Division on the Temple Mount Inside

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$2.00 • 88 PAGES • WWW.CJNEWS.COM
NOVEMBER 20, 2014 • 27 CHESHVAN, 5775
Division on the
Temple Mount
Inside
Israelis debate whether it’s time
for new rules on Har Habayit. PAGE 8
Jesse Brown’s moment
Meet the media upstart who
broke the Jian Ghomeshi story
and started a national debate.
Plus: What will Israel’s
next war look like? PAGE 44
PAGE 14
S
TION
A
R
B
ELE
C
FLASH90 PHOTO
Time to party
Our special 28-page
supplement has great ideas
for your next simchah.
Toldot
Koffler orchestra
takes final bow
Ryseron group takes stand
against anti-Semitism. PAGE 12
Funding cuts mean the end for
nine-year-old string ensemble.
BDS vote at Concordia PAGE 36
CANDLELIGHTING, HAVDALAH TIMES
Halifax
Montreal
Toronto
Winnipeg
Calgary
Vancouver
Jewish students
Vancouverite joins
face campus battles fight against ISIS
4:23 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:29 p.m.
4:20 p.m.
4:23 p.m.
4:06 p.m.
5:28 p.m.
5:06 p.m.
5:33 p.m.
5:31 p.m.
5:35 p.m.
5:16 p.m.
Gillian Rosenberg was
valedictorian at her Jewish
high school. PAGE 20
PAGE 49
RECORD-BREAKING
SELL-OUT HIT
TORONTO STAR
By TOM STOPPARD Directed By EDA HOLMES
NOV 4 – DEC 14 ROYAL ALEXANDRA THEATRE
416.872.1212 MIRVISH.COM
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Trending
T
Nicki Minaj apologizes for video
Hugging terrorists at McMaster
The group Solidarity for Palestinian
Human Rights held a “Hug a Terrorist”
event at McMaster University’s student
centre Nov. 13. The event was based on a
controversial viral video filmed in Toronto
the recent attacks in Ottawa and Quebec.
SPHR said it delayed its event two weeks
out of respect for the soldiers killed in
those incidents. “We can’t always be time
sensitive,” SPHR president and McMaster
student Yara Shoufani said.
Visa troubles snare Israeli NBA player
Rapper says she’d never condone Nazism.
last summer and featured kids asking for
hugs and holding signs reading “Hug a
Terrorist.” The idea was to raise awareness
about civilian deaths in Gaza, particularly
children, organizers told the Hamilton
Spectator. Critics said the initiative
trivialized the seriousness of international
terror and was particularly ill-timed given
Delays in renewing his visa prevented
Israeli point guard Gal Mekel from signing
with the NBA’s Indiana Pacers after the
Dallas Mavericks released him last month.
Mekel, the second Israeli to play in the
NBA after Omri Casspi, had opened his
second season in the league as a starter
for the Mavs, but shooting woes and roster
changes led the team to release the former
Maccabi Haifa standout. He missed part
of his rookie campaign with an injury
and spent time in the NBA’s Development
League. But don’t worry: with a guaranteed
contract, he’ll still be paid $1.76 million
(US) this season and next . n
Inside today’s edition
Rabbi2Rabbi 4
Perspectives 7
Cover Story 8
Comment 10
News 12
International 40
Steeles
Memorial
Chapel
www.Steeles.org
•Current Listing of Funerals
•Listing of Cemeteries
and Maps of Sections
•Yahrzeit Calculator for
Civil & Hebrew dates
•Kaddish Texts
•Educational Information
about Shiva - Unveiling After-Care - Prayers Jewish Burial Rites
•Jewish Holiday Dates
Jewish Life 45
What’s New 52
Social Scene 54
Parshah 55
Q&A 58
Backstory 59
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time for the 500th anniversary of the creation of the Venice Ghetto in 2016.
$20 million
The value of mortgages announced last
week in a fraud case involving 14 members of a Satmar chassidic family in New
York accused of lying to obtain the loans.
Quotable
When I was a camper… Israel was
only about 30 years old and we
were only about 30 years out of the
Holocaust, so there was a different
feeling about it.
— Sindi Kachuk, chair of the board of
Canadian Young Judaea. See Q&A on p. 58.
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Gematria
Sorry about the fascist stuff, and Mekel still gets paid
Rapper Nicki Minaj apologized on Twitter for
her new animated video that contains Nazi
imagery. “I didn’t come up w/the concept,
but I’m very sorry & take full responsibility
if it has offended anyone,” Minaj tweeted
Nov. 11 to 18.3 million followers. “I’d never
condone Nazism in my art.” In the video
for Only, which has more than five million
views on YouTube, a Hitler-like Minaj
marches through scores of soldiers and large
red banners with an insignia resembling
a swastika. The Anti-Defamation League,
which said it was “deeply disturbed” by the
video, accepted her apology.
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
3
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Letters
to the Editor
Holding on to the Kotel
Anat Hoffman and I disagree about the
interpretation of Israeli law (“Norma, I
love you, but you’re wrong,” Nov. 13). Yet
there is no disagreement on the fact that
Robinson’s Arch does not have any of
the kedushah (holiness) of the Kotel (the
Western Wall). To pray in the women’s
section of the Kotel is to claim our inheritance of prayer and of place. Those
old stones are witness to our communal
continuity, as well as to the thousands of
prayers that were uttered in that space.
No other location can make that claim.
Let us be clear: women too stood there
and prayed for generations. We, the original Women of the Wall, have been
struggling to maintain that connection both legally and practically on the
ground. Anat Hoffman helped to make
that presence a reality.
Nonetheless, we do not recognize anyone’s right to negotiate away the place of
women at the Kotel itself. Signing on to
the new plaza of the Robinson’s Arch is
not a compromise but an agreement to
end all women’s presence – in a group
– at the Kotel. If others wish to pray at
Robinson’s Arch, a famous archeological site, that is their right. We wish them
well. However, we will not participate in
or recognize this deal. We will not give
away the Kotel to a haredi establishment
that will use it for its own ends.
The Supreme Court decision of 2003
stated that the government had 12
months to fix up an appropriate location
for women to pray in. Absent that condition, we are granted permission to pray at
the Kotel as a group with Torah and tallit.
The Sobel decision of 2013 further clarifies that our prayer does not violate the
“local custom of the place.” How these
decisions are applied is politics. But the
law is clear. Hence, we have won our
place at the Kotel and will not abandon it.
Norma Baumel Joseph
Montreal
Remembering women vets
I enjoyed the Remembrance Day features about the Jewish war veterans. But,
where were the women?
My mother, Eve Daniels, served during
World War II in the Canadian Women’s
Army Corps until the war ended. As Cpl.
Eve Keller, she was near the front lines
doing record-keeping for the troops.
Being in that position meant the risk of
danger to her and her colleagues. There
were times that the Nazis broke through
and the women had to evacuate quickly
so as not to get left behind by the Canadian troops.
My mother also told me about the time
that the Jewish soldiers were celebrating Chanukah. A Nazi soldier had been
captured and was brought to where they
were. He didn’t believe them when they
said they were Jewish because he claimed
Hitler said he got rid of all the Jews. They
showed him how wrong Hitler was.
Leslie Kinrys
Toronto
Taube gets history wrong
Michael Taube (“The First Jewish Liberal-Conservative,” Nov. 6) not only demeans the 60 per cent of Canadians who
didn’t vote for the Conservative party in
2011, referring to them as a “brood” with
“tiresome left-wing fulminations,” but he
also exhibits a profound ignorance of elemental Canadian history.
His hero, Henry Nathan, the first Jewish MP, did not switch parties. The ruling
party from 1867 to 1874, led by John A.
Macdonald, was a coalition of Liberal-Conservatives (its pre-Confederation
name) and Conservatives. The opposition party was the Liberals.
A key figure in British Columbia’s admission to Canada, Nathan was a director
of the Canadian Pacific Railway. He was
acclaimed (not appointed) in 1871 as a
Liberal (not a Liberal-Conservative) and
elected a year later.
When the CPR was discovered to have
illegally contributed money to the Tories
(the “Pacific Scandal”), Nathan naturally
sided with Macdonald, did not contest
his seat in 1874, and returned to his native Britain several years later.
The readers of The CJN would be better
served if Taube would curb his rhetoric,
get his facts straight and desist from creating illogical speculations about Jewish
voting patterns.
Franklin Bialystok
Centre for Canadian Studies, University
College, University of Toronto
Letters to the editor are welcome
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
RABBI•2•RABBI
Exercise for the Jewish soul
CUSTOM
MONUMENTS
Shuls don’t have the resources to give congregants one-on-one devotional training, but
can they use daily minyans to give their spiritual athletes a challenging workout?
Rabbi AVI Finegold
FOUNDER, THE JEWISH LEARNING LIBRARY, MONTREAL
Rabbi PHILIP Scheim
BETH DAVID B’NAI ISRAEL BETH AM CONGREGATION, TORONTO
T
he time had come for my
wife’s unveiling. My kids
and I wanted a monument that
honoured her memory and
captured who she was. A stone
of lasting beauty, so that when
we visited her grave, we felt
close to her. The monument
counsellor at Benjamin’s
Landmark designed a custom
stone at a price we could afford.
They truly took the utmost care.
“They
thought of
everything.”
Rabbi Finegold: I want to follow up on what we
wrote about last time regarding the work of preserving a spiritual life throughout the year. In my personal
practice, I have tried to adopt a paradigm of the soul
needing exercise just like the body. I have to set up
“gym time” for spiritual work at regular intervals,
whether that’s daily tfillah or a check-in to see how
I’m doing in some area of life. If I find I’m slipping,
then I need to work that “soul muscle group” a little
more.
What are some of the concrete steps that you take,
or suggest your congregants adopt, to help with this
process? Is there anything that may be unique to your
denomination’s perspective that you find particularly
useful?
Rabbi Scheim: I like your image of a spiritual workout. In an ideal synagogue world, rabbis, cantors, and
ritual directors would fill the role of personal trainers.
In my admittedly limited experience in the gym, my
trainer would take me from one exercise machine
to another, back and forth, in the process, activating muscle groups I never knew existed. Similarly,
a spiritual trainer could take one through various
aspects of Jewish traditional life. Unfortunately, we
don’t have the resources for one-on-one training for
every congregant.
Short of the full workout experience, daily minyan is
a good starting point, in that it offers prayer, community, and some study in a nurturing environment.
Our two daily morning minyanim are largely populated by men and women who began attending while
saying Kaddish, and who continued to attend on a
regular basis long after the Kaddish period had ended,
because of the variety of needs, spiritual and otherwise, minyan fulfils.
Rabbi Finegold: I remember training for my first
race. Every run had a very specific role in the lead-up
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to the big day. Even if I didn’t want to run on a given
day, I knew that I had to because I needed to get the
miles in to be able to cross the finish line. And yet
within three weeks after it was over, I had tapered off
to a single run a week, barely enough to stay in shape.
When I realized what was happening, I immediately
signed up for another race, and found a coach (my
running rebbe) to push me out of my comfort zone.
What would the next race be for people who have
finished a year of Kaddish? They know how to pray
by that point and are certainly capable of getting up
early or leaving work and going straight to Minchah.
But they often do not, because the obligation is no
longer felt, even though it really hasn’t gone away. It is
understandable in the sense that they no longer have
the same filial feeling of responsibility, but perhaps
we can create something within the parameters of
daily prayer that can push them to go another year
and another after that.
What can we do with the routine of minyan to activate
new spiritual muscle groups, and continue to challenge
our spiritual athletes?
Rabbi Scheim: In a way, the juxtaposition of the
word “race” with the word “minyan” can be problematic, because, too often, minyan is a race with the
clock, the goal being to finish as quickly as possible.
The age-old conflict between keva and kavanah,
between fixed routine and experiential prayer, is
confronted on a daily basis. When we hurry through
the weekday service, because people need to be
somewhere else soon, those who want to focus on the
words of the siddur, sing a few more melodies and inhale the davening experience are frustrated. Likewise,
when a prayer-leader sings every melody, elongates
every passage and “shleps out” the service, those
pressured by schedules become impatient.
The search for that illusive happy medium, where
some semblance of kavanah can be achieved, while
limiting the service to a realistic time-frame, can be
truly daunting. But both will be necessary for us to
convince year-long Kaddish-sayers to return to the
minyan once the mourning period has ended. As
much as our daily services have to move, time-wise,
likewise, they have to move us emotionally or spiritually, even in some small way, every day. n
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
President Elizabeth Wolfe
Editor Yoni Goldstein General Manager Tara Fainstein
Managing Editor Joseph Serge News Editor Daniel Wolgelerenter
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From the Archives | Cut and a shave
From Yoni’s Desk
A challenge for
federation leaders
M
Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre photo
Outside the United Barber Shop at 199 Dundas St. W., in Toronto,
sometime in either 1952 or 53 are, N. London, left, and Boris Kotzer.
SeeJN | Ottawa Havdalah
PETER WAISER PHOTO
Some 500 people from Ottawa’s Jewish community came out to
celebrate a community unity Havdalah service, co-sponsored
by every synagogue from every denomination in the city as part
of the international Shabbat Project on Oct. 25. Pictured, centre,
are Marlene Wolinsky, head of school for the Ottawa Jewish
Community School, and David Wolinsky, holding a Havdalah candle.
ore than 3,000 staff and volunteers from North American Jewish federations met last week just outside Washington, D.C., for the General
Assembly (GA). The annual event, dubbed “the premier leadership retreat for
federation volunteer leaders and professionals engaged in the business of
Jewish philanthropy,” offers a chance for Jewish community leaders to learn
from each other, brainstorm new ways to engage Jews and discuss challenges
in fundraising.
In the federation world, the GA is the event of the year, a chance to showcase its best and brightest. That’s why The CJN asked two Canadian federation
leaders, Morris Zbar, president and CEO in Toronto, and Deborah Corber,
CEO in Montreal, to relate their experiences there.
The GA stressed “coming together for one another,” Zbar says, even if “we all
have our opinions, and… certainly don’t agree on everything…
“In today’s world,” he writes, “do we really have a choice?”
Given the challenges facing Jewish communities worldwide, Zbar argues,
“it’s vital that we put aside our differences – petty or not – and focus on the
one thing that truly matters, and that is the well-being of the Jewish People.
“Those of us who work day in and day out in the business of Jewish philanthropy have the ability to effect meaningful change,” he concludes. “It’s a
responsibility we don’t take lightly.”
Montreal’s 50-plus GA attendees experienced “a singular opportunity to
connect, learn, engage, exchange and make common cause with fellow Jews
who share a love of the Jewish People and a desire to ensure a bright future for
us all,” Corber writes.
This year’s Montreal delegation “included women and men, young adults
and seasoned veterans, secular and observant, Sephardi and Ashkenazi,
English- and French-speaking – a representative sample of the diversity that
makes Montreal such a unique Jewish community,” she explains. And in that
sense, the GA was “an eloquent expression of the power of community.”
Whether you’re a Montrealer or a Torontonian – or a Vancouverite, Calgarian
or Haligonian – your Jewish life has almost assuredly included some meaningful connection to your local federation. (For me, it’s the memory of floor
hockey games on Sunday afternoons at the late Bathurst Jewish Community
Centre.) There is an undeniable comfort in that shared relationship, and an
important reminder that we are all responsible for each other.
But not everyone would paint as rosy a picture of Jewish federations as
Zbar and Corber did. Some question the continued viability of the federation
model for a younger generation with changing priorities, while others growl
about federations’ uncritical support for Israel (or complain about operational spending figures). Some simply don’t feel their federation has anything to
offer them. When that connection is threatened, federations must redouble
their efforts to engage as many Jews in their communities as possible. In turn,
alienated individuals would do well to try to set aside their differences.
“By learning and sharing together,” Corber writes of the trip to Washington, “we discovered that collectively, we can accomplish great things.”
That’s an important lesson for all of us to remember as our federation
representatives begin the process of implementing what they learned at
this year’s GA. n — YONI
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
Perspectives
T
7
ObituarY
Miriam Herman was the voice behind What’s New for 32 years
Ron Csillag
T
o the legions of Jewish communal
planners who sought to get their
lecture, dinner, ceremony or other worthy
occasion listed in the pages of The CJN,
Miriam Herman was the soothing voice
on the other end of the telephone. “All
right,” she would calmly advise before
taking down the date, time, place, and
other details with a red pen on canary-yellow paper. “But speak slowly. I’m a
slow writer.”
She may have been slow but she was
thorough – and hardy. For 32 years, Herman was the face, voice and reliable tabulator behind The CJN’s popular events
listing pages, What’s New.
She died Nov. 7 in Toronto. She was 92.
At its busiest, Herman’s column sometimes ran three jam-packed pages. It was
her job to list, chronologically, and with
enough advance notice, details of every
talk, class, seminar, luncheon, synagogue
program, names of speakers and machers, and contact phone numbers of every
event called in. These could number up to
100 a week, and her phone never stopped
ringing. She loved to tell callers it was free
of charge (but didn’t much like saying she
had no control over whether the paper
would cover their event, though even that
was delivered with grace).
She graduated from the typewriter to
the computer with relative ease.
Recalled as a refined, elegant lady,
immaculately attired, hair and makeup
perfect, and quick with a smile and kind
word, Herman was known widely by her
nickname, Bubbles. The moniker was
earned because she blew bubbles as a
baby but could have come by virtue of an
effervescent personality.
Friends, loved ones and colleagues
often marvelled at how she maintained
such a cheerful, optimistic demeanour
given the incredible hardships she had
endured. After a long and harrowing battle, her beloved daughter, Meta, died of
multiple sclerosis, and she was widowed
a remarkable four times.
“She continued to use the name Miriam
Herman in her column, since that was
the name she had when she started out
[at the paper],” said her daughter, Thea
Herman. “After she married Leon [Bookman], she became Bubbles Bookman
– but Herman remained her pen name.
And then, when she married Cyril [Rotenberg], she kept the name Bookman for
legal purposes but used Rotenberg in her
social life.”
“Those of us who had the pleasure of
working with Bubbles consider ourselves
richer for the experience,” Gary Laforet,
the former general manager of The CJN
for most of Herman’s time at the paper,
said. “She was a uniquely kind and caring
lady and she will be missed.”
Herman’s column was “always a must
read [and] reflected her love of the Jewish
community,” said Patricia Rucker, editor
of The CJN from 1989 to 1994. “She wrote
with accuracy and grace, and her callers
knew that she cared about every event.
She was a great lady, and a joy to work
with.”
She was born in Toronto in 1921 to Russian immigrant parents, Bessie and Isaac
Hamill, a dentist who had weathered the
Depression. Asked by her mother what
she learned on her first day at school, the
young girl replied that she learned her
name was Miriam, not Bubbles.
After attending Oakwood Collegiate in
Toronto with a group of Jewish girls who
remained good friends for the rest of their
lives, Herman decided to go to nursing
school in New Jersey instead of university
Miriam Herman
with her friends. “She told me it was her
one act of rebellion,” her daughter said.
“She always regretted the fact that she did
not have a university education.”
She worked as a student nurse during
World War II and married immediately
after graduation, at age 22, to Edward
Braun, a doctor.
Although she never worked as a nurse,
“I recall that she made great hospital corners on the bed and she had little tricks to
make my sister and me more comfortable
when we were home sick from school,”
her daughter said.
The coupled moved to St. Louis, Mo.
where daughter Meta was born. But a few
years later, Braun died of a heart attack
while shovelling snow. Herman was a
widow in her 20s with a young child.
She moved back with her parents in
Toronto. A few years later, she met Louis
Herman on a blind date. The couple
spent 20 happy years together, and had a
daughter, Thea. But he too died of a heart
attack when Miriam was 47. That same
year, Meta was diagnosed with multiple
sclerosis and her mother began devoting
two days a week to her, an arrangement
that would last for 40 years.
“To add to my mother’s difficulties, she
had a 17-year-old in full-fledged rebellion
mode on her hands,” said Thea. “I was
angry over the death of my father and
took it out on her.”
Fortunately, Herman had an outlet:
She became president of Holy Blossom
Temple’s sisterhood, a two-year post in
which she learned a lot about community
machinations.
But at age 50, she went job hunting
and landed at The CJN in 1971, the year
new owners took over the paper, and she
began compiling What’s New.
“Many people said it was the first thing
they read when they opened up the
paper,” related her daughter. “It was the
perfect job for someone with all her contacts in the community, her impeccable
social skills, tact and diplomacy.”
A few years later, she married Leon
Bookman and they shared 20 years
together before he died in 1998.
Three years after that, Herman went on
to marry Cyril Rotenberg. She was 79, he
was 81 and they had known each other
since they were young children. When
Rotenberg fell ill and died, Herman was
widowed a fourth time.
But by then, Alzheimer’s had her in its
grip and the disease spared her the grief
she would have otherwise suffered. The
same was true when Meta died several
years after that.
“My mother had a lot of curve balls
thrown her way,” her daughter understated, “but she met each one of them
with strength, courage and a smile on
her face. She always moved forward, not
backward.”
Herman is survived by her sister, Ruth
Fremes, daughter Thea, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. n
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Cover Story
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Religious Israelis divided on Temple Mount
Jennifer Tzivia MacLeod
Jerusalem
Following renewed violence, the Temple
Mount has become part of Israel’s reality
once again. Some religious Jews are vocally reclaiming their right to pray there,
while others refrain from going up – for
religious, not political reasons.
“My knowledge of the place was… vague
and foggy,” says Varda Meyers Epstein,
who has lived in Israel for three decades.
“As if it were a historical place rather than
a real place. It didn’t occur to me what the
symbolism of planting a mosque there
meant.”
The Temple Mount is the biblical site of
the binding of Isaac, Jacob’s dream, and
the threshing floor bought by King David
on which his son Solomon built the First
Temple itself.
“It may be shocking to a lot of people,”
says Batya Medad, an olah of over 40 years,
“but in all honesty, the Kotel [Western
Wall] is of extremely low holiness in comparison. The Western Wall,” she explains,
“is a much later expansion of the Temple
Mount.” It only became a place of prayer
in the last few centuries. “Until then, Jews
were going up to the Temple Mount.”
To Muslims, the Temple Mount is revered as the location of the binding of Ishmael and Mohammed’s ascent to heaven.
Today, two Muslim landmarks stand on its
37 acres. The iconic golden Dome of the
Rock and the lower grey dome of the AlAqsa Mosque.
When it was recaptured from Jordan in
1967, Moshe Dayan, a secular kibbutznik,
saw Jews venerating the Temple Mount
and reputedly sneered, “What is this,
the Vatican?” He handed control over to
Muslim religious authorities, and a law
was enacted forbidding Jews from praying there.
But Jews have been returning in the last
few years, at least until Oct. 29, when a Palestinian Arab terrorist shot and wounded
Yehuda Glick, an American-born rabbi
and Temple Mount advocate.
Medad, a journalist and blogger, visited
the Temple Mount for the first time this
summer with a group of religious women
led by Glick and Rabbi Yosef Elbaum, another prominent advocate.
She was shocked by inequalities between religious Jews and other visitors,
including lengthy delays before her group
was searched and allowed to enter. She
called the restriction of Jews on the Tem-
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Protesters are dragged away from the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Flash 90 photo
ple Mount “the epitome of hypocrisy.”
She also says that the law against prayer
on the Mount is not right.
Many defy the law. “If one is caught
moving one’s lips in a fashion that could
look like prayer, you’re considered to
be breaking the law,” says Medad. “My
friend and neighbour who led the group
was very careful about saying prayers, and
words from Psalms, as if she was having a
conversation.”
Following recent violence, Rabbi Yitzhak
Yosef, Israel’s chief Sephardi rabbi, has
called on Jews to avoid the area.
His statement has spurred a backlash.
“The idea that because the Arabs are being violent, we must desist from going to
our holiest spot,” Medad said, “doesn’t
make any sense.”
Elka Saadon, a Montrealer who has lived
near Haifa for 17 years, is confused by
media reports. “I have mixed feelings; on
one side, it’s really important to us, more
than the Kotel. But on the other side,”
Saadon said, “you don’t want to start another war over it. They say in the news that
it’s because [Glick’s group] went up, they
brought a lot of people; that’s what incited
the whole thing. I have no idea.”
Saadon’s 18-year-old son went up with
Yehuda Glick before the shooting. Though
she was happy he went, she says, “I would
find it too dangerous to go there myself.”
Saadon feels more strongly now. “We have
no idea why the Arabs want it so badly,”
she says, “and why we can’t visit there.”
Jews outside of Israel are too passive; she
says. They say, “Why make trouble? Keep
the Temple Mount for the Arabs. We have
the Wall; it should be enough.”
Epstein, a blogger, believes in the Jewish
right to control the area. But she wouldn’t
go up herself, not because of incitement,
but for religious reasons.
“Since we don’t know the exact location
of the [Holy of Holies], it’s better not to go
up there, since one might end up walking
in this spot, which is forbidden for all except the [High Priest].”
Although rabbis have created maps of
permitted areas, other problems remain.
“One must not wear leather shoes and
one has to immerse in a ritual bath. It’s
complicated.” Disregarding these details
demeans the holy site.
Nevertheless, Epstein’s views have shifted. She sees people like “ Glick, [and MKs]
Moshe Feiglin, Shuli Moalem, and Tzipi Hotovely as absolutely heroic for ascending the Mount.”
Like Epstein, former Torontonian Danny
Hershtal, a political analyst and former
Knesset candidate, would never go up
himself, for halachic reasons. However,
he says, “I don’t oppose it for those given
rabbinic approval.”
He mentions the 1920 riots which happened because Jews wanted to pray at
the Kotel. “We can’t simply constrain ourselves to Muslim sensibilities, because
they could be endless.”
While Arabs throw stones and the world
urges Israelis to concede, Dayan is also
commonly vilified in religious circles for
giving up this precious site.
“This is the biggest sin of my generation,” says Epstein. She will never understand how anyone allowed Dayan to do
such a terrible thing. “ If the cries against
his action were loud, they weren’t loud
enough.”
“It’s an enormous piece of land,” agrees
Medad, “which unfortunately, the Israeli
government has allowed the Jordanians
and the Muslim Waqf to administer, rather
than giving it the holiness it deserves.” She
pauses before adding, “We have thrown
away our responsibility.”n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
T
9
10
Comment
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20,, 2014
Another take on The Death of Klinghoffer
Charles Heller
T
he purpose of music is to help us
relate to other people, and the singing
voice, especially, brings us closer to each
other. This is the basic premise of opera:
to tell a story and help us sympathize
with others, or at least understand what is
going through their mind.
Over the years, different composers have
concentrated on different aspects of this
project. Donizetti and Handel focused on
the human voice, Puccini focused on jolting us with shocking stories, while Wagner
thought in terms of Hollywood blockbusters long before they existed. Now along
comes John Adams, upsetting us all by
turning newspaper headlines into song.
His opera, The Death of Klinghoffer, is
ending a run at the Metropolitan Opera in
New York, where it has attracted considerable attention due to its subject matter.
The Death of Klinghoffer deals with the
Palestinian terrorist attack on the cruise
ship Achille Lauro in 1985, in which
Leon Klinghoffer, a wheelchair-confined
American Jew, was killed and thrown
overboard.
Many newspapers, including The CJN,
have reprinted Klinghoffer’s daughters’
objections to this work (their essay also
appeared in the printed program for the
opera). But many did not at all feel, as the
Klinghoffers felt, that the opera mistreated
Leon Klinghoffer. The Aria of the Falling
Body, sung at his death, far from deserving
the ridicule it has attracted (often from
people who have not heard it), is in fact
a dignified Kaddish and is followed by a
moving soliloquy by his wife Marilyn, with
which the opera ends.
There is indeed a problem with the
opera. The libretto was written by Alice
Goodman, who cannot seem to accept
that Jews are entitled to live in their own
land. But Goodman’s personal beliefs do
not surface in the opera. Some commen-
tators have objected to a presumed “moral
equivalence” in the opera – that is, its
portrayal of terrorists as worthy of equal
consideration to Jewish victims. But the
opera does not provoke such a response at
all – the text is too opaque to be regarded
as giving any of the protagonists an intelligible “argument for discussion.”
It was certainly an intense experience
to see such a Jewish work performed,
where the audience laughs when Marilyn
Klinghoffer refers to the initial hijacking
as “meshugass.” (The Met has certainly
come a long way from its early days, when
it only with difficulty allowed the first Jew
onto its board, an experience summarized
by his remark: “A kike is a Jewish gentleman who has just left the room.”)
The music critic at the London Jewish Chronicle found nothing to object
to in The Death of Klinghoffer, except
that he found it boring. That’s not at all
how I would describe Adams’ colourful
rhythms and orchestration. This work is
not “operatic”– that conventional style
which the original director, Peter Sellars,
described pejoratively as “nice music
for nice people” – although it certainly
requires good singers. Many of the myriad commentators have half-heartedly
defended The Death of Klinghoffer on
the grounds that art is meant to provoke
us. I think that Handel or Mozart would
agree with this argument, but only up to a
point. They thought that art was primarily
meant to console us. Sellars himself has
emphasized the role of art, and opera in
particular, to heal.
This work is not what you might think of
as “opera.” It is more a sombre commemoration of a tragedy with refined music.
It has a hyper-verbose text – the classic
librettists of the past would tear their
hair (or wigs) out if they heard it – that is
almost opaque and monumental.
Is The Death of Klinghoffer worth seeing?
Certainly, if you are responsive to music
and the expressive powers of a great contemporary composer. n
Charles Heller is an associate member
of the Canadian Music Centre, and the
award-winning author of What To Listen
For in Jewish Music.
Day schools across the denominations
Daniel Held
A
fter the Avi Chai Foundation released
its fourth census of Jewish day schools
in the Unites States at the end of October,
media headlines trumpeted the same line
“day school enrolment is up by 12 per
cent.”
Twelve percent growth is a phenomenal
feat. Notwithstanding economic pressures, a
shrinking cohort of Jewish school-aged children, increasing intermarriage and a general
distancing from traditional forms of Jewish
affiliation including synagogue membership
and contributions to legacy agencies, day
school enrolment is on the rise.
Well, not quite.
Yes, overall, enrolment across U.S. day
schools is up by 12 per cent (or 26,437
students) since 2008. This growth, however, comes nearly exclusively from the
chassidic and yeshiva world sectors. In this
same time frame, enrolment in community
Connect with us:
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schools dropped by two per cent, in modern Orthodox by seven per cent, in Reform
schools by 19 per cent, and in Solomon
Schechter (Conservative) schools by 27 per
cent.
In 1998, only 20 per cent of all students
enrolled in Jewish day schools in the United
States were enrolled in non-Orthodox
schools. By 2013, that number had dropped
to 13 per cent. Professors Jack Wertheimer
and Steven M. Cohen, in an article marking
one year since the release of the infamous
Pew Portrait of Jewish Americans, lament
the “tragic [fact] that day schools at every
level have become largely the preserve of
Orthodox Jews, with only small percentages
of others choosing an immersive Jewish
education for their children.”
Here in Toronto, the numbers look very
different. In 1998, 58 per cent of all students
enrolled in Jewish day schools in Toronto
were enrolled in non-Orthodox schools. By
2013, that number had dropped to 54 per
cent – a far cry from the American scene.
There is plenty to celebrate in Toronto’s
non-Orthodox day schools, but before
breaking open the Manischewitz, it’s worth
a closer look at the numbers.
Between 1998 and 2013 enrolment in
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non-Orthodox schools in the U.S. dropped
by eight per cent. In Toronto the drop was
seven per cent. The drop in enrolment
in Toronto has been precipitated in large
part by a drop in the number of Jewish
school-aged children – down nine per cent
between 2001 and 2011. Taking population
into account, market penetration has not
moved significantly.
Now for the Manischewitz.
Retention is one of the success stories
of Toronto schools. The Avi Chai census
demonstrates clear drops in enrolment in
American schools between grades 5 and
6 – when students transition into middle
school – and grades 8 and 9 – the transition
into high school. Not so in Toronto. A concerted effort on the part of school leadership has mitigated these natural points of
attrition, ensuring high retention rates.
A second success is perceived value.
Parents in Toronto are not concerned that
sending their children to Jewish day school
will negatively impact their future options.
Quite the opposite. Day schools open
doors.
A third success is choice. Unlike some
communities where there are but one or
two day schools, we benefit from choice
Twitter: @TheCJN
– in religious philosophy, approach to
pedagogy, size and location. This choice allows parents to ensure the right fit between
school and child.
With enrolment in non-Orthodox day
schools there is a lot at stake. A strong
community needs strong day schools.
These schools produce Jews with deep
knowledge, strong identities, and the skills
necessary to lead our community. A recent
study of young communal leaders demonstrates that a disproportionate number are
day school graduates.
Trends in U.S. enrolment do not bode
well for the future of a diverse and committed Jewish community and further
reinforce the factors leading to the Pew
findings.
For us, the data should serve both as an
opportunity to pat ourselves on the back
and then, quickly, a reminder to redouble
our efforts to build a strong, sustainable
and affordable day school system for the
whole community. n
Daniel Held is executive director of the Julia
and Henry Koschitzky Centre for Jewish
Education at UJA Federation of Greater
Toronto.
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
Comment
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11
I am not a ‘bed’!
Jean M. Gerber
A
l tashlichayni b’et ziknah: Cast me
not away when I am old.
We recite this mantra in shul. For
years, it had only a faint echo of meaning for me. My parents and relatives
aging and dying, my own image in the
mirror slowly changing – these were
natural events, but surely they had
nothing to do with getting old.
To whom are we speaking when we
ask that we not be forgotten in our
old age? For years, I thought it was
addressed to God, but now I think it is
addressed to the society around us.
To society I will eventually become a
“bed.” I’d say over my dead body, but
that is where it will lead.
Here is a phrase my children hate:
when I was growing up (groan), my two
widowed grandmothers lived with us.
One was demented by stroke. In addition to her full-time job, my mother
looked after her, along with my help
as a reluctant teen. The other was not
so frail, but still not a well woman. We
never thought of doing anything else
than having them live with us.
At my recent 50th reunion with Peace
Corps pals, we realized that we have arrived at the stage where young women
give us seats on buses, no one asks for
identification when we get seniors’
passes at the movies, and no one questions our discounts on seniors’ Thursdays at Shoppers.
What care can we, and boomers hot
on our heels, expect? Governments
have created, or helped to create, a
jungle of services for the elderly – most
of which are good, none sufficient, and
each one living in its own little silo
By 2021, one-quarter of our population will be over the age of 65. Surely
the Jewish community’s demographic
will not be far behind. While many of
us still live independent, healthy lives,
older seniors are already feeling the
need of more – and better co-ordinated
– services than are currently available.
Today, a family who has one or two
elders in need of outside support – besides what the family can provide – has
to manage a cacophony of agencies.
There is no central place where all the
various offerings can be co-ordinated.
As a result, you get a few hours a day
or week of home care from the government, supplemented with what you
can afford privately, and the family
picks up the rest. Few are able to fund
24-hour care for parents or siblings
who need it.
And there will only be more of us
who, when they reach the wards of
a hospital, become “beds.” Or, even
worse, “bed-blockers.”
Government services are not keeping
up, or are sporadically administered
and poorly co-ordinated. The Jewish
community currently tries to provide,
but it’s daunting for any agency.
I talked with a community worker
about the issue. “What we need,” she
told me, “given the unco-ordinated
service menu among government and
private home-care agencies, is some-
one to navigate a senior through the
forest.” A ship captain for the aged.
In the Globe and Mail on Sept. 16,
Andre Picard wrote in support of home
care: “Only four per cent of health-care
spending goes into home care… If we
want to encourage people to live in
the community [read not in a hospital
bed], we have to build senior-friendly
cities with better public transit, affordable housing, grocery stores that deliver… If we don’t provide adequate and
affordable home care, a lot of people
are going to end up in institutions, at
much greater financial and emotional
cost.”
Of course, home-based elder care is
only one part of the issue. Canada is
spending billions on “homeland security” and ISIS. How about just one of
those billions being put into a national
plan for elder care? How are we – the
larger community and the Jewish
organized community – allocating
resources to provide the same enthusiastic support of our elders? n
The unfortunate reality of profiling
Uri Dromi
R
ecently, I hosted at the Jerusalem
Press Club a group of students
from the Medill School of Journalism
at Northwestern University in Chicago.
They came to learn first-hand about the
complexities of covering Israel and the
Middle East. With the growing hostility toward Israel on campuses all over
North America, we went out of our way
to prepare for these future journalists the
best program possible, which would send
them home enriched and better educated about the situation here.
One of the participants was a Palestinian-American female, wearing a hijab.
Sensing possible problems, I contacted
security at Ben-Gurion Airport and
vouched for her. Alas, it didn’t help. The
first thing these young people encoun-
tered upon arrival was their hijab-wearing friend being pulled aside and interrogated for two hours.
Trying to avoid more such embarrassments later, I asked security at the
Foreign Ministry (where I had better
connections) not to single her out when
the group entered the ministry, but rather to pick some people, including her, as
if at random, for further inspection. The
trick didn’t work. In her blog she wrote:
“Because of my hijab I became suspect
and was discriminated against.”
To discriminate against people just because of their religion or the way they look
or dress is the last thing Jews should be
supporting. However, the security personnel in Israel didn’t pick on the Muslim student from Chicago arbitrarily. There is an
onslaught on Jews and Christians today,
being carried out by militant Islamists,
and when attacked, Jews and Christians
have the right to defend themselves.
ISIS fighters are easy to identify, with
their beards, machine guns, black flags
and Toyota trucks. On the other hand,
terrorists disguised as airplane passengers or passers-by pose a difficult
challenge. I wish there was a device that
would identify them, perhaps by monitoring the sinister energy they radiate (if
Israeli high-tech mavericks invent such
a thing, remember where you read about
it first). In the meantime, unfortunately,
profiling is sometimes the lesser evil.
Being a woman doesn’t necessarily
help. Security people in Israel remember
Wafa al Bass, a 21-year-old Gazan who
in 2005 befriended Israeli guards at the
Erez checkpoint. She travelled several
times on a special permit from Gaza to
Be’er Sheva, where she had been treated
at the Soroka Hospital. For some reason,
one time the guards became suspicious
and discovered that under her traditional
black robes she had strapped a 22-pound
bomb to her leg. She was sent to prison,
but released in the Gilad Schalit prisoner
swap. To the Palestinian schoolchildren
who came to greet her upon her release,
this pious woman said: “I hope you will
walk the same path we took and, God
willing, we will see some of you as martyrs.”
This feeling of an elusive enemy within
poisons even the most liberal minds. At
the Touro Restaurant at the Jerusalem
Press Club, most of the sous-chefs and
the kitchen workers are Palestinian.
We love them and treat them as equals.
Until at the Begin Heritage Center next
door, a Palestinian cook pulls a gun and
shot Israeli activist Yehuda Glick. Then,
against everything we believe in, we start
becoming suspicious.
When will all this end? When Islam
overcomes this militant phase and
retreats from the battlefields of the jihad
back into the mosques. That, however,
might take some time. In the meantime, my heart goes out to this Palestinian-American student, whose only sin
was that she was wearing a hijab and
now has bad memories from her first trip
to Israel.
I know what I have to do. The next time
I expect a Muslim guest, I’ll try harder.
There must be a way to walk the thin line
between securing our lives and not hurting the feelings of innocent people. This
is a calculated risk worth taking. n
Uri Dromi is director general of the Jerusalem Press Club.
12
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
News
Ryerson Students’Union passes anti-Semitism motion
SHERI SHEFA
[email protected]
A motion that calls on the Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) to oppose anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism, and to publish
an annual report detailing racist incidents on campus was passed Nov. 12 at
the RSU fall general meeting.
The motion, titled “No Anti-Semitism
on Campus,” was put forward in response to a motion that the RSU passed
last April endorsing the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) campaign
against Israel.
Adir Krafman, Hillel of Greater Toronto’s co-ordinator for advocacy in the
GTA, explained that although the BDS
motion that RSU passed in April had
no bearing on the way the university
administration operates, students on
campus were still experiencing “rising
anti-Israel sentiment.”
Any Ryerson student is eligible to vote
at the twice-yearly RSU general meetings. The number of students who voted
on the anti-Semitism motion was not
available at The CJN’s deadline.
The Nov. 12 motion, which was drafted by Hadas Hait, a Hillel Israel Engagement intern and the president of a
Ryerson student group called Students
Supporting Israel, calls on the RSU to
combat anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism.
“This includes, but is not limited to
equating Zionism with Nazism and
claiming that ‘History is repeating itself’
with regards to the Nazi Holocaust and
Students shouldn’t
have to be concerned
about defending
who they are or
defending a country
in classrooms and on
campus.
MERYLE KATES
STAND WITH US
Adir Krafman
the State of Israel,” the motion states.
“We all know that it is not criticism of
Israel, it is a form of anti-Semitism that
makes our students feel uncomfortable,” said Meryle Kates, the executive
director of Stand With Us, a non-profit
organization that works with students to
help them advocate affectively for Israel.
“Students shouldn’t have to be concerned about defending who they are or
defending a country in classrooms and
on campus in general,” Kates added.
“This motion was brought forward by
many students involved with Hillel and
Students Supporting Israel, and Stand
With Us gave them talking points and
worked with them in advance to try to
take this motion and make the campus
less divisive and angry and hateful.”
Perhaps most important was that the
motion called on the RSU to work directly with Jewish students on campus
to fight anti-Semitism and to publish an
annual report detailing all incidents of
racism on campus and the actions taken
by the RSU and university administration.
In a statement released by Hillel, Hait
said, “Jewish students had expressed
to me their concerns about rising anti-Semitism on campus. I wanted to
draft a motion to create a report that
would track and help prevent incidents
of racism in the future.” Krafman explained that the idea behind the report is that if a student experiences or witnesses an anti-Semitic
incident, they will be able to file a complaint with the RSU.
“The report will later be used as a tool
to measure tangibly the level of anti-Semitism and can be used for further
action,” Krafman said.
“The first part of the motion, which
commits the union to work with the
Jewish student community and other
members to combat anti-Semitism is
already being implemented, and in
the following weeks, the president of
the RSU will be meeting with both the
president of Students Supporting Israel,
Hadas Hait, as well as Hillel at Ryerson’s
student president, Ruchie Shainhouse,
to discuss it further.”
Krafman said there were students who
spoke against the motion, “but they
were disorganized and didn’t have any
real substance, and the motion was carried.”
Rebecca Katzman, a Stand With Us
Canada student leader who was at the
meeting said, “I explained to the mediator after the meeting that there is one
Jewish state. Everyone holds the Jewish
state to a higher standard than any other
country in the world. This is how I know
that anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism are
one.” Along with the No Anti-Semitism on
Campus motion, another motion that
called on the RSU to revive its “No Islamophobia No Anti-Semitism No Racism
Campaign” passed unanimously. n
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Web reporter broke Ghomeshi story,
but his rabble-rousing goes way back
PAUL LUNGEN
[email protected]
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Jesse Brown has always had a bit of a
problem with authority.
Back when he was a youngster, he
was politely asked to leave Leo Baeck
Day School. As it happens, his aunt
was the principal at the time.
At Northern Secondary School,
he edited the school newspaper,
Punch, and got into trouble when
it published student report cards
rating the teachers. The incident,
which almost got him expelled, was
picked up by the local media and
Brown, all of 18, was asked by CBC
to debate the school principal on
the air.
It was his first experience with the
media and the kind of controversy it
can provoke. “I saw what it means to
take a stand for free expression,” he
said.
Today, at 37, he’s the successful
entrepreneur behind the increasingly popular website Canadaland. An
accomplished journalist, he’s broken
some big stories in the 13 months
since he launched the website/
podcast. But the one that has really
taken off and shows no signs of abating is the Jian Ghomeshi scandal at
the CBC, which involve allegations
of sexual harassment and violence
against the radio host.
Ironically, Brown worked for a time
at the CBC. He’s also written for Saturday Night magazine and has had a
number of freelance jobs as well.
Last March he received an email
from an unnamed woman relating
her experiences while in Ghomeshi’s
company. Further investigation
showed there were other women
with similar stories.
Brown felt the allegations were
credible and newsworthy, but he was
worried he didn’t have the financial
clout and credibility to publish them
on his own.
On the advice of lawyers, Brown
took the story to the Toronto Star,
where he could benefit from the
paper’s editorial advice, legal support and credibility to give the story
the weight it deserved.
The revelations have rocked the
CBC and have led to the termination
of the popular host of the radio show,
Q.
One story has led to another, and
Canadaland continues to break stories about the case. “I’ve never had a
Fired CBC host Jian Ghomeshi
Canadaland founder Jesse Brown
crazier time in my life,” Brown said.
Whether the Ghomeishi story is
the most important one advanced
by Canadaland is debatable, he acknowledges. Around the same time
in October that the Ghomeishi story
broke, he carried an interview with
American journalist Glen Greenwald
on the prevalence of government
surveillance in Canada.
Other important items he’s covered
include the speaker’s fee CBC anchorman Peter Mansbridge received from
the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, payments to the CBC
from Parks Canada, which suggests a
quid pro quo, as well as a story of a
senior editor at the Globe and Mail
overruling the editorial board’s recommendation to endorse a minority
Liberal government in Ontario and
instead put its support behind Conservative Tim Hudak.
“I’m looking for interesting media
stories that aren’t being reported,” he
said.
A fan of the Daily Show; On the
Media, a public affairs radio program on NPR; and Charlie Brooker’s
Weekly Wipe, a BBC program, Brown
realized there was nothing quite like
these shows in Canada. He saw a
niche and a place to start “a healthy
conversation” about issues related to
the media.
Apparently a lot of Canadians were
looking for something just like that.
Today, he boasts an audience of
10,000 listeners.
Brown learned, however, that attracting that kind of interest doesn’t
necessarily translate into financial
viability. Even with the support of
an important corporate sponsor, he
came to realize “you can’t make it on
advertising alone.”
Brown made a pitch directly to his
audience, asking each of his listeners to contribute $1 a month so that
“Canadaland becomes an independent news org, a podcast network, and
a daily news site.”
So far, 1,442 “Patrons,” responding
through the Patreon website, have
pledged more than $7,200 a month.
The average donation is only $5.
Canadians want good journalism
and they’re willing to pay for it, he
said.
“It’s beyond my expectations,”
Brown said. At $10,000 a month, he
figures he can grow Canadaland into
a small media organization.
As for his audience demographics,
he’s found that it’s slanted to male
over female, young over old and
Ontario residents versus other Canadians. Some lean to the left, others
to the right.
Brown himself defies categorization. On some issues, he considers
himself a libertarian. At other times,
his views line up with those who promote social justice.
“I think that with younger Canadians, partisanship is not an acceptable paradigm,” he said.
And as for his journalistic philosophy, he doesn’t promise his listeners
that his perspective will be free of
bias.
“I don’t believe in objective journalism,” he said. “I do believe in transparent journalism. Tell the people
where you come from.”
He even finds a Jewish element in
his approach. “There’s something
Jewish about the sense of skepticism,” he believes, “not abiding the
BS and asking difficult questions.”
No doubt the staff at Leo Baeck
would be proud. n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
15
T
UJA.is
community unity.
To the Jewish Community of Toronto:
If we raise more money, we can help more people.
Our theme for the 2015 UJA Campaign is that simple. This short phrase embodies what United Jewish
Appeal means to us. It means helping people.
Every person who makes a donation to UJA performs a mitzvah. That donation represents a hand extended
in friendship to a stranger, a hug to a neighbour in despair, and a boost to a person who needs a fresh
start. It recognizes the common history, and joint destiny, that all Jews share.
We have been helping each other forever. Perhaps in the past, we or our parents needed that help.
Maybe in the future, we or our children will need it again. We know that there are many Jews in Toronto,
Israel and other places that need that help right now.
We believe that everyone who has the capacity to do so should help our fellow Jews, and that the way to
help the most people is through a donation to UJA.
If you are one of the more than 12,000 people who have already made your donation to the 2015 UJA
Campaign, we say thank you.
If you have not yet made a donation to the Campaign, we ask that you please do so today. You can
donate by speaking to your canvasser, replying to a mailing you received, calling Shelly Rotman at
416 635 2883 ext. 5174, or online at www.ujadonations.com. We especially wish to encourage anyone
who has never made a donation to UJA to make this the year you join our community of givers by making
your first gift.
We believe each one of us wants to make a difference. Make your donation to UJA today. Make a
difference. You will feel the joy that results from helping more people.
Andrea Cohen and David Matlow
Alison Himel
Chairs of the 2015 UJA Campaign
Chair of UJA Women’s Philanthropy
Sherman Campus 4600 Bathurst Street Toronto, ON M2R 3V2 p: 416.631.5705 f: 416.635.9565
www.uja.is
16
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T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Pier 21 Holocaust exhibit remains in storage
PAUL LUNGEN
[email protected]
By all accounts, the Wheel of Conscience
is a beautiful and effective museum
piece that does what it’s supposed to do
– remind spectators that in 1939, Canada callously turned away the MS St.
Louis and its 937 passengers fleeing the
Nazis.
The trouble is, the Wheel of Conscience
only does what it’s supposed to do intermittently. It has a complex design with
many moving parts and requires regular
maintenance and is prone to breaking
down.
Designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, the son of Holocaust survivors, the
Wheel was installed at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 in Halifax in 2011 to commemorate the 254 St.
Louis passengers who were eventually
murdered by the Nazis after Canada refused them entry.
It has been in storage in Toronto since
the summer at the shop of its fabricators, Soheil Mosun Limited, while Pier
21 undergoes a major renovation that
will see it expand its premises to 90,000
square feet, said Pier 21 CEO Marie
Chapman.
But even early in its life, the exhibit presented problems. Only one week
after it was installed, the exhibit broke
down and was sent back to Toronto for
repair, Chapman said.
It has been sent back several times
every year since then. A black dust forms
on its gears and a burning smell arises
from the exhibit, she said, adding Halifax’s salt air might be a factor in the exhibit’s many breakdowns.
The Wheel’s future is currently being
debated by various stakeholders, including Pier 21 and the Centre for Israel and
Jewish Affairs (CIJA).
The original piece was commissioned
by Canadian Jewish Congress and was
paid for with a $500,000 grant from the
government of Canada. Congress is defunct and its successor agency, CIJA, is
consulting with Pier 21 about the exhibit’s future.
“There are ongoing discussions about
a suitable permanent home for the
piece,” said CIJA CEO Shimon Fogel.
One of the possible new venues for the
exhibit might be the Canadian Museum
The stainless steel Wheel of Conscience,
designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, has
many moving parts and is apparently prone
to breaking down. PIER 21 PHOTO
for Human Rights in Winnipeg, he suggested.
“It is important for the Wheel of Conscience to be in a place where Canadians
will be able to benefit from what it was
intended to do, to mark an event that is
tragic and the lessons derived from that
event.”
Mark Freiman, former president of
Congress, has been involved in discus-
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REGIONAL HEADQUARTERS
CHABAD OF MIDTOWN
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sion about the display’s future.
“What is important is to ensure that
the Wheel of Conscience is exhibited in
a location where it is accessible to the
public and that the government of Canada stands behind its original commitment, where the cost of upkeep will be
[borne] by the government or a federal
institution,” Freiman said.
That does not necessarily mean the
exhibit must remain in Halifax. Another
venue might be appropriate, as long
as it provides the opportunity to educate the public about the impact of the
Holocaust and the role of immigration
in the larger context of human rights,
he added.
In 1939, the Canadian government,
along with the governments of Cuba
and the United States, refused to allow
the St. Louis to land. The ship returned
to Europe where its passengers were
disembarked in a number of countries.
It is estimated that 254 were killed in the
Holocaust.
The exhibit is a polished stainless steel
wheel that incorporates four inter-meshed moving gears labelled antisemitism, xenophobia, racism and hatred. n
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
News
T
17
Germany to award cantor its Order of Merit
Sheri Shefa
[email protected]
He’s been a local Jewish treasure as cantor
at the Holy Blossom Temple for the past
36 years, and now Germany will be honouring Cantor Benjamin Maissner with its
Order of Merit for his dedication to restoring and preserving Jewish music around
the world.
On Nov. 23, Maissner, who also serves as
Holy Blossom’s musical director, will be
presented with one of Germany’s highest
civilian honours by the country’s consul
general in Toronto, Walter Stechel, following the shul’s annual general meeting.
“I don’t know why I’m getting this merit
for the life of me,” Maissner said, humbly.
But Maissner’s list of accomplishments
suggests that this is a well-deserved honour.
The Israeli-born cantor graduated from
the Hebrew Union College’s School of
Sacred Music in 1968 and served as cantor at a Philadelphia synagogue until he
moved to Canada in 1979.
Renowned for his extensive knowledge
of secular and liturgical music, and having mastered musical styles including
Jewish Renaissance and contemporary
Canadian, American and Israeli compositions, Maissner is also the conductor and
music director of Lachan, Toronto’s Jewish
chamber choir.
In addition to his contribution to the art
of cantorial music, Maissner has a strong
connection to Germany that dates back
to the 1920s: his maternal uncle served as
Hanover’s chief cantor from 1925 to 1935.
“Cantor Israel Alter was a… celebrity in
Germany… but in 1935 when he heard
about the Nuremberg Laws [Nazi Germany’s anti-Semitic laws]… he took his
family to South Africa,” Maissner said.
“In 1925, my uncle recorded recordings,
which travelled after the war from Germany to South Africa, then to the United
States, then Israel. I received them and
then sent them back to Germany. A professor who is the president of the European Centre for Jewish Music in Hanover… when I returned the recording of
my uncle… he discovered that I’m the
nephew of Israel Alter. He connected with
me and invited me many times to sing in
Germany.”
He has since performed at a number of
events commemorating the end of World
Cantor Benjamin Maissner
War II and the liberation of concentrations camps.
In 2008, he and his choir, Lachan, were
invited to perform at a Jewish music festival in Hanover to commemorate the
70th anniversary of Kristallnacht.
But perhaps the most significant visit to
Hanover came last year, when Maissner
and his family were invited by the city as
official guests to mark the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht with concerts and
events throughout the city.
As part of the commemoration, the
city placed “stumbling stones” on the
pavement in front of the home where his
grandparents once lived, as well as the
home of his uncle, Cantor Israel Alter, and
his family.
Maissner’s most recent honour, being
awarded Germany’s Order of Merit, was
set in motion by the former consul general
of Germany in Toronto, Sabine Sparwasser, who became friends with Maissner
after she participated in an event at Holy
Blossom.
“She came to my synagogue for a concert and welcomed the cantors, because
we had a convention of 300 cantors here
[for 64th annual Cantors Assembly convention in 2011]... We became friends…
and she initiated this,” Maissner said.
“I don’t think I’ve done anything special. When I came to Holy Blossom many,
many years ago, I said that I would love
to teach the values of Judaism through
music, and that was my motto,” he said.
“I believe in reconciliation, moving
forward, rebuilding broken glass and rebuilding culture, and preserving the glorious music of Europe, which I am blessed
to be doing at Holy Blossom.” n
18
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T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Alleged shul bomber
extradited to France
Paul Lungen
[email protected]
The Supreme Court of Canada last week declined to hear an appeal by alleged terrorist
Hassan Diab, opening the door for Canadian and French authorities to extradite
him to France, where he was charged Saturday in a deadly 1980 synagogue bombing.
Diab, a former sociology professor, was
flown to France shortly after the high
court decision, ending his six-year legal
battle in Canada. Diab had been seeking
to appeal lower court rulings that called
for his removal.
Diab, 60, is alleged by French authorities
to have been a member of the Popular Front
for the Liberation of Palestine and involved
in the 1980 terrorist attack, in which a bomb
hidden in a motorcycle killed four people
and injured more than 40 others. Diab, a
Canadian of Lebanese descent who has
dual citizenship, has denied the allegations.
Waiting in jail pending the Supreme
Court’s decision, Diab told the Ottawa Citizen, “If we don’t get leave, then we will have
to fight this legal battle until the end. If it’s in
Paris, we will do it there.
“We will never give up. I know I had nothing to do with these allegations and they
know it too. This is the biggest hurt of the
whole thing,” he said.
Diab’s battle with the Canadian legal system began in 2008, when he was arrested by
a SWAT team. In 2011, an Ontario Superior Court judge upheld a French request for
Diab’s transfer to their jurisdiction, and in
May 2014, the Ontario Court of Appeal upheld that decision.
He sought the Supreme Court’s permission to appeal, but the high court turned
him down. The court gave no reasons for its
refusal, but the Supreme Court only hears
cases on matters of public importance.
Diab’s lawyer, Donald Bayne, argued in
submissions to the court that it should
consider the case to determine whether untested intelligence evidence should
be used to extradite his client and whether such secret information violated Diab’s
charter right to procedural fairness.
But government lawyers said that “surrender should only be refused owing to trial fairness concerns if it is demonstrated that the
criminal laws or procedures in the requesting state shock the Canadian conscience.”
“Diab is now subject to immediate removal,” Clarissa Lamb, spokesperson for
the minister of justice and attorney general,
said last week after the Supreme Court declined his request.
Lamb noted that “the judicial phase of the
extradition process is a determination only
that the evidence is sufficient to warrant that
the person be extradited. It is not a trial. A
Hassan Diab youtube screenshot
trial will take place in the requesting state.”
“The anti-Semitic bombing in 1980 was
a horrific crime that killed four people and
injured dozens of others. Canada condemns
this cowardly act of terrorism against innocent civilians,” she added.
Stéphane Schorderet, spokesperson for
the French Embassy in Ottawa, said, “The
embassy… wishes to reiterate that at this
point in time and with regard to French law,
Mr. Hassan Diab is presumed innocent. In
France, he will be heard by an investigating
judge in an open judicial inquiry regarding
the attack that took place on Oct. 3, 1980, on
rue Copernic, in Paris.”
“It’s tragic,” Bayne told the Citizen shortly
after hearing the top court’s decision. “I was
shocked. We now have the classic recipe for the
wrongful conviction of a Canadian citizen.”
Dozens of Diab’s supporters, including many academics, released a letter last
week calling on the federal justice minister
“to substantially revise current Canadian
extradition law. We further demand that
the federal minister of justice refuse the request from France that Dr. Hassan Diab be
extradited, a refusal that ought to have been
rendered six years ago when this nightmare
began. Canadian extradition law is a farce.”
The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs
(CIJA), welcomed last week’s developments.
“Like all democracies, Canada’s judicial
system has a number of appeal processes
in place, and Mr. Diab’s legal efforts have
now been exhausted. We are pleased that
the highest court in the land will honour
the French extradition request and allow
the accused to return to France so the
victims may have their day in court. Mr.
Diab will now be able to defend himself
before France’s judicial system, which is
as impartial as Canada’s,” said CIJA CEO
Shimon Fogel.
“We are pleased that authorities in France
and Canada pursued this case even after
more than 30 years since the murderous
attack on the Paris synagogue. This sends
an important message: that diligent, committed authorities will never cease in their
pursuit of justice against terrorists on behalf
of their victims,” Fogel said. n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
19
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Ex-valedictorian joins Kurdish fight against Islamic State
LAUREN KRAMER
PACIFIC CORRESPONDENT
Former Vancouverite Gillian Rosenberg, 31,
has become the first foreign woman to join
YPG, the Kurds’ dominant fighting force
battling the Islamic State in northern Syria.
Rosenberg, who hails from White Rock,
B.C., attended Maimonides Jewish High
School in Vancouver (now called King David High School), where she was valedictorian in her graduating year, 2001.
Shoshana Burton, one of her teachers at
the time, remembers her as a shy young
woman.
“[She] became very passionate when she
recognized opportunities to be involved
with the school’s annual mitzvah day
where we volunteered in the community.
She was compassionate and was fascinated with Israel,” Burton said.
“She was a good kid, and I am really
hoping that she is safe.”
Rosenberg studied aviation at the British
Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT),
where she graduated from a 64-week Airport Operations Program in December
2003, according to Dave Pinton, spokesperson for BCIT.
“It’s a course on how to run airports,” he
Gillian Rosenberg in what she says are the mountains of south Kurdistan. FACEBOOK PHOTO
said, adding that after completing it, she
enrolled in a part-time management degree program in 2004.
She did not complete that course, he
said, and the last course she took at BCIT
was in January 2006.
Sometime after that, Rosenberg moved
to Israel and enlisted in an Israeli army
search-and-rescue unit. On her Facebook
page, she lists her experience as a former
instructor in that IDF unit.
In 2009, she was among 11 people arrested in a U.S. criminal case for her involvement in an international phone scam. An
FBI statement from that year described it
as a “phony ‘lottery prize’ scheme that targeted victims, mostly elderly.”
At that time, Israel’s NRG news site reported Rosenberg had tried in vain to join
the Mossad, Israel’s spy service. She was estranged from her parents and had turned
to crime after landing in financial straits.
After being extradited to the United
States, Rosenberg served approximately
four years in prison under a plea bargain,
according to court documents.
At the time she was represented by Israeli lawyer, Yahel Ben-Oved. Speaking to
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Reuters, Ben-Oved said she had no knowledge of Rosenberg joining the Kurds,
though they had spoken recently.
“It is exactly the sort of thing she would
do, though,” Ben-Oved said.
Israel Radio interviewed Rosenberg last
week by phone from Iraq, where she said
she was training with Kurdish forces she had
joined after contacting them on the Internet. She said she would be fighting in Syria.
“They [the Kurds] are our brothers. They
are good people. They love life, a lot like
us, really,” said Rosenberg, who is known
in Israel as Gila.
Old high school friends in Vancouver
who declined to speak on the record expressed mostly shock and concern for her
safety when they learned Rosenberg had
joined YPG.
Another teacher who had known her in
high school contacted The Canadian Jewish News in the hope that the Jewish community could coax her home.
On her Facebook page, Rosenberg posted photographs taken at Erbil International Airport in Iraq on Nov. 2. Another,
taken Nov. 5 from a vehicle en route to
Sulaymaniya, a city in Iraqi Kurdistan, she
said “kinda looks like anywhere in middle
America.” n
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
News
T
Beth Tikvah displays
books by members
Myrna Levy, left, and Anna VanDelman are co-chairs of Beth
Tikvah Synagogue’s authors display.
Cynthia Gasner
Special to The CJN
At the Beth Tikvah Synagogue, in a showcase at the south
entrance of the building at 3080 Bayview Ave., there’s a collection of books authored by members of the congregation.
“We sent out an appeal to our members for all authors to
send us a photo, a bio and their books,” says Anna VanDelman, who co-chairs the exhibit with Myrna Levy.
“Our idea was to celebrate Jewish Book Month at Beth Tikvah,” Levy says. “To our joy and amazement, more than 20
authors replied and there are more than 30 books. It was a
discovery of unknown talents.”
VanDelman says they quickly filled the showcase. “We are
indeed most proud of our authors. In this manner, we are able
to introduce these talented people to our entire congregation.”
The exhibit includes the authors’ pictures and a short biography and will be on view for the community until Dec. 15.
The books are on a wide variety of topics, including children’s books, memoirs, fiction, non-fiction, books on Holocaust-related themes, food and more.
Levy is a retired teacher and author of three children’s
books. She notes that many of the books on exhibit are by
well-known authors. Among those whose works are on display are three authors of books for children: Kathy Kacer is a
prolific award-winning author of books on the Holocaust for
young people; Rona Arato, author of The Last Train, won the
2014 Norma Fleck Award of Excellence for non-fiction writing
for children, and Etta Nitkin-Kaner’s books on science and
nature are in schools and libraries across North America.
“Then there are two award-winning translators of Yiddish,
Miriam Beckerman and Vivian Felsen,” Levy says. “Writing
memoirs on their experiences during the Shoah, there are
books by Gerda Frieberg and George Stern.”
Levy notes that Bruce Waters wrote a book on astronomy,
Gerald Zeidenberg, whose interest is in European history, has
published three books. There are Noreen Gilletz’s cookbooks,
and books written by former Beth Tikvah congregation rabbis
Avraham H. Feder and Wayne R. Allen.
Some of the other authors include Stuart Foxman, Morley
Goldberg, Harvey Haber, Simon Kreindler, Fiona Gold Kroll,
Myrna Neuringer Levy, Edward Levy, Elaine Snider (Blackstein), and Reva Stern.
VanDelman told The CJN she and Levy “hope that this exhibit gives others in our congregation the inspiration to tell
their stories, either fictional or real.”
She added that the synagogue has a writing group “with
several members having been published.” n
The Beth Tikvah book exhibit can be viewed Monday to
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call
416-221-3433.
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
JTS honours former BJE head for ‘pluralistic education’
SHERI SHEFA
[email protected]
Seymour Epstein, a man with more than
four decades of experience in the field of
education and community development
in Canada, Israel, Morocco and Russia, has
been honoured by his alma mater, the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) in New York.
The Benjamin Botwinick Award, presented to Epstein on Nov. 18, “is an honour
bestowed upon an exceptional individual
who epitomizes the philosophy and practice of Jewish pluralism,” JTS said in a statement. “The award recognizes outstanding
leadership and commitment to furthering
interdenominational understanding and
co-operation within Judaism.”
Epstein, who called the honour “a wonderful thing,” said he’s taken by the idea of
the award itself, which has only been granted once before, to Michael Brooks, executive director of the University of Michigan
Hillel, in 2010.
“It’s about pluralistic education, which is
the story of my life, and I’m also very connected to the seminary. I have very fond
memories of my time there as an undergraduate, and also there is no doubt that
the professors I encountered there influ-
enced my career, my life and just about
everything about me,” he said.
“The largest part of my work has been
in pluralistic settings, teaching at McGill
[University]… I was training Jewish studies
teachers, but in a secular setting, dealing
with all kinds of schools and dealing with
all kinds of students with a broad range of
Jewish backgrounds,” he said.
His 18 years with the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee and the following 10 years as senior vice-president
of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and
head of the Centre for Enhancement of
Jewish Education (formerly known as the
Board of Jewish Education) gave him an
outlet to continue working with Jews of all
backgrounds.
“We were dealing with schools that were
radically different from each other in many
cases, and all kinds of different persuasions
and beliefs. Most of my work has been in
that kind of a setting, and that is what the
award is all about,” he said.
In recent years, Epstein has been lending
his time and expertise as a consultant to
First Nations and Islamic educators.
“I’ve been doing some work with Aboriginal First Nations communities in the field
of education. There is a relationship be-
Nefesh B’Nefesh
invites you to explore
Seymour Epstein
tween Jewish education and some of their
concerns, like an interest in language acquisition,” Epstein explained.
“They have a language they would like
to revive… and they are also concerned
about maintaining a minority culture in
an overwhelming majority. Jews know a
lot about that… They are in the process of
creating some schools and school boards,
and I have a lot of experience with school
boards, so I’ve been helping them out with
some things.”
He is also on the advisory board of the
Islamic Teacher Education Program, a oneyear online professional development program for Islamic school teachers.
“This is not within the Jewish world,
but like the Aboriginal world, it requires
someone that can appreciate what pluralist education is all about,” said Epstein, a
published writer with a memoir titled From
Couscous to Kasha: Reporting from the Field
of Jewish Community Work that details his
international development work and history of community development in Russia
as the Soviet Union collapsed.
As for the current state of the Jewish day
school system, Epstein there are some new
trends in North America, and in Toronto
specifically, that are part of an effort to attract more people to choose Jewish education.
“But there is a need for much, much
more if we’re going to appeal to Jews…
who are unconnected. The existing institutions are not necessarily going to attract
them, which means that new portals and
new institutions will have to be created by
that sector itself with help from the strong
centre. I think there is a need for different
kinds of institutions that will attract different kinds of Jews,” Epstein said. ■
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
Opinion
T
23
GUEST VOICE
We have no choice but to care for each other
Morris Zbar
T
here’s a well-known joke which,
paraphrased, asserts that if you ask
two Jews a question, you’re likely to
receive at least three opinions.
The truth is that while we all have
our opinions, and while we, as Jews,
certainly don’t agree on everything, the
2014 General Assembly conference of
the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), which recently wrapped up
in suburban Washington, D.C., stressed
the importance of coming together for
one another, despite our differences.
Or, as one of the keynote speakers,
Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, Britain’s former
chief rabbi and a highlight of the event,
said during his stirring plenary address,
“I don’t need you to agree with each
other. I need you to care about one
another!”
And in today’s world, with Israel again
in crisis, more than 20,000 Ukrainian
Jews in the line of fire; a virulent resurgence of anti-Semitism in eastern Europe, Jews being attacked on the streets
of France, and a new adaptation of the
old virus that sees anti-Semitism camouflaged as anti-Israelism or anti-Zionism, do we really have a choice?
Combine these compelling and
frightening global realities with the
needs and challenges specific to our
own communities and it’s vital that we
put aside our differences – petty or not
– and focus on the one thing that truly
matters, and that is the well-being of
the Jewish People, regardless of where
they reside.
As president and CEO of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, I was proud
to participate in this important event,
the pre-eminent leadership retreat for
federation volunteer leaders and professionals from across North America and
around the world. It is an event that reaffirmed what I had already known: that
the Jewish federation system is unique
and vital for a number of reasons, most
notably for its ability to look at the
whole picture, across the board, across
the Diaspora and across the globe.
To that end, the cadre of engaging,
inspiring speakers whom I had the
pleasure of hearing – from leaders in
politics and journalism to religion,
the arts and the media – were not only
there to entertain, but to help us think
outside the box in new and dynamic
ways about matters that are important
not only to Toronto’s Jewish community,
but to Jewish communities in more than
70 other countries across the globe, all
of which share commonalities unique
to being Jewish in today’s often challenging climate.
There were a number of other highlights during the conference, dubbed
“The World is Our Backyard”, including
an address by U.S. Vice-President Joe
Biden, who spoke of President Barack
Obama’s “iron-clad” commitment to Israel’s security and even took a moment
to reminisce about the time he took his
children to where the Dachau concentration camp once stood as a lesson
about what he called the “incredible
resilience and indomitable nature of the
human spirit.”
We heard from Jon Medved, a leading Israeli venture capitalist about the
role of technology in creating the next
generation of Jewish communities. Of
course, with more than 3,000 high-tech
companies and start-ups, Israel has
the highest concentration of high-tech
companies in the world, apart from Silicon Valley, so this wasn’t a new message,
but it was still nice to hear.
It was a wonderful experience being
with 3,000 other people who are all
committed to improving Jewish lives
across the globe. We shmoozed, we
ate, we discussed, we discovered, we
listened and, most importantly, we
learned that, like each of you, those of
us who work day in and day out in the
business of Jewish philanthropy have
the ability to effect meaningful change
in Jewish life when we work together for
one common goal.
After all, UJA Federation of Greater
Toronto, like all Jewish federations,
touches more Jewish lives than any
other Jewish organization, and, with
some 200,000 individuals living here, in
our own backyard, it’s a responsibility
that we don’t take lightly. n
Morris Zbar is president and CEO
of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
24
Opinion
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
GUEST VOICE
Hillel at York is reaching out to other groups
Zev Gasner and Natalie Slavat
S
trengthening ties with other student
organizations is a key focus of York
University Hillel this year. Rather than
fearing interaction with others on campus, we’re building bridges.
Voices that are negative toward Israel
have received a great deal of publicity
over the years. On a campus that is as
large and diverse as York, it is not unexpected to hear such voices. We’ve
decided to respond proactively to what
we see around us. We are proud that our
university values freedom of speech and
multiculturalism, and we seek to use
those values to our advantage.
We at Hillel at York have made it our
mission this year to promote and enhance student campus life and leadership. We started the year knowing we
wanted our focus to be on making students feel like they have a home at Hillel
and on the York campus. We wanted to
renew and enhance relationships within
the university with other students and
clubs. Our challenge was to figure out
how to accomplish this goal. How do
you make students feel comfortable, get
involved, become leaders and commit
to enhancing the campus community?
Being a commuter school makes that
challenging, since students often simply
come to class and then go home, with no
commitment to enhance campus life
After careful deliberation and discussion with our director, Tamara Caplan,
we decided the ideal way to handle this
dilemma is to work on enhancing our
“social network” on campus. By reaching
out to other clubs and organizations, we
hope to create a comfortable social and
educational climate for all.
We started this initiative by joining
the York University Interfaith Council.
Representatives from each faith-based
club on campus meet weekly to discuss
events, network and explain their club’s
platform. We have built bridges with
many clubs so far with whom we will
be partnering. For example, we have
collaborated with Leadership, Culture
and Christianity, as well as the Catholic
Chaplaincy at York University. We have
Rather than fearing
interaction with
others on campus,
we’re building bridges
partnered with Sick Kids Charity Club to
put together an event in support of cancer awareness month. We have partnered
with the Ahmadiyya Muslim Students
Association to put together a Nov. 10
conference discussing different religions,
which was expected to attract more than
300 students. We have partnered with the
Random Acts of Kindness club to help
them get their movement off the ground.
We have taken the initiative and offered
our lounge area to other clubs in need of
a meeting space.
In the first two months of school, we
managed to forge bonds with 10 new
clubs, and this number will continue to
grow over the year. We have shown that
Hillel and the Jewish community are
open to collaborating on a multitude
of projects. We have shown them that
reaching out and coming together should
be a core component of a university
experience.
We are all York students. In order for
there to be a comfortable and inviting
social and academic environment, we
must help one another. If there is one
thing that being active at Hillel at York
has taught us, it is how special, diverse
and unique the Jewish community on
campus is. We are fortunate to be a part
of a Hillel that welcomes students from
all ends of the religious, political and cultural spectrum, all of whom have come
to call Hillel their home. We want to show
the rest of the campus community just
how much we have to contribute to the
York community, and we hope to encourage others to do the same. n
Zev Gasner and Natalie Slavat are
co-presidents Hillel at York.
A leader in the provision of programs and services to the 50+ community
Un chef de file dans l’offre de programmes et services
destinés aux personnes de 50 ans et plus
CALL FOR CANDIDATES
APPEL DE CANDIDATURES
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POSITION
POSTE DE DIRECTEUR GÉNÉRAL
The Cummings Jewish Centre for Seniors is seeking a visionary and inspiring Executive
Director to continue the Centre’s mission. Reporting to the Board of Directors, you will
be responsible for providing the overall strategic leadership of a vibrant and thriving
community organization and overseeing the efficient and effective management of the
human, financial, material and information resources of the Centre. You are a leader with
a positive attitude of aging and an excellent communicator and motivator. Committed to
innovation, creativity, continuous quality improvement and excellence, you are a decisive,
action-oriented individual with a demonstrated track record of success in progressively
responsible leadership roles in a non-profit community organization.
Le Centre juif Cummings pour aînés est à la recherche d’une personne visionnaire et
inspirante pour occuper le poste de directeur général et pour poursuivre sa mission.
Relevant du Conseil d’administration, vous aurez la responsabilité d’assumer le leadership
stratégique général d’une organisation communautaire dynamique et florissante tout en
assurant la gestion efficace et efficiente des ressources humaines, financières, matérielles
et informationnelles du Centre. Vous êtes un leader avec une attitude positive envers
la population ciblée en plus d’être un excellent communicateur et motivateur. Vous
souscrivez pleinement à l’innovation, à la créativité, à l’amélioration continue de la qualité
et à l’excellence; vous êtes une personne engagée et tournée vers l’action. Votre parcours
démontre vos capacités à assumer progressivement des responsabilités au sein d’un
organisme communautaire sans but lucratif.
Requirements
• Master’s degree in Social Work and/or related advanced degree.
• A minimum of 10 years management experience including 5 years at senior
management level.
• Knowledge of the Jewish Community and its customs and traditions.
• Fluent in French and English, spoken and written.
Exigences
• Maîtrise en travail social et/ou diplôme d’études supérieures dans un domaine connexe.
• Au moins dix ans d’expérience en gestion, y compris cinq ans à titre de cadre supérieur.
• Connaissance de la communauté juive et de ses coutumes et traditions.
• Maîtrise du français et de l’anglais à l’écrit et à l’oral.
A detailed job description can be found on the Agency website:
www.cummingscentre.org
La description de poste détaillée est publiée dans le site Web de l’agence :
www.cummingscentre.org
Please send your CV accompanied by a cover letter to the following address, no later
than December 24th, 2014:
Prière de faire parvenir votre curriculum vitæ, accompagné d’une lettre de présentation,
à l’adresse suivante d’ici le 24 décembre 2014 :
CJCS Executive Director Selection Committee
Attention: Ms. Susan Rozansky
Cummings Jewish Centre for Seniors
5700 Westbury Avenue
Montreal (Quebec) H3W 3E8
Comité de sélection du directeur général du CJCA
À l’attention de : Madame Susan Rozansky
Centre juif Cummings pour aînés
5700, avenue Westbury
Montréal (Québec) H3W 3E8
Only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.
All applications will be held in strict confidence.
Nous communiquerons uniquement avec les candidats retenus pour une entrevue.
Toutes les candidatures seront traitées en toute confidentialité.
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
25
T
Warm up your winter.
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26
News
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Toronto man needs live liver donor
CYNTHIA GASNER
SPECIAL TO THE CJN
Thornhill, Ont., resident Bradley Ezra,
52, has never asked for anything.
But now he needs a live liver donor for
a liver transplant or he won’t survive,
someone between 18 and 60 with O Positive blood type, who is healthy, willing
and able to donate.
Ezra was employed by Canada Post.
He suffers from Crohn’s disease, and in
1988, he had emergency surgery for an
abscess. His disease was under control
until 1995. Then, suffering with massive
pain, he had to go on disability insurance.
“With medication,” Ezra says, “my life
turned around and I was able to enjoy
my meals again.”
In August this year, Ezra again had severe pain and went to the hospital with
kidney stones. “We were thrilled with
the results of the treatment,” says Gail
Levine, Ezra’s partner for 13 years.
“Our joy was short-lived,” she adds. “A
radiologist at the hospital, who had some
concerns, arranged further testing, and
six weeks later Bradley was diagnosed
with primary liver cancer.”
With chemotherapy, the tumours are
not spreading but the therapy will only
buy him time, Ezra says.
He does not meet the criteria for a deceased liver donor.
Most often, liver transplants are done
Bradley Ezra
with close relatives. Ezra’s family and
many close friends have been tested, but
they are not a blood type match or are
not medically well enough. The blood
type of the donor and the recipient must
be compatible but not always identical.
In a live donor liver transplant, a portion of the liver is surgically removed
from the liver donor and transplanted
into the recipient immediately after the
recipient’s liver has been entirely removed.
This is possible because, unlike other
organs in the body, the liver has the ability to regenerate or grow within a period
of four to eight weeks after surgery.
“It is considered a mitzvah to save
someone from danger,” Levine told The
CJN. If you are considering helping or if
you have any questions, contact Gail Levine at [email protected] n
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS NOVEMBER 20, 2014
News
T
27
Space created with diverse learners in mind
SHERI SHEFA
[email protected]
The newly launched Kimel Centre for Inclusion at Netivot HaTorah Day School addresses educational challenges for diverse
learners, and acknowledges that all children learn in different ways, said Lauren
Korzinstone, the school’s director of educational support services.
The centre, opened earlier this month,
was developed to focus on the “critical
link between the school environment and
how students learn. I wanted to create a
space that was designed with all of our diverse learners in mind,” Korzinstone said.
Featuring a lounge that provides a comfortable space for students to meet, sliding pocket doors that allow for the space
to be partitioned, silent study rooms,
and technological accessories including
a Smart TV, touch screen computers, and
iPads, the $300,000-centre, funded by
Warren Kimel and other donors, focuses
on inclusion.
“The idea is that all students should feel
supported, confident and respected. In
the past with special education, you really
needed a label in order to get extra services. Moving away from that, Best Practices
in Education now focuses on inclusion. So
there is this acceptance that all children
learn in a different way, everyone has
strengths and weaknesses and children
should feel safe and supported in reaching their personal best,” she said.
When the planning began a year ago,
Korzinstone said a lot of research was conducted to determine how the space could
best benefit diverse learners.
“There is one area that we call an active
learning space and it is very different than
a traditional classroom. In a traditional
classroom you have the front of the room,
you know where the board is, it presents
more of a top-down model, where the
teacher would provide directives,” she explained.
“In our active learning space, it’s not
clear where the front or back would be
because there are writing surfaces right
around the room and colour was used
very purposefully to promote group work
and collaboration.”
There are two silent study rooms, one of
which caters to students who are sensi-
Lauren Korzinstone, Netivot’s director of
educational support services, welcomes a
group of students to the new Kimel Centre
for Inclusion.
tive to sensory stimulation and may be
seeking a place that is quiet, calming, and
will allow them to focus, while the other is
for students who may need extra sensory
stimulation.
“So we have furniture that moves and
wobbles… as well as quite a bit of technology, and computers for them,” she said.
The centre is a compliment to the Pidolsky-NESS department, which delivers
services to diverse learners at Netivot,
including psycho-educational testing,
therapeutic counselling, speech language
therapy, and occupational therapy.
Korzinstone said that in the past, the Pidolsky-NESS programming focused mainly on curriculum support, working on the
curriculum and reviewing the material.
“Now what is different with the Kimel
Centre, is that we’ve created a new program. We’re offering what is called cognitive programming and it is offered to children to help them become more aware
of their own thinking, learning styles and
capabilities, and the purpose is for students to develop learning strategies that
can be applied to all curricular areas,” she
said.
“In the first week alone, 197 students
visited the centre to take a look… It’s designed so that all students could access
the space.” n
28
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MOVE IN NOW!
NEW RENTALS
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Shmittah makes comeback
Paul Lungen
[email protected]
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There’s a biblically sanctioned practice
from ancient times that appears to be
making a comeback in the modern State
of Israel, not just among observant Jews
but also with hipsters concerned about
social justice and the environment.
Israelis are increasingly coming to adopt
the practice of shmittah, literally “to release,” in which once every seven years,
farmers put down their plowshares and
give the earth a rest.
The current sabbatical year began in
September 2014, or in Tishrei of 5775 in
the Jewish calendar. During the current
year, many farmers, including individual landowners or those working in kibbutzim and moshavim, generally will not
plant, prune or tend their land, other than
to gather fruits, vegetables and grains that
grow naturally. In ancient times, they were
also required to open their fields to the
poor.
An Israeli journalist called the growing
popularity of shmittah, “The hippest commandment for progressive Jews.”
One of the practice’s foremost advocates,
Rabbi Yosef Tzvi Rimon, was in Toronto last week to discuss the practice with
rabbis, students and members of the community. Rabbi Rimon, whose surname
translates as “pomegranate,” believes the
practice of shmittah has benefits to its adherents far beyond the purely agricultural
practice of letting the land lay fallow.
Those are spiritual and social, and they
connect people to the environment, Rabbi
Rimon said.
Citing Torah parshot and halachic authorities, Rabbi Rimon said the rationale
for practicing shmittah today are numerous: it assists the poor, it ties people to
the land of Israel, it develops the quality of
relinquishing something of importance, it
manifests trust and belief in God, it allows
people to decompress and get away from
striving for material things, and it brings
families closer together.
“I’m trying to take all the moral things
of shmittah and transfer them to modern
society,” said Rabbi Rimon, who estimates
that over the years he’s lectured on the
subject to more than 70,000 people.
An educational guide prepared by the
Halacha Education Center, which Rabbi
Rimon founded in Israel, states that
shmittah accomplishes for society what
the Sabbath does for families and individuals: it interrupts “the mundane life of society in order to allow the revelation of the
Divine light that is concealed within it.”
Rabbi Rimon, a recognized posek who
renders authoritative decisions on questions of Jewish law is also the author of
Shemita: From the Sources to Practical
Rabbi Yosef Tzvi Rimon Paul Lungen Photo
Halacha. He said the practice of shmittah
bridges the gap between capitalist materialism and the requirement to help those
in need.
“It teaches how to make the right economy. On the one side is capitalism, but
from the other side it speaks of a way to
fix all the problems that the capitalist system brings, helping poor people” through
tzedakah and chesed.
In ancient times, Rabbi Rimon continued, when everyone worked in agriculture, shmittah meant stopping work
on the land, allowing poor people to take
foods that grew naturally, and finding
more time to spend with your family. “For
one year, the society changes, becomes
more united, more giving,”
The rules of shmittah can be complex
but as it’s practised today, farmers can
gather the produce that grows naturally,
but they cannot charge anyone for the
cost of the goods themselves, only for
the cost of labour incurred in harvesting
them.
The goods are then made available in
grocery stores, clearly marked as shmittah produce. The Gush Etzion outlet of the
Rami Levy Hashikma Marketing grocery
chain, one of the country’s largest, carries
shmittah produce exclusively, Rabbi Rimon said.
In Israel, a sort of buyer’s club called
Otzar Ha’aretz, also sells shmittah products to its members.
One of shmittah’s requirements, releasing people from their debts, presents all
kinds of complex issues, Rabbi Rimon
said. He suggests complying with the spirit of the law by helping those less fortunate.
“Take the idea of shmittah and help
someone during that year,” he advised.
That approach appeals to Israelis,
whether secular or observant, he continued. “They see the social side, the side
where if you see a problem as [a] capitalist, then the answer is in shmittah.”
“Also, they want to be connected more
to Torah. This is a way for someone not
religious, who does not do mitzvot, to still
find a connection” to the Torah, he said. n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
News
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Non-Jewish teens learn
about Shabbat with JF&CS
Your lifestyle, Your way,
at Toronto’s premier address.
Teens from Children’s Aid Societies enjoyed a traditional Shabbat meal.
JORDAN ADLER PHOTO
Jordan Adler
Special to The CJN
Nearly a dozen teenagers stood around a
table making small talk as they took slabs
of dough, rolled them into three thin ropes
and then attempted to braid the strands of
dough together.
One of the girls finished her small piece
before the rest, showing off her creation as
the rest of the teens struggled with crossing
the ropes together to make a cohesive loaf.
One of the supervisors looked enthralled,
commenting that the girl should be a baker.
“I’ve actually always wanted to be a baker,”
the teenager replied. She had just made her
first challah in only a couple of minutes.
This challah-making workshop was one
highlight of a Shabbat dinner hosted by
Jewish Family & Child (JF&CS) on Nov. 12.
Youths 16 years and up from six non-Jewish
Children’s Aid Societies in the Greater Toronto Area were invited to partake in the weekly
Jewish custom.
“Being able to share some of our traditions with other agencies, whose kids may
not have been exposed to [Shabbat] or didn’t
know a lot about it, it’s just really special for
us,” says Jodi Rishikof, a children and care
worker for JF&CS.
Rishikof planned the dinner with Felicia
Finkelstein, a social worker for the Jewish organization. When they attended YouthCAN,
a conference bringing together Children’s
Aid Societies in Ontario, they discussed with
other social workers from Toronto about
events to involve older youths from around
the city.
“We proposed the idea of a Shabbat dinner,” Finkelstein told The CJN. “We brought
it to our kids [at Jewish Family & Child] and
they loved it. They were just really excited
about teaching other kids about our culture.”
Helping Finkelstein and Rishikof plan
this event were members from the “Just-Us
League,” a JF&CS foster kids youth group.
Several of them attended YouthCAN and
started brainstorming about ideas for the
dinner.
The Just-Us League is a support network
for older teens that either live in or have recently left a group or foster home. At the age
of 21, the Ontario Ministry of Children and
Youth Services cuts funding for those still in
foster care.
The dinner was also a good way for Jewish
youths who do not celebrate Shabbat every
week to partake in the religious custom.
Some of the Just-Us League members got up
to say the blessings over the candles, grape
juice and challah before the meal.
This was the first time that JF&CS has put
on a Shabbat dinner, however, the dinner
did not strictly abide by all of the traditional
customs.
For instance, the hosts planned it for a
Wednesday evening. On a Friday, they would
not have access to the Lipa Green Building,
which housed the dinner, after a certain
hour. Meanwhile, trying to get youths coming from children’s aid societies in different
corners of Toronto, like Durham and York
Region, for a twilight start time in the late
fall is not quite feasible.
“This is a tough age to get them engaged
[in programs],” Finkelstein said. “If they’re
not into it, there’s no reason to do it.”
Regardless, the participants were in high
spirits, speedily gulping down glasses of
grape juice as they waited for the meal to
begin. When Rabbi Ronald Weiss, the director of chaplaincy services for JF&CS, visited
to speak to the gathering of nearly two dozen youths about the holy day, the teens were
attentive and curious.
“That’s the atmosphere we get at all our
events,” Rishikof said. n
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
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11/13/14 11:53 AM
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
TDSB trustee charged
with criminal harassment
JODIE SHUPAC
[email protected]
WOMENS & GIRLS APPAREL
ISLAND VIEW l A LILLY PULITZER SIGNATURE STORE
[email protected]
Toronto District School Board (TDSB)
trustee Howard Goodman, 63, was arrested Nov. 12 on charges of criminal harassment and forcible confinement.
Police said Goodman allegedly harassed
an individual from the fall of 2013 until
the present, and that, on one occasion, he
“forcibly confined” this person. Police said
they’re conducting an investigation into
the matter, and Goodman is scheduled to
appear in court Dec. 18.
A Toronto police spokesperson would
not release the name of the alleged victim, and TDSB spokesperson Ryan Bird
said, “As [the matter] is before the courts,
we won’t be commenting. We’re referring
questions to the Toronto police.”
But both the Toronto Star and the Globe
and Mail have referred to anonymous
sources that say the alleged victim is TDSB
education director Donna Quan. Goodman, trustee for Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence since 2003, did not seek
re-election in the recent municipal race,
and his seat will be taken over by Jennifer
Arp next month.
Last May, Goodman wrote a letter to his
constituents telling them that over the
past few years, “The ‘cut and thrust’ of typical politics have overshadowed all else.”
In the months prior, Goodman had received negative attention for alleged bad
behaviour at board meetings.
According to the Star, Goodman had
apologized to Quan in December for an
outburst he admitted was “not the friendliest.”
In March, Goodman sent Quan an email,
which he also forwarded to the other
trustees on the board. In it, he apologized
for his behaviour at a board meeting several days earlier, at which he’d apparently
confronted Quan about the issue of outstanding fees to the Ontario Public School
Boards Association, an organization that
represents school trustees across the
province.
He wrote, “It was not my intention to
cause distress. In addition, if you and/or
others did feel my behaviour to be out
of line, it would be of great help to have
a conversation about what it was that I
said and/or did that caused these feelings. Such a conversation may avoid these
sorts of unpleasant misunderstandings in
the future.”
Following the incident at the meeting,
Quan and several senior staffers wrote
a letter to the chair of the TDSB and expressed feelings of intimidation, as well as
referring to a culture in which board staff
Howard Goodman
The ‘cut and thrust’ of
typical politics have
overshadowed all else
had to deal with abusive, threatening and
insulting comments by some trustees.
Shortly after the news that Goodman
had been arrested was made public, Sam
Sotiropoulos, outgoing trustee for Ward 20
Scarborough-Agincourt, tweeted “Finally.
#TDSB Trustee @HowardGoodman has
been charged by police for his treatment
of director Donna Quan.”
Sotiropoulos also tweeted a copy of a letter he wrote in January to the then-TDSB
chair Chris Bolton, in which he referred
to a meeting where he felt “Trustee Goodman’s tone and manner were threatening
and unprofessional.”
He said that after he submitted that letter of complaint about Goodman, Bolton
told him that the matter would be referred
to the TDSB’s code of conduct committee, but Sotiropoulous added that, “to my
knowledge, that never happened.”
Sotiropoulos, who lost his seat to Manna
Wong in the Oct. 27 election, has himself
been no stranger to controversy. In late
August, he drew criticism for tweeting
that he “reserve[d] the right not to believe
in [transgenderism],” until he sees “scientific proof.” n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
News
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Zareinu students walk
the runway at fashion show
Susan Minuk
Special to The CJN
The Zareinu Educational Centre’s
11th annual fashion show raised
more than $400,000 in support of
the school and treatment centre for
children with physical and developmental challenges.
For the first time, the fundraiser,
held Nov. 10 this year at Toronto’s
Park Hyatt Hotel, was split into two
events. The 650 guests could choose
between attending either an exclusive luncheon event or an evening
cocktail party, both of which were
followed by a haute couture runway
show in which a number of Zareinu
students participated.
“Seeing those gorgeous kids up
there, proudly strutting it, beaming
with courage and determination, is
the sweetest sight imaginable,” said
host Jeanne Beker.
Esti Cohen, Renee Rosenzweig and
Stacy Markin have jointly co-chaired
the event since its inception. At the
luncheon, Markin shared with the
crowd an emotional breakthrough
that happened only days before.
“Miracles do happen at Zareinu!
My daughter, Shayna, graduated
from Zareinu seven years ago – she
is now 19 years old. Shayna has severe neurological challenges, and
the prospects were grim: we were
told she would never walk or talk.
“Nevertheless, Zareinu laid the
foundation of a future filled with
happiness and hope for Shayna.
“When Shayna was six years old,
she pointed to my picture and said
‘Momma.’ This long-awaited milestone was huge. It was a miracle.
Shayna does not talk,” her mother
said.
“Until last week, whenever Shayna
wanted my help, she would point or
take my arm and lead me. This time,
Shayna walked over to me, looked
into my eyes and said ‘Momma.’ I
asked her what she wanted and she
pointed to her iPad and took me by
the arm and led me to it. She then
said ‘iPad.’ As it had run out of batteries, she couldn’t get it to turn on.
I asked her if she wanted it on, she
nodded yes and said ‘on.’
“We had a conversation. She got
what she wanted… and so did I,”
said a beaming Markin.
Zareinu student and event mod-
Zareinu student, Lea Melkuev
walks down the runway with her
physiotherapist, T.S. Frankel of Zareinu
Educational Centre. George Pimentel
PHOTO
el three-year-old Lea Melkuev has
Down syndrome and has had two
successful heart surgeries in her
short life.
“A miracle happened when Lea
started to attend Zareinu,” Lea’s
father, Oleg Melkuev, said.
“When Lea came to the school at
two years of age, she was this adorable, sweet girl who couldn’t even sit
up straight. When you put her into a
sitting position, she kind of flopped
over,” said T.S. Frankel, a physiotherapist at Zareinu.
Today, Lea can stand at a table
and play, and she can walk holding
someone’s hand.
“We are using the Dynamic Method of Kinetic Stimulation (MEDEK),
a physical therapy intervention to
develop functional movement,”
Frankel said. “Unlike other interventions, tasks can be performed without the child’s attention, conscious
thought or co-operation. By challenging the child’s balance in the upright position, our goal is to develop
stability. The MEDEK therapy focuses on training movements leading to
sitting, standing and walking.
“Lea is a very bright girl, hard
worker and delighted with her accomplishments,” Frankel added.
“My hope is that Lea will be independent one day and be integrated into the public school system,”
her father said.
One of Zareinu’s goals is to have
children leave their centre with an
increased ability to integrate into
more typical surroundings.
Cory Bickof, one of the evening
runway models, also has Down syndrome. He came to Zareinu at four
weeks of age. Now eight years old, he
is fully integrated into a local pubic
school. Without the intensive therapies and support received at Zareinu, he would not have been able to
achieve this goal
“Cory is able to do so many things
independently. He can take his jacket and hang it up. He takes his lunch
out of the lunchbox and feeds himself. Cory is now able to use a pen –
he can draw and he can write some
letters. He is now reading. He is able
to interact socially with other children,” said Leanne Bickof, Cory’s
mother
“These are all skills that he learned
very gradually,” she said.
Zareinu Educational Centre is a
world-renowned treatment centre
and school for children with physical and developmental disorders.
Proceeds raised from this year’s
fashion show will be allocated to
expanding the integrated preschool
program on-site at Zareinu, developing additional satellite classrooms within Toronto Jewish day
schools, and providing more services through its mobile unit (known
as the YEDA program) to schools in
both the private and public school
systems, said event co-chair Rosenzweig. n
For more information, visit www.
zareinu.org.
33
34
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Celebrating 25 years
of excellence
at York University
The Israel and Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies presents
Professor Jonathan Sarna:
Whither Jewish Studies?
Sunday, December 7, 2014
7:00pm
Robert R. McEwen Auditorium
Executive Learning Centre,
Schulich School of Business
York University, Keele Campus
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Free parking passes available for
Student Services Parking Garage
Dr. Jonathan Sarna is the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor
of American Jewish History at Brandeis University and
Chief Historian of the new National Museum of American Jewish History.
GALA 25TH ANNIVERSARY RECEPTION FOLLOWING THE TALK
Sponsored by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada; and the
Department of History, the Department of Humanities, the Department of Languages, Literatures,
and Linguistics, the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, the Graduate Program in
Interdisciplinary Studies, and the Israel and Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies
Kashrut observed
For more information and directions:
416-736-5823 | [email protected]
www.yorku.ca/cjs
Holocaust-Era Assets in Former East Germany
Deadline December 31, 2014
The Claims Conference has established a Late Applicants Fund (“LAF”) of €50 million in order to accept applications
from certain heirs of a former Jewish owner (“persecutee”) of property/assets in the former East Germany for which the
Claims Conference received proceeds as Successor Organization under the German Property Law of 1990.
The heirs of a persecutee who can make application to the LAF are:
(a) The immediate testamentary heir of the persecutee;
(b) Children, grandchildren, or great grandchildren of the persecutee;
(c) Siblings of the persecutee;
(d) Children of siblings listed under (c);
(e) Spouses of persons listed under (b), (c) and (d).
The Claims Conference has published on its website, www.claimscon.org, a list of the properties/assets received by the
Claims Conference as of the date of publication, and such assets for which claims by the Claims Conference are still
pending under the German Property Restitution Law, including the name of the former owners and/or businesses, as
well as the addresses of the properties/assets.
Applications can be filed directly with the Claims Conference for no fee. There is no need for applicants to pay a fee to
any party. The LAF will accept applications through December 31, 2014.
The detailed rules of the LAF, applications, and other information are also on the Claims Conference website,
www.claimscon.org.
All applications and communications regarding the Late Applicants Fund must be submitted to:
Claims Conference Successor Organization, Sophienstrasse 26, D-60487 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
Fax: +49-69-97-07-08-11. Email: [email protected]
After the application deadline, the Claims Conference shall determine the payment that each eligible heir will receive.
This determination will be based on a number of factors detailed on the Claims Conference website.
To aid applicants who do not have complete information, the Claims Conference has a Department for Property
Identification. If you believe that you or your relatives may have owned Jewish property in the former East Germany,
please include as much information as possible in your application and the Department will endeavor to identify such
property. Please write to the above address. There is no charge for this service as well.
The Claims Conference has an Ombudsman. To contact the Office of the Ombudsman,
please email [email protected] or write to The Ombudsman,
PO Box 585, Old Chelsea Station, New York, NY 10113, USA
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Jewish restaurants helped
to ‘Feed Democracy’
LAUREN KRAMER
PACIFIC CORRESPONDENT
It’s no secret that eating out is a social activity, a time when people chat, catch up
and discuss issues on their minds.
Those behind the Feed Democracy
Campaign were counting on that discussion and hoping to sway it in the direction
of politics and the democratic responsibility to vote. It’s why they targeted Metro
Vancouver restaurateurs, coffee shop and
grocery store owners leading up to municipal voting day Nov. 15.
With the permission of business owners,
they placed Feed Democracy signs in their
establishments, delivered stickers that
could be pasted on to-go bags and coffee cups and offered buttons staff could
wear, all to encourage participation in the
democratic process. Some 45 businesses
took part, including several Jewish-owned
restaurants and stores.
“We want to raise awareness about the
upcoming municipal election and encourage their customers to vote,” said
Mira Oreck, director of strategic partnerships at the Broadbent Institute, which
organized the non-partisan campaign.
“Some businesses are doing more than
others, but all have a ‘Feed Democracy’
decal on their windows and some have
tent cards on their tables. The idea is to
be where people are, as a way to remind
them about the election,” she told The
CJN a few days before the vote.
The Broadbent Institute is an independent, non-partisan organization whose
mission is to promote “progressive change
through democracy, equality, sustainability and the training of a new generation of
leaders.”
Several years ago, Vancouver reached an
all-time high of 50 per cent voter turnout,
but since then, the percentage of citizens
casting a vote has hovered in the 30 per
cent range. This pilot initiative, funded
by Van City Savings, hoped to increase
the voter turnout. Oreck said she’d love to
see the numbers back in the 50 per cent
range, but any increase in voter turnout
would be an improvement.
Jason Apple, owner of the food trucks
Vij’s Railway Express and Roaming Dragon, is one of the Jewish restaurateurs who
agreed to participate.
“I think this is super important,” he said.
“Oftentimes people think their vote won’t
make a difference. But if we can play a part
in reminding and encouraging people to
vote, or just to have a conversation about
voting, it’s a good thing.”
The food truck setting is an especially
good place to foster those conversations,
Mira Oreck
he added. “It’s a great social equalizer because you get people from all walks of life
who come to explore the food. The food
truck is a place where a judge can have a
conversation with a drug dealer outside
of a courtroom. We can be the conduit for
people to interact.”
Apple had a sticker on his window and
was pasting stickers on takeout boxes to
let customers know about the municipal
election. “Often it’s taboo to talk religion
or politics, but this is a great way to say
hey, get out there and vote, without talking provocatively about politics,” he said.
Marcus Stiller, owner of the Fish Café
in Vancouver, agreed that a restaurant
setting is a good place to foster conversations, though the only ones he was aware
were being generated by the large sticker
on his front door and the little tent card
by his cash register were among his staff.
“I think a restaurant is a great space
to have any discussion, because people
generally come to wind down and spend
down time,” he said. “These days I stand
in my kitchen, see into the restaurant
and find it frightening how many families
come to eat but don’t even talk to each
other over their tablets and cellphones.”
Other Jewish business owners who took
part in Feed Democracy included The Kosher Food Warehouse, Nava Creative Kosher Cuisine, Café 41, Sabra and Tap and
Barrel.
“One chef told us he feeds 100 people
a day,” Oreck said. “If those 100 get informed and tell another hundred people,
you start to gather some momentum.”
With voting day falling on a Saturday
this year, observant Jews could cast their
ballot as early as Nov. 4, when advance
polls opened in Vancouver. n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
Sports
T
Israeli baseball plan seeks local help
Paul Lungen
[email protected]
In Israel, soccer is the undisputed No.
1 sport, followed by basketball. After
that you’ve got tennis, maybe swimming. And cycling seems to be getting more popular. You’ve got to scroll
down, way down, through a bunch of
other sports before you come to baseball, the great American pastime.
But lately, the sport has been increasing in popularity, not only among
North American olim, but also among
native Israelis who are coming to appreciate the intricacies of both the
hardball and softball varieties of the
game, said Peter Kurz, secretary general of the Israel Association of Baseball (IAB).
One of the things holding back the
sport’s success is the scarcity of dedicated baseball facilities in the country,
specifically diamonds.
Kurz was in Toronto last week to follow up on developments south of the
border in which the Jewish National
Fund’s (JNF) American branch was
set to fund the development of several
new baseball fields across the country,
as well as a baseball complex in Beit
Shemesh, as part of Project: Baseball.
Kurz was scheduled to meet with officials of JNF Canada to see if there is
any interest in following the American
lead. The Canadian Jewish community’s support for Israel is well known,
he said, and coupled with the popularity of baseball here as well as its bright
future in the Jewish state, there’s good
reason for Canadian Jews to support
development of the sport in Israel.
Whether there’s any local interest in
supporting the creation of baseball
fields in Israel remains to be seen. According to Josh Cooper, CEO of JNF
Canada, it’s too early to tell. Cooper
said he is willing to meet with Kurz,
following an introduction from his
counterpart with JNF USA. “We look
forward to meeting him and learning
more about the project and the possibility of working together,” he said
ahead of Kurz’s visit.
For Kurz, broad support of the baseball project makes perfect sense.
“Baseball in Israel has always been
popular among olim from Canada
and the United States. In the last two
or three years, 50 per cent of the new
players are native Israelis,” he said.
“It’s a game almost anyone can play.
Baseball is a family thing, with picnics
and barbecues.”
Currently there are more than 1,000
players of all ages playing on 80 teams
in five leagues across the country.
Israel has had some success on the
international stage, Kurz said. The
senior national team won the Euro-
pean Cup C pool qualifiers in Slovenia,
moving them up to the B pool next
year. As well, the under-16 national team won the silver medal in the
Suma Open – PONY League European
qualifiers in Prague, and the under-12
national team won the silver in the
Tuscany Series Tournament in Italy.
Right now, there are a few modest
diamonds in use in Israel, but under
Project: Baseball, plans are to add
“two or three nice fields, with dugouts
and some stands for a few hundred
people,” Kurz said.
One of the new fields is slated to include seats for 2,000 spectators, which
would let Israel host international
baseball events. Also on tap are four
or five smaller fields in smaller communities across the country.
But the IAB isn’t putting all its eggs
in JNF’s basket. Kurz said the project
could find support among the seven or eight Jewish owners in Major
League Baseball. There’s also private
money out there, including in Toronto,
that could be donated to the project.
For the IAB, football suggests the
model they’d like to follow. Robert
Kraft, owner of the New England Patriots NFL team, supports the Israel
Football League and the Kraft Family
Stadium in Jerusalem.
“We’re looking for the Bob Kraft of
Israeli baseball,” Kurz said. n
Canadian promoted sport in Israel
Paul Lungen
[email protected]
Israel’s baseball community suffered an
unexpected blow last week when Canadian-born Howard Osterer collapsed
and died while umping a game in Gezer.
A native of Ottawa who made aliyah a
few years ago, Osterer was remembered
as a committed Zionist whose dream
was to grow the sport that he loved so
much in his new homeland.
Osterer, 59, served as the Jerusalem
regional director for the Israel Association of Baseball (IAB). He was a certified baseball umpire and had an interest in a variety of sports. Over the years,
he contacted The CJN to suggest stories
on the Canadian Football League, Israeli curling, and of course, baseball in
the Holy Land.
“I have the privilege of working with
a wonderful group of dedicated coaches and volunteers,” Osterer said in an
email to The CJN only a week before he
died. “We are successfully bringing back
Howard Osterer
baseball not just into Jerusalem but
right across our country. We welcome
and support all youth to the greatest
game on this earth.”
“It was natural for Howie to incline
to organized sports” said former CJN
editor Mordechai Ben-Dat. “He was
always a superb athlete and was recognized as such across the country for
his football playing at the University of
Ottawa.
“Howie had a very large heart. His
shoulders were broad. And he had an
effusively mischievous smile. He carried
other peoples’ burdens as if they were
his own. Everybody knew him that way.
And that’s why those who knew him
cared for him, wanted the best for him
and now will mourn that he is no longer part of their – our – world,” Ben-Dat
said.
“I am still in shock,” said IAB secretary
general Peter Kurz. “He was a great guy.
He was so outgoing and happy all the
time and so interested in baseball.
“He died where he wanted to be, behind the plate, umping a game.”
Osterer was reportedly umping a
game between two teams of 16-yearolds when he signalled for a stoppage
in play. Moments later, he collapsed.
Despite efforts of doctors present, he
died from what’s believed to have been
a stroke.
The IAB is setting up a scholarship
fund in his name to help children with
limited financial means play baseball.
Osterer is survived by his parents, siblings, five children and six grandchildren. n
35
36
News
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Battle over BDS
comes to Concordia
Janice Arnold
[email protected], MONTREAL
A proposed anti-Israel resolution at Concordia University has its supporters and
opponents engaged in vigorous campaigns to win over the school’s more than
35,000 undergraduates.
During the Nov. 25-27 Concordia Student Union (CSU) byelections, undergraduates will, in addition to voting for
representatives, have the opportunity to
decide on 10 referendum questions on
the ballot.
One of them, the only one not related directly to student affairs, reads: “Do
you approve of the CSU supporting the
boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS)
movement which calls for the boycott of
all academic and consumer ties with any
institution or company that aids in Israel’s
occupation of Palestine?”
Lauren Luz, one of four students leading the “no” campaign, said the motion
was brought to the CSU council by three
students late on Oct. 17, a Friday and
Simchat Torah, and pro-Israel students
weren’t able to mount an objection at the
time.
CSU chief electoral officer André-Marcel
Baril explained that the BDS referendum
proposal was passed by a resolution of the
CSU council and, therefore, the proposers (a minimum of three undergraduates
are required) did not have to collect the
minimum of 500 signatures required for
a petition.
The yes and no campaigns were permitted to launch on Nov. 11. Proponents have
put up posters, including one that claims
800,000 olive trees have been destroyed
on Palestinian land by the Israelis since
1967.
The no campaign has the slogan “Concordians United Against BDS/ We Believe
in Diversity, We Believe in Freedom, We
Believe in Equality.”
Luz said that approach is being taken
because there are only about 1,000 Jewish
students at Concordia, and to succeed,
her team must appeal to those who have
no stake in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
The campaign’s Facebook page attracted more than 380 “likes” within a
day of its creation.“We believe the [CSU]
should not be taking a stance on complex,
foreign political issues that have no bearing on our quality of student life at Concordia,” it reads.
“We believe that the Israeli-Palestinian
conflict is one such issue that would be
incredibly divisive to the student body for
the CSU to take a stance on.”
Opponents also think that a pro-BDS
Campaign publicity at Concordia.
policy by their student government is
contrary to its commitment to serving the
interests of all students, and would “be
alienating to all those who hold different
opinions and would prevent those voices
being heard.”
The opponents of the BDS referendum
argue that not only Jewish, Israeli and
other pro-Israel students would feel “uncomfortable and unwelcome,” but also
“all students who believe that Concordia
should be a place where everyone feels
welcome and no group feels marginalized.”
What’s more, they call the resolution
“accusatory and one-sided. It fails to acknowledge the responsibility of other regimes for committing abhorrent human
rights violations against Israelis (and Palestinians.)”
Luz is a third-year religious studies major, with a minor in Israel studies, and is
active with the group Israel on Campus.
In a letter to the campus newspaper
The Concordian, Bradley Martin, a fellow
of the Committee for Accuracy in Middle
East Reporting in America (CAMERA),
wrote that support for BDS would be contrary to the CSU’s claim that it represents
the interests of all students, as well as unfair to Israel.
“Israeli students and those who identify
with the State of Israel will be demonized
for their affiliation,” he wrote.
“If consistency was pursued, then there
should be a call for BDS against Syria and
those of Syrian descent. However, such
actions would be equally as ridiculous as
what is being levelled at Israel.”
Aside from its discriminatory nature,
Martin points out the impracticality of
boycotting Israel. “Intel’s new multi-core
processor was completely developed at
its facilities in Israel. Will BDS supporters seek to remove such products from
Concordia University, since they are developed and manufactured in Israel?” n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
37
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Academic BDS a growing
threat: campus activist
JANICE ARNOLD
[email protected], MONTREAL
The academic boycott of Israel is gaining
ground, not so much as a result of student
activism, but because a growing number
of faculty members openly endorse and
promote the campaign, says the director
of an organization that investigates anti-Semitism on U.S. campuses.
Tammi Rossman-Benjamin, director of
the Amcha Initiative, which she co-founded in 2011, warned while in Montreal earlier this month that the academic boycott,
divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement is, at root, anti-Semitic, and support
from North American academics is contributing to the legitimization of the eradication of Israel.
“We are facing a threat, [and] the end
game is the elimination of the Jewish
state. The notion of academic freedom
has somehow become an excuse to hide
anti-Semitism or political activism,” said
Rossman-Benjamin, a lecturer at the University of California-Santa Cruz.
“The boycotters have infiltrated our
campuses and sought in the name of
academic freedom to stifle all criticism
of their behaviour – and they have been
largely successful.”
University administrations are unwilling
to enforce university policies, or even state
or federal laws, including those against
political indoctrination or discrimination
or harassment. Pro-Israel Jewish students,
she said, often find themselves in a hostile
environment.
“The effect is that the academic mission
of universities is being corrupted – political
advocacy is winning out over education.”
The boycott may take the form of opposition to Israeli academics or universities
participating in campus events or publishing in academic journals, to institutional co-operation, and even to student
exchanges, she said, as well as calling for
divesting university holdings in Israeli
businesses or companies that do business
with Israel. This anti-Israel sentiment also
can be felt in classrooms, in what and how
these faculty members teach their students, she added.
The campaign was launched in 2005 by a
coalition of Palestinian organizations that
included Hamas and the Popular Front for
the Liberation of Palestine, she said.
Rossman-Benjamin spoke at McGill
University as part of a lecture series sponsored by the New York-based Institute for
the Study of Global Anti-Semitism and
Policy. Although she’s American, she obtained her undergraduate degree in English at McGill and graduate degree at Concordia University.
Her research focuses on the United
Tammi Rossman-Benjamin
States, but she noted that the number of
BDS-supporting academics is increasing
in Canada as well. She cited a group called
Faculty for Palestine, which has more than
500 members at over 40 universities.
At a meeting with members of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, Rossman-Benjamin shared the findings of a
recent Amcha study about the boycotters.
It looked at 938 faculty members at 316
U.S. colleges, including all the major ones,
who have signed on to one or more calls
for an Israel boycott. Amcha found that
the vast majority (86 per cent) teach in the
humanities or social sciences. Only seven
per cent were in engineering and four per
cent in the arts.
Of those in the humanities and social
sciences, the largest proportion (21 per
cent) was primarily affiliated with English
departments, followed by ethnic or identity studies (10 per cent), history (seven per
cent), gender studies (seven per cent). Only
three per cent were in Middle East studies.
She estimates that a significant number
of the 938, perhaps 20 per cent, are Jewish.
The connection between English and the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict seemed remote,
until Rossman-Benjamin delved deeper.
Of the 143 English faculty members
under study, she found four recurring
themes in their areas of expertise – in descending order: race or ethnicity; gender or
sexual identity; empire, such as colonialism or post-colonialism; and class theory,
socio-economic or political. Fully 92 per
cent were engaged in one or more of these
interests, she said, compared to 38 per
cent of English faculty members as whole.
“I propose that all four of these areas
deal in ideological paradigms that pit the
oppressed against the oppressor… Israel
then fits as the oppressor and the Palestinians as the oppressed.”
Rossman-Benjamin believes the solution to stemming BDS on campus is concerted pressure on university administrations from organizations, parents, donors
and the public at large as taxpayers. Legal
action should also be considered, she said,
if government funds are being misused. ■
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
T
39
40
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
INTERNATIONAL
Security conference
focuses on safe cities
Jennifer Tzivia MacLeod
Special to the CJN, TEL AVIV
Kevin Vickers, the House of Commons
sergeant-at-arms, was honoured for his
heroism during the Oct. 22 Ottawa shootings at the third international Home Land
Security conference in Tel Aviv.
Vickers, who had already been planning to attend the three-day conference
on safe-city initiatives, disaster management and cybercrime before the shootings took place, received a standing
ovation from Avi Dichter, former head
of the Shin Bet, and hundreds of police
officers, businesspeople and political
officials from around the world at the
opening event on Nov. 9. Among other
Canadians present was former minister of public safety Stockwell Day, who
joined a panel discussion on Tuesday,
Nov. 11.
Day attended with Yaron Ashkenazi,
co-founder of AWZ Ventures, a new
company bringing Israeli-style homeland security back home to Canada. As
strategic adviser to AWZ, Day said the
concept of homeland security has been
a tough sell to Canadians.
“Canada has been blessed since 1867,”
he told The CJN. “It has not been affected directly by international warfare.”
Yet during his term as minister of public safety, security forces managed to
“disintegrate” a terrorist cell plotting to
destroy the CN Tower and kidnap the
prime minster.
“This thing was real,” he said.
Calling the recent Ottawa shootings
“heartbreaking,” Day said they were
also a “severe wakeup call about our own
vulnerability.” One focus of AWZ will be
what Day calls “safe smart city” initiatives, which may be better received now
than before the shootings.
Several Israeli cities have safe-city systems in place already, particularly those
close to Gaza. The infrastructure lets
municipalities keep an eye on the streets
even in peacetime.
“Once you have a situation,” said Day,
“citizens with nothing to hide” embrace
safe cities, realizing “they haven’t lost
any freedoms – they’ve gained freedoms.”
Ashkenazi, who is also executive director of the Canadian Society for Yad
Companies have been
reluctant to invest in
cyber-protection. But
once there’s a breach,
they’ll pay almost
anything.
Vashem, said AWZ will also promote
cybercrime solutions by using its associations with Israeli security firms whose
leaders served in security divisions in
the Israeli army and who have now retired to the private sector.
As more and more security, transportation, heating and air conditioning systems go online, cybercrime and hacking
have become a major vulnerability. No
longer a minor issue for IT departments,
it’s now a major concern for all stakeholders.
Boundaries between physical and
cyber security have blurred into nonexistence. Not only bank accounts
and electronic data are at risk, but also
physical infrastructure. “As the threat
level rises, companies are looking more
critically at their own infrastructure,”
Day said
“Companies have been reluctant to
invest in… cyber-protection,” he said.
“But once there’s a breach, they’ll pay
almost anything. It’s one thing to have
an ambulance that can pick you up at
the bottom of a cliff. It’s another thing to
build a fence at the top of the cliff.”
The three-day conference, which
examined intelligence, counterterrorism
and law enforcement, drew thousands
of participants from all over the world.
Speakers included Mississippi governor
Phil Bryant and Luiz Fernando Corrêa,
security director for the Rio 2016 Olympic games.
More than 70 exhibitors showcased
Israeli expertise, mostly gained through
military experience.
Continued ON page 43
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, left, met sergeant-at-arms Kevin Vickers Nov. 12.
Knesset honours Vickers
JTA and CJN Staff
Jerusalem
The Canadian Parliament’s sergeant-atarms who shot a gunman inside the Parliament building last month was honoured by Israel’s Knesset last week.
Kevin Vickers, who was in Israel for a
security conference planned before the
Oct. 22 Ottawa shootings, was recognized Nov. 12 by Knesset Speaker Yuli
Edelstein and met with Edelstein in his
chambers.
Vickers also met with Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who
praised Vickers for his bravery and quick
response, which saved the lives of many.
“This terror attack in Ottawa proves,
once again, that Islamic radical terrorism has no limits and respects no
borders. Israel and Canada stand sideby-side in the international effort to
eliminate terrorism,” Netanyahu said.
Edelstein gave Vickers a gift on behalf
of the Knesset.
Vickers said in response that “thwarting the terror attack was not my act
alone, but that of the entire staff, and we
were proud of it.”
Edelstein stressed the importance
of developing the relations between
the Israeli and Canadian parliaments.
“You are here not only due to the inci-
dent that occurred, but also because we
would be very happy to build with the
Canadian parliament a tight relationship of co-operation between members
of parliament and between professional
teams,” he said.
Vickers also toured the Knesset and
met with Knesset Guard commander
Yosef Griff and other senior members of
the Knesset Guard, who briefed them on
professional issues.
The Canadian delegation’s visit to Israel was sponsored by the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs.
Vickers, 58, a former RCMP officer,
shot and killed Michael Zehaf-Bibeau,
who was firing his weapon in the Hall of
Honour of Parliament in Ottawa on the
morning of Oct. 22. Zehaf-Bibeau had
shot and killed an unarmed soldier, Cpl.
Nathan Cirillo, who was guarding the
National War Memorial.
Hailed as a hero, Vickers received a
standing ovation from Canadian lawmakers the following day.
He and other Canadian security and
police officials are in Israel for the third
international homeland security conference to examine intelligence, counterterrorism and law enforcement.
Vickers was scheduled to be in the
Knesset’s audience gallery when he received his recognition. n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
International
T
41
OPINION
Remembering the murder, fighting for democracy
Matthew Davidov
T
ens of thousands of Israeli youths
descended on Rabin Square in Tel Aviv
recently to participate in a rally in memory of the 1995 assassination of Yitzhak
Rabin. The “alternative” rally was an
astonishing demonstration of the unique
nature of Israeli society, and gave hope for
a future without the cyclical violence that
has plagued Israel for decades.
Unlike the other rallies held throughout
the week, this rally was organized by a coalition of youth groups from across Israel
and brought together participants from all
parts of the political spectrum, from the
right to the left, from haredim to Arabs.
The climax of the rally came when
Rachelle Frenkel, the mother of Naftali
Frenkel, one of the three teenagers murdered in June, kicking off Operation Pro-
tective Edge, gave a memorable address.
After enduring an unimaginable loss, she
stood in front of a massive crowd with a
smile on her face and called for peace and
coexistence.
Amidst the crowd I saw a singular elderly man video-chatting with his wife and
communicating using sign language. He
flipped the camera view so that she could
see what was occurring in the square, and
an infectious grin came to both of their
faces.
Although I can only conjecture as to why
Rachelle Frenkel, who has just suffered a
soul crushing tragedy, and the elderly man
could be so joyous, it appeared to stem
from the same source as my realization
that I will never forget what I witnessed in
Rabin Square. Seeing crowds of children
from all backgrounds and ethnicities
come together, championing a message
of peace in light of what seems to be a
systemic and ingrained hatred afforded
me a glimmer of hope for the future. As an
American college student, I felt that the
turnout and attentiveness of the teenage
attendees made me extremely proud of
my Israeli heritage and reaffirmed my
commitment to the people of Israel.
There were people of all ages in attendance, but it was clear the rally was by kids
and for kids. The older attendees stood on
the periphery while members of numerous youth groups emphatically waved
Israeli flags and held up signs calling for
peace and unity. The rally brought the
leaders of tomorrow into one place and
provided a fundamental basis of agreement from which dialogue and understanding can develop.
While I grew up in Los Angeles, in what
I believe could be considered one of the
most politically active and activist societies, I rarely came across people with a
fundamentally different view on politics
and the world. The lack of exposure to differing ideologies makes finding common
ground nearly impossible. Without a base
to build on, discussion of opposing ideas
becomes divisive rather than constructive.
While the Israeli and American political
systems are inundated with polarizing
rhetoric, bridging the political gorge
begins with a basic agreement on funda-
mental goals, and respect for the views
of those on the other side. In the United
States, there is no platform for teenagers
coming from divergent political backgrounds to talk or even to be in the same
room. That gap feeds more resistance to
progress than the substantive differences
in the positions themselves.
The rally transcended politics and
aligned an estimated 40,000 participants
behind the flag of peace. A similar event in
the United States is inconceivable to me.
Although there are strong social movements incubated across college campuses
in the United States, the strong youth
groups in Israel provide Israeli democracy with a dimension that is missing
in the American system. Civil society is
integral to any healthy democracy, and
the prevalence and engagement brought
forth by youth movements and organizations makes the Israeli system unique and
provides a shimmer of light to a seemingly
dark future. n
Matthew Davidov is an intern at The Reut
Institute.
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Nationality Law postponed by Knesset
JTA
Jerusalem
A Knesset committee vote on a law to officially make Israel the nation-state of all
Jews was postponed.
Justice Minister Tzipi Livni, head of the
centrist Hatnua party, on Sunday postponed her ministerial committee for
legislation’s vote on the bill known as the
Nationality Law.
“The explosive situation that exists in
the Arab sector at the moment has already
led to violent clashes and casualties. A
discussion on the Nationality Law at this
time is irresponsible,” Science, Technology and Space Minister Yaakov Peri said
in requesting the delay of the vote during
the committee meeting.
The bill calls Israel the national homeland of the Jewish People and would make
Hebrew the official language, with Arabic
having “special status.” It also calls Jewish
law a basis for new legislation.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu,
who supports the bill, said after the committee meeting that he would submit the
bill directly to the full cabinet for discussion.
“The State of Israel is the national state
of the Jewish People,” Netanyahu said in a
Justice Minister Tzipi Livni
statement. “This is a central issue which
is important for the future of the Jewish
People in the State of Israel.”
The statement came hours after Netanyahu had opened the cabinet meeting
by saying he would move forward on the
bill, which was proposed by Zeev Elkin, a
member of his Likud party.
Netanyahu acknowledged, however,
that the bill “will yet undergo many changes and discussions, but we will make it
clear that the State of Israel is the national
state of the Jewish People, while providing for equal rights – and ensuring equal
rights – for all its citizens.” n
Lancet article author banned from Gaza
JTA
Jerusalem
A Norwegian doctor who was among the
authors of a letter slamming Israel published in the Lancet was banned permanently from the Gaza Strip.
The Israeli government said the ban on Dr.
Mads Gilbert was for security reasons, according to an email from the Norwegian embassy
in Tel Aviv to the Local, a Norwegian daily.
Gilbert, 67, told the Local he believes he is
being excluded because he has made critical comments against Israel.
The doctor said he has spent more than
30 years working in international conflict
areas, especially Gaza, the Local reported.
He spent more than a month this summer
working at Gaza’s Shifa Hospital helping to
treat some of the thousands injured in Is-
The family of
rael’s operation in Gaza.
Gilbert reportedly was travelling to Gaza
late last month and was prevented from
crossing from Israel into Gaza.
Norwegian government officials reportedly have asked Israel to change its decision.
In “An open letter for the people of Gaza”
published this summer in the Lancet, a British medical journal, Gilbert and his co-authors accused Israel of committing a “mas-
sacre” in Gaza, among other things.
“This is not about me. This is about Israel denying the Palestinian people in Gaza
international support,” Gilbert told the British daily the Independent on Saturday.
“To deny professionals from the medical
field the right to go to Gaza is another aspect
of the collective punishment. They’re exercising the siege in an increasingly harsh and
brutal way.” n
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43
JCC shooter ‘wanted to kill some Jews’
Marissa Newman
Kansas City
In a first interview since his shooting
spree at a Kansas City Jewish community centre and Jewish retirement home,
unrepentant killer Frazier Glenn Miller
Jr. said last Saturday that he wanted to
kill some Jews or attack the Jews before
he died.
The longtime white supremacist – who
was charged with the murder of three
people in the April 14 attack in Kansas,
none of them Jewish – also told the Kansas City Star that while he regretted killing
14-year-old Reat Griffin Underwood, he
is proud of rattling the Jewish community, and does not feel any guilt for killing
the other “accomplices of the Jews.”
Underwood’s grandfather, 69-year-old
physician William Lewis Corporon, was
gunned down alongside his grandson.
Moments later, Miller shot to death Terri
LaManno, a 53-year-old Catholic occupational therapist and mother of two,
outside a Jewish retirement complex
where she was visiting her mother.
In the interview earlier this month, Miller explained that the decision to commit an attack “for the specific purpose of
killing Jews” came after his emphysema
worsened.
“I was convinced I was dying then,”
Miller said. “I wanted to make damned
sure I killed some Jews or attacked the
Jews before I died.”
The murderer said he was surprised to
hear that the victims of the shooting were
not Jewish, saying he was “convinced
there would be all Jews or mostly Jews.”
But despite not killing any Jews, Miller
indicated he was nonetheless satisfied
with the attack.
“Because of what I did, Jews feel less
secure,” he said. “Every Jew in the world
knows my name now and what I did. As
for these… white people who are accomplices of the Jews, who attend their meetings and contribute to their fundraising
efforts and who empower the Jews, they
are my enemy too. A lot of white people
who associate with Jews, go to Jewish
events and support them know that
they’re not safe either, thanks to me.”
But the “young white boy,” he said. “I
regret that.” Miller added that Underwood was 14, but looked 20.
Prior to carrying out the attack, the killer searched for information about the
JCC online, but was “careful” to supple-
ment his searches to throw police off his
trail. He also scouted out the centre on
various occasions.
“I even Googled Islamic community centres, Hispanic community centres, Baptist community centres, just to
throw them off,” he said. “I didn’t drive
my truck because I was convinced it was
being monitored by satellite by the cops.
That’s the reason I took my wife’s car.
“I drove all the way from my home
in Missouri, back and forth, back and
forth,” he said. “I reconnoitered the
damned place.”
Miller said he was “terrified of getting
caught with these weapons” during the
stakeouts, and was astounded that the
police were not on to him.
“And nothing happened,” he said in
recounting the multiple times he visited
the JCC. “I parked right in front of it and
drove around. If the feds had been monitoring me, they’d have stopped me right
then because they were afraid I was going to kill somebody.”
After gunning down his victims, Miller
said he phoned the police 10 times to
turn himself in, but there was no answer.
When the police arrived at the scene to
arrest him, they brought witnesses to
verify that he was the shooter.
“They brought them up in a car and
then they took me out of the police
vehicle and in front of the car where
the people could see me. I screamed at
them, ‘Heil Hitler. I wish I’d have killed
all of you,’” Miller said.
The killer said he murdered his three
victims “for my people.
“Not my family,” he said. “I told my
family when they were kids, I said, ‘Look,
the reason I had you was to grow up and
help me fight the Jews.’”
However, his children were not inclined to participate in his racist attacks,
he said.
“They wanted to have a good life and
to hell with everything else,” he said.
“That’s the way you all are, you know.
All white people are that way. Self-interest. Satisfy their bellies, pocketbook and
genitals. And watch ballgames. That’s all
they want.”
In the immediate aftermath of the killings, Miller said he felt elated.
“I have never felt such exhilaration. …
Finally, I’d done something.” n
Times of Israel
TimesofIsrael.com
Conference showcases
Israeli security firms
Continued from page 40
Ami Daniel and Matan Peled, ex-ship
captains in the Israeli navy, founded
their company, Windward (windward.
eu) to interpret the mountain of data
transmitted by ships worldwide, data
that is increasingly subject to fraud. As
many as one per cent of ships transmit
false identities, Daniel told The CJN.
Others misreport their port of call, or
“go dark,” dropping off the map.
It’s not just about boats on the water.
“We specialize in shipping economics,” Daniel said. With global financial
investment relying on accurate data,
fraud has far-reaching implications.
“Nobody knows what’s happening in the
seas,” he added.
What does Israel have to offer the
world? According to Daniel, “Pure innovation… and we have a bit of chutzpah.”
Israel’s Ministry of Public Security
hosted one of the largest booths, showing off its latest weapons, systems,
and protective equipment. Government-owned Israeli Military Industries,
creators of the Uzi submachine gun,
greeted visitors nearby. An outdoor exhibit area showcased portable bomb
shelters, rugged all-terrain police vehicles and a truck carrying a complete
Iron Dome battery.
Not every participant represented a
corporate or military angle. Frank Allen
Storch of Baltimore came on his own
as part of his “Keep Your School Safe”
initiative (keepyourschoolsafe.com).
Storch, who told The CJN that he has
met with several schools in Canada,
praised exhibitors for their high-tech
solutions, but said he’s more concerned
about protecting kids.
Whether in North American schools or
in seminaries or yeshivas, keeping kids
safe can be both low-tech and cost-effective. His organization offers a free
downloadable guide with worksheets to
help schools prepare for disasters of any
kind. “Everybody here is selling something… I’m here for the mitzvah.” n
ISRAEL SUN PHOTO
Israeli soccer team wins
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu visits the Israeli soccer
team dressing room after Israel beat 10-man Bosnia-Herzegovina
3-0 Nov. 16 to climb above Wales to the top of European Qualifiers
Group B. Two teams from the six-team group qualify for the
European Cup to be held in 2016.
44
International
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THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
ANALYSIS
Israeli wars – looking back and planning for the future
YONAH JEREMY BOB
Special to The CJN
Since 2006, Israel has fought four wars
with either Hezbollah in Lebanon or
Hamas in Gaza.
Given that many consider this summer’s
Gaza war to have ended in a draw, the
next war (separate from the possibly current new intifadah) may be just over the
horizon.
With some similarities, the next war may
look different from recent rounds, including the possibility of having far more casualties on the Israeli side, even if Israel hits
the other side harder overall.
Recently, Israel’s Iron Dome and home
front preparation blocked significant strategic gains by its attackers’ rocket fire.
But in the next war, predictions are that
the volume and power of the rockets will
grow to a point where they could outpace
missile defence and lead to much worse
attacks, especially if Hezbollah, after eight
years of not fighting Israel, decides not to
leave all the “glory” to Hamas.
Hezbollah rocket fire would likely lead
not only to more devastating casualties
(possibly in the hundreds), but also to
short-lightning Hezbollah invasions of
Israeli border villages via its underground
tunnel network.
Hamas used “offensive” tunnels to
emerge behind Israel Defence Forces’ defence lines to make trouble, and the assumption is that anything Hamas can do,
Hezbollah will do better.
Looking back at this summer’s war and
at some of these future capabilities, what
will Israel’s strategy be?
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
trumpeted his “patient” approach and
minimalist use of ground troops in the
last war.
But many former generals and some
politicians are pointing out that the government presented a “straw man” kind of
decision, saying that the IDF’s only two
options were complete conquest of Gaza
(which few experts supported), or the extremely limited and patient ground incursion Netanyahu ordered.
As one former general has asked rhetorically: when did “patience” in war become
considered an inherent virtue?
With 50 days of war, heavy Palestinian casualties, 60 IDF soldiers killed and
thousands of targets hit, many did not
notice that the IDF’s ground troops barely
entered Palestinian urban areas, mostly
letting artillery and air strikes do the work.
In the middle of the war, many voices, including former Shin Bet head Yuval Diskin,
argued that the IDF could strike faster and
deeper into the heart of Hamas territory,
while stopping short of toppling Hamas or
trying to hold territory permanently.
In contrast, Netanyahu said that because of Iron Dome, the IDF could drop
its traditional doctrine that, with its limited resources and territory, it needs to
win wars fast. Instead, he said that the IDF
could wear down Hamas patiently until it
accepted a ceasefire.
That did essentially work this time, but
maybe it was a one-shot deal.
If Hezbollah showers the country with
thousands of rockets a day instead of the
60 to 150 rockets per day from Hamas,
harm to the home front will likely be too
grave for patience.
That could mean a more aggressive
operation earlier, and far more IDF infantry casualties in close-fighting urban
warfare.
In that respect, whether the IDF is already mobilized when fighting kicks into
high gear will matter.
Many criticized the IDF for delaying and
hesitating too much.
But the fact is that with a primarily reserve army, it takes one to two weeks to
fully mobilize.
So if Israel has positioned tens of thousands of reserves before fighting heats up,
a ground invasion can happen around
the same time that rockets start falling instead of coming after the home front has
endured punishment for two weeks.
Another issue is that the IDF is not sure
it has the right army for fighting its current
most likely foes.
Yes, rapid progress has been made in making the IDF faster to better match up with
guerrilla forces (as opposed to “traditional”
slower and larger conventional forces).
The IDF has far better technological intelligence capabilities and is far more networked into a GPS big picture of where all
forces stand to better allocate firepower
with pinpoint efficiency and accuracy.
But each improvement has downsides.
The faster, more nimble forces have
poorer self-defence capabilities against
weapons like anti-tank missiles.
Many of the 60 recent IDF casualties
were killed by Hamas’ anti-tank weapons
fired at unarmoured vehicles that could
have been armoured or have employed
countermeasures to prevent getting hit.
While the IDF has put air power first, the
last war exposed the air force’s ineffectiveness against tunnels and showed that
striking thousands of targets does not, by
itself, stop rocket fire.
Returning to its traditional doctrine of
striking fast and mobilizing reserves before large volumes of rockets are landing
on the home front can help.
Redirecting some funds from more exciting air strike capabilities to more mundane matters like force protection and
engineering answers to tunnels could
also help, though past experience leaves
doubts as to whether the IDF will focus
sufficiently on the tunnels.
But to get optimum results in the next
war, generals say the IDF must be ready to
adjust to surprises and must not become
so dependent on GPS and technological
intelligence that its field commanders become less ready to improvise with adversaries who thrive on surprise. n
Yonah Jeremy Bob is a foreign affairs
lecturer and a correspondent for the Jerusalem Post. www.yonahbobforeignaffairs.
wordpress.com
EU nations’ recognition of a Palestinian state in question
Times of Israel
Jerusalem
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Nov. 16 that European calls and
efforts to unilaterally recognize a Palestinian state have only pushed peace further
away.
“I think the calls that have been coming
from European countries, from European
parliaments, to unilaterally recognize
a Palestinian state pushed peace backwards,” he said at a press conference in
Jerusalem with German Foreign Minister
Frank-Walter Steinmeier.
“[These calls] don’t tell the Palestinian Authority that they will have to make
genuine compromises and take seriously
Israel’s legitimate security concerns. They
merely award the Palestinians a prize
without asking them at all to make the
concessions that are necessary for a genu-
ine peace,” Netanyahu said.
The prime minister added that a negotiated peace is possible only with compromises from both sides.
Steinmeier said he hopes negotiations
between Israel and the Palestinians will
resume as soon as possible, as “returning
to the status quo after the last Gaza war
[this past summer] is not sufficient.
“We must step forward, and hopefully,
we very soon have conditions that [enable] the negotiations to be continued.
There is a need for security and we understand the security concerns here in Israel
and perspective for peace,” he continued.
The German minister stressed that there
is “no other way as to reach this situation
of respecting the needs for security on the
one side and developing a perspective for
peace in the long run, beside and beyond
negotiations.”
Steinmeier seemed to indicate that Ger-
many also believes the unilateral recognition of a Palestinian state would not be
helpful.
“Unilateral activities are not creating
the ground, the atmosphere, in which
perhaps another approach, another initiative from our American friends will be
successful,” he said.
Peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians collapsed spectacularly in late
April after a nine-month, U.S.-brokered
effort. The two sides have traded blame
for the failure while the United States has,
unofficially, largely placed the blame on
continued settlement activity and on Netanyahu.
Earlier this month, several European nations reportedly told U.S. officials that they
were seriously considering unilaterally recognizing Palestine as a state, as Sweden did
last month, if peace talks between Israel
and the Palestinians do not resume.
According to a report in the Wall Street
Journal on Saturday, these countries include some of the U.S.’s closest allies. The
report did not specify which, however.
The Palestinians, for their part, are set to
submit a draft resolution to the UN Security Council later this month calling for an
Israeli withdrawal to the pre-1967 lines, a
senior official said.
Last month, Sweden officially recognized
the State of Palestine, making it the first
major European Union member state to
back Ramallah’s statehood bid in this way.
Also last month, London’s Parliament
voted to urge the British government to
recognize a Palestinian state.
French lawmakers are set to vote on a
proposal by the Socialist Party urging the
government to recognize Palestine as a
state on Nov. 28. n
TimesofIsrael.com
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
45
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Jewish Life
Arts
Music
books
food
what’s new
parshah
Mind-reading
mentalist takes
to the canvas
Sheri Shefa
[email protected]
H
aim Goldenberg, best known as
a spoon-bending, mind-reading
mentalist, now has another talent to add to his resumé.
Goldenberg’s first art exhibit called
Spark of Madness, featuring a series of
portraits, is currently on display at the
Thornhill-based 4 Women Gallery until
the end of the month.
It’s hard to believe that if you had spoken
to Goldenberg about producing art for an
exhibit just four short months ago, he
might have dismissed you.
But according to Goldenberg’s manager
and wife, Miriam Milashut, the performer
has been known to be a little impulsive.
“When he wants to do something, he
just does it… He doesn’t overthink it,” she
said.
During a performance in late June for
the annual Ideacity conference in Toronto,
Goldenberg performed what can only be
described as a speed-painting mind-reading demonstration, available on YouTube,
that resulted in a portrait of Charlie Chaplin.
“I did a painting on stage and someone came after the show and asked, ‘How
much?’ He wanted to buy the painting…
Apparently, he was an art dealer and he
said he wanted to see all my paintings.
I don’t know why, but I said, ‘Yes, I have
many of them!’ So I started to paint,” said
Goldenberg, who was considered an art
prodigy as a child, but turned down a
scholarship to Israel’s national school of
art so that he could serve in the army.
But the person who gave Goldenberg a
real push to try his hand at painting was
Yoav Raiter, the husband of the 4 Women
Gallery-owner Ayala Raiter, who saw
the Ideacity performance and pushed
Goldenberg to produce more art to be
showcased at the gallery.
“I wasn’t sure, but eventually, I did it,”
Goldenberg said. “In the beginning I said
no because… for me it is very personal. I
do shows in front of many people, but [my
art] is very personal.”
One of the paintings that is especially
personal to Goldenberg is the portrait of
the late comedian and actor Robin Williams, who committed suicide in August.
“I really admired him, so I said I wanted
to do a painting of him,” Goldenberg said.
“When Robin Williams died, [Goldenberg] picked up a piece of wood and started to paint him and didn’t stop, and he’s
been painting every night since then,”
Milashut said, adding that the title of the
exhibit, which is dedicated to Williams’
memory, is a reference to a quote by Wil-
liams that goes, “You’re only given a little
spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it.”
In the few short months that Goldenberg has been painting, the feedback has
been nothing but positive.
“We sold a couple of paintings, more
than I thought, so that’s good,” he said.
Ayala Raiter, owner of the gallery that
doubles as a workspace for her one-of-akind jewelry designs, said that since the
exhibit opened last month, more people
have come by to see his work than they
have for any other exhibit featured over
the past two years.
“People are very curious to see his artwork because they know him as a mentalist,” she said, adding that they are
so impressed, they have approached
Goldenberg about commissioning him to
do portraits for them.
But when it comes to choosing subjects
for his portraits, Goldenberg said he’s attracted to those he wants to learn more
about.
“When I see someone, I try to read him
and I want to see what [he is] trying to express, and that’s what I try to put on the
canvas when I draw it,” he explained.
“I chose people who inspired me, in a
good way and in a bad way. For example,
Marilyn Monroe. She is beautiful and
amazing, but I don’t like this celebrity
thing. I wanted to see Marilyn Monroe as
I see her, not as a celebrity, but as a person.”
In addition to portraits of Christopher
Reeve in his role as Superman, Woody
Allen and Charlie Chaplin, part of his collection is a portrait of a pensive monkey.
“The monkey is interesting because I
wanted to draw someone very smart. I
thought about Einstein, and I started to
look at some pictures on the Internet and
I didn’t find someone who I thought was
really smart, so that’s how I found this picture. He’s not smart, but he looks like he’s
thinking,” Goldenberg said with a laugh.
Although painting is his latest passion,
Goldenberg is not letting his work as a
mentalist take a back seat. In addition
to live performances, Goldenberg, who
is famous for his Gemini-winning reality show called Goldmind, recently shot
a pilot in Toronto for a new show called
Mind Makeover that he’s looking to sell to
American television networks.
“It’s a new concept. It’s about making
people believe in themselves. It’s very empowering. It’s less about mentalism, and
it’s more about believing in yourself.”n
For more information about the exhibit,
visit www.4womengallery.com.
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Scott Helman, 19, goes for a walk in Kensington Market, from where Augusta gets its name. Chris payne photo
Jordan Adler
Special to The CJN
If you want to become part of Toronto’s thriving music scene, singer-songwriter Scott Helman has one
piece of advice: write as many songs
as you can.
“That craft will take you farther than
anything,” Helman tells The CJN.
The 19-year-old musician can testify to that: Helman just finished a sixmonth writing and recording spree
leading up to the release of his first EP,
Augusta. The record dropped on Oct.
14, and the Toronto native plans to start
touring around Ontario in November.
Playing concerts is something that
gives Helman great joy. He was performing for his friends at the Aspetta
Caffe in Toronto’s Kensington Market even before he caught the eye
of League of Rock founder Terry
Moshenberg.
Moshenberg, who is now Helman’s
manager, talked to some contacts at
Warner Music Canada, and they decided to take a chance on the young
singer. At the time, Helman was only
a year into high school.
From there, things came together
slowly. Every so often, the teen would
have a writing session with artists and
songwriters who helped him develop
ideas. Helman worked closely with
Simon Wilcox, whom he co-penned
Augusta with, while Warner’s Ron
Lopata offered helpful direction.
As soon as he had proven his worth
and officially signed with the label two
years later, Helman started working at
full speed. While writing music can be
a scary, bewildering process, Helman
says getting into writing a song is his
favourite part of making music.
“When I’m in a writing session,
I feel like I’m making art fully and
truly,” he says.
His debut EP gets its title from an
avenue in Kensington Market, a place
Helman says makes him think back to
working on and recording the album.
“It’s sort of this accumulative
place,” Helman says. “The first place
me and my band played was at The
Supermarket, which is on Augusta.
Five months later, I got an apartment there for two weeks. I ended
up finishing this record while I was
there. It just seemed like the street
was where it all started.”
Augusta’s release and tour will sum
up a breakthrough year for Helman,
who has opened in concert for Tegan
and Sara, as well as Matthew Good.
During Leonard Cohen Week in September, Helman performed a cover
of Suzanne on CBC Radio 2.
Even though he has lofty musical
dreams and says he plans to keep writing songs for as long as he can, Helman does not know if selling out big
arenas to make money is something
he foresees. He says he would rather
do an intimate show at a small club or
café, where he can see the audience react and respond to his music.
“When you’re onstage… it’s like
you’re connecting [with people]
in a way that doesn’t really exist in
any other part of life,” he says. “It’s
ineffable. Especially when you’re
young and you don’t feel secure…
being on stage is where you get a
good response all the time and you
know who you are.”
Helman currently listens to a wide
variety of rock music, from Hozier
and Sun Kil Moon to classic acts like
The Band and Neil Young. Helman
even got to step onto the stage where
Young had played many concerts,
when he performed at Toronto’s historic Massey Hall in September.
“It was the first show I played
where I felt like, this is where I’m supposed to be,” he says. “Just to have a
response from an audience that big
was really reassuring and special.”
Each song on Augusta has its distinct sound and style. Scott’s favourite track from the album is the emotional, low-key track Machine.
A friend of Helman who has had
trouble with drug abuse inspires
another song, The Lion. The titular
animal represents a creature that’s
waiting to pounce and harm.
The biggest crowd-pleasers at concerts, though, are his love songs, including Augusta’s lead single, Bungalow. Another fan favourite, Cry Cry
Cry, was inspired by one of Helman’s
past relationships.
There are more songs in his repertoire, so he should stick with the recommendation to write as often as he
can. Meanwhile, Helman says there
is another piece of advice he hopes
to follow for the rest of his musical
career: always be Peter Pan.
“Always be a kid,” he says. “Don’t
ever think you’ve made it or you’ve
grown or reached a point. For me,
I’m always going to stay who I am.
And I’m always going to be a kid.”n
Augusta is currently available on
iTunes and scotthelmanmusic.com.
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
Music
T
Adam Cohen goes home
to find his muse
47
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Adam Cohen recorded his latest album in the comfort of his family homes.
Susan Minuk
Special to The CJN
Adam Cohen, son of one of Canada’s most
iconic artists, Leonard Cohen, went home
to find his muse for his latest album.
We Go Home, released in September, is
Adam’s fifth album and by all definitions
homemade.
In presenting this new body of work,
Cohen comes home to Canada for a
cross-country tour, having just completed
the first part of his world tour in Europe.
The project is all the more remarkable
for being the album that almost wasn’t.
Cohen completed and then scrapped a
previously-recorded album before starting afresh, choosing to heed the distant
calling of his family and roots by recording
in the living rooms of houses in which he
was raised.
Cohen spoke to The CJN on tour from St.
Albert, a suburb of Edmonton, about We
Go Home:
“I came off my first success with my last
album, Like A Man (2012), my first gold
record, and watched audiences grow. I
thought I was going to have great ease
and success making a follow-up, but I had
a difficult time.”
A gold record signifies sales of 40,000.
“I made a record that was over-eager
and not a success. I had no choice but to
start over.”
Cohen, 42, grew up in Montreal, but today lives globally, in the sense that he travels more of the year than not.
“I retreated into the homes that saw me
grow up and I take refuge and comfort in
the familiarity of these places. I recorded
half the record in our family vacation home
on the Greek island of Hydra and half the
record in our family home in Montreal.
“It is in the comfort of these homes
where I grew up that I conjured my dreams
and what I wanted to become. It is where
I lived that influenced me and the quality
of music I was playing,” explained Cohen.
In We Go Home, Adam takes a more profound ownership and command of his
own voice within a family tradition. He is
the link between his father Leonard, and
his seven-year-old “boy wonder” Cassius.
“My muse turned out to be my home life,
my roots, my family. I think you can hear
the camaraderie on the record. I think you
can hear the walls and the floors boards of
homes that saw me grow up. I am in my
father’s house; I pass by his hat hanging
on the coat rack, and the telephone with
enormous buttons,” said Adam.
All of Cohen’s songs are original and described by him as modern folk.
“The songs on this record chronicle
conversations I have had with my father,
as well as conversations that I would like
to have with my little boy, and basically
my attempt to impart some kind of wisdom and humour to my little man.
“What’s different is the tone – richer and
fuller this time, ” he said.
The album cover is a picture of Cohen’s
son, Cassius, while the back picture is
Adam as a five-year-old with his father
who turned 80 this past September, and
released his own album, Popular Problems, a week after We Go Home.
“Having a dad like Leonard Cohen has
been deeply influential. He is not only my
father who I look up to and take guidance
from but he is also what I consider to be
a remarkable, dare I say historic, figure.
It would be impossible and a sign of absurd aloofness for me to not have taken
immense inspiration and guidance from
him,” said Adam.
“I would like to continue charting progress. It’s a wonderful thing to watch an
audience grow and I’ve gotten very seduced by the idea of being able to chart
even more progress,” he concluded. n
Visit www.adamcohen.com for tour dates
and other info.
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48
Arts
T
Eye on Arts
by Bill Gladstone
TIFF BELL LIGHTBOX PRESENTS
RETROSPECTIVE ON MEL BROOKS
ministers. Thursday, Nov. 20, patron cocktail reception at Windsor Arms Hotel (5:30
p.m.) followed by screening (7:15 p.m.) at
Isabel Bader Theatre. Contact Devyn to
register, 416-864-9735, ext. 21, executiveassistant @fswc.ca
• Comic Deb Filler performs her show I
Lost It in Kiev. Factory Studio Theatre, 125
Bathurst St. Nov. 24 to 30. 416-504-9971,
www.fillerup.ca
• Meet crime fiction author Howard Shrier
(Buffalo Jump, High Chicago, Boston
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CHANUKAH LIVE 2014
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Cream, Miss Montreal) and creator of the
Toronto Jewish investigator Jonah Geller.
Free. Miles Nadal JCC, Thursday, Nov. 27,
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
• Koffler Centre of the Arts co-presents
a staged reading of Infinity, a shocking
and funny new play by Tarragon playwright-in-residence Hannah Moscovitch,
developed with Volcano Theatre. Free admission. Artscape Youngplace, 180 Shaw
St. Thursday, Dec. 11, 7 p.m. www.kofflerarts.org n
Yiddish Swingtet, pictured, and Kyra Folk-Farber will perform at
a Chanukah concert of Yiddish song and klezmer music, Dec. 14,
2 p.m. at the Beth Tikvah Synagogue. Call Sandy 416-458-1440.
• Plumbing • Electrical • Carpentry
OVE
nto
R
Toro ish
50
Jew us Perform
r
ers
Cho
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Friends of Yiddish
en
ts
Born on the brink of the Depression in
a Brooklyn tenement, Mel Brooks (née
Melvin Kaminsky) worked as a Borscht
Belt comedian before helping to initiate a
new era of sketch comedy as a writer on
Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows. Gaining
prominence with his famous “2000 Year
Old Man” routine with Carl Reiner, Brooks
scored more successes on Broadway and
television (Get Smart). His Oscar-winning,
1968 film The Producers propelled him on
a three-decade cinematic career of triumphant bad taste, often involving hilarious Yiddishisms.
Now approaching 90 and one of relatively few people to have won an Emmy,
a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony, the
irrepressible comedian may have attained
showbiz immortality – but not, as he once
observed, actual immortality. “If Shaw and
Einstein couldn’t beat death, what chance
have I got?” he once quipped. “Practically
none.”
The TIFF Bell Lightbox has begun a
month-long retrospective of the films of
Mel Brooks. It continues with showings of
Silent Movie (1976) on Nov. 20, 8:45 p.m.;
High Anxiety (1977) on Nov. 22, 10 p.m.;
History of the World, Part I (1981) on Nov.
27, 8:45 p.m.; Spaceballs (1987) on Nov. 29,
9 p.m.; Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993)
on Dec. 13, 10 p.m.; and Dracula: Dead
and Loving It (1995) on Dec. 20 at 9:30
p.m. $12.50, $10. 350 King St. W. www.tiff.
net, 416-599-8433.
***
Musical Events
• In “Klezmer in the New World, A Musical Alchemy,” musician Jonno Lightstone
demonstrates how klezmer, as transplanted from the Old World shtetl, has
been infused with an explosion of Jewish
creativity as it adapts to modern times.
Miles Nadal JCC, Thursdays, Nov. 20 and
27, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Drop-in, $4 per lecture.
• Kevin Courrier continues his series of
lectures with film clips on the Beatles:
“Fixing a Hole: The Seeds of Break-up” on
Monday, Nov. 24, 7 to 9 p.m. Miles Nadal
JCC. Drop-in $12, students $6. 416-9246211, ext. 606.
• Gerineldo, a Moroccan Sephardi ensemble, returns to the stage after a hiatus of 20 years. The group consists of Oro
Anahory-Librowicz, Solly Lévy, Judith
Cohen and Tamar Ilana, with guest oud
player Demetrios Petsalakis. General admission $20. Théâtre de l’Alliance
Française, 24 Spadina Rd. Nov. 25, 7:30
p.m. alliance-francaise.ca
• The Civic Light-Opera Co. presents The
Judy Garland Christmas Show (That Never
Was) featuring Caroline Morodalicandro
as Garland, David Haines as Bing Crosby,
Julie Lennick as Ethel Merman, Joe Cascone as Liberace and many others. The
spoof-tribute received good reviews in
Los Angeles where it originated. $28. Zion
Cultural Centre, 1650 Finch Ave. E., Dec. 3
to 14. 416-755-1717, www.MusicTheatreToronto. com
***
Arts in Brief
• Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center
presents The Prime Ministers II: Soldiers
& Peacemakers, a film about Israeli prime
FALL
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10% OFF
GTA’s Favourite Family Chanukah Show!
Call Steve at
Sunday, Dec 14 • City Playhouse • Thornhill
Tickets and info judyanddavid.com
416.823.8358
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Email: [email protected]
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Music
T
49
Chamber orchestra puts down its bows after funding cut
STEPHEN CERA
SPECIAL TO THE CJN
The musical life of Toronto is a bit quieter
this season, with the funding cut off for
the Koffler Chamber Orchestra (KCO).
Last summer the Koffler Centre of the
Arts ended its support for the all-strings
orchestra, which since 2005, has been
led by Jacques Israelievitch, the respected former concertmaster of the Toronto
Symphony Orchestra. He is now on the
music faculty at York University while
maintaining an active schedule as a
chamber musician, soloist and recitalist.
The small orchestra, which has a modest budget, was formed nine years ago
after Israelievitch was approached by the
Koffler Centre.
“What was unusual about it,” Israelievitch said recently, “was the combination of students – some younger,
some older – community players (not
professionals), and professionals who
were leading each section. It made for a
very interesting mix. I was trying to get as
close as possible to a professional level in
these concerts.”
In artistic terms, he often succeeded.
The orchestra played a wide range of
music, from Bach to contemporary, often
to a standard beyond that of other community orchestras in the GTA. But when
their home auditorium, the Leah Posluns
Theatre in the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre (BJCC), was closed in 2009 and
torn down in 2010, the orchestra was left
homeless and forced to find other venues.
The audience that had been built in the
Leah Posluns decreased.
The Koffler Centre is sponsored primarily by the Koffler family, UJA Federation of
Greater Toronto, government arts councils and private donors.
Noting the drop in audiences, the centre
gradually began to question the rationale for supporting the orchestra. Cathy
The Koffler Chamber Orchestra and its conductor Jacques Israelievitch
Jonasson – whose background is in visual art and design – became executive
director of the Koffler Centre in February
2014 after working for them as an outside
consultant. She praises the quality of the
orchestra’s performances and the dedication of Israelievitch and the musicians,
but is reluctant to separate a discussion
of the orchestra from the centre’s other
cultural activities (art exhibits, designer
sales, talks by authors, film screenings,
small-scale theatre, book awards.)
“The economics of it definitely began to
be a problem for us… we weren’t drawing a paying audience,” she noted. “What
was the ambition for the KCO? It wasn’t
consistent with the overall mandate of
contemporary culture that we were engaging with in all the other areas of our
program.”
Even in the early days, Israelievitch said
the level of marketing and publicity support from the Koffler Centre was “very
little.” He thinks it simply lost interest in
the orchestra.
“There were changes of staff, there
wasn’t that much continuity. It was always somebody different minding the
running… and there wasn’t that much
to run, but to make sure we had a venue
in which to perform and a place to rehearse,” he said. “We would arrive for a
rehearsal and they had the wrong room
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for us. Or the chairs or the music stands
were not there – we would be chasing the
janitors… We couldn’t contact anybody
about it… It was a little bit disorganized.
So it was kind of frustrating for us.”
In the past decade, the orchestra performed some 25 concerts in a variety of
venues, including two concerts at the
Conrad Centre for the Performing Arts in
Kitchener, Ont. They played in temples
throughout the GTA, in the Al Green Theatre at the Miles Nadal JCC, the Gladstone
Hotel downtown, the Glenn Gould Studio,
Hart House (University of Toronto), York
University, the Art Gallery of Ontario’s
Walker Court and the Music Gallery.
Meanwhile, the former site of the BJCC
near Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue remains an empty plot of land. It
isn’t clear when, or if, a prospective rebuilding of the BJCC will occur on the site.
“The board will decide in the next
couple of months whether to proceed,”
said Morris Zbar, CEO of the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. He suggested the
old building “wasn’t viable any more” and
in a state of disrepair. He said the recession set back the timetable for a possible
rebuilding. But that old building once
provided a home base for the chamber
orchestra.
“The original impetus for the KCO was
really an interesting one,” Jonasson said,
“and it made a lot of sense at the moment
it was put together. I think many things
have happened to the organization since
that time. It doesn’t fit our mandate as
well any more. If we’re involved in contemporary programming, if our education imperative is to reach young people
and develop a contemporary culture that
they identify with, it was becoming something that was tangential to that.”
Yet, to cite one example, the educational aspect of gifted young players working
alongside professionals in the orchestra
obviously had a positive effect on Jaime
Kruspe, a young KCO violinist who was
recently named the new assistant concertmaster of the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra.
And the orchestra, in fact, devoted much
attention to contemporary music over its
10-year existence, including a concert of
music by four Canadian women composers a year ago. It also performed contemporary works by Walter Buczynski, Ödön
Partos, Allan Gordon Bell, Gilles Maurice
Leclerc, Alexander Levkovich, Andrzej Panufnik and others.
In October 2013, the Koffler Centre
moved its administrative headquarters
from the Prosserman JCC campus to the
downtown Artscape near Queen Street
West, quite far from traditional centres
of Toronto Jewish life. Jonasson said this
move has helped broaden the audience
for the Koffler Gallery and other Koffler
Centre activity. “If the BJCC is ever rebuilt,
it’s not clear that the Koffler Centre would
be part of it,” she said.
Israelievitch is trying to resuscitate the
orchestra under other auspices. The orchestra would need a stable home for its
concerts, and a place to rehearse.
“Certainly the members of the orchestra, those that have pursued the activity
through thick and thin, they miss it – I
know they miss it, they are very sad to
have it stop,” Israelievitch said. n
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50
Books
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
A vibrant history of Toronto the Good
BILL GLADSTONE
SPECIAL TO THE CJN
Ambitious in scope and masterful in execution, Allan Levine’s panoramic portrait
of our city from its beginnings to the
present is sweeping and opinionated, judicious and clever, insightful and gossipy
all at once.
This is no dry academic survey, but a
lively, popular-style “biography” in the
mode of Peter Ackroyd’s London (2000)
and other popular histories of New York,
Paris and other cities. Told in chronological order, the story features a cast of hundreds, if not thousands, and a strong sense
of movement and theme.
The tale opens with the usual suspects
– Etienne Brûlé, Lt.-Gov. John Graves Simcoe, William Lyon Mackenzie and other
icons of the city’s infancy and adolescence
– who are measured against a series of
probing questions and insights. Was Brûlé
really the first European to arrive here?
Wouldn’t the city have become more interesting if, instead of Simcoe’s imposed
gridiron layout, the streets followed the
natural topography of rivers and ravines?
Chapter 4, “Orange and Green,” describes the endemic Orangeism of the predominantly WASP town and the ferocious
Protestant-Catholic clashes that became
frequent as a wave of Irish Catholics came
here after 1847. At the same time, the city
was absorbing a wave of black refugees,
fleeing slavery in the United States in
the pre-Civil War era. (As Levine notes, it
hadn’t been so many decades earlier that
slavery was tolerated here.)
These are the first thematic strands in a
recurrent discussion of Toronto’s multicultural fabric. Throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th, Levine observes, religious and class prejudice was
an ugly but uncontested fact of life. With
his roving and penetrating historian’s
eye, he also chronicles the rise of the industrial city and the automobile age, the
stranglehold of the Sunday blue laws, the
birth of Eaton’s and Simpsons and other
commercial colossi, and the 1872 printers’
strike and later clashes highlighting the
strengthening labour movement.
Goldwin Smith, the “Sage of the Grange,”
was Toronto’s most renowned literary
figure and a notorious anti-Semite. Levine, author of a dozen previous books
including a biography of prime minister
Mackenzie King, noted that Smith once
told King that the Jews “were poison in
the veins of the community.” King, under
whose watch the prohibitive “None Is Too
Many” policy against Jewish immigration
came into effect, held similar prejudices.
“No member of Toronto’s high society
(nor much of the rest of the city, for that
Levine excels at
integrating large
amounts of complex
information into a
flowing and satisfying
narrative
Toronto: Biography of A City
by Allan Levine
(Douglas & McIntyre)
Author Allan Levine
matter) would have been troubled by
such racist sentiments,” Levine writes.
“Anti-Semitism was too entrenched in
19th-century Canada – and continued to
be so until well after the Second World
War – for anyone to challenge or question
Smith’s opinions about Jews.”
But as Levine notes, there was also an
enduring philo-Semitism here too, a prevailing counterbalancing attitude of tolerance that helped to usher in a new vision
of Toronto as a cosmopolitan and multicultural haven.
As a historian, Levine crosses the proverbial Rubicon with the chapter titled
“The Ward,” which chronicles how Jewish,
Italian, Chinese and other ethnic immigrants changed the face of Toronto. It begins with a sketch of the life of J. B. Salsberg.
The importance Levine gives to the city’s
all-but-vanished Ward neighbourhood is
both unprecedented and welcome. Long
overlooked, this fascinating downtown
district was a landing ground for tens
of thousands of new Canadians in the
pre-World War I era, and was so densely
packed with immigrants that it was often
called “Toronto’s foreign quarter.” From
these mean streets came the new blood
that would challenge and transform the
Canadian establishment and Rosedale’s
dominance over the city’s commercial life.
In subsequent chapters Levine continues to spotlight a parade of Jewish
Torontonians – Nathan Phillips, Johnny
Wayne and Frank Shuster, Paul Godfrey,
Sam Sniderman, Mel Lastman, Heather
Reisman, the Reichmanns, Ed and David
Mirvish – who made major contributions
in diverse spheres. Italians, blacks, Asians
and a few other select minorities are also
highlighted, albeit to a lesser extent. As
Levine correctly observes, Jewish Torontonians, although always a small minority,
have played an enormous role in making
notable achievements, gaining prominence and influence, and shaping the city.
Levine excels at integrating large
amounts of complex information into a
flowing and satisfying narrative. Although
he covers an incredible amount of ground,
his pen never seems to grow tired or dull
– not even when he is marshalling evidence to show how Hogtown the Good
was considered dull as dishwater for decades. (Ernest Hemingway thought the city
was stuffy and boring; Emma Goldman
thought it was deadly dull “because it’s
church-ridden – Toronto people are smug
and don’t think for themselves.”)
Although based in Winnipeg, Levine
shows how well he understands the city,
which became Canada’s most populous
metropolis after the Montreal exodus of
the late 1970s and 1980s. He covers the
media, hockey, business, the arts and
much more. If there’s a flaw in his social
history, it’s that he pays too much attention to the movers and shakers, and not
enough to the lower classes, the low-paid
workers and the nameless throngs who inhabit the sprawling ’burbs.
The lurid tales of excessive drinking and
cursing from the 19th century, like the
class struggles and snobbish arrogance
of the business elites, help us understand
the city that was. Occasionally, we are
given instances of Toronto’s restrictive
morals, as when an 18-year-old white girl
was charged in 1939 for being “incorrigible” because she was living with a Chinese waiter – her infant was taken from
her and became a ward of the state. More
such stories would have been welcome,
even if it meant cropping the hagiographic bios of, for instance, Peter C. Newman
and other celebrated writers and moguls.
(When writing about the Toronto “establishment,” Levine’s writing style seems
to become cloyingly expansive and Newmanesque.)
Levine’s discussion of the John SewellDavid Crombie era, characterized by a
“clash of visions” over development, bristles with insight. He is equally savvy about
Mel Lastman, David Miller, and even June
Rowlands, who is perhaps best remembered for banning the Barenaked Ladies
from Nathan Phillips Square. And his
coverage of the Rob Ford mayoralty is pure
confection, like the candy figures atop a
wedding cake. His summation of the Ford
years (ending before Ford’s dramatic withdrawal from his re-election campaign for
health reasons) is simply superb.
“Throughout this poor excuse for a sordid reality TV show, Ford, backed by his
brother and lone ally, Coun. Doug Ford,
steadfastly refused to resign. Each day
in November 2013 brought yet another
heartfelt apology from the mayor, blaming
the ‘tremendous, tremendous stress’ he
was under, which he admitted was ‘largely
of my own making,’ but always framed in
a narcissistic construct that portrayed him
as a champion of the people and the only
bulwark against taxpayer abuse.”
Let’s face it: for a writer like Levine, a mayor like Ford is a gift from heaven. And, for
all of us who love Toronto, so is this book.
Toronto: Biography of a City is a timely, vibrant history of our modern megacity as it
comes of age – bursting at the seams even
as it confronts the numerous problems
(traffic congestion, homelessness, urban
sprawl) that loom as never before. ■
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
Food
T
51
Meatballs for dinner
EILEEN GOLTZ
SPECIAL TO THE CJN
There are a few tricks that can turn a regular
meatball recipe into a spectacular one. First
and foremost, there’s nothing worse than a
bland meatball. The kind of meat you use,
what you add and how you cook (and for
how long) are key to getting the perfect mix
of flavour, fat, seasoning and sauce.
You can, of course use beef or ground
lamb, turkey or chicken. Just remember
the more fat in the meat you use, the more
tender the meatball will be. The less fat
you use, the tougher the meatballs will be
if you overcook them.
I have discovered that the less you mix
up the meat and other ingredients, the
better the consistency of the cooked
meatball. You can use a spoon or spatula
to mix, but I think mixing everything up
with your hands, just until combined, is
the best way to go.
There is a real debate in the food world
as to the best way to cook a meatball –
simmer or roast. For the easy answer to
which method to use, look at what the end
product will be. If the meatballs are going
into a sandwich, being frozen to use later,
or being served with a dipping sauce,
roast them. If they are being served in a
sauce, then cook them right in the sauce
The following recipes are easy to throw
together when time is short and the hunger level is high. All the recipes can easily
be doubled or tripled.
Crock Pot Sweet And Sour
Meatballs
o 1 can pineapple chunks in juice
o 1 green bell pepper, cut into chunks
o 1 can sliced water chestnuts, drained
o 1/2 cup brown sugar
o 2 tbsp. cornstarch
o 2 tbsp. soy sauce
o 2 tbsp. lemon juice
o 1 lb. ground beef or chicken
Roll the beef into golf ball size balls.
Place them on cookie sheet and set
them aside. Pour pineapple chunks with
juice into a saucepan. Stir in green bell
pepper, water chestnuts, brown sugar,
cornstarch, soy sauce and lemon juice
until sugar and cornstarch dissolve.
Bring the mixture to a boil. Cook and stir
until thickened, about 10 minutes. Place
meatballs into a crock pot. Pour pineapple mixture over meatballs. Cook on
medium for 3 hours. Serves 4 over rice.
Thai Turkey Meatballs With Peanut Sauce
Meatball Soup
o 1 can stewed tomatoes
o 1 cup cooked rice
o 2 tbsp. oil
o 1 cup red onion, diced
o 1 tbsp. minced garlic
o 1 beaten egg
o 2 lb. ground beef
o 1/2 tsp. cumin
o 1/2 tsp. oregano
o 3 tbsp. fresh parsley
o 1/2 tsp. salt
o 1/2 tsp. pepper
o 6 cups beef broth
o 2 carrots, diced
o 1 cup shredded cabbage
o 2 stalks celery, chopped, for garnish
o 1 avocado, chopped, for garnish
o 1 tomato, diced, for garnish
onion mixture for 5 minutes. In a blender, combine the tomatoes and onion
mixture. Process until smooth.
In a bowl, combine the egg, ground
beef, cumin, oregano, parsley, salt and
pepper and rice. Mix to combine. Wet
your hands to mix and form the mixture
into golf ball sized balls. Heat the oil in
a skillet and then cook the meatballs in
batches. They should be slightly golden
and crusty on the outside. Set aside on
a plate.
In a stock pot, combine the tomato
mixture and beef stock. Heat to a boil
and then reduce to a simmer. Add the
carrots and cabbage. Add the meatballs
to the soup, cover and cook at a simmer
for 20 to 30 minutes. Ladle the soup into
4 bowls and top with the diced avocado,
celery and fresh tomato. Serves 4.
In a skillet, heat the oil, then sauté the
onions and garlic (don’t clean the pan
when done, just set it aside). Cook the
Submitted by Angie Macelroy
Southfield, Mich.
o 1 1/2 lb. ground turkey
o 1 heaping tbsp. minced garlic
o 2 in. fresh ginger, peeled and minced
o 2 jalapeño chilies, seeded and minced
(you can use 1/2 a red bell pepper instead)
o 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
o 1 egg
o 1 tbsp. sesame oil
o 1/2 cup peanut butter
o 1 tbsp. soy sauce
o 1 tbp. ketchup
o 2 tbsp. oil
o 1/2 cup hot water
o salt and pepper
To make the dipping sauce, combine
the peanut butter, soy sauce, ketchup
and 1/2 cup hot water in a bowl. Whisk
until smooth.
In a mixing bowl combine the turkey, garlic, ginger, chili pepper, basil,
egg, and pinch of salt and pepper. Mix
to combine. Shape the mixture into
1-1/2-inch balls. In a skillet, heat the
oil. Cook the meatballs, turning as they
cook. They can burn, so watch and
turn them frequently for 10 to 15 minutes and they should be done. Serve
immediately with the dipping sauce.
Serves 4. n
52
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Nov. 20 - Nov. 27
by Lila Sarick
Thursday, Nov. 20
TORAH STITCH BY STITCH
Temma Gentles combines learning
about the Stitch by Stitch project with
hands-on work, Tuesdays, Nov. 25- Dec. 9,
7:30 p.m., Holy Blossom Temple.
Jews of ETHIOPIA
Judi Oron, author of Cry of the Giraffe,
discusses “The Jews of Ethiopia,” 7:30
p.m., Holy Blossom Temple.
BOOK REVIEW
Naomi Wittlin reviews American Dervish
by Akhtar Ayaad, 8 p.m., Adath Israel
Synagogue. $10/$15. For more information, Beverley 416-499-6920.
BOOKS AND BISCOTTI
Elaine Newton reviews All the Light We
Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. Dessert
at 1 p.m., review at 1:30 p.m., Temple
Emanu-El, $10.
BEST JEWISH BOOKS
Arnold Ages reviews American Post-Judaism, Identity and Renewal in a Postethnic
Society by Shaul Magid, 7:30 p.m. Beth
Tzedek Synagogue.
Friday, Nov. 21
SCHOLAR IN RESIDENCE
Rabbi Yonason Sacks is the scholar in
residence this weekend at Beth Avraham
Yosef Synagogue of Toronto. He will discuss “Ratzon HaTorah: Beyond the Taryag
Mitzvos.”
Saturday, Nov. 22
.
Sock hop
Na’amat Toronto Clubs Dayan, Ilana and
Tamar hold a Sock Hop, Bialik Hebrew
Day School, 2760 Bathurst St. Tickets
$36/$40. Call 416-636-5425 or
naamattoronto.com.
HERZL
Derek Penslar discusses “Theodor Herzl:
Man of letters and modern-day prophet,”
1:30 p.m., First Narayever Congregation.
OFF THE CHARTS CONCERT
Alex Saslove and Justin Raisbeck perform their “Off the Charts Concert,”
7:30 p.m., Temple Har Zion. $20/$25. For
tickets, 905-889-2252 or [email protected]
templeharzion.com.
Sunday, Nov. 23
THE NEW MOON
Aviva Chernick leads a Rosh Chodesh
Deadline Reminder:
The deadline for the issue of Dec. 4 is
Nov. 24. All deadlines are at noon.
Phone 416-391-1836, ext. 269; email
[email protected]
The Rescue
A film about José Arturo Castellanos, former consul general of
El Salvador in Geneva who saved thousands of lives during the
Holocaust by issuing visas and nationality papers, was shown
recently to Na’amat members and guests in Toronto. The Rescue was
made by his grandsons, Boris and Alvaro Castellanos. From left: Boris
Castellanos; Gerry Anklewicz, president of Na’amat Toronto; Alvaro
Castellanos and Roni Maderer,vice-president of Na’amat Toronto.
celebration with song and contemplation, 7:30 p.m., Beth Sholom Synagogue.
RSVP at www.bethsholom.net.
governor Jeb Bush is the guest speaker,
Beth Torah Congregation. For tickets, call
416-781-3584 or www.fromtheheartsz.ca.
Nutrition AND YOUR BRAIN
Dr. Carol Greenwood discusses “Nutrition,
vitality and your brain,” 11:30 a.m., Beth
Emeth Synagogue. Brunch and talk, $10.
TORAH AND SUSHI
Rabbi Micah Streiffer discusses Pirkei
Avot at Sano Sushi, 8143 Yonge St., noon.
RSVP [email protected]
HIDDEN CHILD SURVIVOR
Leah Kaufman discusses her experiences
as a hidden child survivor of the Holocaust, 8 p.m., Aish Thornhill Community
Shul, 949 Clark Ave. W., Thornhill.
UNWORTHY CREATURE
Aruna Papp and Barbara Kay discuss
their book Unworthy Creature about
“honour killing,” 7:30 p.m., Leo Baeck
Day School, 36 Atkinson Ave., Thornhill.
$30. Presented by Canadian Hadassa-Wizo. For tickets, call 416-630-8373 or
[email protected]
Monday, Nov. 24
FILMs BEFORE THE BLACKLIST
Stuart Hands looks at Jewish films before
the blacklist. Tonight, Marked Woman,
7:30 p.m., Holy Blossom Temple.
SHAARE ZEDEK FUNDRAISER
Senator Linda Frum is honoured at
Canadian Shaare Zedek Hospital Foundation’s “From the Heart” event. Former
SICK IS NOT WEAK
Sports television personality Michael
Landsberg discusses his personal experiences with mental illness, 7:30 p.m.,
Beth Tzedec Synagogue. No charge.
Wednesday, Nov. 26
Mollie Rothman PHOTO
Art & GENEALOGY WORKSHOPS
Shaar Shalom Synagogue offers a holistic
art workshop, 12:30 p.m. $15/$25. A genealogy workshop is offered at 7:30 p.m.
FRONTRUNNERS
The film Niigaanibatowaad: FrontRunners, about Aboriginal runners who
carried the torch to the 1967 PanAm
games in Winnipeg but were denied
entry to the stadium will be shown at
Temple Sinai, 7 p.m. Two of the original
frontrunners and the playwright will be
guest speakers.
RAISING RESPONSIBLE KIDS
Dr. Allen Mendler discusses “Keys to
raising responsible kids,” 7:30 p.m., Leo
Baeck Day School, South campus, 501
Arlington Ave. RSVP [email protected]
Tuesday, Nov. 25
LUNCH AND LEARN
Marilyn Herbert reviews A Guide to the
Perplexed by Dara Horn, 12:15 p.m., Beth
Tikvah Synagogue’s lunch and learn program. $20. RSVP 416-221-3433, ext. 352.
REEL AND SPIEL
Beth Emeth Synagogue shows the film
Crossing Delancey with introduction by
Bruria Cooperman, 7 p.m. $5.
ONE-ARMED WARRIOR
IDF squad commander Izzy Ezagui who
lost his dominant arm in combat in 2011
and returned to fight, speaks at Chabad
of Markham, 8 p.m. RSVP 905-886-0420,
ext. 221.
Thursday, Nov. 27
MAIMONIDES AND HALEVI
Rabbi Baruch Frydman-Kohl discusses
“Maimonides and Halevi: Convenant,
conversion and who is a Jew,” 7:30 p.m.,
Temple Har Zion.
GREAT JEWISH BOOKS
Arnold Ages reviews The Origins of Jewish Self Hatred, by Paul Reiter, 7:30 p.m.,
Beth Tzedec Congregation.
YOUR DNA IS NOT DESTINY
Dr. Jennifer Pearlman discusses “Your
DNA is not your destiny,” 7:30 p.m.,
Temple Sinai. $10/$15.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
Coming Events
EMPLOYMENT WORKSHOP
JVS holds employment workshops every Thursday at 10 a.m.
Call 416-649-1688.
VISION IMPAIRED CLUB
The VIP Club (Vision Impaired Persons)
club is celebrating Chanukah Dec. 1,
7:30 p.m. at the Bernard Betel Centre,
1002 Steeles Ave. W. with music and a
dinner. $18/$21. RSVP Bess
905-508-2892.
SMALL WONDERS
Small Wonders, which supports Jewish
couples experiencing infertility, is hosting “A Night of Wonder” at Holt Renfrew, 50 Bloor St. E., Dec. 8. For tickets,
visit smallwonders.ca or 416-742-0090.
SUPPORT FOR ABUSED WOMEN
The Legal Information Service of Act
to End Violence Against Women offers
legal support and guidance to Jewish
women who have experienced abuse.
Free. Call 905-695-5374 or email
[email protected]
JF&CS Groups
GROUPS AND WORKSHOPS
Registration is required for all
programs. Classes are open to all
members of the community. Fee
reductions available. Call Shawna
Sidney, 416-638-7800, ext. 6215, or visit
www.jfandcs.com. All classes at Lipa
Green Centre, 4600 Bathurst St., unless
noted.
❱ Parenting the child/teen with ADHD:
A 4-session group for parents. Call for
pre-group assessment. Starts Nov. 20,
7 p.m.
❱ Beyond the chuppah, becoming a
couple: A 2-session marriage preparation group for couples who are
going to be married in the next year.
Nov. 23 and Nov. 30, 11 a.m., Adath
Israel Synagogue.
❱ Demystifying Alzheimers and dementia: A workshop for anyone wanting to
learn about dementia. Nov. 25, 7 p.m.
BEREAVED JEWISH FAMILIES
Bereaved Jewish Families of Ontario
provides 8-week self-help groups to
bereaved parents. Call Beth Feffer,
416-638-7800, ext. 6244, or email
[email protected]
For Seniors
❱ Adult 55+ Miles Nadal JCC. Mystery
author Howard Shrier discusses his
books, Nov. 27, 11 a.m., followed by
a program on “Klezmer in the new
world.” Email [email protected] or
416-924-6211, ext. 155.
❱ Adult 55+ Fitness, Miles Nadal JCC.
What’s New
T
Pickleball, Thursdays and Sundays,
9:30-11:30 a.m. 416-924-6211, ext. 526
or [email protected]
❱ Bernard Betel Centre. 416-225-2112.
Nov. 25, Gerald Ziedenberg discusses
“The making of Fiddler on the Roof,”
10 a.m.; Nov. 26, Retirement fair,
11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Nov. 27, lecture on back
pain, 1:30 p.m.
❱ Earl Bales Seniors Club.
416-395-7881. Chanukah with live
entertainment, Dec. 18, noon. Casino
Woodbine, Dec. 10; Seniors balance
and co-ordination class, Tuesdays
10 a.m.; Social bridge, Thursdays,
12:30 p.m.
❱ Adath Israel Congregation.
Wednesday afternoon socials. Bridge,
mah-jong, Rummikub, 12:30 p.m.
Call Sheila, 416-665-3333 or Judi
416-785-0941.
❱ Shaar Shalom. Play duplicate bridge
Mondays, 1:30 p.m. Lessons, 12:30 p.m.
905-889-4975.
❱ Beth Emeth. Experienced mah-jong
and Rummikub players meet Mondays
and Wednesdays. 416-633-3838.
❱ Temple Har Zion. Play mah-jong
Wednesday afternoons. Email
[email protected]
❱ Beth Tzedec Synagogue. Play bridge
Thursdays 1:30-4 p.m., mah-jong,
2-4 p.m. Call Maureen, 416-781-3514.
❱ New Horizons is a Jewish Hungarian
seniors club open three times a
week. Kosher food and trips. Call
416-256-1892.
❱ Chabad of Markham offers lunch and
learn classes for seniors with Rabbi
Meir Gitlin, Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.
for women; Fridays at 10 a.m. for men.
Call 905-886-0420 or email [email protected]
chabadmarkham.org
❱ Association of Jewish Seniors. Jack
Pinkus discusses “Safe medication
use.” Nov. 20. Breakfast at 9:30 a.m.,
meeting at 10, Shaarei Shomayim
Synagogue, 470 Glencairn Ave.
Chanukah lunch, Dec. 18. RSVP
416-635-2900, ext. 458.
❱ Circle of Care Exercise class. Free
exercise classes offered at Shaarei
Tefillah Congregation, Mondays
1:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 3 p.m.
416-787-1631.
❱ Feldenkrais awareness through
movement, Edithvale Community
Centre, Mondays, 10 a.m.
416-665-9050.
Prosserman JCC
Sherman Campus, 4588 Bathurst St.,
416-638-1881, www.prossermanjcc.
com. To register for programs call
ext. 4235.
❱ Stroke recovery and Parkinson’s support and fitness group meets Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays 9:15 a.m.
❱ Kevin Courrier examines how psycho-
therapy is depicted in movies and on
television, Wednesdays Dec. 3-17, 1 p.m.
❱ Leon Soriano teaches acrylic painting, starting Jan. 13, 10:30 a.m.
❱ Learn to play bridge, starts Jan. 19,
10 a.m.
❱ Yiddish group meets Mondays at
1:30 p.m. for good conversation.
Miles Nadal JCC
750 Spadina Ave. 416-924-6211,
www.mnjcc.org
❱ Daytime choir meets with Gillian
Stecyk, Tuesdays, 1 p.m.; Open community choir meets Mondays,
7:30 p.m. Email [email protected] Join
the klezmer ensemble, conducted by
Eric Stein, Tuesdays 7:30 p.m.
❱ Kevin Courrier discusses the Beatles.
Nov. 24, “Fixing a hole: The seeds of
breakup,” 7 p.m.
❱ Jonno Lightstone discusses “Klezmer
in the New World,” Nov. 20 and Nov. 27,
1:30 p.m.
❱ Adult education about Shabbat, led
by Annie Matan, Nov. 30, 9:30 a.m.
❱ Teen time. A program for kids in
grades 7-8, sponsored by Camp
Gesher/Habonim Dror, Nov. 23, 1 p.m.;
KatKa Team for children in grades 2-6,
Nov. 30, 1 p.m. Email [email protected]
53
gmail.com.
❱ Collective Memories by Peter
Barelkowski is in the gallery until
Nov. 30.
❱ Will Stroet, star of CBC’s Will's
Jams performs Nov. 30, 11 a.m. For
tickets, www.algreentheatre.ca or
604-727-4413.
❱ Israeli family Kabalat Shabbat,
Nov. 28, 5:30 -7:30 p.m. $10 for adults,
kids free.
❱ Michael Bernstein Chapel holds
services Thursdays at 7:15 a.m.;
Sundays at 8 a.m. Coleman Bernstein,
416-968-0200.
Schwartz/
Reisman Centre
Lebovic Campus, 9600 Bathurst St.
905-303-1821. To register for programs,
call ext. 3025
❱ Beginner mah-jong starts Jan. 13.
❱ Learn to play bridge, starts Feb. 5.
❱ Class on Experimental Mix Media
starts Jan. 14, 7 p.m.
❱ JCC book club discusses Me Before
You, Nov. 25, 7 p.m.
❱ Suzanne Metz teaches “Fundamentals
of drawing and painting,” starting
Jan. 14, 10 a.m. n
54
Social Scene
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
MARRIED WITH KIDS
When the mighty fall
Lauren Kramer
I
’m an avid fan of CBC Radio and until recently the melodic voice of Jian Ghomeshi
would waft into my car as I’d settle into a
long drive. The stress of traffic delays, lousy
weather and bad drivers would melt away
over the course of Ghomeshi’s interviews
with interesting personalities. His questions
were gently prodding, intelligent, reflective
and informed. As a listener, it seemed he
loved his work and that his interview subjects were thrilled to be in his company.
So like most other Ghomeshi fans, I was
stunned last month when allegations about
his sexual violence were revealed. The testimonies were so far removed from the man
whose voice comforted me over the sound
waves. The Ghomeshi described by the alleged victims of his abuse was rough, disrespectful, egomaniacal and sexually deviant.
The man whose voice I thought I knew was
smart, kind and polite. I keep wondering:
how could the two be so far apart?
In Washington D.C., those who attended
Rabbi Barry Freundel’s sermons have been
shocked by a similar disconnect. The man
who preached against pornography and
sexual deviance and supposedly upheld the
highest standards of kashrut and general
Jewish law was caught in the act of voyeurism with a $250 alarm-clock camera.
Though not violent, his betrayal was a total
violation of privacy, an intrusion into his female congregants’ most private moments.
And this from a man who was known for
dismissing rabbis he believed were his
intellectual inferiors.
There’s something spitefully satisfying
about seeing the mighty when they’ve
fallen, those individuals who’ve established
themselves in lofty, high places where
they had so much respect and approval
from their audiences that they considered
themselves safe from public scrutiny. Safe
enough to release their yetzer hara, their
evil inclinations, without fear of reprisal.
In the cases of both Rabbi Freundel and
Ghomeshi, those inclinations may be
traced back several years, a long pattern of
deviance that left many silent questioners,
but no one brave enough to come forward
with allegations until October 2014.
We all have secrets we think are safe
from others, shadows from our past we’d
rather forget than highlight. They’re our
personal character lapses, moments we’ve
been dishonest or unkind in our relationships, incidents we’d rather blot out
so we can focus on how far we’ve come
since then and how much better a person
we are today. Were we in the limelight
occupied by public personas like Rob
Ford, Jian Ghomeshi or Barry Freundel,
perhaps some of those flaws and weaknesses would become public knowledge,
as skeletons from our past collected to
speak of those wrongdoings and together
made a case against us. It’s a disconcerting
thought. What would they say? How would
their words reflect on the upright individual we’ve strived to become?
Most of us will never know because we
neither preach moral rectitude like Rabbi
Freundel did, nor do we occupy a position
like Ghomeshi’s, until recently the “star”
and public face of CBC Radio. I’m not
suggesting we pity these men for the mess
in which they’ve ensnared themselves, an
apparent lengthy web of lies and cover-ups
that have finally come to light. But perhaps
the smug satisfaction we get from witnessing their fall from glory is wrong, too.
Like us, they’re just very flawed people
who happen to be in public places where
we expect more from them. Are those
expectations unreasonable? In our Jewish
congregations, how many rabbis are hiding
secrets behind the moral rectitude they
preach, the “I’m-too-holy-to-warrant-anyinvestigation” aura they exude?
“The lack of sexual morality that pervades
this society is all over the place and the
Orthodox community is not immune from
this,” Rabbi Freundel told the Washington
Jewish Week last month. Who knew he was
speaking about his own alleged weaknesses? “I have always operated on the principle
of doing my best to maintain a dignity and
a commitment to openness and truth,”
Ghomeshi wrote Oct. 26, in a lengthy Facebook posting. Maybe his best just wasn’t
good enough.
Or maybe our expectations are just way
out of whack. At any rate, the two men
have a lot in common. They’re both deeply
flawed individuals, and they both thought
they could get away with their allegedly bad
behaviour. ■
SeeJN | Kids remember
Recalling
the fallen
The children at the Thomas and Marjorie Schwartz Preschool
Centre participated in a Remembrance Day ceremony at the Miles
Nadal JCC. They sang Heenay Matov, a song about living in peace, to
the veterans, in Hebrew, English and French, and they presented
them with poppies they had painted. Pictured, are World War II
veteran Max Dankner with preschoolers Caleb Perlis and Khloe
Berenbaum.
On Remembrance Day,
Jewish war veteran Alan
Simons placed a wreath at
the cenotaph at Toronto’s
Old City Hall on behalf
of Jewish War Veterans
of Canada, the Centre for
Israel and Jewish Affairs
and UJA Federation of
Greater Toronto.
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
55
T
Toldot | Genesis 25:19 - 28:9
Maharat Abby Brown Scheier contemplates the challenges of spousal communication
Rabbi Denise Handlarski says Rebecca’s story reminds us of the power of mothers
Rabbi Yirmi Cohen exhibits further proof that Judaism thrives against all odds
Maharat Abby Brown Scheier
Rabbi Denise Handlarski
Rabbi Yirmi Cohen
R
I
n Toldot, the matriarchal figure Rebecca, like Sarah
before her, is infertile. Once she does conceive, the
text says that “the children struggled in her womb,”
(25:19) which causes her to ask God why does she live/
exist? (25: 22).
This question strikes me as crucial to the experience
of being a woman. Not all women choose to become
mothers, but many who do find that it can be a
struggle. I know many women who have had trouble
conceiving, and I know that this can cut at the core of
how we see ourselves in the world. If I cannot become
a parent as I had planned, then why do I exist? Of
course, the existential question is a challenge that we
all must answer as we endeavour to make meaning of
our lives.
Rebecca’s children, Jacob and Esau, represent
many things – from sibling rivalry to the politics of
inheritance to conflict between nations. Their story is
fraught and fascinating. They jockey for their father’s
love and his blessing. Jacob tricks Isaac into blessing
him instead of his elder brother.
It is Rebecca who orchestrates the ruse, for she
believes Jacob is the better choice for continuing
the line and fulfilling the Abrahamic promise. Many
commentaries focus on how Isaac could be so easily
tricked, and on the relationship between the brothers.
But it behooves us to remember Rebecca and the
role she plays. This parshah begins with the theme
of motherhood. Rebecca is matriarch not only to her
family, but to the generations and nations that spring
from them. Her invisible hand in the events of the
story reminds us of the invisible hands of generations
of women who are not recognized but who were
instrumental in the unfolding of events in our families
and communities. n
P
Rabbi Denise Handlarski is assistant rabbi with
Oraynu Congregation for Humanistic Judaism in
Toronto.
Rabbi Yirmi Cohen is rabbi of Ohalei Yoseph Yitzchak
Congregation in Toronto.
ebecca is a woman of words and action. She offers
Abraham’s servant water, and she draws water for
his camels. She challenges her family and leaves home
for Canaan. She talks to God when her pregnancy is
difficult. She convinces her son Jacob to take Esau’s
blessing, and she devises a plan to make it happen.
Clearly, Rebecca is comfortable articulating her
thoughts. She makes an emotional plea to Isaac about
the terrible choice of wives for their son Jacob. Perhaps
this is a way to send Jacob away from his brother Esau
(and perhaps this is also to ensure that Jacob’s marriage will be better than her own). However, Rebecca
speaks to her husband only this one time. Why does
she have difficulty communicating with Isaac? Their first encounter can be seen as a foreshadowing
of their relationship. Upon arrival from Haran, Rebecca
sees a man approaching – she is so taken by him that
she falls off her camel! She then learns that this man is
indeed her future husband, and she immediately covers
herself with a veil. According to Rabbi Naftali Zvi Yehudah Berlin
(19th-century Germany), this moment sets the tone
for their future relationship. Rebecca sees something
in Isaac that is overwhelming and unusual. She feels
unworthy and she covers up, hiding from him and
establishing a distance that will persist throughout their
marriage.
Tragically, Rebecca – the great communicator – cannot communicate with her husband. Her veil symbolically shields her from Isaac. Perhaps she is afraid of
all that he has experienced, in particular being bound
on the altar by his father; perhaps she is afraid that she
will never understand or know him.
In our relationships as well, we seek to remove the
veils of misunderstanding, and we learn from our matriarchs and patriarchs the challenges and benefits of
effective spousal communication. n
Maharat Abby Brown Scheier is a Judaic Studies teacher
in Montreal, where she lives with her husband and four
daughters.
arshat Toldot begins with the verse stating that
Isaac was the offspring of Abraham.
We are told that the birth of Isaac was a miracle and
above nature, because of Abraham and Sarah’s ripe old
age. This is indeed the Jewish People’s story – we are a
miracle, above nature and above reason.
We exist and we thrive against all odds.
Let us recognize the miracles of God’s hand in our
own life.
There were miracles in Israel this past summer –
with God watching over us, we saw more than 3,000
rockets shot at us, but hardly any casualties. And we
experience a miracle in just being outside, seeing the
leaves change colours and God’s beautiful world.
Our forefather Abraham taught us to recognize God
in our life. He taught us not to be afraid of the world,
but to be in the world itself and to be an example to all.
The whole world was against him, yet he never lost his
faith in God, and even influenced the world.
So it is too with us. There are many challenges we
face, yet we know that God is watching over us. Let
us study more Torah and do more mitzvot to increase
God’s blessing to us.
Abraham had an open tent and was hospitable to all
people. He taught them to thank God for everything.
And God blessed Abraham with wealth, because he
gave charity, so let us give more charity to good causes.
When we put on kosher tfillin, and we light Shabbat
candles, as we saw with the recent wonderful Shabbat
Project, it helps us and our friends in Israel live in true
unity.
Surely all this causes our Father in heaven much joy
and naches, and with God’s help, as all these mitzvot
from all generations accumulate, He will reward us by
sending the Mashiach in our day. Amen! n
56
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
NOVEMBER 20, 2014
CLASSIFIED 416-391-1836
5 HOUSES FOR SALE
130 fLoRiDA
PRoPERTy
130
FLORIDA
foR
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Serving the GTA since 1986
ROYAL LEPAGE GOLDEN RIDGE REALTY INC., Brokerage
7100 Woodbine Ave. #111, Markham 905-513-8878
Thank You LoWER VILLaGE GaTE JUST SO
We Are So Pleased To Announce A 3rd Transaction
This Year. We Just Love This Property
And Are Very Happy To Bring Our Buyer’s Here.
It’s The Very Best Location A Condominium Can Be.
Please Call Us If You Have About 1,700 Square Feet
LD
ARLEN HOUSE EAST: 1 bdrm
convertible apt in Sunny Isles, Fla.
from mid Dec./14, min.3 mths. 2
TV’s & 2 wshrms. Overlooking
pool & Inter-coastal. $2000/mo.
Call Rita: 416-484-9324
Reliab
experi
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Del’s C
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416-74
Cold in Canada…
Florida Real Estate is HOT
35 ConDominiumS
Property Searches at your Leisure
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240 EmPLoymEnT
YES, we Practice Excellent
Customer Service
oPPoRTuniTiES
130 fLoRiDA
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343 Clark, indoor
250
DomESTiC
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PRoPERTy
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905-881-8380
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[email protected]
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South/sunny, on VIP
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3 bdr/ 3 1/2 baths furn’d. All you able.
Inverary-2bd/2
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on golfWe
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[email protected]
will
Please call
416-546-5380.
huge
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Call
905-881-8380
need. Valet, health
club, billiards,
Jan. respond
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30your
or a application
part;1900/
only
New Oceanfront
Development
Del’s
Cleaning
Service, we
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NoIsles
pets.Beach,
3 mos.Florida
mth.
Call
416-733-0411
ex.clean
23
if
your
qualifications
match
our
Sunny
offices, houses and renmin. $6900./mo.
Call 917-273-1630 condo’s,
current
needs.
75 APARTmEnTS
Hollywood,
South/sunny,
on
ovation
clean
up,
after
party
clean,
South
Florida
Real
Estate
Professional
JEFFREY JOSEPH, Broker 416-782-7000
foR
REnT
ARLEN HOUSE
EAST:
1 bdrm
beach, luxurious Ocean Palms,
416-743-8155
Specializing
in Sunny
Isles, Bal Harbour
Harvey Kalles Real Estate Ltd Brokerage
convertible apt in Sunny
Isles,Beach
Fla.
3 bdr/ 3 1/2 baths furn’d. All you
and South
from
mid Dec./14,
min.3
mths.
2
need. Valet, health club, billiards,
Spacious
2 bdrm.
+
1 indoor
pkg.
CONTACT
ME
TODAY
TV’s
2 wshrms.
Overlooking
spot. &
Brand
new appliances,
pool/ tennis, concierge. No pets. 3 mos.
3 4 C A R S C A D D E N D R I V E pool
& Inter-coastal. $2000/mo.
75 APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
www.JodiPuder.com
fitness ctre.
Bath. & Eglinton area. min. $6900./mo. Call 917-273-1630
Bathurst/Sheppard. Country feel Call
Rita: 416-484-9324
3
min
walk
to
Glencairn
subway. ARLEN HOUSE EAST: 1 bdrm
in the city, spacious, bright, clean
888.291.8810
mile Disney,
Westgate
apt., renovated, quiet ravine set- Orlando,
Walk to 1parks,
shops,
Village convertible apt in Sunny Isles, Fla.
Villas, 2 bdrm/2bath,
ting off main street.
TTC.
bdrm. Vacation
2&
Shul. $1350/mo.
avail. Sept. from mid Dec./14, min.3 mths. 2
3 Be2drm
s
sleeps 8. Many amenities. Avail.
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416-398-9424
ila Feb/
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PROPERTY
FOR RENT$2000/mo.
!
LARGE 2 & 3 Bedrooms Suites
Dec.
28-Jan.4/15,
Marnow
Call 905-474-3600 orble
416Bathurst/Sheppard.
Country
feel
477-2314; [email protected]
Call Rita: 416-484-9324
638-6813.
available. Large rooms, eat in kitchen,
in the city,
spacious,
bright, clean
130
fLoRiDA
Sunny
Isles BeachSants
Pointe
some with 2 bathrooms, lots of
apt., renovated,
quiet
ravine
set- Orlando, 1 mile Disney, Westgate
PRoPERTy
penthouse
2 + 22 bdrm.
avail.
Vacation Villas, 2 bdrm/2bath,
ting off maincondo.,
street. TTC.
closet space, large balcony, central
foR
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Ocean
view
from
each
room.
sleeps 8. Many amenities. Avail.
avail.
immed.,
1
bdrm.
avail.
Feb/
a/c, freshly painted and refinished
Direct
beach
access, avail.
from
Dec. 28-Jan.4/15, $950 U.S. 647Mar
Call
905-474-3600
or
416B”HNo
Hallandale
Intercoastal, 477-2314; [email protected]
floors. Ceramic tiles. Parking available,
Jan.
pets. 847-833-8614.
638-6813.
crn.unit acrs. frm. bch. 2 bdr./2
270 www.twoneptune.ca
indoor pool and whirlpool, sauna.
35 ConDominiumS
bath.min3mths.Nov-April/15. Sunny Isles Beach- Sants Pointe
penthouse condo., 2 + 2 avail.
foR for
REnT
75 APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
905
765-6141
Call: 416-931-2206 or 416-663-8662
appoint.
240
EmPLoymEnT
Ocean view from each room.
Direct
beach access, avail. from
oPPoRTuniTiES
Conservatory, 343 Clark, indoor
Jan. No pets. 847-833-8614.
pkg., 2 bdrm. + solar., large kit,
160 iSRAEL
270 www.twoneptune.ca
A Gen.
Studies teacher is needterrace. Call 905-881-8380
35 ConDominiumS
PRoPERTy
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for
Grade
5 in
an
Orthodox
1 & 2 bedrooms.
34 CARSCADDEN DRIVE
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ace
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We will
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75 APARTmEnTS
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Listen
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birds
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a
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forest
setting.
Beautiful,
spacious,
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s.f., 3 bdrm. renov. PH, 3 bath, Please send resumes to [email protected]
renovated units available.
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mostly adult
building. TTC. We will
Call
huge terrace.
Call 905-881-8380
Spacious 2 bdrm. + 1 indoor pkg.
only respond to your application
2
Bedroom
available.
or
if your qualifications match our
spot. Brand new appliances, pool/
current needs.
75 APARTmEnTS
fitness ctre. Bath. & Eglinton area.
Please call for information
to book an appointment:
foRor
REnT
3 min walk to Glencairn subway.
Walk to parks, shops,Donna
Village Goldenberg: [email protected]
Spacious 2 bdrm. + 1 indoor pkg.
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•
spot. Brand new appliances, pool/
416-398-9424
WE LOOK FORWARD
WELCOMING
fitness ctre.TO
Bath.
& Eglinton area. YOU HOME
3 min walk to Glencairn subway.
130 fLoRiDA
Walk to parks, shops, Village
PRoPERTy
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foR REnT
416-398-9424
ACCESS
3636 BATHURST ST.
120 Shelborne
I can c
quickly
Call 64
in the city, spacious, bright, clean
apt., renovated, quiet ravine set- Orlando, 1 mile Disney, Westgate
VacationFOR
Villas,SALE
2 bdrm/2bath,
125
FLORIDA
PROPERTY
ting off main
street.
TTC. 2 bdrm.
avail. immed., 1 bdrm. avail. Feb/ sleeps 8. Many amenities. Avail.
Mar Call 905-474-3600 or 416- Dec. 28-Jan.4/15, $950 U.S. 647477-2314; [email protected]
638-6813.
Sunny Isles Beach- Sants Pointe
penthouse condo., 2 + 2 avail.
Ocean view from each room.
Directwith
beach
access,
avail. from
South Florida Realtor
Market
Expertise
Jan. No pets. 847-833-8614.
270 www.twoneptune.ca
No Pressure, No Hassle Service
PRIVATE LUXURY APARTMENTS ON THE RAVINE
t St
44STJOSEPHST!BAYS/BLOOR!2STOREYPENTHOUSE!
$499,000! Unbeatable 1Br 2Bth West Facing W/2 Balconies+Parking+Locker!
Breathtaking Lake+City Views! Sandon Schwartzben**/Geoffrey Korn* 416-226-1987
Rental PRoPeRtIes
7 BDRM - 6 BATH - Vaulted Ceilings Expansive Decks - Huge Dock - 2 minutes
to fine dining and superb golf at the
Ridge at Manitou Golf Club. 2 main floor
master suites-jacuzzi tubs and saunas.
Custom kitchen. $1,495,000.
Bathrus
STGABRIELTERRACES!LUxURYBLDGSHEPPARD/BAYVIEW
Shane Baghai Blt & Hotel Style Serv. 1Br1Bth Ste W/Prkg+Locker. Super
Amenities Incl. Rooftop Grdn, Party Rm. Ingrid Hemmerich* 416-226-1987
EXECUTIVE COUNTRY HOME ON PRESTIGIOUS BAY
Large 3 bdrm, 2 baths, Lrg living
and dining, Kitchen with eating
area,Finished basement, large
lot, Double drive garage.
Hollywood, South/sunny, on
beach, luxurious Ocean Palms,
3 bdr/ 3 1/2 baths furn’d. All you
need. Valet, health club, billiards,
tennis, concierge. No pets. 3 mos.
min. $6900./mo. Call 917-273-1630
Carscadden Dr
Real estate Inc. - BRokeRage
Village – 416-488-2875 • central – 416-785-1500
Bayview – 416-226-1987•YongeSt.–905-709-1800
•Yorkville – 416-975-5588 • Downtown – 416-363-3373
MANITOUWABING LAKE
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416-782-4120
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elderly. Homes, hospitals, ret.
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57
homes. Eng. & Polish-speaking.
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jobs. For
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ESTIMATES.
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The Canadian
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is
great service call Serge at G&M Moving and Storage.
shift FT/PT. W/car. 647-351-2503
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Body for All
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an ad
appropriately
JewishtoNews
E&MBefore
Painting.signing
The fastest, Apts., homes, offices. Short notice.
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your home
and apt. Glutathionelicensed
416-834-4312.
Licensed
level
is
declining.
a
Inverary-2bd/2
bath
on
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course
1750 Steeles
Ave. W.,
Ste.prices.
218
Good cook/housekeeper quickly
cleanest,
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with a
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ex. 23 Call 647.867.6144.
References.
416-655-4083.
Eli.
647-898-5804
your
contractor
CJN Box Number?
L4K 2L7
[email protected]
SRM Movers-Call Stanley! A-1
405 fuRniTuRE
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Hollywood,hard
South/sunny,
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Before
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MILE’S
PAINTING
Don’t forget to put
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appropriately
beach, luxurious Ocean Palms,
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painting
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interior
the Box Number on
office, business. 416-747-7082
licensed
Earl Bales
Sr. Woodworkers.
3 bdr/ 3 1/2 baths furn’d. All you able.
make
sure
Please
call
416-546-5380.
Before
Before
signing
signing
415
home
able.
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call
416-546-5380.
&
exterior.
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16
years
your envelope.
with
the Regluing,
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416-303-3276.
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ARLEN HOUSE EAST: 1 bdrm 416-743-8155
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call 416-666-5570.
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1750 Steeles
Ave. W., Ste. 218 Restoration, refinishings & gen.
licensed
licensed
ing, etc. Call
647-533-2735.
from mid Dec./14, min.3 mths. 2
450 PAinTing /
repairs
on premises.
416-654-0518
Concord,
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with
with
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Classified
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Odd jobs, small
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ing, etc. Please call Fred at
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Call Rita: 416-484-9324
ANDREW PLUM
Before
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Don’t
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416-420-8731.
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Reasonable. FREE ESTIMATES.
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with a
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ing, etc. Please
477-2314; [email protected]
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licensed
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416-420-8731.
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305 ARTiCLES
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and
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his head at any given time, which is why
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416-484-9324
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NOVEMBER
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an educated lady,
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477-2314;
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TV’s
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wshrms.
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647-351-2503
Call
Jewish
Jewish
News
News You
contact
at 416-606-5898
72-76
for
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1750
1750
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416-655-4083.
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3 mos.
Jewish
News
250
DomESTiC
current
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ministry
guidecondo’s,
offices,
houses and renPRoPERTy
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Villas,
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Call
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416-484-9324
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275
PERSonAL
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Villas,
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395 ELECTRiCAL
240
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669 1716
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oPPoRTuniTiES
The Canadian
Marcantonio Furniture Repair
if your qualifications match our
Jewish News
Specializing in touchups.
current
needs.
A Gen.
teacher
is need1750 Studies
Steeles Ave.
W., Ste.
218
Restoration, refinishings & gen.
ed for Grade 5 in an Orthodox
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Address
your
mail to:
LICENSE
#7005757
Custom, reas.
416-630-6487.
plastering,
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RENOVATIONS
The
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Marcantonio Furniture Repair
Ben Buys
Book
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416-303-3276.
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health
health
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416-999280 ANNOUNCEMENTS
Jewish
News
416-420-8731.
Specializing
inCeramic
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290 LOST & FOUND
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ESTIMATES.
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reliable.
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Magazine award winner for humour has
worked both in print and broadcast, but
says the way he writes lends itself more to
broadcast.
“My first book (Lenny Bruce is Dead) was
in more of a private voice, I guess you could
say,” he adds. “What people have called
an experimental kind of book that was
fragmented and I guess the voice was just
more personal and weirder in a way. Some
people will get it and some people won’t,
and that’s OK. Whereas with the kind of
radio that I do, the challenge is to be inclusive and speak in a voice that allows as
many people as possible to tune in.”
Goldstein says he’s happy with how WireTap, now in its 11th season, has evolved.
“As it goes on I guess you start to figure it
out in a different way,” he says. “You start
to think about it as an entity that you’re
building to endure. So what that means
is you become more of a long-distance
runner as opposed to a sprinter. And you
begin to figure out elements that people
really enjoy and want to reoccur and you
try to give them those things.”
At the same time, he thinks it’s import-
Metropolitan
Licensing
Commission
416-392-3000
night to write down turn out to be not.”
Goldstein says now is a great time for
aspiring broadcasters to try their hand at
storytelling via radio. He references a New
York Magazine story that claims we’re living in the golden age of podcasting.
“Radio has always been a very cheap
medium to produce, but now the means
of distribution are more accessible,” he
explains. “If you do it you could put it out
there and if it’s good it’s gonna get noticed.
You can look at the iTunes podcasting
charts, you see a lot of shows that come
out with bigger budgets and bigger staffs
from radio stations alongside of the podcasts that are being produced in peoples’
basements – just themselves on a microphone.”
His advice is simple: don’t think about
it too much and just put something out
there. “A project is a thing in the world and
it could evolve and change and you could
change with it,” he says. n
The “pay what you can” event is at the Koffler Gallery Art Gallery Artscape Youngplace,
180 Shaw St. Toronto, Nov. 23 at 2 p.m.
58
Q&A
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014
Sindi Kachuck: Canadian Young Judaea
‘made me the person I am today’
Sheri Shefa
Jewish People. That’s my personal feeling.
I have three kids, and they are all CYJ involved. My oldest is 21 and she works for
CYJ during the year. She is program director of the senior programs and she is going
into her fifth year as staff at Camp Solelim.
My son is 19 and in Montreal, and he is
going into his third year as staff at Solelim
and is coming in this weekend for Mifgash,
the annual retreat we have to bring kids
together again after two months of not
being at camp… My youngest is 17. She
was in Israel this past summer [for CYJ’s
Biluim Israel Program] during everything
that was going on. She had a phenomenal
time… She’s hoping to be staff next summer at one of her camps.
[email protected]
F
ounded in 1917, Canadian Young Judaea (CYJ) is the country’s largest Jewish youth movement. It aims to strengthen
its members’ Jewish and Zionist identity
through year-round programs and summer camps including Camp Shalom,
Camp Kadimah and Camp Solelim.
Sindi Kachuck, a 47-year-old CYJ alum
and a volunteer on the board since 2008,
was recently named the organization’s
new chair of the board, replacing Phil
Ber, who held that position for the past 20
years.
Kachuck spoke to The CJN about her
deep connection to the organization and
the State of Israel, and about her determination to spread the word that CYJ is
alive and kicking.
How do you think your summers
spent at CYJ camps shaped you over
the years?
It completely made me the person I am
today. There is no question about that.
It gave me my connection to the Jewish
community. We were a family that went
to synagogue, and I didn’t participate in
synagogue youth programs, but I did participate in CYJ youth programs throughout my years. It gave me my best friends, it
gave me my love for Israel and my interest
in knowing what goes on in Israel. I spent
a year at Hebrew University [in Jerusalem]
because of it… It is so hard to express. It
definitely made me a better leader… it
certainly kept me connected to my Jewish
identity.
There is an underlying theme to what we
do, and there is a mission involved, there
is a vision for what CYJ does and it very
much became a part of my story, to who
I was going to be in life, to who I am because of it. The connection is incredible.
I meet people all the time, and maybe I
haven’t seen them in years, but you have
that connection always.
Has the mandate or mission of CYJ
evolved over the years?
Our vision today is keeping kids Jewish, with a love and connection to Israel.
When I was young, we were very staunchly a Zionist youth movement. We’re still
a Zionist youth movement, but in those
days, you talked about aliyah. That was
the ultimate – to make aliyah, and we have
a lot of CYJ alumni who are living in Israel.
From left: Fern Kachuck, Mark Kachuck, Sindi Kachuch and Marissa Kachuck
But it has changed, because obviously,
times have changed. If kids want to make
aliyah, I mean, amazing, we’ve done a
great job. But really, right now what we to
look at is keeping them connected to the
Jewish community so that they stay Jewish, and giving them that love for Israel so
that they feel the connection, want to visit, want to spend more time there.
Do you think the concept of Zionism
is different today than it was when
you were young?
When I was a camper 30 to 35 years ago,
Israel was only about 30 years old and we
were only about 30 years out of the Holocaust, so there was a different feeling.
And it was still a country being built and
there was still that pioneer, chalutz kind
of feeling about Israel. So I think, just as
Israel has evolved, so has our Zionism. So
for many, it is still about aliyah, but I think
it is also about feeling good about your
support for Israel and feeling connected
to what Israel is. You don’t always have
to agree, but you do have an interest and
connection to it.
Just as Israel has
evolved, so has our
Zionism. For many it
is still about aliyah,
but I think it is also
about feeling good
about your support
for Israel and feeling
connected to what
Israel is.
Why is it important to have a
connection to Israel in order to
maintain a Jewish identity?
I think they exist together. I don’t think
there is just Israel or there is just a Diaspora. I think Israel is our home. It is the
Jewish state, and we shouldn’t only think
of it when we need it. It should be something that is part of our lives. It has to be.
For me personally, there is no separa-
tion. A part of being Jewish is recognizing
Israel, understanding Israel, wanting to
go to Israel, or to have it, at least, as part
of your conversation. Even if you’re not a
person who is going to end up spending
a lot of time in Israel, the Jewish People
now do not exist without Israel and I don’t
think the State of Israel exists without the
Do you have specific ambitions for
the organization as you take on this
new role?
I’d like to get more volunteer involvement,
to let more people know about what we
do and that we are going strong. We have
a ton of kids coming to programs, we
have over 40 kids coming to a program
called JOLT, which is the Jewish Outreach
Leadership Training, and this is where
kids get the opportunity to do a little bit
of tikkun olam. They learn about different
charities they want to support, they learn
about Israel and charities in Israel.
A large part of what we do to in order
to keep kids connected to our movement
and our camps, which keeps them Jewish,
is to fundraise for our Canadian Young Judaea Scholarship Fund to support those in
need and ensure they are not turned away
from our camps for financial reasons.
My vision is to make sure that it continues and that CYJ’s legacy keeps going
and we go beyond 120 years. We’re approaching our 100th anniversary soon in
2017. [I also want to] reconnect alumni
who haven’t been connected in years and
make sure that from the time they leave
camp as staff, we don’t lose them until
they have kids and need a place to send
their kids. We want to keep that connection. Even though it is a youth movement,
it is still fuelled by keeping us in the profile
– people seeing what we’re doing and continuing to attract more kids to our summer camps.
I am thrilled to have the opportunity to
give back to CYJ and look forward to working with our board and professional staff
to see our vision being realized and keep
CYJ in the hearts and minds of all of our
alumni, and of course, our current young
members. n
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS November 20, 2014
59
T
Canadian history: the good and the bad
Backstory
Allan Levine
H
istory can be uncomfortable, especially for Canadians, who like to think they
are highly evolved, that while Americans,
for example, have a long racist history, the
multicultural and tolerant Canada does
not.
In recent years, more of these darker and
controversial issues – such as treatment
of First Nations children in residential
schools and Canada’s refusal to admit German Jewish refugees in the 1930s – have
been introduced into high school curricula. Still, ignorance about the way it really
was from the earliest days of settlement to
well into the 20th century persists.
The tolerant values and attitudes we now
hold in high esteem are, in the big picture
of Canadian history, a very recent phenomenon. That’s why the opening of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR)
in Winnipeg is an event to be praised.
The museum’s exhibits are sure to touch
a raw nerve, since by its very sensitive nature, content about Canada’s horrific treatment of First Nations, the Holocaust or the
Rwanda genocide is personal history tied
up with issues of nationalism, legitimate
feelings of victimization and marginalization.
In the 1790s, some of the 500 or so citizens of York (Toronto, as of 1834), Upper
Canada, owned blacks. This was despite
the fact that Upper Canada’s first lieutenant governor, John Graves Simcoe, was a
vocal opponent. Peter Russell, who served
as Simcoe’s receiver and auditor general,
for instance, was a slave owner, as was William Jarvis, the provincial secretary.
Slavery may have been banned in the
British Empire in 1833 – and there was a
strong anti-slavery society in Toronto in the
1850s – yet prejudice and discrimination
were a constant in Toronto and elsewhere
for decades. Until well after World War II,
most blacks were not permitted to stay at
Toronto hotels. Jobs were hard to come by,
even when there was a “Help Wanted” ad
displayed in the window of a shop.
In a Canadian society that perceived and
cherished itself as white, Anglo and Prot-
estant, the same discriminatory treatment
was accorded Irish Catholics and wave after wave of east European and Asian immigrants that followed them. Into the 1950s,
non-white and non-Christian immigrants
were regarded with trepidation and fear.
In the decade before World War I in particular, Jews, Chinese, Italians, Ukrainians
and others were denounced by politicians,
church leaders, reformers, physicians,
academics and journalists as undesirable,
primitive, uncivilized, dirty, immoral and
degenerate foreigners who could never assimilate to become “true” Canadians. Such
attitudes engendered institutionalized
racism for several generations. Anti-Semitism barred Jews from many professions
and jobs, clubs and beach resorts.
In 1913, Horace Wing a Chinese merchant
in Toronto was arrested and charged with
“procuring a white woman for immoral
purposes” after he answered a young girl’s
newspaper advertisement seeking employment as a stenographer. Her parents had
given to the police Wing’s letter offering
their daughter a job.
Provincial governments in Canada, horrified and enlightened by, among other
issues, the revelations about the Holocaust
and the passing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 at the United
Nations, began to implement anti-discrimination legislation in the 1950s. A
federal Bill of Rights followed under John
Diefenbaker in 1960.
Attitudes changed much more gradually
so that today few Canadians would defend
an Ottawa-area company that was recently deemed guilty and ordered to pay $8,000
plus interest by the Ontario’s Human Rights
Tribunal for telling a foreign-born applicant that it “only hires white men.” At one
time, that would have been the standard.
Now, it is illegal and considered offensive
by the majority.
Prejudice and discrimination will never
completely vanish in Canada – it is the
unfortunate way human beings are hardwired. But education and reflection are the
key, and the CMHR’s positive contribution
to this significant national debate can only
help. n
Allan Levine’s most recent books are Toronto: Biography of a City and Miracle at
the Forks: The Museum That Dares Make
A Difference (co-authored with Peter C.
Newman).
OBITUARIES And RElATEd nOTIcES
The unveiling of a monument
to the beloved memory of
Margit Sara
Schonberger K’’Z
will take place
Sunday, november 30
at 12:00 p.m.
Mount Sinai
Memorial Park
986 Wilson Ave., Toronto, ON
Pride of Israel Section
Relatives and friends are invited to attend
To place an
UNVEILING
NOTICE
please call
or email
at least
15 DAYS
prior to the date
of the unveiling.
416-922-3605
or email
ssoko[email protected]
Dr. Solomon David Coleman,
better known as David, passed away peacefully
in London, UK on Tuesday 28th October
aged 94. A loving father now sadly missed by
his surviving children, Claudette, Patsy and
Leslie, brother Michael, grandchildren, great
grandchildren, nieces, nephews, extended family
and all his friends.
Pastein, Gloria Gussie
Pottens, Albert
Doron, Maurice
Budilovsky, Boris
Najnudel, Jaime
Rose, Sandra
Haber, Pearl
Shubits, Braina
Saunders, Sylvia
Koff, Eleanor Margaret
Waisglass, Harry Jacob
James, Helen
Smith, Philip
Tishkovsky, Lev
Kats, Sofya
Geller, Mitchell
Wajnkranc, Minnie
Waltman, Morris Jack
Anidjar , Mercedes
Hait, Yakov
Vardi-Starer, Ashley
Papoff, Ruth Elaine
Oct. 22, 2014
Oct. 22, 2014
Oct. 22, 2014
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Oct. 23, 2014
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Oct. 29, 2014
Oct. 29, 2014
Oct. 29, 2014
Oct. 31, 2014
Nov. 1, 2014
Victor Istrati
Edith Steinhart
Sam Heller
Paul Rummell
Mynne Zuckerman
Samuel Rose
Sara Cohen
Mayya Shavishvili
Louis Rosenblat
Muriel Silver
Ruth Lazarus
Miriam (Bubbles) Bookman
7601 Bathurst St
3560 Bathurst St
56 Chopin Blvd
Private
3560 Bathurst St
149 John Westway
Private
Private
65 Spring Garden Ave
1131 Steeles Ave W.
Private
24 Verwood Ave
705 King St. W
Private
6101 Bathurst St
Private
343 Clark Ave W
850 Steeles W
485 Patricia Ave
Private
94 Winding Lane
5 Emerald Lane
Nov 1/14
Nov 1/14
Nov 1/14
Nov 2/14
Nov 3/14
Nov 2/14
Nov 6/14
Oct 20/14
Nov 7/14
Nov 7/14
Nov 7/14
Nov 7/14
Watkin, Sarah Renee
Springer, Henry
Karpov, Ninel
Pekar, Yakov
Altman, Gerald
Gordon, Minnie
Mandel, Howard Ian
Guttman, Izzie
Hecker, Henry Robert
Yanofsky, Abert
Goldmacher, Clare
Meyers, Stanley
Drillick, Marion
Gelb, Terezia
Kaushansky, Chaya Mushka
Polson, Daully
Walton, Dorothy
Rypina, Nina
Teyer, Icheskal
Hellinger, Irena
Erdman, George
Press, Lyudmyla
25 Wiggens Court
139 Bannockburn Ave.
484 Steeles Ave. West
17 Newbury Lane
1166 Bay Street, # 1202
11 Carhartt Street
18 Steelee Ave. West
3 Dove Hawk Way
121 Dell Park Ave.
2 Neptune Drive
32 Dell Park Ave.
3560 Bathurst St.
Nov. 2, 2014
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Nov. 10, 2014
Moshe Morris Erlich
Oct 30/14
8 Covington Road
Dan Gayer
Oct 31/14
2195 Jane Street
88 Carl Tennan St
219 Honiton St
Private
3 Goldfinch Crt
4001 Bayview Ave
307 Woodbrook Mews SW
135 Antibes Dr
Private
7 Gale Cres
90 Fisherville Rd.
11 Townsgate Dr
Private
Private
Private
18 Mortimer Crt
25 Brunswick Ave
120 Promenade Cir.
Private
7601 Bathurst St
110 Promenade Cir.
Private
850 Steeles Ave W
60
T
THE CANADIAN JEWISH NEWS
November 20, 2014

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