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FRIDAY
November 21, 2014
129th Year, No. 157
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Wight
enters plea,
‘not guilty’
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — A woman
accused of helping her boyfriend
kidnap and torture his ex-wife
plead not guilty to all five charges
filed against her Thursday at
Sheridan County District Court.
She attended the hearing with
her attorney via closed-circuit
television from Judge William
Edelman’s courtroom in Buffalo.
Nicole Wight was charged with
felony kidnapping, felonious
restraint, two counts of being an
accessory before the fact — both
felonies — and misdemeanor battery in an incident that occurred
Aug. 15 and 16. Wight and her
boyfriend Aaron Arnold allegedly
held Arnold’s ex-wife Bearl
Arnold captive, beat and tortured
her, and stole both money and
property from her.
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEO AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Colorado Mesa
University signs
Mavrakis. B1
Republicans scramble for response to Obama
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fresh
off their big midterm elections
victory, congressional
Republicans thought they might
be on the offensive against a
chastened President Barack
Obama right about now.
Instead, Obama’s executive
order on immigration has them
scrambling for a response that
satisfies irate conservatives
without alienating moderates,
Hispanics and other voters who
will be crucial for the 2016 presidential election.
The situation poses a major
challenge for House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, and
incoming Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.,
as they inaugurate their newly
minted congressional majority
on a familiar note of GOP
infighting that party leaders
sought to avoid. Boehner scheduled a news conference for
Friday morning to respond to
Obama’s immigration plans.
Whether the GOP leaders are
able to rein in the tea party contingent in Congress that forced a
politically damaging government shutdown a year ago over
the president’s health care law is
an open question. The answer
will have major implications for
whether the GOP can hang onto
its newfound control of
Congress, and hope to win the
White House in two years.
SEE IMMIGRATION, PAGE 2
SEE PLEA, PAGE 3
Berger
elected
Majority Floor
Leader
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — The members of
the Wyoming House of
Representatives and the
Wyoming Senate have finalized
their leadership and committee
assignments following party caucuses last weekend.
Members of leadership will be sworn in
during opening ceremonies on the first
day of the session,
slated to begin at
noon on Jan. 13,
Berger
according to a media
release.
One Sheridan County delegate
was elected to leadership in the
state Legislature.
Rep. Rosie Berger, R-Big Horn,
was elected to be Majority Floor
Leader in the House of
Representatives. The position is
the second highest leadership
position.
Berger’s duties will include
directing activities on the floor,
offering the formal motions necessary for conducting legislative
business and regulating the daily
schedule, including the order of
the bills considered by the entire
House of Representatives, also
known as the Committee of the
Whole.
House and Senate committee
assignments were also made last
weekend.
Rep. Mike Madden, R-Buffalo,
and Rep. Mark Jennings, RSheridan, were appointed to the
House Revenue Committee.
SEE LEADERSHIP, PAGE 3
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Got skates? Sheridan Ice does
Seven-year-old Izabell Hendricks skates past the entrance of the ice rink during open skate Thursday at Sheridan Ice. Open skate is free to the public, and skates are provided at no charge.
NWCCD extends president’s contract
for another year, salary increased
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Enrollment and degree
completion numbers are at record highs for
Sheridan College since Dr. Paul Young took
over as president in June 2010, and now his
salary will reflect that fact.
During the Northern Wyoming
Community College District
board of trustees meeting in
Gillette Thursday Young’s contract was extended another year
and his salary was increased to
be on par with national averages.
Other than a 2 percent raise all
state employees received in the
Young
last school year, Young has not
received a raise since being promoted to president from Vice President of
Gillette College.
Now in his fifth academic year, Young’s
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
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base salary will increase to $185,000, effective Jan. 1, 2015, from his current rate of
$170,340.
According to the American Association of
Community Colleges, the average salary for
presidents of two-year multi-campus college
districts is $184,000 and board chair Kati
Sherwood felt the board needed to remain
competitive with that average to retain
Young’s services.
“There’s a huge competition for college
presidents; as a matter of fact next year
here in Wyoming there will be two vacancies, and we would very much like to retain
Dr. Young because he is doing a great job,”
Sherwood said. “Paul is a pretty amazing
person — he’s personable, driven, smart,
he’s so many things — but I think he really
has that leadership quality where persons
with the board of trustees, his faculty and
staff and his administrative team, we’ve all
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
put together a plan for the college over the
years and he’s wonderful at making sure the
necessary steps to implement that plan are
taken.”
Young has a three-year retention contract,
currently set to expire in June 2017.
Today’s edition is published for:
Connie Goodwin
of Sheridan
SEE NWCCD, PAGE 2
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
SPORTS
COMICS
CLASSIFIED
PUBLIC NOTICES
B1
B4
B5
B7
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
Holiday
cheer
City worker Aaron Roberts
hangs a light-up Christmas
wreath on a lamp post on
Grinnell Street Friday morning in downtown Sheridan.
Decorations were hung along
Main Street and parts of
Grinnell for the Holidays.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
NWCCD: Recognition for success
FROM 1
The contract is reviewed and reissued annually, upon approval, essentially adding a year by issuing a new
three-year contract, this one valid for
July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2018.
“I’m succeeding at all the goals
they’ve set for me, so I think it’s recognition for that, and I’m certainly
grateful and thankful to be in a place
where I’m able to do the job,” Young
said. “It’s a great community and a
great college, and I look forward to
many more years of providing leadership.”
The decision was made following a
lengthy evaluation in October and an
executive session in Gillette Thursday.
The NWCCD board of trustees meets
once annually in Campbell County
and once annually in Johnson County
in order to get out and see the district’s service counties.
Young said they try not to do too
much business while off-site so the
brief meeting consisted mostly of
report sharing; however, trustee Bruce
Hoffman presented — on behalf of the
nominating committee consisting of
himself, Vice Chair Norleen Healy and
trustee Walter Wragge — a recommended slate of officers for the
upcoming year of service.
The committee recommended
Sherwood, Healy and treasurer Robert
Leibrich each retain their current
positions on the board and Wragge
take over for current secretary Jerry
Iekel.
The slate was approved, and the officers will be voted upon during the
December board meeting for final
approval.
In other business:
• The board approved a Bond
Resolution and related Ground Lease,
Facilities Lease, Access Easement,
Indenture and Leasehold Mortgage,
authorizing the issuance by the
NWCCD Building Authority of $4.5
million in lease revenue bonds. The
principal and interest on these bonds
is fully funded by a $31.9 million 10year grant from Whitney Benefits.
This was the first of three bond package approvals needed regarding funding of upcoming projects at the college.
• The December meeting of the
board of trustees was moved to Dec.
11, and the March 2015 meeting was
moved to March 12.
• Members of the board toured the
new alternative high school in Gillette
prior to the meeting and received a
private performance from the student
group Energy City Voices during a
dinner after the meeting.
• Trustees who attended the annual
Association of Community College
Trustees Leadership Congress in
Chicago at the end of October reported on the sessions they attended.
• The administration presented the
annual NWCCD Fast Facts, a report
on economic contributions, public
funding by county, number of employees, student demographics, completion
numbers and more.
IMMIGRATION: Republicans: Obama must be stopped
FROM 1
“What did the president do? He pulled the pin on the
grenade two weeks after the election,” said Rep. Pat Tiberi,
R-Ohio, a close Boehner ally. “I don’t think anybody knows
or can predict what happens and the carnage that this creates quite frankly for the legislative process.”
On one point, Republicans are united: Obama must be
stopped.
“It is our obligation and responsibility to fight this
brazen power grab that doesn’t solve the real problems,”
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., said following the president’s announcement of an executive
order to shield as many as 5 million immigrants here illegally from deportation, and grant them work permits.
“Our Constitution does not grant the president the authority to legalize millions of immigrants with the stroke of a
pen.”
But how, exactly, Congress could stop Obama remained
far from clear.
Obama’s announcement presented party leaders with a
knotty dilemma: How to undo an action set to take effect
without Congress doing anything, with no obvious legislative vehicle for doing so and Obama able to veto any legislative solution they derive.
Conservative lawmakers are pushing to insert language
in upcoming must-pass spending bills to block Obama’s
order. Party leaders warn that could lead to a government
shutdown.
Numerous Republicans have discussed suing the president over his immigration orders, or expanding a lawsuit
already planned over the health care law to include immigration. Yet they fret it would take too long and wouldn’t
have the effect of blocking Obama’s orders from going into
effect.
Others said that House Republicans, who never acted on
a comprehensive immigration bill passed last year by the
Senate, had an obligation to try to craft their own legislation. But chances of success seemed remote, at best.
As Democrats largely cheered Obama’s announcement
and the prospect of an enthusiasm boost among Latino
voters who make up an increasingly large share of the
electorate, GOP debate flared between establishment
Republicans and the tea party wing.
House Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers, R-Ky.,
declared that it was impossible to “defund” the U.S.
Citizenship and Immigration Services, since it pays for
itself based on application fees. He’s pushing for passing a
yearlong spending bill to get spending fights out of the
way, and then finding some other way to respond to
Obama.
That angered some conservatives who argued that establishment Republicans were just looking for a way out of a
necessary confrontation with the president.
“They’re contriving red herring arguments to get to the
point where enough members will walk out of this
Congress and go home for Thanksgiving and say, ‘Well,
there’s nothing we can do,’” said Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa,
who was among a small group of conservatives arguing
impeachment should be on the table as a last resort. “I feel
sorry for them if they step up in front of their constituents and say ‘Congress can’t do anything, we have to
let the president violate the Constitution.’ “
Republican lawmakers reported being deluged by calls
and emails from constituents demanding they stand up to
Obama. Publicly and privately, party leaders urged
restraint, but there were concerns that on a combustible
issue like immigration, restraint would be difficult.
“It throws the place in a bit of upheaval,” said Sen.
Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. “Our goal is to not capitulate, but
not overreact by pushing impeachment or shutting down
the government.”
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Cheyenne
hospital still
fixing billing
problems
Q & A with
state
legislators
CHEYENNE (AP) — The
Cheyenne Regional Medical
Center says it is still working
on billing problems that have
patients worried.
Some patients have received
letters saying they were getting money back from the
medical center while they continue to get bills for the same
services.
According to KGWN-TV,
Cheyenne Regional employees
say more than 1,000 patients
are eligible for refunds.
In May hospital officials
said a number of problems
occurred after a switch to a
new system. That system was
set up when the hospital converted from paper medical
records to a new electronic
system.
Sen. Bruce Burns of Senate District 21, left,
and Rep. Rosie Berger of House District 51
speak to a group of high school seniors in
the auditorium at Tongue River High School
in Dayton. The legislators shared about their
roles in the Wyoming State Capitol and
emphasized the importance of the democratic process before engaging in a question
and answer session.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Local news tip?
call The Sheridan
Press at 672-2431
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Periodicals Postage Paid in
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
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1 Mo.
3 Mos.
6 Mos.
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PLEA:Motion filed, Wight, Arnold may be tried together
FROM 1
If convicted, Wight faces a
maximum 61 years and six
months in prison and a fine
of $80,750.
According to the affidavit
filed by the court, Aaron
Arnold invited his ex-wife
to his home under the guise
of reconciling their marriage. When Bearl Arnold
refused to allow him to take
nude photographs of her, he
beat her and invited Wight
to come to his home and
join him.
The affidavit also alleges
that Arnold and Wight
drove Bearl Arnold to the
home where she was living
with Susan Scofield to
retrieve the title to the truck
Bearl Arnold had won in the
divorce. Arnold also allegedly forced his ex-wife to write
him a check for $1,500 and
sign blank checks. Bearl
Arnold said that Wight used
her credit card to purchase
a one-way plane ticket to
Arizona and that Wight and
Arnold drove her to the airport in Casper.
Wight and the Arnolds
were stopped at the gate
when Casper authorities
became concerned about
Bearl Arnold’s injuries.
In addition to the plea,
Wight’s attorney Donald
Tolin filed two motions with
the court. One motion asked
for a joinder so Wight and
Arnold can be tried together. The other motion asked
for a change of bond.
Deputy County and
Prosecuting Attorney
Dianna Bennett asked for
time to review the motion
for joinder, saying the prosecutor’s office wanted to
make sure there was no
avenue for a mistrial before
offering a position on the
motion.
Judge Edelman granted 30
days for the attorneys to
review the motion before he
would make a decision on
it.
The current bond orders
that there be no contact
between Wight and Arnold
despite the two being in a
romantic relationship. Tolin
called the bond punitive
because, he said, the case
was based on the authorities believing Bearl Arnold’s
story rather than Wight’s
and Arnold’s story, and
claimed Bearl Arnold’s living with witness Susan
Scofield was no different
City
Carrier
$12.75
$35.25
$67.50
$126.00
Motor
Route
$14.75
$41.25
$79.50
$150.00
ONLINE RATES
than Wight living with
Arnold.
Edelman denied the
motion and ordered that the
separation ordered by the
bond continue.
Scofield was able to verify
that Bearl Arnold is no
longer living in her home.
2 Mos.
4 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
$15.00
$28.00
$39.00
$69.00
County
Mail
$16.25
$45.75
$88.50
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POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to The Sheridan Press,
P.O. Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Office Manager
Production Manager
LEADERSHIP: 17 new members
position will enable him to be influential,
in particular, for the natural gas pipeline
project being pursued by Dayton,
Ranchester and Sheridan County School
Madden will serve as chairman of the
District 1 officials.
committee. Jennings was elected to the
Burns said he believes appropriations
House of Representatives Nov. 4, and this
will be flat for the next few years, so it will
will be his first term in the Legislature.
be important to convince fellow legislators
Jennings will also serve on the House
that the natural gas project is worth fundCorporations, Elections and Political
ing because it will serve as a pilot project
Subdivisions Committee.
The revenue committee deals with issues for small communities across the state facing similar challenges.
related to revenue generation and collection, including taxation and mineral and
Sen. Dave Kinskey, R-Sheridan, will serve
tourism revenue.
on the Senate Judiciary Committee and the
The corporations committee focuses on
Senate Revenue Committee. Kinskey was
election law, public utilities and the conappointed to fill the Senate District 22 seat
duct of business in the state.
left vacant by the death of Sen. John
Rep. John Patton, R-Sheridan, was elected Schiffer, R-Kaycee, in June. Kinskey has
to his fourth term as a representative in
done some interim committee work over
the general election. He will serve as the
the summer and fall, but this will be his
chairman of the House Education
first session as a senator.
Committee. The committee focuses on eduThe judiciary committee, which Schiffer
cational policy, state education administra- chaired in 2013 and 2014, deals with justice
tion, school safety and statewide education system policy and administration.
goals.
In the 2014 interim session, the commitA key issue for the education committee
tee discussed the need to update statutory
will be reinstating the state education sysprovisions related to children in need of
tem following the Wyoming Supreme
supervision, examined what background
Court’s ruling that Senate File 104 was
information is provided to the National
unconstitutional. The roles and duties of
Instant Criminal Background Check
the state superintendent of public instrucSystem used to determine eligibility to purtion and the Department of Education will chase firearms, reviewed information on
need to be reviewed and reinstated.
the need to amend provisions relating to
The committee will also work on an eduWyoming’s method of execution and more.
cational accountability bill that will considBerger said this week that there are 14
er how to make all 48 school districts in the new members of the House of
state accountable to testing standards.
Representatives and three new members of
In the Senate, Sen. Bruce Burns, Rthe Senate following the general election.
Sheridan, gave up his spot as chairman of
Five of the committees on each side also
the Travel, Recreation, Wildlife and
have new chairmen. She said it will be
Cultural Resources Committee to take a
important for individuals and organizaspot on the Senate Appropriations
tions like the Tongue River Valley Joint
Committee.
Powers Board to get to know the new legisAt the Dayton Town Council meeting
lators as issues move forward in the comWednesday, Burns said he hopes this new
ing session.
FROM 1
Legislative committees
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Open 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri, 11:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Sat.
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any loving family!
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Domestic Short Haired young man. He loves to go
outside and he loves his treats. Parker is a very
nice boy that craves attention and to be loved on.
He likes to play a lot but only with other cats since
he does not enjoy dogs one bit. Come up today
and visit this handsome and stunning boy!
The 10 standing legislative committees in both the House and the Senate are:
• Judiciary
• Appropriations
• Revenue
• Education
• Agriculture, State and Public Lands and Water Resources
• Travel, Recreation, Wildlife and Cultural Resources
• Corporations, Elections and Political Subdivisions
• Transportation, Highways and Military Affairs
• Minerals, Business and Economic Development
• Labor, Health and Social Services
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the
Shelter gates or to our can trailer at Scotty’s Skate Castle. Recycling
proceeds are used to care for the animals. Thanks for your support.
This ad courtesy of:
BIG HORN BEVERAGE
Remember – if your pet
is missing, call us first
674-7694
84 EAST RIDGE ROAD
Sheridan, Wyoming
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Big EGAP!
edition coming
next week
Q
uestion: Why didn’t the Chicago Cubs
get a new website?
Answer: They couldn’t get three WWW’s in
a row.
••••••
My, oh my!
Next Wednesday is a special issue of The
Sheridan Press.
It’s our Black Friday, Everyone-Gets-APress (EGAP!) edition. More than 12,000
homes get this special edition throughout the city
and in some rural areas.
Some stats:
• Eight sections, including Scene magazine.
• Some 13-plus pre-printed inserts; and, three
“wrappers” filled with
PUBLISHER’S advertising and features.
• Coupons! Discounts! We
NOTEBOOK
added them all up — if you
|
took every coupon and
every discount from every
Stephen Woody
special insert or section,
it’s more than $127,200. As they say on
Madison Avenue: something for everyone.
This special edition, now in its third year,
is a project that has several moving parts
that begin in the spring by contacting advertising agencies and major advertisers. As the
summer winds down, we contact local merchants about their Christmas season messages and opportunities to reach consumers.
Then lately, it’s been a matter of ensuring
our delivery contractors are out the door
earlier than usual with a large single edition
for each home, that our news and advertising deadlines are modified, that planning for
this endeavor requires attention to detail
and several “work ahead” issues.
Once the front doors open next Wednesday
morning, it’s a race to complete the newspapers and section, print, produce and deliver.
Thanks to this dedicated staff, we’ve
trimmed production time each year in order
to get the newspaper to each home.
Wednesday’s delivery may be late because of
its scope and logistics. We appreciate your
patience in order to get this special edition
to all the homes.
Thank you for reading and using The
Sheridan Press this holiday shopping season.
••••••
John Rotellini stopped by Thursday. He’s
the mover-and-shaker for the Goodfellow
Fund. It is co-sponsored by The Sheridan
Press and was founded more than 50 years
ago. It benefits the local Salvation Army
ministries. Over time, more than $300,000
has been raised for local families during the
Thanksgiving and Christmas seasons. This
year’s goal is $12,000. Last year, $10,000.
“It’s truly a Sheridan thing,” he told me.
“It’s about neighbors helping neighbors.” All
donations are welcome. The Press’office
manager, Becky Martini, tracks the funds
and the money stays in the community for
the express purposes of food, clothing and
toys. The Bank of the West is the fund’s
financial agent.
••••••
Quotable
“Obama administration staffers boast how
their boss doesn’t know the meaning of the
word ‘quit.’ Apparently, he’s not overly familiar with the words ‘consensus,’ strategy’ or
‘leadership’ either.
—Will Durst, American author/humorist
••••••
This weekend, Shop Sheridan!
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
LETTER |
Liberty, leadership, policy;
citizen input, majority rules
Re: Democracy in Sheridan
Mr. Mayor, what do you have against
public self-governance?
How could you ethically hire an interim
city manager, when the public voted to
not have one? If your abilities are inadequate for the responsibilities of the
appointment, then step down.
Mr. Interim City Manager, same question: how could you morally, as well as
legally, accept a position the people voted
down?
• Citizens of Sheridan, if the city representatives are not accountable to the public then who — just themselves or private
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters that
we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
Email delivery of letters into the Press
works best and have the best chance of
being published.
interests? These individuals are demonstrating behavior that by definition
should constitute a criminal act against
the people of Sheridan as well as democracy.
• Citizens of Sheridan, why do we
accept such disregard for the people's
will? When did the people start electing
public masters rather than public servants? When did the personal liberties of
city representatives start trumping the
freedom of their fellow citizens? When
did the people decide to grant city representatives the authority to create policy
behind closed doors, without any public
input, and against an explicit public vote?
• Citizens of Sheridan, does anyone
know of a single, current or historical,
example where more than 50 percent of
the population, Sheridan or another city,
are on the public record as being in
agreement on anything? It seems self-evident that for the public to have any real
authority and power, it needs to act from
the perspective that the majority of the
population holds. Why are we not working to ensure that the public perspective
is known?
• Citizens of Sheridan, have we completely lost faith in even the possibility
that the public is capable of governing
itself ? Has democracy died?
If so, the experiment in democracy
deserves an obituary notice.
Noll Roberts
Sheridan
QUOTABLE |
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I wrote my opinion in such a way
as I thought conveyed to the whole
world that I thought he had done it,
he had just gotten away with it
because of a lack of evidence.”
— Former Pennsylvania prosecutor Bruce L. Castor Jr., who investigated a woman’s claims that Bill
Cosby had sexually assaulted her in
2004.
“We didn’t file a complaint right
away because we were waiting for a
telephone call asking for ransom.
On Saturday their mother and I
went to put in a complaint and the
killer was with us.”
— Claudio Cecilio Munoz, an
uncle of the slain Honduran beauty
queen and her sister, on the man
who killed them.
H
The climate pact swindle
istoric. Such is the ubiquitous
description of the climate agreement
recently announced in Beijing
between Barack Obama and Xi
Jinping in which China promised for the
first time to cap carbon emissions.
If this were a real breakthrough, I'd be
an enthusiastic supporter. I have long
advocated for a tangible global agreement
to curb carbon. I do
remain skeptical
about the arrogant,
ignorant claim that
climate science is
"settled," that it can
predict with accuracy
future "global warmCHARLES
ing" effects and that
KRAUTHAMMER therefore we must cut
emissions radically,
|
immediately and unilaterally if necessary,
even at potentially ruinous economic and
social cost.
I nonetheless believe (and have written
since 1988) that pumping increasing
amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere cannot be a good thing. We don't know nearly
enough about the planet's homeostatic
mechanisms for dealing with it, but prudence would dictate reducing CO2 emissions when and where we can.
However, anything beyond that, especially the radical unilateralism advocated
by climate alarmists, would be not just
economic suicide but economic suicide
without purpose. It would do nothing to
reduce atmospheric CO2 as long as China,
India and the other developing nations
more than make up for our cuts with
their huge and increasing carbon emissions.
China alone is firing up a new coal
plant every eight to 10 days. We could
close every coal mine in Kentucky and
West Virginia and achieve absolutely
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
nothing except devastating Appalachia
and, in effect, shipping its economic
lifeblood to China.
The only way forward on greenhouse
gases is global reduction by global agreement. A pact with China would be a good
start.
Unfortunately, the Obama-Xi agreement is nothing of the sort. It is a fraud
of Gruberian (as in Jonathan) proportions. Its main plank commits China to
begin cutting carbon emissions 16 years
from now. On the other hand, the United
States must double its current rate of carbon cutting to meet a new, more restrictive goal by 2025, in return for which
China will keep increasing its carbon
emissions year after year throughout that
period -- and for five years beyond.
If this sounds like the most one-sided
deal since Manhattan sold for $24 in 1626,
you heard right. It becomes even more
absurd when you realize that, according
to the Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory, China was on track to plateau
its carbon emissions around 2030 anyway
because of a projected slowdown in
urbanization, population growth and
heavy industry production. We cut, they
coast.
The carbon-emission graph is stark.
China's line is nearly vertical; America's
is already inflected and headed downward. The Obama-Xi agreement simply
ratifies U.S. unilateralism -- the U.S. line
declines even more steeply, while China's
continues rocketing upward unmolested.
Proponents of the Obama-Xi deal will
then point to a second provision: China's
promise to produce 20 percent of its energy from non-carbon sources by 2030. But
China had already been planning to begin
substituting for its immense use of fossil
fuels (mainly by using nuclear power)
because Chinese cities are being choked
to death by their traditional pollutants -sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, mercury
compounds, particulates, etc.
These are serious health hazards. CO2
is not. Whatever its atmospheric effects,
CO2 does not poison the air. So in return
for yet another Chinese transition that
has nothing to do with CO2, Obama has
committed the U.S. to drastic CO2 cuts.
Moreover, beyond substance, there is
process. Or more accurately, its absence.
What's the structure to sustain and verify
the agreement? Where are the benchmarks? What are the enforcement mechanisms? This is just a verbal promise.
Nothing more. Sixteen years from now,
China is supposed to remind the world of
its commitments and begin cutting?
I repeat: I would unequivocally support
a real agreement with China where they
cut contemporaneously and commensurately with the U.S. and where there is
built-in reporting and independent verification. Such a bilateral agreement would
need to be internationalized by bringing
in such rising powers as India, Brazil,
Indonesia, etc. This would be a breakthrough.
Climate enthusiasts will say that I
refuse to take yes for an answer. Of
course I would take yes for an answer. But
the Obama-Xi agreement is not yes. It is
"check back with me in 16 years." Aren't
the people advocating this deal the same
garment-rending climate apocalypticists
who've been warning of irreversible planetary changes beginning now, and the
supreme imperative of acting immediately?
Except, you see, for China, the world's
No. 1 carbon polluter. It gets a 16-year
pass
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER is an American Pulitzer Prize-winning
syndicated columnist, political commentator, and physician. He is a
contributing editor to the Weekly Standard, a weekly panelist on the PBS
news program Inside Washington, and a nightly panelist on Fox News
IN WASHINGTON |
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Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
NEW FACES |
Levi Dienekes Dennee
Levi Dienekes Dennee was born Oct. 20, 2014, at Tripler
Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii.
He weighed 7 pounds, 5 ounces.
He was welcomed by parents Tyler and Leah Dennee.
His sibling is sister Isabella.
His grandparents are Cai Guttierez of Safford, Arizona,
and Tom and Michelle Roush of Big Horn.
Reavis Sheldon Lohof
Reavis Sheldon Lohof was born Oct. 23, 2014, at home in
Otter, Montana.
He weighed 7 pounds, 11 ounces.
He was welcomed by parents Patrick and Christy Lohof
of Otter, Montana.
His siblings are sister Rachel Lohof Larsen and brothers
Kirk Lohof, Hans Lohof and the late Cutler Lohof.
His grandparents are Kay Lohof and Ed Peugh of
Birney, Montana, and Sheldon and Hope Hansel of West
Winfield, New York.
Avie Louise Johanson
Avie Louise Johanson was born Nov. 12, 2014, at
Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 5 pounds, 11 ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Jessica and Ethan
Johanson of Sheridan.
Her sibling is brother Adin.
Her grandparents are Elizabeth and Bert Blyth of
Kalispell, Montana, and Mike and Pam Johanson of Priest
Lake, Idaho.
Addilynn Kay Hall
Addilynn Kay Hall was born Nov. 14, 2014, at Sheridan
Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 6 pounds, 9 ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Thomas Hall and Regina
Francis of Sheridan.
Her grandparents are Shawn and Erin Francis of
Gillette, Tammy Hall of Sheridan, Tommy Hall of Billings,
Montana, and Manda Francis of Casper.
Eden Elizabeth Cross
Eden Elizabeth Cross was born Nov. 14, 2014, at Sheridan
Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 6 pounds, 5 ounces.
She was welcomed by parents Casey and Fallon Cross of
Big Horn.
Her siblings are brothers Leland and Bryson, and sisters
Kendall and Destiny.
Her grandparents are Eric and Missy Fuller of Phoenix,
Arizona, and Ron and Melanie Griffith of Illinois.
The Sheridan Model Railroad Association
Train Show
Tongue
River
turkey trot
to be held
Thursday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Warm welcome
Dr. Paul Young, left, greets Neltje as she is honored during the open house Wednesday at the Sheridan
College AgriPark at the Wrench Ranch north of Sheridan. The AgriPark was built on 48 acres on the
Wrench Ranch donated to Sheridan College by Neltje. The AgriPark features a 45,000-square-foot
multi-purpose indoor facility to be used by the Sheridan College Rodeo team and will be open for lease
at the beginning of next year.
SHERIDAN — The
Tongue River Valley
Community Center
will host a turkey trot
Thursday beginning at
8 a.m.
The entry fee for the
5K run/walk is two
canned food items per
person.
For more information, contact the community center at 6559419.
Participants should
meet at the community center, located at
1100 U.S. Highway 14
in Dayton.
Governmental Affairs Committee
to hold Legislative Forum Monday, Tuesday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan County Chamber
of Commerce’s
Governmental Affairs
Committee is hosting its
Legislative Forum Monday
and Tuesday in the Council
Chambers at City Hall.
The annual forum allows
for more than 30 Sheridan
County organizations and
individuals to present
updates and issues before
our county’s six representatives in the Wyoming State
Legislature.
All sessions are open to
the public and will be
broadcast live on City
Channel 191.
The agenda of presenters
is as follows:
Monday
• 8:30 a.m. City of
Sheridan
• 9:05 a.m. NSI Academy
• 9:40 a.m. Sheridan
County Commissioners
• 10:25 a.m. Sheridan
County School District 1
• 11 a.m. SW-WRAP
• 11:30 a.m. Lunch
• 1 p.m. Rising Sun
Wellness Center
• 1:35 p.m. Sheridan
County School District 2
• 2:10 p.m. Sheridan
Memorial Hospital
• 2:50 p.m. Sheridan
County School District 3
• 3:25 p.m. Sheridan
Travel & Tourism
• 4 p.m. Sheridan College
Tuesday
• 8:30 a.m. Advanced
Communications
Technology
• 8:50 a.m. First People’s
Center for Education
• 9:10 a.m. Sheridan
County Public Library
• 9:30 a.m. Child
Development Services of
WY
• 9:50 a.m. Prevention
Management Organization
of Wyoming
• 10:15 a.m. Town of
Clearmont
• 10:35 a.m. Sheridan
County Conservation
District
• 10:55 a.m. RENEW
• 11:15 a.m. Wyoming
Craft Brewers Guild
• 11:30 a.m. Lunch
• 1 p.m. Northern
Wyoming Mental Health
Center
• 1:20 p.m. Sheridan
Community Land Trust
• 1:40 p.m. Forward
Sheridan
• 2 p.m. Economic
Development Task Force
• 2:30 p.m. Critical Air
Service Task Force
• 2:40 p.m. The Collins
Family
• 3:10 p.m. Green House
Living for Sheridan
• 3:30 p.m. Downtown
Sheridan Association
• 3:50 p.m. Sheridan
County Historical Society
GO ONLINE!
www.DestinationSheridan.com
• 4:10 p.m. Easter Seals of
Wyoming
• 4:30 p.m. Tongue River
Valley Joint Powers Board
• 4:50 p.m. Volunteers of
America Northern Rockies
November 23rd
10am-3pm
Basement of
Taylor School
1030 North Main
For information on joining our weekly
meetings or to express interest in a project of
your own contact: William Tulley at 674-4885
or visit the NMRA Website at: http://nmra.org
“The World’s Greatest Hobby”
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked
about today:
1. WHAT’S NEXT FOR
OBAMA ON
IMMIGRATION
Despite Republican
opposition, the president
heads to Las Vegas to sell
his executive actions on
reform as good politics
and good policy.
2. ANOTHER BILL COSBY
ACCUSER COMES
FORWARD
Therese Serignese, a
57-year-old nurse from
Boca Raton, Florida, says
the TV icon raped her in
1976 when she was 19 following a show in Las
Vegas.
3. U.S. CONTINUES TO
PRESS ANKARA ON
ISLAMIC STATE GROUP
Vice President Biden
will become the latest
U.S. official trying to
push Turkey to step up
its role in the global fight
against the Sunni
extremists.
4. WHY THINGS COULD
GET EVEN WORSE IN
BUFFALO
The snow has stopped,
but the city by Lake Erie
faces a mammoth
cleanup and potential for
rain and flooding this
weekend.
5. PROFILE OF FLORIDA
STATE GUNMAN
EMERGES
Myron May, 31, was an
FSU graduate and attorney who believed the
government was targeting him for persecution,
authorities say.
6. WHAT CHINA IS DOING
TO COUNTER DISSENT
A state-owned newspaper sent reporters to
secretly sit in on lectures
by dozens of university
professors, aiming to
catch remarks critical of
the Communist Party.
7. “GOLDEN PARACHUTE”
OFFERS SOFT LANDING
FOR TITANS
The CEOs who’ve
decided to sell in the 10
biggest U.S. deals this
year are set to rake in an
estimated $430 million in
payments, a study finds.
8. HOW AFGHANS ARE
COPING WITH WAR
Afghanistan’s first
amusement park offers a
rare respite for families
in a country blighted by
armed conflict and
poverty.
9. A GIFT FOR THE TECH
SAVVY
AP’s Anick Jesdanun
says that for $100 or less
there are devices that
can stream online video
to your big-screen TV
set.
10. WHO GOT THEIR
FIRST WIN IN MORE
THAN A YEAR
It took 368 days, but the
Oakland Raiders broke a
16-game losing streak
when they beat AFC
West-leading Kansas City
24-20.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A little help from a friend
Beau LeDoux, left, helps Sheridan College rodeo athlete Brett Williams tighten his glove as Williams readies for bareback riding for a rodeo demonstration during the open house Wednesday at the Sheridan College AgriPark on the
Wrench Ranch.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Holz to present at
BHCHS meeting Sunday
SHERIDAN — Bernie Holz will speak at the
Sunday meeting of the Big Horn City Historical
Society, scheduled to begin at 1 p.m.
Holz worked for the Wyoming Game and Fish
Department for 27 years and will offer a firsthand account of feeding elk on the National Elk
Refuge Feeding Grounds in Jackson Hole.
The meeting will be held at the Big Horn
Woman’s Club clubhouse, and will include a
potluck lunch, followed by the presentation.
The event is free and open to the public.
For additional information, contact Judy
Slack at 674-6363.
The clubhouse is located at 314 S. Third St. in
Big Horn.
Cat rescue participating
in bake, craft sales Saturday
SHERIDAN — Second Chance Sheridan Cat
Rescue will participate in a holiday bake sale
and craft bazaar, both scheduled for Saturday.
All proceeds from these events will go to
Second Chance Sheridan Cat Rescue.
The bake sale at Warehouse Market will be
held Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The group will also have a table at the Swim
Team Craft Bazaar at the Sheridan County
Fairgrounds on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, call 461-9555.
Woodland Park School Fall
Bazaar set for Saturday
SHERIDAN — The Woodland Park School Fall
Bazaar will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. in the school gym.
The bazaar will feature homemade crafts and
other items from vendors.
For additional information, contact Sara
Stevens at [email protected] scsd2.com.
The school is located at 1010 Woodland Park
Road.
Fairgrounds to host Sheridan
Swim Team bazaar
SHERIDAN — More than 100 tables of arts,
crafts and homemade goods will be featured at
Saturday’s Sheridan Swim Team bazaar.
The event will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Sheridan County Fairgrounds exhibit hall and
pavillion. Lunch and a bake sale will also be
available on-site.
For additional information contact Shirley
McPheeters at 674-4188.
The Sheridan County Fairgrounds is located
at 1753 Victoria St.
SATURDAY EVENTS |
• 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., "Spirit of Christmas" bazaar, St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 1 S. Tschirgi St.
• 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sunrise fall bazaar, Sunrise Assembly of God Church, 570 Marion St.
• 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Country Christmas bazaar, Best Western Sheridan Center, 612 N. Main St.
• 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sheridan Swim Team arts and crafts bazaar, Sheridan County Fairgrounds
exhibit hall and pavilion, 1753 Victoria St.
• 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Holiday bazaar, Sheridan Wesleyan Church, 40 W. Brundage Lane
• 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Woodland Park School fall bazaar, Woodland Park Elementary School, 1010
Woodland Park Road
• 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dayton Art Loop tour, various locations in Dayton
• 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Model train show, Old Taylor School, 1030 N. Main St.
• 11 a.m., "Live from the Met: Rossini's 'Il Barbiere Di Siviglia,'" WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St., $18
for adults, $9 for students
• 7:30 p.m., "The Prisoner of Second Avenue," Carriage House Theater, 419 Delphi Ave., $15 for
adults, $12 for students, seniors and active military
TIPPED OVER |
Researcher who found
cause of Lyme disease dies
HAMILTON, Mont. (AP) — The Swiss-born
researcher who gained international recognition for discovering the bacteria that causes
Lyme disease has died in western Montana.
A spokesman at the Daly-Leach Chapel said
Wilhelm “Willy” Burgdorfer died from complications of Parkinson’s disease Monday in
Hamilton. He was 89.
Burgdorfer was educated in Switzerland. He
went to the Rocky Mountain Laboratory in
Hamilton as a research fellow in 1951 and
joined the staff as a medical entomologist six
years later.
He spent decades researching the connections between animal and human diseases
caused by the bites of fleas, ticks and mosquitoes.
In 1982, while he and another researcher
were studying deer ticks in hopes of uncovering the cause of a spotted fever outbreak in
New York, Burgdorfer found the microorgan-
isms called spirochetes that would prove to be
the cause of Lyme disease.
His previous work on relapsing fever helped
him recognize the cause of Lyme disease, said
colleague and friend Dr. Tom Schwan.
Schwan said Burgdorfer called his most
famous discovery “serendipity.” It was made
while looking for something totally different
and is a testament to Burgdorfer’s abilities as a
scientist, he said.
The infection caused children living near
Lyme, Connecticut, to develop rheumatoid
arthritis. It also causes heart and neurological
problems. The spirochete later was named
Borrelia burgdorferi, after Burgdorfer.
Burgdorfer’s research opened doors to diagnose and treat the disease, Schwan said.
Burgdorfer retired in 1986 after authoring
more than 225 scientific papers and traveling
the world giving lectures and working with fellow scientists. He won numerous awards,
including the Robert Koch Gold Medal for
excellence in biomedical sciences in 1988, and
received an honorary medical degree from the
University of Marseille in France in 1991.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Nov. 21, 1864, a letter was
signed by President Abraham
Lincoln expressing condolences
to Lydia Bixby, a widow in Boston
whose five sons supposedly died
while fighting in the Civil War.
(As it turned out, only two of
Mrs. Bixby’s sons had been killed
in battle; also, historians are not
certain that Lincoln actually
wrote the letter.)
On this date:
In 1789, North Carolina became
the 12th state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1861, Judah Benjamin, who
had been acting Confederate
Secretary of War, was formally
named to the post.
In 1922, Rebecca L. Felton of
Georgia was sworn in as the first
woman to serve in the U.S. Senate.
In 1934, the Cole Porter musical “Anything Goes,” starring
Ethel Merman as Reno Sweeney,
opened on Broadway.
In 1942, the Alaska Highway,
also known as the Alcan Highway,
was formally opened at Soldier’s
Summit in the Yukon Territory.
In 1964, the upper level of New
York’s Verrazano Narrows
Bridge, connecting Brooklyn and
Staten Island, was opened.
In 1969, the Senate voted down
the Supreme Court nomination of
Clement F. Haynsworth, 55-45, the
first such rejection since 1930.
In 1973, President Richard
Nixon’s attorney, J. Fred
Buzhardt, revealed the existence
of an 18-1/2-minute gap in one of
the White House tape recordings
related to Watergate.
In 1974, bombs exploded at a
pair of pubs in Birmingham,
England, killing 21 people. (Six
suspects were convicted of the
attack, but the convictions of the
so-called “Birmingham Six” were
overturned in 1991.)
In 1980, 87 people died in a fire
at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las
Vegas, Nevada.
In 1989, the proceedings of
Britain’s House of Commons
were televised live for the first
time.
In 1991, the U.N. Security
Council chose Boutros BoutrosGhali of Egypt to be SecretaryGeneral.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush, trying to mend
relations with Latin America,
pledged during an economic summit in Chile to make a fresh push
for stalled immigration reforms.
Iraqi authorities set January 30,
2005, as the date for the nation’s
first election since the collapse of
Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship.
Six Wisconsin hunters were shot
to death by Chai Soua Vang, an
ethnic Hmong immigrant who
was later sentenced to life in
prison.
Five years ago: The Senate
voted 60-39 to open debate on
health care legislation. An explosion at the Xinxing coal mine
near Hegang city in China killed
108 miners. The University of
East Anglia, in eastern England,
reported that hackers had broken
into a server at its Climatic
Research Unit. (The hackers posted hundreds of private e-mails
and documents online, stoking
debate on whether some scientists
had overstated the case for manmade climate change.) The shimmering, white glove Michael
Jackson wore when he premiered
his trademark moonwalk dance
was auctioned off for $350,000
(plus $70,000 in taxes and fees) at
the Hard Rock Cafe in New York’s
Times Square.
One year ago: Sweeping aside
a century of precedent,
Democrats took a chunk out of
the Senate’s hallowed filibuster
tradition, clearing the way for
speedy confirmation of controversial appointments made by
President Barack Obama;
Republicans warned Democrats
would regret their actions once
political fortunes were reversed
and they could no longer block
appointments made by a GOP
president. Fifty-four people were
killed in a supermaket roof collapse in Riga, Latvia. Three
women were freed after being
held captive 30 years in a south
London home.
Thought for Today: “Never
confuse motion with action.” —
Ernest Hemingway, American
author (1899-1961).
ALMANAC
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
OBITUARY |
SHERIDAN FIRE-RESCUE
Thursday
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 1500
Mydland Road, 9:14 a.m.
• Activated alarm, 300
block North Main Street,
11:36 a.m.
• RMA assist, 2000 block
South Sheridan Avenue,
7:02 p.m.
• RMA assist, 1800 block
Fort Road, 11:14 p.m.
p.m.
• Medical, 100 block West
12th Street, 10:37 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Fort
Road, 11:10 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Wednesday
• Medical, 100 block South
Sheridan Avenue, 6:27 a.m.
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street, 7:26
a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 8:01 a.m.
• Trauma, 400 block
North Jefferson Street, 8:50
a.m.
• Medical, 200 block
Smith Street, 8:58 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block Kroe
Lane, 9:05 a.m.
• Medical, 1100 block
Avoca Court, 10:50 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 2:06 p.m.
• Trauma, 900 block East
Brundage Lane, 3:07 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 9:09 p.m.
• Medical, 700 block Long
Drive, 9:40 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 10:32 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block West
12th Street, 10:55 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 11:55 p.m.
Thursday
• Medical, 1000 block
Gladstone Street, 2:11 a.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Mydland Road, 9:10 a.m.
• Medical, 1800 block
Holloway Avenue, 9:51 a.m.
• Trauma, 300 block West
Alger Street, 12:13 p.m.
• Trauma, 1600 block
Coffeen Avenue, 12:51 p.m.
• Medical, 1300 block
Avoca Place, 12:54 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 1:13 p.m.
• Trauma, 1400 block
West Loucks Street, 3:15
p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 4 p.m.
• Trauma, Intersection of
Kentucky and Lewis
Streets, 6:27 p.m.
• Medical, 2000 block
South Sheridan Street, 7:01
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Thursday
• Suspicious circumstance, Gladstone Street,
12:35 a.m.
• Prowler, Illinois Street,
6:16 a.m.
• Suspicious person, West
Fifth Street, 6:55 a.m.
• Alarm; robbery, Coffeen
Avenue, 7:18 a.m.
• Open door, Jackson
Avenue, 7:51 a.m.
• Hit and run, Long Drive,
8:59 a.m.
• Found property, West
12th Street, 10:14 a.m.
• Animal welfare, Long
Drive, 10:22 a.m.
• Fire alarm, North Main
Street, 11:22 a.m.
• Dog at large, Burton
Street, 11:32 a.m.
• Dog at large, West
Brundage Lane, 12:38 p.m.
• Dog at large, East
Brundage Lane, 12:44 p.m.
• Minor in possession,
Long Drive, 1:23 p.m.
• Warrant service, East
Eighth Street, 1:29 p.m.
• Animal welfare, South
Sheridan Avenue, 1:31 p.m.
• Welfare check, Eighth
Street, 2:03 p.m.
• Barking dog, North
Heights Lane, 2:07 p.m.
• Barking dog, Second
Avenue East, 2:50 p.m.
• Agency Assist, West
Loucks Street, 3:13 p.m.
• Wyoming Highway
Patrol assist, West Loucks
Street, 3:19 p.m.
• Animal found, Holmes
Avenue, 4:32 p.m.
• Accident with injury,
Lewis Street, 6:26 p.m.
• Phone harassment,
North Main Street, 7:21
p.m.
• Damaged property,
Illinois Street, 7:34 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, Fort
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
Thursday
• Dismissals—Courtney
Reynolds, Jada Nadine
Reynolds, both of
Moorcroft.
• No admissions reported.
Everett G. Schilling
Road, 7:55 p.m.
• Dog at large, South
Main Street, 8:51 p.m.
• Suspicious person,
Coffeen Avenue, 9:46 p.m.
• DUI, Coffeen Avenue,
9:57 p.m.
• Suspicious person,
North Main Street, 10:03
p.m.
January 1, 1942 - November 19, 2014
Everett G. Schilling, 72, of Riverton,
died on Wednesday, November 19, 2014,
at the Wyoming Medical Center in
Casper. A memorial service will be held
on Tuesday, November 25, 2014, at 2:00
pm at Davis Funeral Home. Everett G.
Everett Gene Schilling was born on
Schilling
January 1, 1942 in Sheridan, WY to
William D. and Benetta E. (Brokaw)
Schilling. He was one of four children. He was raised and
attended schools in Sheridan. He graduated from Sheridan
High School with the class of 1960. He was of the Lutheran faith. After graduating he went to work in Dubois, WY at the
sawmills. While in Dubois, he met Reta Winchester. They
were married on August 26, 1961 at the Church of
Transfiguration in Moose, WY. Everett and Reta started a family while he worked various
trades including construction and gas stations. The family also lived in Alaska for eight years while he worked at
Chevron Oil. They later moved back to Riverton, WY in
1981 where he worked for the Riverton Memorial Hospital
for 25 years before retiring five years ago. His family said that he loved camping, fishing, hunting,
rock hunting, and everything outdoors. He was a master
wood worker and loved how the wood would transform into
an amazing form of art. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Reta Schilling; his
sons, Everett E. Schilling and his wife Gaye of Gillette, WY,
Rodney D. Schilling of Carson City, NV, and Michael R.
Schilling and his wife, Leilani of Gillette, WY; his grandchildren, Drew, Garrett, Skylar, Bryceton, Jerrid, Alyssa, and
Trevor; his sisters, Cynthia Schelin of AK and Norma Alfred
and her husband, Charlie of WV; his sister-in-laws, Ursula
Schilling of TX, and Delores (Lloyd) Haslam of WY; and his
brother-in-laws, Paul (Carolyn) Winchester of CA, Clyde
(Pam) Winchester of WY, Doyle (Kathy) Winchester of CA,
Raymond (Sharon) Winchester of CA, and Dale ( Penny)
Winchester of CA. He was preceded in death by his parents, William
and Benetta Schilling and his brother, Clayton Schilling. Memorials may be made to the Tough Enough Cancer
Fund in care of the Davis Funeral Home, 2203 W. Main
Street, Riverton, WY 82501. On-line condolences may be made to the family
at www.TheDavisFuneralHome.com. Services are under the direction of the Davis Funeral
Home.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Thursday
• Agency assist,
Gladstone Street, 12:44 a.m.
• Agency assist, State
Highway 332, 7:03 a.m.
• Civil dispute, Horseshoe
Lane, 7:34 p.m.
• Civil dispute, South
Sheridan Avenue, 10:49
a.m.
• Trespassing, Dayton, 12
p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Arvada, 2:20 p.m.
• Agency assist, West
Loucks Street, 3:13 p.m.
• Road hazard, Bird Farm
Road, 5:24 p.m.
• Civil dispute, Coffeen
Avenue, 7:36 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Thursday
• Steven Craig Raley, 62,
Sheridan, warrant (probation violation/revocation),
district court, arrested by
SCSO
• Dixie Lee Yellowtail, 45,
Sheridan, bench warrant
(contempt of court),
municipal court, arrested
by SPD
• Wallace James Chase,
45, Sheridan, compulsory
auto insurance, DWUI,
DWUS, circuit court,
arrested by SPD
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
BIG
Breakfast
DEATH NOTICE |
Kevin Christopher Appell
Kevin Christopher Appell, age 40, passed away in a house
fire on November 19, 2014, in Meriden, CT. He is the son of
Roger A. Appell of Sheridan. Services are pending in
Wallingford, CT.
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 73
Female inmate count: 15
Inmates at treatment
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 7
Number of releases for
the previous day: 8
Now online... www.DestinationSheridan.com
CORRECTION |
A portion of the information provided by Sheridan High School and previously printed
regarding first-quarter honor rolls was incorrect. Aeriana Roth achieved the rank of
Principal’s Honor Roll.
Delivery
problems?
Call The Press
at 672-2431
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
SATURDAY
23
Considerable
cloudiness
46
Overcast, breezy
and colder
27
38
Almanac
TUESDAY
17
Mostly cloudy
and breezy
35
Temperature
High/low .........................................................44/10
Normal high/low ............................................43/17
Record high .............................................73 in 2006
Record low ............................................. -11 in 1977
Precipitation (in inches)
18
37
Thursday......................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.73"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.50"
Year to date ...................................................13.59"
Normal year to date ......................................13.39"
Rise
Set
Today
Saturday
Sunday
7:13 a.m.
7:14 a.m.
7:15 a.m.
4:34 p.m.
4:34 p.m.
4:33 p.m.
Today
Saturday
Sunday
New
Rise
Set
6:07 a.m.
7:11 a.m.
8:13 a.m.
4:23 p.m.
5:07 p.m.
5:59 p.m.
First
Full
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
30/44
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
14/45
Basin
17/42
Nov 22
Nov 29
Dec 6
Dec 14
23/46
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Clearmont
26/48
Story
27/44
Gillette
25/45
Buffalo
30/49
Worland
12/41
Wright
28/45
Kaycee
29/48
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
48/32/c
46/21/c
50/31/c
44/30/c
38/20/c
45/25/c
44/24/sh
34/22/sn
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
41/27/c
33/16/sn
37/22/c
34/23/sn
28/18/sn
34/19/pc
37/18/sn
27/18/sn
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
38/27/c
32/14/sf
33/19/c
33/21/sf
28/15/sf
32/17/c
35/18/sf
25/14/sf
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
42/20/c
46/26/pc
39/20/c
43/20/c
40/20/sh
59/24/pc
45/24/pc
32/12/sn
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Shown are
Saturday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Ranchester
24/47
Thermopolis
18/48
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
27/47
Dayton
26/48
Lovell
20/42
Last
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Thursday ................... 0.00"
Hardin
23/49
Broadus
20/46
22
The Sun
The Moon
Shown is Saturday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Saturday's highs.
Periods of snow
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Thursday
National Weather for Saturday, November 22
Regional Weather
MONDAY
SUNDAY
Billings
31/48
Increasing
cloudiness
A7
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
29/15/sn
35/20/c
28/17/sn
32/16/sn
29/17/sn
44/19/pc
30/18/c
23/14/sn
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
26/14/c
31/18/pc
27/15/sf
30/16/sf
29/14/sf
38/17/c
30/19/pc
24/10/sf
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Giving back
Fort Mackenzie High School student volunteers, from left, Alexis Phillips, Victoria Kaupp and Ray Bautista
serve food from the kitchen during the annual Fall Festival fundraiser for Fort Mackenzie and the Wright
Place alternative schools Thursday evening at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall.
DC service set 20 years
after shooting rampage
WASHINGTON (AP) — A memorial service is being held for two FBI agents and a
District of Columbia police sergeant shot
and killed 20 years ago inside the
Metropolitan Police Department’s headquarters.
On Nov. 22, 1994, a lone gunman walked
into a third-floor squad room at the department’s headquarters and opened fire with
an assault weapon. He fatally shot FBI
agents Martha Dixon-Martinez and
Michael John Miller, and Metro police Sgt.
Henry “Hank” Daly.
The gunman, Bennie Lee Lawson, killed
himself.
The week before the shooting, Lawson
had been questioned as a suspect in a triple
homicide.
A memorial service for Daly and the slain
FBI agents will be held at 9 a.m. Friday at
St. Patrick’s Church in Northwest
Washington. A wreath-laying ceremony
will follow at the National Law
Enforcement Officers Memorial.
1 dead, 2 injured
in Aurora bar shooting
AURORA, Colo. (AP) — One man has died
and two are injured after a shooting at an
Aurora bar.
Police say the shooting occurred shortly
after midnight Friday at the El Bronco Bar.
One victim was pronounced dead at a
hospital. Police say another was in serious
condition and the third was expected to
survive, but the nature of his injuries wasn’t immediately disclosed.
No names have been released.
No one has been arrested. Police say they
don’t have much information about a suspect or what prompted the shooting.
Officers have interviewed several witnesses who were in the bar. They’re asking
anyone else who saw the shooting to contact them.
Police say witnesses can call detectives at
303-739-6106 or Crime Stoppers at 720-9137867. Tips can be texted to 274637 with the
title DMCS.
Hunting reveals good year
for Wyoming sage grouse
CHEYENNE (AP) —
State biologists in
Wyoming say hunting is
helping the greater sage
grouse by providing critical data about the birds’
numbers.
Sage grouse had an especially good breeding year
in Wyoming. Each hen
produced an average of
1.7 chicks, the best reproduction rate since 2005.
Wyoming Game and
Fish Department officials
say they know this
because of hunting. Game
and Fish asks sage grouse
hunters to donate the
wings of the birds they
kill.
Biologists can determine the age and sex of
birds killed by examining
their wings.
Whether sage grouse
hunting will continue in
Wyoming and eight other
states remains to be seen.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service faces a court
deadline of September
2015 to decide whether to
protect the greater sage
grouse under the
Endangered Species Act.
SPORTS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Ovechkin’s
late goal
lifts
Capitals
over
Avalanche
DENVER (AP) — Alex
Ovechkin has scored
plenty of pretty goals in
his career. He even
throws in some scrappy
ones from time to time.
Ovechkin scored late
in the third period,
Braden Holtby stopped
27 shots, and the
Washington Capitals
beat the Colorado
Avalanche 3-2 on
Thursday night.
Nicklas Backstrom
had a goal and an assist,
Jason Chimera also
scored, and Ovechkin
added an assist for the
Capitals. Washington
won the last two games
of its three-game trip.
“Winning on the road,
it feels like a bigger
moral victory than winning at home,” Capitals
coach Barry Trotz said.
“Winning on the road
brings a team closer
together.”
Ovechkin broke a 2-all
tie when he skated past
defenseman Jan Hejda
and put a shot on Reto
Berra. The goalie didn’t
cover up the loose puck,
and Ovechkin poked it
just over the goal line
with 5:56 left. It was his
ninth of the season and
first in four games.
“It was a lucky bounce
(to get the puck back),”
Ovechkin said. “I was
skating and put the
puck on net. It was a
huge goal and gave us
the points.”
Hejda took responsibility for Ovechkin’s
goal.
“It’s a game about mistakes,” he said. “I made
one, and we paid the
price.”
The Avalanche played
half the game shorthanded after Alex
Tanguay was hit in the
face on a shot by
Ovechkin. Tanguay
immediately skated off
the ice and went into
the locker room.
SEE AVALANCHE, PAGE B2
B1
Boise State Broncos
(8-2) @ Wyoming
Cowboys (4-6)
Tomorrow, 8:15 p.m.
on ESPN2
Boxer
Jermain
Taylor
charged
in
Arkansas
shooting
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Keeping her eyes on the ball
Moana Moore sets the ball during Adult Volleyball League Thursday night at the Sheridan Junior High School gym. The Sheridan Recreation
District offers a variety of youth and adult programs throughout the season.
Raiders snap 16-game skid with 24-20 win vs. KC
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Sio
Moore sacked Alex Smith and started to celebrate in the Kansas City
backfield with Oakland Raiders
teammate Khalil Mack.
The elaborate dance could be forgiven if the game had actually been
over considering the Raiders hadn’t
won a game in more than a year. The
only problem was the game was still
going and the Chiefs were at the line
trying to run a fourth-down play.
The Raiders were forced to call a
timeout to stop the clock and then
got one last stop, snapping a 16-game
losing streak with a 24-20 victory
over the Chiefs on Thursday night.
“I don’t need any more of that,”
safety Charles Woodson said. “I
couldn’t believe it. I told them that
was the first time I had ever seen
somebody celebrate for a whole 40second clock. That was ridiculous,
and they know it. I told Sio he’s
lucky we got the win because we
really probably would’ve had to
fight.”
The Raiders (1-10) were able to
laugh about it because Justin Tuck
alertly called timeout to prevent the
Chiefs (7-4) from getting a free play
off against a nine-man defense.
But Moore knows it could have
been a costly mistake.
“I was so caught up in the moment,
man,” Moore said. “That was an
error I’ve got to make sure I clean
up, because in another situation —
in all seriousness — that can make it
the difference and I’ve got to understand that.”
After Smith threw an incomplete
pass on fourth down, Derek Carr
took a knee and the Raiders celebrated their first win in 368 days since
beating Houston last Nov. 17.
SEE RAIDERS, PAGE B2
LITTLE ROCK, Ark.
(AP) — Arkansas prosecutors have charged
champion middleweight
boxer Jermain Taylor in
a shooting at his home.
The Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette
reports the 36-year-old
Little Rock native was
charged Wednesday
with first-degree battery
and first-degree terroristic threatening. If convicted, he faces up to 26
years in prison.
Pulaski County sheriff ’s deputies say Taylor
shot his 41-year-old
cousin, Tyrone
DaWayne Hinton of
Jacksonville, at Taylor’s
home in Maumelle on
August 26.
Deputies say Hinton
was wounded on his
“lower extremities.”
Taylor won the
International Boxing
Federation middleweight title in a
Biloxi, Mississippi, bout
on Oct. 8.
His attorneys have
filed a motion challenging the legality of
Taylor’s arrest and
asked that evidence collected from that arrest
be barred from use in
court.
Polee leads cold No. 16
San Diego State to 51-27 win
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Colorado Mesa bound
Jack Mavrakis, center, signed a national letter of intent to continue his golf career at Colorado
Mesa University in Grand Junction, Colorado, next year. Mavrakis participated with team
Wyoming at the Junior America's Cup over the summer. He finished sixth at the state tournament and was named to the 2014 All-State team. Pictured with Jack are, from left, mother
Jenna Mavrakis, Sheridan High School golf coach Larry Martoglio and father Paul Mavrakis.
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Dwayne Polee II was
the game’s only player in double figures with
13 points and No. 16 San Diego State survived
another awful shooting performance to win
51-27 Thursday night against Cal State
Bakersfield, which missed its first 20 shots.
The 27 points by Bakersfield (0-4) were the
lowest in Division I this season.
San Diego State (3-0) made just 14 of 57
shots, or 24.6 percent.
The victory came one day after SDSU coach
Steve Fisher signed a three-year contract
extension through the 2017-18 season.
Fisher joked then that he might appoint
himself as shooting coach after the Aztecs
made only 32.7 of their field goals in a 53-49
victory against No. 25 Utah on Tuesday.
Fisher will certainly have the Aztecs working on their shooting before they face BYU in
the Maui Invitational on Monday.
The Roadrunners of the Western Athletic
Conference had an equally rough night, shooting just 21.4 percent (12-of-56). CS Bakersfield
didn’t score until Brent Wrapp made a layup
with 7:43 left in the first half to make it 12-2.
Wrapp made two more layups in the half,
which ended with SDSU leading 22-12.
The Roadrunners closed to 22-16 on layups
by Aly Ahmed and Jaylin Airington before
SDSU went on a 6-0 run that included a 3pointer by Aqeel Quinn, and began to pull
away.
Wrapp, Ahmed and Kevin Mays led
Bakersfield with six points apiece.
The teams were awful from behind the 3point line as well, combining to miss 40 of 44
— Bakersfield was 1 of 20 (5 percent) and
SDSU 3 of 24 (12.5 percent).
SDSU’s Skylar Spencer blocked four shots.
TIP-INS
CS Bakersfield: The Roadrunners started a
lineup that went 6-foot-9, 6-4, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0. Aly
Amed, who’s 6-9, committed two fouls in the
first few minutes and took a seat.
San Diego State: The Aztecs wore turquoise
uniforms in honor of Native American
Heritage Month. ... Freshman Malik Pope
made his SDSU debut. Due to leg injuries, he
hadn’t played since he was a junior in high
school. He blocked two shots.
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
131st meeting between Yale and Harvard to air Saturday on NBC Sports Network
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALL TIMES EST
Friday, Nov. 21
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
NBCSN — Formula One, practice for Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, at
Abu Dhabi, United Arab
Emirates
4 a.m.
FS1 — FIA, Formula E, at
Putrajaya, Malaysia (delayed
tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
FS1 — UTEP at Rice
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — San Jose St. at Utah
St.
GOLF
1:30 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Tour
Championship, second round, at
Naples, Fla.
9:30 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour of
Australasia, Australian Masters,
third round, at Melbourne
3 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Tour Championship, third round,
at Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPNU — Teams TBA
2 p.m.
ESPNU — Charleston Classic,
semifinal, teams TBD, at
Charleston, S.C.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Puerto Rico Tip-Off,
semifinal, teams TBD, at San
Juan, Puerto Rico
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — 2K Classic, third
place, teams TBD, at New York
ESPNU — Teams TBA
7 p.m.
ESPNU — Charleston Classic,
semifinal, teams TBD, at
Charleston, S.C.
ESPN2 — 2K Classic, championship, teams TBD, at New York
9 p.m.
ESPNU — Marshall at
Louisville
10:30 p.m.
FSN — Kansas St. at Long
Beach St.
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN — UMass-Lowell at
Notre Dame
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN — Cleveland at
Washington
10:30 p.m.
ESPN — Chicago at Portland
SPEED SKATING
10 p.m.
NBCSN — Apolo Ohno
Invitational, at Salt Lake City
(same-day tape)
Saturday, Nov. 22
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
GUN SHOW
UP IN ARMS GUNSHOWS
November 21st, 22nd & 23rd
Fri. 3-7 • Sat. 9-5 • Sun. 9-3
Gillette, WY • The Camplex
NBCSN — Formula One, qualifying for Abu Dhabi Grand Prix,
at Abu Dhabi, United Arab
Emirates
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN — Teams TBA
ESPN2 — Teams TBA
ESPNEWS — Teams TBA
ESPNU — Northwestern at
Purdue
FSN — UTSA at W. Kentucky
FS1 — Kansas at Oklahoma
12:30 p.m.
NBCSN — Yale at Harvard
2 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC — NCAA, FCS,
Bethune-Cookman vs. Florida
A&M, at Orlando, Fla.
3:30 p.m.
ABC — Split national coverage,
teams TBA
CBS — Mississippi at Arkansas
ESPN — Teams TBA
ESPN2 — Split national coverage, teams TBA
ESPNU — Syracuse at
Pittsburgh
FSN — Texas Tech at Iowa St.
NBC — Louisville at Notre
Dame
NBCSN — New Hampshire at
Maine
4 p.m.
ESPNEWS — Teams TBA
FS1 — Stanford at California,
Arizona at Utah, or Southern Cal
at UCLA
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — Teams TBA
ESPNU — Samford at Auburn
7:30 p.m.
ESPN — Vanderbilt at
Mississippi St. or Missouri at
Tennessee
FOX — Oklahoma St. at Baylor
NBCSN — Richmond at
William & Mary
8:07 p.m.
ABC — Teams TBA
10:15 p.m.
ESPN2 — Boise St. at Wyoming
10:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Fresno St. at Nevada
GOLF
1:30 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Tour
Championship, third round, at
Naples, Fla.
9:30 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour of
Australasia, Australian Masters,
final round, at Melbourne
2:30 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour,
Tour Championship, final round,
at Dubai, United Arab Emirates
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
West Bromwich at Chelsea
12:30 p.m.
NBC — Premier League,
Manchester United at Arsenal
Sunday, Nov. 23
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
NBCSN — Formula One, Abu
Dhabi Grand Prix, at Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
LEAGUE
1 p.m.
ESPN — Playoffs, conference
finals, Montreal-B.C. winner at
Hamilton
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
11 a.m.
ESPNU — NCAA, FCS
Championship Selection Show, at
Charlotte, N.C.
GOLF
1:30 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Tour
Championship, final round, at
Naples, Fla.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPNU — Florida St. vs.
UMass, at Uncasville, Conn.
2 p.m.
ESPNU — Puerto Rico Tip-Off,
fifth place, teams TBD, at San
Juan, Puerto Rico
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Notre Dame vs.
Providence, at Uncasville, Conn.
3 p.m.
FSN — Northwestern St. at
Oklahoma
4 p.m.
ESPNU — USF at NC State
FS1 — NC Central at Creighton
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Puerto Rico Tip-Off,
third place, teams TBD, at San
Juan, Puerto Rico
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — Puerto Rico Tip-Off,
championship, teams TBD, at San
Juan, Puerto Rico
ESPNU — Charleston Classic,
third place, teams TBD, at
Charleston, S.C.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 — Charleston Classic,
championship, teams TBD, at
Charleston, S.C.
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader
FOX — Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX — Regional coverage
4:25 p.m.
CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader game
8:20 p.m.
NBC — Dallas at N.Y. Giants
SOCCER
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN — Premier League,
Tottenham at Hull City
1:30 p.m.
NBC — MLS, playoffs, conference finals, first leg, New
England at New York
5 p.m.
ESPN — MLS, playoffs, conference finals, first leg, Seattle at
Los Angeles
WOMEN'S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1:30 p.m.
FSN — Conference USA, championship, teams TBD, at
Hattiesburg, Miss.
1635 Reata Drive
Don’t miss the flea market!
Buy ~ Sell ~ Trade
for table information call 208-241-4005
AVALANCHE: Forsberg honored for HOF induction
the third period. The defenseman pinched in from the blue
line and tipped in a pass from Gabriel Landeskog for his
The Avalanche announced that Tanguay sustained a jaw second goal of the season.
injury.
“I got over there a little late and should have read it betTanguay’s former teammate, Peter Forsberg, watched
ter,” Holtby said.
from a suite three days
Daniel Briere had a goal, and Berra finished with 20
after being inducted
saves for Colorado.
into the Hockey Hall of
Colorado pulled Berra for an extra skater with 1:28 left.
Fame in Toronto. The
The Avalanche had several scoring chances but couldn’t
get the tying goal past Holtby.
Avalanche played a
“Too bad we could not score toward the end,” Avalanche
highlight video of
coach Patrick Roy said. “We had our chances, plenty of
Forsberg’s career on
Peter Forsberg looks. I thought we had a great third period, as well. It’s a
the big scoreboard as
Former Avalanche player tough situation losing a game where you think you played
he watched with his
wife and two children.
a good game but sometimes those things happen.
Forsberg said before the game he enjoyed his time with
“We need to stick to it because I think there’s a lot of
the Avalanche, which included two Stanley Cup titles.
positives in the way we’ve been playing, especially defen“There was no other goal in this organization than to
sively.”
win the Cup,” he said. “I didn’t think about the Hall of
Backstrom gave Washington a 1-0 lead with his fifth goal
Fame or anything, it was just winning games.”
1:04 into the second period. The Capitals nearly scored
Colorado, playing its first home game in two weeks, tied
again a minute later when a puck sat in the Avalanche
it on Tyson Barrie’s second goal of the season at 6:44 of
crease, but they couldn’t get a stick on it.
FROM B1
‘I didn’t think about the
Hall of Fame or anything,
it was just winning games.’
RAIDERS: Murray suffers concussion after fast start
them twice in the first half and Oakland ran for 179 yards
overall on a wet day not suited to passing.
Carr threw a 9-yard touchdown pass to James Jones with
“When you line up and it’s raining, the weather’s no
1:42 remaining to give the Raiders the long-awaited win.
good and they can’t throw the ball, you just line up and
“Hopefully there’s many more to come because I like this run the football,” Chiefs linebacker Tamba Hali said. “We
feeling better than the other weren’t playing our gaps and it’s like a high school football
one, that’s for sure,” Carr
game.”
said.
RELIABLE REECE: Raiders fullback Marcel Reece has
Here are some other take- been underutilized all season, carrying the ball just six
aways from the Raiders’
times in Oakland’s first 10 games.
win:
But with the game on the line, Reece got seven carries
BIG PLAY MURRAY:
for 34 yards and added an 8-yard reception on the winning
Third-string running back
drive.
Latavius Murray got a
“Anytime I’ve ever used him that way or seen him used
chance early in the game
that way, he can push the pile a little bit,” Sparano said. “I
and made the most of it. He felt like we were moving him pretty good a little bit there.
scored on an 11-yard run on He did a heck of a job. He really did.”
second drive of the game
SLOW START: The Chiefs punted on their first five
and went 90 yards for a
drives and got their only first-half score when Denarius
score on his next carry for
Moore muffed a punt at the 11.
the longest run by a Raiders
Even then Kansas City settled for a field goal. The
running back since Bo
offense then found its groove by scoring two touchdowns
Jackson had a 92-yarder
and a field goal on consecutive drives in the second half to
against Cincinnati in 1989.
take the lead.
Quarterback Terrelle
But it wasn’t enough.
Pryor had a 93-yard TD run
“It’s easy to say — you love to start fast,” Smith said. “We
last season against
talk about that all the time, but it’s a matter of going out
Pittsburgh. Murray’s 112
there and doing it. I think we’ll look back, especially those
yards rushing on four carfirst two series before it started coming down, about lack
ries were the most by any
of execution.”
player since at least 1960
LONG WAIT: No one waited longer for this win than
with five or fewer carries.
Raiders defensive lineman Antonio Smith.
Murray left the game with a
He lost the final 14 games with Houston last year and his
concussion.
personal 24-game losing streak was the third longest for
RUN OVER: The Chiefs
any player since 1980.
came into the game having
“Like heaven,” Smith said. “It feels good, man. It’s awenot allowed a rushing touch- some. That’s it, that’s the word. Long-time coming. Such a
down all season. Murray got relief.”
FROM B1
SHERIDAN IRON
WORKS
will be closing
November 26, 2014.
Joe and Sue are ready to retire!
We want to thank all our customers
and suppliers!
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
NFL |
National Football League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Pct
New England
8
2
0
.800
Miami
6
4
0
.600
Buffalo
5
5
0
.500
N.Y. Jets
2
8
0
.200
South
W
L
T
Pct
Indianapolis
6
4
0
.600
Houston
5
5
0
.500
Tennessee
2
8
0
.200
Jacksonville
1
9
0
.100
North
W
L
T
Pct
Cincinnati
6
3
1
.650
Pittsburgh
7
4
0
.636
6
4
0
.600
Baltimore
Cleveland
6
4
0
.600
West
W
L
T
Pct
7
3
0
.700
Denver
7
4
0
.636
Kansas City
San Diego
6
4
0
.600
Oakland
1
10
0
.091
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Pct
Philadelphia
7
3
0
.700
Dallas
7
3
0
.700
N.Y. Giants
3
7
0
.300
Washington
3
7
0
.300
South
W
L
T
Pct
Atlanta
4
6
0
.400
New Orleans
4
6
0
.400
Carolina
3
7
1
.318
Tampa Bay
2
8
0
.200
North
W
L
T
Pct
Detroit
7
3
0
.700
Green Bay
7
3
0
.700
Chicago
4
6
0
.400
Minnesota
4
6
0
.400
West
W
L
T
Pct
Arizona
9
1
0
.900
San Francisco 6
4
0
.600
Seattle
6
4
0
.600
St. Louis
4
6
0
.400
___
Thursday’s Game
Oakland 24, Kansas City 20
Sunday’s Games
Green Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Detroit at New England, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, ppd., snow
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Miami at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Pittsburgh
Monday’s Games
N.Y. Jets vs. Buffalo at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 27
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:30 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 30
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Oakland at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Washington at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Chicago at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Miami at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Diego at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 1
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
9
2
.818
Boston
4
6
.400
Brooklyn
4
7
.364
New York
3
10
.231
Philadelphia
0
11
.000
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
Washington
7
3
.700
Atlanta
5
5
.500
Miami
6
6
.500
Orlando
5
8
.385
Charlotte
4
8
.333
Central Division
W
L
Pct
Chicago
8
4
.667
Milwaukee
7
5
.583
Cleveland
5
5
.500
Indiana
5
7
.417
Detroit
3
9
.250
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
10
2
.833
Memphis
Dallas
9
3
.750
Houston
9
3
.750
San Antonio
7
4
.636
New Orleans
6
4
.600
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
Portland
8
3
.727
Utah
5
7
.417
Denver
4
7
.364
Minnesota
3
7
.300
Oklahoma City 3
10
.231
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
Golden State
8
2
.800
L.A. Clippers
7
4
.636
Sacramento
7
5
.583
Phoenix
7
5
.583
L.A. Lakers
3
9
.250
___
Wednesday’s Games
Boston 101, Philadelphia 90
Dallas 105, Washington 102
L.A. Clippers 114, Orlando 90
Indiana 88, Charlotte 86
San Antonio 92, Cleveland 90
Toronto 96, Memphis 92
Phoenix 88, Detroit 86
Milwaukee 122, Brooklyn 118,3OT
Minnesota 115, New York 99
Denver 107, Oklahoma City 100
L.A. Lakers 98, Houston 92
Thursday’s Games
L.A. Clippers 110, Miami 93
Sacramento 103, Chicago 88
Friday’s Games
Phoenix at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Boston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Washington, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m.
NHL |
GB
—
4½
5
7
9
GB
—
2
2
3½
4
GB
—
1
2
3
5
GB
—
1
1
2½
3
GB
—
3½
4
4½
6
GB
—
1½
2
2
6
National Hockey League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
OT Pts
21
15
5
1 31
Montreal
21
13
6
2 28
Tampa Bay
Detroit
19
10
4
5 25
20
12
8
0 24
Boston
Ottawa
18
9
5
4 22
Toronto
20
10
8
2 22
Florida
17
7
5
5 19
Buffalo
20
5
13
2 12
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
OT Pts
Pittsburgh
17
13
3
1 27
N.Y. Islanders 18
12
6
0 24
Washington
19
9
7
3 21
N.Y. Rangers 19
8
7
4 20
New Jersey
19
8
9
2 18
Philadelphia
18
7
9
2 16
Carolina
19
6
10
3 15
Columbus
18
6
11
1 13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
OT Pts
Nashville
19
12
5
2 26
St. Louis
19
12
6
1 25
Chicago
19
11
7
1 23
Winnipeg
21
10
8
3 23
Minnesota
18
11
7
0 22
Dallas
20
7
9
4 18
Colorado
20
6
9
5 17
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
OT Pts
Anaheim
21
12
4
5 29
Vancouver
20
13
6
1 27
Los Angeles
20
11
5
4 26
Calgary
21
12
7
2 26
San Jose
22
10
9
3 23
Arizona
20
8
10
2 18
Edmonton
19
6
11
2 14
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Thursday’s Games
Anaheim 4, Vancouver 3, SO
Florida 3, San Jose 2, SO
Minnesota 3, Philadelphia 2
Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 2
Montreal 4, St. Louis 1
Ottawa 3, Nashville 2
Detroit 4, Winnipeg 3
Dallas 3, Arizona 1
Washington 3, Colorado 2
Chicago 4, Calgary 3
Los Angeles 3, Carolina 2
Friday’s Games
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, ppd., snow
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Boston at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
St. Louis at Ottawa, 3 p.m.
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Washington, 7 p.m.
Florida at Nashville, 8 p.m.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Laying it in
Sheridan General Jevon Griffin (2) goes for a layup as Sheridan native Devin
Dooley (33) defends during the exhibition game against the Wyoming All Stars
Tuesday night at the Sheridan College Golden Dome.
Los Angeles at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Colorado, 9 p.m.
New Jersey at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Arizona at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
St. Louis at Winnipeg, 4:30 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Arizona at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Vancouver, 9:30 p.m.
AHL |
American Hockey League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
Manchester
15
11
Providence
15
8
Worcester
15
8
St. John’s
19
6
Portland
17
8
East Division
GP
W
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton18
Hershey
16
8
Lehigh Valley 14
7
L
4
6
6
8
9
OL SL
0
0
1
0
1
0
4
1
0
0
L
10
6
6
OL SL
7
1
1
1
1
0
Norfolk
15
6
Binghamton
15
5
Northeast Division
GP
W
Bridgeport
15
10
Syracuse
16
9
Springfield
17
9
Albany
15
7
Hartford
16
8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP
W
Rockford
16
11
Chicago
16
10
Milwaukee
13
10
Grand Rapids 13
6
Lake Erie
14
4
North Division
GP
W
Utica
16
12
Adirondack
16
9
Rochester
16
7
Hamilton
16
6
Toronto
15
5
West Division
GP
W
San Antonio
16
10
Oklahoma City 14
6
Texas
14
6
Charlotte
14
5
Iowa
15
4
9
8
0
2
0
0
L
4
4
7
4
6
OL SL
0
1
3
0
1
0
1
3
2
0
L
4
4
3
6
7
OL SL
0
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
L
2
6
8
8
9
OL SL
2
0
1
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
L
6
4
4
8
11
OL SL
0
0
2
2
4
0
1
0
0
0
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
If Chicken Little were a
reporter for CNN and
squawked, "Every day at least
175 people are hit by the
Ebola virus and 80 people die,
every single day in the U.S.,"
that should qualify as a runaway epidemic -- and a reason to worry. Especially, if
that onslaught had been
going on for years with no
end in sight! And if the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention confirmed
that over 33,000 American citizens would die from Ebola in
2015, it would be horrendous,
right?
But guess what? Those are
not -- and will never be -- the
North American Ebola numbers. Those are the tragic
numbers of gun shootings
and deaths right here in the
U.S. every year.
Many of you have guns,
and that's your right as
Americans and Canadians.
But laws could be passed that
would curtail civil gun violence. Simple things like
assault-weapons bans.
Hunters don't use them to go
deer hunting, but gangs sure
find them handy when dealing drugs and fighting police.
Making those bullets as hard
to come by as oxycodone and
tougher rules about background checks on gun buyers
would help, too.
So don't panic about an
Ebola epidemic that doesn't
exist here. Turn your attention to epidemics that are
well-entrenched and spreading! Gun injuries are numero
uno, but don't get us started
about preventable flu deaths
(one year it totaled 49,000 people) and health-care-related
infections (75,000 who had
these died in 2011)! Let's
worry about the epidemics
we have.
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your
healthiest, tune into "The Dr.
Oz Show" or visit www.sharecare.com.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: How much
interest in an adult child's
sex life is normal? My mother seems obsessed.
I hooked up with a girl a
couple of months ago on a
Friday. She spent most of the
weekend with me. We both
knew it wouldn't go further
than that.
It turns out she works with
my mom, who by chance
found out about the weekend.
Mom has been interrogating
her for every detail every
chance she gets, and she likes
to drop details into my daily
life to embarrass me.
How much interest is a parent supposed to show? Mine
knows my favorite position
and intimate interests. -EXPOSED IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR EXPOSED: It seems
your mother is not only nosy,
but also has a sadistic sense
of humor. She's getting a kick
out of embarrassing you.
Tell her to lay off because
what she's doing is inappropriate, and it's making you
uncomfortable. If she can't
respect your wishes, then
realize it's time you put some
distance between you and
Mama. And to prevent this
from happening in the future,
find out more about the
chicks you hook up with
because this last one sings
like a bird.
DEAR ABBY: The holidays
will soon be here, and so will
something that may seem
petty, but really irks me. My
friends have a large home
with plenty of room, so they
usually host the holiday dinners. We -- the guests -- supply a few side dishes to
accompany the meal. I usually bring several "sides"
because I like to cook and I
enjoy variety.
My problem is presentation. I bring my sides in nice
casserole dishes and do my
best to make them look
appealing. Because I'm not
particularly artistic, it takes
some effort. When I arrive
with the food, my hosts
unceremoniously dump it
into disposable aluminum
containers, wash my dishes
and put them aside.
I hope I don't sound picky,
but even when I have asked
that the items be served in
the dishes I brought, the
hosts say, "Oh, this is easier."
I have said I don't mind
bringing home dirty dishes,
but my wishes are ignored.
Am I being petty? -- FRUSTRATED GUEST IN NEW
YORK
DEAR FRUSTRATED: I
don't think your feelings are
petty. Having put as much
effort as you have into making the food you're preparing
look as appetizing as possible, it's understandable.
However, because this is a
recurring annoyance, consider preparing this year's contributions in disposable aluminum pans. That way, your
creations won't be "dumped."
DEAR ABBY: My wife is a
neatnik who always finds
extra or unexpected things to
do before meeting me at the
car, in the TV room, etc. It
means I always must wait for
her before going anyplace.
I have asked her a thousand times to avoid doing
"one last thing" before coming to meet me. How can I
appeal to her better nature to
avoid tending to every tiny
detail before joining me? Or
am I being too impatient? -WAITING FOR YOUR
ANSWER
DEAR WAITING: I'm sorry,
but I can't give you an unbiased answer because I am
guilty of the same thing, and
it makes my husband crazy,
too. (I suspect your wife and I
are not the only women who
do this.)
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
To receive a collection of
Abby's most memorable -and most frequently requested -- poems and essays, send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby -- Keepers
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447.
Shipping and handling are
included in the price.
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
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Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
SHERIDAN SQUARE
APARTMENTS
Office Space for Rent
200 Smith Street
WESTERN APARTMENTS
RENTS AS LOW AS
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR:
1 bedroom...$460-$560
2 bedroom...$565-$695
1 Bedroom
Income-based Rent
Utilities Included
62 & Older or
Handicapped/Disabled
Dep. $450
Non Smoking Property
Storage Space
This institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employer.
www.bosleymanagementinc.com
(307) 672-8283
672-8681
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Help Wanted
2 BEAUTIFUL SUITES
for lease. (One with
kitchen area). Security,
janitorial, & utilities
included. Conference
room avail to tenants.
672-8700 or 751-3828.
TDD #711
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
E L D O R A D O
2 BR/1 ba., sm. pets
STORAGE Helping you
neg. No smk. $650 +
conquer space. 3856
utils/dep. 752-1306.
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CLEAN 1BR
Ranchester 4Plex no
smk util incl $610+dep
672-8641
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
STADIUM PLACE
TOWNHOMES
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
3 Bedroom $695/month
Available NOW
• Attached Garage
• Washer & Dryer
• Dishwasher
CROWN STORAGE Inc
KROE Lane. 674-9819.
INTERSTATE
STORAGE.
Multiple Sizes avail.
No deposit req'd.
752-6111.
Help Wanted
For showing call 307.763.2682
4 BR 2 BA.
Nice neighborhood,
close to school.
$1800/mo. 673-5555
LOVELY COTTAGE in
Big Horn, 2BD 1BA, XLg
garage,
W/D,
includes all util & lawn
care. $1250/mo, no
smok/pets, 674-7718
3 BR/2 Ba. $950/mo +
util. No smoking/pets.
673-2571 or 751-2198.
2 BR Townhouse, all
maj. appl., gar. No pets.
$775/mo. + utils.
Local # 737-2479.
Income restrictions apply
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY - a
very nice apartment in
the Historic Keenan
Building at 40 E.
Works Street in
downtown Sheridan.
Large living room,
dining room, bedroom,
kitchen and bath. Use
of laundry room,
storage locker and off
street parking.
$850/month includes
utilities. No pets.
References required.
To look at this
apartment call
Rosemary at
(307)672-5838 or
(307)621-0100.
1 BR W/D, $675/mo.
+ util.+ dep., Ref's
checked. No smk.
729 E. Works.
673-1759
3 BR 2 BA 1 car att.
gar. in Dayton. Nice
neighborhood.
No
smok/pets. $1350 + ulit
& dep. 751-0253
1 BDRM. $750/ mo inc.
util. No smoking/pets.
W/D hookup.
673-2571 or 751-2198
2 BR/1 Ba.
$750.00/mo. Water
paid. Central A/C.
220 S. Sheridan Ave.
752-7704
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
MT. VIEW Estates Lot
for
rent.
$310/mo.
Some restrictions. 6559353
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718
NEWER 2 BR.
$950/mo Water/
heat paid. 1000 SF.
818 E. 7th St. Avail.
12/1. 752-7704
VERY NICE, clean,
spacious 2BD. W/D.
$725mo w/ $725 dep.
No pets. Available
immediately. 672-0227
& leave msg.
Garages for Rent
$400/MO.
25'X80' Storage space
w/ overhead door.
307-256-6170
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS!!!!
Full time. Day shift
(6am-2pm).
Medical,
Dental, Vision. Paid
Time off. Control of your
schedule.
Apply
in
person @ Sugarland
Ridge Assisted Living,
1551 Sugarland Drive.
EEO
TEMPORARY
TAX
Preparer.
Flexible
hours.
Experience
required. Send resume
to 810 Coffeen Ave.,
Sheridan
WAGON BOX Inn is
looking
for
cooks,
waiters/waitresses,
bussers,
hostesses,
dishwashers. Apply in
person 103 N. Piney in
Story or call Buck or
Christie 307-683-2444.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
YOUTH
SERVICES
SPEC.
II
(FOOD
SERVICE) Wyo. Girls
School, Sheridan; Class
Code SOYS06-01979,
Target Hiring Range:
$2962-$3702. General
Description:
Meal
preparation for lunch &
dinner in addition to
aligning
the
meal
s e r v i c e
w/guidelines/expectatio
ns for Food Service
Program. recipe input,
menu creation, ordering
food/food
service
supplies,
maintaining
requirements of food
safety/sanitation
guidelines.
Oversee
students working in the
on-campus
kitchen
vocational program &
the evaluations of those
students. For more info
or to apply online go to:
http://www.wyoming.go
v/loc/06012011_1/Page
s/default.aspx or submit
a
State
of
Wyo.
Employment App. to the
HR Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Ave., Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060,
Phone:
(307)777-7188,
Fax:
(307)777-6562, along
w/ transcripts of any
relevant course work.
The State of Wyo. is an
Equal
Opportunity
Employer & actively
supports the ADA &
r e a s o n a b l y
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
Now Hiring
WE ARE currently
seeking vacuum truck
drivers to join our team
in
Wyoming. We provide
24/7 service. He or she
must have class A CDL,
with tankers
endorsement. Housing
available! We also offer
Insurance! $18-$22
starting pay! Contact
our office in Wright, WY
307-464-1146. Contact:
Gilbert Moncibaiz at
307-299-9200. Email:
g.moncibaiz10services
@gmail.com
• Server, Busser
and Hostess
in Greenery
Restaurant
• Maintenance
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the Front Desk.
Help Wanted, Medical
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS NEEDED.
Doubles, Pneumatic,
Flatbed. Home 2-3
nights and weekends.
Good Pay with Benefits.
Call Mon-Fri. 7am-5pm.
1-800-700-6305.
CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANTS!!!!
Full time. Day shift
(6am-2pm).
Medical,
Dental, Vision. Paid
Time off. Control of your
schedule.
Apply
in
person @ Sugarland
Ridge Assisted Living,
1551 Sugarland Drive.
EEO
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
HELP WANTED! Rock
Stop
Subway
now
hiring. Apply at 1514 E.
5th St.
Rating: SILVER
FT INFANT
caregiver.
Apply in person at
the Children's
Center.
Solution to 11/20/14
© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Bids and Notices
ST. PETER'S BAZAAR
SAT. NOV 22ND
8:00 am - 2:00 pm
Episcopal Parish Hall
Lunch Served 11-1
LOST
PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
11/21/14
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
CARS
$
33,495
‘08 CHEVY 3500 HD
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
'14 CHEVY 1500 CREW
'11 CHEVY 1500 CREW LTZ
'12 CHEVY 1500 EXCAB LTZ
'08 CHEVY 3500 HD
'11 CHEVY SUBURBAN
'11 CHEVY 2500 HD
'09 CADILLAC ESCALADE
'12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
'09 GMC SIERRA SLT
'12 GRAND JEEP CHEROKEE
'08 CHEVY SUBURBAN
'12 DODGE JOURNEY CREW
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
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$
34,495
33,995
33,495
33,495
31,995
30,495
29,995
29,995
28,895
27,495
22,995
21,495
'10 CHEVY CAMERO SS
'10 CHEVY CAMERO RS
'13 CHEVY MALIBU 2LT
'14 CHEVY IMPALA
'13 CHEVY SONIC
'13 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
'13 NISSAN SENTRA
'08 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
'07 CHEVY IMPALA LT
'08 CHEVY HHR LT
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
27,495
19,995
18,495
17,995
16,995
15,995
14,995
$ 9,995
$ 9,995
$ 8,795
For rs!
a
e
y
21,495
8
7
‘12 DODGE JOURNEY CREW
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
$
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
'12 CHEVY TRAVERSE
'08 CHEVY TAHOE LT
'07 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
'10 DODGE DAKOTA
'08 GMC SIERRA
'06 CHEVY 1500 CREW
'07 CHEVY SUBURBAN
'06 GMC SIERRA
'05 FORD EXPLORER XLT SPORT TRACK
'06 SUBARU OUTBACK I
'04 HONDA PILOT EX
'03 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
$ 20,995
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$ 18,995
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$ 13,495
$ 10,495
$ 9,995
$ 8,495
$ 4,995
107 E. ALGER • 307.674.6419
OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 4PM
$
14,995
‘13 NISSAN SENTRA
LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/HAMMERCHEVY
www.hammerchevy.com
$
31,995
‘11 CHEVY SUBURBAN
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Bridge
RELATING A
LIFE IN
BRIDGE AND
MUSIC
Augie Boehm
has spent his life
playing bridge
and the piano. He describes
it in the enjoyable "Big
Deal" (Bridge World Books).
Boehm writes about the
players he knew, some of
the famous cheating scandals and the musical shows
with bridge themes that he
has appeared in and helped
to write. He gives the lyrics
to some songs, including my
favorite, "Overbidder" by
Don Simmons, which you
sing to the music for "Old
Man River." He also
reprints some of his articles, many of which appeared in The Bridge World
magazine.
When young, the author
played bridge at a Manhattan club known as The
Bucket, where he started a
lifelong partnership with
Phillip Alder
Richard Margolis, who became a rabbi and is also an
excellent player. Margolis
found a great bid in this
deal from the final day of
the 1999 Reisinger Board-aMatch Teams in Boston.
Look at the North hand
and the auction.
What would you have
bid over West's five
diamonds, which
showed slam interest
in hearts?
It looks obvious to
raise to six diamonds,
or perhaps even jump
to seven diamonds,
hoping to bounce
your opponents into a
hopeless grand slam.
Margolis did better -he bid six clubs. East
doubled, North ran to
six diamonds, and
West doubled that.
But the contract was
unbeatable! Boehm
drew the missing
trump and crossruffed home.
Why bid six clubs?
Because if the opponents
had gone to six hearts,
South would have led the
club nine, a suit-preference
signal for spades. The defense would have gone: club
to the ace, spade ruff and
club ruff for down two.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
Help Wanted, Medical
Help Wanted, Medical
Real Estate
FULL TIME and PRN
C.N.A's Wanted!!
If you are looking for a
position in a NO LIFT
work environment come see us at
Emeritus at Sugarland
Ridge. Our full time
team members enjoy
employment which
offers access to
medical, dental, vision
insurance, paid time off,
flexible scheduling,
computerized
continuing education
system, opportunities
for growth and
advancement, as well
as a warm, family-like
atmosphere. We
currently have
vacancies for evening
shift (2p-10p) certified
nursing assistants. If
you are energetic,
caring and enjoy giving
excellent care to
seniors, then we want
you to join our family.
We are also seeking
PRN C.N.A. applicants
as well. Apply in person
at 1551 Sugarland
Ridge.
BEAUTIFUL HOME for
Sale in the Meadowlark
School area. 2150 SF.
4 BR/1.5 Ba. C/A. Lge
Fam. rm w/gas
fireplace. Beautiful oak
cabinets. Exquisite
wrap around deck w/
patio. Nice corner lot.
Excellent condtition.
Move in ready.
$259,000.
Call 752-4286.
To Give Away
FREE PALLETS, Sheridan
Press building in back. 144
Grinnell. Wood pallets
ONLY!
Real Estate
FOR SALE BY
OWNER 2 BR.
Renovated. NICE!
$105,000. 751-0194.
Utility Trailers
IDEAL HOLIDAY
GIFT.
A camper which is
homemade and is just
the right size to pull
behind a car or small
truck.
One
axle.
Perfect
for
the
overnight trip into the
Bighorns.
Features
stove & icebox. Can
sleep two. In good
condition.
With
cabinets.
Clean.
$1,000 or best offer.
Call Susan,
(970) 209-8448.
PICKLES
SATURDAY
November 22nd
Hints from Heloise
Dear Heloise: We found a
box of very old (1892-1930)
U.S. SILVER COINS that
my father collected. Unfortunately, he wrapped and labeled each small group in
masking or drafting tape.
They probably were
wrapped more than 30 years
ago, and the tape is dried
out. How do I get the tape
and glue residue off the
coins without damaging
them? -- John D., Cedar
Grove, N.J.
John, I have a feeling that
many of my readers are
going to be running into the
same situation with the
large population of "The
Greatest Generation" passing away. First, do no harm.
You don't really know what
you have there, and the
coins might be worth a little
or a lot.
Try simply soaking a
stack in warm water and a
drop of mild dish soap or
even hair shampoo. This
should soften and dissolve
the tape and glue so you can
peel or rub off the tape with
your fingers or a soft cloth.
Don't use anything harsh or
abrasive. You don't want to
scratch the coins!
Don't try to "clean them
up," either! Too many people make that mistake,
which actually can cause
the value of the coins to go
down! So, leave them be
once you get the tape and
glue off. -- Hugs, Heloise
SEND A GREAT HINT
TO:
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
San Antonio, TX 782795000
Fax: 1-210-HELOISE
Email:
Heloise(at)Heloise.com
TRAVEL HINT
Dear Heloise: When traveling with my daughter, I
bring along a small umbrella stroller. It makes the
trip easier, but the airport
is difficult. I saved a cloth
bag that collapsible chairs
come in and slip the stroller
into it. Mine has a strap
that I use to carry the
stroller when not in use. -C.M. in San Antonio
RED STAIN
Dear Heloise: I've pretreated a red-sauce stain on
a cream-colored knit shirt
several times with liquid
laundry detergent and
spray remover. But I still
have some spots left. I've
washed it several times, but
9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m
MODEL HOME
2312 Larch Lane
Heloise
I haven't dried it. Any suggestions? -- Patti, via email
Patti, sounds like you
have tried all of the right
things. Sometimes a stain is
just a stain and will not
come out. Anything red is a
"RED FLAG" that it's going
to take work. Since the
shirt is cream-colored, try a
little hydrogen peroxide on
a cotton swab. Dab only on
the spot, let sit for an hour
or so and see if it lightens
up. Then wash in cold
water. That's about all you
can hope for. Last resort:
Can you put a small pin or
embroider something over
the spot? -- Heloise
HEATER HELP
Dear Heloise: In North
Dakota, winter can get very
cold. We can have a "headbolt heater" (engine-block
heater -- Heloise) installed
to keep the car's engine
warm so the vehicle is easier to start when needed.
Most North Dakota motels/hotels have plug-ins to
accommodate the customer.
To prevent somebody from
taking your extension cord,
park the front tire on it. -D.H. in North Dakota
$305,900 • MLS# 14-713
Hosted by Mandy Swaney
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m
15 Cottontail Lane
NEW LISTING
$369,000 • MLS# 14-892
Hosted by Marty Anderson
11:00 a.m. - NOON
1419 Birch St
NEW LISTING
$219,000 • MLS# 14-849
Hosted by Mandy Swaney
Noon- 1:00 p.m.
1277 Woodwind
WOODLAND PARK
$206,500 • MLS# 14-602
Hosted by Doris Moeller
306 N. Main St. Sheridan, WY
(307) 672-8911
Office Hours Sat 9am-2pm
www.eracrc.com
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Jamie Campbell Bower was
born in London, England,
on this date in 1988. This
birthday guy played the
role of Caius in the "Twilight" franchise. His other
film work includes "The
Mortal Instruments: City Of
Bones," "Sweeney Todd: The
Demon Barber of Fleet
Street" and "Harry Potter
and the Deathly Hallows:
Part 1." Bower also starred
as King Arthur in the 2011
mini-series "Camelot."
ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19):
Dare to be different. Others
may not agree with your
views or opinions but
they'll certainly respect the
courage of your convictions. Thinking outside the
box will be the key to overcoming obstacles that have
held you back in the past.
TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20):
All's fair in love and war. A
relationship should be a
partnership and not a dictatorship. If one party begins
making rules and decrees,
the other should stand up
for themselves. An outdoor
excursion could clear the
air.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Pay attention. Being careless with your words could
spark a misunderstanding
with someone who's overly
sensitive. Remember who
you're talking to. Steer clear
of confrontations and keep
the mood lighthearted.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Look before you leap. A
new love interest may have
your heart all aflutter, but
unless you share a few common interests, the physical
attraction won't last long.
Get to know the person behind that pretty face before
progressing any further.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't burn bridges behind
you. While you may well be
on the path to a bright future, don't forget about the
past experiences that have
brought you here. Be wary
of signing on the dotted line
or entering into an agreement.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Make dreams into reality.
With your perceptions
keener than usual, you can
set the wheels in motion
that will get your ideas off
the ground. Follow your gut
instincts, as they'll lead you
on the path to success.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.):
Chart your course. Make a
list of reasonable objectives
and set out to achieve them.
You may not create a masterpiece, but you can eliminate some of those
Jeraldine Saunders
annoying little household
tasks that have accumulated over time.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Confidence breeds success. If you're focus on the
idea that your latest undertaking simply can't fail,
then it won't. Carve out
some of your precious spare
time to keep the house tidy
and organized.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Out with the old, in
with the new. It's time to
break away from the past
and make a fresh start with
a new, improved outlook.
That's not to say that a few
of the old ways that have
served you in the past aren't
well worth keeping.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Where there's a will,
there's a way. You're capable of achieving any goal
you set your mind to if
you're determined enough.
Your enthusiasm and grit
will rally others to support
your cause and cheer you
along the way.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): A rolling stone gathers
no moss. Keep the momentum going by using the confidence gained from
previous successes to move
on to bigger and better triumphs. There's little to be
gained from taking a break
now.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20):
Don't expect others to read
your mind. If you have
something to say, say it.
You're setting an unrealistic standard if you think
others will know what's
troubling you simply by
looking at you.
IF NOVEMBER 22 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: Competiveness can help you get
far during the next 2-3
weeks, but you'll be wise to
tone down your flamboyance. You could easily be
overly confident and take
on extra responsibilities
that, while they may further your ambitions, could
become a millstone that
weighs you down. Do what
you're supposed to do in December, but don't take risks
or make crucial changes.
Late January and February
are good times for social activities, joining a club or
other organization, or putting key financial and business strategies into motion.
You can easily make serious errors of judgment in
March and April. Authority
figures could set a high
mark, so focus on doing
your best and put romantic
fantasies on the back
burner.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT 4TH JUDICIAL
DISTRICT STATE OF WYOMING, COUNTY OF SHERIDAN
Civil Action No. 2014-290
Jesse Bradley, Plaintiff,
Vs.
Mariah Bradley, Defendant
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
NOTICE TO Mariah Bradley DEFENDANT CURRENT
ADDRESS: Unknown
You are notified that a Complaint for Divorce, Civil
Action No. 2014-290 has been filed in the Wyoming
Districkt Court for the 4th Judicial District, whose
address is 224 S. Main, Suite B#11 seeking dissolution of
your marriage to Jesse Bradley and a
Decree of Divorce in his/her favor. Unless you file an
Answer or otherwise respond to this Complaint for
Divorce within 30 days following the last date of
publication of this notice, a Default Judgment will be
taken against you and a Decree of Divorce will be taken
against you and a Decree of Divorce will be granted.
DATED this 28 day of October 2014.
BY /S/ Moana Songer, Clerk of
District Court/Deputy
Publish: October 31, 2014 and November 7, 14, 21, 2014.
FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE
WHEREAS, default in the payment of principal and
interest has occurred under the terms of a promissory
note (the "Note") dated March 5, 2009, executed and
delivered by Carl Daniel Bradshaw (“Mortgagor”) to
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as
nominee for Flagstar Bank, FSB, a federally chartered
savings bank, and a real estate mortgage (the
"Mortgage") of the same date securing the Note, which
Mortgage was executed and delivered by said
Mortgagor, to said Mortgagee, and which Mortgage was
recorded on March 9, 2009, at Reception No. 634618, in
Book 731, at Page 0098 in the public records in the
office of the County Clerk and ex-officio Register of
Deeds in and for Sheridan County, State of Wyoming;
and
WHEREAS, the mortgage was assigned for value as
follows:
Assignee: Flagstar Bank, FSB
Assignment dated: December 19, 2013
Assignment recorded: December 27, 2013
Assignment recording information: at Reception No.
2013-709744, in Book 876, at Page 494
All in the records of the County Clerk and ex-officio
Register of Deeds in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming.
WHEREAS, the Mortgage contains a power of sale
which by reason of said default, the Mortgagee declares
to have become operative, and no suit or proceeding
has been instituted at law to recover the debt secured
by the Mortgage, or any part thereof, nor has any such
suit or proceeding been instituted and the same
discontinued; and
WHEREAS, written notice of intent to foreclose the
Mortgage by advertisement and sale has been served
upon the record owner and the party in possession of
the mortgaged premises at least ten (10) days prior to
the commencement of this publication, and the
amount due upon the Mortgage on the date of first
publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of
$271,969.79 which sum consists of the unpaid principal
balance of $257,806.07 plus interest accrued to the
date of the first publication of this notice in the amount
of $10,312.24, plus attorneys' fees, costs expended, and
accruing interest and late charges after the date of first
publication of this notice of sale;
WHEREAS, the property being foreclosed upon may be
subject to other liens and encumbrances that will not
be extinguished at the sale. Any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid;
NOW, THEREFORE Flagstar Bank, FSB, as the
Mortgagee, will have the Mortgage foreclosed as by law
provided by causing the mortgaged property to be sold
at public venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and
for Sheridan County, Wyoming to the highest bidder for
cash at 10:00 o`clock in the forenoon on December 5,
2014 at the North door of the Sheridan County
Courthouse in the City of Sheridan, Sheridan County,
State of Wyoming, 224 S. Main Street, Sheridan,
Wyoming 82801, for application on the above described
amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged
property being described as follows, to-wit:
Lots 8, 9, 10, Block 6 of the Original Town of Lodore,
Sheridan County, Wyoming. Parcel ID # APN #10457
With an address of 9 Lodore Ave, Sheridan, WY 82801,
nka Story, WY 82842 (the undersigned disclaims
liability for any error in the address).
Together with all improvements thereon situate and all
fixtures and appurtenances thereto.
Dated: October 29, 2014 Flagstar Bank, FSB
By: Sheldon A. Smith
Halliday, Watkins & Mann, P.C.
376 East 400 South, Suite 300
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801-355-2886
HWM File # 43729
Publish: October 31, 2014, November 7,14,21, 2014.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Wyoming
Statutes, Annotated, Sections 34-4-104 and 34-4-105
(2014), that a certain mortgage dated December 29,
2010, which was executed and delivered by Oliver R.
Simonis and Tawny D. Simonis, husband and wife, to
First Interstate Bank, a Montana Corporation, and
recorded in the County Clerk’s Office, Sheridan County,
Wyoming, on December 29, 2010, in Book 789 at Page
544 as Document No. 2010-685185, and which
mortgage was assigned to Wyoming Community
Development Authority on March 17, 2011, and recorded
in the County Clerk’s Office, Sheridan County, Wyoming
on March 22, 2011, in Book 795 at Page 313 as Document
No. 2011-687025, will be foreclosed by a sale to the
highest bidder at a public auction of the premises
described pursuant to a power of sale contained in the
mortgage.
The premises that are described in the mortgage are as
follows:
Beginning at an existing rebar with
cap marking the SE corner of original
Lot 9, said point also being on the
West right-of-way of Saberton Ave
nue and the North right-of-way of a
sixteen foot alley; thence along the
right-of-way of said alley
S89º44’08”W, 100.56 feet to an
existing rebar marking the SW
corner of original Lot 8; thence
along the original West line of Lot 8,
N00º09’38”W, 64.88 feet to a set
rebar with cap RLS 5300; thence
leaving said original line
N89º39’47”E, 100.35 feet to a set
rebar with cap RLS5300, said point
being on the original East line of Lot
9, also being the West right-of-way
of Saberton Avenue; thence along
said right-of-way S00º20’53”E,
65.00 feet to the point of
beginning.
The mortgage contains a street address of 956
Saberton Avenue
The above sale will be conducted by the Sheriff or the
Sheriff’s Deputy at the front door of the Courthouse in
Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyoming at 10:00 a.m. on
December 12, 2014. Oliver R. Simonis and Tawny D.
Simonis have defaulted in the terms of the note and
mortgage and the undersigned claims $140,464.82
interest due on the mortgage, plus per diem interest of
$15.99 on the unpaid balance to the date of sale, plus
reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses of sale.
The property being foreclosed upon may be subject to
other liens and encumbrances that will not be
extinguished at the sale and any prospective purchaser
should research the status of title before submitting a
bid.
DATED this 7th day of November, 2014.
Wyoming Community Development
Authority, Mortgagee
By: James R. Bell #5-1606
Murane & Bostwick, LLC
201 North Wolcott
Casper WY 82601
307-234-9345/
Fax: 307-237-5110
Attorney for Mortgagee
Publish: November 14, 21, 28 and December 5, 2014.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACCEPTANCE
AND FINAL PAYMENT AND SETTLEMENT
Notice is hereby given that on the 31st day of December
2014, final settlement will be made by Sheridan County
Airport, for and on account of a contract with Grimm’s
Pump and Industrial Supply for the Sheridan County
Airport – Bid Package C-2 Self Fueling Station Project.
The above work having been completed and accepted
according to the plans and specifications of Vista West
Engineering, Inc. and the above date being the 41st day
after the first publication of this notice, the said
Contractor will be entitled to final settlement and
payment therefore.
Any person, partnership, association, agency or
corporation who shall have any unpaid claims against
said Contractor for or on account of the furnishing of
labor, materials, equipment, sustenance, provisions, or
other supplies used or consumed by such contractor
and/or subcontractor in or about the performance of
said work may at any time, up to and including the date
of final settlement and payment, file a verified
statement of any and all amounts due on account of
such claim with: Sheridan County Airport, 908 W.
Brundage Lane, Sheridan, WY 82801
Failure on the part of the claimant to file such
statement prior to final settlement and payment will
relieve absolutely Sheridan County Airport, for all or any
liability for such claim.
John Stopka, Sheridan County
Airport Manager
Publish: November 21, 28, and December 5, 2014.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to the Wyoming Administrative Procedure Act
and the Wyoming Public Service Commission’s
(Commission) Procedural Rules and Special
Regulations, notice is hereby given of the application of
Powder River Energy Corporation (PRECorp or the
Company) for authority to adjust rates and implement
new tariffs effective January 10, 2015, as more fully
described below.
PRECorp is a public utility as defined in W.S. § 37-1101(a)(vi)(C), subject to the jurisdiction of the
Commission under W.S. § 37-2-112.
PRECorp filed its application on November 10, 2014,
requesting authority to: [i] rename the Large Power
Transmission Level (LPT) rate schedule to Large Power
Transmission – Coal Mines (LPT-CM) in order to serve
members in the coal industry and to better define those
eligible to be served on this rate; [ii] implement the
Large Power Transmission – General (LPT-G) rate which
will accommodate large loads taking service at a
transmission level and are not classified as coal mines
or coal bed methane members; [iii] revise the Tariff
Rate Rider to include the addition of LPT-G; and [iv]
change the applicability on the Billing Adjustments rate
schedule to include treatment of the LPT-G rate
schedule in the Cost of Power Adjustment rate
mechanism.
PRECorp states the current membership’s rates charged
for electric service will not change and all new members
defined within the LPT-G rate class would be served at
the new rate.
PRECorp’s application is on file with the Commission at
its offices in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and at the Company's
offices located in Sundance and Gillette, Wyoming, and
may be inspected there by any interested person during
regular business hours.
Anyone desiring to file a statement, protest,
intervention petition or request for a public hearing in
this matter must do so, in writing, with the Commission
on or before December 17, 2014. Any petitions filed shall
set forth the grounds of the proposed intervention or
request for hearing as well as the position and the
interest of the petitioner in this proceeding. Please be
sure to mention Docket No. 10014-156-CT-14, in your
correspondence.
If you wish to intervene in this matter or request a public
hearing that you will attend, or want to make a
statement, a protest or a public comment, and you
require reasonable accommodation for a disability, call
the Commission at (307) 777-7427 or write to the
Wyoming Public Service Commission, 2515 Warren
Avenue, Suite 300, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002, to
make arrangements. Communications impaired persons
may also contact the Commission through Wyoming
Relay by dialing 711.
Dated: November 17, 2014.
Publish November 21, 28, 2014.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
Notice to all Livestock Producers:
The Predator Management District of Sheridan County,
Wyoming will hold its annual meeting at the Elks Lodge,
45 W. Brundage, Sheridan, Wyoming at 6:30pm on
December 9, 2014. Election of Board Members will be
held to fill the expiring terms of Ralph Foster, Arty
Thomas and Richard Smith, to set predator fees for
2015, and to consider any other business to come before
the meeting.
Ralph Foster
President
Publish: November 21, 2014.
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Your Right
Friday Noon –
To Know
and be informed of
It will be published in
government legal
Wednesday’s paper.
proceedings is embodied in
public notices. This
• Complete information, descriptions
newspaper urges every
citizen to read and study
these notices.
We strongly advise those
seeking
further information to
exercise their right of access
and billing information are required
with each legal notice. A PDF is
required if there are any signatures,
with a Word Document attached.
• Failure to include this information
WILL cause delay in publication. All
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Ralph Kaiser is pictured here in
1947 on a tractor with Chuck Ellenwood on the ground. A Farmhand threshing machine is in the
background. The photo is from
the Lenz collection in the Sheridan County Museum's Memory
Book project.
legal notices must be paid in full
before
an
"AFFIDAVIT
PUBLICATION" will be issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press
legal advertising department at
672-2431 if you have questions.
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
OF
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014

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