THE HAYDON NEWS December 2014

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THE
HAYDON
NEWS
December 2014
Next copy deadline January 22nd 2015
On line: www.haydon-news.co.uk
Editor: Steve Ford
HAPPY CHRISTMAS
FROM
CHURCHES TOGETHER
AT HAYDON BRIDGE
OUR FRONT COVER FOR DECEMBER
2014 HAS BEEN PAINTED BY CHILDREN
FROM MESSY CHURCH
See page 17 for Christmas Services
THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE HAYDON NEWS
WILL BE PUBLISHED IN FEBRUARY 2015
MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR
FRIENDS OF HAYDON BRIDGE
MEMBERSHIP/SUBSCRIPTION 2014
Membership fee
INDEX
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
£3.00
New Members are always welcome.
Subscription fee
£15.00
To receive the Haydon News by post for one year (Feb-Dec).
For people living outside the Haydon News delivery areas.
Donation
£Your choice
Donations are always gratefully received.
Total
£..................
Please tick the box if you want a receipt
Name................................................................................
Address............................................................................
.........................................................................................
Post code.........................................................................
Cheques made payable to ‘The Friends of Haydon Bridge’
When you have completed the form please enclose it,
with the appropriate fee, in an envelope addressed to:
The Friends of Haydon Bridge
Tannery Cottage,
Park Stile
Haydon Bridge
Hexham
NE47 6BP
Or you may leave it at Claire’s Newsagents for collection.
Thank you.
Contributions and crosswords to:
Fron Cover : Churches Together
Index
Editorial and notices
Parish Council Notes
Parish Council Notes
Historical notes - Dennis Telford
Historical notes
Historical notes - What’s in a Name
Historical notes - Haydon Bridge Co-op
Historical notes
Historical notes - Maurice Armstrong
Historical notes - Maurice Armstrong
War Memorial 44 and Remembrance Sunday
Cricket Champions
A View from up There
Churches Working Together
Church Services
What’s On
More What’s on...
Crossword
Euphemia Whaletrouser
Cont.
The Bridge, Judo
Children’s Society, Burnlaw Outdoor Day
GITS
Poetry Corner, HB Writers, Dusty and Raydon
Superfast Fibre Broadband
Haydon Bridge & Allendale Medical Practice
Brendan on Education and Alistair Burrowes
The Green Man
Reflections
Haydonian Social Club
The Friends of Haydon Bridge Association Committee
Steve Ford (Chairman and Editor), Pauline Wallis (vice chair)
Peter Parker (treasurer), Marcus Byron,
John Harrison (Minutes Sec.), John Wallis, Pat Hirst, Sheila Adams.
The Friends of Haydon Bridge,
c/o Five Stones, Heugh House Lane,
Haydon Bridge. NE47 6HJ
or
CLAIRE’S NEWSAGENTS
11, Church Street
EDITORIAL POLICY OF THE HAYDON NEWS.
The editorial policy of the Haydon News is the responsibility of the Committee
of the Friends of Haydon Bridge, although day to day responsibility is delegated to the editors. Our intention is always to ensure that the content of the
Haydon News is as fair and factually correct as possible. Any complaints concerning editorial policy should be addressed in writing to the Chairman of the
Friends of Haydon Bridge, and will be considered by and receive a formal
response from the Committee of the Friends of Haydon Bridge. Complaints
other than those made above will not be entertained. The Editors reserve the
right to decide which letters/articles are to be published, and to alter or shorten
letters/articles when necessary.
Anonymous letters/articles will NOT be published. A nom-de-plume may be
used if the Editors know the writer’s name and address.
email: [email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESS
The Friends of Haydon Bridge are grateful for the contribution made by local businesses who advertise in The
Haydon News. Please always support local businesses and make our community more prosperous.
TO ADVERTISE IN THE HAYDON NEWS
CONTACT
:
STEVEN FORD [email protected]
or
[email protected]
Printed by Contex Office Services Ltd, Hopper Street, Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, NE28 3JJ
2
EDITORIAL
Letters to the editor are very welcome. Informative
and/or constructive letters about topics of local concern or interest are especially welcome. So Thank
You to John Irving - see bottom right.
Thank you to all of those who replied to my enquiry
about the adequacy of deliveries. Unless I receive
any late information to the contrary it would appear
that the situation is under control save for one lady
whose ferocious dogs deter the would be deliverer.
John is, of course, perfectly correct. My source for
the item was The Courant, an organ of ineffable veracity and renown. Shortly to become a tabloid perhaps, at least according to the scuttlebutt that has
come my way.
In case you did not know - the Allenbanks Wobbly
Bridge is back in use. It has been raised by 300mm, I
hope that that is enough.
While we are on the subject of weather, have you
seen what is going on in the USA? I am hoping that
John Harrison will have words of comfort for us all
about the prospects of a similar events here in next
year’s first edition - which appears in February.
If you wish to air a grievance or draw attention to a
problem then please err on the side of politeness and
always try to offer your own preferred solution. It is
not enough to complain and leave the problem for
others to solve.
Dualling the A69 is the topic of the moment. Politicians of all parties are falling over themselves to
promise good things for the North East in time to
catch your vote in 2015 - are we fooled? Egad Carruthers! There goes another flying pig...
I have never understood the point of writing to any
publication but insisting on anonymity but, as mentioned on page 2, providing the identity of the author
is known to the editor then we may occasionally
publish anonymous letters or those bearing a nom de
plume. Having the courage of your convictions has
much to commend it.
Just supposing a few billion pounds were diverted to
the North East for infrastructure projects (road and
rail especially) how long would it be before construction started or finished? Mid century? I’ll be
dead by then.
Wouldn’t it be good if we could have proper to and
fro debates about a variety of things. Let’s have
some more letters please!
However, let’s be forward looking. I think that dualling the A69 and A1 would be a good idea - on balance. Petitions in support of this will shortly appear
all over the parish. Have a think about it.
Deadlines for 2015 are the same as the dates of The
Parish Council meetings:
Jan 22 no Haydon News in January
Feb 26
Mar 26
Apr 23
May 28
Jun 25
Jul 23
Aug - no meeting
Sep 24 no Haydon News in September
Oct 22
Nov 26
Dec 17
Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year
Steve Ford
Letter to the Editor
Dear Sir,
A sentence in your November 2014 editorial caused me to raise
an eyebrow, the sentence being: "The promise of better trains
but higher ticket prices on our railway is a mixed message." By "our railway" I take it you are referring to the Newcastle to Carlisle line.
As far as I know there has been no promise of better trains, nor
can there have been because the process of creating a new franchise to replace Northern Rail has yet to begin. Increased fares
are possible but if you are referring to the limitation placed on
off-peak fares in the afternoon which started on 8 September
then this does not apply to Haydon Bridge.
Contributors of articles might like to pin this list to
their desktop/notice-board/calendar/forehead/other
useful location.
A representative from Northern Rail gave a briefing on the
state of the franchise and fare alterations to a meeting of Northumberland County Council Area Committee - West on 9 September at Allendale. On 12 September the Hexham Courant
published an irresponsible front-page article and leader on the
subject. Unfortunately our county councillors and journalists
have little understanding of the situation so it would be a help
to Haydon Bridge residents if you used part of your next editorial to explain the source of your claim that there has been a
"...promise of better trains..."
When out and about in the parish I have begun to
notice people leaping for cover, when I hove into
view, in case I extract promises of articles for The
Haydon News from them. There’s a lot happening in
our community and it would be good to promote activities before they occur and report on them afterwards—ideally with photographs.
Good News! Superfast broadband has arrived in
Haydon Bridge. See page 29.
Yours
3
John Irving NE46 6ED
and is working mainly with parish councils, businesses and schools. Numbers of students have become involved already. The project is currently advancing very favourably. Walks and other outings
have been arranged and run by volunteers. There are
agreed criteria towards which communities can
work, each in their own way, in order to become
champions.
PARISH COUNCIL NOTES
PARISH COUNCILLORS
Esmond Faulks (chairman)
Mrs. E Charlton (Vice Chair)
684505
Mrs. V Fletcher
688872
Mrs. I Burrows
[email protected]
Mr. E Brown
684084
Mrs. J Thompson
684376
Ms. L. Thompson
[email protected]
Mr. S Walker
684488
Mr. J Ridley
[email protected]
Mr. D Robson
[email protected]
Mr. D Thornhill
07810 336 537
Parish Clerk
Mrs. C. McGivern 07543 912 113
County Councillor: Cllr. Alan Sharp
320167(home)
320363(work)
07759 665200(mob.)
When people are more aware of the condition they
can, with little effort, make life easier for dementia
sufferers and reduce the stigmatisation that many
experience.
Public Participation
An uncommonly large number of members of the
public were present at the meeting, though, it transpired that most were there to observe.
A meeting of The Haydon Parish Council was held
on 27th November at 7.30pm in The Community
Centre.
It was reported that damage had been done to the
railings and coping stones in front of the old Post
Office. Possibly a lorry had clipped them. Repairs
are required.
Proceedings were opened with an address by two
representatives of Dementia Friends — Claire and
Amy, who are from The Alzheimer's Society.
Claire’s area of responsibility includes the entire
north east from Berwick to Redcar.
A very sad mangled plaque was presented to the
Council, having been retrieved from the base of the
equally spavined Millenium Tree in the Church
Yard. It was felt that this sorry situation should be
remedied with a new plaque — at the very least.
They began by explaining how the project had been
initiated by the Prime Minister, was being propelled
by an advertising campaign and workers such as
themselves and had the intention of recruiting one
million Dementia Friends before spring. The central
purpose of the project is to increase understanding of
the condition.
Apologies
Were accepted
Declarations of Interest
Were sought.
Current estimates show that at present there are
850,000 sufferers in the UK, by 2121 there will be a
million and by 2050 there will be two million. All of
these figures are suspected to be underestimates.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Were accepted with one single word amendment.
NCC
Cllr. Sharp reported that superfast fibre broadband
was now available in the parish. He pointed out that
those who live outby may not yet have access to the
service. (How right he is! Ed) This deficiency will be
pursued as soon as possible and rectified.
Dementia is a progressive condition and therefore
the aim is to assist those affected to lead as full and
interesting life as possible, rather than being housebound as too many are.
Courses are being provided to enable volunteers,
businesses, communities and other concerns to become ‘champions’. These courses raise awareness of
the condition and promote the many things that can
be done to assist patients with dementia to continue
to be out and about and lead as near normal lives as
possible.
Three complaints had been received about the undue
delay in the process of planning applications. The
causes of the delays are to be investigated and dealt
with.
Corbridge is the nearest community to be aiming to
become dementia friendly at present.
The works for the East Land Ends road have been
requisitioned but a date for their being undertaken
has yet to be decided.
Amy is a development officer for Northumberland
Following enquiry, it has been discovered that even
4
when a road has not been adopted, the utility companies may undertake works. This relates to an earlier
question about Park Stile.
Correspondence
The Northumberland Archaeological Report and
Highway Winter Policy were received.
Works on highways around the parish continue
amain but there remains much to do.
Parish Projects
The Development Trust, in concert with others, is
working toward the establishment of a Luncheon
Club somewhat after the fashion of the one that is so
successful in Haltwhistle. Transport to and from
such an event and a social element in the proceedings are also envisioned. Several venues are under
consideration.
The three year project to modernise the street lighting in Northumberland seems to have prioritised all
parts other than the west which is currently last in
the queue. We have two years to wait. Kielder, the
place intended to gain the most in support of its Dark
Skies ambitions is, apparently, the last to be dealt
with. That this was a ridiculous situation was noted
with a measure of weary resignation. That Kielder
would benefit from the measure above all other areas
was noted too.
Mary Milford, who runs Meals on Wheels, has the
ability to cater for up to 8 but currently has only
three customers. More would be welcome.
On Shaftoe Green children’s play area a further consignment of wood chippings will be emplaced and
this will become an annual replenishment process.
The steps seem now to be in order and the bin has
been ordered.
Precept setting time is with us again as is the latest
round of budget reductions.
Highways.
The aforementioned railings outside the old Post Office were mentioned again for completeness.
AOB
The flashing speed warning sign pole has yet to be
installed and appears to be delayed by the want of an
assessment by others.
Parking problems in the Park Stile area were remarked. The problem being particularly acute for
delivery vehicles with large turning circles. The
presence of a caravan was mentioned. The possibility of arranging white lines or raised kerbs to constrain parking was discussed. It was hoped that concerned parties might provide drawings showing their
proposed solutions.
The many drain gullies around the village remain to
be cleared - for example in the pavement in Church
Street.
The prominent flagstone and manhole cover on
Ratcliffe Road have yet to be fixed.
Lighting
Nothing to report.
Petitions in favour of the dualling of the A69 are being spread around all the main points of congregation in the parish. The petition is being heavily promoted by the Haltwhistle community and its representatives. That it would be good for businesses
throughout Tynedale cannot be gainsaid.
Planning
Only two applications had been received and there
had been no objections to either:
•Hedge removal at Altonside
•Flat roof replacement at 27 Church Street.
Parking problems in Shaftoe street remain as intractable as ever. Over the years a host of proposals has
been advanced and each rejected by turn. The bottom
line appears to be that whilst the number of households on the street has remained static, the number of
vehicles per household has increased and everyone is
fiercely defensive of their ‘right’ to park immediately outside their own house. If anyone wishes to
advance further proposals to help the situation, they
will be studied closely.
Accounts
Were agreed.
Mandates for HSBC are being arranged.
Some candidates for funding from the current
£15,000 contingency fund were aired. The creation
of a wild flower meadow and woodland burial site at
the cemetery were met with general approval.
That the Spa Well needs further improvement was
agreed and it was proposed that the project might
provide an opportunity for creative artistic endeavour - even a competition and /or exhibition of
works submitted.
The football field bin has yet to appear.
The next meeting of The Parish Council will be on
17th December 2014.
5
HISTORICAL NOTES OF HAYDON BRIDGE
Dennis Telford
Haydon Bridge Golf Club: The AGM heard that
25 members of the Club were serving in France and
the Mediterranean; including four of the 6 member
committee.
I continue my reports of activity on ‘The Home
Front’, at Haydon Bridge, during the Great War.
Previous recollections are recorded in the July,
August, October and November, 2014, issues of
The Haydon News.
Emily Gertrude Mandell: A beautiful font was
erected in St Cuthbert’s Church, Haydon Bridge in
February 1916 to the memory of Miss Mandell, the
youngest daughter of the Reverend John Heanage
Mandell. Emily died aged 31 years in September
1914 and was interred at Haydon Old church.
Composed of red Devonshire marble and alabaster,
of ornate design the marble bases are 4'6'' and 3'6'' in
diameter, the column is of moulded alabaster and the
bowl rests on short pillars of marble.
Benched: The Haydon Bridge Leek Society held
their 21st Annual Leek Show in the Town Hall on
Saturday, October 9th 1915.
The show was principally for trench leeks and the
‘Best Leek in the Show’ was won by John Dargue
with 54.6 cu ins. William Smith of Willow Gap
benched the largest leek at 71 cu ins.
Memorabilia: In December 1915, a German rifle
shattered by a grenade, brought back from The Front
by a local Hussar, was exhibited in the window of
Mr Young’s grocer’s shop in Church Street.
The inscription reads:
TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN LOVING
REMEMBRANCE OF
E.G.M.
DIED . SEPT . 17 . 1914
Bullocks: Robert Ridley of Peel Well and Lipwood
sent ninety three prime heifers and bullocks to the
December 1915 auction. The consignment attracted
much attention and averaged between £33 and £34
each.
Why not call in to
St Cuthbert’s Church
to see this
beautiful Font
in memory of
Emily Mandell
Snookered: At the 1915 AGM and sale of old
newspapers in the Haydon Bridge Reading Room,
G.T. Brown was introduced as secretary and
caretaker, and F.G. Wood as treasurer. It was
reported that sixty members had joined the Colours
with a consequent drop in revenue, particularly
billiard receipts. In the circumstances it was agreed
to discontinue a few of the newspapers which, it was
thought, ‘would not be missed’.
Kept in the dark: At the same time as rumours of a
German Zeppelin being on the east coast, and in
advance of an official lighting order, it was decided
by the Haydon Parish Council to ask shopkeepers to
subdue their lighting, to warn householders to
obscure their lights, to ask the Railway Authorities to
keep the platform lights low, and to extinguish the
village street lights at once. It was reported that the
novelty of the village streets in almost total darkness
for the first time, caused much interest (to courting
couples perhaps?) but no alarm!
R.H. Cowing was noted in the Hexham Courant’s
1915 ‘list of fallen heroes’. Second Lieut. Cowing,
of the 1st York and Lancs, was grandson of the late
Ralph Cowing of Low Morralee.
In January 1916, Haydon Bridge Choral Society
opened its seventeenth season with a very successful
concert in the Town Hall. Proceeds of £7-13s-2d,
including a donation of £1 from Mrs Benson, was
sent to the Service Relief Fund.
Own Goal for a fiver?: In February 1916, George
Anderson the Haydon Bridge born footballer who
plays in goal for Aberdeen, was the central figure in
an attempted plot. Two days before Aberdeen were
due to play Queens Park in Glasgow, an offer of £5
was received by post by Anderson to ‘sell the
match’. Needless to say, George was both surprised
and indignant at receiving such an impudent offer
and promptly acquainted his directors and the
Scottish F.A. about it. The offer served to make the
Aberdeen players put forward their most strenuous
efforts to prevent Queens Park from scoring, and
they were successful.
Shaftoe Trust Schools: At the quarterly meeting of
the managers, Miss A.L. Dickinson resigned her
appointment to get married; Enid Wright was
appointed as a Domestic Science teacher at £80 p.a.,
Miss L.M. Kirton of ‘Lyndhurst’, Haydon Bridge
was appointed to the teaching staff and, in a new
initiative, local joiner Ed. Henderson was appointed
to give instruction in woodwork. School managers
were: .H. Mandell (Chairman) N. Beattie, Irving
Reay, R. Davison and J. Henderson. The average
attendance at the schools in 1915 was 254 pupils.
6
The early days of a long association: In February
1916, it was announced that Lough Green Farm,
Langley was let to Robert Davison of Staward Villa.
PAUL STEAD
Joiner and Builder.
All aspects of building services.
Free Estimates
07731747904
C.W Fairweather died at his ‘Belmont’ residence
on Tuesday, March 14th 1916. Mr Fairweather was
one of the joint founders of the Northern Counties
Electricity Supply Company.
His son, Capt C. Fairweather, was serving with 5th
Northumberland Fusiliers in France.
Checkerberry
Yarn and Design Studio
Interments: The Parish Council, Burial Committee
pointed out that since the purchase of a hearse, 7½
years earlier, it had been used 195 times. Or one
death a fortnight on average in the parish over that
period.
Studio 2
The Forge Studios
Art Centre & Cafe
Allendale NE47 9BD
Tel: 07704 558172
Piscatorial: Local anglers were reported as having
splendid sport on the Tyne in April 1916, and large
baskets of trout were being obtained.
Stockists of Rowan Yarns
Open 9am to 5pm (free all day parking outside)
The water wasn’t so good down Temple Houses,
however, where the residents complained to the
Parish Council that their water supply ‘was not fit to
drink’!
The Reverend J.H. Mandell of St Cuthbert’s
Church, in announcing his retirement, said that he
had been with his Haydon congregation thirty seven
years and was becoming too old to get round the
4,000 acres of the parish.
300 people paid admission to a jumble sale in
Haydon Bridge Town Hall. Together with a house
to house collection, £68-7s-1d was raised for the
Haydon Bridge Nursing Association, the Newcastle
Infirmary and the Cavell Memorial Fund.
R MURPHY
Two Haydon Bridge deaths on Monday, May 8th,
made headlines in 1916.
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE,
ROOF & GUTTER REPAIRS, POINTING,
GENERAL BUILDING WORK.
01434 688 624
07901 106 338
R.W. Thompson died at his home on Church Street,
he was a native of the village and had succeeded his
father in his joinery and cabinet making business, He
was a prominent figure in local cricket circles having
played for Haydon Bridge, and more recently he had
devoted his time to Haydon Bridge Golf Club.
GEOFFREY JACKSON
Edward Gibson of Grindon Hill, one of the best
known farmers on Tyneside, died aged 69 years. He
had lived in the Haydon Bridge for almost all his
life. A member of the Parish Council he was also on
the Hexham Board of Guardians, the Hexham
Rural District Council and the committee of the
Tyneside Agricultural Society. Edward was an overseer of the parish and a manager of Grindon school.
Langley on Tyne.
CABINET MAKING AND SPECIALIST JOINERY.
FOR KITCHENS, BATHROOMS, LIVING ROOMS.
PORCHES & CONSERVATORIES.
Tel: 01434 688977
YOUR
William Rutherford of east Mill Hills replaced
Edward Gibson as overseer of Haydon Parish.
ADVERT
COULD
GO
HERE!
To be continued next month
7
1854 when a devastating explosion and fire broke
out on the Quayside and spread to the south side of
the river. Reports suggest that William never tired
of recounting his experiences of that notable and
disastrous occurrence.
WHAT’S IN A NAME?
A list of names from yesteryear may appear, on
the face of it, boring. Don’t you believe it!
It’s remarkable how often the names I have recalled
over the years have elicited a response from our
readers or those who have found us on the internet:
haydon-news.co.uk and that is why I will continue
to provide lists of names that are relevant to my
Historical Notes.
William Telford returned to Haydon Bridge from
Tyneside in 1859 where he served on the committee
of the Haydon Bridge Floral and Horticultural Soc.,
(see photograph) and ran a successful business as a
cartwright and joiner for sixty years, retiring aged 89
years in 1919. After his retirement, the business
continued to flourish in the ownership of his son,
William Ridley Telford, his grandson, James Cecil,
and his great grandson. This business still trades in
Haydon Bridge today, having been in its various
forms owned by Basil Young, and more recently,
Jimmy Carruthers and Graham Murphy.
A recent response relates to my list of farmers in the
locality in 1886, in the April 2014 issue of The
Haydon News, and specifically Isabel Awburn.
Isabel and her husband John had twelve children and
farmed Lipwood Well, and her 2014 descendents
were alerted to my article by Haydon Bridge resident
Ray Lott. The consequence of this recent connection
was to provide me with further information for my
own family tree, as the Awburn family and the
Telford family were brought together through the
marriage of John Telford of Peel Well (1863-1923)
and Josephine Rebecca Awburn of Lipwood Well
(1865-1942) The couple moved to Australia in 1886
where they had seven children and became well
respected members of a small community near
Melbourne. It is from this Australian connection that
information provided by my extended Awburn
family - many times removed - in the Tyne Valley
has come to my attention, and from which I have
selected a few extracts in relation to my great
grandfather, and Australian John’s father - William
Telford - some of which are news to me and may be
of general interest to social historians in the parish.
My great grandfather, William, died on Christmas
Day 1920 in his ninety first year.
The elements of this story that are new to me have
all been made available as the result of a single name
being read from a long list in the April 2014 Haydon
News.
A willingness to share details of your family tree,
if it contains references to those who have lived in
our parish in the past, would be most welcome as
we continue to compile our social history archive.
And; it may be that one of our readers can unlock
an historical memory for your family in the same
way that the Awburn descendents have for me.
William Telford was born at Chesterwood in 1830,
but, the family moved to Cubstocks when he was
three years old; it was from there that he attended Mr
Cranston’s school at Grindon. In those days most of
the scholars rode to and from the Grindon school on
donkeys and William delighted in telling stories of
the exciting sport they had in racing home. William
could also recall, as a small boy, the opening of the
Newcastle and Carlisle Railway in 1838.
William was apprenticed as a cartwright and joiner
in 1847, with Thomas Charlton of Newbrough, and
his indenture papers make interesting reading.
For example:
He had not to haunt taverns or play-houses, nor to
play at cards or dice.
He had to serve his master faithfully to the end of the
apprenticeship term.
He had to keep his master’s secrets and do him no
damage.
Haydon Bridge Floral and Horticultural Soc. Committee 1885
Top Row L to R: John Potts, George Weir, Andrew Dawson,
John Urwin, William Telford.
Mid Row: Robert Brogdon, John Johnson, J.H. Thompson,
(Secretary) Thomas Heslop, (Treasurer) Robert Walker.
Front row: John Davidson, W.S. Walton.
Best Wishes to you all for a Joyful Christmas
and a Happy New Year. And, to all our readers,
thank you for your support; especially to those
who ensure that The Haydon News continues to
prosper and is delivered throughout the parish.
William was working at Newbrough when a waterspout burst which flooded the village and, after he
had completed his apprenticeship, he went east to
Tyneside and was in employment in Newcastle in
8
THE
HAYDON BRIDGE
CO-OPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY LTD
HENRY WATSON
& CO.
Part 10
Shaftoe Street, Haydon Bridge.
All cars welcome
for M.O.T, Repairs and Service.
Batteries - Tyres at Competitive Prices
Computerised Wheel Balancing
Unleaded and DERV
For parts 1 to 9 see Haydon News’
February to November 2014
In 1928, William Dickinson was presented with a
walking stick, and a set of tobacco pipes and a pouch
in recognition of his forty nine years service as a
Co-op Society committee member, and staff changes
saw Miss White leave the Co-op’s employment after
five years as a check girl and Miss Mitchinson take
over her position in the drapery department.
A check girl was advertised for and Miss Pearson
was appointed from six applicants.
Tel: 01 434 684 214
THE ANCHOR GARAGE
In 1929, tenders for a motor van were received to
work along with the remaining horse and cart
delivering the butchering department’s orders.
Quotations were received from the CWS, £205 . 10s;
C.W. McKay, £195; and Henry Watson & Co., £191.
Mr Watson’s tender was accepted and two of the
Society’s wooden carts were sold to Alan Scudamore
for £1.
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Another dispute with Haltwhistle Co-op arose in
1929, when our neighbouring Store offered drapery
and confectionery for sale to residents in the
Haydon Bridge district. The Haltwhistle committee
was informed that while the Haydon Bridge Society
was willing to consider closer union, they would not
entertain any scheme that involved amalgamation.
The Haydon Bridge Store had survived a difficult
period during the years of depression from 1926, due
to the general stoppage of industry and the local
unemployment. Nevertheless, the committee were
happy to go it alone, as the financial position of the
Society had stabilised, thanks to the endeavours of
the managers of the departments; Mr Melvin, Mr
Armour, Miss Lee; and their staff.
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On September 20th 1929, it was recorded that four
applicants had been interviewed for the position of
apprentice to the butchery department. The voting
was unanimous and Master Ridley Telford was
appointed to serve a five year apprenticeship. This
was a significant appointment as Ridley Telford
continued to serve the Society as the Store butcher
for many years, before opening his own butcher’s
shop in the village with another former Co-op
employee, Edmund Charlton.
SHOTTON WASTE SERVICES
SEPTIC TANK EMPTYING
In May 1930, a letter of condolence was sent to Mrs
Wardle on the death of her husband, John Wardle,
who had served on committee as vice chairman and
who had ‘rendered valued and consistent service to
the Co-op’. J.W. Hamilton was appointed to fill the
vacant position of vice chairman.
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9
Also, in 1930, plans were being formulated to make
considerable extensions to the ground floor grocery
and hardware shop.
ALAN BROWN
Thirty two year old Alan Brown was born at New
Alston, the fifth and youngest son of Jacob and
Bessie. Alan worked at Haydon Bridge Co-op and
lived at New Alston with his brother Stan (known
locally as ‘Stigum’) and his parents. Alan was
engaged to be married to Laura Telford of ‘Tyne
View’, John Martin Street, Haydon Bridge.
The June 1930 half year general meeting was
informed that the Haydon Bridge Co-operative’s
share capital was £14,940-2s-3d, an increase of
£581-13s-4d on the previous year, and it was agreed
that, ‘in spite of the great cost likely to be incurred’,
the whole of the premises should be lit by electricity.
Those who had served on the committee in 1929/30
were: Thomas Hare, G.J. Brown, Wm. Dickinson,
John W. Hamilton, Frank Johnson, Charles Kirton,
James Moffat, John Philipson, James Ridley, John
Wardle, Thomas Wilson, J. Cresswell, George
Briggs, and William Carne. Along with G. Graham
(Secretary and treasurer) and W. Melvin (Manager).
Alan Brown had, for some time, been under the care
of Doctor Richard Bell, of Ratcliffe Road, for
chronic gastritis and an x-ray was arranged for him
at Newcastle’s RVI on Thursday July 17th 1930;
before which he was required to take a Barium
Sulphate meal. Alan picked up the prescription
from Dr Bell on the Wednesday evening and took
the Barium meal on the Thursday morning at 7.30 as
instructed. He was immediately sure that something
was wrong! He said his mouth was burning and as
he swallowed the liquid the pain intensified. Alan
turned to his brother Stan and said: “I’m dying! I’ve
been poisoned!” Alan rushed outside to the toilet
where his brother found him collapsed there.
Doctor Bell was called for immediately but, arriving
at New Alston at 8.30am, he was unable to help and
Alan was declared dead. Due to the nature of Alan
Brown’s death, the Coroner was informed and a post
mortem carried out. The Coroner’s report stated that
death was due to one sixteenth part of an ounce of
Barium Sulphide.
On July 18th 1930, the sudden death of Alan
Brown, an employee of the Co-op, was reported.
(See block on adjacent column.)
Eighteen applicants were interviewed on August
15th 1930, for the vacant position of apprentice to
the grocery department and fifteen year old Oswald
Moore was appointed. Like Ridley Telford, this was
another significant appointment, as Ossie served the
Society throughout his working life, going on to
manage the Ratcliffe Road Store in later years.
In May 1931, the Society agreed to purchase a new
motor lorry with the existing lorry in part-exchange.
Three alternatives were considered: A Morris 2 ton
costing £330; an Albion 2 ton, £517 and a 30cwt
Ford. Mr Alan Scudamore’s tender of £210 for the
Ford was accepted, with a part exchange allowance
of £17-10shillings.
As a result of the purchase of the lorry, a new garage
would have to be built and the arched entrance to the
rear of the Co-op widened; for the Society’s own
lorry and for ever larger delivery vehicles. Until the
work was completed, it was agreed that the new
lorry would be garaged at Scudamore’s until an old
joiner’s shop belonging to LNER became available
for which an agreement of £12 per annum rent was
reached.
Meanwhile, the pharmacist in the chemist shop at 10
Ratcliffe Road - a Mr Bell, unrelated to Dr Richard
Bell - made a horrifying discovery.
As neither Doctor Bell nor the chemist had Barium
Sulphate in stock, an order was made from another
source and, checking his order book, Mr Bell the
pharmacist realised that he had made a dreadful error
and had written the poisonous Barium Sulphide on
his order, instead of Barium Sulphate.
The package arrived at the chemist’s unmarked and,
unaware of his earlier mistake, Bell the pharmacist
labelled it ‘Barium Sulphate’, before its delivery to
Doctor Bell. When Alan picked up the package from
the Doctor on the Wednesday night, little did he
know that his fate was sealed due to, according to
the coroner, a tragic error and an unfortunate set of
circumstances.
In October 1931, an advertisement was placed for an
apprentice to the grocer, and seventeen individuals
applied for the position. Once again, it seems that
the committee made a very good choice, in fifteen
year old Charles Cowing. Charlie became another
long standing employee of the Society, along with
previous young appointees, Ridley Telford and Ossie
Moore, until his sudden death in November 1968
aged fifty two years.
Alan Brown was laid to rest on Sunday, July 20th
1930 and among the mourners was his heartbroken
fiancée, Laura Telford. Laura never married and
continued to live in Haydon Bridge for the rest of her
life, until her own death in 1997 aged 95 years.
As far as I am aware, neither family pursued those
who were responsible for this sad affair; although I
do wonder whether later generations would have
been quite so forgiving in similar circumstances.
In 1932, Mr Joe Longstaff was appointed assistant
manager of the Haydon Bridge Co-operative Store
and I will continue the Co-op’s history from 1932
in our next issue. (February 2015)
10
MAURICE ARMSTRONG
C I ACCOUNTANCY
As another year comes to a close, each of us will
mourn our loved ones and friends who have passed
away. As someone who seeks to record the detail of
our social history, the sadness this past year has been
two-fold. The loss of a great friend who shared my
interests, humour, and lifelong support for Newcastle
United; but also, one who retained an encyclopaedic
knowledge of individuals and their families who
have lived in our district during his lifetime. Those
readers who have taken an interest in my ‘Notes’ in
the Haydon News for over fifteen years, will be
aware of how often I have called on my friend’s
anecdotes and unfailing memory of village folk and
events.
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[email protected]
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For details & booking contact Cynthia Bradley
01434 684622
email: [email protected]
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What will I do now that Maurice is no longer with
us?
RICHARD HUNTER JOINERY
Maurice Armstrong died on June 2nd and was laid to
rest in the village where he was born and lived
throughout his eighty eight years. A true Haydonian.
Established 1989
All aspects of joinery.
Registered installer of UPVC
Windows and doors.
Born on November 6th 1925, Maurice never tired of
explaining that: “It was the fireworks that set me
mother Elsie off that Friday.”
Tel: 01434 674452 Mobile: 07850 935 836
Forever the businessman, whether working full time
at the Haydon Bridge Co-op, or on his own behalf as
a grocer and fruiterer at 13, Church Street, Maurice’s
early memories at Haydon Bridge were of collecting
firewood after school in Geeswood, to bundle up as
kindling to sell ‘round the doors’ or in his father’s
shop at 25 John Martin Street; and collecting empty
pop bottles to claim a penny or tuppence back off
them so he could afford to go to the pictures in the
Haydon Bridge Town Hall. It’s an indication of
Maurice’s memory for detail, that almost seventy
two years later, he could clearly recall the night in
1937 he went to the first talkie film at the Town
Hall. “The picture was called ‘Oil For The Lights Of
China’ and it broke down the first night.” Maurice
told me. To seek confirmation before publishing this
story in The Haydon News of May 2009, I checked
the ‘Town Hall Cinema’ advert of the day. I needn’t
have bothered, of course, the film first released in
1935 was indeed the early ‘talkie’ at Haydon Bridge.
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PIANO TUITION
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homemade cakes, pies
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for orders, bookings & quotations.
SEPTIC TANK
EMPTYING SERVICE
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For a competitive quote
All ages.
Beginners to grade 8.
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Cars/trucks/coaches
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In his early years, Maurice was very much a ‘South
Side’ boy, living with his parents Joe and Elsie and
his sister June, at 25, John Martin Street. Apart from
going to St Cuthbert’s Church, where he was a choir
boy, he often told me that he never had any need to
go across the bridge to the north side. School and all
he ever wanted as a playground could be found south
of the river. Maurice was, probably, one of the last
Haydonians who lived in one or other of the age old
village postal districts of ‘Haydon Bridge South
Side’ or ‘Haydon Bridge North Side’, and was proud
of it. Certainly, a generation later, it never occurred
STEPHEN BROOKS
(formerly W. G. DUFFY)
Approved Solid Fuel Merchant
Old Coal Cells – Haydon Bridge
Tel: 01 434 684 348
ALL TYPES OF FUEL AT COMPETITIVE PRICES
SMALL COAL DOUBLES, NOTTS DOUBLES
11
to me that my Haydon Bridge village was anything
other than a single community, on both sides of the
water. (Except for November 5th of course, when
parochial rivalry took over, we became separatists
and huge bonfires were built and jealously guarded
on the sacred ground alongside the river, by those
who lived on each bank of the Tyne.)
When our earthly days are done, we will be judged
through the memories of those whose lives we have
touched along the way. In this regard, there’s no
doubt that Maurice Armstrong will be remembered
by those who knew him,
with a big smile and huge
affection. When the sorrow
has diminished, we will
continue to laugh out loud
at the memories Maurice
has left us - but my social
life will never be quite the
same again and, sadly, my
Haydon News ‘Notes’ will
be lacking the authenticity
that my friend’s special
recollections of our parish’s
Maurice Armstrong.
history provided.
Waiting for Customers!
Maurice’s father did, eventually, move his grocer’s
shop, from the Armstrongs’ front room at 25, John
Martin Street to 13, Church Street, and it was from
there that Maurice continued the business when Joe
retired, and from where he will be remembered by
our residents of all ages. (It would surprise no one,
if we were to hear that Roy Clarke had fashioned his
famous grocer in the BBC series ‘Open All Hours’
on our very own, ‘Arkwright’. Maurice even had a
till that severed your fingers if you didn’t have the
knack!)
W.M.H.
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Church Street, Haydon Bridge.
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Haydon Bridge Pharmacy
John Martin Street, Haydon Bridge.
LUNCHTIME, TEATIME & EVENINGS
Church St, Haydon Bridge. Call for more information on
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
01434 684354
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Premier Bookkeeping
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Tel: 01434 684427
12
HAYDON VIEW
Residential Care Home
North Bank, Haydon Bridge
Long Term Residential Care
Respite/Holiday/Day Care
For more information please contact:
Chris or Audrey Kay
Tel 01434 684465
HAYDON BRIDGE WAR MEMORIAL by Pam and Ken Linge
We continue our series of articles on those individuals who died in the Great War.
The biographies are published chronologically and the forty fourth casualty, in 1918, was
John William Johnstone (MM)
John served as Second Corporal, 463191 (1940), 50th Division
(44) John William
Signal Company, Corps of Royal Engineers.
Johnstone (MM)
He died on 12th April 1918, aged 24.
Born in Haltwhistle one of four children of William Pearson
Johnstone and Alice Johnstone (nee Dixon). William was a
bootmaker and dealer.
Initially he enlisted at Hexham on 10th September 1914 as
Private 1991, Northumberland Fusiliers. He transferred to the
Royal Engineers on 12th January 1915 as a Sapper and went to
France on 18th April 1915.
The award of the Military Medal was gazetted on 27th October 1916.
As well as having his name on the War Memorial John is also
commemorated on the Reredos in St. Cuthbert’s and the Shaftoe
School Memorial.
Photograph from
Hexham Courant
John has no known grave and is therefore commemorated on one
of the panels on the Pozieres Memorial, France.
If you have any information relating to John William Johnstone, or any of those individuals on the
Haydon Bridge Memorial, then please contact Pam & Ken Linge at: Drystones, Heugh House Lane,
Haydon Bridge, NE47 6HJ, phone (01434) 684050 or email: [email protected]
2014
WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.
Photo: ARON MAZEL
13
CHAMPIONS AGAIN
BACK ROW
IAN WATSON, CHRIS WELTON, JAMIE TAYLOR, JOE BARBER, THOMAS WAUGH, GAVIN BOYD
FRONT ROW
DANIEL WATSON, ROBERT STEPHENSON, LIAM SCUDAMORE, GRAEME PIGG(CAPT), MARK ELLIOTT, ROBERT
GIBSON
PHOTO TAKEN BY DEREK BOYD
On Saturday 9th September Haydon Bridge cricket club were crowned champions of the West Tyne League
(Senior League) for the 2nd year running. Hopefully we can make it a hat trick next year.
My congratulations go to all the players who were used during the season as every one had a part to play in us
winning the league. Our biggest thanks go to our main sponsor Steve and Lindsay from the Anchor Hotel for
their continuing support and especially their after match catering which is the envy of everyone in the league.
I would also like to thank the following for their match sponsorship:
CLAIRES NEWSAGENT
D+J OLIVER ELECTRICAL
J.P.WESTALL LTD
ALAN SHARP
BARRY HOPE Senior Site Manager, Haydon Bridge High School. NE47 6LR
[email protected]
Tel 01434 684422
Mr. GEORGE’S
MUSEUM OF TIME
4 Central Place
Haltwhistle
Watch and Clock Museum
suitable for all ages.
JOBSONS ANIMAL HEALTH
- also -
LEAP INTO JOBSONS
Gift Shop
Secondhand Collectables
Watch and Clock Repairs
6, CHURCH STREET
HAYDON BRIDGE
Everything for your pet
01434 684248
Tues - Sat
Weds
Tel: 01434 321776
14
10.30am - 4.30pm
10.30am - 1.30pm
Web: www.timeforgeorge.co.uk
A VIEW FROM UP THERE …..
John Harrison
Now I am not a prudish person and I do believe that notices should force home the point they wish to make,
but the other day I was saddened to come across some roadside anti-litter notices near Haltwhistle which said
“Don’t be a Tosser……..” – which were a little too coarse for my taste. But around the next bend I was greatly
cheered to encounter a lorry across the front of which it proclaimed “Brampton Skips” – what a cheery place
Brampton must be.
And perhaps there’s much to smile about when it comes to autumn weather. Although we’ve had a few ground
frosts (forecasters refer to these as ‘grass frosts’ nowadays) the air has been remarkably mild. I am still taking
a steady crop of outdoor lettuces and I hear of late season tomato crops in many gardens.
October was generally very mild but extremely variable. The weather was unsettled for most of the month
with some exceptional temperature swings. On consecutive mornings temperatures had fallen to only 12.5
degC on the 1st, but 1.3 degC on the 2nd, and similarly 14.0 degC on the 28th and 1.0 degC on the 29th. This
is quite typical of autumn weather, the UK lying directly under the battle zone between cold polar and warm
tropical air. Extensive cyclonic systems (low pressure) occasionally brought air sweeping in from the Azores
which was both warm and damp. On the last day of the month the daytime temperature reached a remarkable
19.4 deg C, which was the warmest Halloween on record across many parts of the UK. Overnight minimum
temperatures were more like the long-term October average for maximum (daytime) on 5 occasions.
Unsettled weather also brought moderately strong winds from a broadly westerly direction, which reached
gale force at times. We were fortunate in Haydon Bridge to escape the worst of former hurricane Gonzalo
which brought storm-force winds and heavy rain to the UK on the 20th and 21st.
There were 18 rainy days over the month but rainfall was prolonged and heavy on only two occasions, the 3rd
and the 28th. Although water courses ran high briefly, the ground is still relatively dry, and the streams near
Plunderheath are now back to a mere trickle.
A particular characteristic of the weather in recent years has been a marked increase in easterly winds. These
generally bring us dull and rather damp weather with low cloud shrouding the hills. What seems to be rare at
present is the traditional blustery westerly wind which freshens things up and blows the cobwebs away. Talking of which, the spiders at Plunderheath have taken a great liking to my automatic weather station and in no
time at all they festoon the thing with web. This has relatively little effect on the temperature records but on
several nights, when the winds have fallen light, the anemometer (wind meter) has ground to a halt in a strangling web.
Monthly Weather Summary (Haydon Bridge : Height 162m asl)
Month
October
2014
Average
Maximum
Temperature
(Daytime)
Deg C
14.5
Relative to
long-term
average
degC
+1.8
Average
Minimum
Temperature
(Night-time)
Deg C
7.6
Relative to
long-term
average
degC
+1.6
Rainfall
mm
72.1
Percentage
of longterm average
83
And finally Gladys tells me of three clergyman friends of hers who have worked together in a university chaplaincy for many years – a Catholic priest, a Baptist minister and a Jewish rabbi. Great friends, they have often
set each other small challenges – nothing serious but just for fun. One day, a colleague suggested that they
take on a more serious challenge – “I bet you couldn’t convert a grizzly bear to the Christian faith”. They readily agreed and two weeks later their colleague went to visit all three of them in the university medical centre.
The Catholic priest had several broken bones and many scratches. “Well how did you go about the challenge”
he was asked. “Well I preached the word to the bear but he didn’t want to listen and he attacked. In desperation I sprayed the bear with holy water and he became as calm as a lamb and I’m sure he became a Christian”.
The Baptist minister was also very much in the wars and was also asked how he tackled the challenge. “Well
that bear just wouldn’t listen to the word of the Lord so I wrestled with him. While we were wrestling we
rolled down a hill and fell into the creek, where I baptised him in the water and he became as mild as a lamb. I
also am sure that he became a Christian. The Rabbi was in a terrible state. He was swathed from head to toe in
bandages and was in traction. When asked how he tackled the challenge, his one-line reply was “With hindsight, perhaps starting with circumcision wasn’t such a good idea”.
15
CHURCHES WORKING TOGETHER
CLERGY MESSAGE FROM:
From Father Leo Pyle
WHO AND WHERE
The names and phone numbers of the Clergy who minister in Haydon Bridge:
Rev. Dr. Benjamin Carter
with St. Cuthberts Anglican Church
The Vicarage, Station Yard
Tel. 01434 688196
Clergy Message
Mission!
World mission, foreign mission, home mission? What is this mission all about? Mission is sending. Mission is being sent. Mission is task or goal assigned, vocation, expedition to evangelise, our life’s work and our
crusade. We are sent to announce God’s
love, mercy and forgiveness. We are commissioned to tell our world the good news
which is Jesus; his life, his death, his resurrection. We are sent to tell the world that
God loves each and every one of us, forgives
us and asks us to forgive others, even the
greatest offence.
This is the fundamental content of Mission
Sunday and every Sunday. Even of every
weekday! It must be registered in every fibre
of our being. It is our only hope. It is the
only hope of our world. Only God’s love and
forgiveness can make us truly brothers and
sisters of each other and of people of all races
and cultures, names, creeds and colours.
Only God’s love and forgiveness can heal the
painful divisions in our communities at home
and abroad, in church and state. Only God’s
love can heal ideological conflict, economic
imbalance and the violence which oppresses
humanity.
There is a longing for God and his mercy.
This longing may not be recognised for what
it really is. It is for us to spell it out for folk
by a myriad gestures of love, care and concern. This way the glorious face of the risen
Christ reveals God’s longing to share with us
all, his life, his love and his holiness. Our
mission is to invite folk to this fullness.
The way is the way of the cross. Jesus’ way.
Not a negative but a positive, learning to live
with humility and forgiveness, in peace and
in communion. And total forgiveness is the
beginning of the new justice of the Kingdom
of God for everyone.
Deacon Anne Taylor
with the Methodist Congregation
Woodville, Redesmouth Road, Bellingham
Tel: 01434 220283
Father Leo Pyle
with St John’s Catholic Church
St John’s Presbytery, North Bank
Tel. 01434 684265
Our proclamation then is peace. Through our
Good News we help people to realise that we
are indeed, all brothers and sisters. As pilgrims, albeit on different paths we are all on
our way to our common homeland with our
God through ways known only to him.
The main road of mission is sincere dialogue.
Dialogue that speaks to others with respect
and understanding, stating the principles in
which we believe and proclaiming with love,
the most profound truths of the faith which
are our joy, our hope and the meaning of life.
That is our mission. That is Mission Sunday
and every Sunday and every weekday. Your
mission, my mission, OUR mission.
A very Happy Christmas to you all!
Father Leo Pyle
Messy Church At Methodist Church
3.30 pm — 5.45 pm
Weds. 10th December
Weds. 14th January
Methodist Church
Christmas Fayre
Sat. 6th Dec 2pm
Usual stalls
Christmas gifts Candles
Special visit from Santa
All welcome
16
METHODIST CHURCH
SERVICES
BELTINGHAM/HENSHAW
CHURCH SERVICES
December 7
10.00am Family Service
Envoy Eunice Blakey
incl. toy coll’tn for S/Army
6.00pm Rev. J. Harrison
December 14
10.00am Family Service
Matthew Barrick
2.30 pm Carol Singing
At Haydon View
December 21
10.00am Valerie Anthony
6.00pm United Village
Carol Service at St. John’s
December 29
10.00am Communion
Worship Supt Tom Quenet
No 6pm Service
January 4
10.00am Deacon A Taylor
Covenant Service
3.00 pm United Epiphany
At Haydon Old Church
January 11
10.00 am M. Burgess
6.00 pm Father Leo Pyle
January 18
10.00 am Local Arrangemts
6.00 pm Communion
Worship Rev. T. Buglass
6.00 pm
December 7
Beltingham
9.30 Parish Eucharist BCP
December 14
Beltingham
9.30 Parish Eucharist
December 21
Henshaw
10.30 am Village C/Service
December 24
Henshaw
6.00 Crib Service
December 25
Henshaw
9.30 Parish Eucharist
December 28
Henshaw
10.00am Joint Eucharist
January 4
Henshaw
9.30 Parish Eucharist BCP
January 11
Beltingham
9.30 am Parish Eucharist
January 18
Beltingham
9.30 am Parish Eucharist
January 25
Haydon Bridge
10.00am Joint Eucharist
25th January
10.00am Tom Dodds
6.00pm Kevin Williams
THE METHODIST CHURCH
Come and Bring your friends for
Tea, Coffee and Biscuits
Tuesdays & Thursdays
10am – 12 noon
A Warm welcome to All
Sun. 21st 6.00pm United Village Carol Service, St. John’s
Christmas Eve (Wednesday)
United Crib Service, St. Cuthberts
Christmas Carols, St John’s R.C. Church
Nativity Vigil Mass, St John’s R.C.Church
Midnight Mass St. Cuthberts
Christmas Day (Thursday)
9.30am
10am
11.00 am
Mass of the Nativity of the Lord St.John’s R.C.Church
Christmas Family Service Methodist Church
Parish Eucharist St. Cuthberts
United Service for Epiphany:
Mass each Sunday at
9.30am
Mass each Sunday at
11am at Haltwhistle
Mass on weekdays (except
Mondays) at 10am
either St John’s or
Haltwhistle
ST CUTHBERT’S
CHURCH SERVICES
December 7
11.00 Parish Eucharist BCP
December 14
11.00 Parish Eucharist
December 21
11.00 Parish Eucharist
December 28
10.00 Joint Eucharist
At All Hallows Henshaw
January 4
11.00 Parish Eucharist BCP
3.00 Haydon Old Church
January 11
11.00 Parish Eucharist
January 18
11.00 Parish Eucharist
January 25
10.00 Joint Eucharist
THE MEETING PLACE
VILLAGE CHRISTMAS SERVICES 2014
4.00pm
9.30pm
10.00pm
11.30 pm
ST JOHN OF BEVERLEY
CHURCH SERVICES
Sun 4th Jan. Haydon Old Church 3pm
17
COFFEE MORNINGS
On Saturday 13th December the
The Church will be giving an
extra push to the Coffee Morning both for the run into Christmas and to coincide with the
Village Nativity. There will be
a Cake Stall and a Raffle all
beginning at 10am in the Community Centre.
On Saturday 10th January we
are going to use the Church
Coffee Morning - again at 10am
- as a chance to ask the community how they would like to see
the life of the Church develop
over the coming years. If anyone has any ideas they would
like to share they are very welcome on the 10th, or to pass
them on to me by email or
phone.
NOTICES & WHAT’S ON?
HAYDON BRIDGE UNITED
ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL CLUB
HBUAFC hold their monthly meeting on the first Monday of
every month at 7.30pm in the Lounge of the Anchor Hotel
where representatives of every football team in the village are
invited to attend.
This meeting is also open to members of the public.
Haydon Bridge
& Allendale Medical Practice
Monday to Friday: The Health Centre is open continuously
from 8.00am until 6.00pm
(except for the afternoon of the fourth Wednesday of every month)
Doctors consult between:
WEST TYNEDALE JUNIOR RUGBY CLUB
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS AGE 5yrs–12yrs
TAG/CONTACT RUGBY
MEET AT HAYDON BRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL
ON SUNDAYS 10.30am– 12.00noon
Contact Dave on 07757362309
or [email protected] or the website
www.pitchero.com/clubs/westtynedalejuniors.
All phone calls for appointments and visits,
including ‘out of hours’: 01434 684 216
All phone calls for dispensing or prescriptions: 01434 688351
E-mail address: [email protected]
Website www.haydonbridgesurgery.co.uk
NATURE CLUB WINTER PROGRAMME
Meetings held at the Methodist Hall at 7.15pm.
December 4th
Sheila Morris
The Peripatetic Pensioner
ALL WELCOME.
HAYDON BRIDGE
VICTIM SUPPORT
DANCE CLUB
Working for
victims of crime.
SEQUENCE DANCING
EVERY MONDAY
7.30 to 10.00pm
Haydon Bridge
Community Centre
Only £1.50 inc. tea &
biscuits
DANCING IS FOR FUN
Ask for details at:
December 18th
Stephen Westerberg RSPB at Geltsdale
If you are a victim of crime, we can
offer support in practical and emotional ways. Just a phone call away.
Call Leanne at:
01661830770
82, Front St. Prudhoe.
NE42 5PU
Or
0167082234 (Bedlington)
HAYDON ART CLUB
Juniors: 6pm – 7pm
Seniors: 7pm – 9pm
BJA Qualified Coaches
Contact Michael on: 01 434 684 783
Numbers in Nature
January 22nd
Lizzie Ross
Otters & the Otter Project
A Summer walks programme will be arranged to cover April - September
2015. Copies will be available at the 19th March meeting.
All enquiries to: The Hon. Secretary Robert Ford
28 Strother Close, Haydon Bridge. Tel No 684486
Open to all, first session free. Meets fortnightly at
HAYDON BRIDGE COMMUNITY CENTRE
DECEMBER 10th & JANUARY 7th and 21st
All Wednesdays, 6.30pm-9.15pm
For details/enquiries
please contact Barbara on 01434 688 886
Keep Fit, Have Fun! Young or Old.
Tuesdays at HB High School
January 8th
John O’Reilly
February 5th
A.G.M.
HAYDON BRIDGE LOCAL ARTISTS’ GROUP
HAYDON BRIDGE
JUDO CLUB
8.00am and 11.00am
3.00pm and 5.30pm
HEAR TO HELP
Anne Shilton, Action on Hearing Loss (previously RNID)
01670 513606 [email protected]
Thursday 8th January
Thursday 12th March
Thursday 14th May
WHIST DRIVES
Langley Village Hall
Fortnightly on
Saturdays
at 7.00pm.
12 noon – 1.00 pm
12 noon – 1.00 pm
12 noon – 1.00 pm
Following dates to be confirmed, depending upon
continued project funding:
Thursday 9th July
Thursday 10th September
Thursday 12th November
£1.00 entrance
(Everyone welcome)
THE BRIDGE LIBRARY
& TOURIST INFORMATION POINT
Telephone 01434 688658
12 noon – 1.00 pm
12 noon – 1.00 pm
12 noon – 1.00 pm
All sessions at the Haydon Bridge Health Centre.
RIVER WATCH GROUP
OPENING TIMES
MONDAY: 9.00am-12 noon
TUESDAY: 1.00pm-4.00pm
WEDNESDAY: 1.00pm-4.00pm
FRIDAY: 4.00pm-6.30pm
SATURDAY: 9.30am-12.30am
Coffee and tea available
LITTER PICK
SATURDAY 31st JANUARY 1pm
AT THE FOOTBALL FIELD
contact Barbara on 01434 688 886
18
Community Centre Regular Activities
Christmas tree lights
switch on event
Lots of different activities. Try something new.
Make new friends. Have fun.
MONDAY
Zumba 6.15pm
Shelley Murray,
07824449731
[email protected]
Dance Club, 7.30-10pm
Audrey Philips,
684452
[email protected]
7th December 2014 at 4.15
(meeting at the Anchor end of the bridge)
What’s happening -- lights
will be switched on from the
middle of the bridge.
Then on to the War Memorial
for carols - from Shaftoe
School children
&" Positive Vibes"
Refreshments and Father
Christmas on Church Street.
TUESDAY
Pilates – 9.15am
Lorna,
07747 842364
Karate – 6.15pm
David Beales,
07561153485
[email protected]
WEDNESDAY
Yoga 10am
Alicia Lester,
[email protected]
Pilates - 6.30pm
Lorna,
07747 842364
Art classes (bi monthly)
Barbara Wardle,
688886
[email protected]
GENERAL HAVELOCK
Booking essential for free OAP lunch 16th Dec. 122.30 followed by sing along with Dennis Telford &
Sheffield Exham coffee & tea for everyone.
Mon 22nd
Tues 23rd
Wed 24th
Thursday 25th
Friday 26th
Saturday 27th
Sunday 28th
Monday 29th
Tuesday 30th
Wednesday 31st
New years day
2nd January
THURSDAY
Chairobics 11.30am
Lorna,
07747 842364
Irish Dance 4.15pm
Kathleen Hannon,
0191 2648240
[email protected]
Youth Club6-8.30pm
Amey Henry
01434 603582
[email protected]
Bowls Club 7.30pm (Sept-April)
Joseph Tulip,
688817
[email protected]
Parish Council 7.30pm (monthly)
lunch & dinner
lunch & dinner
lunch & dinner
lunchtime only
lunch & dinner
lunch & dinner
lunch & (pm bar only)
(pm bar only)
lunch & dinner
7-1 fizz, quiz,
fireworks on bridge
(pm bar only)
lunch & dinner
FRIDAY
Karate – 6.15pm
Home made xmas puddings for sale
10% off all local bookings
We thank all our customers for support this year
David Beales,
07561153485
[email protected]
SATURDAY
Coffee morning, 10am
Various groups and organisations.
POPPY COLLECTION
SUNDAY
Hornby Model Railways Association 10am
Grant Robinson, 01661 844843
[email protected]
NEW ACTIVITIES ALWAYS WELCOME.
Contact: Valerie Bell 01434 684705
[email protected]
Total collected in Haydon Bridge and
Langley was £1656 so a
Big Thank You to All!
Camilla Royds
19
The £10 Crossword
NAME...........................................................................
November
ADDRESS……………………….................................
.......................................................................................
2014
Entries in before 20th January
Please hand in your entry to
Claires Newsagent or post to the
editors — see page 2.
NUMBER OF ENTRIES
5
LAST MONTH’S WINNER:
Anne Plastow - from Leyland!
LAST MONTH’S
ANSWERS ON
PAGE 23.
20
HAYDON BRIDGE PLAYGROUP
Glendale Pool
and Parties!
From 2 years
Playgroup runs on Monday and Friday mornings
from 9.15 to 11.15 (term time only)
at Haydon Bridge Fire Station
The sessions give children a chance to learn through
play and to experience lots of different activities.
Playgroup is lead by a fully qualified Playgroup
Leader & assistant(s). Cost per session is £6.00
North Road, Haltwhistle, NE49 9ND
SWIM in the private, indoor heated pool
(Private Hire)
PARTY in the pool
EAT in The Lodge and
PLAY in The Glen;
HB Playgroup is a member of Pre-School Learning Alliance.
our wooded garden with large climbing frame, picnic area
and beautiful valley views.
For more information on the above sessions or an informal
chat please contact Kelly Richardson 07732260415
To book call Julie on
01434 320711 or 0797 169 1631
More information at glendaleleisure.co.uk
HAYDON BRIDGE TINY TOTS
TINY TOTS - from birth to three years
Hexham Beacon Club
Tiny Tots runs on Tuesday mornings
from 9.15 ‘til 11.00 (term time only)
at Haydon Bridge Fire Station.
Program26th Nov.
3rd Dec.
10th Dec.
17th Dec.
7th Jan.
14th Jan.
21st Jan.
28th Jan.
The sessions offer a chance for babies/toddlers, parents and carers to meet, play and try crafts. Followed
by a snack and a drink, music or story time.
Cost per session is £1.50.
For more information on the above sessions or an
informal chat please contact:
Kelly Richardson 07732260415
or Nicola Grint on 07879999289
Herring Girls and Hirings.
The History of The Longbow
Railways of Tynedale
Christmas Entertainment
Allendale tar bar’Is
The Arctic
The Dambusters
Royal Yacht ‘Britannia’
On Wednesdays 10-30 to 12-00 at
Trinity Methodist Church Hall, Hexham.
ANTIQUE RESTORATION
Village Carol Singing
FRENCH POLISHING
DESK LEATHERS
CABINET MAKER
UPHOLSTERY
MIRRORS
Friday 12th December 8pm
Some of the members and friends from the
Methodist Church are meeting to carol sing
around the village—anyone who would like
to join in, please meet at the Chapel 7.45pm
(do come warmly dressed and with a torch!)
HOOKERGATE ANTIQUES
HIGH SPEN NE39 2AJ
FURNITURE BOUGHT AND SOLD
CALL: JERRY TAYLOR
07787124005
01434 688228
Village Street Nativity
[email protected]
Saturday 13th December 10.00am
S.W.S. Ltd
Home property repairs including:
Specialist Window Services
Home Improvements
As in previous years, members from all three
Churches in our village are meeting to act
out a Street Nativity. We will begin at
10.00am at the Community Centre and culminate at the War Memorial where a Christmas Tableau scene will be created with carols and readings.
leaking gutters, fence repair/
replacement, garden
maintenance.
Repairs to static caravan
windows and doors.
All aspects of double glazing
including repairs and replacements.
Misted units - new handles and
locks - letter boxes - new seals and all other repairs
Installer of Rehau UPVC
Windows, Doors and Conservatories
Tel: 01434 32 11 47
No call out charge; No obligation
FREE ESTIMATES
(Proceeds from both these events will be
given to charity)
Unit P,
Hadrian Works,
Haltwhistle,
NE49 0HF
21
CREATIVE & LOCAL
DEAF-INITELY MAYBE
I realised I was deaf - properly deaf - one day in late
Spring fourteen years ago when the ENT Consultant
in the Freeman Hospital confirmed it. And as a respected medical professional that announcement
made it finally 'official'.
Prior to this I had remained in a state of denial despite the fact I had the volume control on my TV
turned so high the people in the next street could
hear it.
Our neighbour a few doors down asked me once if
I'd enjoyed University Challenge the previous evening. I put his resentful tone down to the fact that
he's a bit thick whereas I knew most of the answers.
There again so did the panellists who were at least
ten (ok then twenty) years my junior.
Many people who can't hear are also in denial - as
was I. Probably because it creeps up on you in getting older. Or because being deaf can often be misinterpreted as being none too bright. Or because it is so
very gradual. It's also a fact that being deaf in only
one ear means the 'good' ear has to compensate and
do the work of both. This is fine until the good ear through overwork - becomes ineffective too.
I thought - as do others - that maybe a few drops
would cure it. Or perhaps I had a cold. Yes, that's it!
A very long cold. Or because people speak very quietly nowadays don't they? But then as the Consultant
spoke I realised all the drops in the world were never
going to restore my hearing. I was completely deaf
and without help I would never hear again.
With this bad diagnosis also came good news - although I was initially too dejected to take it in. He
said my hearing loss was such that I could possibly
benefit from a BAHA.
BAHA is an acronym for Bone Affixed Hearing Appliance. A long name for a very tiny yet powerful
object. He explained that it's a small box - no longer
than an inch - which fits on to a screw. The screw is
surgically placed into a bone behind the ear. This
screw is permanent although the box (attachment)
can be removed ie whenever you have a shower or
go to sleep.
Fitting the screw would require an overnight stay in
hospital and general anaesthetic. I had no problem
with that and was grateful for anything which could
bring me out of my silent world.
Like many people I had tried hearing aids - the ones
which fit inside the actual ear. Thousands of pounds
later I still could not hear and apparently my type of
deafness meant they were never going to work. Foolishly I expected the salesmen in the shop to point
this out but their loyalties lay with the sizeable commission rather than my welfare. In fairness these
type of aids may benefit many people.
I was not one of them and I felt the advice was not
impartial. I remained deaf but also poorer. Perhaps I
had just chosen the wrong shop and others are more
honest. In sharp contrast my Freeman Hospital procedure was free.
Now I urge anyone to please PLEASE see a medically-qualified hearing specialist before visiting such
shops, going online or replying to a newspaper ad.
Your hearing is far too important to leave in amateur
hands.
So with this in mind I have mentioned BAHAs versus shop-bought aids to fellow hearing-impaired
people ever since. Some are receptive and want to
know more. Others recoil in horror and say
"Whaaaat??? Hospital??? Operation??? Screws in
my head??? Are you mad - I'd rather be deaf!"
I'm always amazed by this reaction as such a short
painless procedure can have incredible and permanent life changing consequences. The Consultant
told me some people are also self-conscious about
the little box being visible. I told him if I could hear
again properly I wouldn't care if the box was two
foot wide, bright yellow and did the Hokey-cokey.
As it is this thing is so tiny (and flesh coloured) I
barely know it's there. Others are amazed and impressed when I show them. As I do often! If it can
help just one more person to hear then I'll gladly
show anyone.
The day of the operation loomed. I was actually
looking forward to a bit of a rest and receiving visitors bearing armfuls of grapes and chocolates! The
Consultant came by my bed earlier that morning and
said as my hearing was so poor I could benefit from
having both sides done and he was happy to do it.
"Bring it on!" I cried, grateful at last that someone
was taking so much care. I could have done with a
nip, tuck and a bit of liposuction too but I didn't like
to ask. So I carried on eating the chocolates instead.
No hospital procedure is to be undertaken lightly but
I had weighed up the pros and cons and all the options carefully and discussed it with my family at
length. An overnight stay and permanent minuscule
screws in my skull in return for full hearing? I did
not need to think too long or hard. It was already getting to the stage where my young son was no longer
talking directly to me. He was fed up with Mum
saying "pardon?" every time he spoke and I didn't
want to distance him further.
So for that reason alone I knew I needed to hear.
As I lay in my hospital bed with a slight throbbing
pain I kept that thought and motive. The next day after checking me over - the Consultant deemed me
well enough to go home. I still couldn't hear but I
now owned a pair of minute titanium screws and a
trendy patch of shaved hair.
22
The wounds needed to heal before any more action
could be taken. So it was some weeks later that I returned to the Freeman to check that these were progressing. I was excited knowing the years of deafness would soon be over yet I still couldn't imagine
it. By now my hearing was so poor that I heard only
through vibration and by looking at someone's face
whenever they spoke. Telephones were for other
people - not me. I knew a train was roaring past as it
made the ground a little shaky and a thunderous jet
taking off left a vapour trail. Neither made any noise
at all in my world.
The day came for the BAHAs to be fitted. I was ushered into a small room and shown a box of different
coloured attachments. All the size of a Lego brick
(and funnily enough also made in Scandinavia!). I
was invited to choose a shade which could either
match my hair or skin. I pointed out that as a woman
my hair colour can change. A lot!
By now other medical staff had joined the Consultant and myself. Between us we decided a soft shade
of pale sand would do the trick. Using a mirror to
show me, the Consultant took a small attachment and
placed it carefully on the screw. I would later learn
to do this in seconds and even in the dark.
Everyone looked at me as the Consultant slowly
turned up the volume button. A gentle woo-oosh became increasingly louder (it was still only at volume
one!) and suddenly sound filled the room.
Wonderful wonderful sound! Never in my wildest
dreams could I have imagined this. I stared unblinking in astonishment and incredulity at the Consultant
before bursting into tears. Obviously he'd witnessed
this reaction many times but his gentle confident
smile showed he was as thrilled for me as I was.
I danced out of the Freeman on air. I could hear people chattering, birds singing, traffic moving, leaves
rustling. Heck I swear I could even hear the grass
growing! All this magnificent sound through a tiny
box.
But best of all was when I arrived home and my little
boy asked if it had all gone ok. This time I heard his
every word.
And in that glorious moment I knew life would never
be the same again.
Euphemia Whaletrouser
ACROSS
1
10
11
12
13
14
16
18
20
23
24
26
27
28
EXPLANATORY
ANNOY
TERMINATE
TENTACLES
INDIA
ESCUDO
REPROACH
NITRITES
GLADYS
DROOP
ACROBATIC
UNINSURED
LIANA
PERPETUATED
DOWN
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
15
17
19
21
22
25
NEED A
CLEANER?
GARY
CUNNINGHAM
07783912293
Professional
decorator.
Pauline Story
References available
P. COATS
PAINTER AND
DECORATOR.
Free estimates.
Tel.01434 688739
Mobile 07940 429920
30 years experience
Tel 01434 684041
email:
[email protected]
‘Quality doesn’t cost,
it pays’
Conservatories Made Superior
Local suppliers of quality UPVc products.
Conservatories, Doors, Windows, Porches, Fascias,
Soffits, Cladding, White, Golden Oak, Rosewood.
Specialists in Stable Doors and Sliding Sash Windows.
Also Dormer Window Replacement.
Tel. Chris Sim 01434 684704
Mobile 07916 334154
PAUL BROWN
WALL AND FLOOR CERAMIC TILING.
KITCHENS, BATHROOMS CONSERVATORIES.
ALL TYPES OF CERAMIC, PORCELAIN
AND NATURAL STONE TILES
FREE ESTIMATES.
Call; 01434 684890. mobile 07821 828495
Email [email protected]
XENON
LEYLAND
NETTLE
THRUSHES
RAINIER
WATTLE AND
DAUB
HANDMAID
METAPHYSICIAN
CATHOLIC
GET A GRIP
IMPASSE
LOBELIA
CREDIT
TRACE
J. P. WESTALL LTD
TES
Plumbing & Heating
Engineers
Central Heating,
Bathrooms & Showers
Quality work and prompt
attention
REPAIRS TO WASHERS,
COOKERS & OTHER
DOMESTIC APPLIANCES
also TV TUNING.
Tel: 01434 602740
D & J OLIVER
ELECTRICAL
ALL TYPES OF
ELECTRICAL WORK
UNDERTAKEN
Tel. 01434 688132
23
Contact Kevin Moore
Tel 01434 684 736
KEN TULIP
(Electrical Contractor)
All types of electrical work.
FREE estimates.
New installations guaranteed
for one year
Tel: 01434 684742
‘Portree’, Land Ends Road, H/B
Robert Ford
is holding an exhibition of
original water colours
in the "THE BRIDGE"
for all of December & January
Haydon Bridge Judo Club
The Bridge and Visitor Information Point
We’ve had such a wonderful autumn, this year, and although
the trees still display beautiful and varied shades in their remaining leaves, winter approaches and the Produce Stall is now
at an end until next year. As always, we send our grateful
thanks to the Allotment Association for their kind efforts for us,
and to our supportive village inhabitants, who buy the fruit,
vegetables and flowers. The Stall raised a welcome £206 to
help with heating/lighting bills!
Archives:
All of the football and cricket photographs of Haydon Bridge
teams are now online at the Haydon Bridge website. Once
there, click on Community, then click on Archives and the pictures are there. You can merely browse but there are still many
players’ names that need to be added. Can you help?
During Remembrance weekend, at the Methodist Chapel, Ken
and Pam Linge gave an updated talk on WW1 with particular
reference to Haydon Bridge men and women. Most appropriately, they also included recent research concerning WW2.
They have very generously given copies of much of their material to the Archives in the Bridge, including recently, a signed
copy of Ian Johnson’s “Newcastle Battalions of WW1”, which
is now on display.
Not so long ago, you will remember, a copy of a letter was
found near the Community Centre. The contents, gave the
news that a Sergeant AF Johnson (wireless operator) was missing. Sadly, no-one has claimed the letter as yet. It would be
good to find it a home. Maybe it was dropped by someone visiting?
Library
When Jim Smith had the antique shop in Haydon Bridge, a lady
who was visiting the village, bought two books that it was
claimed, had belonged to Philip Larkin’s amour, Monica Jones
and had been part of her house clearance. Now, the lady has
sent the books to the Bridge to be placed in our reference library. There may be more to learn about Monica …
For those avid readers, there are now one or two ways to avoid
running out of reading matter. Above the adult fiction shelves,
there are suggestions for books by similar authors to those who
are your favourites; on the top shelf of the “Returns” bookcase
are a selection of books, which are most popular reads for the
month. There are also suggestions in the Children’s Corner
and, in addition, a featured author. Last month was Francesca
Simon, this month Michael Morpurgo.
Children’s Corner
The Summer Reading Challenge ended on a really high note
with over 90% of the children completing their task. Tom Taylor won the red cap for best performance and his name went
into a draw for the county prize: an i-pad mini. The successful
readers were presented with their medals and certificates by
Councillor Alan Sharp, who commended the children for their
efforts.
Happy reading …
The Haydon Bridge Judo Club is celebrating it's 40th
year. It started in the village in 1974 and is still being
coached by Michael Bolton. It has produced international competitors and it still has a current Great
British and Commonwealth Judo Tournament Gold
medallist, as well as all the up and coming juniors.
Our players range from seven to 67 and we are looking for more to join. We are offering four free lessons for any one who wishes to join.
Haydon Bridge Judo Club is whatever you want it to
be from basic judo to competitive judo.
Contact Michael on: 01 434 684 783
24
The Children’s Society
Fun and Festive Frolics at the
Many thanks to all the box holders who live in and
around Haydon Bridge and who have filled their boxes
during 2014. The total amount donated is £503.39 and I
am grateful to all who have supported The Children’s
Society. In 2013 the amount donated was £518.30
This charity began in 1881 to help destitute and orphaned
children and still works with disadvantaged and vulnerable young people.
Today the SCARPA programme in Newcastle works with
young runaways. Another programme helps to identify
and meet the needs of young carers and their families.
A new campaign - The Debt Trap - has started. This is
to help children in families struggling with debt amnd
preventing familiesfrom falling into poverty because of
debt.
If you would like to become a box holder please contact me on 01434 684094.
Thank you
Joyce Armstrong
Anchor Hotel
‘Christmas Menu’
Eat, drink and be merry with our delicious
new Anchor menu featuring
‘Christmas Specials’ throughout December.
Tailor made Christmas Parties
Let us know what you fancy and we will create your personal Christmas Do.
To pre - book your party call (01434)
688121, (private function room on request.)
‘Christmas Cracking Party
Saturday 20th December.’
December.
Free Festive sparkly Shot to all party revellers. Put on your dancing shoes and enjoy a
Christmas Cocktail.
Featuring music from
Wreckage 9 ‘till late!
‘Christmas Day’
Open for drinks and good cheer
12noon – 3pm
‘Boxing Day Hunt 9am’
See the spectacle of the Haydon Hunt, the
oldest Hunt in Northumberland.
Horse and hound gathering at 9am at Anchor Hotel car park,
Bar open 9am. Complimentary canapés
‘New Year’s Eve’
Complimentary haggis, neeps and tatties at
10pm - enjoy the best view of the midnight
Fireworks from the Anchor Decking and,
See in the New Year with glass of sparkly or
nip with our compliments
‘New Year’s Day’
Legendary All day Hangover breakfast
served 12 – 6pm
Fizzy Friday’s
A bottle of prosecco and olives for only £10
served every Friday
Anchor Quiz nights
th
Thursday 4 December and Christmas quiz
18th December 7.45pm
Burnlaw Outdoor Day
The West Tyne Federation enjoyed a fun day in the outdoors at Burnlaw, Whitfield just before half term. 140
children from Greenhead, Henshaw, Herdley Bank and
Whitfield took part in a range of activities for the day.
The Reception and KS1 children enjoyed a farm walk,
looking at the different things around the organic farm
and also did a treasure hunt, looking for birds in the
woods. They also took part in a storytelling activity and
singing in the big barn.
KS2 worked with School Explorers on a survival day.
They went into the woods to find materials to build dens.
There were some excellent ideas. They made bread and
cooked it in the fire pit.
Here are some of the children’s thoughts of the day…
Mmm…it’s hard to choose the best thing, but I enjoyed
the den building and toasting marshmallows. [Luke]
I enjoyed making the dens. We used plastic sheets and we
had to find a place in the woods to build a den. We found
a place between four trees so that we could tie the rope to
each of the trees. We used a fallen tree for one side of the
den. [Emma]
Today we went to Burnlaw. My favourite part was den
building and I think most people would agree. We made
bread outside. I really enjoyed getting my hands all messy
with the dough. Izzy and David were really good at explaining what we were doing and had some cool camouflage equipment. [Archie]
We’ve had a great fun day at Burnlaw. I enjoyed the bird
hunt activity. We had clipborads and had to find lots of
different birds in the trees – tawny owls, woodpeckers
and tree creepers. I enjoyed the storytelling because it
was really imaginative. The story was about a man cutting down a very big tree. [Inigo]
I enjoyed having my lunch in the big barn. We sat on hay
bales and had a big picnic. [Sam]
We sang some songs about animals with Mrs Aldred in
the big barn. [Imogen]
Den building was the best. We used lots of things we
found in the woods to build our dens. [Lane]
01434 688121
25
CLAIRE’S NEWSAGENTS
BEE ACTIVE SPORTS
11, Church Street Tel: 01 434 684
303
Mon - Sat: 6.00am - 6.00pm
Sunday:
6.00am - 1.00pm
24 hour cash point
New classes at
HAYDON BRIDGE COMMUNITY CENTRE
Tuesday 9.15am PILATES
Thursday 11.30am Easy Keep Fit
For information on classes contact:
NEWSPAPERS & A WIDE RANGE OF MAGAZINES
Lorna 01434 684424 07747 842364
Groceries, Confectionery, Tobacco, Beers, wines &
spirits, Birthday & Special Occasion cards,
Stationery, Toys.
BUG OFF
PEST CONTROL SERVICES
ATTIC FLIES, ANTS, WASPS NESTS, RATS
MICE, RABBITS, SQUIRRELS. ETC
DOMESTIC. AGRICULTURAL. COMMERCIAL.
CO-OP LATE SHOP
Ratcliffe Road Tel: 01 434 684 327
Fresh &frozen foods,
General groceries
Housewares, off-licence
Open 7.00am. - 10.00pm every day
PLEASE TELEPHONE STEVE
01434 607858/07949852644
24 hour cash point
Patricia Haggie
R.S. Hom F.S. Hom
Registered Homeopath
9 Alexandra Terrace Haydon Bridge
Tel 01434 688687
email pat _ [email protected]@homeopathy-soh.org
Ofsted Registered
DAY NURSERY
QUOTABLE QUOTES
For children
from birth to 5 years.
There are three kinds of intelligence: one
kind understands things for itself, the
other appreciates what others can understand, the third understands neither for
itself nor through others. This first kind is
excellent, the second good, and the third
kind useless.
Niccolo Machiavelli
Activities follow the Early Years Foundation Stage.
Quality assurance scheme ‘Aiming Higher’.
Sensory garden.
OUT OF SCHOOL CLUB/HOLIDAY CLUB 5yrs-12yrs
Sports. Arts &Crafts.
Fun & Games. Trips.
CALL 01434 684 446 for further information
26
Howard Dockray & Son
Scotch Corner Holiday Cottage
Approved Coal Merchants
All types of solid fuel at competitive prices.
Haydon Bridge
Comfortable 2 bedroom cottage
Sleeps 4
Stunning river views from all rooms
Available for Xmas and New Year
Contact Pauline
01434 684061
[email protected]
Dene House, Catton. NE47 9LH
Tel. 01434 683343
Mob. 07940263331
ALLEN VALLEYS PHYSIOTHERAPY
with Joyce Charlton
MCSP, Chartered Physiotherapist.
Studio 4, Allendale Forge Studios,
Allendale.
Tel 01434 618423
www.allenvalleysphysiotherapy.co.uk
ANDREW SMITH
PROPERTY & GARDEN MAINTENANCE
STONEWORK * REPOINTING * WINDOWS CLEANED
GARDEN TIDY-UPS * GRASS CUTTING
ALL WORK CONSIDERED * NO JOB TOO SMALL
NEW YEAR’S EVE FIREWORKS
The New Years Eve fireworks display is all sorted, so all
we need now is a nice clear night –John Harrison is under strict instructions to organise it!! There’ll be hot
chocolate and mulled wine to keep you warm!
The best viewing point will be on the new bridge and
from the Anchor so gather there from 11.30pm.
Please remember that the old bridge will be closed to
pedestrians from 3pm to allow the fireworks company
to set up. This is totally out of our hands, and is at the
insistence of Northumbria Police. Disruption will be
minimal, and it’s only a couple of minutes extra walk.
The new bridge [A686] will be closed to traffic from
11.30pm-12.30am, so as not to cause any danger to
spectators. It’s unlikely that there’ll be much traffic at
that time but alternative routes are available and there’ll
be marshals to advise on this. We’d be very grateful to
anyone who can spare some time to marshal; the more
people we have the less time each person needs to
spend doing it.
Please don’t bring sparklers to the event – we know kids
love them, they look lovely but they can be dangerous
when used in a crowd. Thank you.
After the fireworks, all our lovely local hostelries will be
open to carry on celebrating with your friends and
neighbours, so we hope to see lots of you there.
07726007249 OR 01434 684685
HAYDONIAN
SOCIAL CLUB
Shaftoe Street, Haydon Bridge. NE47 6BQ 01434 684383
Traditional Ales, Heineken & Coors Beers, Guinness.
Available for Weddings, Birthdays,
Funerals and Anniversaries
Village fund raising welcome.
Bingo:
Sunday at 8.00pm& Wednesday at 8.30pm.
Join our Social Club for £3 and take advantage of our
cheaper drinks & free room hire for parties.
MICHAEL HAGGIE
ARCHITECT
9 Alexandra Terrace, Haydon Bridge.
01434 688100
[email protected]
Michael Haggie BA(Arch), Dip Arch. RIBA
THE BOWEN
TECHNIQUE
The General
Havelock Inn
EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR
& Riverside Restaurant.
SPORTS / WORK RELATED
INJURIES
MUSCULAR & SKELETAL
DISORDERS,
STRESS & TENSION,
HAY-FEVER & BRONCHIAL
SYMPTOMS
GENERAL RELAXATION
AND BODY BALANCING
Which Good Pub Guide 2013.
AA Pub Guide 2013
Senior citizens’ meals half price
on Tuesdays
(lunchtime and evening)
Phone: Bridget Enever
on 07963 429 739
01434 684 376
ART COMPETITION
There’s an Art Competition for children aged up to 11
and the winner will have the opportunity to press the
button that starts the fireworks display! [There will be
other prizes]. Just create an A4 picture of Haydon
Bridge’s New Year Fireworks and take your artwork to
the library or to Shaftoe Trust Primary School before
midday on Friday December 12th. Make sure your name,
age and address /phone number is on the back.
HAYDON BRIDGE
10% Discounts for village groups
AGM
Our AGM is at 8pm on Monday December 1st, followed
by the monthly meeting, in the Havelock. All welcome.
Special event nights: film & food
Opening times:
Tues-Sat
12noon-3.00pm
7.00pm-midnight
Sun
12noon-5.00pm
Sun & Mon 7.00pm-midnight
Pauline Wallis
Get It Together Society
email:[email protected]
27
Poetry Corner
Haydon Bridge Writers’ Group:
You know you're getting old
When you always feel cold
Even in the middle of June.
Your bones they will ache
And may easily break
But really you shouldn't moan.
At least you're alive
And able to thrive
The alternative isn't so great!
I.e buried and dead
So that's enough said
I'd rather be living than 'late'.
Still, I'm not old yet
And I'd sooner forget
That one day all my functions may fail
I'll know the day's come
When my time on earth's done
Cos it'll be the end of the DFS sale!
Our October meeting focused on all aspects of publishing and getting published. We discussed the difference between self-publishing and vanity publishing as well as new, exciting opportunities in epublishing. Then we shared our stories and poems
on technology and its impact on people and communication. Although the topic sounds quite boring, the
results were interesting, ranging from poetry to fiction.
As we have our next meeting a week after the deadline for HBN, I shall report on the eagerly expected
presentation about script writing, given by my husband and an experienced script writer Chris Dunn, in
the next issue in February.
In the meantime, we will be happy to welcome any
new members and friends. Our pre-Christmas meeting is going to take place on Thursday, December
18, at 7:30 pm, and the first one of the year 2015 on
January 8, at 7:30 pm at my house. From next year
we will be meeting every second Thursday of the
month for an evening session. There is no fee at the
moment and anyone over the age of 18 is welcome
to join.
Wilhelmina Wordsworth
To further burnish The Haydon News’ formidable
reputation for cultural accomplishment and fearless
exploration of the creative avante garde I feel the
time has come to renew our monthly limerick competition—anything couth and refined that mentions
some person, place or event in the parish is eligible.
The editor’s judgement about what is fit to print will
be final—unless money changes hands... Ed.
Should you wish to come and join the
group, please contact me at:
[email protected]
28
N.B.
We are delighted to announce that superfast fibre broadband has arrived in Haydon Bridge! The first cabinet at
Old Foundry Court went live at the end of September, and
the second cabinet on North Bank has just gone live in
November. This means that those throughout Haydon
Bridge can now upgrade their service to receive speeds of
up to 80 Mbps – but please note that this will not automatically happen and requires action from you.
There are many reasons to upgrade your service to fibre.
If you use your broadband at home then you will see a
huge difference in how fast you download files or movies, how little buffering you get on BBC iPlayer or YouTube, how easy it is to upload photos online or how much
faster it is when multiple users are online at the same time
for example. For business users or home-workers, you
can expect to significantly improve your productivity by
not waiting for large files to upload or gaining access to
shared workspaces.
As mentioned, unlike previous speed upgrades this does
not happen automatically. To upgrade, you must contact
your chosen Internet Service Provider (ISP) and upgrade
your package. Several ISPs will offer fibre broadband
and it is well worth your while shopping around to find
the best deal on the market. To make this easy for you,
we have a functionality on our website
(www.inorthumberland.org.uk) that will allow you to input your postcode and see what deals are available to you.
Need a protected species
survey for a
planning application?
Bats, birds, great crested newts?
Call Laura;
01434 674 476
www.hadrianecology.co.uk
Follow us on Facebook
The technology in Haydon Bridge is called Fibre-to-theCabinet (FTTC). This means that fibre will run directly
from the exchange in to the cabinet. The existing copper
is then used to provide fibre broadband in your home.
However, this does mean that your speed will be dependent upon the distance of the wiring from the cabinet to
your home. Unfortunately this does mean that there will
be some properties outside of Haydon Bridge itself that
will not be able to benefit from a fibre connection. There
are other options such as satellite available, which we are
happy to provide more information about.
There are many more reasons why you should upgrade
and further information available at our website
(www.inorthumberland.org.uk). Also, please feel free to
contact us at [email protected] if you have
any queries.
29
Haydon Bridge and Allendale Medical Practice
Winter Newsletter
GP Timetable
Monday
Morning
Allendale
Dr Hadaway Dr Aitken
Haydon Bridge
Dr George
Monday
Afternoon
Dr Hadaway
Dr George
Tuesday
Morning
Dr Hadaway
Dr Henderson Dr Wyatt
Tuesday
Afternoon
Dr Hadaway Dr Aitken
Dr Henderson
Wednesday
Morning
Dr Henderson
Dr George
Dr Wyatt
Wednesday
Afternoon
Dr George
Dr Wyatt
Thursday
Morning
Dr Aitken
Dr Henderson Dr Wyatt
Thursday
Afternoon
Dr Aitken
Dr Henderson Dr Wyatt
Friday
Morning
Dr Aitken Dr Wyatt
Dr Henderson
Friday
Afternoon
Dr Aitken
Dr Henderson Dr Wyatt
Dr Aitken
NB: Please note that this timetable is subject to change during periods of cover for annual leave.
Please check with Reception for start and end times of specific clinics.
Appointments
You can book routine appointments by telephoning either surgery on 683280 or 684216, or book GP appointments on
line at www.patient.co.uk
If you require an urgent appointment and there are no available appointments on the day, a GP will call you back to discuss your symptoms. They will then either make you an appointment or if appropriate give you advice over the phone.
Home visits
It is preferable to be seen in the health centres, where staff and equipment are readily available. However for those unable to attend through illness, a home visit can be requested by telephoning the surgery, where possible before 10am.
Repeat prescriptions
From Monday 3rd November you will be able to order your repeat prescriptions in one of 3 ways:
•Telephone 688351 (24 hour line) and leave a message
•Go to www.patient.co.uk to order on line
•Tick the box on the right side of your prescription and hand it into the surgery
Appointment DNA’s
There continues to be a number of patients who do not attend their booked appointments. If you no longer need or cannot get to your appointment please let the surgery know as the appointment can be offered to another patient.
GP Registrars
Dr Victoria Oliphant will be working in the Practice from August 2014 – February 2015.
Dr Rebecca Downie will be working in the Practice from February – August 2015.
Patient Participation Group
Meetings are held regularly at both sites to discuss general and local health issues and practice specific issues. If you
would like to join the group, suggest a topic or just want more information please contact the Practice Manager.
Friends and Family Test
•Is being introduced for GP Practices from 1st December 2014
•All NHS patients have the opportunity to give feedback through FFT
•We are hoping feedback will highlight good experiences as well as pointing us in the
right direction on where we can make improvements
•You can fill in one of the cards located in reception at both surgeries or on line
Out of Hours service Telephone NHS 111
30
I went to college. I was accepted on my ability to play the
piano and trombone. There were minimal exam requirements for entry as it was a performance-based music
course. And I must tell you, I loved it. I was taught by
proper, seasoned professional musicians.
The head of the college, Paul Abbott, was a fully trained
counter tenor who had perfect pitch. A fantastic musician
and man who I’m sure was fully aware that we all called
him Mr Rabbit. The head of light music was Brian Whittle; an awesome sax and alto flute player who was once
with the Ted Heath orchestra, and there were no mugs in
that band. He used to take big-band rehearsals and one
day fired me and the bass player Dave Blackwell ‘cos we
were late. We were late because we had had to take the
front seat out of Dave’s mini to get his bass cabinet in but
it made no never mind to the Band Leader. We hung
around outside the rehearsal rooms not knowing what to
do until Brian came and told us that if this was the real
world we would stay fired and our wives and children
would not eat. These were invaluable lessons from proper
pros.
Later on in life I hired Brian to work for me in an orchestra pit. I was wary of asking him but, as he said, ‘What
the heck do you think I was training you to do?’ He was
A***** in my book.
Anyway enough of my rantings, but if you would like to
vote for me as the next education minister, don’t bother. I
wouldn’t turn up.
Brendan Healy
Because now, it seems, we can’t get rid of him.
A journalist once asked me if my school days had been
‘The best days of my life?’ to which I replied “I don’t
know, I wasn’t there often enough to form an opinion.”
I am not condoning playing the wag, (that’s ‘being absent
without permission’ for the younger reader) and there is
nothing worse than being caught by the hookey man.
I simply didn’t like school.
Later I found great love for things they tried to teach me,
things I now find fascinating were often put to me in the
dullest manner. Was it me or was it the teaching?
Nobody told me that Mozart was a drunken belligerent
who wouldn’t do a stroke of work unless he was paid up
front. All I heard was ... boy genius, played for Kings and
Queens, blah, blah, blah.
Nobody told me that Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock
Holmes was a drug addled chain smoker. I might have
read the books.
It was never mentioned at my catholic school that Van
Gogh had presented his severed ear to a prostitute. What
was going on there?
(Although there is a new school of thought that he didn’t
cut off his own ear but his artistic rival Gauguin cut it off
in a fight. That’s dead interesting as well!)
I like Shakespeare now, I like art, cooking, classical music, woodwork, gardening - all stuff I have learnt about
since school. By the way, I really like sculpture, especially the Angel of the North. When driving home it
heartens me in the same way the Tyne’s bridges do when
returning by train.
I don’t think education has moved with the times. Subjects and exams seem to be dumbed down. I reckon I
would have 27 G.C.S.E’s and 12 A levels at A***** if I
was sitting them today. Nah! I wouldn’t have turned up.
It may seem as if I am having a go at teachers. I’m not. I
feel terribly sorry for those teachers that care about their
jobs. Their lives are all about government statistics now.
How many kids? How many passes? How many A stars?
Blah, blah, blah.
I think we should get a bit more fun back into schools.
For a start everyone should start the day with half an
hour’s strenuous exercise followed by a thorough cold
shower. I’m sure we learn better when we are fully awake
and buzzing. It would also help to combat obesity, laziness and teenage hygiene problems. After showers it’s off
to a hearty breakfast of salted porridge. Too many kids
don’t eat in the morning. Everyone should then have to
speak a foreign language for the next hour. French’ll do
but one of the Chinese languages might be better as they
are undoubtedly the emerging business market, and
wouldn’t it be nice to order your take away without using
the numbers?
There should be more school trips and holidays. I really
liked them, especially the sponsored walks where the local convent girls came along. Does anyone ever dare do
any of these things any more? What about health and
safety and police checks and first aid training et patati et
patata. (I looked that up. It’s French. It means blah, blah,
blah.)
Alistair Burrowes writes
In 1962, Philip Larkin wrote to his muse, Monica
Jones, at 1A Ratcliffe Road Haydon Bridge:
“I thought your little house seemed … distinguished
and exciting and beautiful: clever of you to have
found it … it looks splendid, and it can never be ordinary with the Tyne going by outside. Others may
have … ‘Theatre in the Round’ around the corner, or
a Picasso, or a Stereo Hi-fi, or a split-level Dining
area – you have a great English river drifting under
your window … ”
In 2012, Alistair Burrowes wrote to his daughter,
Claire Richardson, at 1A Ratcliffe Road Haydon
Bridge:
“I thought your little house seemed canny enough,
central, yet hidden and handy for the co-op of
course. At the least, you are back in Haydon
Bridge... it’ll do for now, although the parking with a
busy road outside can be a nuisance. Other places in
the village might have fewer cars about, or not have
to listen to delivery cages being rattled furiously at
6.00am, or have drunks falling past their window at
night – but you can nip over the road almost anytime
for reduced stuff at the co-op...”
31
Interesting indeed! It would appear with the current
drive towards alternative energy (which I am all in
favour of) that the demand for wood is out-stripping
supply. Bio-mass for energy production is growing –
but do we really have enough wood available. I
heard recently that a new bio-mass power station in
Scotland will annually require more than the total
annual output from Scotland’s forests! Sounds a bit
crazy to me – we look to be heading into a woodchip
war!! We are becoming more and more reliant on
imported wood – from the Baltic states (and apparently Canada soon as well) – someone even told me
they could sell me slow grown high quality Ash logs,
from the Baltics cheaper than UK grown logs! But
the biggest worry is that most tree related diseases
and pests have come here on imported timber!!
The Green Man
The wood from the trees!
A Bit of a Blow
The recent high winds across the UK bring back reminders of the 1987 hurricane. In those days I lived
in Sussex and had started my tree surgery business
just three years before – so when those winds
whipped across the south of England on the night of
16/17 October, I woke up “in the thick of it.” It was
the night when Sevenoaks became One Oak; when
whole woodlands were flattened; when mighty trees
toppled onto cars and buildings alike as nature
roared across the south eastern corner of our country.
The clear-up took over a year, but one of the most
worrying things was that suddenly everyone who
owned a chainsaw became a “specialist”, often
charging outrageous prices for tree work – often on
trees that did not need any work. To a lesser extent
we face a similar issue these days – despite the introduction of chainsaw certification, and certification
for tree climbing and tree surgery – trees do not always get appropriate care, from appropriately experienced professionals.
Forestry is about growing trees to be harvested for
our use – but no one anticipated the rise in demand
for bio-mass etc, and forestry must be one of the
slowest forms of farming – waiting at least 40 years
from planting to harvest!
A final note
Want to know what is the best firewood – there is a
great poem “Logs to Burn” that you can find at
http://pond1.gladstonefamily.net/logs-to-burn.html
Preservation or Management?
In 1969 Tree Preservation Orders (TPO) were created as a system for local Authorities to help protect
“significant” trees on their districts. TPOs placed on
trees means that the Council have to give permission
for any work carried out on the tree (mini version of
planning permission).
Mark Shipperlee
Green Man Enterprises
(see our advert in this newsletter)
Free advice and estimates on all types of tree care
Over the years I have seen much evidence of trees
with “TPOs on them” falling into poor health and
dying, because often people do not want to touch
them, for fear of doing anything “wrong”. I actually
believe a better way of ensuring a tree maintains
good health would be to change TPOs to “tree management orders” – whereby protected trees would
need inspecting on a regular basis – and work carried
out to keep them healthy. If you have trees with
TPOs on – you can always ask for advice – and tree
surgery can be carried out on them – it is just that
permission must be sought first.
Looking for a life-time
Christmas Present idea!
Why not register your child/
grandchild to our funny
French class for a year?
“Tree Harvests”?
Living in the Tyne Valley we will all have noticed
the huge number of timber trucks moving “logs” into
our local chipboard factory and also to other mills. I
spotted an advert on the back of one of the trucks full
of woodchip – a campaign to “stop burning our
trees!!” I thought for a moment that we were in the
Amazon, but when I checked the website listed, it
was a campaign to prevent power stations burning
wood, to ensure enough wood to process into wood
products.
La Jolie Ronde Club in Haydon Bridge
Methodist church
every Tuesdays after 3.45pm
Please call Lydia Mills to register:
Mob: 07958053479
Email: [email protected]
32
Reflections
They stood in line along the pier,
Their shoulders stooped with battle gear,
No cheering crowds, no marching bands,
No outstretched arms to shake their hands.
Young men, one time with rosy cheeks,
Who scrumped for apples and swam in creeks,
Stood forlorn in dawn’s grey light,
While seagulls swooped in early flight.
What were their thoughts on that June day,
While boarding ships to sail away?
Across a sea with rising swell,
Leaving a land they knew so well,
Heading for shores where unknown foes,
More battle-hardened than any of those,
We asked to stem the tide of war,
Were watching on that fateful shore.
They stood in line across the pier,
Their shoulders stooped from passing year.
No cheering crowds, no marching bands,
No outstretched arms to shake their hands.
Old men, one time with rosy cheeks,
Who scrumped for apples and swam in creeks,
Stood, just three, neath summer skies,
While seagulls shrieked their strident cries.
What were their thoughts on that June day,
Now seventy years had rolled away?
One wiped a tear from rheumy eye,
Another coughed and gave a sigh.
Their thoughts perhaps would have in mind
The many pals they left behind.
The horrors seen, the scars they bear,
Too grim to want to even share.
With final glance across the bay,
They turned as one and walked away,
Perhaps recalling rising swell,
While leaving a land they knew so well,
Heading for shores, where unknown foes,
More battle-hardened than any of those,
We asked to stem the tide of war,
Were dug in on that fateful shore.
But very soon there’ll be no more,
Who witnessed carnage on that shore.
They’ve earned their time for rest and peace,
With other heroes long deceased.
For never shirking given task,
Remember Us, is all they asked.
GEORGE GAMBLE
Est. 1988
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Tel 07736 671612 or 01434 688726
33
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