxwell of Canby has his picture taken with Queen Apailana (right).
BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY B
THE FORCE IS
OUT FOR BLOOD
Story by Jim Redden • Photos by Jaime Valdez
ever watched,” Santos says. “If it’s ‘Dexter,’
the crime scene is some beautiful modern
house that’s white with perfect blood
splatter. Our crime scenes are garbagefilled, single-wide trailers that a hoarder
lives in.”
COURTESY OF NBC
“Let’s be careful out there” was Sgt. Phil
Esterhaus’ weekly roll call command on
“Hill Street Blues,” and a memorable one,
according to a number of Portland police
officers. Esterhaus was played by actor
Michael Conrad.
See DETECTIVES / Page 2
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Portland Police Officer Benson Weinberger walks Diesel into the safe
portion of the Centennial Mills building where the Mounted Patrol
prepares for their shifts.
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Jeff Shang joins fellow neighbors at a volunteer work party for the Sabin Community Orchard last Sunday.
Grant funds paid for the addition of bee-friendly trees, plants and shrubs to the orchard last summer.
Next time you’re out and
about in Northeast Portland,
stop and smell the flowers.
That’s what the Sabin Community Association hopes you
will do on their Bee Friendly
Garden Tour, a program heading
into its third season this spring.
“This is about providing forage and native habitat” to bees
and other pollinators, says Diane
Benson, a neighborhood board
member and co-founder of the
project. “Bees need food, and all
of us can do that.”
In three years, the tour has
come to include 41 stops — 40
Murphy shines his flashlight inside and
sees three young black men. They aren’t
wearing gang colors or smoking dope.
On a crisp, clear Thursday evening They’re just sitting, engine off. Dale and
Murphy want to talk to them.
with the temperature outside hoverWith Portland police rolling out the
ing around freezing, Portland Gang
city’s new hot-spot policing
Enforcement Team offiprogram, the unfolding
cers Brian Dale and Patscene involving Dale and
rick Murphy pull their
Murphy and the young
squad car to the curb on
Southeast 119th Avenue. SECOND OF TWO STORIES men they are about to confront is a microcosm of
A black two-door Honda
what criminologists say might be the
Civic is a good four or five feet from
the curb — the result of either a hor- program’s defining moment.
The evidence is clear that done right,
rible parking job or someone intentionally half-blocking the street.
See POLICING / Page 11
As the officers walk toward the car,
residents’ homes plus the pub- do, but it’s not a way to save bees.
licly owned Sabin Community You’ve got to get these flowers
Orchard, at Northeast 18th Ave- out there,” says Mace Vaughan,
another co-founder of the Bee
nue and Mason Street.
Each stop has a “Bee Friendly Friendly Garden Project who is
Garden” sign, funded by the the pollinator program director
neighborhood association. There for Portland’s Xerces Society for
are maps and a telephone hot- Invertebrate Conservation.
Vaughan hapline that provides
pens to live six
information about
blocks from Beneach site. Hundreds
son in the Sabin
of people throughNORTHEAST
neighborhood. The
out the city and subthird co-founder of
urbs have come to
the project is Tim Wessels, a piocheck it out.
Now the Sabin neighborhood neer in the field and a master
would like to inspire other neigh- beekeeping instructor at Oregon
borhoods to create a similar State University, president of the
Portland Urban Beekeepers, and
project of their own.
They’ll hold a public forum founder of Bridgetown Bees, an
March 19 to share their experi- effort to breed a winter-hardy
ences and suggestions for how to Portland queen bee.
Serendipitously, Wessels, too,
start a bee-friendly garden.
They’ll answer questions about lives in Sabin.
The project started, Benson
plant types, outreach, pesticides
and more.
“Beekeeping is a fun thing to
See BUZZ / Page 12
Portland teachers reached a tentative deal Tuesday.
Follow the story at portlandtribune.com.
Tech firms
seek a place
in economy’s
spotlight
Intel is well-known, but other
companies fly under the radar
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
TribSeries
TribTown
DEAL MIGHT AVERT A STRIKE
Portland Tribune
Online
See HALES / Page 9
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
Portland Tribune
Inside
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAMIE VALDEZ
Gang Enforcement Team officer Patrick Murphy — after asking
permission — pats down a young black man who had been sitting in a
parked car on Southeast 119th Avenue. Officer Brian Dale looks on.
WHAT’S LOCAL FOOD?
SELECTING STALLS FOR THE JAMES BEARD PUBLIC MARKET.
— SEE SUSTAINABLE LIFE SECTION
There are more high-tech companies in the
Portland area than Intel — and many of them
are desperately trying to get that message
out.
“There’s a ton of world-class companies in the
Portland region, but the word hasn’t gotten out
on that,” says Sam Blackman, co-founder and
CEO of Elemental Technologies, a Portland-based
company working on ultra-high definition signal
transmission technology.
According to Blackman, the lack of awareness
See TECH / Page 10
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
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By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
See BLOOD / Page 2
Police say conversation a priority; others
say random stops are recipe for trouble
It’s the bees’ needs, and Sabin has it
Sabin residents raise
awareness about
pollinators, habitat
Wars’ and ‘Star
Trek’ both have a
lot of fans who turn
out, and we always
have a lot of fun.”
The competition, similar to the Oregon vs. Oregon
State Civil War blood drive, has been
held three times in the past. It has been
won twice by “Star Wars” fans, which
is not surprising, considering the popular franchise has two active fan clubs in
the Portland area, both of which have a
lot of practice supporting charitable
events in authentic-looking, homemade costumes.
Most recently, more than a dozen of
them showed up to support the Salvation Army bell ringers outside of the
Pat downs likely
to increase as cops
take to the street
Shootouts every day?
Everybody likes to look in the mirror at
least a little bit, right? So if you’re a cop,
that means you probably watch some cop
shows on TV, at least a little bit, right?
If nothing else, cops know that what the
rest of us see on TV and in movies influences what we think of them.
Surprisingly, none of the officers we put
the question to admitted to watching real-
lood will
flow when
fans of
“Star
Wars” and “Star
Trek” rally their
supporters later this month.
At least that’s the hope for the upcoming American Red Cross blood
drive that pits supporters of the two
popular entertainment franchises
against each other to see who can turn
out the most donors. The Galaxy Blood
Drive is from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 28, at the donor center at
3131 N. Vancouver Ave.
“This is a great event for us,” says
Red Cross spokeswoman Daphne
Mathew. “Donations normally drop between Thanksgiving and New Year’s
because people are so busy. But ‘Star
Portland Mayor Charlie
Hales pledged Friday to pursue a new tax
measure to
pave city
streets in
2014, as well
as funding to
build out the
city’s parks
system.
Hales also
told the Portland Tribune
“I don’t feel
editorial
a need to
board that
he’s exploring look at a
a major reno- map of the
vation of Veterans Memo- city and
rial Coliseum, come up
hoping to pigwith new
gyback on the
World Indoor visions at
Track & Field the
Championships coming moment.”
— Mayor
to the Oregon
Charlie Hales
Convention
Center in 2016.
(See related
story, Page A8.)
Hales gave himself a “B”
grade for his first year in office,
but said he succeeded in setting
a tone of “collegiality and plainspokenness” at City Hall.
One example: he’s making no
bones about the need for a new
revenue source to pave dozens
of miles of the city’s gravel and
mud streets.
“There’s no point in kidding
you, or kidding ourselves,” he
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
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09PT4
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HOME
DELIVERY
A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Suspense is over: GMO
labeling measure fails
ADVERTISEMENT
Doctor’s Digestion Corner
If You Take Prescription
Meds to Fight Bouts of
Heartburn, Acid-Reflux
and Constipation
YOU COULD BE A
WALKING TIME BOMB
Despite recount,
legal challenge,
voters doom law
By PETER WONG
Salem bureau
Despite a flurry of activity last
week, the unofficial, but final result of a statewide recount was
the same: Oregon voters rejected
a labeling requirement for genetically modified food by 837
votes of 1.5 million cast.
Though voters in Multnomah
County — Oregon’s most populous — and seven others approved it, Measure 92 failed in the
other 28, including Washington
and Clackamas counties.
The recount: 753,574 against,
752,737 for.
The difference from the initial
tally, before Secretary of State
Kate Brown ordered a recount on
Nov. 24, was 25 more votes
against the measure.
Measure 92 was failing, although narrowly, in initial returns.
Supporters made aggressive
use of a law that, a week after the
Nov. 4 election, made public the
names of those voters whose ballots are challenged. Although
there is no way of knowing how
those voters decided on candidates or measures, supporters
targeted voters in areas where
But what if I told you I can solve almost any
digestion problem; so you eat anything you
want without suffering the consequences?
It’s a lot easier than you think.
Overproduction of stomach acid can lead to bouts of:
9Heartburn
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9Sour Stomach 9Belching
9Constipation
9Irritable Bowl
Liza H Leal, MD
Chief Medical Officer
Meridian Medical Dental Healthcare
Look, I get it. It’s almost
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Eat a slice of pizza and
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Even the simple act of going to the
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If this sounds like you, you’re not
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Prilosec®, Prevacid®, Pepcid® and
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[email protected]
twitter.com/capitolwong
Marc Solomon
points to Oregon role
in changing opinions
501515.121814
Like thousands of others, you could
end up with brittle bones, hip and wrist
fractures and a damaged spine. Plus put
you at risk for nasty infections that can
land you in the hospital for weeks. And
it’s especially true if you’re over age 50
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Coalition that opposed it.
Judge Henry Kantor ruled the
next day in Multnomah County
Circuit Court that he lacked authority under Oregon law to
grant the request.
Supporters then announced
they would concede. They could
have challenged the results of the
recount, but once the election
was certified, the only legal remedy available would have been a
new election.
Similar ballot measures failed
in California in 2012, in Washington in 2013, and in Colorado on
Nov. 4. V ermont’s Legislature has
passed such a law, which is being
challenged in federal court.
At $29.2 million — $8.7 million spent by supporters and
$20.5 million by opponents —
Measure 92 was the costliest
ballot-measure campaign in
Oregon history. Both sides reported thousands in cash on
hand by Dec. 15, but when all
bills are paid, supporters estimate they will owe $72,837 and
opponents will end up with
$381,303.
The total votes cast on Measure 92 were exceeded in the
Nov. 4 election only by those
cast on Measure 91, which legalized recreational use and retail
sales of marijuana. The ballot
totals exceeded those cast for
governor and U.S. senator.
Author on front lines
of marriage rights battle
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Measure 92 prevailed.
The difference then dropped
below the 3,000-vote threshold
required to trigger an automatic
recount.
Supporters of Measure 92
went to court early last week,
hoping to include in the recount
about 4,600 ballots that county
elections officials had disqualified because of signature discrepancies.
Supporters had hoped to pick
up additional votes for the measure, because at that point, the
“yes” side had gained little in the
22 counties where recounts already were completed. One of
them was Multnomah County,
where the measure won a 63 percent majority.
“Those voters did everything
right, completing, signing and returning their ballots on time. If
their voices could be heard we
believe it would result in victory
for Measure 92,” says Kevin
Glenn, who issued a statement on
behalf of the campaign for it.
Under Oregon’s mail ballot
system, signatures on the return
envelopes must match those on
registration cards in county elections offices. If they do not match,
voters are invited to clear up the
discrepancies.
“The proponents of the measure don’t like the outcome, so
now they want the court to
change Oregon’s election system
just for them,” says Pat McCormick, treasurer of the No on 92
As national campaign director
for Freedom to Marry, Marc Solomon has been involved for more
than a decade in working for
marriage rights for same-sex
couples.
But when he was in Portland
to discuss “Winning Marriage,”
Solomon said his book is more
than just a personal memoir or
even a public history of the
TRIBUNE PHOTO: PETER WONG
movement that has resulted in
marriage rights in 35 states, in- Marc Solomon, the national campaign director for Freedom to Marry,
signs a copy of his new memoir at Portland’s Q Center.
cluding Oregon.
“I want to show what it really
takes to win a major civil rights
battle,” he said in an interview including a slew of Republican some Republicans. Solomon says
following a public appearance candidates backed by then-Gov. many other Republicans, “at the
last week at the Q Center in Port- Mitt Romney to unseat pro-mar- very least, have not expressed
riage Democrats in 2004. All the strong opposition.”
land.
Monica Wehby, the GOP nomi“It takes really hard work — GOP challengers lost.
However, that same year, Ore- nee for the U.S. Senate in Orethe slog it takes in state legislatures, in the courts, and in public gon was among the 14 states gon, even featured in a television
opinion. It’s hard physically and where voters amended their ad the endorsement of one of the
emotionally, and it takes persis- state constitutions to ban mar- same-sex couples involved in the
Oregon lawsuits. (The other five
tence and dedication from many riages by same-sex couples.
Over the next decade, some couples endorsed Democratic
people.”
He also says he hopes his book states joined Massachusetts in Sen. Jeff Merkley, who defeated
will be read by advocates for ac- granting marriage rights for Wehby.)
Solomon says the marriage
tion on climate change, economic same-sex couples — some
equality, prevention of gun vio- through the courts and others movement for same-sex couples
via legislatures, such as in New has patterned itself on the 1960s
lence, and other causes.
“I want to share some of the Y ork — and others including Or- battle to overturn laws against
lessons we learned in the mar- egon created civil unions or do- interracial marriage. When the
U.S. Supreme Court nullified
mestic partnerships.
riage fights,” he says.
Marriage advocates had been such laws back in 1967, there
By focusing on the decadelong marriage movement, Solo- poised to submit signatures for were still bans in 16 states, mostmon’s book is broader than two the repeal of Oregon’s ban, but ly in the South. Now, as the high
others published earlier this they chose not to proceed after court considers whether to acyear: “Forcing the Spring: Inside Judge Michael McShane over- cept a same-sex marriage case,
the Fight for Marriage Equality,” turned the ban in U.S. District bans are in effect in 15 states.
by New Y ork Times reporter Jo Court.
Unfinished agenda
Becker, and “Redeeming the
Dream: The Case for Marriage Public opinion matters
But Solomon says there’s still
Equality,” by David Boies and
Solomon, in the interview, a way to go, both in terms of marTed Olson, the lawyers in the le- says advocates for gay, lesbian, riage rights in those remaining
gal challenge to California’s 2008 bisexual and transgender people states and in nondiscrimination
ban on marriage by same-sex can thank Oregon, which has laws based on sexual orientation
couples.
seen more statewide ballot-mea- in many more states. Neither the
While the U.S. Supreme Court sure fights than any other state. federal government nor 29 states
nullified California’s ban on techNational polls have shown have laws barring LGBT discrimnical grounds in 2013, it decided support for marriage rights at 50 ination in employment, housing
in a related case that under the percent or more this year.
and public accommodations; Orconstitutional guarantee of equal
Solomon says public opinion egon passed such a law in 2007.
protection of the law, federal has been ahead of the politicians
“Ten years ago, so many peobenefits cannot be denied to in most instances.
ple said this was impossible; now
same-sex couples under a 1996
“What this campaign has so many people say it’s inevitalaw. That decision opened the done is taken the American ble,” Solomon says. “The one
way for federal judges to over- people on a journey of under- thing they have in common is
turn same-sex marriage bans in standing who same-sex couples that they allow themselves to sit
other states, including Oregon are and why this (marriage) is on the sidelines. It was not imon May 19.
possible 10 years ago, but it is not
important for them,” he says.
“We have moved the needle of inevitable now. We have to finish
A decade-long fight
public opinion pretty dramati- the job.”
Solomon says he is confident
Same-sex couples now have cally. We now are at a place
the right to marry in 35 states, where judges consistently find that equal rights for the LGBT
which is far more than the single that the equal protection guaran- community will prevail, and that
state — Massachusetts — where tees of the Constitution apply to the marriage movement has
made a big contribution.
it all began back with a court de- gay and lesbian couples.
“I think the movement over
“I think Congress is usually
cision in 2003.
“A lot of people said it would the last group to come our way the past decade has done a lot to
show Americans who gay people
be an impossible accomplish- on any cause.”
Most national Democrats — and same-sex couples are,” he
ment,” Solomon says.
After the Supreme Judicial including President Barack says. “It laid the groundwork for
Court’s ruling took effect in May Obama and Hillary Rodham letting all of the people know
2004, Solomon helped run the Clinton, the former secretary of what our values are, and that we
campaigns that turned back leg- state and likely presidential can- are doing the same things everyislative attempts to refer the is- didate for 2016 — have endorsed body else is doing. It’s had a big
sue to Massachusetts voters — same-sex marriage, as have effect on the views of society.”
NEWS A11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
(L to R) Sean Connors, Marcus Mariota, Margaret Connors and Jim
Connors pause together for a photo on the grounds of the 9/11
memorial in New York City. On Monday, Margaret and Sean — both
Forest Grove High School grads — and their dad, Jim, met the
Heisman Trophy-winning University of Oregon q uarterback and gave
him a tour of the memorial grounds.
WORSHIP
DIRECTORY
FGHS grads give
Mariota a 9/11
memorial tour
“(Jim) said, ‘Guys, do you
want to take Marcus around?’
And of course they said ‘Yeah!’ ”
Susan said Tuesday morning.
“They were thrilled.”
Margaret, 19, and Sean, 21,
are both “huge U of O fans,” acBy NANCY TOWNSLEY
cording to their mother. MarPamplin Media Group
garet is a sophomore and Sean
is a senior on the Eugene camA pair of Forest Grove
pus. “They’re crazy fans of
High School graduates stum- Duck football.” And both were
bled into a chance to escort
accomplished athletes at
2014 Heisman Trophy winFGHS, with Sean starring at
ner and University of Orewide receiver for the Vikings
gon quarterback Marcus
his senior year.
Mariota around New York
To make the date with MariCity’s World Trade Center
ota, a UO junior, the Connors
on Monday, Dec. 15.
had to drive 2.5 hours. But they
Sister and brother Margaret were happy to oblige, and got
and Sean Connors — children to meet members of Mariota’s
and step-children of Forest family in the bargain.
Grove residents Susan Fichter
“Margaret called me yesterand Rudy Marchesi —
day all excited,” said
were able to spend sevSusan. “It was comeral hours with Ameripletely unexpected.”
ca’s best-known Duck.
Mariota was in the
The meeting unfoldBig Apple over the
ed quite serendipitousweekend to receive his
ly, according to Susan.
Heisman during a gala
Her kids, both U of O
event in mid-town
students, were in New — Susan Fichter Manhattan, attended
of Forest Grove by more than a dozen
York visiting their dad,
Jim Connors — who
former trophy winworks as a manager for
ners. He also taped a
the National September 11 Me- “top-10 list” segment on the
morial & Museum and is a sur- “Late Show with David Lettervivor of the 9/11 attacks — for man.”
the holidays.
After helping the Ducks post
On Monday morning, they a 12-1 record this fall, Mariota
found out the person originally and his teammates will face
scheduled to give Mariota a the Florida State Seminoles at
tour of the memorial grounds the Rose Bowl Game on Jan. 1,
had to back out.
2015.
“They’re
crazy fans
of Duck
football.”
The Community of Ss Brendan & Brigid
A Contemplative Congregation
in the Catholic Tradition
500270.121614
Sean and Margaret
Connors get a meet and
greet with Heisman
Trophy winner
Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church
Proudly Presents the 9th Annual Drum
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Featuring Special Guest
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PORTLAND TRIBUNE PUBLIC NOTICE 121814
PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES
These notices give information concerning actions planned and
implemented by attorneys, financial institutions and government
agencies. They are intended to keep you and every citizen fully informed.
Space-reservation deadline for all legal notices is Thursday 10 am
one week prior to publication. Please call Louise Faxon at (503) 546-0752
or e-mail [email protected] to book your notice.
CLEVE B. COLSON
BINGHAM COUNTY PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
CODY L. BROWER
Deputy Prosecuting Attorney
501 North Maple, #302, Blackfoot, Idaho 83221-1700
Phone: (208) 782-3101
Attorney for the Plaintiff
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL
DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE
COUNTY OF BINGHAM MAGISTRATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF:
DILANIAN LYNN STOCKTON
D.O.B.: 06/24/2012, A Child Under Eighteen (18) Years of Age.
Case No. CV-2013-1563
NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR
TERMINATION OF PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP
TO: BLAKE JOHNSON
YOU WILL TAKE NOTICE that the Plaintiff, State of
Idaho, will call up for hearing its Petition to Terminate Parental
Rights on the 20th day of January, 2015, at the courtroom of the
Magistrate Division, Bingham County Courthouse, at the hour
of 10:30 o’clock a.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel can be
heard.
DATED this 3rd day of December 2014.
/s/ CODY L. BROWER
Deputy Prosecuting Attorney
Publish 12/18, 12/25/2014, 01/01/2015.
PT1326
496534.121614
Trib Info Box 0813
View legals online at: http://publicnotices.portlandtribune.com
496632.121814
A12 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Holidays
D
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of NW 23rd, NE Alberta, SE Hawthorne and other destination neighborhoods
where Portlanders can spend the entire day exploring the area. For a time,
the neighborhood’s reputation as a “happening destination” was growing
faster than the cost of renting commercial space.
New buildings, new shops and restaurants have all enhanced the
character of SE Division, and it has grown to become a vibrant and engaged
neighborhood. The street has long had must-visit, notable restaurants, but
now with the addition of more restaurants and shops, the area joins the ranks
The street was repaved and redeveloped in October 2014, after years
of planning. In many ways the changes were inevitable – after all,
neighborhoods, like all other living systems, survive by adapting and
changing.
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You will be pleasantly surprised by all the changes made on SE Division
Street in the last few years. The character of the street has been re-vitalized
and more than 50 new retail outlets have been added between the blocks
of SE 11th through 50th.
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NEWS A13
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Holidays
D
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It started with the advent of up-market
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Merchants and developers alike place a high
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walkable and more fun since the re-development.
It has seven new multi-story buildings and
supports as many as 50 new businesses, including
women’s boutiques, home & kitchenwares, men’s
clothing, dry goods, a magazine kiosk, a florist, an
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A14 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Legislators to
consider local pot
taxes, regulation
By PETER WONG
Salem Bureau
A new Senate-House committee will consider whether
to propose changes to the
voter-approved ballot measure legalizing recreational
use of marijuana.
The committee that will look
at Measure 91 will be led by Sen.
Ginny Burdick, D-Portland, and
Rep. Ann Lininger, D-Lake Oswego. Burdick, with 18 years
service, is one of the Senate’s
two senior members; Lininger,
a former Clackamas County
commissioner, is entering her
first elected term after her appointment earlier this year.
Leaders and members were
announced Thursday as part of
a list of legislative committee
appointments for the 2015 session, which opens Jan. 12.
Among questions the committee may take up are local
taxation on retail sales, in addition to the state tax authorized
by Measure 91, and a potential
merger of regulation of medical
marijuana — which has existed
since voters approved it in 1998
— and recreational marijuana.
Measure 91, which voters
passed Nov. 4, is a law that can
be amended by legislators.
Some of its provisions take effect July 1, but the Oregon Liquor Control Commission has a
deadline of Jan. 4, 2016, to start
receiving applications for licenses to grow, process and sell
it in retail outlets.
Other senators on the committee are Lee Beyer, D-Springfield; Republican Leader Ted
Ferrioli of John Day; Jeff Kruse,
R-Roseburg; and Floyd Prozanski, D-Eugene.
Other representatives are Peter Buckley, D-Ashland; Ken
Helm, D-Beaverton; Andy Olson, R-Albany; and Carl Wilson,
R-Grants Pass.
Kruse, Prozanski, Buckley
and Wilson have been involved
in previous legislative negotiations on related issues, such as
medical marijuana and hemp
cultivation. Olson retired from
the Oregon State Police as the
lieutenant in charge of its drug
enforcement unit.
[email protected]
Tech fl aws cause $ 2 3 million
in false child-welfare claims
Glitches raise more
questions about state
software investments
By HILLARY BORRUD
Salem Bureau
SALEM — Oregon has repaid more than $23 million in
federal funding, after flawed
software caused the state’s
child-welfare system to claim
money for which it was ineligible.
Managers at the state Department of Human Services were
aware of defects in the OR-Kids
information system when they
decided to go live with it in August 2011, but they forged ahead
anyway, according to an audit
report released by the Secretary of State’s office last Thursday. Three years later, DHS has
identified hundreds of unresolved problems with the software and still allows the system
to retroactively claim federal
reimbursement for services
provided more than two years
ago, which is beyond the federal
limit.
In a written response to the
audit, DHS Director Erinn Kelley-Siel defended OR-Kids as a
key investment that centralized
child-welfare program data that
previously was spread across
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paper files and seven separate
computer systems.
“Everyone who works in a
large organization knows that
complex technology systems
have challenges,” Kelley-Siel
wrote. “However, the ORKids system
provides essential technical
support for
child safety
and related
business operKELLEY-SIEL
ations for the
Oregon Department of Human
Services.”
Kelley-Siel was unavailable to
answer questions about the audit findings last Thursday, an
agency spokesman said.
The OR-Kids system processes payments to services
providers in the child-welfare
system, but also tracks provider certification, adoption cases,
eligibility for governmentfunded services and case management. DHS had an average
of 8,500 children in foster care
in 2012 and received 67,500 reports of child abuse or neglect
that year, more than 6,300 of
which the agency determined
were founded.
Similar to other recent state
technology projects, the ORKids system ran into delays and
cost overruns even before it
launched. The state contract
with company CGI Technologies and Solutions, Inc. was not
supposed to exceed $29.6 million, but the final cost of the
contract reached $40 million,
according to the audit report.
DHS’ total cost for the project
was $74 million. OR-Kids went
live in August 2011, more than a
year later than planned, and
DHS began to receive complaints that foster parents were
not receiving payments and
child-welfare managers could
not access important data.
OR-Kids was a crucial investment for Oregon, which needed
new software to comply with
reporting standards to receive
federal money for child-welfare
programs. The state child-welfare program’s previous system
relied upon several mainframe
computers and other databases
and spreadsheets, and it did not
meet federal reporting requirements, according to the audit
report.
DHS also indicated to state
auditors that it had another
goal: to “maximize state revenue by increasing the amount of
federal funds used towards the
cost of ongoing care,” according
to the audit report.
The OR-Kids system automates payment adjustments
that previously were handled
manually. For example, it evaluates whether children in the
system are eligible for federally
subsidized programs, and in
cases where DHS already paid
for services with state general
funds, OR-Kids may request
federal reimbursement. Flaws
in this system ultimately caused
DHS to obtain approximately
$23.9 million “from federal programs to which it was not entitled,” and OR-Kids understated
by $11 million the amount of
general fund and other money
DHS should have spent on childwelfare programs.
The audit looked only at financial controls in the OR-Kids
system, in an effort to assist
state and federal compliance
auditors. The Secretary of
State’s Office did not examine
how the state and private vendor developed and implemented the software system, nor did
it evaluate how well the system
performed case management
functions. However, the auditors did write that DHS had a
list of more than 290 unresolved problems related to data
quality and other issues as of
June.
Auditors also discovered two
instances when human error
caused the system to generate
huge overpayments to contractors. In July 2013, a state employee intended to pay a service provider approximately
$324 but because the employee
incorrectly entered information into the system, it generated a payment of $1.7 million.
A supervisor approved the payment, which was sent to the
provider, but ultimately recovered by DHS. The same scenario occurred at a different DHS
branch office in April, and the
agency again sent an overpayment of at least $1.7 million, according to the audit report.
State Sen. Betsy Johnson, DScappoose, said the audit was a
good first step, but the issue
deserves broader review.
“I appreciate the secretary of
state looking into the child welfare system from a fiscal perspective,” Johnson said. “I look
forward to a performance audit
sometime in the near future as
well.”
Johnson is a member of the
Legislature’s powerful Joint
Ways and Means Committee,
which writes budget bills. She
predicted that news of ORKids’ problems will only add to
lawmakers’ skepticism about
major state technology projects, following the failure of
Oregon’s health insurance exchange and other problems
with expensive computer systems.
“Based on the heightened level of scrutiny following the Cover
Oregon debacle, agencies are going to have to make much more
detailed, comprehensive and
substantiated requests for information technology investments,” Johnson said. “The Legislature, based on my observation of (the interim session this
week), has an exponentially
heightened interest in making
sure we are not party to another
catastrophic failure like Cover
Oregon.”
The problems disclosed in
the audit were not a surprise to
Janet Arenz, who closely followed implementation of the
software in her role as executive director of the Alliance of
Children’s Programs. The
group represents 47 organizations that serve children
around the state, from therapeutic foster care providers for
children with severe emotional
and behavioral issues, to addictions recovery. In recent years,
Arenz requested an audit of
OR-Kids in meetings with staff
at the Secretary of State’s Office, Oregon Department of Administrative Services and state
lawmakers.
“The problems with ORKids, which lasted over two
years for providers contracting
with DHS, was one of the most
difficult and, in some cases,
devastating challenges faced
by children’s service providers,” Arenz said. For example,
some service providers struggled to meet payroll obligations and took out personal
loans while they waited for
DHS to resolve payment errors
in OR-Kids.
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Weekend!Life
PortlandTribune
SECTION B
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2014
Portland
food lovers
THESHORTLIST
HOLIDAYS
Holiday Happenings
It’s a week before Christmas, and we’re in the middle
of Hanukkah. There are plenty of new listings on page B2,
since most events in the next
week have something to do
with holiday festivities. Included is a great place to shop
for a gift or two: Portland Saturday Market Festival of the
Last Minute, daily through
Christmas Eve at Waterfront
Park and Ankeny Plaza.
Meanwhile, here’s a
reminder of some of the
displays that can be viewed
next week and beyond:
DISPLAYS
will have lots to
feast on
Christmas Ships Parade
It’s the 60th edition of the
lighted boats on the Columbia
and Willamette rivers.
Nightly through Dec. 21,
christmasships.org (check for
schedule)
in 2015
Dairyville
Lights, decorations and
holiday themes fill the replica
Western frontier town at
Alpenrose Dairy.
3 p.m.-6 p.m. Fridays, 11
a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, through Dec. 21, Alpenrose Dairy, 6149 S.W. Shattuck
Road, alpenrose.com, free
‘ The Miracle of a Million
Lights’
There’ll be 10 Christmas
trees and decorations at the
Victorian Belle home in North
Portland, and the 2.5-acre
property is filled with more
than a million lights.
6-10 p.m. daily, through
Dec. 23,Victorian Belle,
1441 N McClellan St.,
VictorianBelle.com, $6,
$3 students/seniors
Winter Wonderland
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
Brunches and brewpubs, a
steady stream of food-cartsturned-restaurants, and artisan
products sprouting like a Chia
Pet.
If there’s one word for the food
and beverage trends of 2014, it’s industrious. Here in Portland, we’re
busy little beavers: baking and
brewing, mixing and harvesting,
distilling and building, hosting and
collaborating.
Chefs say the scene isn’t competitive, that the more restaurants that
sprout up in any given location, the
better. But truly, they know that the
hypercompetitive market will
squeeze out those
that don’t deliver.
In seven
months of Bread
& Brew reporting,
I’ve noticed two
critical factors in
each of the new
spots that are
thriving: authenticity and location.
People were skeptical that Fogo
de Chao, the international Brazilian
steakhouse that took over the huge
Niketown space downtown, would
be well-received in Portland. By all
accounts, the meatopia is thriving
because they’re true to their style
and they know their audience.
A counterpoint is Hawthorne
Lobster House, which seemed to be
forcing it a bit with their concept
and decor, and chose a peculiar location for their price point.
Tamale Boy, one of a number of
food carts that went brick-and-mortar this year, stayed true to its roots
by keeping its menu simple and
fresh. The owners created an inviting spot, just the right size, in an
under-the-radar cool location in the
Woodlawn neighborhood. That in
itself earns it instant street cred.
Cultured Caveman, the paleo
food cart that opened its first outpost in Kenton, had a little trouble
getting its expanded menu and systems in place. But they may start
filling tables if their grassroots base
and neighors adopt the place as
their own and start spreading the
buzz.
Then there was 10 Barrel, the
sellout heard ‘round the world. Will
Portlanders and craft beer fans forgive the Bend-based
brewpub for selling
to Anheuser-Busch,
just in time for its
2015 opening in the
Pearl District?
Judging by the
talent of the crew,
I’m guessing the
food and beer will
be top-caliber and innovative, especially now that expectations are so
high. Truth is, the notoriety the
brand picked up in this only-in-Oregon controversy probably generated enough customers for a long
time to come.
All of this, of course, is crust
around the edges of the real
bread and butter of Portland’s
globally delicious food scene,
food carts included.
Pok Pok, Salt & Straw and Voodoo Doughnuts are now global
names.
It’s the 22nd year of wowing
revelers with the drivethrough animated lights/
holiday display at Portland
International Raceway.
5-9 p.m. Sundays-Mondays,
Wednesdays, Thursdays, 5-10
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays,
through Dec. 28, PIR, 1940 N.
Victory Blvd., winterwonder
landportland.com, $18 per car
Festival of Lights
There’s no
mistaking the
attraction at
Hawthorne
Lobster House,
but its delivery,
decor and
location could
suit it better.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
ADAM WICKHAM
Bread&Brew
Biweekly food and drink
news and reviews
TRIBUNE PHOTO: ADAM WICKHAM
Tamale Boy, a food cart-turnedrestaurant, keeps its menu simple and
fresh, and its neighborhood location
earns cache.
Portland’s brewpubs continued
their attempt at world dominance
with the openings of Baerlic Brewing in June, Ex Novo in July, BTU
Brasserie in October and Fat Head’s
in November.
Ex Novo, in North Portland, is a
nonprofit brewery, giving 100 per-
cent of its net profits to charities including Impact NW, Friends of the
Children, Mercy Corps and International Justice Mission.
It’s a totally “Portlandia” concept,
but not the first of its kind. The Oregon Public House, the nonprofit
brewpub on Northeast Dekum, next
to Breakside Brewing, another phenom — has been at it since last
year.
Not to be outdone by the craft
beer scene, the city’s distilleries,
wineries and cider-makers have
been just as prolific, with openings
of Rolling River Spirits, Wild Roots
Vodka, and Reverend Nat’s Taproom, among others.
There’s yet another defining factor of food success in Portland: Less
is more. Whether it’s elevated
street food at Nong’s Khao Man Gai
or Bollywood, small plates at Tasty
n Sons or Smallwares, or classic
Americana at Ned Ludd or The
See FEAST / Page 3
COURTESY OF JOHN VALLS
Feast Portland, which included the Night Market at Z idell Yards (top), drew more than 12 ,000 people in 2 014 . Next year, it’s scheduled for Sept. 17 -2 0.
Violin prodigy has
the world on a string
Kiarra SaitoBeckman, a
violin prodigy
from Bend, will
be a featured
performer in the
Aaron Meyer
Holiday Concert
Series this week.
COURTESY OF FROM
THE TOP, INC.
Kiarra Saito-Beckman
to join Aaron Meyer
for holiday concert
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
A rock violinist himself, Aaron
Meyer knows something about being a bit wicked and a tad wild with
the bow and stringed instrument.
And, when he watches — and hears
— young Kiarra Saito-Beckman, Meyer continues to be very impressed.
“She attacks the violin likes she’s
going to rip it in half,” says Meyer,
who will joyfully play alongside SaitoBeckman at his holiday concerts this
week. “The maturity and focus she
plays with ... wow. What she’s doing on
violin is like competing for gold medals in any sport.
“For me to stumble upon someone
like her is unique and remarkable.”
Meyer stops short of saying SaitoBeckman is the best violin prodigy he
has ever heard. But the 15-year-old
from Bend is clearly on her way to
great things, he says.
Indeed, Saito-Beckman has focused
on a classical career, and she plans to
attend a prestigious music school after her days at Summit High School in
Bend.
It was there at Summit where Meyer first heard of her in March. Meyer
played a benefit concert for the Summit music department, and a teacher
told him about the young violinist.
Meyer later received a video of
Saito-Beckman playing “Carmen Fantasy” by Franz Waxman, an extremely difficult arrangement for violin, he
says.
See VIOLIN / Page 2
The Grotto features five
choirs each night, and the
Catholic shrine will be
adorned with a million lights.
5-9:30 p.m. daily, through
Dec. 30 (except Christmas
Day), The Grotto, Northeast
85th Avenue/Sandy Boulevard, thegrotto.org, $10, $9
seniors (65-over), $4 children
(3-12)
Peacock Lane
The popular street tour of
homes has started, and Portland Police, for the first time,
will manage street closures
to ensure pedestrian safety
and prevent neighborhood
gridlock.
6 p.m. to 10 p.m. nightly
through Dec. 31 (till midnight
Dec. 24 and 31), Southeast
39th Avenue and Stark and
Belmont streets, peacocklane.
net.
Pittock Mansion
The theme is “Christmas
Past, Present and Future.”
11 a.m.-4 p.m. through Jan.
2 (closed Christmas Day),
Pittock Mansion, 3229 N.W.
Pittock Drive, pittock
mansion.org, $10.50 adults,
$9.50 seniors (65-over), $7.50
youth (6-18)
Z ooLights
The Oregon Zoo, lit with a
million lights, has a new track
and trestle for its decorated
Zooliner and Centennial
engines and trains.
5-8 p.m. Sundays-Thursday, 5-8:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays, through Jan. 5 (closed
24-25), Oregon Zoo, 4001 S.W.
Canyon Road, oregonzoo.org,
$10 teens and adults, $9
seniors (65-over), $7 children
(3-11)
MISC.
Cirq ue Musica
The Oregon Symphony
teams with circus
performers.
7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 19, 2
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, Arlene
Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037
S.W. Broadway, orsymphony.
org, starting at $25
‘ Stumptown Soul Spectacular’
The concert and toy drive
benefits Shriners Hospitals
for Children.
8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 19,
Dante’s, 350 W. Burnside St.,
danteslive.com, $10 advance,
$12 at door
Portland!Life
B2 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Holiday
Happenings
MUSIC
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Celebrate the season with one of
Portland’s most beloved
Performers, Pianist/Composer
Portland Chamber Orchestra
The orchestra and Choral
Arts Ensemble present their
holiday concert, featuring
Handel’s oratorio “Judas Maccabaeus” and “Messiah,” at
metro-area churches. The
schedule: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec.
19, St. Matthew Catholic
Church, Hillsboro; 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20, St. Andrew
Catholic Church; 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 21, Agnes Flanagan
Chapel/Lewis & Clark College.
$15-$25; visit portland
chamberorchestra.org.
The Dandy Warhols
24th Season
21 Shows
December 12-26
Tickets on sale Now!
Purchase Tickets:
www.michaelallenharrison.com
Or call 503-255-0747
NO SERVICE CHARGES
Julianne Johnson
Sisters Cayla and Ashley Bleoaja
Brian Harrison
MAH Girls Choir
Several Community Choirs
Israel Annoh
Haley Johnson
Travis and Tanner Johnson
Fred Korman and Mac Potts from
“Ten Grands”
Special Appearance by Bill Schonely
“The Schonz” Dec. 12th & 16th
488574.112714
Christmas At
The Old Church
The Portland band puts on
its holiday concert for the
third year in a row, with this
year’s theme “Pagan Christmas.” The concert partly benefits Ethos Music Center.
8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20,
Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W.
Burnside St., crystalballroompdx.com, $20, $25 at door
This heart-warming holiday concert
series features Michael’s musical
family and many special guests —
The Historic
Old Church
‘ Comfort and Joy: A Classical
Christmas’
The Oregon Symphony, with
Paul Ghun Kim, is joined by
soprano Nadine Sierra for a
night of seasonal classical and
pop music, and a Christmas
medley sing-along for the
whole audience.
4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 21, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall,
1037 S.W. Broadway,
orsymphony.org, starting at $15
‘ An Appalachian Christmas’
1422 SW 11th Ave. (at Clay)
Period music,
dance, costumes
and traditions
are part of
Portland Revels’
2 0th anniversary
Christmas show,
Dec. 18 -2 3 .
The orchestra plays J.S.
Bach’s “Christmas Oratorio,”
with more than 40 musicians
and soloists taking part.
7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 18,
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral,
147 N.W. 19th Ave., starting at
$29
All Classical Portland radio
station presents Mark
O’Connor & Friends, featuring
the Grammy-winning violinist
leading the third-annual tour
of the show. The performance
features interpretations of
Christmas classics found on
O’Connor’s celebrated album,
“An Appalachian Christmas,”
which includes guest appearances by Alison Krauss, Renee
Fleming, Yo-Yo Ma, James
COURTESY OF
PORTLAND REVELS
1 p.m-4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec.
21, Beverly Cleary Middle
School, 1915 N.E. 33rd Ave.,
JewishNortheast.com, $5
Taylor and more.
7:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 22,
Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall,
1037 S.W. Broadway, portland5.com, $8.50-$57
STAGE
‘ Homegrown Christmas’
The fifth annual Christmas
shows by Michele Van Kleef,
Naomi LaViolette and
Christina Cooper continues in
Portland next week. It benefits
the Oregon Food Bank.
7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 22,
McMenamins Kennedy School,
5736 N.E. 33rd Ave., naomil
music.com, $5 suggested
donation
Portland Revels
COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER MCLALLEN
MISC.
Grammy-winning violinist Mark
O’Connor performs here on his
“An Appalachian Christmas” tour,
Dec. 2 2 .
Portland Menorah Lighting
Hanukkah lasts through
Dec. 23, and there’ll be nightly
candle lightings at Director
Park, Southwest Taylor Street
and Park Avenue. There’ll be
live music, Hanukkah foods
and activities for children.
Times for lightings: 5:30 p.m.
Dec. 18; 3 p.m. Dec. 19; 6 p.m.
Dec. 20; 5:30 p.m Dec. 21-23.
Portland Saturday Market
The market’s Festival of the
Last Minute is being held at
Waterfront Park and Ankeny
Plaza on Southwest Naito
Parkway. There’ll be handcrafted items and food, Santa,
roving carolers and warming
stations. The schedule: 11 a.m.5 p.m. Dec. 18-19; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Dec. 20; 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Dec.
21; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Dec. 22-23; 11
a.m.-3:30 p.m. For info: portlandsaturdaymarket.com.
Wanderlust Circus
The circus, Eric Stern (as
The Ghost of Hanukkah Present), 3 Leg Torso and more
combine on “A Circus Carol,” a
circus “revusical” based on
Charles Dickens’ classic tale.
Noah Mickens plays Scrooge.
8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Dec.
19-21, Alberta Rose Theatre,
3000 N.E. Alberta St., albertarosetheatre.com, $20 advance,
$15 (12-under), $40 preferred,
all tickets $25 at door
Stumptown SantaCon
The theme is “Northern
Lights,” and it’s all about
adults dressing up as Santa
and roaming the streets — and
bars — of our fair city. It starts
at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, at
Waterfront Park, and benefits
the Portland Police Bureau
Sunshine Division.
‘ Chanukah Wonderland —
Miracle of Ice’
The
Chabad Northeast Portland
is putting on the third annual
event, billed as Portland’s premier event on the fifth day of
the Festival of the Lights.
There’ll be something for kids,
arts and crafts, making
dreidels of clay, a modern-day
Judah Maccabee for photo opportunities, and kosher noshes
at a reasonable price.
The organization is in its
20th year and puts on its
Christmas production, which
is set in 17th-century London
during the Caroline era — the
time of Charles I of England
and the Three Musketeers
coming to life through period
music, dance, costumes and
traditions. It’s a new production by scriptwriter Gray
Eubank.
7:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday,
Dec. 18-19; 1 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 20-21; 7:30
p.m. Monday-Tuesday, Dec.
22-23; St. Mary’s Academy,
1615 S.W. Fifth Ave., portland
revels.org, $7-$39
ONGOING
Here’s a short list of some previously mentioned holiday happenings: “It’s a Wonderful Life,”
Stumptown Stages, Brunish
Theatre, through Dec. 28, stumptownstages.org; “A Tuna Christmas,” Oregon Repertory Theatre, Winningstad Theatre,
through Dec. 21, portland5.com;
“Christmas at the Old Church,”
Michael Allen Harrison, The Old
Church, through Dec. 26, michaelallenharrison.com; “The
Nutcracker,” Oregon Ballet Theatre, Keller Auditorium, through
Dec. 27, obt.org; “A Christmas
Carol,” Portland Playhouse,
through Dec. 28, portlandplay
house.com; “The Santaland Diaries” (through Dec. 26) and “A
Christmas Carol: Twist Your
Dickens” (through Dec. 24),
Gerding Theater, pcs.org.
Violin: She is branching out to nonclassical
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“I said, ‘C’mon, 15 years old, it’s
going to be amazing and blow me
away or be awful,’” he says. “After the first couple notes, I was
blown away. I thought, ‘This kid
can do anything with the violin.’”
Meyer immediately invited
her to perform in the 2014 Aaron
Meyer Holiday Concert Series,
which takes place 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 19, and 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20, at First Congregational Church, 1126 S.W. Park
Ave. ($30-$40, $25 children/students/seniors, aaronmeyer.
com). She’ll play “Carmen Fantasy,” as well as some traditional holiday music. She had also
joined Meyer, his violin playing
father Julian Meyer, and musical partner and guitarist Tim
Ellis to record the “Father and
Son” CD at Kung Fu Bakery
Recording Studio.
Saito-Beckman is excited
about playing holiday music in a
nonclassical way, although she’ll
team with the Meyers on a Vivaldi concerto movement.
“This is not typical Christmas music,” she says. “It’s
really exciting.
“I thought this would be super fun to play with him. ... I
would love to continue to have
fun and branch out in alternative styles. Having a wider view
of music overall makes you a
more well-rounded player. It
helps with musical decisions
and adds to playing.”
Saito-Beckman was adopted
from Vietnam by Bob Beckman
and Jan Saito. She first picked up
a violin at age 3. Her sister also
played violin, and her mother
teaches piano.
“Music has always been a part
of our household routine,” she
says.
She has been a solo performer
with the Charleston (S.C.) Symphony Orchestra, Central Oregon Symphony, Oregon Symphony, Oregon Ballet Theatre Orchestra and Coeur d’Alene Sym-
phony. She has won several competitions, and attends the prestigious Meadowmount School for
Music in the summer months.
Itzhak Perlman attended Meadowmount.
Meyer, who calls himself a
mentor and defers any credit to
her two instructors, has gotten to
know Saito-Beckman’s parents.
“Her parents don’t make her
practice. She practices six hours
a day,” he says. “Her focus is
mind-boggling.”
He adds: “She’s just a cool kid.
She’s not only a master on violin,
but her stage presence is amazing, great with the audience,
humble and down to earth, a nice
person. ... She hits a home run
everywhere she plays, and people freak out.”
Meyer plays with various musicians throughout the year, but
he looks forward to his holiday
events, which he calls “like our
harvest in winemaking.” He has
played in Bismarck, N.D., and
British Columbia, lots of concerts
locally, and corporate engage-
G.F.
HANDEL’S
MERRY & BRIGHT!
ments at Nike and Columbia
Sportswear. The season spikes
with the four performances at
the First Congregational Church,
where he has played concerts
around the holidays for the past
13 years.
“It’s a lot of fun, a lot of music,
and I like the families and kids,”
he says.
Next to him will be a very talented teen.
“I just think that the kind of
music he does is really neat,”
Saito-Beckman says. “I’ve never
heard anything quite like it. I’ve
not heard much violin and rock
music together. It sounds awesome, upbeat, you want to tap
your foot.”
Meyer knows that Saito-Beckman could excel at anything.
“I know she’ll do great, it’s
just a matter of how she wants
to design her career,” he says.
“She’s 15. It’s just a matter of
time for bigger things to come.
She’s focused on a classical
path, but she has abilities to do
anything.”
Messiah
& JudasMaccabeus
483354.121014
AN ECCUMINICAL CONCERT WITH TWO HOLIDAY TREASURES
S t. Henry Catholic Church, Gresham - Dec. 17, 7:30 pm
Downtown Portland.
507 SW Broadway
phone: 503.227.3437 www.JudithArnellJewelers.com
496629.121814
St. Matthew Catholic Church, Hillsboro - Dec. 19, 7:30 pm
St. Andrew Catholic Church ,Portland - Dec. 20, 7:30 pm
Lewis & Clark College, Flanagan Chapel, Portland - Dec. 21, 3:00 pm
TICKETS and INFORMATION AT:
PORTLANDCHAMBERORCHESTRA.ORG / 503.771.3250
Portland!Life
LiveMusic!
Noted harmonica
player Mitch
Kashmar
appears with his
Blues Band in a
post-Christmas
show at Duff’s
Garage, Dec. 2 7 .
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
Dec. 18
Rock times three
OK, this show is gonna be fun
with a capital ... oh heck, it’s
gonna be all caps FUN! The
Muffs, fronted by the indomitable Kim Shattuck, bring the
punk rock sounds of Southern
California our way. Shattuck
was fired by The Pixies (their
loss, by the way), thus giving
her maximum cred with every
indie and alt rocker on Earth.
In a more just world, The
Muffs would have their own
reality TV show or maybe a
string of oil rigs, but we live in
this cruel world where we must
catch joy when we can, and
you’d be insane to miss this gig
if joy is what you value.
The Muffs, Summer Cannibals, The Suicide Notes, 9 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 18, Doug Fir
Lounge, 830 E. Burnside St., $13
in advance, $15 at the door. Info:
503-231-9663, dougfirlounge.com.
Jane’s predilection
It’s not clear who “Dr. Jane” is
from this here press release
we’ve got, but apparently she
COURTESY OF DELTA
GROOVE
heme, 1530 S.E. Seventh Ave., $12
in advance, $15 at the door. Info:
503-360-1233, viedebohemepdx.
com.
does have good taste in music,
which is why her “annual JaneFest” features the Karen Lovely
Band.
Lovely, front woman and
multi-award-winning Northwestern blues singer, will be
joined by Doug Rowell on guitar,
Timmer Blakely on bass, and
Justin Matz on drums. Lovely
can rock a joint, but she’s also
more than deep enough to sing
with empathy, like that friend
you share a cup of coffee with
while her man sleeps off his
drunk in the other room.
Neither of you wants him to
awaken because you know she’s
staying for the kids and these
off-the-record conversations are
her only comfort these days.
Karen Lovely Band, 8 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 18, Vie de Bo-
Dec. 2 0
LIFE B3
After returning to the States,
he moved to Seattle to study
ethnomusicology at the University of Washington. There he
worked with the groups Carmona Flamenco, The Rez Quartet and others ranging in style
from Hungarian Csardas and
Gypsy swing to flamenco. In
2000, Hulskamp co-founded the
Vancouver, British Columbiabased Arabic/flamenco group
Aire with ney (flute) player and
singer Emad Armoush. He now
lives in Portland, composing
and performing with his own
trio as well as Shabava and
Seffarine.
The Nat Hulskamp Trio, 8-11
p.m. Friday, Dec. 19, Bar Mestizo, Andina’s, 1314 N.W. Glisan
St. Free. Info: 503-228-9535,
andinarestaurant.com.
Dec. 2 0, 2 7 , 2 8
One, two, trio
The Nat Hulskamp Trio’s
music combines his background
in flamenco guitar with elements of bossanova, jazz and
Middle Eastern music. Hulskamp began studying guitar
with guitarist/composer Paul
Chasman at age 17. He soon was
introduced to flamenco guitar
by Jose Solano. Hulskamp’s interest in the influence of Arabic
music on flamenco led him to
study oud (a stringed instrument) in Morocco.
Dec. 2 7
Pizza with a pulse
One of Portland’s most musically eclectic nightspots is Mississippi Pizza, which features
three shows you want to catch
this month.
First off is the Professor Gall
Band, a Tom Waits-meets-New
Orleans outfit with a horn section, sharing the stage with innovative cellist Skip VonKuske
and Don Henson from Sneakin’
Out, at 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20.
Feast: C ity’s f ood sc ene only getting b etter
■ From page 1
Country Cat, the food is beautiful, truthful and soulful.
Yes, we also love fried chicken, bacon and things cooked in
lard (hello, Lardo). We love the
Chefstable’s growing empire of
16 Portland restaurants and
bars, including the eightmonth-old giant wine bar, Coopers Hall, and the two-monthold tongue-in-cheek hot spot,
Big Trouble (in Old Town/
Chinatown).
Next year, Portland chefs
and artisans will no doubt continue to crank out the masterpieces, minus the occasional
short-timers.
What we shouldn’t forget,
while we’re Instagramming
our favorite dishes, is that we
might be devoting the same
amount of attention to social
issues involving food.
Leaders at City Hall talk a
lot about access to fresh, affordable foods in each neigh-
TRIBUNE PHOTO: LACEY JACOBY
True-to-its-style Brazilian
steakhouse Fogo de Chao — with
general manager Alceu Pressi
(above) — is thriving as a
destination restaurant downtown.
borhood. That’s still a far cry
from reality. The Natural
Grocers to be built on Northeast Martin Luther King Jr.
Boulevard and the James
Beard Public Market, starting its design process now,
will go a long way toward
that goal.
Many of Portland’s chefs
are committed to the cause,
partnering with the Oregon
Food Bank and other charities through events like Feast
Portland.
This year, Feast’s four-day
extravaganza donated its net
proceeds of $62,143 to the
nonprofit Share Our
Strength’s No Kid Hungry
campaign and Partners for a
Hunger-Free Oregon.
A whopping 12,000 people
showed up to 35 events, with
84 chefs, 21 artisans, 23
breweries, 39 wineries and
13 distilleries.
They’ll continue to bring
the party next year; mark
your calendars now for the
Sept. 17-20 festival.
In the meantime, get yourself a bite of the goodness
around you and remember
these times for posterity.
With the boom of small incubator businesses and the
Then at 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
27, the joint’s monthly hip-hop
showcase (which usually takes
place on the last Sunday of the
month) takes place with R & D
and Glenn Waco headlining.
Finally, at 8 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 28, Three-Fifths Compromise reunites, showcasing the
jazz-fusion sounds it shared
around town from 1999 to 2005.
The band features Chris Hardin (Dirty Revival) on tenor
sax, George Mandis (Inky
Shadows) on guitar, Aaron Landau on bass, and Drew Shoals
(Train) on drums, and featuring special guests John Nastos
(Mel Brown Septet, Christopher Brown Quartet) on alto
sax, and Chris Frank (Inky
Shadows) on bass.
Mississippi Pizza, 3939 N.
Mississippi Ave. Info: 503-2883231, mississippipizza.com.
Gen-X chefs who are now
coming into their own, Portland’s food and drink scene in
2015 and beyond won’t just be
a novelty, it’ll be world-class.
Movin’ through Kashmar
All you need to know about
singer-harmonica-player Mitch
Kashmar is Stevie Ray
Vaughan once asked him if he
could sit in with his band.
Which, as any persistent harmonica-player brushed off by a
guitar-heavy blues band
knows, is the last thing most
guitar players ever ask.
A relaxed singer and soulful
harp player, Kashmar can blow
a chromatic harp with the
same confidence he can a diatonic, thus putting him in the
upper levels of harpdom, along
with cats like Little Walter,
Little Sonny, Paul DeLay and
Joe Powers, among others. He’s
also fronted WAR and shared
the stage with John Lee
Hooker, Big Joe Turner and
Jimmy Witherspoon.
Mitch Kashmar Blues Band
(Jimi Bott on drums), 9 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 27, Duff’s Garage, 2530 N.E. 82nd Ave. $10.
Info: 503-234-2337, duffsgarage.
com.
And the award goes to ...
Special shoutout this week
to Portland’s own Liv Warfield,
whose second album “The Unexpected” won the Soul Train
Award for Best Contemporary
Jazz Performance last month.
Warfield also was a nominee
for Best New Artist and was
nominated for Best Independent R & B/Soul Performance
for her horn-driven soul tune
“Why Do You Lie.” Warfield, a
backing vocalist for Prince,
who produced “The Unexpected,” has had a great year, performing on “Letterman,”
“Arsenio” and “The Tonight
Show.” You can hear her stuff
at livwarfieldmusic.com.
Brighten up the
holidays.
Twitter @jenmomanderson
Introducing
Landport® :
Security with Style
Sunset Pendant with Mother-of-Pearl Inlay
and Diamond in 14K Rose Gold $599
Chain included
Matching Earrings available
A charming steel lockbox that
protects packages. Perfect for homes
and small businesses. Share the access
code with your delivery driver.
www.thelandport.com 971. 258.1970
Washington Square
By Portland Seafood Company, 503-684-6200
NaHoku.com
496554.121614
488168.121814
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
THANK YOU
COFFEE • ESPRESSO
486436.121614
Clean & Safe for supporting
homeless youth
V i s i t O re g o n H u m a n e . o r g t o f i n d yo u r s .
Ty Barker, Clean & Safe board chair, and Dennis Lundberg, associate director of Janus.
The downtown Clean & Safe board provided
needed funding that keeps Janus Youth’s
Yellow Brick Road program delivering basic
services to homeless kids this winter.
HOME
DELIVERYCOMING TO A
HALES PLAYS BALL
MAILBOX NEAR PortlandTribune
PortlandTribune
YOU!
Getting your Portland news Yikes!
is easier than you think.
— SEE SPORTS, B8
BIG MAN, little playing time
— SEE SPORTS, B8
THURSDAY, MAY 1, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Food cart culture digs in,
grows up,Bike
has a few drinks
THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER
• PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
■ Not
longer
seen as
just a fad,
customers
relish new
options
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Brett Burmeister waits to dig into his burger at Cartlandia, the 30-food cart pod on
Southeast 82nd Avenue that was the first in the city to get a liquor license. Now a dozen
others have followed suit.
envoy
gears up
for fun
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
“People are now opening
A couple of years ago, Port- food carts with the
land’s food carts — beloved
intention of it being a first
by hipsters, downtown busistep in being a brand.”
ness people, neighborhood
— Steven Shomler
folks and tourists alike — offered strictly PG fare.
Now, they’re all grown up.
Nearly a third of the city’s
Thanks to a set of OLCC refood cart pods now serve beer, strictions on the licenses, the
wine or cocktails.
infusion of alcohol hasn’t had
Thirteen of the 36 food cart any ill effect on the industry.
pods citywide have in the past
“We haven’t seen any publictwo years sought and received safety impact at these businessliquor licenses from the Oregon es,” says Christie Scott, an OLCC
Liquor Control Commission.
The OLCC board
By JENNIFERspokeswoman.
ANDERSON
Film f estival, other
events lighten up
c ity’s b ik e c ulture
In partnership with Portland Police, Janus workers reach more than
2,000 kids a month by walking Portland’s streets every night, building
trusted relationships and offering a first step to a better life.
approved the restrictions as permanent rules last Friday, for the
first time differentiating food
carts from other outdoor areas
like patios and sidewalk seating.
The rules limit customers to
no more than two drinks at a
time (16 ounces of beer or cider,
6 ounces of wine, or 2 ounces of
distilled spirits); except to allow
two people to share a standard
750-ml bottle of wine, and three
people to share a 64-ounce pitcher of beer.
“No minors” signs must be
posted, and there’s no drinking
See FOOD CARTS / Page 14
The Tribune
There used to be a time
when cyclists in Portland
would whoop and holler during videos of other cyclists
blowing past stop signs,
weaving in
and out of
traffic and
disobeying
the rules of
the road.
Not anymore, says
Ayleen Crotty,
a self-proclaimed “bike
culturalist”
who’s produced dozens
of bike-themed
events, rides
— Ayleen Crotty and festivals
in Portland
since 2002.
“We don’t do that here,”
Crotty says. “We share the
road. It’s actually how we’re
living, staying alive, getting
around to our friends’ houses,
school and work. Nowadays we
don’t have that in Portland,
and we don’t need it.”
That’s not to say that the
bike-obsessed in Portland take
their cycling too seriously.
To the contrary, 38-year-old
Crotty, who lives in Woodlawn,
has made it her mission to
■ C rime is down just ab out everywhere. Fear is on the rise. D etails at 11
TUESDAY
EDITION
FOR RAPE VICTIMS –
A LIGHT IN DARKNESS
■ Polic e B ureau advoc ate Susan Lehman helps sex
assault vic tims rec over f rom c risis
T
here are days, more than a few,
when Susan Lehman feels, if not
torn, at least tugged by the possibility of what could be done.
Lehman works as a Portland Police Bureau sex abuse victim advocate. Her job
is to help women who have been raped
Story b y Peter K orn
Photos b y J aime V aldez
“I have thought to myself, I would like
to g t thi b d
ff th
Susan Lehman, a
Portland Police Bureau
advocate for sex assault
victims, talks with a
former homeless woman
who has been victimized
several times on the
streets.
Homeless, mentally
ill most vulnerable
For many women on street, rape
f
f
500273.121614
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and Thursday Portland Tribune
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B4 LIFE
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
www.Community-Classif ieds.com
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Help
Wanted
PLACEMENT INFORMATION
Telephone:
(503) 620-SELL (7355)
Fax:
(503) 620-3433
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Address:
6606 SE Lake Road, Portland, OR 97269
Office Hours:
8 am - 5 pm
Sonographer
Sonographer for a private
practice OB/GYN office in
Gresham. ARDMS
OB/GYN a must. Needs
current OBMI card. Preferable 2 years’ experience.
Assist Dr.s with
sonohysterograms
Must have excellent patient
care and be able to work
independently. Part time,
flexible hrs. Fax resume to
503-666-3298 or mail/bring
to 2150 NE Division Ste.
202, Gresham OR 97030
Need a new employee?
Advertise it in the
classifieds. Call now!
Call 503-620-7355
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Wanted
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Wanted
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AD?
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Notices
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papers.com
Christmas
Holiday
Deadline
We will have the following
early deadlines:
12/23 edition
LineCopy, Thurs,12/18 at
Noon
Display, Wed, 12/17 at
Noon
Portland Tribune Mail Room
Part time positions available in the Gresham Outlook
mailroom. We are looking to fill two shifts, Monday,
2:30pm-9pm and Wednesdays, 12pm-8pm. The job
would be working on an inserting machine putting together the Portland Tribune for delivery. These positions require that you be able to lift at least 50lbs, and
stand for long periods of time. More hours could be
available by covering for the graveyard shift throughout
the week. These positions will pay $9.50 per hour, and
will require a background check and drug test. Please
send resume to [email protected] or
stop by and fill out an application.
The Gresham Outlook is located at
1190 NE Division St. Gresham, OR 97030
The Portland Tribune
We will have the following
early deadlines:
12/30 edition
LineCopy, Wed,12/24 at
Noon
Display, Tues, 12/23 at
Noon
1/1 edition
LineCopy, Mon,12/29 at
Noon
Display, Fri, 12/26 at
Noon
YOUR HANDS
CAN HEAL YOU!
Find out how FREE classes.
heart-to-heart-healing.com
Liza at 503-502-5186
LOST:
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The Portland Tribune
H ELP W ANTED
New Year’s
Holiday
Deadline
Antiques/Collectibles
ATTENTION
READERS
Due to the quantity and
variety of business opportunity listings we receive, it is impossible for
us to verify every opportunity
advertisement.
Readers respond to
business opportunity
ads at their own risk. If
in doubt about a particular offer, check with the
Better Business Bureau,
503-226-3981 or the
Consumer Protection
Agency, 503-378-4320,
BEFORE investing any
money.
12/25 edition
LineCopy, Mon,12/22 at
Noon
Display, Fri, 12/19 at
Noon
Community Classifieds
office will be closed on
Thursday,
December 25th, 2014.
Male neutered cat with
green eyes. Last seen in
Mulino, may have a red
color. Please call
503-829-9876
S A L E!
Closet space cramped?
Sell those items today
in the classifieds.
Call now!
Call 503-620-SELL
Loans
It is illegal for companies
doing business by phone to
promise you a loan and
ask you to pay for it before
they deliver. For more information,
call
toll-free
1-877-FTC HELP. A public
service
message
from
Community Classifieds and
the Federal Trade Commission.
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Up to 50% off on
clocks, pictures, misc.
glassware, etc. Rare
Chippendale banded
inlaid table with 2 - 24”
leaves, 8 carved
clawed feet chairs,
was $1850, now $1250.
Victorian cellander
desk, china cabinets,
bookcases, secretaries, drop front desks,
library tables, high
boys, dressers, nightstands, 15 sets of
chairs, rockers, corner
cabinets, buffets, rare
oak hall trees, stacking
bookcases, lots and
lots of glassware and
unusual items hard to
find. One stop shopping. We’re dealing our
loss - YOU SAVE ON
THIS SALE!
PONY EXPRESS
ANTIQUES
6712 NE Sandy Blvd.
Wed - Sun 10-5,
closed Mon & Tues
or by appt.
503-287-8796
A PPAREL /J EWELRY
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Computers/
Electronics
Health Care
Equipment
Get cash for your
VIDEO GAMES
Today!
503-877-9501
ELECTRIC
MOBILITY CART:
3 Wheel, $500.
ALSO, 4-Wheel,
$500. Call:
503-895-8982
Firewood/
Heating Supplies
DRY FIREWOOD
Lost & Found
Call Mindy!
503-546-0760
for ad rates, general
information or help
writing your ad in any one
of our
Community Newspaper
Publications
and get the RESULTS
you want!
Business
Opportunities
Community Classifieds
office will be closed on
Thursday,
January 1, 2015.
Driver - Class A CDL
(Part-Time) – Savage Services Corp, is seeking a
highly motivated, productive, hard-worker at our
Portland, OR facility. Responsibilities include local
hauls, offloading of product, cleanliness, maintenance and safe operation
of equipment. Must have a
Class A CDL with doubles
and triples endorsement,
pneumatic experience and
2 years’ prior Class A experience. Prospective candidates must pass drug
screen & physical. EOE &
DRUG FREE. Interested
individuals should apply
online at:
www.savageservices.com
Announcements/
Notices
WE BUY GOLD
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
The Jewelry Buyer
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Alder. $200 cord.
Free delivery within 20
miles of Molalla.
*Cash Only*
503-829-6114
FIREWOOD
Maple Firewood - one cord.
All seasoned & cut up for
$325.00.
Call 503-487-0531
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
FOR SALE: Recliner
Upholstered & swivel $50
503-902-0402
FOR SALE: Oak Buffet
Upper glass doors, lower
drawers w./ storage $350
503-902-0402
LAZ-E-BOY RECLINER
All leather, tan, 100%
warranty, like-new, hardly
used. $800
PORTABLE RICCAR ZIG
ZAG SEWING MACHINE
$100
3 WHITE BOOKCASES, 3
SHELVES $30 EA.
503-668-4975
PLEASE NOTE:
Abbreviations destroy the
intent of your advertisement. Your advertisement
should be attractive and
easy to read. Let us help
you put together your advertisement. Call us today
at:
503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
Garage/Rummage
Sales
GRESHAM:
MOVING SALE
SAT ONLY: 9-3
4520 SE 14th Street
Orient Drive to Salquist
Road, Follow Signs.
Miscellaneous
Wanted
$10-10,000 A-#1 BUYER $
I want jewelry. Costume
etc, also pre-80’s glassware& misc. 503-869-2802
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
LIFELONG COLLECTOR
pays cash for GERMAN &
JAPANESE war relics.
Helmets, swords, flags etc.
(503)288-2462 | Portland
GET
FAST
RESULTS
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
Records and Tapes
I WILL BUY YOUR VINYL
RECORDS!!!
I’m currently looking to buy
record album collections of
any size. Please call me to
set up an appointment. If
I’m interested, I will come
to you and make a cash offer!!! You can reach me at:
323-301-5746.
Sewing Machines
Vacuum Cleaners
FOR SALE: Elna Sewing
Machine w/ instruction bk
&
attachments.
$125
503-902-0402
Holiday Lane
H ELP W ANTED
SANDY:
Kautz Nursery
SHERWOOD:
“BEST TREES IN
SHERWOOD”
Part-Time Reporter Needed!
We are looking for individuals who want long term
positions with the opportunity to grow within the
company. Must be a team player and available to work
a flexible schedule.
To Apply: www.bugattisrestaurant.com
Download, print and complete an application and email
to the General Manager of the restaurant in which you
are interested in becoming a team member. You may
also stop by the restaurant in person between the hours
of 2 pm to 4 pm.
All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment
criminal background check and drug test.
Bugatti’s is an equal opportunity employer.
SALES PROFESSIONALS
T
28879.121114
PA M P L I N M E D I A G R O U P
Community Newspapers circulation department has an
excellent opportunity to make great money in a
part-time position. As a community outreach
salesperson you will sell newspaper subscriptions for
our award-winning publications at kiosk and festivals
throughout the metropolitan area. If you have excellent
communication skills, the drive to succeed and ability
to work independently this could be the perfect position
for you.
Regular part-time (primarily Friday, Saturday & Sunday
but some weekday work is required). Hourly wage plus
excellent commission. Sales experience preferred.
Provide own transportation & ability to lift up to 25lbs.
Background check & drug screen required.
Please submit resume to
[email protected] or fax to
503-620-3433.
______________________________
REPORTER
The Outlook has an immediate opening for a reporter
covering the city of Gresham and several other smaller
beats. The Outlook is a twice weekly newspaper, which
took first place in the 2014 general excellence category
of the ONPA Better Newspapers Contest.
We are seeking a reporter who enjoys enterprise
journalism and who demonstrates a commitment to
community-based journalism. This reporter will write
features, and cover general news and breaking news.
This reporter also will embrace online and social
media. The ideal candidate will have a degree in
journalism and 5 years newspaper reporting
experience. Strong writing and editing skills are a
requirement, as is the ability to meet deadlines and
manage several projects at one time. We are looking
for a team player with a passion for accuracy, a sense
of curiosity and the proven ability to turn out a large
volume of compelling news content each week.
Please email a short letter of interest, resume and at
least three samples of your published work to
Executive Editor Steven Brown at
[email protected]
No phone calls please. To learn more about our
newspaper, visit www.greshamoutlook.com
To see who follows instructions, use these words
(and only these words) in the subject line:
Gresham Reporter
_____________________________________
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS ✵ YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
(503) 620-3433
Cedar Creek
Tree Farm
17744 S Windy City
503-632-3567
Weekends Only
Sat Nov 29-Dec 21
Nobles up to 12 ft,
Nordmann Fir, Doug Fir,
& Grand Fir.
Gift Shop & Trailer Rides
to Pick Your Tree!
CLASSIFIEDS CAN help you
with all your advertising needs.
Whether it is hiring, selling,
buying or trading, call us today!
Call 503-620-SELL.
RAINY MOUNTAIN
FARMS
U-CUT Christmas Trees
•Dougs •Noble
•Blue Spruce
3’-20’, $20/Each
Open Fri, Sat & Sun: 9-4
Mon-Thurs: By Appt.
49400 SE Marmot Road
503-351-0965
www.rainymountainfarms.com
OLCOTT’S
CHRISTMAS TREES
& SEASONED
FIREWOOD
Choose & Cut Quality
Noble Fir
503-695-5219
Weekends: 9am-Dusk
Weekdays: Please Call
Directions: From Corbett
Fire Hall (East end of
town); travel East 1.6
miles to Larch Mountain
Rd, Follow Signs.
THOMPSON FARMS
Fresh Pre-Cut
• Douglas Fir
• Grand Fir
•Noble Fir Trees
3’-9’ $9.95 - $39.95
Our produce is grown with
no Insecticides or Fungicides
for Maximum Flavor!!!
Open Thurs thru Sun 10am - Dusk
Located 5 miles south of Powell of SE 242nd
or 1 mile north of Hwy 212 on 242nd
503-667-9138 • 503-658-4640
✵
22688 SW Kruger Road
Sherwood, OR 97140
503-625-5541
OPENING FRIDAY,
NOV 28, 2014
HOURS: 10-4
ood Fa
w
y
r
rm
Open
er Every
Day
M
OVER 12 VARIETIES of TREES
• Tour the Farm Museum
in the Historic Barn
• FREE HOT CIDER
• FREE PONY RIDES
on Weekends
12328 S. Casto Rd., O.C.
From Canby take Township Rd. & follow signs.
From Hwy. 213 take Spangler Rd. & follow signs.
503-266-9257 or 503-307-2495
www.merrywoodfarm.com
Pick your tree
after hours!
%FDUIUIUIUItOpen until 8pm
Christmas Trees
Douglas, Grand Fir & Noble
G Beautiful
Trees Up To 16+ Ft.
20 Acres to Wander Through
G Fresh Wreaths & Garlands
Complimentary
Cider & Cookies
Shaking & Baling
G Over
Large variety of Fresh Wreaths
20% off any produce
items purchased at the
time of Tree sale.
503-620-SELL (7355)
SCHAEFER
U-CUT NOBLE FIR
TREES
24 Hours per day
For personal
assistance, call
(503) 620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
Marketing Consultant
The Gresham Outlook, a twice-weekly newspaper, is
seeking a high energy, motivated salesperson to join
our sales team as an outside Marketing Consultant. We
are looking for someone with previous advertising
experience, a proven track record of success, a strong
prospector, organizational and computer skills. An
existing account base will be provided, but our new
team member will be required to contact and create
new accounts. Must have reliable transportation and a
clean driving record. Pre-employment drug screen and
good references required. This is a full time position
with commission on all sales, a base salary, mileage
expenses and full benefits that include health care and
vacation. If you have a passion for sales and are
committed to success, send your resume and cover
letter to Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director –
[email protected]
FAX
Your classified ad :
MULINO
28235.112514 c
he Pamplin Media Group is on the grow and
currently seeking several top-notch sales
representatives to join our busy sales team.
These jobs require tenacious individuals to help us
to continue our growth. We are looking for personable individuals, professional in manner and appearance, with great sales and presentation skills.
These positions all require individuals with at least
two years of successful sales experience, including
extensive cold calling. Media sales experience is
preferred, but other business-to-business sales experience might be considered. Strong computer, math,
spelling and grammar skills are a must for working
with budgets and creating presentations. Attention
to detail is critical.
We currently have opportunities with our new
Business product, major accounts, local sales, classified advertising and one part-time opportunity as
a primary sales rep for one of our thriving monthly
products.
For full-time employees, we offer a base salary plus
commission, along with a variety of benefits including paid vacation and sick time, 401k, medical/dental/
vision insurance options, life insurance and a variety
of other insurances.
If you are looking for a challenging sales opportunity with a growing company, why not talk with us?
Send a resume with cover letter and salary history to:
[email protected]
p p
Kiosk & Festival Subscription Sales
NOBLE FIR TREES
U-Cut 5’-12’, 7.5 mi east of
Gresham on 362nd Ave,
off Bluff Rd. $20 any tree.
503-807-6941.
Noble, Grand, Doug Firs,
Pine, Cedar, & Spruce
Cut & Potted 1’-20’
OPEN DAILY
14565 S Kirk RD
BLDG “A” - 2nd Driveway
South of Oregon City
400 ft east of Hwy 213 on
Kirk Rd
503-632-3846
***Firewood For Sale***
25% off Nursery Stock
50 varieties of fruit trees
Buy 3 Get 1 FREE
25250.112613c
Bugatti’s Family of Restaurants is Oregon owned and
operated since 1991. We have the distinctive dinner
house Ristorante in West Linn on Hwy. 43, and three
family style Italian restaurants in Beaverton,
Tanasbourne, and Oregon City. We are currently
looking for cooks (sauté, grill, pizza & salad) for our
Cedar Hills and Oregon City locations.
Part-time reporter needed for monthly newspaper, the
Southwest Community Connection. This position is
approximately 20-24 hours per week and is
responsible for generating a majority of the content for
this newspaper. Some weekend and evening work will
be required. Beat includes covering everything
newsworthy that happens in SW Portland and
specifically the Multnomah and Hillsdale
neighborhoods. Ideal candidate will have newspaper
experience in writing, editing and photography.
Attributes of a good community reporter include:
self-starter, attention to detail, patience, flexibility,
prolific writer, ability to meet deadlines, team player,
motivated and understands community journalism.
Send resume, cover letter and three clips to Publisher
J. Brian Monihan via email at
[email protected]
File size is limited to 5M. No phone calls please.
______________________________________
Open
7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon - Sat 9-5
Sun 10-5
Also by apointment
28897.112514c
Line Cooks (Sautee, Grill, Pizza & Salad)
Above average
quality trees
Allen’s Tree Farm
19067 S. Redland Rd., Oregon City
503.631.7997
Come & get addicted to an Allen Tree
www.facebook.com/AllensTreeFarm
8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -CLASSIFIEDS.COM
Portland!Life
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Sheds/Outdoor
Buildings
Hay/Straw/Feed
CUSTOM POLE
BUILDINGS &
RIDING ARENAS
EASTERN HAY
ORGANICALLY
GROWN.
$230/TON DELIVERED
TO SANDY.
100LB BAILS.
ALFALFA GRASS MIX.
503-504-2317
60’x120’x14’
Arena, $42,000
36’x84’x14 Vehicle
Storage, $20,000
Barn Metal &
Siding
Replacement
Call Fred
503.320.3085
Pets & Supplies
**Just an old girl who
has no one**
or visit
barnsrusonline.com
ccb# 117653
Sporting Goods
CASH FOR GUNS
SELLING A
COLLECTION OR
SINGLE PIECES
503-704-5045
[email protected]
Seeking options for senior
black and grey Chow
Chow found near a commercial greenhouse on
SE 60th Avenue in late October. At local crowded
shelter where she is terrified and shaking in a noisy
loud unfamiliar setting;
nevertheless she will
come to you for hot dogs,
cannot thrive here, seeking
foster or foster adopt. Rescue involved; support provided. For more information call (503) 625-4563
or
e-mail
[email protected]
Oregon’s Largest 3 Day
GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
DEC. 19-20-21
Portland Expo
Center
1-5 exit #306B/ Adm $10
Fri. 12-6....Sat. 9-5
Sun. 10-4
1-800-659-3440
CollectorsWest.com
Stereo/TV/Video
FOR SALE: Sony AM/FM
Clock Radio/CD Combo under counter mount $40
503-902-040
AKC Standard
Poodle Puppies
Brown, red & black- male
& females avail, all shots,
microchip, housebroke,
crate trained,
Ready Now! $950
Go to our Web site:
www.ourpoeticpoodles.net
or call (509)582-6027.
ALLIE:
Pets & Supplies
BALDWIN:
Pets & Supplies
Pets & Supplies
Clementine:
ENGLISH MASTIFF
Puppies-$550 & Up
I’m a happy-go-lucky kitty
who is looking for my forever home. I’m a young
boy who enjoys exciting
games like chase the toy
mouse and follow the string. My outgoing personality will win you over! Stop
by Animal Aid’s Show &
Tell Saturday and and ask
for me, Baldwin! Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Are you looking for a gentle lady to complete your
home? That’s me, Clementine! I’m a sweet girl who
adores chin rubs and ear
scratches. My gentle personality means I can be a
little reserved at first, but I
love being pet! I’ll even,
politely, ask for more by
rubbing my cheeks on your
hand. Come visit me at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday
or
call
503-292-6628 for more information.
Bella!
B & P HITZ FARM
•Apples - MANY Varieties
•Pears •Onions •Potatoes
•Squash •Walnuts
•Filberts •Chestnuts
•Apple Cider & MORE!
Stand open 1:30 - 5:30
Closed Monday
503-982-9307
14070 Wilco Hwy
Woodburn
bphitzapples.com
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
Imported line, exclnt tempermantes & pedigree,
large blocky heads,
parents sweet & gentle.
720-326-5127 Vanc
Gino’s gentle personality
emerges after he has had
an opportunity to relax and
become comfortable in a
new environment. This
sweet cat thrives on attention and will flourish in a
home with regular activity.
Gino loves to chase string
toys and to receive chin
scratches. Gino is waiting
at Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter:
14175 SW Galbreath
Drive 503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sun, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
Young, playful, hilarious,
medium sized tan and
white spayed female Shelter dog mystery mix, great
with children and adults,
loves to start and play
chase games be in your
lap, knows some basic
commands, has been an
only family dog, lost her
home dueot misfortune
when her owner lost his;
looking for a new family to
call her own, tired of shelter life, rescue involved .
For more information call
503.625.4563 or E-mail
[email protected]
Come meet cute as a button, Minnie, at our Homes
for the Holidays Adoption
Events.
Minnie
is
uber-affectionate and is
looking for a forever lap.
She loves to talk and tell
you all about her day. She
loves to play, but sometimes it is too rough for the
other cats, so, a dog or a
dog sized cat may be her
best companion. She is
about 2, spayed, vaccinated, micro-chipped, and
is eligible for 30 days free
health insurance. Minnie
will be available to meet,
until she is adopted. Come
meet her Saturdays at our
Homes for the Holiday
Adoption Events in Beaverton and Forest Grove.
Email
[email protected]
for hours and locations.
In a calm and attentive
home, Clausine is talkative, friendly, and adventurous. Clausine has a confident and lively personality
when she’s around patient
and slow-moving adults,
but the fast movements of
younger children can
sometimes make her nervous. Clausine adapts
quickly to a new environment and she likes attention. Clausine spends her
time at the Washington
Square PetSmart:
8825 SW Cascade Ave
503-644-3091
catadoptionteam.org
Sat and Sun, 12 pm-4 pm
Jellybean isn’t just my
name, it describes my personality! I’m a sweet,
friendly cat and I’m ready
to bring something special
to your home. I have beautiful emerald colored eyes
that will gaze at you lovingly and gratefully when
you take me home. Come
visit me at Animal Aid’s
Show & Tell Saturday or
call 503-292-6628 for more
information.
We have buyers!
List your
MANUFACTURED HOME
JandMHomes.com
503-722-4500
Wacissa is a quiet, calm,
and affectionate cat who
would do well in a home
that is similar to her personality. Wacissa is a lap
cat who enjoys sleeping in
sunny spots, and occasionally, playing with a cat toy
or two. Wacissa’s dream
home will be as mellow as
she is, with only older children, easy-going cats, and
no dogs. You can meet
Wacissa at Cat Adoption
Team’s Sherwood shelter:
14175 SW Galbreath
Drive 503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sunday, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Leo:
Are you looking for a kitty
who will be your new best
friend? Then look no further! This gorgeous boy is
a great companion – he
loves playtime, snuggles
and conversations. One
look into Leo’s eyes and
you’ll know you have found
your soul mate. Come visit
Leo at Animal Aid’s Show
& Tell Saturday or call
503-292-6628 for more information.
Lovely
Marmalade
will
make a sweet addition to
your family this year. Marmalade is a 1-1/2 year old
female orange tabby with
the cutest little flag tail you
have ever seen. She loves
other kitties and would
make a great dog companion with a proper introduction. She is spayed, vaccinated,
micro-chipped,
and is eligible for 30 days
free
health
insurance.
Marmalade will be available to meet, until she is
adopted, Saturdays at our
Homes for the Holiday
Adoption Events in Beaverton and Forest Grove.
Email
[email protected]
for hours and locations.
Sell your
puppies
here!
1404 sqft,4/12 roof, arch
shingles,dbl dormer, 9lite
door,glamour bath,
appl pkg, fireplace,
$69,900 finished on site
PRICE GUARANTEED
TILL MARCH
JandMHomes.com
503-722-4500
WANT TO SELL?
TUALATIN:
GET
FAST
RESULTS
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
503-652-9446
wrightchoicehomes.com
Condos/Townhouses
For Rent
Help For Sellers!
SCAPPOOSE, Oregon
SW 1st Street
We take over your monthly
mortgage, keep your
house in EXCELLENT
condition and cash you out
at a future date. We are
not real estate agents.
We are serious home
buyers. How soon do you
want to move?
Call 503-953-0860
or 503-648-2119
New Townhomes, 3 Bdrm,
2½ Bath, Single Car Garage, W/D Hookups. $1095
per month, includes Water/
Sewer/Garbage & Landscape Maintenance,
$1200 sec dep. Quick
and easy commute to
Portland Metro area.
Call 503-543-8985
Houses for Rent
Apartments for Rent
1BD APARTMENT
NO SMOKING
NO PETS
All real estate advertised
herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or intention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discrimination.
State law forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
factors in addition to
those protected under
federal law. Oregon
State law forbids discrimination based on
marital status. We will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available
on an equal opportunity
basis.
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
Real Estate Wanted
MOLALLA:
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE
1 bdrm/1ba: $767
2 bdrm/2ba: $913
3 bdrm/2ba: $1051
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
WrightChoiceHomes.com
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
Acreage/Lots
Have you ever seen such a
cute kitty smile?! I’m
Corrine the Lynx point Siamese and not only am I
adorable, I’m sweet, affectionate, and looking for my
purrfect match. I love to be
brushed more than anything and a nice warm lap,
it’s my favorite place to be!
Stop by Animal Aid’s Show
& Tell Saturday and and
ask for me, Corrine! Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or visit our website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Apartments for Rent
NEW Marlette
Special
ROTTWEILER
AKC Puppies
Jellybean:
Corrine:
Food/Meat/Produce
Pets & Supplies
House raised with our
family, variety of colors,
Large sweet gentle giants,
Call to see our cute babies.
360-562-1584
Clausine
Hi there! I’m Allie, the tiny
cat with the adorable black
and white markings. I love
to be held. In fact, I’m quite
content to hang out on
your lap or curled up in
your arms all day long! But
I also have a really playful
side and love to have fun
with all sorts of cat toys.
I’m quite the conversationalist as well. My little chirps
are as cute as I am! I’m
looking for a home filled
with lots of attention and
love. Come by to meet me
and we can talk all about it
at Animal Aid’s Show &
Tell Saturday. Please call
503-292-6628 option 3 or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
LIFE B5
First, last, & move-in
deposit, $500/ month.
Nice, clean, available now.
147 Shirley St. Call for info:
406-560-4437
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $767, 2 Bed: $913!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
ESTACADA
ASK ABOUT OUR
NO DEPOSIT
OPTION
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
applces. Storage shed.
Includes water & sewer!
Sec. 8 OK
[email protected]
E-mail for
details.
503-630-4300
NEWBERG/Bald Peak:
1 bdrm, 1 bath, view, W/D,
1300 sq ft, carport, storage, no smoking, no pets,
$850/month. 503-538-1737
Manufactured
Homes/Lots for Rent
SANDY
www.gslwestridgemeadows.com
PORTLAND NW:
Located near MAX,
Portland Streetcar & Bus.
Beautiful courtyards,
downtown view,
close to Waterfront Park
and the Pearl District.
Great amenities!
The Yards at
Union Station
815 NW Naito Pkwy
503-478-1695
gsltheyards.com
Newer 2 bedroom
Mobile home. Very clean.
Large storage shed, covered deck, heat pump,
washer/dryer, etc.
Garbage, water, sewer provided. Wunder Mobile Park
$775 plus deposits.
Non-smoking, no pets.
Background check.
503/668-3715 or
503/317-6245
B UILDING M ATERIALS
Poplin is an active and adventurous cat who would fit
in with any home – as long
as there aren’t any other
cats. Poplin is a sweet and
adorable four-year-old cat
who looks forward to lots of
playtime interspersed with
some time for naps and
pets. You can find Poplin
at Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter:
14175 SW Galbreath Dr
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sunday, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
503-620-SELL (7355)
www.community-classifieds.com
C OMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
503-620-SELL (7355) ✵ 8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -CLASSIFIEDS.COM
Portland!Life
B6 LIFE
Motorcycles
Scooters/ATVs
Pickups
Buy it!
1975 FORD F-250
REDDING FLATBED
20,000 lb PTO winch, 390,
4x4, $4750 503-266-2319
Auto Services
2009 KAWASAKI Ninja
250r: with 16,757 miles on
it. I am the second owner,
well maintained and runs
great. This is a great
starter bike and allows you
to learn at your own speed
while getting use to the
mechanics of a motorcycle.
Call or text 503-419-8748.
West Linn. Price: $2,800.
CAR NUTS
Car Storage $140/mo.
Mechanic Shop $25/day.
Paint Booth $150/car-2
days. Located in Newberg.
Dale 503-267-2991
Boats/Motors/
Supplies
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
RVs & Travel
Trailers
2012 CREEKSIDE
TRAVEL TRAILER
23.5’, w/slide, power hitch,
power awning. Pristine
conditon! $16,500.
503-829-4299
CHRISTMAS
SURPRISE!!!
1969 WINNER
BOAT
RV CONSIGNMENTS
Let us sell your RV!
17’ 2”, Newer Full Canvas
Top & Interior & 120 Merc
Cruiser. Set up for fishing
or water skiing. These
boats are very, very rare.
Many extras- fishing related gear.
Has trolling
motor with it, if you wish.
Cheaper if you don’t. Nice
trailer. Heath forces sale.
PRICE HAS BEEN REDUCED TO $2900!
2015 VESPA Primavera
150; Red, practically new,
300 miles, great for
commuting. Price includes
destination fee, setup,
fresh 4 year tags, high
friction brake pads, aux
12V outlet and euro
luggage compartment
(holds full-face helmet).
$4,399
Call 503-344-4473 or
503.781.2529
503-538-6884
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Cars For Sale
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
CHEVROLET CAMARO
Z28 2001: Black 6 spd,
10,000 miles, Best Offer
503-786-2943.
TOYOTA Avalon
2000
86,250 miles, good condition, well-maintained, clear
title, tags through April
2016. Comes with 4
mounted
snow
tires.
$6,000. Gresham area.
503-661-2962.
C ARS
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
FOR
S ALE
Travel Trailers,
Toy Haulers,
Motorhomes,
Fifth Wheels
Call Mike at
503-381-4772 for a
consignment or
purchase value.
Read our customer’s
testimonials at:
AdventureTradingRV.com
• • •
Located at the corner of
Beavercreek & Hwy 213
in Oregon City, by Appt.
WHY STORE YOUR
RV ~ LET US TURN IT
IN TO $$$$$
Northwest RV offers one
of the best consignment
programs around. We
have an outstanding
reputation for being #1 at
customer service.
Our specialty is -
503-620-SELL (7355)
Selling your RV!
We sell all types of RV’S.
Call about our consignment program. There are
no hidden fees.
We will get you
the most for your RV!
www.community-classifieds.com
Here at Northwest RV we
have a large budget for
advertising that targets
buyers of all ages! We
advertise not just locally
but Nationwide and
throughout Canada!
Buying or
Selling?
Exceptional 1998 Mercedes Benz E320 sedan
6492 Portland Road NE
Salem, OR 97305
Find
it!
Call Jasmine at
503-393-3663
www.northwestrvsales.com
3.2L V6 5spd A/T w/traction & cruise control. New
Michelin Pilot Sport AS3 tires on original alloys custom
polished & painted by Skips Wheelwerks. Beautiful emerald black (blue/green metallic) paint. Electric moon
roof, grey leather interior, heated power front seats w/3
memory settings. Bose sound system, dual climate control heating & A/C. Bluetooth for cell and more. None
nicer in this vintage. Recent service (57,195 mi) at Star
Motors in Tualatin. MSRP new $47,250 Offered at
$7,995/obo. Michael Freeman, [email protected]
(503) 636-1201, cell (503) 680-5449.
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503-620-SELL (7355)
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FOB Hubbard, Or. Subject to code requirements.
Price subject to change without notice.
PO Box 407, Hubbard, OR. 97032
OR CCB#86204 WA CCB# PARKEB1071D6
24x36
30x36
30x48
36x36
36x48
40x48
40x60
10’ EAVE
$4,765
$5,513
$6,575
$6,219
$7,399
$8,313
$9,644
12’ EAVE
$5,201
$5,978
$7,140
$6,709
$7,998
$8,889
$10,255
14’ EAVE
$5,636
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16’ EAVE
$6,060
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$11,985
24x36
30x36
30x48
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36x48
40x48
40x60
60x120
10’ EAVE
$2,279
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$4,191
$4,934
$5,992
$17,848
12’ EAVE
$2,333
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$4,261
$4,995
$6,099
$18,065
14’ EAVE
$2,394
$2,916
$3,635
$3,426
$4,357
$5,142
$6,241
$18,516
16’ EAVE
$2,564
$3,118
$3,747
$3,776
$4,617
$5,599
$6,793
$18,927
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Community
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26348.062014c
Low (57,500) miles very well maintained & equipped.
2nd local owner. Perfect CarFax & maint records since
June 1998 delivery. Combines responsive performance,
luxury and economy.
503-620-SELL (7355)
www.community-classifieds.com
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Home & Professional Services
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RV
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The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Ballard Street
Portland!Life
Scary Gary
LIFE B7
Free Range
Dog Eat Doug
Strange Brew
Nest Heads
Dogs of C Kennel
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Oregon City / Hilltop
334 Warner Milne Rd.
503.722.8222
437753.060613 ENT
West Linn / Ristorante
18740 Willamette Dr.
503.636.9555
B U G AT T I S R E STA U R A N T . C O M
Portland!Life
B8 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
SOLUTIONS
“MISSTAKES” By Pawel Fludzinski Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Sudoku
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Sudoku
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
12/18/14
©2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
[email protected]
Puzzle 2
PUZZLED
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by Eugene Shaffer
SOLUTIONS
Answer
12/18
©2014 King Features, Inc.
CRYPTOQUIP
12/18
12/18
12/18
LOOK NO FURTHER
Published every Tuesday and Thursday
www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
484921.070814
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86 100 lbs.
87 Spacious
89 Prefaced
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105 Bank offerings
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62 German article
65 Hi-__
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71 __ Park, N.J.
72 Science guy Bill
73 Swimming spots
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21 Silents star Bara
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30 Follow
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34 Canola oil spray
35 More or less,
informally
37 Baseball great
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39 Not kosher
40 Cooler in hot
weather
41 Poked
46 Gripe from the
weary
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49 Mother with a
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79 Part of a CSA
signature
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in Düsseldorf
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marksmen
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84 Cunning
86 Boorish
DOWN
88 Gomer or Goober
1 Sugar or cookie
91 Start to deteriorate
2 Truman secretary
97 Film critic Pauline
of state
98 Parking garage
3 Use a roundabout
location
route
99 Totaled
4 Gas pump spec.
100 __ hand: help
5 Words of defeat
101 Magna __
6 Rail family bird
102 Destines, not in a
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GALLIC GAELIC.
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Cornwell
9 Former
clandestine org.
12 Ruler of Asgard
16 Beer choice,
briefly
19 Command levels
20 Subatomic particle
22 Lass
23 Accept
unpleasantness
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36 Part of MSG
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44 Greek vacation
spot
45 Finagle
47 Bear witness
50 To be, to Bizet
54 MLB stat
56 Demonstrate
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60 Snookered
61 Lighter yet
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SPORTS B9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Eggers: Blazers improve defense, bench play
■ From page 12
ern foes, all ahead of or within
two games of Portland in the
standings.
A year ago, the Blazers were
one of the top offensive teams
in the league but a so-so team
at the defensive end. Coach
Terry Stotts’ primary mission
was improved defensive play
this season. There’s no question that has happened.
The Blazers entered the
week ranked among the NBA’s
top five in opponents’ scoring,
field-goal percentage and
3-point percentage.
In 2013-14, Blazer opponents
averaged 102.8 points, shot .451
from the field and .355 from
3-point range.
Going into the Milwaukee
game, Portland foes this season were averaging 95.6 points,
shooting .431 from the field
and .288 from beyond the arc.
“We’re mostly heading in
the right direction,” Stotts
says. “The preseason priorities
— being a better defensive
team — have come about. But
it’s easy to have slippage. You
can’t look at what you’ve done
in the past. You have to continue to do it.”
Defense is very much a mindset. The Blazers went into the
season determined to show
progress, and their body of work
has consistently done that.
“We’re doing great defensively,” point guard Damian
Lillard says. “Twenty-five
games is a good amount of
time to show it. It shows
growth.”
“Our defense is definitely
better,” power forward LaMarcus Aldridge says. “Guys came
back more locked in, taking it
more personal and trying to be
better at the defensive end.”
Offense has been a bit of a
different story.
A year ago, the Blazers averaged 106.7 points while shooting .450 from the field and .372
from 3-point range.
“We haven’t shot the ball as
well as we did last year,” Lillard said Monday night.
That’s not true. Going into
the Milwaukee game, the Blazers’ shooting percentages
were almost identical to what
they finished at last season —
.452 and .367.
Matthews is off to what
could be a career season offensively. He is on pace for career
highs in scoring (16.5 points)
and field-goal percentage
(.486) and is shooting .388 from
3-point range. His free-throw
percentage — .672 after shooting .837 at the stripe last season — is a bit mystifying, but
there is plenty of season to be
played.
Portland’s lower scoring average this season, 102.3 points,
COURTESY OF DAVID BLAIR
Improved defense, like with Blazers backup guard Allen Crabbe contesting a shot Monday by San Antonio’s Kyle Anderson, has been a key to Portland’s fast start to the 2 014 -15 NBA season.
could be attributed in part to
the emphasis on defense. After
all, the Blazers are still winning games at a very high rate.
And they’re sharing the ball.
They began the season with 24
straight games with 20 or
more assists, the first time
that has been done in 20 or
more games since Utah in the
2007-08 season.
But it does seem there are
more nights when the Blazers
are struggling to make shots.
There have been 10 games already in which they have shot
43 percent or less.
Part of that can be attributed to the season-long shooting
struggles of small forward
Nicolas Batum, who is shooting .377 from the field and .237
from 3-point range while averaging 8.8 points a game. A year
ago, Batum’s numbers were
.465, .402 and 13.0. That’s a dramatic decline.
Overall, it just seems as if the
Blazers are simply not knocking down open opportunities
they can be expected to make.
“We’re getting a lot of good
looks,” Lillard says. “We’ve
missed a lot. I think it will
come around. The exciting
part is, we haven’t played our
greatest offensively, and we’re
still 19-6. The defense is the
biggest reason.”
That, and improved bench
play. The addition of Chris Kaman and Steve Blake has made
the bench deeper. Kaman has
been outstanding, averaging
10.0 points and 6.2 rebounds
while shooting .500 from the
field in 25 minutes a game.
Also, second-year guard Allen Crabbe is emerging as a
contributor at both ends. And
C.J. McCollum’s return from a
broken finger should make the
reserve group even better.
“I like our bench,” Lillard
says. “It’s not one person.
Chris and Steve have been the
biggest factors, but Allan and
CJ and Joel, all of them are
helping. It’s been a collective
effort. I have confidence in
them. When they go in, I believe they’re going to play well
and hold the lead.”
Even as Portland finished
last in the league last season in
both bench scoring and point
differential, Stotts defended the
reserves. But he agrees that
this year’s bench is better.
“I don’t place a lot on bench
scoring,” he says, “but we
wouldn’t be where we are today without the production off
our bench. The guys coming
off the bench have played their
roles very well.”
Two weeks ago, Portland
ranked No. 1 in the league rebounding percentage. Going
into the Milwaukee game,
though, the Blazers had outrebounded opponents in only
two of their last eight games,
slipping to 10th in the NBA.
“We have been a little lax on
the rebounding lately,” Al-
dridge said. “We just have to
get back locked in.”
After a challenging fourgame road trip that begins Friday at San Antonio and includes stops at New Orleans,
Houston and Oklahoma City,
the Blazers’ schedule through
early February is more forgiving. Through the next 21
games, they face only nine op-
ponents who currently have a
winning record.
Health permitting, there’s
no reason to think the Blazers
can’t match or better their
2013-14 total of 54 victories.
They understand, though, that
they have to keep the pedal to
the metal.
“We’re in a good spot, but
we have to continue to get bet-
ter,” Matthews says. “We can’t
be complacent. We didn’t play
that well at the end of our last
road trip. We might have got
used to it a little bit and taken
it for granted. You can’t do
that. Nothing’s easy in this
league.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
SEA SHORE
ESCAPE
Congratulations to
our Winners!
GRAND PRIZE
Angela Grozav of Boring, OR
won a two-night stay at the Hallmark Oceanfront Resort in Cannon Beach
for two and a $150 Eat, Drink & be Merry Visa Card.
SECOND PRIZE
Ann Zitzelsberger of Canby, OR
501506.121814
won a two-night stay at Hallmark Oceanfront Resort in Newport
for two, a $50 dining certificate for Georgie’s Beachside Grill and a
$100 Eat, Drink & be Merry Visa Card.
COURTESY OF DAVID BLAIR
Blazers guard Wesley Matthews is on pace for perhaps his best season offensively.
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B10 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
Barnum: PSU may add third ‘money’ game
■ From page 12
ing about Pokey Allen,” Barnum. “Mouse Davis has forgotten more football than most of
us know. I played and coached
against Tim Walsh. I know the
blue-collar mentality he
brought. I’ve always followed
this place.”
After Burton was let go, the
names of many potential successors surfaced.
“How do I say this properly?”
Barnum asks. “I know every
name that was out there. There
are a lot of guys who wanted
this job for many reasons. I’m
not worried about them. I know
the history of this place. I love
Portland State. I love Big Sky
football. I hope in a year when
we talk, you’ll be saying I deserved this shot.”
Barnum has coached in high
school and at Western Washington, American International, the Coast Guard and Cornell. His longest stint was for 10
years at Idaho State, where he
finished as defensive coordinator. Among his players there
was a true freshman named
Jared Allen, the 2011 NFL defensive player of the year now
with the Chicago Bears.
PSU’s interim head man
loves coaching.
“My first year in college
coaching, I asked, ‘Do you get
paid for this?’” he says.
He is thrilled for his opportunity to run the show at Portland State.
“I’ve thought about this for
20 years,” Barnum says. “My
wife thinks I’m a nut. All I do is
take notes.
“I didn’t know Nigel when I
came here. I learned from him,
good and bad. He set me up for
an opportunity and brought me
back to the Big Sky. I’m excited
about what’s going on.”
Barnum says he has a “100day plan to make this program
what we need.”
“My plan has already started,” he says. “I know I’m the
right guy for this job. Usually
when they fire a head coach,
players want to leave. I have
guys who want to come back.
That’s unique.”
Barnum said he is grateful to
Cleary and to school President
Wim Wiewel.
“They’re not going to let
Portland State football disappear,” Barnum says. “A lot of
people think I’ve been put in
this job to keep the dam up, but
the people who gave me a shot
at this have faith in me. That’s
great to know.
“But in the end, they’re going
to look at the record. All people
look at is the numbers. But
there’s so much more going on
here.
“Val, Mr. Wiewel, other people here at Portland State —
they’re the ones who went to
bat for it. They think I have a
shot. People fought for me to
have a year. They heard my
plan. They saw my vision.”
Barnum knew little about the
pistol offense until he came to
Portland State. Burton, who
learned the run-oriented pistol
from the other side as defensive coordinator at Nevada,
brought in experts the first
year to help Barnum with its
nuances.
After that, “Nigel let me
coach the offense and left me
alone,’ “ Barnum says. “He said,
‘I’ll take care of the rest, Barney.’ I think it worked well. Except for the last year, I’m happy
with what we did.”
The Vikings finished 3-9 this
fall, losing four games by a
touchdown or less, a problem
throughout the Burton era.
Barnum is optimistic about
the immediate future, though
he knows opposing Big Sky
coaches will use his one-year
contract against him in recruiting. Even so, he is eager to get
the word out there.
“I’m going to get them excited about Portland State,” he
says. “This program isn’t about
me. (Recruits) are possibly
with me for only one year, but
(they should) go to Portland
State because of what you can
gain at the university academically. That’s why you come
here.
“It’s not about me, but you’re
going to help me with my oneyear interview. You’re going to
be part of the most fun year of
college football I can make it.
You’re going to see a disciplined, fundamentally sound
product on the football field.
That’s what I’m going to give
you the first year. After that,
the athletic director will make
a decision on me.”
Barnum knows the limitations. Portland State is a commuter school that resides in a
state where Oregon and Oregon State are king. The agreement to play at Portland Timbers-operated Providence Park
is less than ideal. He has only
four fully paid assistants. The
COURTESY OF PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY
New Portland State head coach Bruce Barnum says he is intrigued by the run-and-shoot offense used by former Vikings coach Mouse Davis but
probably will stick with the run-oriented pistol attack of predecessor Nigel Burton because it fits PSU’s personnel returning from a 3 -9 season
in 2 014 .
Vikings are under the FCS limit of 65 scholarships, and facilities — though improved during
the Burton era — are only OK.
Can PSU football be successful next season?
“It has to be, or you won’t be
talking to me anymore,” he
says. “Yes, I think it can be. I
do. We have 14 starters back.
The recruiting side is going to
help. I’m going to recruit Oregon. I have a firm grasp on every student-athlete in the state
of Oregon. There is a strong
foundation of players here, but
I have some holes to fill. I need
some guys to impact right now
in certain positions.
“I have grandiose ideas, maybe, but I need to make them fit
Portland State University.”
With his top three quarterbacks returning, Barnum will
probably continue to use the
pistol.
“Offense is the third thing I’ll
look at when it gets to the football side,” he says. “I’m looking
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UO: Even
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arket
arden Mr own backyard
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“I put a lot of time into this
thing and worked hard,” he
says of his Oregon career. “Early in the year, I had some success. I hit a couple of bumps in
the road. But I’m going to be
looking to go out strong.”
Those bumps include a hamstring injury and various aches
and pains.
The 5-9, 185-pound Lowe is
cryptic about his injuries.
“I’m just working through
whatever I’ve got to work
Enjoy fresh
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at the other two sides (defense
That would probably mean an
and special teams) right now. 0-3 hole, an impediment to a poMouse Davis’ (run-and-shoot tential winning record and a conoffense) intrigues the hell out tract extension for Barnum. He
of me, but I’m going to stick says he can’t worry about that.
with our run game.
“I’m just a coach,” he
That’s what we’ve resays. “Maybe I speak
cruited to. If I wanted
from the heart too much,
to run something difbut I like where we’re
ferent, I couldn’t in a
going. I’ve never been as
year. Our quarterbacks
excited in my life. Everyare all suited for that.” — Bruce Barnum, body involved in this
To balance the budnew Portland program feels the same
get, Portland State
State football way.
played two “money”
“Nobody knows me
head coach
games last season,
right now. You don’t
against Pac-12 foes Orknow me. But I’m preegon State and Washpared for this seat. I’m
ington State. The Vikings will ready as hell. But you be the
open with Washington State judge. Look at the product we
next season and also play FBS put on the field. I know in the
opponent North Texas. There’s end, you’re going to like what
a chance they might schedule a you see. I’m not cocky; I’m conthird FBS foe.
fident. “I like my plan. I’ve
“We need to add a game,” been through a lot of head
Barnum says. “We’re going coaches at this level, have seen
through the options. If we find where they faltered. I’ve seen
one, it’s my understanding, we the good and the bad. I’m gowould sign that.”
ing to apply all the good, and
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through,” he says. “No one’s
healthy at this time of the year.
Everyone is in the training room
right now trying to get right.
We’re all just trying to get
healthy and keep it going.”
It would seem that Lowe is still
not at 100 percent. He answered
a question about how healthy he
is by talking about how grateful
he is that Oregon has time off
before facing the Seminoles.
“I feel good about how much
time we have before the game,”
he says. “I’m feeling pretty good
about it (the injuries) now. I’ve
been battling some injuries here
the last couple of weeks, but by
game time I’m going to be feeling
great.”
For most players, an injuryplagued season with solid numbers would be all there was to
say about their contribution to
the team. But Lowe has taken it
upon himself to raise up the receiving corps man by man.
“I try to stay in the ears of
the young guys who haven’t
been in this position,” he says.
“We need everyone. We have a
lot of vets and a lot of guys who
have been here a long time, and
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then we have a nice mix of
young guys. Every veteran guy
is out there helping the younger guys because we know their
number has been called, and
we’re going to need them.
“Of course, (being injured) is
frustrating. But that’s why we
all worked so hard as a receiving corps. When I’m out, it
doesn’t even matter. We’ve got
a lot of guys who can play. Our
receiving corps has been pushing each other ever since the
offseason. We push each other,
and we all get better, and we all
rise up. I went down, and for
those guys it’s the next man up.
Oregon’s younger receivers
know just how important Lowe’s
tutelage and leadership have
been for them.
“He’s been a big key, a part of
our success,” said freshman receiver Devon Allen. “He’s one of
those guys who gives us tips and
pointers and encourages us. He
knows exactly what to do and
how to do it. Coaches make examples of him all the time because he’s doing everything
right. We just kind of follow. He
makes everything easy.”
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Barnum takes a breath, then
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“As a coach, I’m probably a
mix of Tim Walsh and ... you’ll
have to decide the other piece,”
he says. “All I know is, there’s
nothing better in life than what
I’m doing right now.
“In one year, I could be on the
street. I plan to not let that happen. Football is a great game,
and it’s an awful profession. But
I’ve chosen it and, knock on
wood, I’ve survived in it for 25
years.”
The next era at Portland
State has begun. It may be a
short one. All I can tell you is
this: Bruce Barnum won’t fail
for lack of enthusiasm. The
man is determined to make
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SPORTS B11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, December 18, 2014
History
MainEvents
Prep girls basketball:
Central Catholic-Butler (Pa.),
10:20 a.m., Nike Tournament
of Champions, Phoenix area …
Wilson at Nike Tournament of
Champions.
Prep boys basketball:
Lincoln at Southridge, 7:15
p.m.
College women’s basketball: Santa Clara at Oregon, 6
p.m. ... Portland CC at Green
River Crossover, Auburn, Wash.
College men’s basketball:
De Paul at Oregon State, 7
p.m. (Pac-12 Networks). ...
Multnomah at Central
Washington, 7 p.m.
College wrestling: Warner
Pacific men at Southern
Oregon, 2 p.m. ... Warner
Pacific women-Montana StateNorthern at SOU, 4 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 19
Blazers: Portland at San
Antonio, 5 p.m. PT (CSNNW,
ESPN).
College football: Southern
Oregon-Marian (Ind.), NAIA
championship, Daytona Beach,
Fla., noon PT (ESPNU).
Prep girls basketball: St.
Mary’s Academy at Lakeridge,
6:45 p.m. ... Sprague at David
Douglas, 7 p.m. ... Lebanon at
Jesuit, Cleveland at Westview,
Louisiana-Lafayette, MercedesBenz Superdome, 8 a.m. PT
(ESPN). New Mexico Bowl
— Utah State-UTEP, University
Stadium, Albuquerque, N.M.,
11:20 a.m. PT (ESPN). Las
Vegas Bowl — Utah-Colorado
State, Sam Boyd Stadium,
12:30 p.m. PT (KATU 2). Potato
Bowl — Western Michigan-Air
Force, Albertsons Stadium,
Boise, Idaho, 2:45 p.m. PT
(ESPN). Camellia Bowl — South
Alabama-Bowling Green,
Cramton Bowl, Montgomery,
Ala., 6:15 p.m. PT, ESPN.
Prep girls basketball: Central
Catholic and Wilson at Nike
Tournament of Champions,
Phoenix area.
Prep boys basketball:
Roosevelt at Oregon City,
Madison at Hood River Valley, 7
p.m.
Prep wrestling: Cleveland,
Grant, Roosevelt at Liberty
Tournament ... Jefferson at Canby
Tournament.
College women’s basketball:
Oregon State-Nevada, New
Orleans Shootout, 3:30 p.m. PT
(Pac-12 Networks).
College men’s basketball:
Delaware State at Oregon, noon
(Pac-12 Networks). ... Montana
State at Portland, 7 p.m.
College wrestling: Warner
Pacific men at NAIA Desert
Duels, Las Vegas, Nev.
Reynolds at Parkrose, La Salle
Prep at Wilsonville, 7:15 p.m.
... Aloha at Lincoln, 7:30 p.m.
... Central Catholic and Wilson
at Nike Tournament of
Champions, Phoenix area.
Prep boys basketball:
Madison at The Dalles, 5 p.m.
... Westview at Central Catholic,
Jesuit at South Eugene, Sunset
at David Douglas, 7 p.m. ...
Wilsonville at La Salle Prep,
7:15 p.m. ... Parkrose at
Cleveland, Reynolds at Grant,
Canby at Franklin, 7:30 p.m.
Prep swimming: LincolnWilson, Franklin-Grant, both at
Dishman Pool, 6 p.m.
Prep wrestling: Franklin,
Madison at Glencoe
Tournament ... Benson, Lincoln
at Milwaukie Tournament ...
Roosevelt at Tillamook
Tournament.
College women’s basketball: Oregon State-Southern
Illinois, New Orleans Shootout,
6 p.m. PT. ... Warner Pacific at
Concordia, 5:30 p.m.
College men’s basketball:
Warner Pacific at Concordia,
7:30 p.m. ... Portland CC at
NWAC Crossover, Everett, Wash.
Saturday, Dec. 20
Blazers: Portland at New
Orleans, 4 p.m. PT (CSNNW).
College football: New
Orleans Bowl — Nevada-
Sunday, Dec. 21
Seahawks: Seattle at Arizona,
5:30 p.m. PT (KGW 8).
College women’s basketball:
Fresno State at Oregon, 2 p.m. ...
Portland at Boise State, 1 p.m.
PT ... Lewis & Clark at UC Santa
Cruz, 4 p.m.
College men’s basketball:
Oregon State at Quinnipiac, 10
a.m. PT
College wrestling: Oregon
State at Reno Tournament of
Champions.
Horse racing: Live at Portland
Meadows, noon.
Monday, Dec. 22
Blazers: Portland at Houston, 5
p.m. PT (KGW 8).
Prep girls basketball: David
Douglas at Woodburn, 7 p.m. ...
McKay at Parkrose, 7:15 p.m. ...
Wilson at Nike Tournament of
Champions, Phoenix area.
Prep boys basketball: Central
Catholic at South Eugene, 6 p.m.
... David Douglas at Central,
Parkrose at Centennial, 7 p.m. ...
Barlow at La Salle Prep, 7:15
p.m.
College women’s basketball:
Lewis & Clark-Calvin at UC Santa
Cruz, 3 p.m.
College men’s basketball: UC
Santa Barbara at Oregon, 6 p.m.
(Pac-12 Networks) ... Lewis &
Clark at Portland, 2 p.m.
TV&Radio
Thursday, Dec. 18
NFL: Tennessee at
Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m., NFL,
KUFO (970 AM)
NBA: New York at Chicago, 5
p.m., TNT ... Oklahoma City at
Golden State, 7:30 p.m., TNT
College women’s basketball:
Santa Clara at Oregon, 6 p.m.,
KUFO (970 AM)
College men’s basketball: De
Paul at Oregon State, 7 p.m.
(Pac-12 Networks) ... Seton Hall
at South Florida, 4 p.m., CBS
Sports ... Cleveland StateVirginia, 4 p.m., ESPN ...
Connecticut-Duke, East
Rutherford, N.J., 5 p.m., ESPN ...
LSU at Alabama-Birmingham, 6
p.m., CBS Sports
Friday, Dec. 19
Blazers: Portland at San
Antonio, 5 p.m., CSNNW, ESPN,
KPOJ (620 AM), KKRZ (102.3
FM)
NBA: Oklahoma City at L.A.
Lakers, 7:30 p.m., ESPN
College football: Southern
Oregon-Marian (Ind.), NAIA
championship, Daytona Beach,
Fla., noon, ESPNU
Prep girls basketball: Lake
Oswego at Tualatin, 7 p.m., KUIK
(1360 AM)
Prep boys basketball:
Parkrose at Cleveland 7:30 p.m.,
KBPS (1450 AM)
College women’s basketball:
Oregon State-Southern Illinois,
New Orleans Shootout, 6 p.m.
College men’s basketball:
Eastern Washington at California,
7 p.m., Pac-12 Networks ...
Arizona at UTEP, 8 p.m., FS1 ...
Saint Marys at St. John’s, 4 p.m.,
FS1 ... Alabama A&M at
Marquette, FS1
Delaware State at Oregon, noon,
Pac-12 Networks ... Montana
State at Portland, 7 p.m., KMTT
(910 AM) ... UCLA-Kentucky,
Chicago, 12:30 p.m., KOIN (6) ...
Oklahoma at Washington, 6 p.m.,
ESPNU ... Lehigh at Arizona
State, 7 p.m., Pac-12 Networks
... Stanford at BYU, 8 p.m.,
ESPNU ... Louisville at Western
Kentucky, 9 a.m., FS1 ...
Syracuse at Villanova, 10 a.m.,
FOX (12) ... North Carolina at
Ohio State, 10 a.m., KOIN (6) ...
Massachusetts at Providence, 10
a.m., CBS Sports ... MissouriIllinois, St. Louis, 11 a.m.,
ESPN2 ... Butler-Indiana,
Indianpolis, 11:30 a.m., FS1 ...
Oral Roberts at Memphis, noon,
CBS Sports ... West VirginiaNorth Carolina State, New York
City, 6:30 p.m., ESPN2
Saturday, Dec. 20
Blazers: Portland at New
Orleans, 4 p.m., CSNNW, KPOJ
(620 AM), KKRZ (102.3 FM)
NFL: Philadelphia at
Washington, 10 a.m., KUFO (970
AM) ... San Diego at San
Francisco, 5:25 p.m., KOIN (6),
NFL, KUFO (970 AM), KUIK
(1360 AM)
College football: New Orleans
Bowl — Nevada-LouisianaLafayette, Mercedes-Benz
Superdome, 8 a.m., ESPN. New
Mexico Bowl — Utah State-UTEP,
University Stadium, Albuquerque,
N.M., 11:20 a.m., ESPN. Las
Vegas Bowl — Utah-Colorado
State, Sam Boyd Stadium, 12:30
p.m., KATU (2), KFXX (1080 AM).
Potato Bowl — Western MichiganAir Force, Albertsons Stadium,
Boise, Idaho, 2:45 p.m., ESPN.
Camellia Bowl — South AlabamaBowling Green, Cramton Bowl,
Montgomery, Ala., 6:15 p.m.,
ESPN.
College women’s basketball:
Oregon State-Nevada, New
Orleans Shootout, 3:30 p.m.,
Pac-12 Networks
College men’s basketball:
Sunday, Dec. 21
Seahawks: Seattle at Arizona,
5:30 p.m., KGW (8), KUFO (970
AM)
NFL: Green Bay at Tampa Bay,
10 a.m., KUFO (970 AM) ...
Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 10
a.m., KOIN (6), KFXX (1080 AM)
... Indianapolis at Dallas, 1 p.m.,
KOIN (6), KFXX (1080 AM), KXTG
(750 AM)
NHL: Philadelphia at Winnipeg,
3 p.m., CSNNW
College women’s basketball:
Fresno State at Oregon, 2 p.m.
College men’s basketball:
Oregon State at Quinnipiac, 10
a.m. PT ... Harvard at Virginia, 9
a.m., ESPNU ... Maryland at
Oklahoma State, 11 a.m., ESPNU
... USC at Boston College, 1 p.m.,
ESPNU ... San Jose State at
Washington State, 4 p.m., Pac-12
Networks
College wrestling: Oregon
State at Reno Tournament of
Champions.
Horse racing: Live at Portland
Meadows, noon.
Dec. 18-22, 1993
Portland is one of 30 cities on a
list of prospective sites for a franchise in the fledgling Major League
Soccer. The league says it will narrow the list to 12 being played in
April 1995.
Clive Charles, former Portland
Timbers standout in the North
American Soccer League and
now University of Portland coach,
is the point
man locally in
search of investors for a
Portland MLS
team. Charles
says Civic
Stadium fits
perfectly with
the new
CHARLES
league’s guidelines, except for
its artificial turf. Bill Sage, MLS
chief executive officer, says the
league will spend its own money
renovating existing stadiums and
help build new stadiums to its
standards.
The Trail Blazers are in the throes
of their worst start in five years —
and captain Clyde Drexler goes
down with a severely sprained
ankle in a victory over the lowly
Milwaukee Bucks. Drexler is carried
off the court on a stretcher and
taken to Emmanuel Hospital for
X-rays, which are negative. Center
Chris Dudley already is out with a
broken ankle. Portland is 14-10.
And, in off-the-court news, an arbitrator rules that the Blazers were
within their rights to fine players
Tracy Murray and Dave Johnson
about $20,000 each for their
alleged involvement in sexual misconduct with teenage girls in Salt
Lake City.
In prep football, Centennial High
coach Chris Knudsen is voted
coach of the year for a second
consecutive season. Knudsen’s
Eagles won the Mt. Hood
Conference and a school-record
12 games in making the state
semifinals.
Birthdays
Dec. 21, 1950
Dec. 19, 1964
Mike Bellotti (age 64)
Arvydas Sabonis (age 50)
Born in Sacramento, Calif.,
Bellotti came to the University of
Oregon in 1989 as offensive coordinator, then served as head
coach from
1995-2008,
going 137-80-2
and taking the
Ducks to 12
bowl games. He
recently was
inducted into
the College
Football Hall of
BELOTTI
Fame.
“Our-vydas” came from Lithuania
to the Trail Blazers in 1995, nine
years after Portland’s team selected
him 24th overall in the NBA draft.
The 7-3 “Sabas,”
born in Kaunas,
Lithuania, won
numerous
awards in Europe
and is a FIBA
Hall of Famer. He
averaged 12.0
points and 7.3
rebounds per
SABONIS
game in the NBA.
Monday, Dec. 22
Blazers: Portland at Houston, 5
p.m., KGW (8), KPOJ (620 AM),
KKRZ (102.3 FM)
NFL: Denver at Cincinnati, 5:30
p.m., ESPN, KUFO (970 AM)
College football: Miami Beach
Bowl — BYU-Memphis, 11 a.m.,
ESPN
College women’s basketball:
Kentucky at Duke, noon, ESPN2
... Connecticut at UCLA, 2 p.m.,
ESPN2
College men’s basketball: UC
Santa Barbara at Oregon, 6 p.m.,
Pac-12 Networks, KUFO (970 AM)
... Lewis & Clark at Portland, 2
p.m., KMTT (910 AM) ... Kansas
at Temple, 4 p.m., ESPN2 ...
Wisconsin at Cal, 6 p.m., ESPN2
... Tennessee-Martin at Butler, 4
p.m., FS1 ... Long Beach State at
St. John’s, 4:30 p.m., CBS Sports
... Miami (Fla) at Providence, 6
p.m., FS1 ... Boise State at
Houston, 7:30 p.m., FS1 ...
Tulane at Washington, 8 p.m.,
Pac-12 Networks
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Tribune’sATHLETESoftheWEEK
PRO
Blazers
Pacific
Oregon
DANNY BRAKEBUSH, basketball
— The 6-3, 185 sophomore G from
Central Catholic, back after missing
last season with a torn ACL, had a
game-high 26 points as the Boxers
beat Evergreen State 81-71. He leads
Pacific with 19.0 points and 1.2 steals
per game.
DAMIAN LILLARD — It wasn’t his
greatest shooting week (35 of 81 overall,
10 of 31 on 3s), but the All-Star PG had a
team-high 90 points in 4 road games last
week, plus 21 assists and 20 rebounds.
Winterhawks
Concordia
DOMINIC TURGEON — The C from
Cherry Hills, Colo., 6-2, 190, had 2
goals and 2 assists in a 3-game
weekend that included victories of
2-1 at Seattle and 4-3 at Tri-City.
COLLEGE
Portland State
BRAXTON TUCKER, basketball
— The Vikings snapped a 3-game skid
with a 65-59 home win over Cal State
Bakersfield. Tucker, a 6-6, 220 soph F
out of Tacoma, Wash., had 14 of his
team-high 18 points in the 1st half to
set the tone. He was 7 of 10 from the
field for the game.
Portland
TYLER VELASQUEZ, basketball —
The 5-11, 175 senior PG from
Colorado Springs, Colo., had gamebests of 20 points, 7 assists and 8
steals to go with 7 rebounds as the
Cavaliers dusted off Camosun 79-71. MARCUS MARIOTA, football — The Ducks got
their 1st Heisman Trophy winner, as Mariota collected the honor in a runaway. The 6-4 junior QB
from Honolulu reaped 4 other national player-ofthe-year honors, along with the Johnny Unitas
Golden Arm Award in a whirlwind week unprecedented for a UO player.
Oregon State
THOMAS VAN DER MARS, basket-
ball — The Pilots’ 6-11, 240-pound C
from Gouda, Netherlands led UP to a
road win against Sacramento State,
80-75. He had 20 points and 8
rebounds (16 and 6 in the 1st half).
He was 9 of 10 overall from the field.
LANGSTON MORRIS-WALKER,
basketball — The surprising Beavers
of new coach Wayne Tinkle improved
to 6-2, with Morris-Walker 1 of 3
OSU players in double figures in a
59-49 win over Mississippi State. The
6-5, 215 junior G from Berkeley had
10 points.
CHARLES JONES, David Douglas
basketball — The 6-1 junior G has been
a big reason behind the Scots’ 5-0
start. He is averaging 25.4 points per
game and helped David Douglas win
the Sandy Tournament last week, beating Aloha 55-44 and Summit 60-53.
XAVIER HALLINAN, Central Catholic
basketball — A 6-1 senior G, he
helped the Rams open 3-0 with wins
of 76-36 over Liberty, 73-39 vs. Grant
and 49-31 vs. Sheldon in the Halligan
Classic title game. He leads the team
in points (11.0) and assists (5.0).
Warner Pacific
DOUG THOMAS, basketball — With
20 and 27 points, the 6-5, 205
senior F from Aloha High led the
Knights (11-2) to victories over
Multnomah and Walla Wallace.
Thomas added 15 rebounds and
made 16 of 30 FG attempts. HIGH SCHOOL
KADEEM STRICKLAND, Jefferson
basketball — The 5-9 senior G led
the PIL favorite Democrats to a
52-44 victory over Wilsonville with his
22 points, 7 assists, 4 rebounds and
3 steals.
BENDU YEANEY, St. Mary’s Academy basketball — The 5-10 soph W/P came through in
large wins of over Clackamas and Newberg last
week. She is averaging team highs of 18.0
points, 8.5 rebounds and 3.5 steals, with 3.5
assists, and has hit 28 of 50 FGA, for the highly
ranked Blues.
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SportsTribune
PAGE B12
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2014
COURTESY OF PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY
Bruce Barnum, former offensive coordinator, now has a one-year contract to be head football coach of the Portland State Vikings. “I’ve never been as excited in my life,” he says.
Bruce Barnum gets 1-year shot at PSU
Coach outlines his
100-day plan to win,
make Viks relevant
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
As he begins what he affectionately calls “my oneyear interview,” new Portland State football coach
Bruce Barnum won’t have to
borrow a page from his
great-great grandfather, the
legendary Phineas Taylor
(P.T.) Barnum, the 19th-cen-
tury American showman
who co-founded the Barnum
& Bailey Circus.
(Full disclosure — Bruce and
P.T. aren’t really related.)
Barnum also won’t have to
duplicate the feats of former
PSU coach Pokey Allen — a
master showman himself.
Allen once rode an elephant
and talked about shooting himself out of a cannon and bet his
paycheck, all ameans to promote Vikings football.
Bruce Barnum says he would
be willing to do those things,
and more, to get butts in the
stands for Portland State
games next fall, becausee wants to make the
Vikings more relevant
to fans in the Portland
community.
“I want to do everything I can to put Portland State football on
the map,” Barnum
says.
But Barnum quickly
notes that his improvement plan won’t have
to include the new
coach sky-diving into Providence Park or wagering his
paycheck that his team will
draw 10,000 fans.
Barnum has other,
more basic ideas.
“We don’t have
enough people in the
stands,” he says. “We
need to put something
on the field that somebody is proud of. We
need a better product
on the field.”
Barnum was named
the Viks’ interim head
coach after the school
fired Nigel Burton on
Nov. 26. Then, on Dec. 8, PSU
went one step further and gave
Barnum a 12-month contract to
do the job.
Viking
Watch
Barnum, offensive coordinator under Burton at PSU the
past five years, is getting his
chance to run the show because of timing.
There has been no permanent athletic director at Portland State since Torre Chisholm resigned Oct. 31. Valerie
Cleary is running the department on an interim basis. Candidates to be Chisholm’s successor have been interviewed,
but there is no telling when a
successor will be hired.
So the powers-that-be at the
Park Blocks decided to let Barnum handle the reins for a
year.
“I’m jacked about it,” said
Barnum, 50, who has been
coaching football for 27 years
but has never been a head
coach. “I’m running with it.”
Barnum is a local guy, a
graduate of Vancouver’s Columbia River High who played
three sports for the Chieftains,
then was a middle linebacker
at Eastern Washington. He
knows PSU football history better than almost anybody.
“I grew up listening to
(broadcaster) Ed Whelan talk-
See BARNUM / Page 10
Trail Blazers
center Robin
Lopez is out for
a while with a
fractured hand,
but Portland’s
depth, defense
and momentum
bodes well for
the team’s
chances to stay
in the NBA
Western
Conference race.
COURTESY OF
DAVID BLAIR
T o succeed, B la z ers
ca n’t let gua rd dow n
A
lmost one-third of
the way into the
NBA season, the
Trail Blazers are off
to a nice start. Going into
Wednesday night’s matchup
with Milwaukee, Portland was
19-6, the fifth-best 25-game
start in franchise history.
There’s a lot of ground to
cover, but chances are strong
that the Blazers will win the
Northwest Division championship and earn homecourt advantage in the first round of
the playoffs.
Portland began Wednesday
seven games ahead of runnerup Oklahoma City (11-13). The
Thunder, missing injured stars
Kevin Durant and Russell
Westbrook, stumbled out of
the block 5-13, but took a sixgame win streak into Tuesday’s visit to Sacramento.
Competition in the Western
Conference is as fierce as ever,
with seven teams at least nine
games over .500. The battle for
No. 8 in the short term is between OKC, New Orleans,
Phoenix, Sacramento and Den-
“We’re not going to get any
help. It’s got to be in this locker room. That’s what our mantra is.”
That is: Keep winning, baby.
The challenge grew bigger
with the loss indefinitely of
center Robin Lopez, who fractured his right hand against
the Spurs.
The Blazers are equipped to
ON SPORTS
handle it in the short term
with good depth up front.
Chris Kaman, Joel Freeland,
Thomas Robinson and perver, all within 1 1/2 games of
haps even Meyers Leonard
each other through Monday.
will see their opportunities
Only the L.A. Lakers, Utah
and Minnesota seem out of the grow.
Portland faces its toughest
race for the postseason in the
extended road trip of
West.
season with a fourThe Blazers would
More online the
game, five-day swing
seem to have a lock
Read other
that begins Friday at
on one of the first
Kerry Eggers
San Antonio and inseven seeds — but it
columns during
could be anywhere
the week at portland cludes visits to New
Orleans, Houston and
from No. 1 to 7.
tribune.com
Oklahoma City.
“I don’t look at the
How the backup bigs
standings,” guard
handle things will be imporWesley Matthews told me after Monday’s win over San An- tant as the Blazers try to keep
pace with the likes of six Westtonio. “I just assume everybody in the West is winning.
See EGGERS / Page 9
KerryEggers
COURTESY OF DAVID BLAIR
Keanon Lowe (right) celebrates with running back Royce Freeman after an Oregon Ducks touchdown. Lowe,
a senior from Jesuit High, has been a leader on and off the field at UO, when healthy or injured.
D uck s receiv er L ow e
‘ ma k es ev ery thing ea sy ’
By STEPHEN ALEXANDER
The Tribune
EUGENE — Look beyond
his diminutive stature. Forget about the catches he has
made. Never mind the touchdowns he has scored.
The most important things
about Oregon Ducks receiver
Keanon Lowe are not what he
has done on the field. The senior from Jesuit High has become a general on the field, a
leader off the field, and one of
the most important cogs hold-
ing the Ducks
together as a
team.
“I
don’t
think you can
measure Keanon’s importance by even
what he does
on the field,”
LOWE
offensive coordinator Scott Frost says. “He’s
one of the toughest, hardestworking guys, one of the best
competitors I’ve been around,
and he’s one of our best lead-
ers. The things that he brings
to the team can’t be quantified.”
If you were to quantify
Lowe’s statistics, you would
find he has 65 career catches
for 836 yards and 10 touchdowns. Hampered by injuries
this season, he is the Ducks’
sixth leading receiver with 25
receptions for 359 yards and
four touchdowns in 10 games
as Oregon prepares to meet
Florida State in the Jan. 1 Rose
Bowl national semifinal game
See UO / Page 10

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