Skvortsovia Editorial George W. Argus, salicologist for life

Document technical information

Format pdf
Size 1.1 MB
First found Jun 9, 2017

Document content analysis

Language
English
Type
not defined
Concepts
no text concepts found

Persons

Mark Twain
Mark Twain

wikipedia, lookup

Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle

wikipedia, lookup

Henry H. Arnold
Henry H. Arnold

wikipedia, lookup

Organizations

Places

Transcript

Skvortsovia
Skvortsovia: 1(2): 99–111 (2014)
Copyright: © 2014 Russian Academy of Sciences
ISSN 2309-6497 (Print)
http://skvortsovia.uran.ru/
ISSN 2309-6500 (Online)
Editorial
George W. Argus, salicologist for life
Irina Belyaeva1,2* and Keith Chamberlain3
1
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, TW9 3AE, UK
Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch: Institute Botanic Garden, 8 Marta, 202A, 620144, Yekaterinburg, Russia
3
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, AL5 2JQ, UK
*Corresponding author. Email: [email protected]
2
Published on line: 30 April 2014
This April saw the 85th birthday of one of the world’s greatest salicologists, George W.
Argus. Despite having retired, officially, almost 20 years ago he continues his scientific
research, editorial work and the identification of
specimens at the Canadian Museum of Nature in
Ottawa where he is Professor and Curator Emeritus. He
also runs workshops on the identification of willows
anywhere that he is invited to do so.
However, he did not start his career as a
botanist, having studied engineering at Valparaiso
University, Indiana, and subsequently worked as a
labourer on the Alaskan Railroad and a lineman’s
assistant in the Alaskan gold mines. It was in this
special environment of mountains and glaciers that he
developed a lifelong interest in natural history,
Ottawa, local field trip, 2006
especially in geology and palaeontology and completed his undergraduate degree at the
University of Alaska in biology and geology in 1952. After a brief spell as a surveyor on the
Juneau Icefield Research Project George entered the US army as an instructor in arctic
techniques. He was a founder of the Alaska Alpine Club and while he was in the army, in
April, 1954, George joined with three others in an expedition to climb Mount McKinley
(Denali) in what was to become an impressive story of survival in extreme conditions.
Their aim was to climb McKinley from the south and descend on the north side and
after trekking for 40–50 miles with heavy packs they reached the starting point for their
pioneering ascent of the South Buttress. Despite finding the conditions more difficult than they
had expected they reached the 20320 ft summit on May 15th and began their descent in high
spirits. Unfortunately, their mood did not last as a tragic accident happened leading to the death
of Elton Thayer, the expedition leader, and a serious leg/hip injury for George Argus. Even
99
after several days he still could not stand so the
other two, Morton Wood and Leslie Viereck,
improvised a sled and were able to move George
further down the mountain to a safer position.
Leaving George at 11000 ft with most of their
remaining provisions and the shelter of a tent they
made the difficult and long return to Kantishna in
Two weeks after the fall, 1954
record time where they were able to organise a
helicopter rescue for him. George was finally
rescued after spending a week alone, carefully rationing
his supplies and in great discomfort with a dislocated hip
and deranged knee and only the stories of Mark Twain to
occupy himself. In the 60 years since that expedition
George has been in the mountains and in Alaska many
times but never really done that sort of climbing again.
After completing some ecological projects in
Alaska George continued his studies at Wyoming
University where he obtained a master’s degree in botany
and developed his interest in willow taxonomy under the
supervision of John Reed. He published the first of his
numerous works on willows (see below), ‘The Willows of
Wyoming’ (1957). He completed his PhD at Harvard
University in 1961, under Reed Rollins with the help of Hugh
Raup. The latter remained as a mentor and role model for
George Argus at Denali, 2004
George who later named a new species, Salix raupii Argus, after him. From Harvard George
moved to the University of Saskatchewan where he taught plant taxonomy and phytogeography
for nearly a decade. Whilst there, he studied the willows of Alaska and the Yukon, including a
few summers spent in the field collecting plants, which later resulted in the publication of the
book ‘The Genus Salix in Alaska and the Yukon’ (1973). He also developed the DELTA
database of willows which evolved into the Interactive Identification of New World Salix:http://aknhp.uaa.alaska.edu/botany/salix-salicaceae-identification-using-intkey/ .
After a couple more positions he settled in Ottawa as the curator at the Canadian
Museum of Nature where he has remained ever since, at some point achieving Canadian
100
citizenship by reciting the names of
all the provinces and territories of
Canada. For 22 years, he was the
Canadian botanist with CITES
(Convention on International Trade
in Endangered Species) and started
the Rare and Endangered Plants
Project, for which he was awarded
the George Lawson Medal by the
Canadian Botanical Association.
However, his heart was always
Measuring the height of a tall Salix arctica Pall. on Attu Island.
Photo by Steven Talbot
with Salix and he made a great many field trips, sometimes accompanied by his wife Mary and
their five children, studying willows in North America
and Siberia, where he met and collaborated with
Alexei Skvortsov.
George Argus has recently published a
treatment of Salix for Flora of North America (2010)
with which he has been involved since 1985 as a
member of the editorial committee. He is currently
working on a treatment of Salix of Saskatchewan with
Anna Leighton that will be published soon. He has
agreed to write a coauthored revision of the Gleason
and Cronquist Flora of Northeastern United States and Canada, and hopes that he will have the
energy to write a key that will include over 40 species ranging from Wisconsin to Labrador and
south to Virginia. He is also resolving a number of
typifications and identifications.
Despite his eminence he is very modest and is
always ready to help anyone with a query or a problem
concerning Salix and to fit it into his busy schedule. He has
even accommodated his salicologist colleagues in his own
house and driven them on local field trips in his car with the
unique number plate, SALIX.
George was the son of German immigrants who ran
101
a bakery in New York and has retained his inherited talent for baking bread and pancakes to
this day. While at high school George had no academic inclination and no idea of what he
wanted to do in the future but he developed an interest in photography which has also remained
one of his many hobbies. His outdoor activity hobbies have included hiking, cross country
skiing and canoeing and currently his main pastimes are country dancing and music. George is
a staunch member of the local choir. Living with his family on a small farm he has tried his
hand at subsistence farming, keeping bees, raising chickens and ducks and growing wheat and
oats. Now, his large garden includes a small willow nursery so that he can continue to study
aspects of the biology of North American willows.
George and Salix. arctica,
Anchorage, Alaska 2011
Local field trip, Ottawa, 2006
George, conducting a willow identification
workshop, New York, 2005. Photo by Julia
Kuzovkina
George and his ‘little’ farm, 2006
102
During his very successful life George Argus has adhered to some advice given to
him by Hugh Raup, that whatever you do in life it should be fun and as soon as it stops being
fun, stop doing it. It seems that George must still be having lots of fun. Long may it continue.
Publications of George W. Argus
Argus, G. W. Salicaceae. In S. Payette, ed. Flore du Quebec nordique. (In press)
Argus, G.W. 2012. Salix. Pp. 1220–1230 in B.G. Baldwin et al. (eds.) The Jepson Manual,
Vascular Plants of California. 2nd ed. Univ. of California Press, Berkeley, CA.
Argus, G. W. 2012. A guide to the identification of Salix (willows) in Alberta. Jasper National
Park, Alberta. Prairie and Northern Plant Diversity Centre, Devonian Botanical Garden,
Edmonton, Alberta. 75 pp.
Argus, G. W. 2012. Salix (willows) in the New World. A guide to the interactive identification
of native and naturalized taxa using Intkey (DELTA). Prairie and Northern Plant Diversity
Centre, Devonian Botanical Garden, Edmonton, Alberta. 80 pp.
Percy, D.M., Argus, G.W., Cronk, Fazekas, A.J., Q.C., Kesanakurti, P.R., Burgess, K.S.,
Husband, B.C., Newmaster, S.G., Barrett, S.C.H., and Graham. S.W. 2011. Understanding
the spectacular failure of DNA barcoding in willows (Salix). Fourth International Barcode
of Life Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
Argus, G.W., J. E. Eckenwalder, and R. W. Kiger. 2010. Salicaceae – The Willow Family. Pp.
2–3 in Flora of North America North of Mexico, Volume 7. Magnoliophyta: Salicaceae to
Brassicaceae, eds. Flora of North America Editorial Committee. Oxford and New York:
Oxford University Press.
Argus, G.W. 2010. Salix L. Pp. 23–162 in Flora of North America North of Mexico, Volume 7.
Magnoliophyta: Salicaceae to Brassicaceae, eds. Flora of North America Editorial
Committee. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
Zmarzty, S., and G. W. Argus. 2008. Salicaceae . In F. O. Zuloaga, O. Morrone & M. J.
Belgrano (eds.), Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares del Cono Sur. Monogr. Syst. Bot.
Missouri Bot. Gard. 107: 2927–2934.
Argus, G. W. 2007. Salix L. (Salicaceae) distribution maps and a synopsis of their classification
in North America, north of Mexico. Harvard Pap. Botany 12: 335–368.
Aiken, S. G., M. J. Dallwitz, L. L. Consaul, C. L. McJannet, R. L. Boles, G. W. Argus, J. M.
Gillett, P. J. Scott, R. Elven, M. C. LeBlanc, L. J. Gillespie, A. K. Brystring, H. Solstad and
103
J. G. Harris. 2007. Flora of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Descriptions, Illustrations,
Identification, and Information Retrieval. [CD-ROM] NRC Research Press, National
Research Council of Canada, Ottawa.
Viereck, L. A., and E. L. Little Jr.; with contributions by D. F. Murray and G. W. Argus. 2007.
Alaska Trees and Shrubs, 2nd ed. Fairbanks: University of Alaska Press.
Timoney, K. P., and G. W. Argus. 2006. Willows, water regimen, and recent cover change in
the Peace—Athabasca Delta. Ecoscience 13: 303–317.
Argus, G. W. 2006. Guide to the identification of Salix (Willow) in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and
Pennsylvania. Dunes National Lake Shore, Porter, IN.
Argus, G. W. 2006. Guide to the identification of Salix (Willow) in the Canadian Maritime
Provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island). E.C. Smith
Herbarium, Acadia University, Wolfville, N.S.
Argus, G. W. 2005. Guide to the identification of California Salix (Salicaceae). Friends of the
Jepson Herbarium Weekend Workshop. Salix II. Sequoia, Kings Canyon National Park,
CA.
Argus, G. W. 2004. Guide to the identification of the Genus Salix (willows) in Alaska, the
Yukon Territory, and Adjacent Regions. University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK.
Argus, G. W. 2004. Guide to the identification of the Genus Salix (willow) in New England and
New York. Delta Institute of Natural History, Bowdoin, ME.
Argus, G. W. 2003. A guide to the identification of Salix (willows) in Alberta. Plant and
Northern Plant Diversity Centre Workshop on willow identification. Jasper National Park,
Alberta.
Argus, G. W. 2003. The identity of Salix waghornei (Salicaceae). Harvard Papers in Botany 8:
111–114.
Romero-González, G. A., G. C. Fernández-Concha, R. L. Dressler, L. K. Magrath, and G. W.
Argus. 2002. Orchidaceae. Introduction. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 26:
490–494
Brown, P. M., and G. W. Argus. 2002. Epipactis Zinn, Orchidaceae. Flora of North America
North of Mexico. 26: 584–586.
Argus, G. W. 2002-onwards. The interactive identification of native and naturalized New
World Salix using Intkey (DELTA). http://aknhp.uaa.alaska.edu/willow
Argus, G. W. 2002. Guide to the identification of California Salix. Jepson Herbarium Weekend
Workshop. 85 pp.
104
Argus, G. W. 2001. A guide to the identification of willows in Alaska, the Yukon Territory and
adjacent regions. Anchorage, Alaska. 112 pp.
Argus, G. W. 2001. A guide to the identification of willows in Alberta. Jasper National Park,
Alberta.
Prairie and Northern Plant Diversity Centre, Devonian Botanical Garden,
Edmonton, Alberta. 80 pp.
Argus, G. W. 2001. Synthesis of the North American Flora. Version 1.0 by J. T. Kartesz and C.
A. Meacham. Rhodora 103: 233–237.
Argus, G. W. 2000. Salix. Pp. 645–654, in A. F. Rhoads and T. A. Block. The Plants of
Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Argus, G. W. 2000. A guide to the identification of willows in Alaska, the Yukon Territory and
adjacent regions. Palmer, Alaska and Whitehorse, Yukon. 138 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1999. A workshop on the use of INTKEY in the identification of Pacific
Northwest Salix. Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon. 93 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1999. The genus Salix L. in British Columbia: A workshop on the identification
of British Columbia Salix. British Columbia Native Plant Society Workshop, Williams
Lake, B.C. 82 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1999. A workshop on the use of INTKEY in the identification of Pacific
Northwest Salix. Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon. 93 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1999. The genus Salix L. in British Columbia: A workshop on the identification
of British Columbia Salix. British Columbia Native Plant Society Workshop, Williams
Lake, B.C. 82 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1999. Classification of Salix in the New World. Version: 5 July 1999. Botanical
Electronic News (BEN) # 227. http://www.ou.edu/cas/botany-micro/ben227.html
Argus, G. W., R. Elven, and A. K. Skvortsov. 1999. Salicaceae – a ‘PAF’ checklist example.
In, I. Nordal & V.Y. Razzhivin, eds. The species concept in the High North – A Panarctic
Flora initiative. Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi, Ny Serie 38: 387–418.
Argus, G. W., C. L. McJannet, and M. J. Dallwitz. 1999. Salicaceae of the Canadian Arctic
Archipelago: Descriptions, Illustrations, Identification, and Information Retrieval. Version:
29 March 1999. http://biodiversity.uno.edu/delta/ .
Elven, R. and G. W. Argus. 1999. The Salix workshop, in I. Nordal & V.Y. Razzhivin, eds. The
species concept in the High North – A Panarctic Flora initiative. Det Norske VidenskapsAkademi, Ny Serie 38: 357–358.
105
Talbot, S. S., B. A. Yurtsev, D. F. Murray, G. W. Argus, C. Bay, and A. Elvebakk. 1999. Atlas
of rare endemic vascular plants of the Arctic. Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna
(CAFF) Technical Report 3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, AK. 73 pp
Nault, A., D. Gagnon, D. White, G. W. Argus. 1998. Conservation of ginseng in Ontario.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. Report 1997/1998.
Argus, G.W. 1998. The genus Salix L. in California: A workshop on the identification of
California Salix. Jepson Herbarium Weekend Workshops Salix - XXIA and XXIB.
Argus, G.W. 1997. Notes on the taxonomy and distribution of California Salix. Madroño 44:
115–136
Argus, G.W. 1997. Infrageneric classification of Salix L. in the New World. Systematic Botany
Monographs. 52: 1–121
Argus, G.W. 1997. Updated status report for Athabasca thrift Armeria maritima (Mill.) Willd.
subsp. interior (Raup) Porsild in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife
in Canada.
Argus, G.W. 1997. Updated status report for tyrrell’s willow Salix tyrrellii Raup (formerly
Salix planifolia subsp. tyrrellii (Raup) Argus). Committee on the Status of Endangered
Wildlife in Canada.
Talbot, S. S., B. A. Yurtsev, D. F. Murray, G. W. Argus, C. Bay, and A. Elvebakk. 1997. Atlas
of rare endemic vascular plants of the Arctic. Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna
(CAFF).
Talbot, S. S., G. W. Argus, and W. B. Schofield. 1997. Vegetation recovery at Simeonof
National Natural Landmark, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Refuges,
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1011 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, AK 99503.
Argus, G.W. 1997. Catkin bearing plants of British Columbia by T.C. Brayshaw. Rhodora 99:
182–184.
Argus, G.W. 1996. The genus Salix L. in California: A workshop on the identification of
California Salix. Jepson Herbarium Weekend Workshops, Salix .
Argus, G.W. 1995. Salicaceae: Willow Family. Part Two: Salix. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada
Academy of Science 29: 39–62
McJannet, C. L., G. W. Argus, and W. J. Cody. 1995. Rare vascular plants in the Northwest
Territories. Syllogeus 73. 104 pp.
Argus, G.W. 1993. Salix. Pp. 990–999, 1001. In J.C. Hickman, ed. The Jepson Manual. Higher
Plants of California. University of California Press, Berkeley.
106
McJannet, C. L., G. W. Argus, S. A. Edlund, and J. Cayouette. 1993. Rare vascular plants in
the Canadian Arctic. Syllogeus 72. 79 pp.
Argus, G.W., and C.L. McJannet. 1992. A taxonomic reconsideration of Salix taxifolia sensu
lato (Salicaceae). Brittonia 44: 461–474.
Argus, G.W. 1992. The phytogeography of rare vascular plants in Ontario. Canadian Journal of
Botany, 70: 469–490.
Argus, G.W., and A. Roberts. 1992. Salix. Pp. 54–77 in A. MacKinnon, J. Pojar, and R. Coupé.
Plants of Northern British Columbia Plant Guide. British Columbia Ministry of Forests and
Lone Pine Publishing, Edmonton, Alberta.
Argus, G.W. 1991. Salicaceae. Pp. 55-67, in G.W. Douglas, G.B. Straley, and D. Meidinger.
The vascular plants of British Columbia. Part 3. British Columbia Ministry of Forests,
Special Report 3.
Argus, G. W. 1990. The phytogeography of rare vascular plants in Ontario. Symposium on the
Flora of Ontario. Canadian Botanical Association Meeting, Windsor, Ontario (Abstract).
Argus, G. W. 1990. Comments [on papers presented in workshop on Technological Barriers to
the Communication of Environmental Information.] Environmental Monitoring and
Assessment 16: 175–177.
Argus, G. W., and K. M. Pryer. 1990. Rare vascular plants in Canada. Our natural heritage.
Canadian Museum of Nature. 318 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1989. Taxonomic treatment of Salix for the Jepson Manual of the Flora of
California. Canadian Museum of Nature Research Results Conference, Ottawa, Ontario
(Abstract).
Pryer, K. M., and G. W. Argus. 1988. Atlas of the rare vascular plants of Ontario. Part 4.
National Museum of Natural Sciences.
Argus, G. W. 1988. Salix scouleriana discovered in Mexico. Madroño 35: 350–352.
Argus, G. W., and T. C. Brayshaw. 1987. Noteworthy collections. Salix tweedyi (Bebb) C.R.
Ball (Salicaceae) in British Columbia. Madroño 34: 268.
Argus, G. W. 1987. Noteworthy collections. Salix geyeriana Anderss. (Salicaceae) in New
Mexico. Madroño 34: 268–269.
Argus, G. W., and S. G. Aiken. 1987. Noteworty collections. Festuca minutiflora Rydb.
(Poaceae) in New Mexico. Madroño 34: 269.
Argus, G. W. 1986. The genus Salix (Salicaceae) in the Southeastern United States. Systematic
Botany Monographs 9. 170 pp.
107
Argus, G. W. 1986. Studies in the Salix lucida Muhl. and S. reticulata L. complexes in North
America. Canadian Journal of Botany, 64: 541–551.
Argus, G.W. 1986. Salix raupii Argus, new to the flora of Alberta and the Northwest
Territories. Canadian Field-Naturalist, 100: 386–388.
Weber, W. A., and G. W. Argus. 1986. Salix lanata ssp. calcicola in Colorado. Madroño 33:
148–149.
Argus, G. W., and K. M. Pryer. 1986. The Canadian Rare and Endangered Plants Project.
Canadian Plant Conservation Programme, Guelph, Ontario (Abstract).
Pryer, K. M., G. W. Argus, and E. Haber. 1986. The Canadian Rare and Endangered Plants
Project. American Institute of Biological Sciences Meeting, Amherst, Massachusetts
(Abstract).
Argus, G. W., K. M. Pryer, and E. Haber. 1986. The Canadian Rare and Endangered Plants
Project. Canadian Botanical Association Meeting, Sudbury, Ontario (Abstract).
Argus, G. W. 1985. Computerized catalogue of herbarium specimens of Salix in the
Southeastern United States. National Museum of Natural Sciences. 166 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1985. Taxonomic problems in the Salix in Southeastern United States. American
Institute of Biological Sciences Meeting, Gainsville, Florida. (Abstract).
Argus, G. W. 1984. The identity of Salix conifera (Salicaceae). Brittonia 36: 321–327.
Argus, G. W. 1984. Salix occidentalis Walter, the correct name for S. tristis Aiton (Salicaceae).
Brittonia 36: 328–329.
Argus, G. W., and C. J. Keddy. 1984. Atlas of the rare vascular plants of Ontario. Part 3.
National Museum of Natural Sciences.
Smith, F. F., R. E. Webb, G. W. Argus, J. A. Dickerson, and H. W. Everett. 1983. Willow
beaked-gall midge. Mayetiola rigidae O.S., (Diptera: Cercicomyiidae): Differential
susceptibility of willows. Environmental Entomology 12: 175–184.
Argus, G. W., and D. J. White. 1983. Atlas of the rare vascular plants of Ontario. Part 2.
National Museum of Natural Sciences.
Argus, G. W. 1983. Salix. Pp. 198–214, in E. H. Moss, Flora of Alberta, revised by J.G. Packer.
University of Toronto Press.
Argus, G. W., and D. J. White. 1982. Atlas of the rare vascular plants of Ontario. Part 1.
National Museum of Natural Sciences.
108
Raup, H. M., and G. W. Argus. 1982. The Lake Athabasca sand dunes of northern
Saskatchewan and Alberta, Canada. I. The land and vegetation. National Museum of
Natural Sciences. Publications in Botany 12. 96 pp.
Argus, G. W. 1980. The typification and identity of Salix eriocephala Michx. Brittonia 32:
170–177.
Argus, G. W. 1980. Salix. Pp. 420-428, in J. Kartesz and R. Kartesz. A synonymized checklist
of the vascular plants of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. University of North
Carolina Press.
Argus, G. W. 1980. The export of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) from Canada.
Proceedings of the 2nd National Ginseng Conference, Jefferson City, Missouri. Pp. 9–11.
Argus, G. W., and J. W. Steele. 1979. A reevaluation of the taxonomy of Salix tyrrellii, a sand
dune endemic. Systematic Botany 4: 163–177.
Maher, R.V., G. W. Argus, V. L. Harms, and J. H. Hudson. 1979. The rare vascular plants of
Saskatchewan. Syllogeus 20. 55 pp.
Hudson, J. H., V. L. Harms, and G. W. Argus. 1979. Rediscovery of the climbing late
buckwheat in Saskatchewan. Blue Jay 37: 20–23.
Argus, G. W. 1979. Rare and Endangered Plants Project. Canadian Contributions to the
UNESCO Program on Man and the Biosphere. Canada/MAB Report 11: 29–31.
Argus, G .W. 1979. Rare plants and their habitats. Pp. 4-5, in R.C. Passmore. Endangered
Habitat. Wildlife in danger. Canadian Wildlife Federation, Ottawa.
Smith, F. F., D. K. Smith, and G. W. Argus. 1978. Willows for pleasure and benefit. American
Horticulture 57: 22–25, 32–33.
Argus, G. W. 1978. List of Canadian flora affected by CITES (Convention on International
Trade in Endangered Species). Canadian Wildlife Service. CITES Repts. 4. 14 pp.
Argus, G. W., and D. J. White. 1978. The rare vascular plants of Alberta. Syllogeus 17. 46 pp.
Maher, R. V., D. J. White, G. W. Argus, and P. Keddy. 1978. The rare vascular plants of Nova
Scotia. Syllogeus 18. 37 p.
Argus, G. W., and R. V. Maher. 1978. Nine Canadian rare or endangered plants. In G. Lucas
and H. Syng. IUCN Red Data Book. IUCN, Morges, Switzerland.
Argus, G. W. 1977. Canadian conservation legislation. Pp. 17–27, in G.T. Prance and T.S.
Elias. Extinction is Forever. New York Botanical Gardens.
109
Argus, G. W. 1977. The conservation of Canadian rare and endangered plants. Pp. 138–143, in
T. Mosquin and C. Suchal. Canada's threatened species and habitats. Canadian Nature
Federation.
Argus, G. W. 1977. Catkin bearing plants (Amentiferae) of British Columbia by T.C.
Brayshaw. Canadian Field-Naturalist 91: 107–108.
Argus, G. W., and D. J. White. 1977. The rare vascular plants of Ontario. Syllogeus 14. 63 pp.
Argus, G. W., and J. McNeill. 1975. The conservation of evolutionary centres in Canada. Pp.
130-141, in J. S. Maini and J. Carlyle. Conservation in Canada - A conspectus.
Environment Canada, Publication 1340.
Argus, G. W. 1975. The conservation of Canadian rare and endangered plants. The 37th
Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference, Toronto. p. 110. (Abstract).
Argus, G. W. 1975. Experimental studies of hybridization and taxonomy of Salix (willow).
Botany - Entomology - Plant Pathology Joint Meeting., University of Saskatchewan. p. 35.
(Abstract).
Argus, G. W. 1974. An experimental study of hybridization and pollination in Salix (willows).
Canadian Journal of Botany 52: 1613–1619.
Argus, G. W. 1974. A new species of Salix from northern British Columbia. Canadian Journal
of Botany 52: 1303–1304.
Argus, G. W. 1974. Salix L. Pp. 402–420, in S. L. Welsh, Anderson's Flora of Alaska. Brigham
Young Univ. Press, Provo, Utah.
Argus, G. W. 1973. Pinus banksiana Lamb. or Pinus divaricata (Aiton) Dumont? Taxon 22:
318–319.
Argus, G. W. 1973. The genus Salix in Alaska and the Yukon. National Museum of Natural
Sciences. Publications in Botany 2. 279 pp. www.uaa.alaska.edu/enri/willow/index.htm
Argus, G. W., and J. W. Sheard. 1972. Two simple labeling and data retrieval systems for
herbaria. Canadian Journal of Botany 50: 2197–2209.
Argus, G. W. 1972. Atlas of the United States Trees. Vol. 1. Conifers and important hardwoods
by E.L. Little, Jr. Canadian Field-Naturalist
Argus, G. W. 1971. A necessary name change for jack pine: Pinus divaricata in lieu of P.
banksiana. Canadian Journal of Botany 49: 573–576.
Argus. G. W. 1970. Flora of the Prairie Provinces by Bernard Boivin. Canadian
Field-Naturalist 84: 325–326.
Argus, G. W. 1969. Some new combinations in Salix. Canadian Journal of Botany 47:795-801.
110
Suda, Y. and G. W. Argus. 1969. Chromosome numbers of some North American arctic and
boreal Salix. Canadian Journal of Botany 47: 859–862
Suda, Y. and G. W. Argus. 1969. Chromosome numbers. Pp. 221, in A. Love. IOBP
chromosome number reports. Taxon 18.
Suda, Y., and G. W. Argus. 1968. Chromosome numbers of some North American Salix.
Brittonia 20: 191–197.
Argus, G. W. 1968. Contributions to the flora of boreal Saskatchewan. Rhodora 70: 200–214.
Argus, G. W. 1967. Salix. In C.L. Porter, A Flora of Wyoming. Part 5, Agricultural Experiment
Station, University of Wyoming, Research Journal 14: 9–20.
Argus, G. W. 1966. Botanical investigations in northeastern Saskatchewan. The subarctic
Patterson - Hasbala Lake region. Canadian Field-Naturalist 80: 119–143.
Argus, G. W. 1965. An endemic subspecies of Salix reticulata L. from the Queen Charlotte
Islands, British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Botany 43: 1021–1024.
Argus, G. W. 1965. The taxonomy of the Salix glauca L. complex in North America.
Contributions of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University. 196: 1–142.
Argus, G. W. 1964. Preliminary reports on the flora of Wisconsin. No. 51. Salicaceae, The
genus Salix - willows. Wis. Acad. Sci. Arts and Letters 53: 217–272.
Argus, G. W. 1964. Plant collections from Carswell Lake and Beartooth Island, northwestern
Saskatchewan. Canadian Field-Naturalist 78: 139–149.
Argus, G.W. 1964. A short history of the W.P. Fraser Herbarium, University of Saskatchewan.
Blue Jay 22: 46–49.
Argus, G. W., and M. B. Davis. 1962. Macrofossils from a late-glacial deposit at Cambridge,
Massachusetts. American Midland Naturalist 67: 106–117.
Argus, G. W. 1962. Arethusa bulbosa, an addition to the flora of Saskatchewan. Blue Jay 20:
162–163.
Argus, G. W. 1962. The use of stomatal characteristics in the taxonomy of Salix. American
Journal of Botany 49: 647. (Abstract).
Argus, G. W. 1957. The willows of Wyoming. University of Wyoming. Publication 21: 1–63
111

Similar documents

×

Report this document