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Thunder Bay
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WWW.TBNEWSWATCH.COM
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014
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Task force says region running out of time to convert generating station to gas /4
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Firefighters launch annual
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ANNUAL EVENT: Lakehead’s Jay Gilbert (left) and Mike Quesnele gather stuffed animals Saturday night during the team’s teddy bear toss.
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Getting storm ready
T H U N D E R B AY
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
n times of emergency, it’s best to
act like the Boy Scouts – be prepared.
That was the message delivered
Wednesday morning by a group of
community partners, including
Thunder Bay Fire Rescue Chief John
Hay, who recommended households
be able to sustain themselves for 72
hours when disaster strikes.
Hay said too often the public thinks
it’s OK to call emergency services
for help in non-emergency situations.
Taking those few preparedness
steps ahead of time can alleviate
many problems and help bridge the
gap until help can arrive.
“If we tried to take care of all the
inconvenienced as well as all of the
threatened, we could quickly run out BE PREPARED:Fire Chief John Hay urges households to be sustainable for 72 hours.
of resources,” Hay said.
On top of knowing your own riskThe city, together with partners candles, extra car keys and cash,
including Thunder Bay Hydro, the important papers, a manual can management strategy, it’s important
Red Cross and the Lakehead Social opener, non-perishable food and to think of friends and family. And
Planning Council, have joined forces bottled water, two litres per person, the risks in each home are different.
to create the Storm Ready campaign, per day.
which provides tips to residents to
Evacuation kits should include
Unique
deal with a variety of different disas- clothing, blankets or a sleeping bag,
“There are some people who
ters.
medication, toilet paper and even actually have risks with regards to
With more frequent severe weather forms of entertainment for running water without power. There
incidents likely at the local level prolonged absences from the home.
are other people who have risks
according to climateHay said most people because of medication or health
change
experts
at
have many of the items issues. You need to really take a look
EarthCare Thunder Bay, “We realized already in their homes.
at what the risks are and you need to
the timing is right, Hay
Thunder
Bay
Hydro
make a plan,” Dias said.
that people
said.
spokeswoman Eileen Dias
“That plan is going to involve all
really were
said the campaign is about members of your family and your
not prepared keeping people safe during household and you need to be
Information sent
to deal with an emergency.
thinking of those people in your life
Thunder Bay Hydro will
“We saw the gap when who may need help during an emerbe including a brochure in
power
the ice storm hit the Greater gency.”
monthly billing starting
outages.”
Toronto Area and we saw
The brochure also includes a link
this month, detailing the
EILEEN DIAS
what happens when a to the Storm Ready quiz, to help
basics of emergency
minor outage happens here residents determine if they are
preparedness.
First and foremost each residence in the city of Thunder Bay. We prepared for the worst Mother
should have an emergency kit, either realized that people really were not Nature has to offer and cautions the
to live off of for three days or to grab prepared to deal with power outages. public to be aware of upcoming
And in particular a winter-storm forecasts, tune into local radio
on the run in case of an evacuation.
Items on the list include a flash- power outage could be really devas- stations during an emergency and to
call 211 for information about
light, a radio and telephone that can tating,” Dias said.
Being prepared isn’t just thinking disrupted services or an extended
work without electricity, spare
emergency.
batteries, a first-aid kit, low-profile about your own needs, she added.
Weather Forecast
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
A mix of sun and
clouds
Mainly Sunny
Cloudy with
sunny breaks
Mixed precip.
Snow
Probability of Precipitation: 20%
HIGH -9 LOW -14
Probability of Precipitation: 30%
HIGH -5 LOW -15
Probability of Precipitation: 30%
HIGH 2 LOW -4
Probability of Precipitation: 60%
HIGH 2 LOW -5
Probability of Precipitation: 80%
HIGH -1 LOW -6
LEITH DUNICK
I
3
4
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Energy crisis could happen in 2015
CITY HALL
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
he Ontario Power Authority is starting to come around, but
Northwestern Ontario could find itself
without enough electricity as early as
next year.
Iain Angus, co-chairman of the
Energy Task Force, says for that reason
alone it’s imperative to convince the
province and its subsidiaries to proceed
with the conversion of the Thunder Bay
Power Generating Station to natural
gas.
Angus and the ETF met Monday with
the city’s Intergovernmental Affairs
Committee, showcasing projections
that suggest running the plant on
biomass will likely leave businesses
and residents in the region facing
T
rolling power outages if the demand
can’t be met.
It’s time to put the gloves on and put
up a good fight, Angus said.
It’s not just a question of maybe, he
added, even with the addition of an
east-west tie line.
“This is when we’re going to run out
of power and this is when we’re going
to need these facilities up and running,”
Angus said.
“It creates a greater sense of urgency
once we look at those kind of
numbers.”
2021 Atikokan will need to produce a
continuous stream of 50 MW of electricity, while the TBGS will be required
to produce 150 MW.
The province has agreed to convert
the Thunder Bay plant to biomass, but
only as a stopgap when power use hits
capacity.
Short-sighted
Dangerous levels
Using ETF projections, should the
region face a drought, an occurrence
that happens roughly every four years
when El Nino strikes, it would not have
the energy needed to meet demand in
2015.
As early as 2016 the region will
require 85 MW of continuous power
from the TBGS and by 2018 the
requirement jumps 300 MW, along
with 200 MW from the Atikokan
LEITH DUNICK
Task force says OPA
and province must
convert TBGS to gas
IAIN ANGUS: Energy Task Force chair
says it’s time to push for TBGS conversion.
Generating Station.
In a best-case scenario, with highwater conditions, the ETF projects by
And, Angus said, the province has
already cut its biomass order in half,
from 15,000 tonnes to 7,500 tonnes.
That’s enough to keep the plant
producing 150 MW of power for 31
days, or 40 MW for 122 days.
Angus says the good news is the
province is starting to come around.
“The first time we met with them
they were suggesting that the load
growth in the Northwest would be
something like 80 MW. We were
saying it was going to be 700, 800 MW.
And they’ve moved significantly and
they’ve moved again in the last goaround,” Angus said.
“But we still disagree with them at
the 2018 and beyond (projection) that
we’re going to need much more power
than they think we’re going to. And it’s
our job to keep hammering at them to
let them know.”
Angus said his urgency to hammer
the message home results from the fact
it will take at least two years to
complete the TBGS conversion to
natural gas.
Next steps involve an economic
analysis of the conversion, a meeting
with Northern Development and Mines
Minister Michael Gravelle and a Nov.
26 presentation to the Northwestern
Ontario Municipal Association.
The ETF is also hoping to meet with
OPG CEO Tom Mitchell when he
makes a public apology to Gull Bay
residents later this month and add the
issue to the Ontario Good Roads
Association agenda.
ETF member Rod Bosch said slowly,
but surely, the OPA is starting to understand.
“They are very begrudgingly admitting we are right,” he said.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
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ON US.
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ever to find exactly what you’re looking for.
JODI LUNDMARK
w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
HONOURED: People flooded to Waverley Park last Tuesday despite chilly temperatures for the Remembrance Day ceremony.
Sacrifices remembered
T H U N D E R B AY
By Jodi Lundmark, Matt Vis &
Jamie Smith – TB Source
obin Rickards knows he’s lucky
to be alive.
A corporal with the Lake Superior
Scottish Regiment, Rickards served
with the Canadian Armed Forces for
11 years, which included three tours
to Afghanistan.
During the first tour in 2006, he
served with Cpl. Anthony Boneca,
who was killed on July 9, 2006 at
the age of 21, and Rickards said it
was a roll of the dice that determined which battalion they ended
up in.
“Had it been me in Tony’s circumstance, I wouldn’t be able to enjoy
the family I have and the life I have.
I’m very conscious of things like
that on Remembrance Day,” said
Rickards, who attended the
Remembrance Day service in
Waverley Park on Nov. 11
R
Ultimate sacrifice
Boneca was just one of the
Canadian men and women who lost
their lives in conflicts throughout
the last century to be remembered in
last Tuesday’s ceremony.
Waverley Park flooded with
people braving the cold weather to
attend the service and Rickards said
it was great to see people remembering the sacrifices that have been
made on their behalf.
“For me, it’s reinforcement of the
fact the Canadian public values the
service that Canadian Forces
members have done and continue to
do in their honour,” he said.
Second Lieut. Kari Ranta-Ojala
has been serving with the LSSR for
three years and said the turnout
shows how much the community
cares about local servicemen and
women.
“Our community of Thunder Bay
supports its troops and we’ve seen
that through how they look after the
troops when they come home,” he
said.
For himself, the day is about
focusing on what Canadian soldiers
did during all the conflicts
throughout history.
“Their sacrifice allowed us to live
the current life we have now. That’s
something I’m grateful for,” said
Ranta-Ojala.
“They gave us a gift that we can
continue our lives in our lifestyle
and allow Canada to maintain its
freedom and independence.”
Every Remembrance Day
ceremony means a lot to Elmer
Auld but he said this year carries
special significance.
The Second World War veteran
said the recent killings of
uniformed military members Cpl.
Nathan Cirillo, 24, and Warrant
Officer Patrice Vincent, 52, cast a
solemn shadow as people from
coast to coast stop and recognize
the contributions of the nation’s
armed forces.
“It’s a sad thing, these two young
fellows who got killed in the past
month. Just terrible,” Auld said
Tuesday following the annual
Remembrance Day ceremony at the
Fort William Gardens.
“I think it opens people’s eyes to
see what the heck happened years
ago…It really hits your heart.”
At least 2,000 people filled the
stands at the Gardens for the
ceremony, which saluted all of
Canada’s contributions to global
conflict and recognized the individuals who made the ultimate
sacrifice for their country.
Honoured
Frank Banning and John Baptiste
“Sunshine” Louis grew up on Fort
William First Nation doing everything together. When war came
they enlisted together and side-byside stormed the beach at
Normandy on June 6,1944, the last
day of Louis’ life. Banning would
live to 84, passing away in 2010.
And yet there they were side-byside again Tuesday morning during
Fort William First Nation’s
Remembrance Day ceremony,
soaring as eagles over the crowd of
hundreds who journeyed to Mount
McKay to honour First Nations
veterans.
Banning’s daughter Catherine
knew it was the two as soon as the
pipe ceremony, which invites
ancestors in, began.
“To honour us with their presence
and their wisdom and to honour us
with the peace that they bring with
them,” she said.
5
6
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Editorial
EDITORIAL
ETF makes
good case
he Energy Task Force is at it again,
attempting to convince the province
to convert the Thunder Bay Generating
Station to natural gas.
They seem to haave a compelling
argument.
If their projections are right, the
region could be facing rolling blackouts if available power can’t meet
demand.
Under high-water conditions the
region should be OK, but as soon as
water levels drop, the ETF projects
shortages.
According to their figures, in 2017,
the TBGS will need to output a continuous 150 MW supply of electricity, 300
MW by 2018 and full capacity for
months at a time beyond 2020.
The situation gets worse under lowwater conditions.
It sounds like the Ontario Power
Authority is starting to listen to what
the ETF has to say.
But with a two-year window needed
to convert the first unit to natural gas,
time is running out.
Should the ETF’s projections be
remotely close and many of the mines
they say are going to open in the next
few years actually do, we could be
facing a crisis.
Yes, it will be expensive to convert
the plant, but the impact to the
economy by not seeing the conversion
through could be even more dramatic
to residents and businesses.
T
C O N TAC T U S :
87 North Hill Street,
Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 5V6
Ph: 807-346-2600 • Fax: 807-345-9923
Editor: Leith Dunick 346-2650
[email protected]
Reporter: Jodi Lundmark 346-3558
[email protected]
Web Manager: Scott Paradis 346-2527
[email protected]
Web Reporter: Jamie Smith 346-2591
[email protected]
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[email protected]
Production:
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Misguided opinion
To the editor:
take great issue with the timing of
J.R. Shermack’s opinion.
Is the point of his opinion to cancel
Remembrance Day, to not make it a
stat holiday for all, or is it just him
reliving his youth and ignorance of the
meaning of the day?
Let me start with his paragraph of
“But now might be a good time to be
mindful about old cliches like Lest We
Forget.”
To reduce that solemn statement to
“an old cliche” not only shows his
ignorance to the plight that veterans
had to endure but also to the families
that lost sons and daughters.
He goes on to make assumptions of
what the mothers and veterans are
thinking on Remembrance Day, both of
which I am sure he is neither, nor has he
bothered to speak to any of them.
The notion of making remembrance
day a stat. holiday for all is the only
wise thing he proposes.
As veterans must return to the work
force not all companies give the
veterans the day off to remember their
fallen.
I do believe it will help him along
with others who are the “benefactors
of the millions of young men who
died to keep us free and preserve our
way of life” to really understand it all,
maybe even learn to respect those who
have served and their choice to answer
the call of duty, not only by their
government but by the millions of
people around the world that can’t or
don’t have the ability to stand up to
the next crazy leader to take over.
Too often we hear of the politicians
that send our troops off to war and
how that is the standard reaction to a
crisis in some far away land.
I had served in the air force for
twenty years and even served on a
peace keeping mission, although I am
called a veteran I don’t consider
myself in the same league as the true
veterans for which the day of remembrance is for. My grandfather served
in the First World War and every year
I think of him and his sacrifice to
volunteer to take up the fight. He
survived the war, but should still be
honoured.
In my opinion J.R. Shermack should
take his freedom (that he doesn’t
understand) and interview some of the
victims of the last 20 years.
Those that have had to endure the
lack of rights and freedoms that
should be afforded to every human
being.
Stop dwelling on the Vietnam war
and pick up a newspaper to see what
the hardship of the human race outside
of our borders are. Better yet, give up
his press pass and passport, move over
to some of the hot spots and live what
they are living.
It saddens me to think that there is
I
still this level of ignorance around
Remembrance Day.
Lorne Schaump,
Thunder Bay
Remembrance thanks
To the editor: n behalf of the Executive,
Members, Staff, Volunteers and
Ladies Auxiliary of the Royal
Canadian Legion, Port Arthur Branch
No 5, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all that helped out this
year at the Waverly Park Cenotaph
Parade:
G Silver Cross Mother Mrs. Carol
Klukie & Escort,
G The City of Thunder Bay, Parks,
Roads, Community Services, Parking
Authority,
G HMCS Griffon,
G Lake Superior Scottish
Regiment,
G Signals Regiment,
G LSSR Cadets
G 84th Squadron
G RCAC
G RCSCC “Vindictive” and Band
G MacGillivray Pipe Band
G Parade Marshall
G A and B Company Commanders
G Memorial Address Speaker
G Master of Ceremonies
G Vigil Commander
G Firing Party Commander
O
G Bugler and Reviewing Officer
G The Legions
G Veteran’s Associations
G Police Marching Contingents
G Photographer
G Cenotaph
G Wealth
G Silver Cross Mother’s Luncheon
and Cadet Luncheon Coordinators,
G All the individuals and
organizations that placed wreaths
G Thunder Bay Police
G Thunder Bay Transit
G Superior North EMS
G Magnus Theatre
G St. Paul’s United Church
G Northern Flight Training Centre
G All of the local media, Dougall
Media, Thunder Bay Source and the
Chronicle-Journal for their extensive
coverage,
G The citizens of Thunder Bay and
surrounding Districts for their attendance,
And most of all, the veterans.
Robert Cutbush, CD
President
Royal Canadian Legion
Port Arthur Branch No 5
Pointless fun good thing
To the editor:
am writing in response to the article
“Television needs silly, pointless
fun.” (Thunder Bay Source, Thursday,
I
November 6, 2014).
I do not agree. Pointless fun is just
that—pointless. There are no benefits
to be reaped from a lazy brain.
If people need a chance to escape
life and just calm down, why not
read a book?
Reading for even six minutes
reduces stress levels by two-thirds,
more than taking a walk, drinking
tea or coffee, or playing video
games. (Anonymous. “Reading ‘can
help reduce stress’” The Telegraph
March 30, 2009.)
Or how about listening to music?
I’ve heard from various people and
sources that certain types of music
are good for the brain.
The author of the article had the
idea that silly TV shows could
encourage family watching and
bring families together for a laugh.
If the goal is silly, happy family
time, then it would be much better to
have a family joke night with
everyone contributing their favorite
jokes, or to read a humorous book
out loud together.
This would be more inclusive,
more personal, more relaxing, and
much more likely to build happy
memories than just watching a TV
show—however funny it may be—
together.
Kayla Falkenholt,
Thunder Baay
7
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Perspective
Digging for dirt
TOY MOUNTAIN
Sand is the second most consumed resource on Earth
By J.R. Shermack
Special to TB Source
hen I was a kid growing up in
Westfort, sand was a big part
of my life and playing in the sand
was one of life’s pleasures.
Sand came in many forms (boxes,
piles, lots) and most backyards had
an area reserved for young diggers,
scrapers and Tonka truck drivers.
Sometimes we built dirt roads
and raced our toy cars around the
sand pile and some days we would
dig deep holes and fill them with
water.
It seemed like important work at
the time but it never occurred to us
that the stuff we were digging,
moving and throwing at each other
was a valuable resource.
And we never even imagined a
day when all the sand would be
gone and criminals operating
illegal sand mines would kill to
protect their dirt stash.
But believe it or not, that’s
exactly what is happening on
beaches, on the ocean floor and in
river beds all over the world.
I’ve been learning about a global
sand shortage that is driving up dirt
prices and encouraging the dirt
mafia to get involved in illegal
sand mining.
It is also causing ecological and
economic hardship as sandy
beaches around the world are
scraped away illegally and shipped
thousands of kilometres away.
I wasn’t surprised to discover that
W
water is the most consumed more illegally.
That’s why everybody with a
resource on Earth, but I was a little
shocked to find what is in second shovel, a wheelbarrow or a donkey
is stealing sand from beaches,
place – sand.
It is used in the manufacture of ocean floors and riverbeds to sell
products like glass, plastics and for profit.
Slowly but surely over the years
metal alloys but most of the available sand is being sucked up by a these dirt entrepreneurs, legally or
otherwise, have stripped the
global construction boom.
More than 80 per cent of all world’s beaches, riverbeds and sea
human structures are made from floor of all sand.
Five-star resorts must import
concrete - sand and gravel are two
sand every spring to repair the
of the main ingredients.
Building an average sized house beaches.
As the world supply of sand
requires the use of 200 tons of
diminishes, rising sea levels and
sand – a hospital takes 3,000 tons.
Every kilometre of finished violent storms are scouring coastal
highway requires 30,000 tons (you beaches and making “beach renourishment” even more
do the math) and to build
imperative and costly.
a nuclear reactor, you will
Some
resorts
are
need 12 million tons of
resorting
to
artificial
sand
sand.
“Five-star
Besides construction, resorts must made from recycled glass
(no sharp edges) to
some countries use vast
import sand replenish their devastated
amounts of sand to
every spring beaches.
expand their territory by
On your next tropical
reclaiming the sea.
to repair the
vacation,
the sand filtering
Singapore is the top user
beaches.”
between your toes might
of sand in the world – it
be old ketchup bottles and
has increased the size of
brown, beer bottle glass
its territory by 20 per cent
since the 1960s with sand beads.
We can exist without sand but
purchased from neighbouring
this is another example of man’s
countries.
The artificial islands constructed greedy compulsion to exploit the
off Dubai used up more than 600 Earth’s limited resources – even the
very ground beneath our feet.
million tons.
I don’t know if little kids still
The UN estimates global
consumption of sand to exceed play in the sand but adults sure do
40 billion tons per year which and they won’t stop digging until
fuels a legitimate $70 billion all natural beaches and sandboxes
industry and countless billions are extinct, empty and forgotten.
JODI LUNDMARK
OPINION
COLLECTING GIFTS: The Salvation Army’s Maj. Rob Kerr and Cranton Wellness Centre’s Debbie
Sklazeski helped launch the health centre’s 10th annual toy drive for the Salvation Army on Monday.
HOW TO WRITE US:
PA town hall
uilt in 1880 at the corner of Court and
Arthur (Red River Road)
Streets, present day site
of the Bank of Montreal,
Port Arthur’s town hall
was a multi-purpose
facility. It served as a
town hall, Masonic
temple, firehall, entertainment centre and
was used by local
churches. It was
destroyed by fire
after the showing of
a moving picture in
November 1907.
B
etters to the editor are most welcome.
Those kept to 350 words or less
have priority.
L
The Thunder Bay Source reserves the
right to edit submissions for content and
clarity. All attempts will be made to
preserve the core argument of the author.
Address them to:
Thunder Bay Source
87 North Hill Street,
Thunder Bay, ON P7A 5V6
Fax: 345-9923
Email: [email protected]
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
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L O C A L NEWS
Veterans awarded
Legion of Honour
THUNDER BAY
By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source
im Crooks’ father didn’t discuss his time
serving in the Second World War often, but
when he did he referred to it as his ‘great
adventure.’
The late Jamie Crooks, a lieutenant in the
Royal Canadian Navy, and Sgt. Don Bliss of
the Lake Superior Regiment were awarded the
Knight of the National Order of the Legion of
Honour from the Republic of France Thursday
afternoon at the Armoury on Park Avenue.
“For me personally, it’s quite an honour and
it’s been a learning experience because my
father did not talk about his wartime experience to any great extent,” said Jim Crooks,
who accepted the award on his father’s behalf.
Jamie Crooks died in April, but was aware
he would be receiving the award.
France’s government is paying tribute to 49
Canadian veterans who were part of the Battle
of Normandy and the D-Day landings with the
Legion of Honour award as part of their events
commemorating the 70th anniversary of those
campaigns.
While Jamie Crooks didn’t talk about his
experience, his son did say he enjoyed and
valued his naval experience.
“When I look on some of his characteristics
through his life, he certainly acquired some
phenomenal life skills during his time in the
navy. I’m sure he learned a lot of lessons both
from the navy and from the war. I’m sure he
saw a lot of hardship but he was not one to
dwell on any of that,” said Jim Crooks.
“For us as a family, it’s given us cause to go
into some of his memorabilia, to look up some
information in the archives to learn more that
way about his navy experience and his
J
JODI LUNDMARK
8
DON BLISS: Received the Legion of Honour
award from France last Thursday.
wartime experience.”
Bliss was on hand at the ceremony and
accepted the Legion of Honour award from
MP John Rafferty (NDP, Thunder Bay-Rainy
River).
He said it felt wonderful to receive the
recognition, especially with several family
members there to support him, including his
great-grandchildren.
“It was something unexpected,” he said.
For Rafferty, events like this one are
humbling.
“The Legion of Honour is a very prestigious
award and it’s not given lightly,” he said.
Murder suspects remanded
COURT
By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source
even suspects in two separate homicide investigations appeared in court
Friday morning.
Five of six people charged with seconddegree murder in the violent death of
44-year-old Lloyd Oskineegish on July 18
appeared in person at the Thunder Bay
Courthouse.
Larissa Shingabis, 20; Felton Sakanee,
26; Kevin Wabason, 38, Christopher
Meeseetawagesic, 25; and Keith
Mishenene, 21, were all remanded to Dec.
12.
The sixth suspect James Chapais is
scheduled to appear in bail court on Nov.
21.
Police discovered the victim’s burned
remains in a wooded area off of Field
Street in July. It’s alleged Oskineegish was
the victim of a violent assault.
S
All six accused are in custody.
Two people charged in a Canada Day
murder case were also in court Friday and
remanded to Dec. 12.
Carl Spencer Rae, 31, and Becky
Mamakwa, 22, are both facing seconddegree murder charges in connection with
the death of 52-year-old Christopher
Adams, who was assaulted outside of city
hall in the early morning hours of July 1.
Adams died in the hospital on July 8.
At the time of the incident, police said
four people were involved and that robbery
appeared to be the motive.
On Monday, the police said a third
suspect, 26-year-old Kyle Stoney, was
arrested and charged with second-degree
murder in the case.
Rae remains in custody and Mamakwa
was released on bail in September.
None of the allegations against any of the
accused in either case have been proven in
court.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Do you have an opinion to share?
E-mail the editor at [email protected]
Former councillor
Joe Vanderwees dies
OBITUARY
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
ongtime city councillor and
entrepreneur Joe Vanderwees
has died at 84.
Vanderwees first joined council in
June 1978, replacing Taras Kozyra,
who had resigned the Dawson Ward
seat.
Born in the Netherlands,
Vanderwees emigrated to Canada
and set up a successful greenhouse
in Thunder Bay.
He remained on council intermittently until 2006.
"Joe was a kind and gentle man.
Whether on council or at his garden
centre, he was quick to help one out.
Joe will also be remembered as a
strong supporter of the arts. He will
be missed," said Coun. Iain Angus,
who served alongside Vanderwees
from 2003 to 2006.
Longtime councillor Rebecca
Johnson said she considered
Vanderwees a friend, dating back to
their days as trustees on the public
school board.
He was a champion of the education of youth in our community
which then continued into his role
as a municipal councillor. Joe was
a dear friend. We shared many
moments together," Johnson said.
"I remember fondly being a guest
at his 80th birthday party and his
sharing of times together. He was a
PORT ARTHUR ROTARY CLUB
L
CIVIC-MINDED MAN: Joe Vanderwees first joined city council in 1978.
true gentleman and cared about his
community. His singing of the
National Anthem at many public
occasions showed his love of his
new adopted country.
Johnson said aside from his
family, his love of Thunder Bay was
equalled only by his love of his
family business.
"The time and commitment he
gave to his business knows no
bounds as Vanderwees Greenhouses
is one of the outstanding local busi-
nesses who looks at innovation and
creativity. We were fortunate to
have a man of his calibre in our
community, committed to its future
and its people. I was proud to call
him a friend," she said.
Neebing Coun. Linda Rydholm
said Vanderwees always put others
first.
"Joe Vanderwees was a sincere,
caring individual -- always trying to
do what was best for the people of
Thunder Bay."
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9
10
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
E D U C AT I O N
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
akehead University president
Brian Stevenson says running a
university these days is definitely a
balancing act.
On the one hand, students need the
latest and greatest technology and
tools to enter the workforce with the
best possible education in their back
pockets.
But someone’s got to pay for it and
the fiscally challenged province is
constantly looking for ways to cut
spending, including for postsecondary education.
“I think it’s a balancing act because
we have to try to fulfill a lot of
different needs with a lot of
constraints,” Stevenson said on
Thursday, before delivering the
Thunder Bay school’s 2013-14 annual
L
CHOICE
BUILDING
LOTS
report to the community at an oncampus breakfast gathering.
“As you know, we are trying to reach
out to the community with programs
that are going to be connected to the
economy and try to help support and
create jobs, while at the same time we
have financial constraints and challenges that we have to face.”
School officials estimate Lakehead
has a $318-million economic impact
from its operating expenditures alone
on the local economy.
The school received $22.7 million in
research funding in 2013-14 and
listed capital assets worth $303.3
million as of April 30, up more than
$12 million from the year prior.
The university brought in $177
million in revenue in 2013-14, $57
million of which was attributed to
student fees. Total revenue was about
$14.7 million more than it spent,
double the profit the school made a
year ago.
That doesn’t mean there aren’t challenges, says chairman of the board
Murray Walberg.
“We understand there are headwinds
in front of us, with government
funding, with the demographics of an
aging population. But they’re exciting
(times) because I think the university
is really responding to those challenging times with a really
inspirational strategic plan which
talks about how we can make tough
choices and grow our university,”
Walberg said.
Part of the growth will be reaching
out internationally for new students
and inward, seeking more Aboriginal
youth.
Not all the news is good, Walberg
acknowledged.
“Our education program has been
MOUNT McRAE VISTA
General Location = 15th Side Road & Mountain Road
2014
PRICES
Sale conditions all Lots:
SIGNS POSTED
• 1” City water line paid for by developer and to be installed by City to building setback line (if purchaser wants deeper distance, you must
contact City immediately; WALK YOUR LOT
• Purchaser must obtain permit approval from Thunder Bay District Health Unit for actual location of septic field and must follow all
requirements of TBDHU & City Engineering SINGLE FAMILY SUBURBAN BUILDING LOTS
• Purchaser must arrange and pay for installation of connection for electricity service with Thunder Bay Hydro Electric Distribution Inc.
• Purchaser must contact City Engineering to arrange for driveway location permit and install own culvert & gravel for driveway
• Notification/Subdivision Agreement registered on title - Purchaser is subject to same - essentially City is warning that the new house must
have a pressure reducing valve because of the higher water pressures due to the Mount Forest Reservoir and that the Purchaser must
conform to higher septic field standards such as a raised bed above regular ground level because of clay soil conditions in the area;
• The City has imposed drainage plans on each lot as per diagram attached which will be enforced at building permit time, and each Purchaser
must undertake and promise on closing to abide by the terms of the drainage plan.
LOT 9 55R13811
Plan 55R-13811 - see plan for accurate dimensions - numbers below are approximate:
Lot 9 - (Parts 9&10) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 8 - (Parts 8&11) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac)
SOLD
SOLD
Lot 7 - (Parts 7&13) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 6 - (Parts 6&14) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2137.7m2 (23,011ft2 - 0.528ac)
Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 5 - (Parts 5&16) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2137.7m2 (23,011ft2 - 0.528ac)
Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 4 - ((Parts 4&17) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 2 - ((Parts 2&20) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac) Price $99,000 + HST
Lot 1 - ((Parts 1&21 - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2170m2 (23,358ft2 - 0.536ac)
SOLD
LOT 7 55R13811
15TH SIDE ROAD
Lot 3 - ((Parts 3&19) - 31m (102’) x 70m (220’) 2137.8m2 (23,003ft2 - 0.528ac) Price $99,000 + HST
LOT 6 55R13811
Call Today
SOLD
LOT 2
55R13811
476-7a6k5e0
to m
!
your offer
LOT 3
55R13811
15TH SIDE ROAD
LOT 5 55R13811
MOUNTAIN ROAD
LOT 4 55R13811
Zoning By-law: R1 - Residential Zone 1 - single detached dwelling, min front yard 10m with 50% landscaped open space, min rear
yard 10m, min exterior side yard 6m, min interior side yard 3m, no limit on lot coverage, max height 10m,
Future Development - Developer will make application for further lots along Mountain Road, and apply to City for draft plan approval
for retained lands not fronting on 15th Side Road or Mountain Road; Purchasers to sign undertaking and covenant not to object to
further suburban lot development; Carson Street will be extended from west to meet 15th Side Road between Lots 5 & 6; there is
likely to be development of suburban lots which will abut the sides and rear of all current lots for sale; City is asking for linear
parkland dedications (trails) at unspecified locations in proposed subdivision;
Agreement of Purchase & Sale - Purchaser to submit offers on Vendor’s form to be supplied
scaled down. The government is only
funding so many spots and we have a
large faculty of education,” he said.
“That’s a key challenge for us.”
The theme of the annual report was
environmental, financial and social
sustainability.
Guest speaker David Greenwood,
director of Lakehead’s Centre for
Place and Sustainability Studies, said
no institution in this day and age can
afford to remain stagnant. It’s the
schools that learn to adapt that will
survive, he added.
“(Universities) are actually designed
for a century in which we no longer
live. And I’m not talking about the
20th century,” Greenwood said.
Stevenson said on that front, he
thinks Lakehead is thriving.
“This is a university that’s
connected to the community,” he
said.
LEITH DUNICK
Lakehead faces a fiscal balancing act
BRIAN STEVENSON: Lakehead
University president presents annual report.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
Want to Buy or Sell?
CLICK ON US.
The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s
easier than ever to sell those unwanted items.
LEITH DUNICK
w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
BOOK SMART: Shannon MacLeod, 12, (left) reads to Emily Gernat, 6
School gets
new books
E D U C AT I O N
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
hannon MacLeod loves to read. She also loves to inspire reading in others.
On Friday she joined classmates at Chapters, helping younger
students at Hyde Park School choose books that will be donated to
the school library through Indigo’s Love of Reading Foundation.
“I think it’s important because it’s good to read to kids so they
get used to reading and pick out the books they like,” the 12-yearold said.
The youngster developed her own love of reading at a young
age, after being read to for many years.
“I really like reading now,” she said, taking a quick break from
reading a story to six-year-old Emily Gernat, her book buddy at
the south-side school.
“I ask them what kind of books they like to read and who they
like to read. She wanted to pick out Frozen, because she likes
Frozen.”
Emily said she likes books of all kinds.
“I like them because sometimes they’re creative,” she said.
The idea of picking out some books to restock the library was
pretty cool too, Emily said.
“Sometimes we need good books,” she said.
Twelve-year-old Isabella Badanai said showing younger
children good books is the best way to convince them that reading
can be fun.
“Then as they get older they can get better at reading and as the
years go on they can get into great books to,” she said.
Hyde Park School teacher Susan Lieske said reading is everything for students at her school.
They’ve been talking about Friday’s field trip for weeks.
“The kids are so excited to come here and pick out books that
are just right for them and things that they’re excited about for our
school.
“For them to have their own choice on topic and genres – and
we talk about that in the school a lot – and for them to have that
interest in literacy is a big deal.”
It’s also a chance for students to leave a legacy, she added.
Since 2004 the Love of Reading Foundation has donated more
than $17 million to 1,600 schools, including Ogden and
Sherbrooke public schools in Thunder Bay.
S
HOLIDAY
BEAUTY
GALA
beauty BOUTIQUE™
McIntyre Centre - 1186 Memorial Avenue Thunder Bay ~ (807) 623-3601
Christmas Gala
November 27th, 2014 ~ 11am - 7pm
Exclusive retailer of Chanel, Smashbox & Benefit in Thunder Bay
Featuring Clinique, Elizabeth Arden, Lancome, Strivectin, Clarisonic
Plus new to Thunder Bay Rodial and Bio-beauté (organic skin care)
Samples, prizes, gifts and free makeovers.
Beauty tricks and tips for your holiday look.
Gift ideas for him, her and you.
GIVE BEAUTY
11
12
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
L O C A L NEWS
IN BRIEF
Bob Rae
Guest Speaker
November 26, 2014
Stabbing suspect
arrested by police
17-year-old is facing aggravated
assault charges after allegedly stabbing a 20-year-old man.
Police say the incident happened
shortly before 2 a.m. Sunday morning in
the laneway north of Mary Street.
The victim and the accused are said to
be known to each other.
The victim, who had been stabbed in
the back, alerted a nearby resident who
called 911.
The accused was located and arrested a
short time later.
The victim was taken to the Thunder
Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre
with non-life threatening injuries and has
since been released.
A
6pm - 10pm
Victoria Inn, Thunder Bay
$45/ticket or reserve your table of 8 for $360.
Join us for an evening of silent auction and live bidding conducted by David Smith. Proceeds from this exciting charitable evening
will provide critical funding towards the realization of the First
Nations Trades High School (FNTHS).
We are accepting donations of goods and services for auction
until November 25, 2014.
The goal of the FNTHS is to ensure that First Nations students
receive a solid trades skill education, in a supportive
environment that leads to an Ontario Secondary School Diploma.
To donate an auction item or puchase a Gala ticket,
please contact A.J. Haapa at
[email protected] or call 807-623-8914.
Fire destroys garage
garage on Francis street will likely
have to be torn down following an
evening fire.
Crews were called to the scene just
before 8 p.m. Monday.
They arrived to find the garage on the
corner of Francis Street and Syndicate
Avenue fully engulfed in flames.
Fortunately no one was in the garage at
the time and no one was injured as a
result of the fire.
Thunder Bay Hydro also attended the
scene as a precaution, as there was some
initial concern over nearby hydro lines.
Platoon Chief Larry Warner told TBT
News that the structure will likely have
to come down.
It took about half-an-hour for firefighters to bring the blaze under control.
A
open
Now rdays
Satu to 2
10
The fire didn't spread to the home.
Mac’s suspect sought
male suspect is being sought by
police after an armed robbery at a
southside convenience store early
Sunday morning.
The suspect allegedly entered an Arthur
Street Mac’s location shortly after 1
a.m., brandishing a weapon.
The Mac's Crime Busters Twitter
account said the suspect threatened the
clerk with a syringe. He fled the store
with a quantity of cigarettes and undisclosed amount of money.
Nobody was injured.
Anyone with information is asked to
contact the Thunder Bay Police Service
or Crime Stoppers.
A
Mitomics Inc. sold
he sale of a struggling local biotech
firm has been approved.
A provincial court has approved the
sale of Mitomics Inc., which went into
receivership in August with nearly $20
million owed to secured lenders and
unsecured creditors.
The company was sold to a Newco
Delaware corporation for $19 million,
Mitomics president Robert Poulter
confirmed to TBT News last Friday.
Mitomics, which was formerly known
as Genesis Genomics, was involved in
research and development of medical
tests for the early detection of cancer.
T
CHEER ON OUR JUNIOR A HOCKEY TEAM
THUNDER BAY NORTH STARS
at the FORT WILLIAM GARDENS @ 7:30PM
UPCOMING HOME GAMES:
Friday, November 21st vs. Dryden Ice Dogs
Saturday, November 22nd vs. Dryden Ice Dogs
Wednesday, November 26th vs. Fort Frances Lakers
Box Office opens one hour before home games.
Adults $12.00 * Seniors (65+) $7.00
Students (valid student ID must be presented at door) $7.00
* Children (3-12) $7.00
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
13
L O C A L NEWS
T H U N D E R B AY
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
hristmas is a joyous occasion for
most children.
But for Thunder Bay’s most impoverished the holiday is a stark reminder
they’re among the city’s have-nots.
Parents have to choose between
keeping the heat on, a roof over their
heads or putting food on the table. Toys
aren’t even part of the equation in many
households.
That’s where Toys for Tots comes in.
Put on by the Thunder Bay
Professional Firefighters Association
each year, the organization partners with
the Christmas Cheer Fund, collecting
more than $150,000 last year to
purchase toys for children in need that
will be handed out during Christmas
Cheer’s annual hamper campaign.
C
Toys for Tots chairman Paul Penna
said the need keeps growing, but he
remains optimistic that they’ll be able to
take care of everyone who needs help
this Christmas.
“Thunder Bay obviously hasn’t been
booming in terms of paper mills and
pulp mills. So a lot of people have gone
through a lot of hard times and that
means children go through hard times,”
Penna said.
“This is our way to help those
families.”
As usual, firefighters have set up shop
at Intercity Shopping Centre, adjacent to
the food court, where they will be
collecting donations for the next few
weeks.
The campaign kicked off with a
$47,880 donation from local Tim
Hortons owners, the proceeds of the
annual Smile Cookie campaign.
LEITH DUNICK
Firefighters launch Toys for Tots drive
HELPING OUT: Thunder Bay Fire Rescue mascot Sparky is ready for Toys for Tots to begin.
“We’re so blessed to have that, so I’m
pretty optimistic that we’ll be able to
take care of the children in our community this year once again,” said Penna,
who would like to see this year’s Toys
for Tots campaign top last year’s result.
Joleene Kemp, chairwoman of the
Christmas Cheer Fund, called it the
perfect partnership.
While not a necessity, every child
likes to have at least one present to open
at Christmastime each year, Kemp
added.
“There’s an expectation that every
child is going to have something special
at Christmas. These children deserve to
be the same as the children they are
sitting beside in school. They deserve to
have something brand new and through
no fault of their own they are living in
poverty,” Kemp said.
“We want to make a difference. We
don’t pretend to be the solvers of any of
the ills of the world. Rather we look at
how can we help, how can we make it
better.”
Christmas Cheer employs a volunteer
toy buyer who takes the money and
purchases gifts for qualified children to
put in the hampers.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Life
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB
people health home food leisure
40-year milestone for OPP
Provincial police force celebrating four decades of women officers
POLICE
By Jodi Lundmark - TB Source
ith a snub-nose .38-pistol in her purse
and a skirt just above the knees, Joan
Green became one of the first female OPP
officers in 1974.
“Try climbing a fence with a skirt, pantyhose, granny shoes and a purse,” she says,
remembering those early days. “If you stop an
18-wheeler truck, try climbing up those big
steps in a skirt.”
It took about a year of loud complaining
before they were given pants and a duty belt.
From then on climbing fences and other
police duties became a little easier for Green
and her fellow female officers.
“It was a silly move putting us in skirts,” she
says.
Green was 26 when she became an OPP
officer. She was hired in 1966 in a civilian
capacity, doing clerical work in Geraldton and
then Toronto. When she learned the force had
decided to hire its first female class eight years
later, she was eager to sign up.
“It was always a dream of mine and because
I was already working for the OPP, I wanted
to work with them especially. So when they
decided to hire, I got rather excited.”
This year marks the 40th anniversary of
women as uniform members of the province’s
police force and Green wasn’t only a member
of the first women’s class, but was also the
first female officer to retire in 1997.
That milestone forced the provincial organization to design a new retirement watch.
“The men’s watch was a little too big,” she
says.
Green became a uniformed member of the
OPP in Toronto and spent time in
Peterborough before moving back to the
W
JODI LUNDMARK
14
LEARNING CURVE: Joan Green, a provincial constable, was the first female OPP officer to retire in
1997, which meant a new watch had to be designed. She was also in the first class of female officers.
Northwest where she worked for the Thunder
Bay and Kakabeka Falls detachments.
Looking back on her career, Green doesn’t
see herself as paving the way for women in
the OPP. The members of that first class just
did their work with the male officers and tried
to fit in.
And they did fit in; the men’s attitudes
generally were accepting.
“There’s always problems with some, but
that was their problem. It wasn’t mine,” Green
says.
Story continues on page 15
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
SUPPLIED
TB Life
REWARDING CAREER: Deb Tully, now a sergeant, receiving her OPP badge in 1986.
‘Always accepted’
“It makes a difference how the people you
work with accept you and I was always
accepted. As long as you do your work, they
don’t mind,” Green says.
There was a learning curve for the organization and not just when it came to the uniform.
Women trained separately from men in the
beginning.
“Because we were the first class, they didn’t
know how to do anything,” says Green,
adding that it took a couple of years for the
force to get its footing.
“It wasn’t just us learning. It was the entire
OPP learning to deal with women on the
force.”
Although her career was rewarding, Green
says it was more fun retiring.
With nothing but praise for her coworkers
and pride for being a member of the first class,
after 23 years she was ready to say goodbye.
“It was a difficult job. When you’re not
used to dead people and bad accidents, that’s
all difficult,” Green says, adding that life as a
police officer is not as depicted on television.
“It can have some difficult moments, tense
moments, sad moments, but it’s a good job.”
In 1976, women made up 1.6 per cent of the
OPP’s uniformed members. By 1995, that
number had grown to 13.6 per cent and Green
says it was nice to see more women join the
force over the years and show they could do
the job as well as their male colleagues.
Today, women represent more than 20 per
cent of the OPP’s uniformed members and
there have been females in all nine ranks,
including commissioner with Gwen Boniface
holding that position from 1998 to 2006.
When Deb Tully joined the OPP in April
1986, she was widely accepted by her peers.
The civilian public, however, oftentimes
viewed the role of a policewoman as a novelty.
“I certainly got lots of interesting glances
and I even had people coming up to me and
asking me ‘gee, do you carry a gun?’ Tully
says about her early days.
Now a sergeant with the northwest detachment, Tully remembers those same people
suddenly noticing the gun on her hip, which
SUPPLIED
Continued from page 14
FIRST CLASS: Joan Green (fifth from bottom)
was in the first female OPP class in 1974.
would be followed by questions about her
police-issued weapon..
Today she feels women are seen as an
integral part of policing.
“People don’t find it a novelty the way they
used to when a woman police officer tends to
an issue and is involved with the public,”
Tully says. “We’re all seen as police officers
for the most part.”
Tully joined the OPP 28 years ago because
she felt it was a job that would challenge all of
who she was; she wouldn’t be pigeon-holed
into doing one particular activity.
“What I enjoy the most is the OPP and
policing in general has all kinds of different
activities you can do throughout your career,
different opportunities and it certainly allows
you almost to be faced with something new
each day.”
When she first came on the job, Tully says
most, if not all, women held the rank of provincial constable. Since then she’s noticed women
progress through the ranks all the way to the
top and participate in all the specialty areas.
The Northwest detachment will be celebrating 40 years of women in the OPP this
Thursday and Tully says she was surprised by
the milestone.
“It’s been such an interesting career and such
an amazing journey that the 28-and-a-half
years I’ve spent in the OPP have flown by.”
15
16
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, November 20, 2014
17
18
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB Life
A strong foundation
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97
5
Prices effective from Friday, November 21 to Thursday, November 27, 2014
James and Marsha’s Nofrills ~ 766-0003
1020 Dawson Rd. Thunder Bay
Darcy’s Nofrills ~ 626-0003
425 N. Edward St. Thunder Bay
Carol Baker Visage Mineral Matte
oundation in a makeup routine is important and
usually the first thing to go on during your mornCarol Baker Visage Mineral Matte is what I use at
ing routine.
the moment. I find that the cream-to-powdered finish
Whether you use a brush, sponge or shovel to put on does much better on my skin texture for cooler months
your base coat, there are a number of things to consider and doesn’t dry my skin out.
when looking for the bread and butter of the makeup
The colour palate for this particular foundation is
world.
also fabulous. It doesn’t have the staying power on the
I personally like a uniformed
high traffic places on my face (I
matte finish that lasts all day. I
always touch my chin!) but it will
know I am hard to please.
usually last until the end of a work
These are my three top picks for
day.
SHELBY
that perfect, uniform and polished
This foundation also goes well
CH’NG
skin finish.
with the compact powder and
FASHION FILE
Although I look white (or seeblends nicely with blush.
through) I am actually very pink
and freckled which makes choosing
Revlon Colour Stay
a foundation very difficult. If you are multi-coloured
I am not a huge Revlon fan but I often go back to
like I am you may find the following picks useful.
using this liquid foundation. This foundation is great if
you sweat a lot. I can only really use it in the summer
time.
Estee Lauder Double Wear
It has excellent coverage and goes on thin enough to
Estee Lauder Double Wear has some of the best
staying power in the industry. You may need WD40 to build up the base. The downside to this foundation is
remove this stuff at the end of the day (please don’t use that it can be very drying and requires some extra
WD40 since it is not meant for skin, but you get my buffing if you apply your makeup with a foundation
brush.
point).
The tools you use to apply your foundation make as
I like the consistency of this foundation. It comes in
a jar and is a liquid. It is also very easy to build your much difference as the product itself. My favourite
foundation, too, depending on how much coverage you way to apply makeup is with a foundation brush.
This will smooth out even cheap makeup and allows
need.
Letting each coat dry in between is helpful in the foundation to go on more evenly.
Keep this in mind when purchasing your next round
obtaining that flawless look. The downside to this
particular foundation is that I am in between colours of foundation and you will be on your way to that
and get washed out or it is a shade too orange. It is flawless matte finish.
Written by Shelby Ch’ng – Owner and Operator of Unveiled Bridal Boutique
also expensive.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
19
TB Life
The snow appears to be here to stay
e awoke last week to snow covering the ground, vehicles, wood
pile and in the distance the branches of
pine trees. “Ah-ha,” I thought. “Our first,
serious snow.”
I greeted this new transformation of the
land with mixed feelings. I was hoping
for a couple of weeks without any sort of
precipitation so the land could dry. We’d
had a lot of rain this autumn and the yard
between barn and horse paddocks as
well as the riding trails was a mushy
mess of wet clay. Where the horses or
Big Red, my elderly diesel tractor, had
trod, great grooves and divots now populated the ground. When the thermometer
sinks to consistently hover below
freezing, these pockmarks will harden,
which is not much fun on the feet.
Walking across the yard to the barn,
Laura and I figured the heavens had
blessed us with about three to four inches
overnight. Would the snow stay?
Probably, because the temperatures are
W
see only a mere hint of a dusting of
now consistently below zero Celsius.
I look out of our living room window flakes on the soft shoulders. As I drove
across the back field we converted into along Highway 11/17, again I noticed
horse paddocks. There are patches of almost nothing.
This first snowfall has thinned a bit
green but it will take several snowfalls
before the stubble of tall grass is covered. what with the winds and with normal
Since that dump, we have received evaporation. Those winds have, at times,
been brisk and cold.
flurries, mere dustings
Their effect has been to
that a good wind blows
harden the snow on the
away.
FRED
JONES
driveway and on the yard.
Later that day I drove to
So now a thin base of
town.
RURAL ROOTS
hard-pack is forming.
Our township is physiEach snowfall we receive
cally divided by a long
hill called Mile Hill. Our residents are will form another layer to make an even
either above or below the hill folk. We greater hard-pack. When the accumulalive above. What amazed me was that as tion gets to the point where I have to
I drove down Mile Hill, the snow cover actually plough or blow the driveway
stopped. Our concession road was and and yard clear, Big Red won’t gouge the
still is covered in snow; but as soon as I ground.
In the past, I have had to count on
reached the highway, nothing. The fields
and lawns of neighbours had some snow several snowfalls with repeated driving
but not like what we’d received. And at of vehicles on the driveway to create the
the bottom of that lengthy hill, I could hard-pack necessary before being able to
plough. This is one of the first years
where I have a ready-made hard-pack
after only one snowfall. I figure I need
another storm or two to really ensure a
firm hard-pack.
When we first bought our farm snowblower, I had to learn if I didn’t have
sufficient had-pack, I would be blowing
gravel all over. The first and only time I
discovered this important fact, I sent
gravel flying through the funnel of the
blower all over our lawn. I had to wait
until spring thaw before I could painstakingly pick up the stones. Had I not done
same, the blades on my riding lawn
mower would have been toast.
Saturday morning Laura hinted that
“today might be one of your last chances
to get the quad into the bush to retrieve a
couple of trees.” After a couple of good
storms, the depth of snow becomes too
much for the quad even with these great
‘nubbly’ tires.
Our neighbour, Wendy, was visiting
last week and asked us if we thought
we’d been going through a lot of
firewood already and here it was only
early November. We have, beginning in
September. Usually we can count on not
really having to deplete our wood supply
until about now. So I have to trundle
along our trails and seek standing-dead
trees to haul home, buck and split to
supplement our precious supply of birch
wood. And the ‘square-tire, concreteseat’ cold hasn’t yet arrived.
I mentioned at the outset that I had
mixed feelings about the snow-here-tostay. The one that I do like is that with the
nice, new, clean, white snow on the
ground, I don’t have to wash Todd the
dog’s paws when he re-enters Casa
Jones. At least not until mud season next
spring.
Thank heavens for small mercies.
You can contact Rural Roots by e-mail:
[email protected] or by writing to Rural Roots, P.O.
Box 402, South Gillies, On. P0T 2V0.
20
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
TB Life
READ US ONLINE: w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
Planning for success
JENNIFER
BIRON
THE RED
HEAD
AND THE CHEF
hen preparing for a regular
meeting, strategic planning
session with staff or even a teambuilding session to improve over
all staff performance, there are
many things to consider.
The attention given to all the
details, big and small, beforehand
will help to ensure a successful and
productive outcome. A few things
that are often overlooked are how
the location and meal can affect the
productivity and participation of
your attendees. As well during the
planning stages, it is important to
think of your staff and what you are
asking of them. They are the ones
that will determine how successful
and productive the day is.
W
Same page
As employers you host meetings
to keep everyone on the same page,
and yes they are paid to attend and
it is expected that they contribute,
but let’s think of these meetings as
more of an opportunity to invest in
your company, and invest in the
people who make the company
what it is!
Location is an important aspect of
any meeting. The atmosphere in
which you host your meeting will
have a significant impact on your
staff from the moment they arrive;
what they see, smell and hear will
set the tone for the day’s events.
Consider things like lighting, the
acoustics in the room, air flow (too
hot? too cold?) It is important that
your staff feels comfortable.
Distracting noises, uncomfortable
drafts or difficulty hearing what is
being said all detract from the
effectiveness and enjoyment of the
meeting. As an example; if you are
preparing for a strategic planning
meeting where you want staff to be
attentive and participate in discussions, consider getting out of the
office and into a different location.
Look for a space that has natural
light, to help people relax, get
focused and keep them inspired.
Closed spaces with florescent
lights can create an environment
that can be hard to concentrate in
and often the buzzing noise from
the lights can be distracting. As
well they often have poor air flow
that can just be downright
“stuffy.”
Your staff will be agitated,
shifting in their chairs trying to get
comfortable and doing the all too
familiar checking the clock to see
when the next break is coming.
All of these things combined will
detract from them focusing on the
presenter, information being giving
and reduce their active input into
the meeting.
It becomes the race of “how can
we get out of here faster?!”
So do some research and ensure
the environment is comfortable,
inviting and inspiring, and you will
be pleasantly surprised at the
outcome
Next spend some time thinking
about the meal you’re offering for
the day. Break time is when
everyone gets up, stretches their
legs and allows for an opportunity
to reflect on the information given
and shared and is a time to refuel
their bodies and minds, preparing
them for the next round of information and participation.
Special meal
Consider selecting a meal that
will make them feel special,
thought of and not a meal that
screams “limited budget!”
Once again, the meal is a great
opportunity to show that you invest
in them and it is important to you
that they feel valued.
A hot lunch option that is healthy,
not to heavy, flavourful and
aromatic when presented will get
your staff excited and keep them
inspired.
After years of being in this
industry and being a part of
meetings or planning meetings,
these little things can definitely be
the determining factor of a
successful meeting and have a
direct impact on the future productivity of your staff and your
company.
CHURCH
PRESBYTERIAN
Lakeview Presbyterian Church
278 Camelot Street
The Rev. Harold Hunt, Minister
Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School & Nursery Provided
Phone:
345-8823
St. Andrew’s
Presbyterian Church
207 S. Brodie Street
(beside City Hall)
The Rev. Joyce Yanishewski
11am Worship
with
Sunday School &
Child Care provided
DIRECTORY
UNITED
Current River
United Church
333 Morse Street
Sunday Worship 10:30
Little Congregation:
Big Heart!
All Welcome
Knox Shuniah United Church
1 Shuniah Street • 345-5065
[email protected]
[email protected]
``Reign of Christ`` Sunday Service:
10:30 a.m. Hospitality to follow
Worship Service Leader:
Rev. Scott Gale
Director of Music: Betty E. White
Sunday School lovingly provided
VINEYARD
www.saintapc.ca
LIGHTHOUSE OF HOPE
Call 346-2600
Pastors Tony & Uschi
Sunday Service 10:30am
PHONE: 622-4273
To Advertise In The
Church Directory
257 Park Ave.
767-1705
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
IN THE
bay
MATT VIS
arts entertainment culture
HO HO HO: The arrival of Santa Claus was one of the most anticipated moments in Saturday's annual Rotary Christmas Parade.
Santa Claus arrives
T H U N D E R B AY
By Matt Vis - TB Source
he presence of winter was felt
rather than seen at the annual
Santa Claus parade.
Thousands of people braved
chilly temperatures and lined the
sides of Memorial Avenue on a
sunny but frigid Saturday morning
for the 24th annual Rotary
Christmas Parade, an event that is
considered the local kickoff to the
Christmas season.
Nine-year-old Holden Trewin,
who was along the route with his
parents and friends, was among
those in a festive spirit.
“I really like seeing the trucks
and the floats,” he said, adding the
wind chill that felt like -15C would
not keep him inside.
The parade is a tradition not only
for the children but for their
parents, many of whom had also
anxiously anticipated the arrival of
Santa when they were younger.
Kaela Stradiotto still remembers
the excitement of writing a letter to
Santa and the thrill of seeing him
each year.
Stradiotto was one of a number of
Canada Post carriers who were
collecting letters to send to the
North Pole, detailing the Christmas
T
MATT VIS
Nov
.
at I2n0 - De
terc c. 13
ity!
Our secret shopper is on the
lookout for holiday shoppers toting
bags from participating Intercity
retailers. We’re giving away $5,100
in Intercity Gift Cards between
November 20 and December 13
-it’s our way of saying “Thanks for
Shopping Local!”
BRAVING THE COLD: Annual parade kicks off holiday season in the city.
wishes of the city’s children.
Getting to be part of the parade,
along with her young daughter, was
a special experience.
“It’s a really neat thing for her to
not just sit on the sidelines and be
part of it,” she said.
Parade co-chair Volker Kromm
was pleasantly surprised with the
number of participants, with there
being more than 65 floats and
walking groups making up the
convoy.
“We exceeded our expectations,”
he said. “There were also a lot
more colourful and creative floats
this year.”
Many groups had members
walking along the route, offering
treats to the crowd.
For other groups it was an opportunity to accept goodwill from a
large portion of the community.
Among other organizations, volunteers from The Shelter House were
taking non-perishable food donations.
“There were a lot of other small
initiatives going on out there
raising awareness for various charities and organizations,” Kromm
said.
“I think that really does well
because they see this as a venue to
get their message out to a larger
group in the city.”
November 20 - 22
November 24 - December 13
21
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
I N T H E bay
Opening the windows
THEATRE
By Linda Maehans - TB Source
than Claymore lives just outside a town where scenery
changes more due to the seasons
than anything day-to-day. People
here know one another; from time
to time they look out for each
other. They notice things, big or
small; and sometimes the naturally
wonderful things like the splendour of a starlit field in December,
when winter solstice has arrived.
Ethan Claymore heads out, well
before sunrise, to check on his
birds; or to be more exact, on the
temperature and lighting inside the
hatchery. His footsteps on the snow
squeak in the stillness. Ethan
Claymore doesn’t notice.
Magnus’ upcoming production of
the same name, by Norm Foster,
heralds the season of winter arrived
anew with all its ferocious strength
or near-ethereal beauty following a
storm: tall snow-laden evergreens
in the forests of postcards; a
flawless new world of white
sparkling in the sun. This show is
for people of any age or time in
life; for anyone with an open heart
and mind to see.
The Source met with some of the
actors during rehearsal. In character Jerry Getty as Ethan sat at his
kitchen table mid-day, looking a bit
tired. “Well, it’s a lot of work.
Especially as I’m the only person
working the farm.” He ran his hand
through thick wavy hair. “I’ve got
two thousand hens; keeps me
pretty busy. Neighbours? Yeah,
Douglas and Caroline; they’re
probably my best friends in town;
they’ve really been there for me,
especially after my wife’s death.
Oh, Douglas can be quite the char-
E
ADVERTORIAL
SUPPLIED
22
HEART-WARMING: Vince Metcalfe, William Matthews, Martin Sims, Jordan
Campbell (top row left to right) and Danielle Nicole and Jerry Getty (bottom row left
to right) rehearse for Magnus’ production of Ethan Claymore.
acter, good for some laughs.”
Ethan’s unexpected smile. “I sure
appreciate having ‘em around.”
Vince Metcalfe as Douglas
cradled a mug of steaming coffee
at the local diner.
“Ethan? Quiet guy. Works a lot.
Ethan just works, works, works.
Doesn’t have much time for his
neighbours, really; never goes out;
not one for attending social functions. But, I keep track of him,
and,” Douglas’ bright eyes
gleamed, a kid with a secret, “I
have a certain plan! What? Oh, I
don’t wanna go into details just
now. Just know I have a four-stage
plan. Yes, farming is hard work;
people need some fun too.
Consorting. Fraternising. Making
your neighbours as happy as you
can. Because it’s a happy life; with
your happy wife; and my wife
wants to make sure everyone is
happy. My wife, Caroline, yes,” he
concluded. Metcalfe, or rather,
Douglas wore an unreadable
expression on his cheerful face.
Danielle Nicole plays Teresa, a
relative newcomer in town. I met
her over at the schoolhouse, where
this attractive young woman with
light hazel eyes and a disconcertingly direct gaze was busy marking
homework.
“This town? What struck me
when I first arrived four months
ago was how everyone is so
friendly. Everyone seems to know
just about everything about everybody; no secrets here. I’m from a
big city, so it’s been a bit of adjustment. But, I like it here!”
She returned to her papers. I
didn’t think I should ask if she’d
met someone named Ethan
Claymore just yet.
This heart-warming show opens
next Thursday, Nov. 27. Runs until
Dec. 13. Smile and enjoy.
Want to
Sell?
CLICK
ON US.
The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s easier
than ever to find exactly what you’re looking for.
w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
I N T H E bay
Goodbye to
Mrs. Wolowitz
The death of Carol Ann Susi leaves void on BBT
disdain but secretly still desires.
Raj’s relationship with his parents is
limited by cultural differences and a
webcam, leaving him especially bereft
and alone.
And then there’s Howard. After his
father abandoned them when he was still
a child, Howard was raised by a needy
single mother who couldn’t let go any
more than he could.
Howard was a brilliant engineer who
went to the moon and yet, until recently,
couldn’t move out of his mom’s house.
She could have been a one-note joke
for the writers.
However, behind the bellow was a
mother’s love.
Despite Howard’s big talk – and
possibly because of his somewhat offensive one-liners – nobody was
particularly interested in the skinny little
Jewish guy with the Beatles mop-top
hair and the tightest pants
known to mankind.
iewers were in shock and mourning
last week at the news of the death of
Mrs. Wolowitz.
Writers can say they’re still working
on how to deal with her passing, but for
diehard Big Bang Theory fans, Mrs.
Wolowitz is gone and no amount of
clever writing is going to change that.
For those non-“Bangers,”
Mrs. Wolowitz was the mother
of Howard Wolowitz, a raw,
shrieking-voiced matriarch
viewers never saw but always
“She would
heard.
always be
Dogs down the street could there, waiting
hear her bellow.
for him to
And she was played by the
late Carol Ann Susi who died come home last week after a brief battle usually with a
with cancer.
complaint or
V
Always there
But that didn’t matter to his
mom.
She would always be there,
waiting for him to come home –
usually with a complaint or a
question about where he had
been.
So we knew she loved him.
That’s
why when Howard and
a question
his wife briefly moved into her
Best job
about where house, Bernadette developed a
Susi once said she had the
he had
similar screech.
best job because she worked
It was how they showed affecwith a fabulous TV family and
been.”
tion and acceptance in that
didn’t have to wear makeup at
family. And it made us smile.
work.
Because it was also the voice
But what was it about this
nails-on-a-chalkboard voice from down that said, “No matter what you do, I
the hall that made the writers constantly won’t leave you.”
It said, “No matter what anyone says, I
bring her back?
She wasn’t exactly warm. She wasn’t think you’re just fine the way you are.”
This was the voice that reminds us to
exactly insightful.
Yet Mrs. Wolowitz was an important come home when we’re lost or alone.
And now that voice has been silenced.
part of who this group of geeks are:
Personally, I think the writers should
intelligent, socially-awkward with some
let Mrs. W pass away suddenly.
serious mama issues.
Perhaps Howard’s father might come
Leonard desperately wants to be
mothered but his world-renowned back for the funeral.
One can hope.
psychiatrist mother would rather analyze
But no one can replace Carol Ann
him than hug him.
Sheldon was smothered in simple Susi’s grating “Howaaaaard!”
Goodnight Maaaaah!
Texan love and support that he claims to
23
24
Thursday, November 20, 2014
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For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Shop amidst the crackling fire at
Bloomers and the
Brownhouse Chocolates
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Corporate Accounts Welcome!
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Monday
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Friday 9:30am
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5:00pm Saturday
Saturday 10:00am
10:00am -- 4:00pm
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This week’s Hagi TV Bingo winners were Loris Buckley and Jeanette Revell.
WORD SEARCH
Charles Dickens’
T V{Ü|áàÅtá VtÜÉÄ
At Fort William Historical Park
December
5, 6, 7,
11, 12, 13, 14
8:00 pm
Adults $20
Students &
Seniors $15
Al’s RV Service & Repair
OPEN YEAR ROUND
Parts & Accessories Available
Specializing in Rubber Roof & Filon Lamination,
Floor & Wall Rebuilds • Complete Undercarriage Work
• Repairs to RV Furnaces, Fridges, HWH & Convertors.
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Factory Trained, Fully Licensed,
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Service You
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Al Swerhun
To advertise on this page
contact your
Sales Representative
or call
346-2600
Tickets
available at
Fort William
Historical
Park or
call 473-2344
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Sports
25
PLEASE
local sports news information coverage
Falcons take football crown
Dray Theriault fumble recovery puts St. Ignatius ahead for good in senior final
FOOTBALL
for four points after making one of two
field goal attempts.
Whatever Marcon told the Saints at
the halftime break had a profound
impact, as it only took one play from
scrimmage for St. Patrick to regain the
edge.
Quarterback Joey Ward took the snap,
got past the first level of defenders and
raced away for an 80-yard touchdown.
That held up until the critical fumble
recovery.
By Matt Vis – TB Source
he football adage that defence wins
championships can be overused.
However, on Saturday it was a fitting
description of how the St. Ignatius
Falcons captured an elusive high school
senior football crown.
Falcons defender Dray Theriault put
St. Ignatius ahead for good with a goahead fumble recovery touchdown late
in the fourth quarter, leading the
Falcons to a 21-14 triumph over the St.
Patrick Saints in the final at Fort
William Stadium.
“I was just waiting for that tackle to
come right to me. When the ball
fumbled I went right for it and it came
to me,” Theriault said of his gamewinning play.
“Defence is always key in the game.
There is always defence. Defence is
always in the back and offence always
gets the glory but right now we’ve got
the glory.”
T
Long time coming
The title is the first at the senior level
for St. Ignatius since 1998 and only the
second in the school’s history. Last year
the Falcons found themselves entering
the playoffs as one of the top teams,
only to fall in a disappointing semifinal
loss to the Churchill Trojans.
This year’s group was determined to
not let that happen again.
“Coming into the semifinals we had
that in the back of our minds,” said
Grade 12 running back Jake Puskas.
“I think with our coaches and the
preparation we pushed through it with a
victory today.”
Even though the offence, specifically
the ground attack, had been strong all
season head coach Tyler Dennis knew
MATT VIS
Moved the ball
FINALLY: Jake Puskas (left), Kyle Hughes and Liam Fors ceelebrate St. Ignatius’ win.
the game would likely be decided on
the other side of the ball.
“I knew it from the start. I told the
guys, offensively you win games but
defence will win championships and
our guys stepped up and helped us
win,” he said.
“We believed all along it was just a
matter of making one play and that was
big for us.”
That one play came in the fourth
quarter with the Falcons trailing 14-11,
their offence sputtering and after the
Saints seemed to seize momentum.
St. Patrick safety Marc DeGagne had
just killed a Falcons drive with his
second interception of the game,
picking off St. Ignatius quarterback
Justin Migliazza at the goal line.
Two plays later a botched snap in the
Saints backfield popped the ball up in
the air, right into the arms of Theriault.
St. Patrick head coach Mike Marcon
said that fumble was a backbreaking
play.
“In big games you have to execute.
We just came off a huge interception
and we couldn’t execute when we
needed to and we lost,” he said.
Coming in as the underdog with a 5-3
regular season record against the No. 1
seeded Falcons, St. Patrick drew first
blood. After forcing a Falcons punt the
Saints took the ball to the end zone with
a 68-yard major by running back
Trenton Woodbeck.
That lead stood until the early stages
of the second quarter, when Kyle
Hughes capped a St. Ignatius drive with
a two-yard touchdown run.
The Falcons expanded the lead later,
with kicker Ryan Grandell accounting
Trailing by seven the Saints put
together a drive in the final stages of the
quarter looking to draw even. St.
Patrick advanced the ball into the red
zone, helped along the way with a 30yard third down hookup between Ward
and DeGagne for the Saints’ first
completed pass of the afternoon.
Facing 11 yards between the line of
scrimmage on first down and the end
zone, the Falcons defence made their
biggest stand of the game.
After a short loss on a Woodbeck run,
Theriault did his part to make sure his
scoring play held up as the difference.
On second down he chased Ward down
for a 15-yard sack.
Facing third down from the 30, Ward
tried to find a receiver in the end zone
but the pass fell incomplete.
The Falcons received the ball after the
turnover on downs and ran out the
clock.
The senior victory completes a sweep
of the city high school football championships after St. Ignatius claimed the
junior trophy last week with a 39-6
romp over the Saints.
The senior Falcons advance to the
Northern Bowl, which will be played
on Nov. 28 at Tim Hortons Field in
Hamilton.
DRUG FREE, SURGERY FREE!
Dr. Alan Cranton is excited to offer the
latest advance in safe, comfortable
and highly effective pain relief and
tissue repair. LASER TREATMENTS
are safe, effective and painless and
decrease the healing time by 30%.
Neck Pain
Shoulder Pain
Back Pain
Hip
Pain
Knee
Pain
No Referrals Necessary
Complimentary Consultations.
Cranton Wellness Centre
Call 343-7932 for a FREE consultation
www.crantonwellness.com
g at
Financin
%
4.99 %/
5.99
946 Memorial Ave. 345-2552
Toll Free: 1-866-345-2552
HST & Lic.
are not
included.
All inclusive pricing includes
registration, tire and rim warranty,
etching $394, carproof $45, OMVIC
fee $5. All vehicles are used.
Financing eg. $10,000 @ 4.99%
over 36/48/60/72/84 months cost of
borrowing is $1,309/$1,852.
Financing eg. @ $10,000 at 5.99%
over 6/42/48/54/60/72/78/84
months has a cost of
$1,101/$1,263/$1,426/$1,591
/$1,925/ $2,095/$2,254. Financing
OAC. All vehicles are used. $1000
price change credit does not apply
to AS IS sales units.
26
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
sports
ADVERTISING FEATURE
NEWS
FROM CHIROPRACTIC TO THE HEALTH CARE AIDE, OUR SPECIAL SECTION OFFERS AN ABUNDANCE OF IDEAS, AND SERVICES.
LIVE A HEALTHY LIFE BY MAKING POSITIVE CHOICES THAT IMPROVE YOUR
PHYSICAL , MENTAL AND SPIRITUAL HEALTH .
LEITH DUNICK
SECOND WEEK OF EVERY MONTH
ROUGH GAME: Lakehead’s E.J. Faust (right) and Bennan Dubchak fight for the puck against McGill.
Redmen dominate
Thunderwolves come up short against McGill
UNIVERSITY HOCKEY
By Leith Dunick – TB Source
ustin McDonald has been put to the test
this season.
Saturday night was no different, though the
second-year goalie stood tall against a McGill
Redmen squad that arrived at Fort William
Gardens with all guns blazing.
McDonald, filling in for the still-injured Jeff
Bosch, stood tall in the Lakehead
Thunderwolves net, stopping 17 of 18 shots
directed his way in the opening period.
But the onslaught proved too much as the
game progressed and the McGill offence
went into overdrive, and buoyed by a trio of
second-period goals, the Redmen coasted to a
5-1 win, their eighth in 11 outings.
Mike Hammond had the lone goal for
Lakehead, opening the scoring at 6:14 of the
first. With the loss the Wolves fell to 4-7-2.
Jonathan Brunelle, who netted the firstperiod equalizer on the power-play, Samuel
Labrecque, Neal Prokop, Guillaume Monast
and Simon Tardif-Richard were the McGill
goal scorers.
J
Easy answer
Lakehead coach Bill McDonald didn’t have
to think long when asked where to lay the
blame. In fact, he had an immediate answer.
“I can tell you in a nutshell right now what it
was,” the second-year bench boss said. “It
was faceoffs. Our faceoffs were atrocious
throughout the game and you either start with
the puck or you start without the puck.
“And we started without it a whole pile.
They’re a skilled team and I just looked at the
faceoffs after the second period and they were
just killing us.”
McDonald said he met with players
between the second and third periods, and
asked them to at least try to tie the number of
draws and come away with the puck 50 per
cent of the time.
“It was a really good start and they just
started to take over. There was a section there
in the first period where I think we lost five
draws in a row in our own end. And against a
team like that, they get momentum, they can
move it around and they (owned) the time of
possession in the end zone,” McDonald said.
‘Frustrating’
Justin McDonald said he’d rather have
more shots than not enough, but even he
admitted it was a bit frustrating watching
McGill control the puck for most of the night.
“It’s tough, that’s for sure. They had a lot of
great chances, but we had our chances too.
We had a couple of power plays throughout
the game, three or four, that we didn’t capitalize on, which is too bad," the
Saskatchewan-born goalie said.
“But I was a little disappointed with myself
too, there were few goals I thought I should
have had. Five-to-one was definitely the
result we didn’t want."
McDonald, who made a huge stop on
Alexandre Lemieux about a minute after
Hammond`s opening goal, couldn`t catch up
to Jonathan Brunelle at the 8:45 mark. The
Redmen forward one-timed a Mathieu
Pompei shot for the equalizer and the two
teams were tied 1-1 after 20 minutes.
Labrecque fired a howitzer from one step
inside the blue-line that beat McDonald top
shelf just 2:09 into the second, the goal
proving to be the winner.
Lakehead`s Jay Gilbert had a chance to tie
at the 6:00 mark, but rang the puck off the
crossbar. McGill scored twice more in the
final 4:06 to take a commanding 4-1 lead
into the final frame.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
sports
NEWS
COMMUNITY CLOTHING
ASSISTANCE
Ski season begins
SKIING
By Matt Vis – TB Source
ven though the city has not yet
been blanketed by snow one
local ski hill is jumping ahead to
the winter season.
Loch Lomond officially opened
for business this weekend, with
artificially created snow covering
what would otherwise be bare hills.
New co-owner Grant Brodeur
said this is one of the earliest
openings for an area ski hill in
recent memory, with weather cooperating despite not actually
receiving any snow.
“Without the cold temperatures
the crew wouldn’t have been able
to make the snow,” he said Sunday
afternoon with a hill full of skiers
and snowboarders just behind him.
All of the powder on the runs was
artificially created, taking an
exhausting amount of effort from
the grooming crews.
Brodeur, who along with Jason
Gerry took over ownership of the
facility in the fall, said getting an
early start to the season makes a
strong statement about the future
direction of the hill.
“To be able to deliver a ski hill on
Nov. 15 is a great thing,” he said.
“People can see all the changes and
things we’re going to be doing is
going to be a positive.”
Northrop Johnston was one skier
MATT VIS
E
OPEN: Snowboarders and skiers were
out in full force last weekend.
who was taking advantage of the
early season.
“These are unbelievable conditions. It’s been really cool to get
out and rip,” he said.
Johnston, who is a student at
Lakehead University, is an FIS
level competitor who is accustomed to having to travel to get a
head start on his training.
Being able to do it while staying
at home is a huge advantage.
“It means I can sit in class and
catch my lecture at noon, come on
out and hit some training under the
lights and then go back for the
evening,” Johnston said.
Brodeur and Gerry brought in
Olympic skier Robbie Dixon for
their annual fundraising dinner and
to kick off the season.
Dixon said the city, which was
the home of fellow Olympians
Jason Myslicki and Amber
Peterson, has a reputation as a
strong ski community.
“There’s a rich history with one
of the Crazy Canucks from here,”
Dixon, who competed in the 2010
Games in Vancouver, said. “My
time here in the last four days
meeting lots of people and hearing
their stories, and for them to enjoy
skiing and ski racing, is really
cool.”
The biggest sign that the run was
in good shape was the number of
people making repeated trips down
the hill.
“If people are taking more than
one run on their first day that
means the snow conditions are
good and they’re out having a good
time,” Brodeur said. “Usually on
the first couple of days the snow
has the consistency of marbles
because it’s more frozen ice but the
guys did a great job with the
groomer.”
Brodeur said the hill plans to
introduce two new runs later in the
season.
HELPING CHILDREN COVER BARE NECESSITIES
The Undercover Project is asking the people of Thunder Bay to donate
brand new socks and underwear to help meet the goal of assisting over
2000 children in need.
Please help us give Thunder Bay Children these bare necessities
PLEASE DROP OFF NEW SOCKS AND UNDERWEAR TO:
Superstore - 600 Harbour Expressway
CCA Clothing Assistance- 404 N. May St Mon- Sat 10:00 - 5:00
CAW Local 22 Office Chapples Building 5th Floor Mon- Fri 8:30 - 4:30
Pioneer Ridge 705 Tungsten St. Mon- Fri 8:30 - 4:30
Grandvieaw Lodge 200 Lillie St. Mon - Fri 8:30 - 4:40
Dawson Court 523 N. Algoma St. Mon- Fri 8:30 - 4:30
Rosview Manor 99 Shuniah St. Mon- Fri 8:30 - 4:30
Century 21 Superior Realty Inc. 68 North Algoma Street Suite 101
Copperfin Credit Union ( including cash donations) - 3 DROP off Sites:
318 Syndicate Ave. S. 71 Algoma St. , 320 N. Arundel St.
NORTHERN Credit Union 581 Red River Road & 560 Arthur St.
Kuhl Lighting 1082 Memorial Avenue
THANK YOU EVERYONE
15TH ANNUAL GORE MOTORS
Donate a toy in support of the kids at Faye Peterson Transition House
Together we remain committed to make Christmas a little brighter for children less fortunate. We welcome your new unwrapped toy
donations. Drop off to Gore Motors Honda 361 Memorial Ave., Auto Tool Toy Sense 447 North May Street or Lulu's Variety Hwy 130.
Children's Items
Women's Items
Infant/Toddler Items
Socks, Underwear, Slippers, Pajamas,
Board Games, Make-up For Teens,
Fun Pillows, Fleece Throws, Gift Certificates,
Movie/Bowling/Swimming Passes
Slippers, Pajamas, Hair Dryers,
Gift Cards (Grocery Stores), Bubble Bath,
Journals, Photo Albums, Picture Frames,
Bus Passes/Tickets
Play Toys,
Wipes, Diapers,
Baby Wash, Shampoo, Lotion,
Baby Einstein DVD’s
361 MEMORIAL AVENUE 345-0902
27
28
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
sports
NEWS
SPORTS IN BRIEF
LU’s volleyball squad
taken out by Badgers
he Lakehead Thunderwolves
volleyball team was not able to
build on the momentum from their
first win of the season.
Just one night after rallying
against Western to snap a winless
streak, Lakehead fell in four sets
(19-25, 25-23, 17-25, 21-25) to the
Brock Badgers on Sunday afternoon, capping a three-game road
swing.
The Badgers (5-4) defence stifled
the Lakehead (1-6) attack, holding
the Thunderwolves to 36
successful kills in the afternoon.
Veteran hitter Jen Casey had the
most on the team, finishing with
11. Setter Vanessa Masters finished
with 30 of the team’s 32 total
assists.
Defensively libero Breanne
Hilhorst was able to dig 16 balls.
Brock was led by Renee Helmer,
who accumulated a game-high 21
points on 13 kills while adding
seven aces.
Lakehead lost to Windsor Friday
night before rallying from two sets
down to beat the Western Mustangs
in five on Saturday.
The Thunderwolves hit the road
again next weekend, this time
headed to Kingston to take on
Queen’s and the Royal Military
T
College to conclude the first half of
the campaign.
T-Wolves lose first
he Lakehead Thunderwolves
women’s basketball seasonopening unbeaten run has come to
an end.
Lakehead fell 63-59 to the No. 6
McMaster Marauders on Saturday
night, snapping a three-game
winning streak to open the regular
season.
Once again the Thunderwolves
were paced by Jylisa Williams,
who notched her second doubledouble of the weekend. Williams
recorded 34 points with 11
rebounds while dishing out five
assists.
Looking for their third win
against a nationally ranked top-10
team this season, Lakehead jumped
out to a 17-13 edge after the first
quarter with Williams pouring in
10 of those.
The Marauders defence dominated the second frame, holding the
Lakehead offence to a mere five
points in the 10 minutes. McMaster
led 29-22 heading into recess.
McMaster expanded the lead in
the second half, at one time devel-
T
oping a 15 point cushion.
A late Lakehead rally was too
little too late as the Marauders held
on.
McMaster was led by Clare
Kenney, who finished with a
double-double of her own scoring
24 points while hauling 12
rebounds on the glass.
Lakehead returns home next
weekend for a Saturday contest
against the No. 1 Windsor Lancers.
Ski hills improve
future Olympian could be skiing through town this winter.
From March 6 to 12, 2015
Thunder Bay will see up to 180
athletes from across the province as
it holds the Ontario Under-16
Alpine Championships.
Alpine Ontario technical director
Brad Lashley, in Thunder Bay over
the weekend to inspect Loch
Lomond and Mount Baldy, said
sites across the province have been
busy making changes to adopt
international standards, including
in Thunder Bay.
"Here you've got two spectacular
resorts with a long history in
hosting events," he said.
"Each has its own challenges."
A
Get Ready for Winter
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660 Balmoral 622-7779
1194 Dawson Rd. 767-7779
napacanada.com
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
REAL ESTATE
01. City Homes
02. Rural Homes
03. Mobile Homes
04. Lots / Acreage
05. Condos For Sale
06. Cottages
07. Commercial for Sale
08. Investment Property
09. Out of Town
10. Real Estate Wanted
FOR RENT
11. Houses
12. Apartments
13. Rooms
14. Room & Board
15. Shared Accommodations
16. Cottages
17. Commercial
18. Storage/Space
19. Wanted
20. Condos
21. Miscellaneous
MERCHANDISE
22. Bargain corner
23. Misc. For Sale
24. Antiques
25. Music
26. Office Equip.
27. Machinery
28. Pets & Livestock
29. Food
30. Misc. Wanted
VEHICLES FOR SALE
tbClassifieds
9
1/2 PRICE
$
99
ADDITIONAL
INSERTIONS
FOR SALE! 14’ Utility trailer $700. 9hp
boat Motor $300. 632-6425
BUSINESS & SERVICES
53. General Services
54. Home Improvements
55. Bus. Opportunities
56. Training Courses
EMPLOYMENT
57. Help Wanted
58. Careers
59. Child Care
60. Health Care
61. Employment Wanted
62. Students For Hire
ANNOUNCEMENTS
63. Coming Events
64. Craft & Flea Markets
65. Happy Ads
66. Cards of Thanks
67. In Memoriam
68. Death/Funerals
Thunder Bay’s Source reserves the right
to classify ads under appropriate
headings and to set rates therefore and to
determine page locations.
Thunder Bay’s Source reserves the right
to revise, edit, classify or reject any
advertisement and to retain any answers
directed to the Box Reply Service, and to
repay the Customer the sum paid for the
advertisement and box rental.
Box replies on "Hold" instructions not
picked up within 10 days of expiry of an
advertisement will be destroyed unless
mailing instructions are received. Those
answering Box Numbers are requested
not to send originals of documents to
avoid loss.
48. CLASSES
Plus HST
and on the internet at
FOR SALE LG fridge 29’2W x 65”H,
White. Asking $100. 577-1208
FOR SALE! Valuable hockey cards, rookies etc... Serious inquiries only. 3550583
Norm’s Northern Auto Body and Paint,
903 Northern Avenue since 1984. We
work with you, and advise you on which
is the best course to take. Reasonable
prices, excellent workmanship, top quality materials, expert paint matching, best
value for dollar in town. 622-2249. Will
work weekends by appointment only.
48. CLASSES
Sesame Street wooden toddler bed,
Thomas Toddler bedding, Radio Flyer
wood rocking horse, Dora beauty salon
play-center, Blue Plastic rocking horse,
Fisher Price smiley Face potty like new
with sound effects. Call JoAnn 7670021, after 6pm weekdays or anytime on
weekends
29. FOOD
CHRISTMAS BAKING! 60 pieces of homemade goodness selling for $35.00 each.
Fully licensed kitchen. Please call 9863826. FOND memories Cake Design.
30. MISC. WANTED
WANTED
$ TOP DOLLAR PAID $
For Scrap Vehicles
DAN’S EMERGENCY
ROAD SERVICE
767-3818
$CASH$
On the spot for your scrap
cars, trucks, vans and SUV's.
Same day pick-up with CASH.
Tanya Reynolds, Estate Manager
30. MISC. WANTED
50. PERSONAL
WANTED. Rifles, Shot guns, Mukets, and
swords. Legally certified to purchase.
627-4764
COSTUMES/LINGERIE - The only Adult
Superstore in Thunder Bay now has a
huge selection of costumes, lingerie,
nylons, stockings, fetish gear and
bondage accessories to choose from.
Come check out their showroom full of
intimate apparel to expand your horizon
in the bedroom. With over 500 costumes
to choose from, it’s the only place for real
fun in Thunder Bay. Exxxxtacy
Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stopshop for all your adult needs in Thunder
Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight ‘til midnight.
31. CARS
2012 Dodge Challenger 3.6l v6, automatic, loaded, sunroof, one owner,
24,000kms. Balance of gold plan warranty. Certified $19,950 + HST + licensing. Gary’s Auto Sales. 344-3543
50. PERSONAL
ADULT TOYS - The only Adult Superstore
in Thunder Bay now has over 20,000 different adult toys to choose from. Rated
top 5 in Canada for the best selection,
variety and content for adult toys. Come
check out these top sellers in Canada
such as the “Rabbit” for women, the
“Fleshlight” for men and the “We-Vibe”
for couples. You will be dazzled by the 60
foot wall of inventory that awaits you. It’s
everything you can imagine under one
roof. Remember, a healthy sex life is a
sign of good health. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stop-shop
for all your adult needs in Thunder Bay.
79 Machar. Open tonight ‘til midnight.
ATTENTION - Exxxxtacy Superstore is the
official retailer in Thunder Bay for LELO.
These adult toys for women are known
around the world as the Rolls Royce. The
most luxurious adult toys for women.
Made in Sweden, they will amaze you like
never before. Over 18 different demos are
now in stock for your viewing pleasure.
Come see them and ask for them by
name. LELO - the best adult toys for
women in the world. Only available at
Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your only “TRUE”
one-stop-shop for all your adult needs in
Thunder Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight ‘til
midnight.
Call Marcel
624-7242 or 626-0161
All claims of errors in advertisements must
be received by the Publisher within 3 days
after the first publication. No refund if ad
is cancelled before expiry date.
30. MISC. WANTED
Thunder Bay’s Source reserves the right
to increase prices with 30 days written
notice.
CASH PAID for World War I and II German
& Canadian military items and World War
II P.O.W. art. Call 977-2977.
ON-LINE
WWW.
tbnewswatch.com
Visit our office @
https:shop.dougallmedia.com
www.tbnewswatch.com
23. MISC. FOR SALE
YARD SALES
45. Auctions
46. Health
47. Travel
48. Financial
49. Lost & Found
50. Personal
51. Notices
52. Tenders
4
$ 80
*
DEADLINE
Classified Word Ads: MONDAY @ 4:00p.m.
Display & Photo Ads: MONDAY @ Noon
87 N. Hill Street,
Thunder Bay, ON P7A 5V6
or online at
Comfortable house to share or room to
rent. Spacious yard, pets ok, lady preferred, Central location. Please call 4757277.
3 wooden bar stools $60. Set Taylor Strat
copy w/case $75. Computer Desk $35.
Cannon printer $20. Glass dining table
$150. Oak entertainment center free.
Leave msg with phone number 2525373
MISCELLANEOUS,
NOTICES, TENDERS
ONLY
*Must be run in consecutive weeks. No additions to ads.
Does not apply to Bargain Corner ads.
31. Cars
32. Trucks
33. Vans
34. Motorcycles/ATV’s
35. Campers/Trailers
36. Motor Homes
37. Marine Equip.
38. Snowmobiles
39. Parts & Repairs
40. Current River
41. Northward
42. Southward
43. Westfort
44. Rural
ADS
Must contain price.
Additional words 25¢.
15. SHARED ACCOMMODATIONS
PHONE 346-2600
FAX 345-9923
EMAIL [email protected]
ALL
BARGAIN
CORNER CLASSIFIED
15 words max. for items under $500.
AD UpRATES
to 20 words
29
EXTRA EXTRA. Read all about it!!!
Exxxxtacy Superstore has thousand of
new items that have just arrived in all departments. Come check out all the new
movies, all the new adult toys for both
men and women, all the new glassware
in the Water Pipe Emporium and all the
new lingerie/costumes they have in their
beautiful showroom. If you’re looking for
these items on-line, we’ve got it all at
EXXXXTACY SUPERSTORE. Your only
“TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your adult
needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar. Open
tonight ‘til midnight.
SEX MACHINES NOW IN STOCK!!! 3 different models to choose from. The
Sybian Sex Machine is the most popular
toy in the world and is in very high demand. Go online and check it out. Ask
your wife or spouse about them, and you
will be surprised by what they say. Exclusively at Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your
only “TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your
adult needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar.
Open tonight ‘til midnight.
XXX MOVIES - The only Adult Superstore
in Thunder Bay now has over 100,000
adult XXX DVD titles for rent/sale. It’s
Canada’s largest adult XXX DVD Superstore. It’s everything you can imagine
under one roof. Rated #1 in Canada for
the best selection, variety and content.
Daily specials and discounts are always
available. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your
only “TRUE” one-stop- shop for all your
adult needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar.
Open tonight ‘til midnight.
Office Hours:
Mon. - Fri. 8:30a.m. - 5:00p.m.
50. PERSONAL
50. PERSONAL
SPECIALS & DISCOUNTS - The only
Adult Superstore in Thunder Bay now offers “Deals Of The Day” specials, all-day,
everyday at Exxxxtacy Superstore. Save
up to 97% off throughout the entire store
and check out their amazing door crashers. All departments are on sale. XXX
DVD movies as low as $5.00, adult toys
as low as $10.00 and hand pipes as low
as $2.00. The Back- To-School 4:20 sale
is now on in the Water Pipe Emporium.
This is a limited time offer and some restrictions apply. We guarantee to all of
our loyal and faithful customers the best
selection, variety, content and prices in
Thunder Bay. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your
only “TRUE” one-stop-shop for all your
adult needs in Thunder Bay. 79 Machar.
Open tonight ‘til midnight.
WATER PIPE EMPORIUM - The only
Adult Superstore in Thunder Bay now has
over 50,000 different “PUFFING” items to
choose from. Come check out the new
designs and styles of the thousands of
hand-blown glass items exclusively available in the water pipe emporium at
Exxxxtacy Superstore. Rated top 10 in
Canada for the best selection, variety and
content for their hand-blown glass. It’s
the only place to go for all of your “PUFFING” needs in Thunder Bay. Exxxxtacy
Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stopshop for all your adult needs in Thunder
Bay. 79 Machar. Open tonight ‘til midnight.
The 4th annual BACK-TO-SCHOOL sale is
now on at Exxxxtacy Superstore. For a
limited time, Exxxxtacy Superstore is now
offering huge savings, up to 90% off
throughout the entire store. Adult XXX
DVD’s as low as $5.00 each and buy 3,
get 2 free on all DVD’s. All adult toys are
now buy 1, get 2nd and 3rd for 1/2
price. All items in the Water Pipe Emporium are now buy 1, get 2nd for $4.20.
Huge selection of male/female sexual enhancement supplements that work 100%
effectively and are always available. Also
visit our lingerie/fetish showroom full of
costumes and bondage gear. But remember, selection is limited and it’s only while
quantities last. And don’t forget to ask
about their amazing door crashers!!! It
doesn’t get any better than this Thunder
Bay. When it comes to adult fun, nobody
does it like EXXXXTACY SUPERSTORE!!!
Nobody!!! Open tonight ‘til midnight. The
2015 Exxxxtacy Superstore adult calendars are now in!!!
THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH - The only
Adult Superstore in Thunder Bay now offers male/female sexual enhancement
supplements that are “GUARANTEED” to
make you feel energized and young
again. It’s the male/female version of Viagra, Cialis and ExtenZe, now available
over the counter without a prescription.
These products will amaze your partner
for hours of intense pleasure. Thousands
of repeat buyers. 100% safe and effective. Extra strength formula now available
and multi-pack discounts are always in
stock. Remember, a healthy sex life is a
sign of good health. Exxxxtacy Superstore. Your only “TRUE” one-stop-shop
for all your adult needs in Thunder Bay.
79 Machar. Open tonight ‘til midnight.
small ads can
CATCH
ATTENTION
call the tbSOURCE
at 346-2600
51. NOTICES
Royal Canadian Legion Br. #149 Remembrance Day Tea Penny Auction unclaimed tickets: #0575025, 0575149,
0575159,
0575206,
0575226,
0575337.
West Arthur Community Centre ANNUAL & GENERAL MEETING and
ELECTION of OFFICERS. Tuesday November, 25th at 5:30pm 1914 W Arthur
St. Your help is greatly needed to keep
us going!
53. GENERAL SERVICES
AARON’S LANDSCAPING. Fall clean,
leaves, trim trees, hedge, clean eavestrough, dump runs, snow plowing, residential and small commercial.
626-3639.
Christina’s Home and Garden, Reno’s,
handyman, painting, house cleaning,
snow removal, Christmas decorating,
much more! Certified, great customer
service. 621-1505
Experienced cleaning lady available,
weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly. References. One spot available left. Call 2858909 please leave message.
EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR GARMENTS.
For all your tailoring needs. Alterations,
zippers, hemming, etc. Reasonable rates,
prompt service. Home Visits For Seniors
Only!! 767-1705.
Free pick-up of washers, dryers, dishwashers, stoves, BBQ’s, microwaves,
misc. scrap. No Electronics. No Refrigeration. Call for pick up 939-1469 G+G
Recycling. Leave message.
Laminate flooring, ceramic flooring, hard
wood flooring, competitively priced and
installed by Handy Hamlin services.
Please Call 708-5731.
LOOKING FOR TREE REMOVAL? Fast
Safe & Efficient, with our unique 34in
wide 100ft reach manlift. we cut higher
than anybody in town. Free estimates.
626-3542
Snow blowing, shoveling driveways,
walkways, $30 and up. Dump runs,
garbage pick-up, clean out/clean up
houses, apartments. Odd jobs. Call
Frank 628-5919.
30
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
Thursday, November 20, 2014
53. GENERAL SERVICES
Norm’s Northern Auto Body and Paint,
903 Northern Avenue since 1984. We
work with you, and advise you on which
is the best course to take. Reasonable
prices, excellent workmanship, top quality materials, expert paint matching, best
value for dollar in town. 622-2249. Will
work weekends by appointment only.
53. GENERAL SERVICES
Looking for
Tree Removal?
Restoration work, repair, paint decks,
fences, aluminum siding, interior/exterior
painting, carpentry work, drywalling,
minor plumbing. Call Don 285-2416.
RJC Window Cleaning and Handyman
Services. Christmas light installation.
Home repair, Yard clean-up, hedge trimming, pruning of trees/shrubs, painting,
dump runs. Yes I do clean windows in
the Winter. What you need not listed?
Call Robert 632-2161. Licensed and insured.
SNOW BLOWING! Driveways $30 to $40
depending on the size of your driveway.
Phone Brian 768-9849 . Anytime leave
message.
Snow plowing and removal. For free estimates, call Lorne at LM Contracting.
472-8918.
SNOWBLOWING, snow shoveling driveways/walkways, decks, snow banks,
houses, apartments, basements, clean
outs, dump runs. Call Gerald 355-0142.
Read us online at
www.tbnewswatch.com
58. CAREERS
54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS
64. CRAFT & FLEA MARKETS
# CWR CONTRACTING. Framing and
Renovation including customized cabinets. Exterior work includes all roofing
work, landscaping, Bobcat services,
Skidsteer and, excavator. Stone/cement/brick, driveway, land levelling,
decks, fences, weeping tile, foundations,
and repairs. Additions and garages.
Work all expertly completed and proudly
provide references. Call for Five Star
Service: 577-0068. Quality workmanship guaranteed.
West Arthur Community Centre CHRISTMAS CRAFT/BAKE SALE! Sunday November 30th 10am-2pm 1914 W Arthur
St. FREE ADMISSION!
Drywall install and repair, painting, and
all renovations for your home or cottage.
Call Handy Hamlin Services at 7085731.
Fast,Safe & Efficient
With Our Unique 34” wide
100ft reach man-lift,we cut
higher than anybody in town.
626-3542
54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Fences and decks built for you. Custom
or pre-fabricated. For a free estimate
call Handy Hamlin Services at 7085731.
58. CAREERS
Experienced autobody repairman/painter.
F/t position. Wage negotiable. Call 6247733
63. COMING EVENTS
Medical Condition? Get up to $40,000
from the Canadian Government. Do You or
Someone You Know Have any of These
Conditions? Anxiety, Difficulty walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable bowel, Phyiscal Disabilities...ALL medical conditions qualify.
Ask us how. Call ONTARIO BENEFITS at 1888-588-2937 ext. # 101
73. INFORMATION
73. INFORMATION
58. CAREERS
58. CAREERS
73. INFORMATION
FREE
DVD PLAYERS AND
BLUE-RAY PLAYERS
WITH PURCHASE.
QUANTITIES ARE
LIMITED.
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS.
EXXXXTACY
SUPERSTORE
79 MACHAR - 345-5558
OPEN TONIGHT ‘TIL MIDNIGHT
PLEASE
64. CRAFT & FLEA MARKETS
PENSIONED PAINTERS looking to
stay active. Very reasonable rates.
Neat, fast working, former housing authority professional painters. Also drywall repairs & small renovations.
626-6926
Canadian Red Cross Creations Sale, Monday November 24th until Friday November
28th, from 9am-3pm at Victoriaville Mall.
Beautiful hand-made sweaters, socks,
afghans, mitts, hats, toys, and more! For
more information call 623-3073
58. CAREERS
58. CAREERS
58. CAREERS
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
73. INFORMATION
73. INFORMATION
73. INFORMATION
73. INFORMATION
73. INFORMATION
73. INFORMATION
ANSWERS TO THIS WEEK’S PUZZLES
Want to Sell?
CLICK
ON US.
The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s easier than ever to find exactly what you’re looking for.
w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
SWERS TO
TEN” FOR AN
IT
R
W
IS
T
“I
T QUESTIONS:
WATCH
ST IMPORTAN am,
O
M
’S
FE
LI
R
YOU
day 11:00
on CTV. Satur
S TV.
. on CTS or YE
m
a.
30
8:
at
y
ND
and Sunda
CHRIS HOLLA
N TV SPEAKERNDER BAY,
TE
IT
R
W
IS
IT
to THU
will be coming ar y 23rd - 25th, 2015.
nu
Ja
on
n
In
Victoria
January 24th
Free Lunch
Rieder 983-2659
632-9325 • Jim
ra
re
Pe
J
E
m
t:
Contac
aysdachurch.co
www.thunderb
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Has Your Car Reached
The End Of The Road?
Donate it to
Kidney Car!
2-4349
www.directcabinets.ca
x
ä
t
f
w
Ç
t
Ñ
|
Ä
V
ON ALL
EH8
345-7174
FABRIC
221 Bay Street
Your Ad Could Be Here!
Increase exposure by advertising
in a future directory.
For more info, call 346-2600.
Ask for your Account Executive
Thunder Bay Source
ns
Walk-i e
welcom
Proceeds Benefit The Kidney Foun
datio
n of Canada
www.kidneycar.ca ~ 1.866.788.CA
RS(2277)
346-2273
footcarecon
nect.ca
BESTWAY Sewer and Drain
Cleaning Services
Direct Cabinets is having an isla
542 S. Syndicate Ave. • 62
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
FREE AND FAST TOWING ~ VALUABLE
TAX RECEIPT ~ VEHICLES OF ANY AGE
OR CONDITION ACCEPTED ~ ENVIRONME
NTALLY-FRIENDLY PROGRAM
Direct Cabinets
nd sale.
These islands are the entertain
ment
Handcrafted to embellish any area of your kitchen.
kitchen available in
Antique White Dark Mocha and
We’re also featuring Renaiss Dark Cherry wood.
ance Series Kitchens:
Brandywine & Tuscany Map
le
Full Maple ¾’’ Solid American
Maple
Tuesday - Friday 10-5pm
• Saturday 10-2pm
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
14 Years of Experience.
Happiness is a drain that Works
!
touch
Putting you inbusiness.
with the right
Residential Plumbing Repairs,
Mobile Steamer Jetter Unit,
Video Inspection Available,
Grease Trap Cleaning, Pressure Washing
Serving Thunder Bay • FREE Estimates • Ph.
286-2929
2 for1 on all stock!
Bring in a 2nd prescription
for your husband, wife, child,
friend, cousin it’s 2 for 1.
30HP & 40HP
TRACTORS
AND
IMPLEMENTS
Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 9am to 5pm. Closed Friday.
DAVE KNIGHT OPTICAL
906 E. VICTORIA AVE. (Corner McK
ellar) 622-0311
BLUE-RAY
AYERS AND
PL
D
V
D
E
E
FR
SE.
ITH PURCHA
PLAYERS W
ED.
IT
S ARE LIM
QUANTITIE
S.
FOR DETAIL
SEE STORE
om
fortektractors.c
w.a
475-5171 • ww
Your Ad Could Be Here!
Increase exposure by advertising
in a future directory.
For more info, call 346-2600.
Ask for your Account Executive
Thunder Bay Source
31
32
Thursday, November 20, 2014
For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com
ON NOW UNTIL THE END OF NOVEMBER
SPIN & WIN PRIZE VALUES ARE AS FOLLOWS: $200 Gas Card, $300 Gas Card, $1600 Rust Pkg. (Paint Protector, Fabric, Leather, Vinyl), $500 After Market Credit, $599 Car Starter, $200 Gift Certificate Naxos, $300 Intercity Mall Certificate, $500 Accessories (Service), $200 Up
In Smoke Gift Certificate, $320 5 Free Oil Changes, $750 4 Free Snow Tires, $600 Bose Sound System, $799 50” Samsung Plasma, $400 Norwester Hotel 1 Night Spa Retreat, $209 2 Free Greens Fee with Cart F.W.C.C., $200 Thunder Bay Community Auditorium Gift Certificate.
2013 Toyota Corolla CE
WE’LL DO THE REST!
D
SOL
D
SOL
Receive
FREE CAR
WASH
When You Test Drive any NEW or USED
vehicles on our lot!
(includes full Sales Consultation, see Dealer for details)
%
4.99 %/
5.99
HST & Lic. are not included.
All inclusive pricing includes registration, tire and rim
warranty, etching $394, carproof $45, OMVIC fee $5. All
vehicles are used. Financing eg. $10,000 @ 4.99%
over36/48/60/72/84 months cost of borrowing is
$1,309/$1,852. Financing eg. @ $10,000 at 5.99% over
36/42/48/54/60/72/78/84 months has a cost of $1,101/$1,263
/$1,426/$1,591/$1,925/$2,095/$2,254. Financing OAC. All vehicles
are used. CPO 0.9% financing on 24 month term on model year.
Example $10,000 @ 0.9%, 24 months has a 92.19 cost of borrowing.
Sales/Leasing
Sales/Leasing
Sales/Leasing
Wayne Fortes
BRING IN A CURRENT PAY STUB, VOID
CHEQUE, PHOTO I.D.
g at
Financin
Alyssa Craig
Sales/Leasing
Tony Kolic
Used Car Manager
Finance Manager
Steve Eaton
Seija Nousiainen
$0 DOWN AVAILABLE
2013 Kia Sorento
V6, awd, grey, auto, air, cruise, tint, alloys, foglights, heated
seats, push button start, daily rental, 51,000km, stk #PC6723.
Kristine Thompson
Auto, white, 4dr, 4 cyl, air, cruise, CD, PL, PW, PM, Bluetooth,
Sirius radio, Keyless, Daily Rental, 25300km, stk #PC6681.
General Sales Manager
2014 Kia Forte LX
2009 Volvo XC90
Silver, awd, 7 passenger, black heated leather,
sunroff, U.S. car, 68,400km, stk# PC6744.
Sales/Leasing
Shaun Mcleod
Upgrade Pkg. Silver, auto, air, cruise, PC, PW, PM,
CD, 44400km, stk PC6725. Daily Rental.

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