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Area artist is all around
Ad am M cI saac’s l atest work ad orns state b uil d ing
— SEE LIFE, B1
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
REBOOTING
THE BRAIN
OHSU neurosurgeon Kim Burchiel performed the first Deep Brain Stimulation surgery in the U.S. Now, Burchiel is looking to expand the use of brain implants beyond movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.
Airbnb may put new ALZHEIMER’S, ADDICTION, OBESITY
squeeze on renters MALADIES FOR FUTURE BRAIN IMPLANTS
C ity C ouncil poised
to O K short stay s in
apartments, cond os
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
Most Airbnb hosts are ignoring new city permit requirements for offering shortterm rentals in their homes,
but Portland City Council is
poised to plow ahead and legalize such rentals in apartments and condos as well.
At the urging of Mayor Charlie
Hales, city commissioners will
take testimony next week on a
proposal to permit short-term
rentals in multifamily properties,
if the tenant has the signed approval of the landlord, or a condo
owner or tenant has the OK from
their homeowners association.
No more than 10 percent of the
units of a multifamily complex
could get permits under Hales’
proposal.
“When it became clear that
there were lots and lots of multifamily listings in Portland, the
mayor and others on the City
Council said our policy no longer
reflects reality,” says Hales
What’s next?
The Portland City Council will take
testimony on Mayor Charlie Hales’
proposal to legalize short-term
rentals in apartments and condos.
A public hearing is slated for 2
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, at City
Hall.
spokesman Dana Haynes. “We
probably ought to have a policy
that reflects it.”
Airbnb estimates it has 1,600
Portland hosts opening up their
homes, apartments and condos
to short-term renters staying less
than 30 days at a time. Those
were all illegal until the City
Council passed an ordinance in
July that allowed residents of
single-family homes, houseboats
and duplexes to seek permits.
Now several hundred more hosts
might become legal if the City
Council adopts Hales’ proposal
for multifamily properties.
City permits for single-family
homes cost $178 and require a
cursory inspection to make sure
the homes are equipped with
good smoke alarms and the bedrooms are legal accommodations. Though Airbnb lobbied the
city to pass the ordinance and
institute the permit system, most
of its local hosts are ignoring the
new ordinance. Roughly two
months after the ordinance took
effect Aug. 1, less than 10 percent
of the single-family hosts had
bothered to apply for permits to
become legal.
Permit applications under
Hales’ proposal for condos and
apartments would be only $100,
and no city inspections would be
required. Tenants or condo
dwellers would merely have to
certify that their units have proper smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide detectors.
Still, it’s unclear how many
multifamily Airbnb hosts will
See AIRBNB / Page 10
Portland Tribune
Inside
STORY BY
PETER KORN
PHOTOS BY
Finding the
precise spot for
a deep brain
implant is one of
the trickier
elements of the
surgery. Here,
physician Kim
Burchiel probes
a patient’s brain
with electrodes.
L.E. BASKOW
I
n 1990, Oregon Health &
Science University neurosurgeon Kim Burchiel
pioneered the use of a
technique called Deep Brain
Stimulation in the United
States as a last chance therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Burchiel implanted a thin electrical wire
into the brains of Parkinson’s
patients who had lost much
of their ability to control
their bodies and for whom
therapeutic drugs no longer
worked.
By hitting just the right
spot in the brain with 180
electrical impulses a second
sent from a battery pack im-
planted near the patient’s
shoulder, Burchiel was able
to help his Parkinson’s patients regain motor control,
some for five or more hours a
day.
“This is a success story,”
Burchiel says. “It’s a rare
procedure in surgery that
has proved to the highest level of evidence. There are
very few procedures that are
proven to this level.”
Throughout the world today, more than 100,000 people
afflicted with Parkinson’s
and similar movement disorders have received brain implants, about one-tenth the
number who might benefit,
according to Burchiel. But
the idea of hitting tiny targets in the brain as a means
of overriding misfiring neurological circuits created intriguing possibilities for neurosurgeons everywhere.
See BRAIN / Page 2
Bowtie summit envisions bigger
Portland splash in fashion world
C ongressman, d esigners b rainstorm
way s to b ol ster l ocal ind ustry
By JOSEPH GALLIVAN
The Tribune
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOSEPH GALLIVAN
University of Oregon’s Innovation Lab participants — ( from left) Tito
Chowdhury of FashionX t, Crispin Argento of Portland Apparel Lab, U.S.
Rep. Earl Blumenauer, Anna Cohen of Imperial Stock Ranch, Dawn
Yanagihara of Kiriko, and Russell Davis-Cohen of Bowyer and Fletcher
— gathered last week to discuss advancing the local fashion industry.
Earl Blumenauer is known
for wearing colorful bowties.
Now he wants Oregon to
lead the nation in bowtie
technology.
Blumenauer, a Portland Democrat who was re-elected Nov. 4
to his 10th term representing
Oregon’s 3rd Congressional District, met last week with fashion
designers at the University of
Oregon Innovation Lab under
the west end of the Burnside
GIANT KILLERS: WHEN OSU RULED THE STATE
— SEE SPORTS, PAGE B12
Bridge to judge Oregon’s chances of becoming a leader in the
bowtie industry.
Blumenauer listened to designers such as Russell DavisCohen and Jiah Sisco from local
bowtie company Bowyer and
Fletcher, who praised Portland’s
prowess as a haven for independent craftspeople and smallbusiness owners.
Davis-Cohen gave the examples of beer and salt as industries where Portlanders have ig-
See FASHION / Page 5
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
OWNER & NEIGHBOR
A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Brain: Resistance to psychosurgery stalls trials
■ From page 1
As scientists have begun
mapping the brain, experiments using brain implants for
people suffering from depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, obesity, addiction and
Alzheimer’s disease have begun to proliferate. But for the
last 24 years, Burchiel, the pioneer, was forced to watch as
scientists in other states and
countries pursued new uses
for brain implants.
An obscure Oregon statute
enacted in 1973, in reaction to
the mind-control horrors detailed in Ken Kesey’s Oregonbased novel “One Flew Over
the Cuckoo’s Nest,” restricted
the use of brain surgery here.
Burchiel wanted to join other
neurosurgeons across the
country in experimenting with
brain implants for depression
and obsessive-compulsive disorder, but couldn’t get approval from the state medical
board.
“People are so paranoid
about the idea of psychosurgery,” Burchiel says. “It was
like a third rail. They wouldn’t
touch it.”
In 2013, Burchiel finally convinced the medical board that
brain implantation was not the
psychosurgery of “Cuckoo’s
Nest” fears. No brain matter is
removed, or even changed.
Take the implant out and the
brain is as it always was.
Yet Burchiel remains very
much aware that a green light
from the medical board does
not dispel public squeamishness about the idea of planting
electrodes in brains, and that
the moral and ethical questions that kept him from pur-
suing his research now are going to become more, not less,
prominent.
Northeast Portland resident
Robert O’Neal was diagnosed
with Parkinson’s five years
ago, but he’d known something was wrong with his body
for awhile before that. When
his right hand began to tremor
uncontrollably, a neurologist
delivered the news, explaining
that Parkinson’s is a progressive disease that would slowly
rob him of motor control and
energy and for which there is
no cure.
Five years of medication has
helped slow the progression of
the disease, but brought with
it a common side effect, what
O’Neal calls “mental fogginess.” As time has passed, he
has had to increase the dosage
of drugs that increasingly
aren’t working as well.
O’Neal, 67, has been told a
brain implant might significantly help him regain motor
functions and eliminate the
mental fogginess. Still, he
says he’s inclined to put off
his decision.
“It’s kind of a scary deal,”
O’Neal says. “Electrodes in
your brain, nickel-sized holes
in your skull. They talk about
one of the downfalls can be infection, and infection in the
brain doesn’t sound good.”
Hope for other disorders
While OHSU’s Burchiel is
just beginning to look at using
deep brain stimulation for maladies beyond movement disorders such as Parkinson’s, during the past 15 years Emory
University neurologist Helen
Mayberg has experimented
with implants to help patients
suffering from depression.
Depression is a much more
complicated disease than Parkinson’s, not only because it
involves a psychological component, but also because it appears to involve numerous areas of the brain. Yet stimulating one tiny spot in the brain
volved in depression, from
cognition and motivation to
sleep and libido. Depressed patients who improved after taking medication showed decreased activity in Area 25.
Mayberg’s work has its detractors. A study called
BROADEN was halted this
Brain surgeons
year at its halfway mark, apexpect a
parently because the Area 25
technological
stimulation wasn’t working on
advance soon
depressed patients. But Maythat will allow a berg remains undeterred.
feedback loop,
Deep brain stimulation is still
so implants can a poorly understood procedure
change their
using a road map — the brain’s
signals in
circuitry — that is far from
response to
completed, she says.
brain activity.
Mayberg doesn’t anticipate
a day when hundreds of thouCOURTESY OF
L.E. BASKOW
sands of people submit to
with an electrode has greatly
brain implants to deal with
relieved the symptoms of sepsychiatric diseases such as
vere depression in well more
depression. Ironically, she exthan half of her patients, May- pects her work will someday
berg asserts.
lead to new drugs that can tarMayberg uses an analogy to get small areas of the brain to
describe her work — the brain help depressed patients.
as a city’s electrical grid.
“I can envision a day where
“Take out a transformer of
if you know there’s a problem
the electrical grid in a city,
at a particular hub, you might
and sometimes you’re surbe able to alter it permanently
prised,” she says.
and fix it,” she
“You might think
says.
(only) contiguAt Ohio State
ous neighbors
University, neurowill lose their
surgeon Dr. Ali
power. A lot of
Rezai is predicting
times you see it’s
that 20 years from
actually spread
now more than a
out in a pattern
million people will
you hadn’t
be walking around
anticipated.”
with brain imMayberg found
plants. Rezai has
that one spot on
— Robert O’Neal, put brain implants
the brain, the
Northeast Portland in 10 patients suftransformer, in
resident diagnosed with fering from AlArea 25, which is
Parkinson’s zheimer’s disease,
connected to a
and he says in
number of differsome of them he is
ent brain regions that are innoticing behavioral and cogni-
“It’s kind of a
scary deal.
Electrodes in
your brain,
nickel-siz ed
holes in your
skull.”
tive improvements.
Rezai isn’t alone in his belief
in the future of brain implants.
The U.S. Department of Defense announced a year ago
that it will invest more than
$70 million to find deep brain
targets that might be involved
in aggression and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Ohio State neurosurgeons
also are experimenting with
deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder,
and Rezai says he’s excited
about the work being done using implants with obesity and
addiction as well.
Yes, Rezai says, there is a
fear factor involved with opening up the brain, but he says
initially, the same reluctance
greeted heart pacemakers
when they were introduced 50
years ago. Today, more than 3
million people have pacemakers helping their hearts beat
consistently. In fact, some neurosurgeons call brain implants
pacemakers for the brain.
“Fundamentally, the era of
brain implants is here to stay,”
Rezai says.
Impulse to resist implants
Using brain implants to
treat diseases such as depression, Alzheimer’s and addiction gets to the heart of the
reason Oregon limited the use
of deep brain stimulation for
so many years — fear of mind
control. Specifically, the Oregon statute limited the use of
any form of psychosurgery
“for the primary purpose of
altering the thoughts, emotions or behavior of a human
being.”
Those sorts of limitations
See IMPLANT / Page 3
Surgery while patient sleeps reduces risk
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
One of the weirder aspects of
deep brain stimulation is that, traditionally, the surgery tak es place
while the patient is awak e. Surgeons use thin wire electrodes to
touch as many as five spots in the
brain trying to find the precise target for their implant. One millimeter off and the implant may be useless, or worse. B y having the patient awak e, the surgeons can monitor the patient’s response as they
touch different targets.
But that technique often keeps the
patient in surgery up to six hours.
And, according to Oregon Health &
Science University neurosurgeon Kim
Burchiel, who pioneered the technique
in the United States, it increases the
risk of complications.
electrodes. The surgeries
“The more times you
take about half as long as
push a sharp object into
when patients are awake.
the brain, the more likely
So far, he has done 300 of
it is you’re going to get a
the surgeries and not one
hemorrhage in the brain,”
has resulted in a brain
Burchiel says.
hemorrhage, he says. The
While other neurosurtraditional implant surgeons have been pushing
gery has a hemorrhage
ahead with new uses for
rate of about 1 percent.
brain implants, Burchiel
An added bonus, acin recent years has been
cording to Burchiel, is
focused on new surgical
— Dr. Kim Burchiel that once patients were
techniques he thinks
told they could have brain
make the implant operaimplant surgery under antions safer. Last year he announced esthesia, twice as many were willing
what he thinks is a breakthrough — to submit to the surgery.
brain implant surgery with the patient
Ironically, given the reluctance of
asleep.
the public to accept the idea of any
Burchiel’s new technique involves type of brain implants, surgeons
using medical imaging before and dur- around the country so far have been
ing surgery to find the right targets for slow to adopt Burchiel’s new surgery.
“The more times
you push a sharp
obj ect into the
brain, the more
likely it is you’re
going to get a
hemorrhage in
the brain.”
Musician Brad
Carter played his
guitar as
surgeons at
UCLA placed an
implant inside
his brain, helping
surgeons locate
the right spot for
their electrodes.
OHSU
neurosurgeon
Kim Burchiel is
pioneering a
techniq ue that
allows patients
to remain asleep
during surgery.
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©2014 Portland Tribune
NEWS A3
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Prison isn’t all fun and games?
For Oregon inmates, it could be
I
n an effort to reward good
behavior, prisoners in Oregon are allowed to play
Xbox video games in their
cells. Nothing like a violent video game to promote good behavior, huh? Of course the inmate must pay for the game
systems — it’s the one thing
they can’t make out of a bar of
soap.
•••
Crying all the way back to
the Senate, Jeff Merkley laid
blame for big Democratic losses last week squarely on the
shoulders of big donors, aka
the Koch Brothers. He should
be thankful. They spent truckloads of money mentioning his
name more than anyone else’s.
The person who should be upset is Monica Wehby. Maybe
she should have plagiarized
Merkley’s name.
•••
Mark&Dave
UP IN THE AIR
Villagers in a southern China province swear their local
drink cures illnesses, including
cancer. It’s a collection of fresh
cow and sheep manure dried in
the sun then ground up and
mixed with water and consumed at least twice a day.
They call it “excrement water.”
Our name is much catchier.
Around here we call it “The
Willamette.”
•••
Are you kind of geeked out
now that “Star Wars: Episode
VII” has a name? “The Force
Awakens.” It’s also the name of
the new Republican-controlled
Congress. The Obama White
House also has a new movie
name: “Sleeper.”
•••
Hawaii is launching an initiative to keep the homeless away
from tourists. Far away, it
seems. They’re buying some of
the vagrants’ one-way tickets
to the mainland. Portland is a
popular destination. This is
good news for budget-minded
travelers. We can buy a oneway ticket to Honolulu, and
then spend the last day there in
our grubby clothes.
•••
Published research proves
no one wants to hear about
your vacation. A new study
says bragging about your summer getaway actually may re-
In Oregon, being an
incumbent is best
political advantage
sult in your being shunned by
your friends, and thus make
you feel worse. Now we can
add not talking about vacation
to not talking about your sex
life, your weight loss, or how
much money you have or don’t
have. ... About the only thing
left is religion and politics.
•••
O
regon must have
the best politicians in the country. In a year of
election upsets from
coast to coast, not
a single federal
or statewide
incumbent
in Oregon
was defeated in the primary or general
election. And only
two Republican incumbents in the state Senate
may have lost their seats,
Betsy Close of Albany and
Bruce Starr of Hillsboro,
who is slightly trailing
Democratic challenger
Chuck Riley at press time.
The record is even more
remarkable when you consider other elections in the
Portland area. All of the incumbent Metro councilors
were re-elected in May; so
were all of the incumbent
Multnomah, Clackamas
and Washington county
commissioners. And so
were both of the incumbents on the Portland City
Council.
Of course, most of the
incumbents were Democrats, and Oregon tends to
favor Democrats. Still, all
of the polls show that Oregon voters are just as disillusioned with politics as
the rest of the country,
where many incumbents
were thrown out of office.
A spilled soda here, a
dropped French fry there, a
leaky window or air-conditioning unit and the next thing you
know you are the victim of sick
car syndrome. New research
shows people actually are getting ill from bacteria cultured
in their car, and they may not
even realize it. So the next time
you’re in a Portland taxi, that
smell might not be the driver.
SOURCESSAY
Listen to Mark and Dave 3 to 6 p.m.
weekdays on AM 860 KPAM. Follow
them at www.facebook.com/
themarkanddaveshow.
Implant: Lowers complications
■ From page 1
don’t apply to any of the medications used to treat people
for psychiatric diseases such
as depression. And that may
be the product of an irrational, but very human, response
to the idea of brain implants,
says Erik Parens, a bioethicist
at the New York-based Hastings Center and author of
“Shaping Our Selves: On
Technology, Flourishing and a
Habit of Thinking.”
Burchiel says his new surgical approach to brain implants (see sidebar) lowers
the risk of complications to 1
percent or less. Parens says if
that’s true, people might need
to reconsider their resistance
to brain implants.
“Sticking an electrical pulse
in the brain seems yuckier
than sticking a capsule in the
mouth, but in principle I can’t
see the difference, assuming
the side effect profiles are the
same,” he says, noting that at
present, brain implants are
Using advanced
imaging
techniq ues,
OHSU
neurosurgeon
Kim Burchiel
implants
electrodes while
patients remain
under an
anesthetic.
COURTESY OF
JOHN VALLS
only being used in patients for
whom drugs already have
been tried and have failed.
Concerns about mind control or changing patients’ personalities are almost archaic
in a world of freely dispensed
Prozac, Parens says. “Pharmacology is a form of mind
control, but mind control in
the service of treating a psychiatric disorder,” he says.
“All of these drugs are a form
of changing our minds.”
For his part, OHSU’s Bur-
chiel is viewing the rush to
try deep brain stimulation for
a variety of psychiatric maladies with a little bit of distrust.
“It’s sort of become this
snowball,” he says. “People
get overenthusiastic about
technology that’s the next big
thing.”
Nevertheless, he’s enthusiastic about pushing forward
with trials for new uses, even
as he declines to say which
diseases he’s looking at. He
other states, where his
candidates fared poorly.
Of the seven U.S. Senate
and governors’ races
where the PAC spent
money, only three
Democrats won
in mostly
liberal
states.
And
Steyer did
even worse in
Washington, where
Steyer spent money in
three legislative races to
help the Democrats take
control of the state Senate. They are all losing in
unofficial results.
says he’s hoping that within
the next year or two his team
will be announcing new technologies that will push brain
implants beyond the “primitive” stage that he says is the
status quo.
Burchiel looks to the pacemaker model, where the most
advanced devices don’t just
send out the same signal at
the same pace over and over.
Instead, they are part of a
feedback loop, the electrical
impulses sent to the heart
changing based on what is
happening with the heart or
breathing rate. As neuroscientists become better at decoding the brain’s signals,
Burchiel says, deep brain
stimulation will enter a truly
modern age.
“We don’t understand the
message,” Burchiel says. “If
you had that ability, we would
have the next generation of
neurostimulation, and we’d be
able to do many things. That to
me is the excitement factor.”
Billionaire’s bucks a bust
If both Betsy Close and
Bruce Starr are defeated,
their losses will represent
two of the few victories
for Tom Steyer, an environmental billionaire who
spent at least $57 million
of his own money to help
Democrats in the election.
Steyer’s PAC, NextGen
Climate, gave $130,000 to
the League of Conservation Voters for mailings
against Close and Starr.
He spent far more money
on statewide elections in
Ads failed to sway voters
It’s going to be awhile
before we learn how much
money was really spent in
the general election and
where it came from. In the
weeks leading up to Nov.
4, campaigns had to report
contributions within a
week of receiving them.
That’s now switched back
to a 30-day deadline,
meaning the public won’t
learn about last-minute
contributions until next
month, and contributions
made after Election Day
even later.
Nevertheless, some of
the most recently reported contributions are
worth noting. For example, Gov. John Kitzhaber
received a whopping
$250,000 from the national
gun control group Everytown for Gun Safety on
Oct. 30. He also received
an additional $10,000 from
Nike that day, bring the
company’s total contribution to $100,000. Meanwhile, Republican challenger Dennis Richardson
has now reported receiving in-kind contributions
totaling a measly $2,958.05
from the Republican Governors Association, suggesting even they never
gave him much of a
chance to win.
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A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Put a bird on it —
or maybe 5,000 of them
Man aiming for
species-spotting record
part of Wild Arts Fest
Wild Arts Festival
What: Audubon Society of
Portland’s 34th annual Wild Arts
Festival
When: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 22, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 23
Where: Montgomery Park, 2701
N.W. Vaughn St.
Tickets: $6 for adults; kids 16
and under free
More: wildartsfestival.org
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
Noah Strycker has lived for
months at a time in some of
the most remote places on
Earth — Antarctica, Costa Rica, the Galapagos Islands, the
volcano fields of Hawaii, the
Amazonian Ecuador, the Australian Outback and the Farallon Islands — doing nothing
but studying birds.
Artist Erika Beyer will be one of doz
He’s seen thousands of species
— penguins, finches, fairy-wrens, Fest next week.
bowerbirds, mockingbirds, pelicans, albatross, hawks, crows and 5,000 in a year before, but nobody
even the endangered Hawaiian has really tried.”
nene.
Strycker, who keeps an updatHe figures he’s observed about ed blog with bird photos from
2,500 species of birds on six conti- each place he’s traveled (noahnents, a fifth of the world’s bird strycker.com), says he’ll keep a
species.
daily blog of his big birding year
And he’s just getting started.
on the National Audubon SociThe 28-year-old Oregonian is a ety’s main Web page (audubon.
professional “birder at large,” a org).
photographer, public speaker and
After the big year, he has a
author of two books about bird- book deal with Houghton Mifflin
ing and his travels.
to write about the adventure.
In January he’ll embark on an
In the meantime, Strycker will
epic quest to see 5,000 species of be one of the local bird-centric
birds by the end of the calendar artists whose work will be showyear. The current, official record cased next week at the Audubon
is 4,341, set by a British couple in Society of Portland’s 34th annual
2008.
Wild Arts Festival, a creative celStrycker expects he’ll have no ebration of all things feathered.
trouble crushing the record, with
The 70 artists and 35 authors
a plan to visit about 35 countries will gather in the light-filled
on all seven continents on a con- space at the Montgomery Park
tinuous around-the-world bird- building in Northwest Portland to
ing trip.
share their like-minded passion
“The idea is to connect with lo- for birds.
cal birders in each place to highAll feature nature or wildlife
light stories of bird conservation as a subject, use natural materiand to see a ton of birds,” he says. als as a medium, and use their
“Nobody has even come close to art to promote environmental
COURTESY OF WILD ARTS FEST
ens of artists showcasing her bird-centric work at the annual Wild Arts
COURTESY OF WILD ARTS FEST
Portland-based science fiction
author Ursula Le Guin takes
nature as her inspiration for her
decades of work.
tion to humanity.
His first book, “Among Penguins,” 2011, documents his time
living with 300,000 penguins in
Antarctica at the age of 24.
Wandering the hills
COURTESY OF WILD ARTS FEST
Noah Strycker, left, will be part of the Wild Arts Fest to promote his
latest book, “The Thing with Feathers.”
sustainability.
As in past years, there will be
novelists, photographers, poets,
children’s authors, nonfiction
writers and visual art of all kinds.
The annual 6x6 Wild Art Project is a compilation of birdthemed paintings done by 200
artists on a 6-inch square canvas.
The project’s theme this year is
“yard birds.”
Each canvas will be available
for sale.
Strycker will be promoting his
second and latest book, “The
Thing With Feathers,” published
in March, detailing the secret
lives of birds and their connec-
One of the most famous authors at the Wild Arts Festival,
meanwhile, will be Ursula Le
Guin, the 85-year-old science
fiction novelist who lives in
Portland.
Le Guin this week will be receiving a National Book Association award considered one of
literature’s most prestigious
honors.
She’s being honored with a
Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters,
which recognizes individuals
who have made an exceptional
impact on the country’s literary
heritage.
Raised in Napa Valley in the
1930s and ‘40s, Le Guin says she
was especially influenced by her
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For Strycker, he started watching birds at age 10 and never
stopped. He recalls when his fifthgrade teacher suction-cupped a
bird feeder on their classroom
window.
“The other kids in my class
thought birds were pretty dumb,”
Strycker says. But he was hooked.
“You never know where that
spark will come from,” he says.
He’s been able to make a fulltime living of his pursuits, funding most of his traveling through
the National Science Foundation
and other agencies.
In Antarctica, he worked as a
seasonal guide on an expedition
cruise ship. He now earns an income through his writing, speaking, expeditions and other birdrelated projects.
In addition to his literary work
— as associate editor of Birding
magazine and contributor to
about a dozen different bird-related publications — he is a fivetime marathoner and completed
the entire Pacific Crest Trail from
Mexico to Canada in four months
in 2011.
There’s a reason, Stycker and
other artists say, that they are
driven to put a bird on it.
“I think that, by studying birds,
we also study ourselves,” says
Strycker, who lives in Creswell,
just outside of Eugene. “Directly,
there are many parallels between
bird and human behavior (perhaps more than we like to admit).
More than that, for me, birds are
an entry point to the outdoors
and all kinds of adventures. They
take us to places we’d never go
otherwise.”
DA: Pot
cases
will be
dropped
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• Hot & Cold Seafood Platters
for 2-4 people
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summers of solitude and silence,
“a teenager wandering the hills
on my own, no company, ‘nothing
to do,’ were very important to
me. I think I started making my
soul then.”
Her stories — set in imaginary
“subworlds” — grew out of her
experiences, Le Guin says.
For example her first trip to the
Eastern Oregon desert led to
“The Tombs of Atuan.”
She checks her science facts,
but “most of my research is into
the geography of my own imagination,” she says. Le Guin says
she started writing when she was
5 years old and never stopped.
The Multnomah County
district attorney’s office
plans to stop prosecuting
some marijuana possession
cases because of the passage
of Ballot Measure 91, which
legalizes recreation pot use.
The DA’s office issued a
statement Monday, six days after voters approved the measure at the Nov. 4 general election, saying that nearly three
dozen pending cases would be
dropped.
According to the statement,
the DA’s office reviewed 21
open marijuana cases “associated with the conduct alleged
will be decriminalized as of
July 1, 2015 when the measure
becomes law.” Of the 21, 18
cases were violations, “the
equivalent of a traffic ticket,”
according to the statement.
The remaining three were
charged as crimes.
Warrants had been issued
for 29 similar cases, all of
which will be dropped, according to the office.
“Because it is clear that a
significant majority of voters
in Multnomah County support
the legalization of marijuana
in certain amounts, this office
will dismiss the pending
charges related to conduct
which will otherwise become
legal July 1, 2015,” according
to the statement. “Any remaining charges not impacted
by Ballot Measure 91 will be
prosecuted.”
NEWS A5
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Metro panels spar over
contents of Toolbox
Officials from outlying
cities question climate
change action plan
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
Metro wants all cities in the
region to think and look like
Portland.
That’s apparently what some
elected officials outside Portland
think. A number of them questioned a list of proposals for
fighting climate change at a recent Metro meeting. Many of the
proposals already have been adopted in Portland, and the officials wanted to be sure they were
not going to be required to adopt
them, too.
The proposals are included in
what is called the Draft Toolbox
of Possible Actions to enact the
Climate Smart Communities
Strategy. Metro is scheduled to
finalize the strategy and present
it to the state in December. Two
Metro advisory committees, including the suburban officials,
met last Friday to review and
discuss the most recent version.
The ordinance to be approved
by the Metro Council includes
references to the so-called Toolbox, which is a separate eightpage document listing hundreds
of “possible actions” by the state,
Metro, cities, counties and special districts to reduce motor vehicle emissions. Metro attorney
Roger Alfred repeatedly said the
actions were recommendations,
not mandatory.
That did not reassure Hillsboro Mayor Jerry Willey and
some of the other committee
members, however. They recommended taking all references to
the Toolbox out of the ordinance
and considering it as a separate
resolution, which does not carry
as much legal weight. Wilsonville Mayor Tim Knapp said he
wanted to be sure his city could
pick and choose among the actions, and also would be free to
adopt policies not included in the
Toolbox. Knapp said he did not
even understand some of the
listed actions, such as “adopting
shared and unbundled parking
priorities.”
Alfred finally promised to rewrite the ordinance to make it
even more clear the cities will
not be required to adopt everything in the Toolbox.
It’s easy to understand the
confusion. Most of the listed actions are very specific, and many
of them read like plans and policies already adopted by Portland, like the Bicycle Plan for
2030 and the Green Street Program. Others sound like part of
the draft Comprehensive Plan
update that is currently working
its way to the City Council for approval in the new year, such as
focusing growth in designated
centers and corridors. Even such
controversial Portland policies
as reducing requirements for offstreet parking are listed in the
Toolbox.
Metro staffers explaining the
ordinance didn’t help their cause
when Knapp said it could require
all cities to adopt new climate
change action plans. “Portland
and Multnomah County already
have,” one of them responded.
After Alfred promised to rewrite the ordinance, most of
those at the meeting said they
could support the strategy.
Hitting the target
The Climate Smart Communities Strategy is the result of a requirement approved by the 2009
Oregon Legislature for Metro to
develop a regional plan to reduce
emissions from personal motor
vehicles by 20 percent by 2035.
Extensive research by Metro
staff concludes this goal can be
met if all the governments in the
region enact growth plans they
have been developing over the
past few years that call for higher-density development and
more transit. But the current
version of the strategy is far
more ambitious than that.
“The draft Climate Smart Action Strategy does more than
just meet the target. It supports
many other local, regional and
state plans and goals, including
clean air and water, transportation choices, healthy and equitable communities, and a strong
regional economy,” reads the introduction to the Toolbox.
Among other things, the Toolbox calls for support for reauthorizing the Oregon Brownfield
Redevelopment Fund, reauthorizing the Oregon Clean Fuels
Program, implementing the
Statewide Transportation Strategic Vision, updating the Oregon Public Transportation Plan,
adopting an Oregon bicycle and
pedestrian plan, adopting Vision
Zero strategies to eliminate traffic fatalities, and signing the U.S.
Conference of Mayors Climate
Protection Agreement.
The strategy does not estimate how much all of these steps
will cost or exactly where the additional money will be found to
pay for them. It does suggest possible sources of more revenue,
however, including a tax on carbon-based fuels, higher state gas
taxes, and a mileage-based road
charge.
The two committees that met
Friday are the Metro Policy Advisory Committee and the Joint
Policy Committee on Transportation. They will meet separately
to review and vote on the revised
ordinance and related documents. The Metro Council will
consider them in December.
Fashion: Industry needs synergy
■ From page 1
nored the outside world and
gone do-it-yourself.
“My dream with the bowtie
business is people in Oregon
wear our products, and people
in New York can go make their
own bowties,” Davis-Cohen
said. “It could trickle out, but I
don’t want it to be everywhere,
that’s not my dream.”
“It’ll trickle out,” Blumenauer
added.
Tito Chowdhury, executive
producer of FashionXt, told the
congressman that sportswear is
only 20 percent of the total
clothing industry and Portland
tends to wrongly be pegged as
an outdoor apparel town, with
nothing to offer the fashion
world.
Anna Cohen spoke of hitting
it big on the covers of magazines such as Vogue and Elle
with her fashion designs at the
same time as having to close
her business because it wasn’t
making money. She said Portland was great for fashion designers, but “the infrastructure
and investors were not there.”
A Portlander who attended
the Fashion Institute of Technology and has worked in New York
City and Italy, Cohen designs
knitwear for Imperial Stock
Ranch in Maupin, which produces sustainable wool and yarn.
for Imperial Stock Ranch.
She said Imperial Stock Ranch
is at maximum capacity and
needs help because 75 companies have come asking to source
sustainable American wool.
Blumenauer pressed the designers to imagine “what would
a farm bill look like for Imperial,
for Oregon State University, just
for Oregon wine?”
Blumenauer wants industry
clusters, like fashion design, to
have a chance to build on manuTRIBUNE FILE PHOTO facturing synergy and have a colU.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer has made lective voice. “There are amazbowties a Congressional fashion
ing people here with success
statement. Now he wants to help the stories, but not everyone has acstate’s fashion industry lead in
cess to capital and common rebowtie designs and production.
sources,” Blumenauer said.
Dawn Yanagihara’s company,
Her work is knitted on machines Kiriko, makes accessories such
in California and available local- as bags, ties and pocket squares
ly at Mercantile. (The Ralph Lau- from vintage Japanese fabrics.
ren sweaters for the London The company sells at 100 indeOlympics were made from Impe- pendent stores worldwide, but is
rial Stock Ranch yarn.)
looking to expand. Yanagihara
“The climate, investment- said when the company wanted
wise, doesn’t totally understand to outsource its manufacturing
the value of this industry with- locally the response was weak
out it being at the Nike, Adidas, compared with the response beColumbia level,” Cohen told yond Oregon. Her company has
Blumenauer.
been approached by investors,
but doesn’t know whom to partBuilding an industry
ner with, or how to legally proCrispin Argento of the soon- tect itself.
to-launch accelerator Portland
“My wish list would be for a
Apparel Lab said Cohen has “re- collective that could bounce
vived the Oregon wool industry ideas off each other, and get legal
single-handedly,” with the Olym- help that doesn’t break the
pics connection and designing bank,” Yanagihara said.
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76638 10/2014
The crowd at the
Citiz ens for Secession
from Damascus party
poses for a picture by
activist Jim Syring.
The audience was
j ubilant as its slate of
candidates won more
than 60 percent of the
vote and the
comprehensive plan
was slammed with
around 70 percent
“no” votes.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
SHASTA KEARNS MOORE
Election might spell
Damascus’ final fight
DAMASCUS
Pro-disincorporation
candidates sweep;
land-use plan blocked
By SHASTA KEARNS MOORE
The Tribune
You might call it the “only
in Damascus” election.
Only in Damascus could a
mayor be elected on a platform
of dismantling the city. Only in
Damascus could a state-required land-use plan six years
past due fail again and by an
overwhelming margin.
Only in Damascus could citizens feel such jubilant relief at
the results of a small, local
election.
“We won! We won! This time
we won!” That was Damascus’
new mayor Diana Helm after
her 64 percent initial result was
announced at the “Liberation
of Damascus” party hosted by
activist Jim Syring.
The crowd celebrated Helm’s
63 percent victory over current
Councilor Bill Wehr, as well as
those of her coalition of councilors. David Hadley won 64.1
percent of the vote over Doug
Walker and Nancy Robbins
Carpenter won 63.3 percent
over Pat Higgins.
The comprehensive land-use
plan, the product of years of political wrangling, failed more
than 2-to-1 against.
Syring, who hosted the election night party, is the leader of
Citizens for Secession from Damascus, a group of property
owners being sued by the city
for their state-sanctioned attempts to transfer into Happy
Valley.
“I wouldn’t mind being part
of Happy Valley. It’s a great
city,” said Helm, who says she
will disincorporate the city if
that’s what its citizens want or
allow adjoining cities to annex
it piece by piece. She doesn’t
have high hopes that a comprehensive land-use plan will ever
pass in Damascus. One is on
the ballot in March, but requires a super-majority of voters to turn out.
“They’ve been frightened for
so long (of development), that
how do you unfrighten them?”
Mayor Steve Spinnett said he
was disappointed at the results
but didn’t take it personally.
“I think that the community
out here has been through so
much in the last 10 years, and I
think they’re just saying no,”
Spinnett said. “I think they’re
done with the city, done with
the comp plan. They’re just
done.
“I kinda knew that,” he added, “but as a mayor, you want
to make it all work and it
didn’t.”
Spinnett added that he holds
no ill will toward his opposition
and will support the “citizens’
plan” comprehensive plan in
March.
“I truly hope that they’ll
have success in their endeavors,” he said. Spinnett said his
perspective has shifted from an
activist, who tears down, to a
legislator, who builds up.
“I want to help be a builder,”
he said. “If that’s towards people with a different perspective, so be it.”
What does it mean for the
region?
Metro Councilor Shirley
Craddick, whose district includes Damascus, says the vote
reflects how difficult it is to
start a new city in an area
primed for growth. “Creating
the governance, infrastructure
and market needed to move
forward can be done, but the
City Council needs to work together and the community
needs to be engaged in a positive way,” Craddick said in an
email.
She added that disincorporation of the fledgling city would
have repercussions throughout
the Portland region.
“Damascus residents would
have fewer options about the
future,” Craddick wrote. “Other cities in the Portland metro
region would need to accommodate the people who otherwise might choose to live in
Damascus. Fortunately, there
are cities in the Portland metro
region that are hungry to grow
their communities in ways that
maintain our great quality of
life.”
{ INSIGHT }
A6 INSIGHT
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
D on’t let transp ortation p lans run out of gas
T
he Oregon Legislature is losing a key transportation advocate, but that doesn’t alter
the need for this state to improve its roads, highways, bridges
and other means of moving people
and goods around.
The legislative path to such meaningful upgrades to Oregon’s transportation system did
get a little trickier
last week with the
defeat of state Sen.
Bruce Starr. The Washington County
Republican has been a strong voice
for transportation who worked well
with Democrats and members of his
own party to fashion transportation
packages in the past. He very narrowly lost his re-election bid to former
state Rep. Chuck Riley.
Starr’s defeat came after a California billionaire targeted him after
Starr opposed moving forward with a
low carbon fuel program that otherwise would sunset in 2015.
With the defeat of Starr and fellow
Republican Sen. Betsy Close, Democrats now have an 18-12 majority in
the state Senate and they also gained
OUROPINION
Portland
Tribune
FOUNDER
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
MANAGING EDITOR/
WEB EDITOR
Kevin Harden
VICE PRESIDENT
Brian Monihan
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Christine Moore
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Vance Tong
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
Kim Stephens
CREATIVE
SERVICES MANAGER
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SYSTEMS
MANAGER/WEBMASTER
Alvaro Fontán
NEWS WRITERS
Jennifer Anderson,
Peter Korn, Steve Law,
Jim Redden, Joseph
Gallivan, Kendra Hogue,
Peter Wong, Shasta Kearns
Moore
a seat in the House in the November
election. Presumably, they have the
votes to extend the deadline for the
carbon fuels standards, which were
approved by the 2009 Legislature but
never implemented.
Less clear, though, is what a Democratic-controlled Legislature will see
as essential components of a transportation-funding package that’s
been expected to emerge from the
2015 legislative session. If Starr had
remained part of a more closely divided Senate, we would be confident
in anticipating a transportation bill
that was balanced between roads,
highways, transit, bicycles and pedestrians.
Starr also would have been an influential and credible voice for the need
to raise money to pay for these transportation projects. After his defeat,
transportation supporters now must
work hard to ensure that legislators
don’t tilt too far away from traditional infrastructure — roads, bridges
and highways.
We aren’t arguing that transit users, bicyclists and pedestrians don’t
also need improved facilities, but the
SPORTS EDITOR
Steve Brandon
SPORTSWRITERS
can provide a good starting point for
legislators. Funding ideas include indexing the gas tax to increases in
the fuel efficiency of cars. This is
viewed as a stopgap measure, as it
still would not affect electric cars or
truck taxes.
The forum also is recommending
an unspecified general increase in
the gas tax to address highway maintenance, preservation and modernization. The group further suggests
use of state general fund dollars and
lottery funds for specific transportation needs.
The Oregon Transportation Forum’s recommendations provide a
rough outline for a legislative package and various groups will seek to
improve upon those recommendations, based on their own particular
transportation needs. However, no
one can argue with the forum’s stated
goals: to put Oregonians to work, reduce costly traffic congestion, protect
environmental quality and improve
health and safety.
Those are outcomes that — no matter who is in the Legislature — ought
to be supported by all.
READERS’LETTERS
City’s ramrod efforts disrespect citizens
T
he citizen grassroots
effort to give Portlanders a vote on the new
tax before it is ever implemented is NoStreetFee.com
(Hearing set for latest street fee
proposal, Nov. 6).
It is disrespectful of Mayor
Charlie Hales and city Commissioner Steve Novick to bypass
Portland citizens in enacting a
new tax of this significance.
The Portland way is to refer
such taxes for citizen approval.
Citizens just approved the
parks levy and the Portland
Public Schools levy and routinely approve other council tax
ordinances. Now Hales and
Novick come along and say just
give us the money, no matter
citizens’ need to balance the
needs of the community with
their own personal finances.
How does this not deteriorate a sense of community?
And just after the city auditor
reports citizens are disenfranchised by a City Hall running
roughshod over real public processes.
Bob Clark
Southeast Portland
FEATURES WRITER
Jason Vondersmith
majority of commerce — not to mention commuting — still depends on an
up-to-date road system. The crucial
concept is balance, and legislators
should make sure the next transportation package addresses all modes.
Lawmakers also need to tie transportation funding to more sustainable sources of revenue. As cars become evermore fuel efficient, proceeds from the state’s 30-cent-pergallon gas tax will not keep pace
with current and future needs. Oregon is experimenting with a vehicle
miles tax as an alternative, but so
far, participation in that program
will be limited to 5,000 volunteer
drivers.
In advance of the 2015 legislative
session, a group called the Oregon
Transportation Forum has been
meeting to form a consensus
around a transportation funding
and policy package. Among others,
this group includes advocates for
driving, biking, transit and freight
movement. Its daunting goal was to
develop a package that everyone
could support.
The end result of those discussions
‘Kitz’ will do just fine
during final term
You just wrote that “Gov.
John Kitzhaber will start an
unprecedented fourth term as
perhaps the lamest of lame
ducks in state history” (Voters
should demand better choices,
editorial, Nov. 6).
Well, that’s politically naive
or partisan fantasy nonsense.
John Kitzhaber has been toiling
in the political fields for many
decades with IOUs and connections in abundance. He knows
the political territory better
than any Oregonian. The Oregon Legislature just increased
its Democratic majority in both
the House and Senate.
John Kitzhaber is going to do
just fine in his last term.
Richard Ellmyer
North Portland
Oregon is getting
what it deserves
So we’re going to have four
more years of Dr. Do Nothing
(Gov. John Kitzhaber) except
waste our money on frivolous
projects (Voters shrug off scandal, return Kitz, Nov. 6).
Nothing will change. In fact,
it will probably get far worse. A
once-great state is caving in to
a man who called us “ungovernable” and presided over the
worst debacle of state waste ever seen here.
So here we are. God has really given this state exactly what
TRIBUNE PHOTO: ADAM WICKHAM
Gov. John Kitz haber’s re-election has stirred letter writers who think he will either be j ust fine in his fourth
and final term, or he’ll be so hampered by unfolding scandals that he won’t be effective.
it deserves. Hope all of you who
voted for this loser enjoy the
rest of his tenure.
Cheryl A. Eby
Salem
Kitzhaber’s win was
just timing, breaks
There were probably several
high-profile Republicans who
could have defeated Gov. John
Kitzhaber handily in the wake
of the Cylvia Hayes revelations,
but the cards did not break
right (Voters should demand
better choices, editorial, Nov. 6).
Kitzhaber delayed his announcement to run for a fourth
term until very late in the
game for fundraising. That
kept challengers from both
parties from hopping in. On
top of that, Cover Oregon had
not yet exploded, and it was on
Kerry Eggers,
Jason Vondersmith,
Stephen Alexander
SUSTAINABLE LIFE
EDITOR
Steve Law
COPY EDITOR
Mikel Kelly
DESIGN
Keith Sheffield
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Jonathan House
Jaime Valdez
INSIGHT
PAGE EDITOR
Keith Klippstein
PRODUCTION
Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler
CONTRIBUTOR
Rob Cullivan
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to d el iver a compel l ing,
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accurate l iving chronicl e
ab out how our citizens,
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l ead ership throughout
our community .
the heels of the “Grand Bargain.” All the money in the
state started to line up for
Kitzhaber, including the usual
Republican donors.
Given more money, Dennis
Richardson might have won
and, given the scandals, someone like Allen Alley would
have won. It was timing and
the breaks. That’s politics.
Dave Lister
Tigard
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he governing principle
of the Internet to date
has been net neutrality
— bits are bits, and Internet service providers should
not prioritize content delivery
based on ability to pay.
Net neutrality ensures that all
Internet users can seek out and
find information from all points of
view without discrimination. It
has generated substantial benefits for consumers, entrepreneurs
and the users at every one of Oregon’s more than 120 public libraries, as well as hundreds more
school and college libraries.
As the president of the Oregon
Library Association and as Oregon’s senior U.S. senator, we
share the view that the Internet
must remain neutral if it is to continue to support freedom of
speech, open new educational
frontiers, and spur economic
growth. That is why industry
schemes to create pay-to-play Internet fast lanes have librarians
and lawmakers alike sounding
the alarm.
Internet providers want to
charge an extra fee to content
providers to move their information at the fastest speeds. They
call this scheme “paid prioritization.” In other words, if you can’t
afford to pay up, your data will be
relegated to the slow lane. This
means that startups, which sometimes get their start at public libraries, won’t be able to compete
on the same terms as companies
that can afford access to the fast
lane.
Here are some other ways that
paid prioritization harms Internet
users.
First, content providers who
pay a fast lane surcharge are likely to pass the cost on to their subscribers. This will be a financial
burden for public libraries, which
according to statistics provided
by the Oregon State Library, provide Internet access to thousands
of Oregonians every year. Ultimately, it undermines our best ef-
forts to ensure that all Americans
have equal access to the information and opportunities created by
the Internet economy.
Second, materials such as ebooks, digital music and research
databases that Oregon libraries
provide to the general public will
be delivered at slower speeds. Libraries can’t afford to spend more
tax dollars to pay Internet providers for fast-lane delivery, which
means the materials they make
available to serve the public interest will be harder to access than
commercially developed content.
Paid prioritization would make
the Internet a pay-to-play field,
and everyone who can’t pay will
end up losing.
So who are the people that get
hurt? All those with modest incomes who are using a library
Internet connection to research
job opportunities or start new
businesses. All the high school
or college students who are using library-provided research
materials for homework projects. The bottom line is that all
Oregonians, regardless of income, should be able to access
high-quality, online information
at the same speed and not face
painfully slow service.
Rural Oregon is especially
dependent on libraries for reliable and accessible Internet
connections. According to data
provided by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, 40
percent of Oregon’s libraries
are in rural areas. Providing
equal Internet access to Oregonians, wherever they live, is vital to local economies and community development.
For example, the Hood River
County Library District recently upgraded its Internet connection to a fast 100 megabites
per second. That investment,
however, would lose its value if
significant portions of the Web
are slowed. And that’s just one
example among many at Oregon public libraries that thousands of Oregonians use each
year.
All the good work that libraries are doing to provide highspeed Internet access and
trustworthy information to Oregonians could crumble if the
FCC allows Internet broadband
access providers to segment
the Internet according to ability
to pay. This is a critical time in
the fight for net neutrality.
The Federal Communications
Commission is writing new rules
right now that will decide the
fate of the open Internet. It is
more important than ever for the
public to let the FCC know that
Oregonians won’t stand for an
Internet that is split between
haves and have nots.
Net neutrality levels the playing field and allows everyone
equal access to the flow of information on the Internet. That’s
why we’re asking you to join us
in fighting to preserve a level
playing field online. To learn
more about what you can do to
support an open Internet and
net neutrality, visit the Oregon
Library Association’s toolkit for
communities at tinyurl.com/
p7ujdtv.
Democrat Ron Wyden is the senior
U.S. senator for Oregon, and Candice
Watkins is president of the Oregon
Library Association.
Portland Tribune editorial board
Submissions
■ J. Mark Garber – president, Portland Tribune
and Community Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714; [email protected]
■ Kevin Harden – managing editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5167; [email protected]
■ Vance Tong – associate publisher, Portland Tribune
503-546-5146; [email protected]
The Portland Tribune welcomes essays on topics of public interest. Submissions should be no longer than
600 words and may be edited. Letters should be no longer than 250 words. Both submissions should include your
name, home address and telephone number for verification purposes. Please send submissions via e-mail:
[email protected] You may fax them to 503-546-0727 or send them to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605 S.E. Lake Road, Portland, OR 97222.
NEWS A7
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Compromise will be needed to guide Damascus
MYVIEW
Shirley Craddick
W
hen I drive through Damascus on my way to
the office or a meeting, I
can’t help but think of
one word: Potential.
Amid the beautiful valleys and
buttes, Damascus has the potential
to be a spectacular city, where new
development and natural beauty go
hand-in-hand.
It’s no wonder the residents of Damascus, in my Metro Council district,
are so passionate about their nuanced visions of their community’s
future.
The potential of Damascus is exactly why Oregon law requires cities to prepare comprehensive plans.
Unplanned development flies in the
face of our Oregon traditions and
values. The people of Damascus
prefer Oregon’s values over the values of Orange County in southern
California.
By setting a long-term vision,
communities can make sure their
values are in charge of housing, land
use, recreation and the roads, water
lines, schools and other public services that make cities work. Developers still get to turn a profit, people
still get to find homes, but all of that
is shaped by what the community
wants.
It’s been a decade since Damascus
incorporated, and after another unsuccessful attempt, in last week’s
general election, the city doesn’t
have a comprehensive plan.
Because we all benefit when our
region works together to plan
growth, nothing significant is going
to happen until Damascus has a comprehensive plan. Building a city without a comprehensive plan would be
like buying your house’s blinds before you know where you’re putting
the windows, and how big those windows will be.
There are many reasons why the
latest plan was defeated — all coming back to how the community has
many visions about its future. It’s
time for leaders on all sides to compromise on a vision that can pass
muster with the voters. They’re doing a disservice to property owners
and to current and future residents
by continuing to pitch untenable
plans.
The urban growth boundary expansion in Damascus wasn’t ideal.
The Metro Council essentially was
forced to expand to the area by an
old state law that required expansions to take place in areas that had
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO
Damascus Mayor Steve Spinnett walked past protesters shouting “Free our city! Free our city! ” on his way to an Oct. 20 City Council meeting. A comprehensive land-use plan
for the town was defeated in the Nov. 4 general election, amid a struggle for its future, and the future of Portland-area growth.
the least potential for farming and
forestry — places like Damascus.
Metro and its partners worked together with the state Legislature to
improve the old law.
While we’re still working to protect farm and forestland, we now
have the flexibility to use other areas
for urban growth boundary expansions — when they’re necessary.
Metro also changed its own policies. Moving forward, the Metro
Council made it clear that cities and
counties that want UGB expansions
would first need a plan to govern
the expanded area, and an idea of
how to serve it with the roads,
bridges, schools and other quality
of life essentials. Nobody wants another Damascus, where local residents spend more than a decade developing governance before many
homes can be built.
Surely, our local government partners agree with that premise — a
UGB expansion should lead to dirt
being turned as quickly as possible.
Even in areas with established governance, development can be challenging. For example, a recent study estimated that it will cost $ 250 million
just to build the roads for a UGB expansion near Hillsboro.
That expense of growing outward
is one of the key reasons that from
1998-2012, 94 percent of new homes in
the Portland region were built in areas in the original 1979 urban growth
boundary.
Some communities in our region
are actively seeking new growth and
change; others are largely happy
with the way things are. But bringing
their plans together, along with hear-
ing the preferences of residents,
helps us understand where the region is headed, and what it might
need to get there.
As Damascus demonstrates,
there’s often a big gap between raw
land and ready land. It complicates
our choice, but it also informs it.
Looking to more land to solve all our
needs is a risky strategy. Trying to
bring it all inside the urban growth
boundary also creates challenges.
But no matter what choice we
make, we as a region — and each of
us in our own communities — need to
ask: What can we do to make available land ready for development?
It’s why the Metro Council will be
thinking carefully about any requests that come up for an urban
growth boundary expansion in 2015.
The region’s residents, today and
tomorrow, expect something better
than what’s happened in Damascus.
Damascus voters need to make
their city functional. It’s time for
the city to do whatever it takes to
adopt a comprehensive plan, and
to find positive ways to discuss its
future.
Nobody will get everything they
want, but if the people of Damascus
can find general agreement on aspirations and goals and what they
want their community to look like
in 20 years, we can finally get the
ball rolling on realizing that city’s
long-awaited potential.
Shirley Craddick sits on the Metro
Council representing District 1, which
includes Fairview, Gresham, Troutdale,
Wood Village, Damascus and parts of
East Portland
Drive the
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A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Memorial Tributes
Placing an obituary is a final keepsake of a loved one
and provides a memorial tribute to their life.
Joseph Mathew Perletti
Portland
832 NE Broadway
503-783-3393
August 31, 1957 - November 1, 2014
Milwaukie
17064 SE McLoughlin Blvd.
503-653-7076
Ismael Martinez
Tualatin
July 19, 1947 to October 28, 2014
Richard “Dick” Caffall
Frances Louise Davis
June 25, 1930 to November 4, 2014
February 24, 1936 to November 5, 2014
Richard “Dick” Caffall died from a stroke at
Mandan Estates Foster Care Home on November 4,
2014 in Tualatin, Ore., at the age of 84.
Dick was born on June 25, 1930, in Portland, Ore.,
The second of two sons to Ray and Hazel Caffall. He
first lived at 2402 N Webster St., Portland & attended
Beech Elementary School through 7th grade. In 1943,
Dick moved with his family to Newberg, Ore., where
he graduated in 1948 from Newberg High School.
While at Newberg High he lettered in Football playing
right guard.
Upon graduation he went to Linfield College,
graduating in 1952 with a Bachelors degree in Business.
While at Linfield he competed on the school’s golf
team. In the summers, he worked in logging camps
throughout Oregon.
Dick served in the Army Reserves from 1950 until
his discharge in 1963, as a First Lieutenant; Artillery
Division.
After graduation he went to work for Caffall
Brothers Forest Products, a company founded by his
Father Ray & Uncle Rex. He & his brother Charles
“Chuck” later ran the company until his departure in
1984.
At the time he lived in Beavercreek where he
purchased and managed a Quick Mart called
Meadowbrook, in Molalla, Ore.
In the early 80’s, Dick began to compete in National
Cutting Horse Association events. In 1983 he and his
horse Spankee placed 7th in the nation.
Throughout his life Dick was always handy with
carpentry tools, building a boat, a beach house and
constantly building and repairing things on his farm
in Sherwood. In 1986 he began a remodel/handyman
business with his son Curt, later working with his son
Rick in new home construction.
2004 he hung up his tool belt for good and he spent
much his time playing golf. Dick was an accomplished
skier, played competitive racquetball, enjoyed hunting,
fishing and horseback riding.
Dick served in many civic organizations serving as
a board member of many.
In 2006 Dick moved in with his son Rick and his
wife where he lived until 2014.
He is survived by his daughter and son-in-law Linda
& Dr. Brian Mitchell of Newberg, Ore., his son and
daughter-in-law Richard & Tamera Caffall, son and
daughter-in-law Curt & Leslie Caffall and daughter
and son-in-law Jill & John Stoltenberg - all living in
Tualatin, Ore. In addition he has 7 grandchildren and
4 great-grandchildren.
Mr. Caffall will be interned at Finley’s Sunset
Memorial Cemetery and a memorial service will be
held on November 22, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Hinson
Baptist Church in Portland. All are welcome.
The Family would like to thank Mandan Estates
for their care & support of Dick over the last 6 months.
Remembrances may be made to Young Life of
Oregon/ Big Vision at 13635 NW Cornell Rd., Ste. 200
Portland, OR, 97229-5887
Frances Louise (Habig) Davis
of Wilsonville, Ore., passed away
peacefully in her sleep on Nov. 5,
2014. She was 78 years old and
100 percent Southern Belle.
Fran was born in Jackson,
Miss. on Feb. 24, 1936. Her
parents were Paul M. Habig
and Bessie Brent Habig, and her
brother was Paul M. Habig, Jr., all
of whom have predeceased her.
Fran graduated from Central
High School in Jackson, Miss. in
1954 and attended Mississippi State College for Women
in Columbus, Miss. She was a member of the Lockhearts
at the “W.” During her sophomore year, she appeared on
the cover of “Dixie Magazine” in 1955, and the following
spring, she was runner-up in the 1956 Maid of Cotton
Pageant held in Memphis, Tenn.
On June 2, 1956, Fran married Arthur Davis in
Jackson, Miss. and they soon moved to Pittsburgh, Pa.
for Art’s rookie season with the Pittsburgh Steelers. After
injuries abruptly ended his NFL career, they entered
college coaching, living in Baton Rouge, La., (LSU),
Atlanta, Ga., (Georgia Tech), and finished their coaching
travels in Austin, Texas (University of Texas) with the
1963 National Champion Texas Longhorns.
Moving to Cleveland, Miss. in 1964, Fran was a
dedicated mother, helping to raise their two children, Diane
and Doug. In 1971, the family moved to Starkville, Miss.,
where Fran became an interior decorator and eventually
opened her own store, Magnolia’s. In 1983, Fran and Art
moved to Clarksdale, Miss., where she continued to help
families with their home and office decorating needs while
enjoying many friendships across the state. In 2001, after
Art’s retirement, they moved to Oregon to be close to
Doug and his wife, Jennifer, and to watch their second set
of grandchildren, Emma and Eli, grow up.
Throughout Fran’s life, she was quick to make friends
and family feel extra special with grace, charm and humor.
She cherished sharing descriptive memories of her happy
childhood. She loved to laugh and “make on” over those
she knew or had just met, in the most animated of ways.
She was especially proud of all the members of her
family – and delightedly claimed her children’s spouses,
Gregg Jones and Jennifer Davis, as her very own.
Fran is survived by her husband of 58 years, Arthur
Davis of Wilsonville, Ore.; daughter Diane Davis Jones
(Gregg) of Houston, Texas; son Douglas Arthur Davis
(Jennifer) of Lake Oswego; grandchildren Bradford K.
Jones (Amanda) of Starkville, Miss., Shelby Jones White
(Adam) of Madison, Miss., Emma Kathryn Davis and
Eli Arthur Davis of Lake Oswego; great-grandsons
Brody Jones, Archer Jones and Hunter White.
A memorial service will honor Fran’s life at Lake
Grove Presbyterian Church, 4040 Sunset Drive, Lake
Oswego, at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14, 2014.
In lieu of flowers, Fran’s memorial and charitable
wishes are Lake Grove Presbyterian Church and St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.
495
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Ismael Martinez, beloved
Son, Brother and Father passed
away suddenly of a heart attack
on October 28, 2014. Ismael was
born in New York City to Carlos
and Maria T. Martinez.
Ismael worked for his brother
Ralph’s Dealerships, Town &
Country, for more than 25 years
in various positions. During his
automotive career he was the
liaison to the Clackamas County
Chamber and the Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber.
Beginning his retirement this past February, Ismael
was looking forward to pursuing some of his earlier
passions again, as well as writing a book to include
some of his many, many stories.
Ismael was academically gifted and had many
talents. In his early years he was a speed skater and
a Tennis pro as well. As a young adult, he was a
Formula Race Car Driver. Ismael loved people and
enthusiastically shared his stories with all. He was
kind, caring and a friend to everyone. He was extremely
funny, energetic, loving and adored his family. He was a
member of St. Francis Catholic Church in Sherwood.
Ismael is survived by his wife, Natalie, his daughters,
Alexandra Martinez and Jamie Stewart, his Mother,
Maria T. Martinez, his brothers, Carlos, Eddie, Ralph,
Robert & Julian and his many nieces and nephews,
cousins, extended family members and numerous
friends. He is preceded in death by his Father, Carlos
Martinez, and his Sister, Angelina “Gigi” Martinez.
A Funeral Mass was officiated by Father Tom
McCarthy and took place on Wednesday, November
5, 2014. Both the viewing and the funeral were at
St. Francis Catholic Church, Sherwood. The Burial
took place at Finley’s Sunset Hills Memorial Park.
Memorial Donations can be made to the American
Heart Association at www.heart.org
Please sign the guest book at www.Anewtradition.com
8970 SW Tualatin Sherwood Rd
503-885-7800
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500
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John Phillip Baker
December 24, 1933 to November 3, 2014
John Phillip Baker, of Silverton, formerly of
Woodburn, died Monday, Nov. 3, at the Benedictine
Care Center in Mount Angel, Ore.
He was born Dec. 24, 1933, in Portland, the sixth
child of John W. and Selena U’Ren Baker.
He attended Benson High School and later served
in the National Guard during the Korean War.
He is survived by a son, John Baker; daughter,
Ruth Baker; three grandchildren and numerous
nieces, nephews and cousins.
In Loving Memory
Barbara J. Hardy
March 2, 1920 –
October 22, 2014
Barbara J. Hardy, 94, was born in
Richardton N. Dak. on March 2, 1920
and passed away on Oct. 22, 2014. She
was employed at Willamette Falls Hospital for 35
years. Barbara was very active in the Catholic Church
and was a member of the Catholic Daughters. She was
preceded in death by her husband, Val Hardy and son,
Leonard Hardy. She is survived by 5 of her 6 children:
Bill Hardy, Kathy Butts, Sandra Thurman, Shirley
Coffman and Jim Hardy. She is also survived by 11
grandchildren, 14 great grandchildren and 8 greatgreat grandchildren.
Funeral services and a reception will be held at Saint
John’s Catholic Church in Oregon City on November
14th at 11:00 AM.
In Loving Memory
Nancy A. Peterson
November 23, 1936 -November 7, 2014
Nancy Anne Peterson, 77 of Damascus OR, passed
away on Friday, November 7, 2014. She was born on
November 23, 1936 in Pendleton, Oregon to William
and Muriel (Hampton) O’Donel. She was a 1955
graduate of Cleveland High School and received her
beautician license from Portland Beauty Academy.
Nancy was proud of her Irish heritage and married
Clinton Mons Peterson on St. Patrick’s Day March 17,
1957 in Portland, Oregon. She was a member of Mt.
Hood Snowmobile Club, Oregon State Snowmobile
Association (serving as secretary in 1976) and was
active with Curves. She enjoyed reading, playing SkipBo, musicals, was an avid Trailblazer fan and loved
traveling which included frequent trips to Mt. Hood, the
Oregon Coast and Pennsylvania. Nancy was an Old
Mother Hen and a strong advocate for children which
included organizing fundraisers and events for
Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Family Alliance.
Nancy is survived by her husband Clinton Peterson
of Damascus OR; daughters Karen Southard of
Damascus OR, Marcia Tangwall of Gresham OR and
Sonja Peterson (Ann Worthington) of Portland OR;
sons Jerry Peterson (Joy Abbott) of Portland OR,
Brandon Shaver (Carmen) of Damascus OR and
Matthew Shaver (Denise) of Milwaukie OR; sister-inlaw Evalyn O’Donel of Milwaukie OR; grandchildren
Kasey (with Kirsten), Nicole (with Jeffrey), Laura,
Jeffrey, Yvonne, Stephanie, Leslie and Quinn; great
grandchildren Ella and Samantha and many others who
called her Grandma. She was preceded in death by her
sons William Peterson in 1992 and Dwight Peterson in
2006 and her brother James O’Donel in 1979.
A Celebration of Nancy’s Life will be held at
2:00pm on Sunday, November 16, 2014 at West Linn
Lutheran Church, 20390 Willamette Drive, West Linn
OR 97068. In lieu of flowers contributions may be
made to www.ourhouseofportland.org or at Our House,
2727 SE Alder, Portland OR 97214.
Bateman Carroll
Funeral Home
520 W Powell Blvd | Gresham, OR 97030
503-665-2128
BatemanCarrollFunerals.com
497142.111414
497143.111414
J
oseph Mathew Perletti passed away peacefully into eternal rest, surrounded by
friends and family, in Soldotna on Nov 1,
2014, at age 57. Joe was born in Portland, Oregon
on August 31, 1957.
Joe embraced his natural entrepreneur skills at
a very early age by buying and selling coins at a
Flea Market. At age 15, he purchased his first
vehicle to repair and resell and continued this
passion throughout his life. He took great joy
in owning a multitude of ‘muscle cars’. Joe
attended Centennial High and MHCC. At age 18,
he earned his real estate license and purchased
his first home and continued buying and selling
real estate. He opened All Z-East, a successful
wrecking yard, specializing in Datsun Z parts, in
Gresham, Oregon.
Joe was very thankful to have met and married
the love of his life, Susan Monish, on March 9,
1985. Together they have three beloved children
Micah, Kadie, and Jonas.
In 2001, Joe realized his dream by moving his
family to the great state of Alaska. He enjoyed
living on the Kasilof River and the thrill of catching salmon there with his family and friends.
Joe was an insurance agent and later built and
then sold Soldotna Auto Salvage. Joe most of all
loved spending time with his family and
friends. He relished coaching both his sons’
hockey teams in Oregon and Alaska, and
also fishing and clam digging with his daughter. His kind and generous spirit will remain forever in the hearts and memories of his family and
friends.
Joe was preceded in death by his father, Paul,
and sister Karen. He is survived by his wife
Susan, sons Micah and Jonas, daughter
Kadie, mother Susanna, brothers Bill and Kevin,
sisters Paula and Marcy.
Mass and Celebration of Life Service were
held in Alaska.
NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Celebrating The Lives
Of Local Residents
Douglas Hiroshi Kato
December 24, 1941 to October 25, 2014
To place an
obituary, go online
to any of our
newspaper
websites and fill
out our easy
to use form.
Douglas Hiroshi Kato was
the second of four children
born to Henry and Chiyo Kato. Born in Portland, he was raised
in Gresham after the family
returned from being interned in
Eastern Oregon during WWII.
He graduated from Gresham
High School in 1960, and
received degrees from U of O
and Oregon Dental School. His
dental practice was in Gresham.
Doug had two children Andrew and Amy. Besides
coaching and attending their events, he was often
recording their activities with his camera. He also
enjoyed playing cards and board games, fishing,
boating, mushroom hunting and visiting family and
friends.
He is survived by his son, Andrew (Heather
Heikkila) and daughter Amy Kato; his Mother Chiyo
Kato, siblings Carl (Toni) Kato, Kathy Kato (Steve
Burgess), Curtis Kato; niece Denise Kato, nephew
Brian Kato and grandson Blake Heikkila
Arnold Andrew Kehrli
December 18, 1928 to November 4, 2014
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to Good Shepherd Community Church, or the
charity of your choice.
November 8, 1994 to November 6, 2014
497140.111414
There will be a celebration of life for Arnold on
Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 pm at Good Shepherd
Community Church, 28986 SE Haley Road, Boring,
Oregon 97009.
Kyle Sanders
Kyle Clinton Sanders, 19 of
Gresham OR, passed away on
Thursday, November 6, 2014 as the
result of an auto accident. He was
born on November 8, 1994 in Las
Vegas, Nevada to Bryant and
Jennifer (Duclon) Sanders. Kyle
attended Barlow High School and
graduated from Gresham/Barlow
Web Academy. He was in the
apprenticeship
program
at
Northwest College of Construction
and was working for Nutter Construction. He was
actively involved at Greater Gresham Baptist Church and
enjoyed archery, shooting, snowboarding and woodcutting
and loved hunting and fishing. Kyle cherished the Big
Brother role and always had time for his siblings. He was
a hard worker and will be remembered for his contagious
smile and big heart.
Kyle is survived by his parents Bryant and Jennifer
Sanders of Gresham OR; brother Evan Sanders and sister
Anika Sanders both of Gresham OR; grandparents Sybil
Bumgardner of Gresham OR, Gary & Cecelia Duclon of
Wauwatosa WI and David and Katherine Sanders of
Elgin OR; numerous aunts, uncles & cousins and his
girlfriend Abbagail Long of Gresham OR. He was
preceded in death by his Grandfather Robert Bumgardner
on November 7, 2009.
A Celebration of Kyle’s Life will be held at 11:00am
on Saturday, November 15, 2014 at Greater Gresham
Baptist Church, 3848 NE Division, Gresham OR 97030.
Arrangements entrusted to Bateman Carroll Funeral
Home in Gresham, Oregon.
Gary L. Linn
June 21, 1938 - October 16, 2014
G
ary Linn passed away October 16,
2014. He was survived by his wife of
57 years Glenda Linn and children
Greg Linn and Ginger Alexander. Gary graduated from Estacada High School in 1957, where he
met and shortly after married the love of his life
Glenda. After high school Gary served in the
United States Army for 2 years before he found a
career at Portland General Electric. He retired
from PGE, where he was a power operator at
River Mill Dam. He would most like to be
remembered as a hard working man that was
devoted to his family. In his free time he hunted
and fished every chance he got. Most of his days
were spent taking care of his property and watching the ball games. He will be missed very much
by his family and friends.
497141.111314
497138.111114
Arnold Andrew Kehrli passed
away on Tuesday, November 4,
2014. His spirit is carried on by
his wife, children, grandchildren,
great-grandchild, sisters, many
beloved cousins, nieces and
nephews and extended family.
Arnold’s parents, Arnold Kehrli
and Margaret Fahner immigrated
from Switzerland in the 1920’s
and upon arriving in America,
the Kehrli’s started the Skyline
Dairy and the Fahner’s owned the White Rose Dairy,
both in Gresham, Oregon. He would go on to own his
own dairy, Kehrli’s Dairy, in Troutdale with his lovely
bride. Arnold made a career change in his 30’s when he
went to work for Multnomah County Fire District 10
where he served for 23 years until his retirement. Arnold
made many good decisions in his 85 years of life, but the
best decision he ever made was when he chose Georgetta
Duerst as his wife. They married on April 21, 1950 and
had been happily married for 64 years. Arnold and
Georgetta loved family and home life and added Paul
(1951), Debbie, (1953) and Terri (1964) to their happy
family, to which their children are eternally grateful.
Grandchildren Justin (Vannessa) and Kelsey, and greatgranddaughter, Bettie, have great memories of the time
spent at Grandma and Grandpa’s house and many special
outings. Arnold and Georgetta enjoyed exploring the
world around them and travelled to 48 of the 50 states,
and also took multiple international vacations – with
Switzerland being a favorite destination. Arnold’s sisters,
Marguerite Kehrli and Esther (Ron) Cox joined them on
many of these travel adventures, and are thankful for the
many memories shared with their older brother. We were
lucky to have Arnold around for 85 years, and we will
miss his incredibly dry sense of humor, his sparkling
eyes and his mischievous grin.
Bateman Carroll
Funeral Home
520 W Powell Blvd | Gresham, OR 97030
503-665-2128
BatemanCarrollFunerals.com
Please join us in remembrance Saturday,
November 15, 2014 at the Estacada Junior High
School. Memorial will be held at 12PM in the
auditorium, followed by a potluck in the cafeteria. Please bring food items to the cafeteria before
the service.
HOW TO
LIVE UNITED:
JOIN HANDS.
OPEN YOUR HEART.
LEND YOUR MUSCLE.
FIND YOUR VOICE.
GIVE AN HOUR.
GIVE A SATURDAY.
THINK OF WE BEFORE ME.
REACH OUT A HAND TO ONE AND
INFLUENCE
THE CONDITION OF ALL.
GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.
LIVE UNITED
™
Want to make a difference? Help create opportunities for everyone in your community. United Way
is creating real, lasting change where you live, by focusing on the building blocks of a better life–
education, income and health. That’s what it means to Live United. For more, visit LIVEUNITED.ORG.
A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
State housing forecast paints
brighter picture than in past
Revenue keeps pace
with spending as
economy improves
An improved
housing market
has cheered
up local
homebuilders,
who have faced
tough economic
news in the past
few years.
By JON BELL
For the Tribune
These notices give information concerning actions planned and
implemented by attorneys, financial institutions and government
agencies. They are intended to keep you and every citizen fully informed.
Space-reservation deadline for all legal notices is Thursday 10 am
one week prior to publication. Please call Louise Faxon at (503) 546-0752
or e-mail [email protected] to book your notice.
MULTNOMAH COUNTY DRAINAGE DISTRICT #1
PENINSULA DRAINAGE DISTRICT #1
PENINSULA DRAINAGE DISTRICT #2
1880 NE ELROD DRIVE
PORTLAND OR 97211
You are hereby notified that the Board of Supervisors for
Multnomah County Drainage District #1, Peninsula Drainage
District #1, and Peninsula Drainage District #2 will meet
on 11/20/14 at 11:30 a.m., at the District Office, 1880 NE
Elrod Drive, Portland, OR 97211. Agenda items include:
legislative updates, contracting policies, and board management practices. Public members wishing to participate should call the District Office at 503-281-5675 x 300.
Publish 11/13/2014.
PT1319
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON
FOR MULTNOMAH COUNTY Juvenile Department
In the Matter of HEMPE, MADISON SUMMER A Child.
Case No. 2002-81896
PUBLISHED SUMMONS
TO: Jennifer Hempe
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON:
A petition has been filed asking the court to establish
paternity to the above-named child. YOU ARE DIRECTED TO
FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER to the petition NO LATER THAN
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF LAST PUBLICATION
OF THIS SUMMONS, specified herein, admitting or denying the allegations in the petition and informing the court
of your current residence address, mailing address and telephone number. YOUR ANSWER SHOULD BE MAILED TO
Multnomah Juvenile Complex, 1401 NE 68th Ave, Portland,
Oregon 97213. You are further directed to appear at any subsequent court-ordered hearing. AN ATTORNEY MAY NOT
ATTEND ANY COURT-ORDERED HEARING IN YOUR
PLACE. THEREFORE, YOU MUST APPEAR EVEN IF
YOUR ATTORNEY ALSO APPEARS.
This summons is published pursuant to the order of the
circuit court judge of the above-entitled court, dated November
4th, 2014. The order directs that this summons be published
once each week for four consecutive weeks, making four publications in all, in a published newspaper of general circulation in
Multnomah County.
Date of first publication: November 13, 2014.
Date of last publication: December 4, 2014.
Typical large city
The foreclosure scene also has
shown some marked improvement, and housing starts are rising solidly. Denk noted that between 2000 and 2003, the average
number of housing starts for the
country was 1.3 million singlefamily homes. In 2009, the country saw about 27 percent of that
Airbnb: Less housing, higher rent
■ From page 1
bother to seek permits, especially
when leasing out apartment
rooms violates most tenants’
leases.
The standard lease used by
Multifamily NW, which represents owners of about 175,000
apartment units in Oregon, bars
subletting, says Deborah Imse,
the trade group’s executive
director.
Imse participated in a task
force put together by Hales’ staff
to vet the new proposal. While
the landlords group may seek
some changes, such as requiring
the landlord signature get notarized, its main concern is that
landlord approval is granted,
Imse says.
New wrinkle
City Commissioners Nick Fish
and Amanda Fritz want to go fur-
ther, and require that the landlord apply for the permit instead
of the tenant.
“It is the landlord and not the
tenant who we should hold accountable,” Fish says. “The landlord has the ultimate responsibility for a safe building.”
That could further limit the
number of permit applications.
Under Portland’s ordinance,
people opening up their singlefamily homes to short-term renters only have to live on the premises nine months of the year. That
means they could hire an off-site
manager and rent their home to
short-term visitors all summer
while traveling abroad or enjoying the sun in Hawaii.
Steve Unger, proprietor of the
Lion and the Rose Victorian Bed
& Breakfast in Irvington, will ask
the City Council to be more strict
for multifamily properties. He
wants hosts to live on site for all
W H AT T O O K Y O U A L I F E T I M E
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.
WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE.
©2004 American Heart Association
Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation.
but about 12 days a year, to allow
for modest vacations.
“If the host is residing there
during the stay, you’re not likely
to have problems,” says Unger,
who competes with Airbnb but
also uses the service when he
travels.
“The close proximity of multifamily makes it more of a nuisance to the neighbors,” he says.
“If you’re a single-family home,
you can be 50 feet away,” he says,
but with apartments, you’re only
a wall away.
Losing affordable housing
Expanding the city ordinance
also raises more concerns that
Airbnb-style operations will reduce the stock of affordable housing in Portland, driving up rents.
Mayor Hales recognizes that
problem, Haynes says, but is
confident that operators of subsidized housing will not allow
short-term rentals in their
properties.
But even the loss of marketrate apartments can drive up
rents if that causes the supply of
units to dwindle.
Hales doesn’t dispute that,
Haynes says, but figures it’s better to have a regulatory system
in place given that short-term
rentals have become so common here and are unlikely to go
away.
One Portlander already filed
an anonymous complaint that
four apartments at 514 N.W
Ninth Ave. are being listed illegally under Airbnb. The local
property manager and Seattle
owner of the Northwest Portland
apartment building both declined to discuss the complaint,
which resulted in a zoning violation notice sent by the Bureau of
Development Services.
Several people have testified
to the City Council that they can
charge much higher rents to
tourists on short stays than they
can to long-term tenants. “If you
rent a unit short-term, you can
usually make in three months
as much as you can all year long
renting it long-term,” Unger
says.
That means there will be a
temptation for more apartment
owners to convert their units to
A i r b n b - styl e p r o p e r t i e s ,
despite the on-site residency
requirement.
Fish is concerned about that
prospect. “I don’t have any illusions about how hard it is to
regulate this,” he says.
The city is hesitant to mount
a major enforcement effort
against those who fail to seek
permits or otherwise violate the
short-term rental ordinance,
preferring to intervene only
when someone files a complaint.
So far, no city commissioner has
asked for more money to spend
on enforcing the ordinance,
Haynes says.
Greater use of Airbnb in multifamily settings also is likely to
reduce the supply of affordable
units even when the tenant remains on site. That’s because
tenants or condo owners might
be tempted to stop renting out
rooms to longer-term tenants in
favor of higher-paying nightly
renters.
There is little available data on
such arrangements, since they
often occur under the table. But
it stands to reason that renting
out a room is usually cheaper
than renting a studio apartment.
“Roommate rentals are real
important affordable housing,”
Unger says.
[email protected]
twitter.com/SteveLawTrib
$6 Billion In Ratepayer
Savings Since 1984
Every Time Your Utility:
• Recommends a rate increase;
• Proposes an expensive new project;
UP NEXT!
Skippyjon Jones
I
-W
NNING T
JAN 17 – FEB 15, 2015
H
Timmy Failure:
Mistakes Were Made
TER
EA
NOTICE
READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY
IF YOU DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER
AS DIRECTED ABOVE, OR DO NOT APPEAR AT ANY
SUBSEQUENT COURT-ORDERED HEARING, the court
may proceed in your absence without further notice and
TERMINATE YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS to the above-named
child either ON THE DATE AN ANSWER IS REQUIRED BY
THIS SUMMONS OR ON A FUTURE DATE, and may make
such orders and take such action as authorized by law.
RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS
(1)
YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE
REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY IN THIS MATTER.
If you are currently represented by an attorney, CONTACT
YOUR ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING
THIS NOTICE. Your previous attorney may not be representing you in this matter.
IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE AN
ATTORNEY and you meet the state’s financial guidelines,
you are entitled to have an attorney appointed for you at
state expense. TO REQUEST APPOINTMENT OF AN
ATTORNEY TO REPRESENT YOU AT STATE EXPENSE,
YOU MUST IMMEDIATELY CONTACT the Multnomah
Juvenile Department at 1401 NE 68th Ave, phone number 503988-3463, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. for
further information.
IF YOU WISH TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY, please
retain one as soon as possible. If you need help finding an
attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral
Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 4527636.
IF YOU ARE REPRESENTED BY AN ATTORNEY,
IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAINTAIN CONTACT
WITH YOUR ATTORNEY AND TO KEEP YOUR ATTORNEY
ADVISED OF YOUR WHEREABOUTS.
(2)
If you contest the petition, the court will
schedule a hearing on the allegations of the petition and
order you to appear personally and may schedule other hearings related to the petition and order you to appear personally. IF YOU ARE ORDERED TO APPEAR, YOU MUST
APPEAR PERSONALLY IN THE COURTROOM, UNLESS
THE COURT HAS GRANTED YOU AN EXCEPTION
IN ADVANCE UNDER ORS 419B.918 TO APPEAR BY
OTHER MEANS INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
TELEPHONIC OR OTHER ELECTRONIC MEANS. AN
ATTORNEY MAY NOT ATTEND THE HEARING(S) IN
YOUR PLACE.
PETITIONER’S ATTORNEY
Patrick G. Ward
Assistant Attorney General
Department of Justice
1515 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 410
Portland, OR 97201
Phone: (971) 673-1880
ISSUED this 6th day of November, 2014.
Issued by:
/s/ Patrick Ward
Patrick G. Ward #02478
Assistant Attorney General
Publish 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/04/2014.
PT1321
ment in the overall economy, not
just special tax credit or homebuying programs. Job creation is
up — some 214,000 jobs were created nationally in October — unemployment is below 6 percent
nationally and other conditions
have shored up the nation’s economic picture.
“The strongest housing recoveries are associated with
the strongest labor market recoveries,” he said. “It’s not a
perfect relationship, but it’s a
solid indicator.”
• Presses the legislature for
anti-consumer policies;
CUB Is There To Protect Your Interests.
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PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES
years, didn’t address homebuilding specifically, but instead talked about how the gap between
the state’s revenue and its expenditures has been closed in recent
years. When mapped out as two
lines on a graph, Jordan said the
state’s expenditures and revenues used to resemble and be
called “the jaws of death” for the
way they diverged. Thanks to
some painful cuts and a new approach to delivering services in a
more local way, those two lines
are now nearly on top of each
other.
“The jaws of death are gone,”
Jordan said. “That’s not the case
at the local level, but from the
state level, they are gone.”
Robert Denk, a senior economist with the National Association of Home Builders, told builders that, for the first time in
years, the housing market recovery is driven by a solid improve-
01
-2
4
4
Trib Info Box 0813
View legals online at: http://publicnotices.portlandtribune.com
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
198
PORTLAND TRIBUNE PUBLIC NOTICE 111314
RD
494744.111114
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481148.101414
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AWA
world’s largest christmas choral festival
LIGHT DISPLAYS-INDOOR CHORAL CONCERTS-PUPPET SHOWS-PETTING ZOO-CHRISTMAS CAROLERS
For the past few years, the
message of the Home Builders
Association of Metropolitan
Portland’s annual housing
forecast has sounded almost
like a broken record: The market’s improving, but it was
down so low for so long that it
still has a long way to go.
But this year, the takeaway
from the event finally sounded
firmly on the positive end of the
spectrum.
“It was much better news than
a lot of the past years,” said Jan
Lewis, owner of Tryon Creek
Construction. “I think it’s been a
lot slower of a recovery than anybody expected, but the news this
year seemed like it was finally
better.”
The annual forecast drew
nearly 500 professionals, politicians and city officials from
across the metro region. They
were there to hear what three
experts had to say about the
economy and the housing market ahead.
Setting the stage first for this
year’s forecast was Michael Jordan, Oregon’s chief operations
officer. Jordan, who has been in
government for more than 30
average. Since then, the United
States has slowly worked its way
back up to almost half of the 1.3
million average. While that’s
good, Denk said there’s still some
ground to make up.
“We still have the other half
of the housing market recovery
ahead of us,” he said, adding
that he expects housing starts
to hit 68 percent of the 1.3 million average by the end of 2015
and 90 percent by the end of
2016.
Focusing more exclusively on
Oregon was Josh Lehner, an
economist with the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis. He
blazed through the high points
for Oregon — strong population
growth, hefty job creation, and
the fact that builders didn’t
overbuild too much during the
boom before the bust — and also listed the lows: a lack of midwage jobs, lingering tough
times in the rural portions of
the state, and the difficulty in
obtaining credit that many
younger Oregonians are running into.
Lehner said Portland gets
tagged with some negative narratives about having nothing but
creative-class service jobs, and
while there’s some truth to that,
it’s not any worse here than in
other cities across the country.
“Really, Portland matches the
typical large city anywhere,” he
said. “In Portland and Oregon,
we are right there with the rest
of the country.”
www.octc.org
Join us for this hilarious musical based on the New York Times bestselling series Ivy + Bean by Annie Barrows
30 Years and Counting
Look For Info In
Portland Water Bills
Or On-Line At
Oregoncub.org
NEWS A11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Electric taxi firm stays ahead of the curve
Washington man
hopes to expand
EcoCab in Portland
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
Would you go out of your
way to schedule a taxi ride if
it were in an electric vehicle? How about if it was a
$96,320 Tesla Model S, which
is winning accolades as one
of the best cars on the road?
That’s the business plan of
Ron Knori, who hopes to expand his Longview, Wash.’s
EcoCab taxi company into Portland.
Knori says he’s already ordered two Teslas and hopes to
supplement those with 10 allelectric Nissan Leafs, plus
three vans that can accommodate people in wheelchairs.
Portland is the “perfect city”
to start an electric vehicle cab
company, Knori says. “We’ve
got all the public charging in-
TRIBUNE PHOTOS: JAIME VALDEZ
Ron Knori, owner and CEO of taxi
company EcoCab in Longview,
Wash., stands next to his Tesla
taxicab in Portland.
frastructure that we need already,” he says, and the city is a
hotbed for people who prefer
electric vehicles.
In Longview, EcoCab operates two Teslas, two Leafs and
two Chevy Volts. He notices a
bump in business just from offering the Teslas.
“It’s making people literally
change the way they go out,”
he says. When he drives one to
Portland, people stop him and
ask to take his photo.
Though there is a demand
for more taxis in Portland, EcoCab is going to have to wait in
line to get permits.
The city has licensed about
460 taxis, and there are applications for more than 400 more,
says Bryan Hockaday, a policy
adviser for city Commissioner
Steve Novick.
Oversight of taxi regulatory
matters was shifted from the
city Revenue Bureau to the
Portland Bureau of Transportation in July, giving Novick
new responsibility for oversight. Last Wednesday, Novick
announced he wants to appoint a task force to help evaluate the city’s taxi industry
and regulatory matters, says
Hockaday, the commissioner’s
new point person for taxi matters. The review will look at
More bumps ahead
on road to street fee
Response to Hales,
Novick plan comes
fast, mostly furious
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
The city’s revised street
fee is stirring up a hornet’s
nest of opposition.
Some Portland business
leaders and neighborhood activists already are calling for
changes to the proposal unveiled Monday morning by
Mayor Charlie Hales and Commissioner Steve Novick. The
leader of at least one grassroots organization is asking its
members to support the revised fee, however. Opponents
are labeling it a “street tax”
and urging its defeat. And a
lobbyist is predicting it will be
referred to the ballot.
And all this is happening before the first City Council hearing, which is scheduled for Nov.
20.
Within hours of the City Hall
news conference by Hales and
Novick, Sandra McDonough,
president of the Portland Business Alliance, posted a message on her blog calling for the
proposal to be amended.
Among other things, McDonough said the PBA opposes
the residential portion of the
revised fee, the city’s first progressive income tax.
“Under this new plan, almost
half of Portland taxpayers will
be exempt from paying even a
modest amount, contrary to
the longstanding tradition of a
user-pay system for street
maintenance. This is a result of
the structure of the proposed
new income tax and the city’s
inability to tax public retirement incomes (although private retirement income would
be taxable),” wrote McDonough, who urged the city to
reconsider the fee structure.
But Southeast Uplift questioned provisions of the revised
proposal even before it was formally unveiled. On Nov. 6, the
board of the Southeast Portland neighborhood coalition
office sent a letter to the council saying the cost falls too
heavily on residents and not
heavily enough on large road
users, such as the Union Pacific
Railroad Yard in that part of
town and large medical institutions, like Oregon Health & Science University, Providence
Hospital and Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital.
“In many cases major users
of roads may pay less than a
single Portland resident,” said
the letter, signed by Southeast
Uplift board President Robert
McCullough, who attended
Monday’s news conference and
repeated the criticisms in the
hallway afterward.
But even earlier, on Nov. 3,
Jonathan Ostar, director of the
OPAL Environmental Justice
Oregon, sent an email to members of the nonprofit organization calling on them to express
their support for the fee to the
council. Ostar served on one of
the work groups that revised
the fee and said it would fund
safety projects favored by his
organization. They include
more sidewalks, crosswalks
and better access to transit
along 122nd Avenue in East
Portland.
“I have worked very hard to
push for a progressive revenue
Ron Knori,
owner and CEO
of taxi company
EcoCab, in
Longview, Wash.,
drives his Tesla
taxicab in
downtown
Portland.
market demand, customer service, taxi driver compensation,
and new technologies that are
being used by companies like
Uber.
“We certainly think that we
need to do a new market de-
mand study,” Hockaday says.
There’s clear demand for more
taxis in Portland, he says, and
increasing complaints about
long wait times for people trying to get taxi service.
Maybe some of those com-
plainants will feel better if a
$96,320 electric vehicle pulls
up to their door to give them a
ride.
[email protected]
twitter.com/SteveLawTrib
Court: Long traffic stop negates evidence
Justices rule in local
case, favoring U.S.
Supreme Court tests
proposal that exempts low-income households and shifts
responsibility to our most affluent residents. I have also advanced a project list that ensures that the revenue generated will be spent in communities that need the most investment, like East Portland,” according to Ostar’s email.
Meanwhile, critics on the
nostreetfee.com website are
urging the rest of the council to
defeat the new tax.
“Even if they call it the ‘Portland Street Fund,’ a tax by any
other name is still a tax,” reads
one post.
And lobbyist Paul Romain
says if the council does not refer the measure to the ballot, it
will be placed there through a
petition drive, although he did
not say who would lead it.
The revised proposal includes a progressive personal
income tax that begins at
$25,000 for a single person and
$35,000 for a couple. It would be
capped at $75 a month and includes a $5,000 per child deduction. The taxes paid would be
deductible on state and local
income tax forms. The nonresidential portion would assess
businesses based on the number of employees, the square
footage of office and other building space, and their gross revenue. Payments would range
from $3 to $144 a month, with a
50 percent discount available
for nonprofit organizations.
The revised fee is intended to
raise $46 million a year, with 56
percent of the revenue going to
street maintenance projects and
44 percent dedicated to safety
projects. The council is tentatively scheduled to vote on the
proposal Dec. 3.
We’d like to meet you!
By PETER WONG
The Tribune
The Oregon Supreme
Court has ruled that police
cannot stretch out a traffic
stop illegally if they had no
reasonable suspicion to detain the driver or passengers — even if police turn
up incriminating evidence
later.
The court was careful to say
that it depends on the circumstances and three legal tests
laid out by the U.S. Supreme
Court four decades ago.
The justices decided last
week in favor of Clark Allen
Bailey, who was a passenger in
a car stopped by Portland police in 2010. During what would
have been an otherwise routine stop, Bailey declined to
identify himself to police until
another officer arrived about
30 minutes later, recognized
him as a gang associate and
ran a records check on him.
Bailey had an outstanding
arrest warrant, and in an ensuing search, police found him
in possession of cocaine and
$700 in cash.
Despite a motion to exclude
the drug evidence, a Multnomah County judge and a
split Oregon Court of Appeals
panel allowed it. But the Supreme Court ruled otherwise,
and sent the case back to circuit court. Justice David Brewer, who wrote for the court,
says that the circumstances
amounted to an unreasonable
search of Bailey after an unlawful stop of the car he was
riding in.
Unreasonable searches and
seizures are barred under the
Oregon and U.S. constitutions.
In this case, the justices overruled a 1967 decision by the
court in favor of a 1975 ruling
by the U.S. Supreme Court,
which lays out three legal
tests to determine the validity
of the seized evidence. The
tests are the proximity of the
unlawful conduct and the discovery of the challenged evidence, the intervening circumstances, and the flagrancy of
the official misconduct.
The case stemmed from a
police officer who reported
gang activity in 2010 in Portland. An officer spotted by air
a group of people leaving a
home where gang members
gathered after a funeral of an
associate. The officer, concerned that the group were on
their way to commit violence,
asked police to check out their
vehicle. A patrol car then
stopped the driver of the rented vehicle for a minor traffic
violation — failure to signal a
turn — and asked her for proof
of insurance that she did not
have. (She was cited later on
both.)
While the check was proceeding, an officer asked for
the identities of the passengers, but Bailey declined. A
second officer in a backup car
also asked Bailey, but he declined again. That officer suspected that Bailey was a gang
associate, but it was not until a
third officer arrived about 30
minutes later, recognized Bailey and ran a criminal records
check on him that police discovered an outstanding arrest
warrant.
[email protected]
twitter.com/capitolwong
JOIN... the Portland Business Alliance.
As Greater Portland’s
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membership in the
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to more than 1,700
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Why should you become a member?
ƒ Opportunities to build relationships with
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academic curriculum supported by a wide range of co-curricular activities.
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503-262-4844 | 9727 SW Terwilliger Blvd., Portland, OR 97219
495371.110614
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Wheels!
A12 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Auto enthusiast offers
ailing kids a dream ride
By JIM REDDEN
For Pamplin Media Group
Although Eric Peterson is enjoying the
benefits of being a successful high-tech
consultant — including a growing exotic
car collection — he is also giving back to
the community by giving sick and recovering children rides in them.
“When children are in treatment, they
really don’t have
time to be be kids.
Jim Ervin,
So I’m giving them
chance to get out
executive director aand
have some fun,”
of the Doernbecher says Peterson, the
Children’s Hospital founder of Web Analytics Demystified,
Foundation,
a local consulting
firm named after
praises the
his successful 2004
Peterson family
book about web
for bring joy to the traffic data.
Peterson and his
patients.
wife Amity formed
Dream Drives for
Kids earlier this year to offer free rides to
sick and recovering children. They have
partnered with OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and the Children’s Cancer
Association to find patients and recovering
kids who would enjoys such rides, and who
are healthy enough to take them.
Adeline enjoyed a ride in Peterson’s
McLaren MP4-12C Spider while visiting
Doernbecher for follow-up cancer monitoring. It helped re-energize her after years of
necessary but debilitating treatments,
says he mother, Angela.
“Adeline would often lament that she
would like to ride in a fast and special car
Dream Drives for
Kids’ Eric Peterson
takes Shane for a
drive in a Ferrari
599 GTB.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JONATHAN HOUSE
Adeline enjoyed a ride
in a McLaren MP412C Spider while at
Doernbecher
Children’s Hospital.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO:
ERIC PETERSON
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Shane gets a hi-five from Eric Peterson of Dream
Drives for Kids as he and his grandfather Derek decide
which car to take for a cruise.
someday instead of going to chemo. And
thanks to Eric and Amity’s kindness and
generosity, her dream came true,” says
Angela. “I could tell something had re-ignited in Adeline when she lightly hopped
out of the car, spirited from the rush, ready
to go again. This was the vivacious child
that illness had hidden away. And the excitement has spilled into the weeks since.”
More recently, Shane, another Doernbecher patient, took a ride in Peterson’s
Ferrari 599 GTB on a breezy fall day.
Jim Ervin, executive director of the Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Foundation,
praises the Peterson family for bring joy to
the patients.
“It’s been so touching to see the smiles
and enthusiasm from children who realize
their going to get to go for a ride. They are
special people who are giving to the community,” says Ervin.
Peterson has taken around a half-dozen
See DREAM / Next page
Chevy Spark offers a lot of technology, efficiency for little cost
REVIEW
EV model is one of the
most efficient vehicles
By JOHN M. VINCENT
For Pamplin Media Group
C
hevy’s Spark is their smallest U.S.
vehicle, but it’s loaded with costsaving technology not found on the
competition, or even on larger
models. Plus, it’s available with either gasoline or electric power.
The 1.2-liter gasoline engine is tuned for
efficiency, especially when linked to the continuously variable automatic transmission.
The new 2-step CVT is a lot better than the
COURTESY: CHEVROLET
For about $60, Spark buyers can have a navigation
system that appears to be built in to the car, but is
actually powered by their Smartphone.
automatic that the Spark launched with, but
the available 5-speed manual allows drivers
to maximize the utility of the motor’s
84-horsepower.
The peppiest powertrain is found in the
pure-electric Spark EV. Because electric motors produce high torque at low rpms, the
nimble Spark EV is a blast to drive around
town. Power tapers at the top end, but highspeed freeway driving isn’t really what the
electric Spark was designed for.
Where the Spark shines is in the implementation of technology. Most buyers in this
segment are well-connected to the world
through their smartphone. Chevy leverages
this by using the owner’s phone to provide
the computing power for the car’s information and entertainment systems.
The available MyLink system incorporates a fairly basic radio and 7-inch touchscreen to channel information to and from
the phone. You simply link your iPhone to
the USB port or Android via Bluetooth.
See SPARK / Next page
COURTESY: CHEVROLET
The Chevy Spark looks like a 2-door, but the handles for the back door are cleverly
hidden in the car’s rear pillar. A 5-year, 100,000 mile powertrain warranty is included.
www.armstrongvw.com
Armstrong Volkswagen
$
$
$
$
DOWN
DUE AT
SECURITY
0 0 0 0
SIGNING
PAYMENT
NEW 2015 VW
NEW 2014
VW JETTA S
159
$
1AT
$
DOWN
PAYMENT
$
DUE AT
SIGNING
$
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
PASSAT S 1.8T
NEW 2015
0 0 0 0
$
36
MONTHS
ALL ELECTRIC!
IN STOCK... CHARGED UP...
READY TO GO!!
2014
BEETLE TDI
0 $0 $0 $0
$
PER
MONTH
DOWN
DUE AT
SECURITY
1ST MO.
PAYMENT
SIGNING
DEPOSIT
PAYMENT
Lease MSRP $23,310, cap cost $18,965 after $3250 lease bonus cash & $1095 Armstrong Discount. $0 down payment, $0 first payment, $348 Ore. License, title & admin. Fee, $0 security deposit totaling $348 due at inception plus $3500 lease bonus cash.Total lease
charge $8,713. Residual $12,121. Vin #006399. 10K miles per year. Financing through VCI on approval of credit.
Expires 11/30/14. Lease Only.
1AT
NEW 2014 MODELS-CLEARANCE PRICE NOW!
2014 JETTA
SPORTWAGEN S
239
$
VW E-GOLF
1ST MO.
PAYMENT
Lease MSRP $17,985, cap cost $14,399 after $2500 lease bonus cash & $1,086 Armstrong Discount. $0 down payment, $0 first
payment, $348 Ore. License, title & admin. Fee, $0 security deposit totaling $348 due at inception plus $2500 lease bonus cash. Total
lease charge $5,913. Residual $9712. Vin #437142. 10K miles per year. Financing through VCI on approval of credit.
Expires 11/30/14. Lease Only.
2014
JETTA S
1ST MO.
PAYMENT
DEPOSIT
NEW 2015 MODELS-ON SALE NOW!!
2014
TOUAREG VR6
2015
JETTA S
2015 GOLF TSI S
4 DOOR
2015
PASSAT S 1.8T
2015 GTI 2.0 T S
4 DOOR
Air, Keyless Entry, AM/FM CD
Stereo, Power Windows &
Locks, Tilt Wheel.
Automatic, Air AM/FM CD
Stereo, Power Windows &
Locks, Tilt/Cruise.
Automatic, Air, Keyless Entry,
AM/FM/CD Stereo, Power
Windows & Locks, Tilt/Cruise.
Sunroof, Automatic,
Air AM/FM CD Stereo,
Power Windows & Locks.
$6165
OFF MSRP
Air, Power Windows & Locks,
Tilt wheel, AM/FM CD Stereo,
Keyless Entry & More.
Automatic, Air Conditioning,
AM/FM/CD Stereo, Power
Windows/Locks, Heated Seats
4Motion, AWD, Automatic,
Power Options, AM/FM/CD
Stereo, Navigation and more.
14,950 $19,950 $23,950 $43,450
$
1 AT
Automatic, Air, AM/FM CD
Stereo, Tilt/Cruise, Power
Windows & Locks.
1 AT
Sale Price after
$3,035 Armstrong Discount.
MSRP $17,985. Vin#437142
1 AT
Sale Price after
$3,235 Armstrong Discount.
MSRP $23,185. Vin#619245
1 AT
Sale Price after
$2800 Armstrong Discount
MSRP $26,750. Vin # 666353
Sale Price after
$6,165 Armstrong Discount,
MSRP$49,615. Vin # 015465
17,950 $20,950 $21,950 $29,950
$
1 AT
1 AT
1 AT
Sale Price after
$565 Armstrong Discount.
MSRP $21,515. Vin#029883
Sale Price after
$665 Armstrong Discount.
MSRP $18,615. Vin#352096
ARMSTRONG VW SELECTION OF CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
2013 VW PASSAT
2014 VW JETTA S
Vin # 136660 $
Vin #360945
Automatic,
15,950
1 AT
1.99
%
UP
APRTO
60MOS.**
2013 VW BEETLE
Automatic
Vin# 672523
20,950
$
1 AT
1.99% 60MOS.**
495813.111214 W
UP
APR TO
Automatic,
1 AT
1.99
16,950
$
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
2014 JETTA TDI PREMIUM
Vin#378713
1 AT
1.99
24,205
$
%
UP
APRTO
60MOS.**
18,950
$
1 AT
1.99
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
2014 VW JETTA TDI NAV
Vin#378051
1 AT
25,485
$
1.99% 60MOS.**
UP
APRTO
**Available through VCI, on approved credit, A+ tier, expires 11/30/14 All sales subject to prior sale, pictures for illustration only
Armstrong
Volkswagen
20000 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Gladstone, OR
www.armstrongvw.com
Sales/Service/Parts
1-888-331-6314
TOLL
FREE
Sale Price after
$235 Armstrong Discount. MSRP
$30,185. Vin#014561
• 2 YEAR OR 24,000 MILE BUMPER TO BUMPER LIMITED WARRANTY
• 24 HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE • 112 POINT INSPECTION
2014 VW JETTA SPORTWAGEN
Vin #602832
1 AT
Sale Price after
$1,360 Armstrong Discount.
MSRP $23,310. Vin#006399
2012 VW PASSAT SEL
Vin#040622
1 AT
2.79
19,950
$
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
2011 VW TOUAREG TDI
42,950
Executive Model $
Vin # 005361 1 AT
2.79
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
NEWS A13
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Wheels!
AUTONEWS
Kuni COO passes away
Joseph C. Herman, chief operating officer of
Kuni Automotive Group, passed away on Oct. 29,
following a year-long battle with pancreatic cancer.
Born on June 9, 1942 in
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
Herman worked in the
automotive industry for
more than 40 years in a
c a r e e r m a r ke d by
successes at dealerships
across the country. He
joined
the
Ku n i
Automotive Group as its
COO in 2010 and helped
Joe Herman
double annual revenue
from under $500 million to more than $1 billion.
The company elevated Herman him to Executive
Vice President in August of this year and, more
recently, announced the creation of a new “best in
class” dealership award that will be named “The
Joe Herman Challenge Cup.” He is survived by his
wife Kathryn Herman, son Christopher Scott
Herman and daughter Rebecca Brooke Herman.
Dream: Enthusiast gives thrill rides
■ From previous page
kids on rides so far and hopes to
complete 20 before the end of the
year. They have includes rides in
his McLaren, Ferrari, Lamborghini
Gallardo, and A.C. Cobra Superformance replica. Free gifts have
been provided by Ron Tonkin
Gran Turismo, BMW Portland and
Sunset Porsche.
Peterson came up with the idea
for the rides after noticing how excited children get about seeing his
vehicles at local car shows. He
broached the idea with a friend
who works at Doernbecher’s, who
said many of the young patients
there would enjoy them. Some of
the rides are documented on Eric’s
webpage: dramdrivesforkids.com
If you know someone who would
enjoy a ride, contact Peterson at:
[email protected]
Spark: Makes an attractive package
The Chevy Spark EV
battery-electric
vehicle is only sold
in California and
Oregon. It’s estimated driving range
is 82 miles, and it
can be fast charged
to 80 percent
capacity in just 20
minutes using a SAE
Combo standard
charger.
COURTESY: CHEVROLET
■ From previous page
What appears to be a built-in
BringGo navigation system is actually a $.99 download from the Apple
App store or Android Marketplace.
With a one-time subscription
payment of $59.99 you get navigation guidance
with map upAfter a week of dates and realdriving a Spark time traffic information.
around the city That’s a lot
of St. Louis, it less expensive
than traditiononly cost $25 to al navigation
systems with
fill the tank
their high inifrom nearly
tial
cost,
$100-plus
per
empty.
year updates
and traffic data subscription fees.
MyLink also channels data from
your phone’s Pandora, TuneIn Radio or Stitcher apps into the audio
system, with content information
displayed on the screen. iPhone users can control the system using
Apple’s Siri Eyes Free voice recognition system.
The diminutive Spark looks like
a 2-door coupe, but it’s a 4-door. De-
signers cleverly hid the handles for
the back doors high in the rear pillar. While the 2 back seats aren’t
exactly spacious, they’re okay for
kids or the occasional office lunch
run.
The Spark earns EPA estimated
mileage of 30 in the city and 39 on
the highway, and those numbers
seem to be attainable in real-world
driving. After a week of driving a
Spark around the city of St. Louis,
it only cost $25 to fill the tank from
nearly empty.
2014 Chevrolet Spark
Models: LS, LT, EV.
Base prices: LS $12,270, LT $14,040,
EV $26,685. Plus $825 destination (2015
models).
Type: 4-passenger 4-door front wheeldrive hatchback mini car.
Engines: 1.2-liter inline 4-cylinder, 105 kW
Electric motor (EV).
EPA Estimated Mileage: 30 city/39
highway (as tested).
Length: 144.7 inches.
Curb Weight: 2,368 (as tested).
Final Assembly: South Korea.
John M. Vincent can be reached at:
[email protected]
COURTESY: WENTWORTH SUBARU
Wentworth Subaru donated $22,500 to Doernbecher Children’s Hospital last year.
Subaru launches ‘Love’ campaign
Kuni Lexus teaming with Trail Blazers again
Subaru will be launching its sev- hometown dealers and their charienth annual “Share the Love” chari- ties: Wentworth Subaru, Doerntable fundraising drive beginning becher Children’s Hospital; Carr
next week.
Subaru, Providence Child Center From Nov. 20, until Jan. 2, for ev- Bill’s Kids Fund; Lithia Subaru, the
ery new Subaru vehiOregon Humane Socicle sold or leased dur- Make your charity
ety; Hannah Subaru,
ing that period, Subaru
the Police Activities
will donate $250 to the selection three ways League; Royal Moore
customer’s choice of Customers will be able to
Subaru, Willamette
participating charities.
make their charity selection West Habitat for HuThey include four chomanity; and Gresham
for the Share the Love event
sen nationally and one
Subaru, 4th Dimension
in three ways — online at
designated by each
Recovery Center.
Subaru.com/share, by
hometown dealer.
The hometown charphone at 1-800-SUBARU3,
During the past six
ities have traditionally
and in-store, by completing
years, Subaru has doproven very popular.
the selection form on the
nated $35 million to a
For example, last year
Digital Showroom. The web- Wentworth Subaru dorange of charities nasite will open on Nov. 20.
tionwide.
nated $22,500 to DoernThe four nationallybecher Children’s Hosselected charities this year are the pital.
American Society for the Preven“Doernbecher is a wonderful ortion of Cruelty to Animals, the ganization. They’ve touched so maMake-A-Wish Foundation, the ny families in the community, inMeals On Wheels Association of cluding people who work for us,”
America, and the National Park says Bob Wentworth, president of
Foundation.
Wentworth Subaru at 400 E. BurnIn the Portland area, here are the side in Portland.
AUTOEVENTS
Kuni Lexus is sponsoring the renovated Club
Level at the Moda Center. It is accessible to make
than 1,500 Club Level ticket holders for the Portland
Trail Blazer season that just began. It features new
seats, new local food and refreshment options,
concierge service and retail kiosks.
“Lexus has always been extremely supportive of
the Trail Blazers and we are proud to have taken a
more exclusive role in our partnership,”says Phil
Lane, President of Kuni Lexus of Portland. “We
pride ourselves on the excellent customer
experience we provide at Kuni Lexus of Portland,
and the new Kuni Lexus Club Level was also built
with the same purpose in mind — making it the
natural next step in our successful partnership.”
The Kuni Lexus Club Level is the latest change
in a $16 million renovation project at the Rose
Quarter. This is the ninth season that the Blazers
and Kuni Lexus have had a sponsorship deal.
Details of the arrangement were not announced.
Sunset Audi renovation nearing completion
Sunset Audi is undergoing a major renovation
that will triple its showroom space.
The renovation, which began in 2013, is
scheduled to be completed early next year.
Sunset Audi is located at 4050 S.W. 139th Way in
Beaverton.
24th Annual Santa Cruise
Dubs & Donuts
Saturday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m., Sesame Donuts, 11945 Pacific
Hwy., Tigard. Casual gathering hosted by Rose City Volksters, but all makes and models welcome. Continues third
Saturday of every month.
16th Annual Roadmasters Kruze for Kids
Saturday, Dec. 6, 10 a.m., Benny’s Pizza, 4219 N.E. St.
Johns Rd., Vancouver. Proceeds benefit the Open House
Ministries.
Saturday, Dec. 6, 8 a.m., Stayton Fire Station, 1988 W. Ida
St., Stayton. Cruise-in and breakfast with entry fee an
unwrapped toy.
Angels on Wheels Toy Run
Saturday, Dec. 13, 9 a.m., Portland Meadows. Annual
cruise-in and toy run to Randall’s Children’s Hospital
sponsored by the Multnomah Hot Rod Council. Bring
unwrapped toy or gift card.
The 2015 Portland International Auto Show
Thursday, Feb. 5, to Sunday, Feb. 8, Oregon Convention
Center, 777 N.E. MLK Jr. Blvd, Portland. Hundreds of the
vehicles will be on display. Sneak Peek Charity Preview
Party on Wednesday, Feb. 4. Produced by the Metro
Portland New Car Dealers Association. For additional
information, visit: portlandautoshow.com
9th Annual Salem Roadster Show
Saturday and Sunday, March 7-8, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem. Invitation-only show with hundreds of
vehicles coming from Canada to California.
59th Annual Portland Roadster Show
Friday through Sunday, March 20-22, Portland Expo
Center, 2060 N. Marine Dr. Hundreds of vehicles, displays,
special guests and vendors. Presented by the Multnomah
Hot Rod Council. For more information, visit: portlandroadstershow.com
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A14 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
A name you know and trust
BRUCE CHEVROLET
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NEW 2014
SILVERADO 1500
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$
2 at
21,988
Sale Price after $2000 factory rebate,
rebate $2682 Bruce discount
discount.
MSRP $26,670, Stk #480305 Vin #4EZ332, Stk #480327 Vin #3EZ343
DOUBLE
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31MPG
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39MPG
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NEW 2014 CHEVY SPARK
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ABS Brakes, Traction Control, 10 Air Bags, Air Conditioning, 1.2 Litre
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1 at
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$
$
10,988
NEW 2015 SILVERADO 2500
CREW CAB LT 4X4
1 at
Sale
ale price after $1997 Bruce Discount, MSRP $12,995.
Stk#470336 Vin#550323
$
26,988
6,000
1 at
Salee Price after $2000 factory rebate, $2477 Bruce discount.
MSRP $31,465, Vin #EZ344889, Stk #480337.
Off
MSRP
Sale Price afterr $2000 Factory Rebate and $4000 Bruce Discount. MS
MSRP $43,750.
Sale Price $37,750. Vin #105357. Stk #58001
29MPG
CITY
40MPG
HWY
NEW 2015 EQUINOX FWD
Dual Power Heated Seats, Leather, Traction control, Third Seat, Back-up
Camera, Alloy Wheels, Power Options and More!
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Fully Equipped, Ready to go
$
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22,999
1 at
NEW 2015 CHEV TAHOE 4X4
NEW 2014 SONIC LT 5-DOOR
1 at
Sale Price after $1000 factory rebate, $1396 Bruce discount.
MSRP $25,395, Stk#590085, Vin#FZ1085
$
14,988
1 at
48,888
Sale
le Price after $5,107 Bruce Discount. MSRP $53,995.
Vin # 107940, Stk # 580002.
Sale Price after $1500 Factory Rebate, $2022 Bruce Discount.
MSRP $18,510. Vin#4222455, Stk#410348
$
4000
OFF
MSRP
NEW 2014 CRUZE LS
NEW 2014 MALIBU
NEW 2014 CHEVROLET VOLT
Automatic, AM/FM/CD/MP3 Stereo, Air & more. Great Gas Mileage.
Automatic, ABS Brakes, Traction Control, Alloy Wheels,
AM/FM/CD/MP3 Stereo.
Automatic, Equipped, Power Options and more.
$
1 at
15,999
Sale Price after $2000 Factory Rebate, Bruce Discount $1531
$1531.
MSRP $19,530. Vin#404253, Stk#440387
$
18,999
1 at
1 at
ce after $3000 factory rebate, $1166 Bruce discount. MSRP
M
Sale Price
$23,165, Vin #291926, Stk #460280.
$
30,995
Sale price after $1000 factory rebate, Bruce discount $3000.
MSRP $34,995. VIN 172310, STK#420360
Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles
2012 CHEVY CRUZE 1 at
$
12,999
Only 25,000 miles Stk# P9950
SERVICE COUPON
MULTI-POINT
INSPECTION*
2013 CAPTIVA LTZ
1 at
$
17,899
Leather, Moon Roof. #P10057
$
2011 EQUINOX LT AWD 1 at
20,999
2014 TRAVERSE LTZ AWD
Plenty of Options. #P9932
Low Miles, great on gas. #P9975
WE PAY CA$H FOR USED VEHICLES
FREE
Includes inspect fluid levels; check steering, suspension,
wiper blades, exhaust, undercarriage, belts and hoses. Plus
tax, if applicable. Coupon valid at vehicle check-in.
Expires 11/30/14 Must present coupon at time of service.
Coupon Code:19
2 year/24,000 mile Standard CPO Plan
12 mo./12,000 mile Bumper to Bumper Warranty
5 Year/100,000 mile Power Train Limited Warranty
Sportwagen, Auto, Clean #P9977
1998 DODGE RAM QUAD CAB 4X4 SLT
$10,888 Automatic, 1 owner. #580028A2
1 at
2011 MALIBU LS 1 at $11,988
Equipped. #P10067
38,999
100K MILE
SERVICE SPECIAL*
5000
OFF
Save now on your 100,000 Mile Scheduled Maintenance. See
Service Advisor for details. Plus tax, if applicable. Not valid
with other offers. Coupon valid at vehicle check-in.
Expires 11/30/14
Must present coupon at time of service
Coupon Code:32
SERVICE COUPON
SERVICE COUPON
FALL SPECIAL
OIL CHANGE
50,000 MILE
SERVICE SPECIAL*
Change Oil and Oil Filter, Check all fluids,
Check tire pressure and adjust as necessary.
2012 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 1 at $13,888 2010 MINI COOPER
Power Sliding Doors #P9987
1 at $13,999
Panorama roof, Low miles # P9897
2010 FORD
EXPLORER 4X4
1 at $14,999
1 Owner, Equipped. #P10022
19
$
95
Expires 11/30/14 Must present coupon at time of service.
Excludes Semi Synthetic, Synthetic and Diesel Engines.
2006 EXPRESS 2500 PASSENGER LT
1at $15,888 11 passenger, low miles. # P10020
2007 CHEV TAHOE
1 at $23,988
LT 4X4 Leather, Roof, Quad Seating. #9956A
2013 TAHOE LT 4X4 1 at $33,888
$
2500
OFF
Save now on your 50,000 Mile Scheduled Maintenance. See
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with other offers. Coupon valid at vehicle check-in.
Expires 11/30/14 Must present coupon at time of service
Coupon Code:68
Leather. #P10062
1084 SW OAK ST • HILLSBORO • 888-546-7350
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:00 Sat 8:30-8:00 Closed Sunday (Family Day)
495816.111214 W
$
SERVICE COUPON
$
2009 DODGE CALIBER SXT 1 at $9,999
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All vehicles subject to prior sale. Tax, licence, title processing fees not included. All financing subject to credit approval. Interest rates and rebates subject to change without prior notice.
Pictures for illus. only. Offers expire 11/19/14.
Weekend!Life
NU SHOOZ MOVES ON FROM ’80S FAME TO ENERGETIC ERA — PAGE 3
SECTION B
PortlandTribune
NATURAL
WONDER
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014
A dam M cI saac carv es and
casts new art for th e Oregon
D ep artment of Fish and
W ildlife’s new building
By DEAN BAKER
For the Tribune
A
fter 20 years carving his way into the
heart of Pacific
Northwest Native
art, Adam McIsaac is turning
his hand to 21st century applications of those motifs, at
times using aluminum.
“I’m moving more into
Adam McIsaac work,” he says.
“There is less demand for Native art than there was.”
He is finishing his latest
job, a $ 68,880 arts grant for
atmospherics in the new
Oregon Department of Fish
and Wildlife Department in
Salem.
“I think Adam’s sensibility,
both his relationship to the
natural world and his artistic
work, are a perfect fit for the
ODFW headquarters,” says
Meagan Atiyeh, visual arts
coordinator for the Oregon
Arts Commission, which administered the grant and
chose McIsaac over 45 other
artists who applied for the
job.
“It’s been a nice opportunity to create work that is integrated into the building itself,” she says.
McIsaac, 40, is a Hockinson, Wash., native and a
graduate of Clark County’s
Prairie High School. Of German, Scottish and Irish blood
he learned the ways of the
Columbia River Native people, starting at the knee of
his father, a biologist.
He has translated his love
of Native American art and
the natural world into totem
poles, canoes, spoons, ladles,
masks, wall panels and metal
moldings. He apprenticed for
years with legendary North
Coast artist Duane Pasco,
learning the totems — from
owls to frogs, ducks, warriors
and other lore.
He’s worked closely with
Native people, especially
with the Chinook tribe, including tribal leader Tony
Johnson, in making traditional art from totem poles
to canoes.
Public art has been McIsaac’s forte for 20 years, and
his influence is growing.
He made carvings for Blue
Lake State Park in Troutdale,
a panel in Multnomah Falls
State Park and an eight-foot
cedar work in the Tualatin library. He built a huge set of
double doors for the Port of
Portland Building. He created an installation for the
Portland State University
recreation center.
McIsaac also carved eightfoot panels as wallboards for
the new Oregon State Hospital wing in Salem. Intricate
wallboards can take three
weeks to carve, he says.
Maybe 120 hours of close
work, carving away with a
chisel under a bright light.
In Washington, McIsaac
carved a totem pole for the
La Center City Hall and a giant sculpture called “The
Navigator” that welcomes
students into the Columbia
V alley Elementary School in
V ancouver. He carved poles
and figures for the Cathlapotle Plankhouse, a full-scale
replica Indian meetinghouse
at Ridgefield National Wild-
See McISAAC / Page 2
Sculptor Adam
McIsaac shows
off some works
in progress
( above and left) .
He has excelled
at Pacific
Northwest
Native art over
the years.
Wall panels made by Adam McIsaac include
frogs ( top) and goats.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF
DEAN BAKER
THESHORTLIST
STAGE
ta Rose Theatre, 3000 N.E. Alberta
St., livewireradio.org, $20, $25 day of
show, $35 preferred
‘True West’
The Willamette Speaks Storytelling
The final play of Profile Theatre’s
Sam Shepard season continues, as
brothers examine their relationship
and manage fraternal conflicts, the
final of Shepard’s “family quintet” of
plays and self-examination.
7:30 p.m. Thursdays-Sundays, 2
p.m. Sundays through Nov. 23, Profile Theatre, 1515 S.W. Morrison St.,
profiletheatre.org, $30
Native American stories are at the
forefront, as well as recollections of
people who lived, worked or played
on the river. The pubic is encouraged
to share stories.
4 p.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 16,
Linnton Community Center, 10614
N.W. St. Helens Road, email
[email protected] for
info
‘Far Away’
Yo Gabba Gabba! Live!
Portland State’s School of Theater and Film puts on its seasonopening performance of Caryl
Churchill’s play, a pervasive study
of violence that has seeped into
inanimate objects.
7:30 p.m. Thursday-Sunday, Nov.
13-15, 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 16, 7:30
p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, Nov. 1922, Lincoln Performance Hall, 1620
S.W. Park Ave., pdx.edu/boxoffice/
home (check for tickets)
It’s the fifth anniversary of the
tour of TV ’s cool kids’ live-action
stage show with DJ Lance Rock,
Brosbee, Foofa, Muno, Plex, Toodee,
Leslie Hall, Biz Markie and more in
“Music Is Awesome! ”
3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.
19, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall,
1037 S.W. Broadway, portland5.com,
$23-$43
Live Wire! Radio
The stage/radio variety show welcomes comedian/writer (and Portland native) Megan Amram, political
comic Hari Kondabolu, author/poet
Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz and music
by Deep Sea Diver and the Alialujah
Choir (made up of members of M
Ward, Weinland and Norfolk &
Western).
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, Alber-
‘Mamma Mia! ’
Broadway Across America brings
the Benny Andersson/Bjorn Ulvaeus
smash hit to Portland based on the
storytelling songs of ABBA, from
“Dancing Q ueen” and “S.O.S.” to
“Money, Money, Money” and “Take a
Chance on Me.” It’s been seen by 54
million people worldwide, and celebrated 5,000 performances as the
ninth-longest running show in
Broadway history. The original production has surpassed 6,000 perfor-
mances in London.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, Nov.
25-28, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 29, 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 30, Keller Auditorium, 222
S.W. Clay St., BroadwayAcross
America.com/Portland or 503-2411802, starting at $25
MUSIC
The worldwide
Broadway hit
“Mamma Mia! ”
comes to
Portland,
bringing its
irresistible slew
of ABBA hits,
Nov. 25-30.
Bastille
The United Kingdom band is on
its North American tour, singing
such hits as “Pompeii” and “Bad
Blood.”
8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, Moda
Center, rosequarter.com, $29.50-$39.50
COURTESY OF
JOAN MARCUS
Oregon Symphony: Alban Gerhardt
The cello player returns for his
third year as the symphony’s Artist
in Residence and will play Haydn’s
“Cello Concerto in C major” as Carlos Kalmar conducts. The symphony
also plays Mahler.
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, 8 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 17, Arlene Schnitzer
Concert Hall, 1037 S.W. Broadway,
orsymphony.org, starting at $22
MISC.
Portland SkiFever
and Snowboard Show
It’s the unofficial kickoff of the
snow-sport season, with ski reps and
retailers offering deals on gear, vacations at ski resorts, and a huge ski
swap area.
1 p.m.-10 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14, 10
a.m-10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 16, Expo
Center, 2060 N. Marine Drive, expo
center.org, $13, $3 juniors (6-12
years), $8 parking
The Art of Bellydance
From the Hip magazine presents
its quarterly night of dance with
Grace Constantine, international
improvisational bellydance guru,
other dancers and live music by
Baksana. It’s a night of local, national and international Middle Easterninfluenced dance and music.
6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, Alhambra Theater Lounge, 4811 S.E.
Hawthorne Blvd., alhambrapdx.
com, $12, $20 at door
The Bicycle Ball
The Community Cycling Center
is putting on a new fundraising
event with live music (Swingtown
V ipers), 1920s-inspired cocktails, a
silent auction and more as it marks
20 years of broadening access to bicycles. It’s inspired by the 1920s decor of The Secret Society.
6:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 19, The Secret Society, 116
N.E. Russell St., Community
CyclingCenter.org, $12, $15 day of
event
Portland!Life
B2 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Bits&Pieces
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Forbes’ big gig
China Forbes has earned acclaim as the singer for Pink
Martini, since joining the group
in 1995, but now she’ll get to perform opera arias of which she’s
long dreamed. Forbes will perform with the Portland State
University Orchestra at 7 p.m.
Dec. 11, in a concert titled “A
Room with a V iew,” at the First
Congregational Church, 1126
S.W. Park Ave. She’ll be singing
arias by Catalani, Puccini and
Offenbach, with special guest
Angela Niederloh-Hayward.
“This is something I have
dreamed of doing since I saw
the (1985) movie ‘ A Room with a
V iew’ in high school and was so
moved by the arias on the
soundtrack,” she says.
Adds Ken Selden, PSU Orchestra conductor: “What I love
about China’s approach to opera
is the very warm and expressive
quality of her voice, and her fo-
FORBES
cus on the atmosphere and intimacy of the music.”
Tickets are $ 15 general admission and $ 10 for students
and seniors, and can be purchased through www.pdx.edu/
boxoffice, or by calling 503-7253307.
Yee-haw!
Tickets go on sale Wednesday, Nov. 14, for the Professional
Bull Riders Blue DEF V elocity
Tour, which stops in Portland at
the Moda Center at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28. It’ll be the ninth
stop on the tour. Tickets range
from $ 15 to $ 65 and can be purchased online at rosequarter.
com or by calling 1-800-745-3000.
COURTESY OF DANNY KNUDSEN
An amphitheater at Ridgefield, Wash., includes one of Adam McIsaac’s first public art metal proj ects. He works on metal art with Portland’s
Fouch Electric Mfg. Co. & Profile Laser.
McIsaac: Tackling non-Native theme
■ From page 1
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COURTESY OF ADAM McISAAC
Adam McIsaac holds one of the coho salmon sculptures he has made
for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife building in Salem.
Hargrave says.
The huge, fabricated aluminum coho salmon honor the
ODFW’s work to bring back
the salmon runs, McIsaac says.
McIsaac says he is making
use of metal art for the first
time because some public
agencies won’t accept his
woodcarvings for outdoor displays as they once did. “They
want metal, bronze, concrete,
something that is maintenance
free. I’m feeling the push to
broaden my scope,” he says.
“For the fish and wildlife
project, they were interested
in my work and its ties to the
Northwest, but they weren’t
too interested in the Native
American art, which is what I
usually do.”
So he’s left that behind for
this project.
“I’m branching out, and I’ve
used all the stylistic conventions I’ve used to do my Columbia River art, and to apply
it to a non-Native theme,” he
says.
At times, McIsaac says, it’s
been difficult getting art dealers or public agencies to accept Native art from an artist
who is not a Native. But his relations with the tribes have
been good.
“The tribes love it. I’m in
good standing with all the
tribes,” he says. A large collection of his individual pieces
are on sale at Stonington Gal-
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life Refuge. He made Columbia
River art panels for Skamania
Lodge in Stevenson.
Recently, McIsaac has installed a series of metal sculptures for the City of Ridgefield. “It’s stunning,” says
Danny Knudsen, operations
manager of Fouch Electric
Mfg. Co. & Profile Laser in
Portland, who worked with
him on the project.
Now Knudsen is working
with McIsaac on the Salem
building, using a Fouch’s fiberoptic cutter to fabricate the
aluminum salmon McIsaac
created.
“Adam’s artwork is great,
and he’s a pleasure to work
with,” Knudsen says.
McIsaac also teaches carving, sometimes to Indian people at reservations at Grand
Ronde and Tokeland, Wash.
But his focus now is on the
Salem building.
“As of today, four of Adam’s
pieces of art are on display in
the ODFW headquarters
building,” says Rick Hargrave,
deputy administrator for information and education at the
agency. “The pieces are handcarved wooden planks with
geometric and zoomorphic imagery representing Oregon’s
game and nongame species.
They are mounted over each
door that lead into the Commission Room.
“He’ll soon be mounting
some large salmon pieces on
an outside wall that, when finished, will provide a dramatic
interpretation of the journey
of this iconic Oregon fish,”
lery in Seattle, but galleries in
Portland have declined to carry his Native art because of
his heritage, although he has
shown art occasionally in
Portland festivals.
To branch out from Native
work, he went to the advertising engravings from the
late 1890s to early 1900s for
Winchester deer rifles and
shotguns.
“They all have to do with
wildlife, and I got inspired and
transfered them into wood —
some pheasants, some oak
leaves, a deer at the center,
some scroll patterns,” he says.
“The theme was wildlife, so
I looked at it all: wetlands, big
game species, upland birds,
the flora and fauna,” he says.
“The panels reinforce the mission of the agency. A lot of
these designs go into the council room, so I have one with
two bucks fighting, bighorn
sheep, and so on to suggest the
butting of heads.”
McIsaac pointed to a cedar
panel he is finishing in his studio on the eight-acre rural
homestead east of La Center,
Wash., he shares with his wife,
Mandi, a psychological counselor, and two of their homeschooled children, Cooper, 10,
and Cloey, 8. Another daughter, Katie, 21, is an agriculture
and business major at California Polytechnic University.
They live with a female pet
raccoon named Coonie, a
20-year-old sulcata tortoise,
and a couple of dogs.
Adam and Cooper recently
returned from 10 days hiking
in the Idaho wilderness, each
bagging a deer.
Portland!Life
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
LIFE B3
Nu Shooz ‘Can’t Wait’ to do pair of shows
J immy M ak ’s to host
‘ 8 0s chart- toppers as
they renew l ive gigs
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
In 1986, it was impossible
to go anywhere as summer
beckoned without hearing “I
Can’t Wait” by Portland
band Nu Shooz.
Coupled with an uber-fun
animated MTV video that highlighted V alerie Day, the group’s
lead singer and wife of guitarist John Smith, “I Can’t Wait”
blasted out of car stereos and
club systems and eventually
spent 15 weeks in the Top 40.
COURTESY OF NU SHOOZ
In the wake of their new- Valerie Day and John Smith, the wife-husband leaders of Nu Shooz ,
found fame, Nu Shooz, a popu- believe their style of R&B is making a comeback.
lar nightclub act in Portland for
years prior, shared the stage nice, down-home and humble,” incredible band. It forced us to
with a number of international Day says. “Same with Billy up our game.”
stars of the day.
Ocean. Morris Day and the
Nu Shooz was nominated for
“Tina Turner was incredibly Time — they had such a tight a Best New Artist Grammy in
The nine-piece
Josh Hoyer
& The
Shadowboxers
play funky,
soulful blues and
appeal to fans of
Curtis Salgado
to James Brown.
They’ll play
Duff’s Garage,
Nov. 18.
COURTESY OF JOSH
HOYER AND THE
SHADOWBOX ERS
LiveMusic!
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
Nov. 15
Snakebitten!
Every now and then a band
releases a song that places it
firmly in the pantheon of rock
‘ n’ roll history. “Learning
Slowly” is that song, courtesy
of fuzzy-wuzzy Philly trio
Purling Hiss, a riff-happy,
noisy outfit led by guitarist
Mike Polizze, also known for
his experimental work with
Birds of Maya. In addition to
the pop-punk anthem-madeto-disorder feel of “Slowly,”
Purling Hiss dabbles in psychedelia, grunge and drone
on “Weirdon,” the trio’s latest
album. You will forget any objections you had to hearing
this band and simply submit
once the shredding starts.
Landlines, The Woolen
Men, Purling Hiss, 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, The Know,
2026 N.E. Alberta St. Info: 503473-8729, theknowpdx.com.
Nov. 16
Racket strings
L.A. trio Tennis System
combine shoegaze, dream-pop,
grunge, surf-punk and noise to
create effects-enhanced music
that puts you inside the echo
chamber of their hellos. The
group just released “Technicolour Blind,” which is sort of
like listening to the waves that
wash over your mind after
you’ve passed out on the beach
following an epic all-night party only to wake up with the hot
sun baking your hungover
face. It takes you a minute to
realize where you are, but then
you start grinning because you
realize this is where you want
to be, no matter how you feel.
Tennis System, 9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 16, Analog Cafe, 720
S.E. Hawthorne Blvd. Free. Info: 503-432-8079, analogpdx.com
1987 and earned a gold record
for the album “Poolside.” The
record featured the hit song
“Point of No Return,” in addition to “I Can’t Wait,” itself
since covered or sampled by
everyone from V anessa Williams to 50 Cent.
Now, 28 years later, Nu
Shooz is back on the scene set
to play two shows at Jimmy
Mak’s, 221 N.W. 10th Ave., at
7:30 and 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
15, (Info: jimmymaks.com).
Tickets are $ 18 reserved seating, $ 15 gallery.
In addition to Day and Smith,
Nu Shooz features Gary Fountaine on bass, Johnny Riley on
drums, Margaret Linn on backing vocals and vocal arrangements, Tracey Harris on backing vocals, Haley Horsfall on
backing vocals and percussion,
Paul Mazzio on trumpet, and
Tim Jensen on saxophones and
flute.
“It seems like the style of
R& B we’re playing is making a
definite comeback,” Day says,
noting Nu Shooz has been playing dates with the Freestyle
Explosion Tour, featuring other
hit ‘ 80s acts Lisa Lisa, Exposé ,
Stacey Q ., Shannon and Pretty
Poison.
“The audiences at our Freestyle shows are mostly younger
than us, late 20s to early 30s,”
Day says. “A lot of the people
we talk to know about the
Shooz because their parents
played our records.”
Speaking of records, if you
go to nushoozmusic.com you
can listen to “Kung Pao Chicken” the band’s most recent album, released in 2012, which
features nine songs ranging
from funky rug-cutters to midtempo ballads. The record and
subsequent gigs highlight a
new, energetic era for the band,
Day says.
“We’re planning to hit the
live band thing pretty hard for
the next three years — after
that, who knows?” she says.
Day and Smith explored a variety of styles after calling it
quits in the early ‘ 90s.
“I sang jazz with a big band
and smaller groups, something
I’d always wanted to do,” Day
says. “John spent 20 years scoring films and commercials.
When we came back together
in 2007 to make (the album)
‘ Pandora’s Box,’ we each
brought new things into the
mix. The break did us a lot of
good, and in the interim we’d
learned different ways of working together.”
The group has evolved its approach to songwriting, Day
adds.
“At first it was just John
cranking out songs alone in the
basement,” she says. “Over the
years I was able to contribute
more. During the third album
for Atlantic, Margaret Linn
started working with us, contributing these incredible ideas
for vocal arrangements, which
just made the songs better.”
Nov. 18
group broke up, Porterfield
played with his new outfit,
Conrad Plymouth, before forming Field Report. The band has
opened for Counting Crows,
Emmylou Harris and Aimee
Mann and its latest record
“Marigolden” echoes such efforts as Bruce Springsteen’s
“Nebraska” and Deer Tick’s
“Flag Day” with its sparse
beauty.
Field Report, Hip Hatchet, 10
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, Bunk
Bar, 1028 S.E. Water Ave., $10
in advance, $12 day of show.
Info: 503-328-2865, bunkbar
sandwiches.com/shows/.
■ Semi-heavy garage pop
rockers Twin Peaks join
groovy psych-rockers
Meatbodies for a show with
Criminal Hygiene and Mope
Grooves at 9 p.m. Monday, Nov.
17, at the Star Theater, 13 N.W.
Sixth Ave. $ 10. Info: 503-3457892, startheaterportland.com.
■ Metalcore rockers Every
Time I Die wrote a song
called “Underwater Bimbos.”
Metalcore rockers The Ghost
Inside wrote a song called
“Avalanche.” These bands
co-headline a bill with
Architects, Hundredth and
Backtrack at 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 18, at the Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 S.E. 39th Ave. All ages. $ 18.50 in advance, $ 20 at the
door. Info: 503-233-7100,
hawthornetheater.com.
■ Acoustic Americana kings
Steel Wheels join Birds of
Chicago for a fine rootsy bill at
8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, at the
Alberta Rose Theatre 3000 N.E.
Alberta St. $ 15 in advance, $ 17
at the door. Info: 503-719-6055.
albertarosetheatre.com
■ Critically acclaimed bluesfolk musician Andrew Duhon
plays with his New Orleans trio
at 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19,
in Mississippi Studios, 3552 N.
Mississippi Ave. Info: 503- 2883231, mississippipizza.com.
What they’re drinkin’ in Lincoln
Hailing from Lincoln, Neb.,
Josh Hoyer & The Shadowboxers play funky, soulful blues
and were named 2013’s “Best
Soul/R& B” act at the Omaha
Entertainment Awards. The
band features nine, count ‘ em,
nine pieces who mine the classic veins of Stax, Motown, New
Orleans, Philly and West Coast
sounds to create a brassy, bold,
dramatic music fans of everyone from Curtis Salgado to
James Brown will dig. To get a
taste of this great band’s sound,
check out their YouTube video
“Make Time for Love.”
Josh Hoyer & The Shadowboxers, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
18, Duff’s Garage, 2530 N.E.
82nd Ave. $10. Info: 503-2342337, duffsgarage.com
Outstanding in their own field
Field Report calls Milwaukee, Wis., their home, and the
town must like them since the
mayor declared Oct. 22 “Field
Report Day.” Why, you ask? It
might be because the band
plays fine, literate Americana
as penned by Chris Porterfield,
who originally played with
Justin V ernon (Bon Iver) in
DeYarmond Edison. After that
Q uick hits
■ Joyous folk musician Ellis
plays a 7 p.m. show Friday,
Nov. 14, at O’Connor’s V ault,
7850 S.W. Capitol Highway.
$ 15 in advance, $ 20 at the
door. Info: ellispdx.brown
papertickets.com
■ Dreamy pop rocker
Springtime Carnivore (what
a voice! ) joins indie rockers
Generationals for an all-ages
show at 5 p.m., as well as a
21- and-over show at 9 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 16, at the Doug
Fir Lounge, 830 E. Burnside
St. Info: 503-231-9663,
dougfirlounge.com.
Zoo train’s LET US LIGHT UP
YOUR WORLD!
a-comin’
494728.111314
The Oregon Z oo train will be
open to the public Nov. 28 for
Z ooLights, organizers say.
After work was done on
them, the Old West-inspired
Centennial steam locomotive
and the retro-modern Z ooliner
were transported recently on
Interstate 5 and Highway 26 via
flatbed trailer from Pacific Power Group’s Ridgefield, Wash.,
headquarters.
The zoo’s new train track
was designed to provide unique
views of animals and Z ooLights
and is part of a decadelong renovation funded by the community-supported zoo bond measure. Rerouting the train was
necessary to provide space and
a service road for the Elephant
Lands habitat. The new route
will circle on an elevated trestle
through the trees north of Elephant Lands.
For more info: oregonzoo.org.
— Jason Vondersmith
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Portland!Life
B4 LIFE
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
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of beats, including business, arts & leisure, government and general assignment. The newspaper, located 25 miles
southwest of Portland in
the beautiful Chehalem
Valley, is looking for a reporter with two or more
years of experience working
at
a
weekly,
twice-weekly or small
daily newspaper, someone capable of producing
12 to 17 stories weekly,
with good interviewing
and time management
skills. Salary is at the industry standard for small
newspapers and there is
a benefit and 401(k)
package as well. Experience with Twitter and updating the newspaper’s
Facebook page are a
plus. Submit a resume,
cover letter, references
and about a dozen clips
of a variety of stories via
email to Managing Editor
Gary Allen at
[email protected]
com.
HELP WANTED
HUMAN SERVICES SPECIALIST 3
St. Helens & Hillsboro
The Department of Human Services branch office within
the Children, Adults and Families Program is seeking to
fill two Human Service Specialist 3 positions to provide
and determine eligibility services for Self Sufficiency
programs. These positions are permanent, full time,
bilingual and are located in St. Helens and Hillsboro.
This is an opportunity to join a team committed to
providing excellent services and to follow your interests
in a large, diverse organization. Benefits include a
competitive salary and family health benefits.
Application information and a detailed job
announcement are available at website
http://www.oregonjobs.org (search for job posting
DHS14-1326 and DHS14-1369A). DHS is an AA/EOE.
Announcements/
Notices
Thanksgiving
Holiday
Deadline
Consider joining one of East Idaho’s oldest & most
innovative employers!
We are seeking three experienced, safety conscious,
highly motivated individuals with the skills to fill the
critically needed full and part time positions of Hydro
Supervisor and Hydro Operator for our three run of the
river hydro generation facilities. Located in the upper
Snake River valley, Fall River is a non-profit electric
cooperative, established in 1938.
Visit our website for full job descriptions:
www.fallriverelectric.com
To apply, send your resume, salary requirement, and
position desired by December 5, 2014 to:
Fall River Electric Cooperative, Attention: Human
Resources, P.O. Box 736, Milville, UT 84326
Or email to: [email protected]
Antiques/Collectibles
11/27 edition
LineCopy, Mon,11/24 at
Noon
Display, Fri, 11/21 at
Noon
Community Classifieds
office will be closed on
Thursday, November 27th
Lost & Found
Lost cat in
Sellwood
Black, short-haired,
domestic,
slightly-built, 5 years old,
9 pound, neutered male,
no distinctive markings,
no collar or microchip.
Went missing
October 27, 2014. His
scent was tracked by a
professional
Search and Rescue team
along Tacoma’s south-side
sidewalk to a spot at
10th and Tacoma. There, his scent abruptly
ended, indicating he was
grabbed and carried off by
either a person or a
predator(coyote?).
If you have any information
specific to the abduction (did
you hear or see anything?),
please contact me. Reward
for return, no questions
asked:
Contact: Elizabeth at
949-545-8169 or Dan at
585-269-1670.
FOREST GROVE:
KAREN YOUNG
ESTATE SALE
NOV 13 & 14: 12 to 6
South of baseline at
Mountain View Lane
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY. Call or text Karen
at 503-807-2450.
Oriental style rosewood
dining and hutch and
lamps and tables.Women’s
and Men’s clothes, clocks,
kitchen, Christmas, gardening, loads of misc.
Photos at
http://tinyurl.com/r5nq8
SALE
Grand
Re-Opening!
First, we would like to
apologize for going out
of business. But our
son, John, came down
with Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS.) We rented
out 2 portions of our
shop but we still have
the good stuff you want.
Formal Dining sets,
china cabinets, hall
trees, bookcases, secretaries, cedar chests,
sets of chairs, lots of
clocks, dishes, jewelry
and off the wall stuff!
Thank you for 35 years
in the business, hope to
see you soon.
-----------------6712 NE SANDY BLVD
503-287-8796
PONY EXPRESS
ANTIQUES
MOVING SALE
2452 SW
Willowbrook Ave.
Gresham 97080
Saturday @7:00am
Upholstered furniture, antiques, clothing, A full set
of Odyssey CASSETTES
CHRISTIANS BOOKS
AND MORE!!
Business
Opportunities
Due to the quantity and
variety of business opportunity listings we receive, it is impossible for
us to verify every opportunity
advertisement.
Readers respond to
business opportunity
ads at their own risk. If
in doubt about a particular offer, check with the
Better Business Bureau,
503-226-3981 or the
Consumer Protection
Agency, 503-378-4320,
BEFORE investing any
money.
FOR SALE: E-Commerce
website & wrestling singlet
mfg. business. Included:
singlets.com domain
name, 5 ind. sew mach. 3
Juki over seamers, 2400 &
3600 series, Kansai
cover-stitch. Pegasus
binder, Chickadee hand
held cutters. Inv. of 300+
completed singlets, 250 +
yds fabric, patterns &
thread, as well as 30 yr client list, art work & vendors.
Down sizing!
Beautiful top grade
black leather love seat,
barely used, $400. Comfortable swivel rocking
chair, wood trim and
overstuffed, $50. Story &
Clark small piano with
bench, $800, NICE! St.
Helens, OR
All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment
criminal background check and drug test.
Bugatti’s is an equal opportunity employer.
Radio Advertising Sales
Oregon’s 2014 Radio Station of the Year, KPAM 860,
and sister station Sunny 1550, are seeking Portland’s
next great radio Account Executive. If you know how to
build long-term relationships with small to mid-size
business owners, care about bringing results to those
businesses, and can do it without ratings, then KPAM
and Sunny could be your next home. The successful
candidate will be motivated with high integrity and a
strong desire to win and make a good living. Extensive
experience in broadcast media sales is necessary.
KPAM and Sunny are two locally-owned radio stations
offering excellent benefits and above average compensation plans in an employee focused environment.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Please send resume to:
General Sales Manager
Email: [email protected]
No phone calls please
UNUSUAL ESTATE
SALE
NOV 15th & 16th: 11-5
18390 SW Boones Ferry
Road
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Electronics, surround
sound system, new printer,
hundreds of DVDs: action,
Disney, CDs; spiritual, self
help, new binoculars, massager, crystals, stones,
Hindu statues, furniture,
washer & dryer, much
much MORE!
All excellent or brand new.
Tons of great free stuff.
971-235-8891
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
Vintage; chests, dressers,
dining & buffet, high chair,
rockers, including wicker,
linens. Recliner, framed
art, pottery, toys, log table
and benches, twin and
queen beds. Loads of
misc.
Photos
at
Estatesale-finder.com
PLEASE NOTE:
Abbreviations destroy the
intent of your advertisement. Your advertisement
should be attractive and
easy to read. Let us help
you put together your advertisement. Call us today
at:
503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
**ESTATE SALE**
21100 NE Sandy
Blvd (Quail Hollow)
Space 31
Fri 11/14 &
Sat 11/15 9am-4pm
Furniture, Hammond
Chord Organ, Vintage
Sewing Machine in Wood
Cabinet, Oak Dining Table,
much more.
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Miscellaneous for
Sale
SELL your unwanted items in
the classifieds. Call today.
503-620-SELL
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Bazaar
B
outique
MILWAUKIE
ADVERTISE YOUR
HOLIDAY SALE
IN OUR
BAZAAR BOUTIQUE!
St Paul’s
15th Annual
Nov 14 & 15
9:30-4:00
Exquisite handcrafted
Holiday and non-holiday
gifts, items & yummy
baked goods. $ to local
charities
Call Today for
Pricing and Options!
MILWAUKIE:
Mindy • 503-546-0760
Reedville Presbyterian
Church Bazaar
Gift Shop, Bakery, Country
Store and Café
503-649-1282
Nov 15: 10-4pm
3330 NE Division
CHRISTMAS CRAFT
BAZAAR
NEW HOPE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
11731 SE STEVENS RD
(Across I-205 from
Clackamas Town
Center)
FRI: 10-6 & SAT: 9-5
NOV 21st & 22nd: 9-4
Westmoreland Union
Manor
6404 NE 23rd Ave
HOLIDAY BAZAAR
Nov 14 & 15: 9 – 4
Clackamas Park
Friends Church
8120 SE Thiessen Rd
PORTLAND
GRESHAM
of Elks #1805
SE PORTLAND:
36th Annual
Holiday Marketplace
ting
“Celebra
!”
rs
a
ye
7
2
Vendors, Door Prizes,
Raffle, Baked Goods,
Homemade Candy, Snack
& Lunch Bar.
503.722.4047
Sat, November 22: 9-4
2785 SW 209th
Gresham Women
PORTLAND SE:
Handmade gifts & food
Vendors Welcome!!!
For assistance in placing
YOUR CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENT,
please call
the experts at
Community Classifieds
503-620-SELL (7355)
community-classifieds.com
Shop thousands of unique
items on 2 floors;
110+ NW vendors; café &
baked goods.
newhopepdx.org
[email protected]
Garage/Rummage
Sales
FAIRVIEW
Model 1920 4x4
TRACTOR
w/front bucket &
accessories. 920 hours.
503-266-8480 8-5pm
$10-10,000 A-#1 BUYER $
I want jewelry. Costume
etc, also pre-80’s glassware& misc. 503-869-2802
ALOHA:
LIVING
ROOM
SET:
3-piece, sofa, coffee & end
table w/drawers, like new
condition, $500/obo. Call
for info: 503-722-5168.
Machinery & Tools
The Jewelry Buyer
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
Wanted small older
Crawler (bulldozer), any
model/condition running or
not or related equipment,
Skidsteer farm tractor. Any
old small track machines.
Also wanted old gas
pumps, advertising signs,
vending machines, cigarette, candy slot machines.
Any old novelty items. Private Party Cash. (360)
204-1017 or e-mail:
[email protected]
Miscellaneous
Wanted
360-835-8354
Historic Overlook
House - Holiday
Craft Bazaar
Nov 15: 9-5pm
Nov 16: 9-4pm
3839 N Melrose Dr
Local artisans and crafters,
bake sale, over 30
vendors.
historicoverlookhouse.org
Every Husband’s Nightmare
Gifts, Décor & Collectibles Bazaar
November 18-22
Washington County
Fair Complex
Weekdays:
10am - 8pm
Saturday:
10 am- 5pm
November 17th, 5-8pm
Preview Night
with a $3 donation going to Love Rocks
(Memorial Fund for Anna & Abigail)
Jackie Lee - 503-327-4113
www.nightmarebazaar.com
Free admission
& parking
(257th & Kane)
Line Cooks (Sautee, Grill, Pizza & Salad)
To Apply: www.bugattisrestaurant.com
Download, print and complete an application and email
to the General Manager of the restaurant in which you
are interested in becoming a team member. You may
also stop by the restaurant in person between the hours
of 2 pm to 4 pm.
TUALATIN:
KAREN YOUNG
ESTATE SALE
Sat. & Sun, Nov.15
& 16th, 11am-4pm,
numbers at 10:45
13401 NW Rock
Creek Rd., Portland
11631 SE Linwood Av
HELP WANTED
We are looking for individuals who want long term
positions with the opportunity to grow within the
company. Must be a team player and available to work
a flexible schedule.
NW PORTLAND:
WE BUY GOLD
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
WASHER/DRYER
$125/set. Fridge $150.
503-723-9227
DAYBED
Gold
&
white
frame
w/mattress.
Floral
bed
spread
&
bed
skirt,
w/blankets & sheets. $200
LAZ-E-BOY RECLINER
All leather, tan, 100%
warranty, like-new, hardly
used. $800 503-668-4975
Miscellaneous
Wanted
A PPAREL /J EWELRY
Appliances
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
Garage/Rummage
Sales
FOOT PAIN?
Good Feet Service Plan
Complete package, must
sell, $295. Call For Details,
503-784-3309.
Christmas Bazaar
Bugatti’s Family of Restaurants is Oregon owned and
operated since 1991. We have the distinctive dinner
house Ristorante in West Linn on Hwy. 43, and three
family style Italian restaurants in Beaverton,
Tanasbourne, and Oregon City. We are currently
looking for cooks (sauté, grill, pizza & salad) for our
Cedar Hills and Oregon City locations.
Garage/Rummage
Sales
GRESHAM:
The Portland Tribune
We will have the following
early deadlines:
ATTENTION
READERS
Hydroelectric Facility Supervisor - F/T- Ashton, ID
Hydroelectric Facility Operator - F/T - Ashton, ID
Hydroelectric Facility Operator P/T - Island Park, ID
It is illegal for companies
doing business by phone to
promise you a loan and
ask you to pay for it before
they deliver. For more information, call toll-free
1-877-FTC HELP. A public
service
message
from
Community Classifieds and
the Federal Trade Commission.
Garage/Rummage
Sales
28230.110414c
Loans
45 Vendors, Homemade &
Boutique items, Lunch
REPORTER
served all day. Admission:
The Gresham Outlook has an immediate opening for a
reporter covering Troutdale, Fairview, Wood Village
and Corbett. The Outlook is a twice weekly newspaper,
which took first place in the 2014 general excellence
category of the ONPA Better Newspapers Contest.
We are seeking a reporter who enjoys enterprise
journalism and who demonstrates a commitment to
community-based journalism. This reporter also will
write features, and cover general news and breaking
news. This reporter also will embrace online and social
media. The ideal candidate will have a four-year
degree in journalism and three years newspaper reporting experience. Strong writing and editing skills are a
requirement, as is the ability to meet deadlines and
manage several projects at one time. We are looking
for a team player with a passion for accuracy, a sense
of curiosity and the proven ability to turn out a large volume of compelling news content each week. Please
email a short letter of interest, resume and at least
three samples of your published work to Steven Brown,
executive editor, at [email protected] No
phone calls please. To learn more about our newspaper, visit www.greshamoutlook.com or check out our
Facebook page at
www.facebook.com/TheGreshamOutlook.
Use the words “Outlook Reporter” in the subject line.
The application deadline is Oct. 17.
_____________________________________
3 cans of food or donation.
November 15th 11-5
November 16th 12-2
Sell it today
in the
Classifieds.
FOOD LOCAL CRAFTS MUSIC ELVES!
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-7355)
Atkinson Memorial Church, 710 Sixth St., Oregon City 97045
www.AtkinsonChurch.org
28232.111114 c
Marketing Consultant
The Gresham Outlook, a twice-weekly newspaper, is
seeking a high energy, motivated salesperson to join
our sales team as an outside Marketing Consultant. We
are looking for someone with previous advertising
experience, a proven track record of success, a strong
prospector, organizational and computer skills. An
existing account base will be provided, but our new
team member will be required to contact and create
new accounts. Must have reliable transportation and a
clean driving record. Pre-employment drug screen and
good references required. This is a full time position
with commission on all sales, a base salary, mileage
expenses and full benefits that include health care and
vacation. If you have a passion for sales and are
committed to success, send your resume and cover
letter to Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director –
[email protected]
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS ✵ YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -CLASSIFIEDS.COM
Portland!Life
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Sheds/Outdoor
Buildings
Pets & Supplies
Pets & Supplies
Pets & Supplies
Clausine
DUKE:
In a calm and attentive
home, Clausine is talkative, friendly, and adventurous. Clausine has a confident and lively personality
when she’s around patient
and slow-moving adults,
but the fast movements of
younger children can
sometimes make her nervous. Clausine adapts
quickly to a new environment and she likes attention. Clausine spends her
time at the Washington
Square PetSmart:
8825 SW Cascade Ave
503-644-3091
catadoptionteam.org
Sat and Sun, 12 pm-4 pm
I’m the one-of-a-kind cat
you’ve been looking for! I
have a great big personality and I’m not shy about
showing my affection. Did
you notice that my eyes
are two different colors
yet? It’s true! I have a fractured pelvis which is healing with time and I have
some nerve weakness in
one leg giving me a swagger just like the Duke, John
Wayne! I have bounds of
energy and you’ll be
amazed at how agile I am,
considering my injuries.
Come visit me, Duke, at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday
or
call
503-292-6628 for info.
CUSTOM POLE
BUILDINGS &
RIDING ARENAS
AKC Standard
Food/Meat/Produce
60’x120’x14’
Arena, $42,000
36’x84’x14 Vehicle
Storage, $20,000
Barn Metal &
Siding
Replacement
Call Fred
503.320.3085
or visit
barnsrusonline.com
B & P HITZ FARM
•Apples - MANY Varieties
•Pears •Onions •Potatoes
•Squash •Walnuts
•Filberts •Chestnuts
•Apple Cider & MORE!
Stand open 1:30 - 5:30
Closed Monday
Poodle Puppies
Brown, red & black- male
& females available,
Ready Now! $1100
Go to our Web site:
www.ourpoeticpoodles.net
or call (509)582-6027.
BALDWIN:
503-982-9307
14070 Wilco Hwy
Woodburn
bphitzapples.com
ccb# 117653
Sporting Goods
CASH FOR GUNS
SELLING A
COLLECTION OR
SINGLE PIECES
503-704-5045
WALNUTS &
HAZELNUTS
Shelled & In Shell
Dried & Ready to Use
Open: Sunrise to Sunset
Daily.
Egger’s Acres
20040 NE Trunk Rd
(99W & Trunk Rd,
just S of Dundee).
Call for Prices,
503-538-5496
I’m a happy-go-lucky kitty
who is looking for my forever home. I’m a young
boy who enjoys exciting
games like chase the toy
mouse and follow the string. My outgoing personality will win you over! Stop
by Animal Aid’s Show &
Tell Saturday and and ask
for me, Baldwin! Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Pets & Supplies
[email protected]
PORTLAND N:
“Original” Rose City
GUN SHOW
Nov 22nd, 9am-6pm
Nov 23rd, 9am-4pm
Portland EXPO Center
Admission $10
503-363-9564
ADORABLE SIBERIAN
HUSKY/RED-NOSED
PITBULL PUPPIES for
sale. 8 wk+. $300 male,
$350 female. Loving purebred parents on site.
(503)666-7666
wesknodelgunshows.com
Timber
LUMBER:
Western Red Cedar, 1”x6”
chip lap, random lengths,
approx 1,700 board ft.
Mixed, clear & knotty.
Excellent for interior
panelling. $1200.
For info call 503-630-7366
or 505-720-0703
Corrine:
AKC Standard
Poodle Puppies
Brown, red & black- male
& females available,
Ready Now!
Go to our Web site:
www.ourpoeticpoodles.net
or call (509)582-6027.
CHIHUAHUAS: Puppies,
Call for pricing. Financing
avail. Adult adoptions
also. Reputable Oregon
Kennel. Unique Colors,
Long & Short Haired, Tiny
to Hearty sizes. Health
Guaranteed, UTD Vaccinations/ Wormings, Litterbox
Trained, Socialized.
Video/Pictures/ Info/Virtual
Tour:
www.chi-pup.net
References Happily Supplied! Easy I-5 Access.
Drain, Oregon. Umpqua
Valley kennels, Vic & Mary
Kasser, 541-459-5951.
Have you ever seen such a
cute kitty smile?! I’m
Corrine the Lynx point Siamese and not only am I
adorable, I’m sweet, affectionate, and looking for my
purrfect match. I love to be
brushed more than anything and a nice warm lap,
it’s my favorite place to be!
Stop by Animal Aid’s Show
& Tell Saturday and and
ask for me, Corrine! Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or visit our website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
To place your
Community Classified
advertisement,
call 503-620-SELL(7355).
Eeyore is a calm and
cuddly cat who spends his
time waiting in anticipation
of his next meal. His last
family surrendered him to
the shelter because they
couldn’t care for him any
longer. Now, Eeyore is patiently waiting for his next
home – and hopefully that
home comes fully stocked
with toys and cat treats!
Eeyore can be visited at
the Cat Adoption Center in
the Tualatin Petco: 8775
Tualatin-Sherwood Rd
503-885-9224
catadoptionteam.org
Sat and Sun, 12 pm-4 pm
FOUND Near NE Springbrook, Siamese Cat
Call to identify.
(503) 537-9988
LIFE B5
Pets & Supplies
Malone is a big bundle of
energy and movement
wrapped in a tiny cat package. An active, busy
household where he can
get lots of attention and exercise would be the best
match. Malone is playful
and tolerant with children
over the age of ten; however, he doesn’t much like
other animals (especially
cats) and would be best as
the only pet in the home.
Malone will be an energetic, affectionate, and
talkative companion. Malone can’t wait to meet you
at Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter: 14175
SW Galbreath Drive
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sun, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
MINIATURE
AUSTRALIAN
SHEPHERD
PUREBRED PUPPIES
FAMILY RAISED
Parents Onsite are Family
Pets, 1st shots, wormed,
dew claws & tails removed.
weighs between 15-25lbs,
$450 & Up
360-261-3354
MURRAY:
Hello there! I’m Murray, the
big, mellow orange and
white cat! Although I’m a
big guy, I’m a softie at
heart. I love nothing more
than curling up and taking
a nice long nap. When I’m
awake, I appreciate head
rubs. I’m not at all shy
about talking to you! My
raspy meow is just like me
– one of a kind! Please call
503-292-6628 option 3 or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
ROBIN
A home for the holidays
Gino’s gentle personality
emerges after he has had
an opportunity to relax and
become comfortable in a
new environment. This
sweet cat thrives on attention and will flourish in a
home with regular activity.
Gino loves to chase string
toys and to receive chin
scratches. Gino is waiting
at Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter: 14175
SW Galbreath Drive
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sun, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
Hi, I’m Suz, the beautiful
smoke and white colored
DSH kitty. My fur is very
soft and, compared to my
size, so is my purr! The
markings on my face almost make me look like I’m
wearing a mask – maybe I
can be your very own Supercat? I adore attention
and getting pets and hanging out with people. Right
now, I prefer to be a solo
cat, so I’m looking for a
home where I can be the
queen. Come visit me at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday
or
call
503-292-6628 option 3 for
more information.
Pets & Supplies
Apartments for Rent
WINSTON:
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $767, 2 Bed: $913!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
I’m a stunning cat from the
white tip of my tail to my little white mustache! I’m a
kitty that’s always dressed
up in a tux although I’m far
from a formal guy! I love to
play, I love to snuggle, I
love people! I’m not shy,
and I quickly warm up to
new people and cats.
Come hang out with me
and you’ll agree. Why don’t
you come visit me, Winston, so you can see my
great personality firsthand?
C’mon, let’s play at Animal
Aid’s Show & Tell Saturday
from 12PM to 4PM. Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
FAX
www.gslwestridgemeadows.com
PORTLAND NW:
Located near MAX,
Portland Streetcar & Bus.
Beautiful courtyards,
downtown view,
close to Waterfront Park
and the Pearl District.
Great amenities!
The Yards at
Union Station
815 NW Naito Pkwy
503-478-1695
gsltheyards.com
Closet space cramped?
Sell those items today
in the classifieds.
Call now!
Call 503-620-SELL
TUALATIN:
Your classified ad :
(503) 620-3433
24 Hours per day
For personal
assistance, call
(503) 620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
For assistance in placing
YOUR CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENT,
please call
the experts at
Community Classifieds
503-620-SELL (7355)
community-classifieds.com
1 bdrm/1ba: $767
2 bdrm/2ba: $913
3 bdrm/2ba: $1051
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
Condos/Townhouses
For Rent
Acreage/Lots
SCAPPOOSE, Oregon
SW 1st Street
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE
Robin believed he was finally at home but
life
changed quickly. His new
owner must travel now, is
often gone from home on
business, and no longer
can take care of
him.
Robin must find a new
home or foster by December 03. He is a young,
healthy, 70 pound, neutered, American Bull dog,
handsome,
loving,
extremely personable and
athletic. He knows multiple
commands, is crate trained
and is continuing his training lessons. He is best as
an only dog until his training is completed. Seeking
committed, kind, experienced individual to adopt
or foster to adopt. His training resources come with
him. We all love him. For
more information call (503)
625-4563
or
e-mail
[email protected]
THOMAS & ALICE:
All real estate advertised
herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or intention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discrimination.
State law forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
factors in addition to
those protected under
federal law. Oregon
State law forbids discrimination based on
marital status. We will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available
on an equal opportunity
basis.
New Townhomes, 3 Bdrm,
2½ Bath, Single Car Garage, W/D Hookups. $1095
per month, includes Water/
Sewer/Garbage & Landscape Maintenance,
$1200 sec dep. Quick
and easy commute to
Portland Metro area.
Call 503-543-8985
Houses for Rent
ESTACADA
ASK ABOUT OUR
NO DEPOSIT
OPTION
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
applces. Storage shed.
Includes water & sewer!
Sec. 8 OK
[email protected]
E-mail for
details.
503-630-4300
NEWBERG:
LAVENDER: Is 13 years
old and she is healthy and
is doing well. This kitty is
sweet, snuggly and a lap
cat. She would love to
hang out with you and sit
and look out the window.
Please call Cat’s Cradle
Rescue 503.312.4296 for
further information or to
schedule a visit.
This sweet pair is Thomas
(6 years) and Alice (4
years). They are offered for
adoption by their owner
who has been evicted and
has no home for herself
and no home for the cats.
This is a dire situation.
Contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue at 503.312.4296 if you
can adopt or foster these
two who are soon to be totally homeless. Please
complete the adoption application at our website:
catscradlerescue.com/adopt
Townhouse for
Rent
Apartments for Rent
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
2 story, 2 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath,
enclosed one-car garage,
refrigerator, electric range,
microwave,
dishwasher,
gas furnace. New carpet &
paint.
No pets, no smokers, no Section 8; Reference and $800 deposit required.
$800 per mo.
Available now.
Call 503-338-9310
H OUSES W ITH A CREAGE
Antique & Classic
Autos
AURORA:
LUCY: I am a beautiful little
girl who loves to cuddle
and be loved on by my person.
I look forward to
meeting you and hope we
can have lots of “snuggle
time soon.” For information
on how to help this cat and
perhaps adopt her please
contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue at 503.312.4296 and
we will put you in touch
with her owner. Cat’s Cradle is an all-volunteer,
non-profit
foster-home
based rescue serving Oregon cats who need new
homes. 100% of your
adoption fee goes to provide for the medical and
physical needs of the cats
in our care. We invite you
to become a foster parent
and experience the great
satisfaction of helping a cat
or kitten in need.
55’ Pontiac
Catalina 3 Speed
V8
43 acre HORSE BOARDING FACILITY w/ 72’x156’
COVERED ARENA, 32 matted stalls, OUTDOOR
ARENA area, 4 BAY SHOP, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath HOME,
& year round CREEK. Level and sloping terrain, excellent for trail course! Great location just 3 minutes to I-5
and 20 minutes to Portland. Very low taxes!
Priced to move at $745,000!
Horsepower Real Estate
Peggy Kernan, Broker
503-931-9751
Lisa Johnson, Broker
541-510-4601
WesternOregonHorseProperties.com
2 door hard top, low miles,
dual exhaust, wide white
walls, original door panels,
updated yellow & black
paint, seats and headliner,
carpeted trunk, CB radio
and cassette deck.
$18,000 503-982-5667 or
971-338-3143
B UILDING M ATERIALS
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Sell it today
in the
Classifieds.
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-7355)
C OMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
503-620-SELL (7355) ✵ 8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -CLASSIFIEDS.COM
Portland!Life
B6 LIFE
Boats/Motors/
Supplies
Mini Vans &
Passenger Vans
1969 WINNER
BOAT
17’ 2”, Newer Full Canvas
Top & Interior & 120 Merc
Cruiser. Set up for fishing
or water skiing. These
boats are very, very rare.
Many extras- fishing related gear.
Has trolling
motor with it, if you wish.
Cheaper if you don’t. Nice
trailer. Heath forces sale.
$4300 OBO or trade equal
value for dual axle wood
trailer.
503-538-6884
Cars For Sale
2012 HONDA Accord
EX-L V6, 4 Door Sedan,
Excellent condition.
35,000 miles.
Airbags NOT on recall list.
For Sale by original owner.
$16,500 firm.
Call 503-651-3873
to see car.
‘55 WILLY’S JEEP
Attention Rebuilders!!
Includes the following:
• Title,
• New 383 Stroker motor,
• New bed & bumper,
• Fresh bodywork
Some parts missing.
$6,768 | 503-984-3868
CHEVROLET CAMARO
Z28 2001: Black 6 spd,
10,000 miles, Best Offer
503-786-2943.
VOLKSWAGEN
BEETLE 1971
SUPER
Restored ground up.
$25,000 invested. All work
done by specialized VW
classic mechanics.
$12,000 OBO
503-435-7268
2001 CHEVROLET
VENTURE LT EXTENDED
VAN - $3800
78,729 actual miles, very
good condition, tan color,
clean title. Non-smoker,
no pets. 6 cyl Automatic
transmission. Front & rear
air/heat, pwr steering &
brakes, dual pwr windows,
driver pwr seat, pwr door
slide, cruise control, seats
8 passengers, alloy
wheels, roof rack, AM/FM
& CD, back up alarm,
security alarm, On Star.
Contact Tim Edington
503-568-6843
WHEELCHAIR VAN: 2003
Chevy Express, full size,
BRAUN lift, high top conversion, hand controls, 19K
miles, $20,000 Please call:
406-334-0143.
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Motorcycles
Scooters/ATVs
2000 YAMAHA, V-STAR,
1100CC, like new, $2565
503-397-1507 - St. Helens
Pickups
Service Directory
‘82 FORD, F-150, PICKUP
110K miles, needs repair,
not running. Comes with a
fifth wheel trailer hitch,
good tires, good brakes,
FWD, dual gas tanks.
Needs tags.
$760 / OR BEST OFFER!
(503)630-4770 - evenings.
Home & Professional Services
Building &
Remodeling
RVs & Travel
Trailers
2004, SEA BREEZE LX36ft:
Workhouse chassis,
powered by Vortec 8100,
2 slides, 36’, low miles,
excellent condition.
$53,950.
503-970-2991
Air Conditioning
& Heating
2012 CREEKSIDE
TRAVEL TRAILER
23.5’, w/slide, power hitch,
power awning. Pristine
conditon! $16,500.
503-829-4299
Service Call $79.00!!
Family Owned & Operated
•Honest Repairs & Fair
Prices
•HVAC Repairs & Installs
•We also service
Manufactured Homes
Call(503) 512-8430
CCB#202626
RV
NORTHWEST
Let us sell your RV!
Call Jim at (503)708-3843
and find out what the consignment value is for your
•Fifth Wheel •Motorhome
•TravelTrailer •ToyHauler
Read our customer’s
testimonials at:
AdventureTradingRV.com
• • •
Located at the corner of
Beavercreek & Hwy 213
in Oregon City, by Appt.
WHY STORE YOUR
RV ~ LET US TURN IT
IN TO $$$$$
Northwest RV offers one
of the best consignment
programs around. We
have an outstanding
reputation for being #1 at
customer service.
Our specialty is -
Selling your RV!
Located in Tigard
RV Northwest rents,
sells, buys and consigns
RVs and travel trailers.
We have been in
business since 2004
and have a 5 star rating
with the
Better Business Bureau.
We have a full service
department and a new
parts department and
have recently added a
sales department. We
also provide temporary
housing if you are
remodeling your home,
are between residences,
or have suffered some
sort of natural disaster
(often with your
insurance company
covering the costs).
We also rent for remote
job sites, events etc.
Check out our website:
rvnorthwest.com
for more details or call
us at 503-641-9140.
James Kramer
Const.
Locally since 1974!
Kitchen, bath, walls,
ceilings, additions,
counters, cabinets,
decks, drywall, tile,
granite, windows and
doors, etc.
Reasonable.
CCB#11518. Jim
503-201-0969,
503-625-5092.
jameskramerconstruction.com
Remodeling all phases.
Over 30-years of service.
503-658-7012.
CCB#37169
NEED YARD HELP?
See the Classified
Service Directory!
To place your ad,
call (503) 620-SELL(7355).
CLASSIFIEDS CAN help you
with all your advertising needs.
Whether it is hiring, selling,
buying or trading, call us today!
Call 503-620-SELL.
CLEANING
We will get you
the most for your RV!
VOLVO S60 2008: $8,800
Well maintained, one
owner, nonsmoker, no
pets, 93k miles, NEW
TIRES, Automatic, AC,
Cruise Control, AM/FM/CD
audio, 5-Cyl, LP Turbo,
2.5L., Leather, 19 MPG
City and 27 MPG Highway,
Premium Pkg, Heated
Front Seats, Moon Roof.
Call fo more info:
503-351-1094
JAMES F.
WIEDEMANN
CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling, Windows,
& Doors, Decks,
Fences, Sheds. 20 yrs
exper. L/I/B CCB
#102031.
503-784-6691
Automotive Services
RV CONSIGNMENTS
Chimney Services
BIRDS CHIMNEY
SERVICE
1-800-CHIMNEY
Cleaning & Repairs
503-653-4999
CCB# 155449
JAMES F.
WIEDEMANN
CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling, Windows,
& Doors, Decks,
Fences, Sheds. 20 yrs
exper. L/I/B CCB
#102031.
503-784-6691
Frank’s Heating &
Cooling
We sell all types of RV’S.
Call about our consignment program. There are
no hidden fees.
2009 KAWASAKI Ninja
250r: 16,757 miles on it.
Selling because I need a
car. Second owner, well
maintained and runs great!
Call or text 503-419-8748.
Location: West Linn.
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Concrete/Paving
CONCRETE FLATWORK
Everything Concrete
Excavation/Retaining Wall
ccb#158471 503.297.6271
www.PDXconcrete.com
Decks
DECKS: New install, deck
repair & removal, pressure
washing & staining.
CCB# 118609,
503-734-7172
FENCES: New install, old
repair & removal, Chain
link, Pressure washing.
CCB# 118609
503-734-7172
Handyman Services,
Roof & Gutter Cleaning
Debris Removal, Pressure
Washing & more!
CCB# 118609
503-734-7172
Hawke Fence & Deck
•Fences •Decks •Gates
•Arbors •Retaining Walls
ccb#191476 503-941-8844
Handyman/
Handywoman
HANDYMAN MATTERS
Locally owned, nationally
recognized. Specializing in
small to medium jobs
#191473
WestPortland.HandymanMatters.com
COMPLETE YARD
SERVICE BY
STEPHEN SECOR
Senior Discounts
We do it all!
Trimming, hedges &
shrubs, pruning, bark
dust. Gutter cleaning,
leaf/debris cleaning,
weeding, blackberries,
staining & pressure
washing & water sealing
(503) 853-0480
Award Winning
Exteriors
Flawless Interiors
Painting Finer Homes in
your area for 40+ yrs.
GARCIA
CPRplumbing
MAINTENANCE, LLC
Mowing, weeding, trimming, blackberries, hauling, year-round maintenance. One-time cleanups for all seasons. E-mail:
[email protected]
503-774-2237
www.CPRplumbing.info
503-621-0700
YEAR AROUND
SERVICE
•Mowings $25 & up.
•Trimming •Pruning:
Hedges, shrubs, fruit &
ornamental trees.
•Bed work •Fertilize •Bark
•Maintenance programs
Affordable rates!
Call Dave, (503) 753-1838
HOLIDAY LIGHTING!!!
MOW •CUT •EDGE
•LEAF CLEANUP •MORE!
Average Price, $30. (503)
550-8871 / 503-708-8770.
YARD DEBRIS HAULING
•Rototilling •Trimming
•Bark Dust •Gravel •Yard
Maintenance. Free est,
7 days. (503) 626-9806.
(503) 867-3859
Senior Discount
CCB#194308
Attorneys/Legal
Services
DIVORCE $155
Complete preparation.
Includes children, custody,
support, property and
bills division. No court
appearances. Divorced in
1-5 weeks possible.
503-772-5295
www.paralegalalternatives.com
[email protected]
Counseling
Autism Spectrum
Disorder Services
✔✔✔
Teens/Adults.
Consultation/Counseling
Support Service planning.
Community Classifieds
Dan Gilbride, MA/MRC
Treatment & Service
Specialist since 1985.
503-367-3630
for information, rates, special promotions or for help in
writing an ad (from 3 lines to a display ad).
I can help!
f
Plumbing &
Drainage
IT’S TIME FOR
FALL & WINTER
CLEAN-UPS!!!
Call Mindy Johnson
at 503-546-0760
Call Jasmine at
503-393-3663
www.litkie.com
503-803-9284.
Bring Quick Results!!!
Whatever service you offer, I have the
readers to call you.
6492 Portland Road NE
Salem, OR 97305
BBB -CCB# 54535
(503) 668-8000
Owner-operated. 13-yrs
exper. Call Laura,
CHECK US OUT!
Pickups
1975 FORD F-250
REDDING FLATBED
20,000 lb PTO winch, 390,
4x4,$5000 503-266-2319
Painting & Papering
I can help with all
of your yard care
needs!!!
Fences
Here at Northwest RV we
have a large budget for
advertising that targets
buyers of all ages! We
advertise not just locally
but Nationwide and
throughout Canada!
Landscape
Maintenance
[email protected]
PLEASE NOTE:
ABBREVIATIONS destroy the
intent of your ad. Your ad
should be attractive and easy
to read. Let us help you put together your ad. Call us today at
(503) 503-620-SELL
www.northwestrvsales.com
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS ✵ YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE ✵ 503-620-SELL (7355) ✵ 8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -CLASSIFIEDS.COM
Oregon’s largest source
of local news.
Keep in touch with your community 24/7, online or on-the-go at
PortlandTribune.com
480047.031814
The Pamplin Media Group’s newspapers offer more original, local news from more places than any other
news source in Oregon. For the most comprehensive news of YOUR community, visit portlandtribune.com
and click on the link to your town. There you will find local news, sports, features and more — all of it coming
directly from your community to you, 24/7.
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Ballard Street
Portland!Life
Scary Gary
LIFE B7
Free Range
Dog Eat Doug
Strange Brew
Nest Heads
Dogs of C Kennel
Beaverton / Cedar Hills
2905 SW Cedar Hills Blvd.
503.626.1400
Hillsboro / Tanasbourne
2364 NW Amberbrook Dr.
503.352.5252
Oregon City / Hilltop
334 Warner Milne Rd.
503.722.8222
437753.060613 ENT
West Linn / Ristorante
18740 Willamette Dr.
503.636.9555
B U G AT T I S R E STA U R A N T . C O M
B8 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
SOLUTIONS
“CHILDS PLAY” By Amy Johnson. Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
3 Wear black, perhaps
89 Obeys
4 Little Spitz, briefly
91 Kudrow of “Friends”
'LHWHUV·OXQFKRUGHUV
92 Navel concavity
6 “__ Brockovich”
93 “__ appétit!”
7 Turf controller
1<&YLVLWRU·VILQDO
8 Subj. with exponents
destination, perhaps
9 Worker, informally
95 1998 home run
10 Host
record chaser
*XPE\·VVLGHNLFN
97 Take the gold
12 Relatives of ums
104 Puts into words
13 Honshu Isl. peak
108 Unprincipled
14 Youngest of the
109 Reduce
three Prozorov
110 Pigeon shelter
sisters
112 Half-pretentious?
15 Forum wear
113 Shows pluck
16 Figure out
114 Snap
17 Case weaknesses
117 Play, as Julius
&RHXUG·BB
Caesar
23 Dissolution
118 Curved moldings
24 Low-budget flicks
119 Blew the whistle
29 Advantages
120 Blows the whistle
31 “Inside the NBA”
121 Shades
analyst, to fans
*DPHU·VWLWOHLVODQG
33 Outer: Pref.
123 Nice sweetheart
35 Wii locale
124 Brief writer: Abbr.
36 Tight position?
38 Morning
DOWN
announcement
1 Places on una
39 Word before time
avenida residencial
and place
2 Fictional Ziff
40 At this very moment
infatuated with
42 Flip over
Marge Simpson
43 Trust
44 “Grumpy” film title
characters
45 Fútbol shout
46 Part of a layette
47 Hippie bus decal
48 __ marsala
49 Choir number
51 Perry of fashion
52 Hardly
inconspicuous
54 Egyptian, usually
60 Show places?
62 Dressed to the
nines, with “up”
64 Log holder
66 Take back to the
drawing board
67 Eye-catching signs
68 Nuts go-with
69 Island greetings
70 __ quam videri:
North Carolina motto
71 Three-time All-Pro
Giant lineman Chris
75 Half-Betazoid aboard
the Enterprise
76 “Alfred” composer
78 It might be inspired
79 Driving instructor
6WRUPWKDW·VFKDVHG
84 Grave offender?
86 Neat finish?
87 Med sch. subject
90 Fangorn Forest
inhabitant
7RRWVRQH·VKRUQ
94 Outback young
96 Reason for
oversleeping
97 Future officer
98 Saudi neighbor
99 Bugs with weapons
100 Like a Siberian
+XVN\·VHDUV
101 Informal science
6NHWFKDUWLVW·VDUUD\
&HUWDLQIROORZHU·V
reading
105 Ostentation
106 One giving Scarlett
a fever?
107 No tough guy
110 Study all night
111 Luxury hotel chain
114 “Ten Little Indians”
actor Herbert
115 Today preceder
9LFWRULD·V6HFUHWEX\
Sudoku
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Sudoku
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
Crossword
Answers
Family Style Customer Service
Delivery Service $ Custom Cutting $ Special Orders
Puzzle 2
YOUR AD
COULD BE HERE!
7609 SE Stark St.
(503) 254-7387
Mrplywoodinc.com
Reach more than 200,000 readers every week!
CROSSWORD
Keeping minds
& bodies ACTIVE
for 47 years!
1400 NE Second Ave.
Portland, OR
503.736.3642 | www.pacificacalaroga.com
by Eugene Shaffer
484921.070814
©2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
[email protected]
480263.030414
11/13/14
447570.061114 Mkt
ACROSS
1 Tie-dye locale
5 “Sonic the
Hedgehog”
developer
9 Skunk Le Pew
13 Pileggi of “The
X-Files”
18 Suffix for stink
19 Sea once fed by the
Amu Darya River
20 Round Table array
21 Cape Cod vacation
destination
22 Obstacles
25 End-of-term hurdle
26 Put out there
27 Pealed
28 Barroom disorder
29 Special Olympics
founder Shriver
30 Picked up on
32 Wild pair, sometimes
34 Biblical verb
36 Playwright Ensler
37 Technology in Pixar
films, briefly
38 “Wicked Game”
rocker Chris
41 Boastful opening
43 Civil War historian
Shelby
46 Aquarium fish
50 “The Phantom of the
Opera” setting
53 With reason
55 Coal industry org.
56 Conspiracy
57 Get under the tag,
hopefully
58 Hades, to Satan
59 Amanda of “2012”
61 Like drag strips
63 24-hr. convenience
64 A hitchhiker might
have one
65 Morsel mentioned
LQ·V$XVWUDOLDQ
tourism ads
70 Spots
72 Area usually not
mowed
73 Pelican St.
metropolis
74 Spanish 101 verb
'XPP\RQ%HUJHQ·V
knee
78 As a companion
80 “Herding Cats: A Life
in Politics” author
82 Bargain basement
letters
83 Seasoned sailor
85 Abstained, in a way
88 Cries from one
standing on a chair,
maybe
SOLUTIONS
Here’s One Answer
11/13
©2014 King Features, Inc.
CRYPTOQUIP
11/13
11/3
11/13
I THOUGHT ABOUT
PUTTING A COUPLE
OF SHARP CREASES
IN MY PANYS,
BUT ONLY FOR A
PLEATING MOMENT.
Cryptoquip solution:
HOME DELIVERY coming to a mailbox near you!
Getting your Portland news is easier than you think.
Published every Tuesday and Thursday | www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
SPORTS B9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
B eav ers h op e to cool
S un D ev ils’ h ot streak
CORVALLIS — Oregon State
appears to be in over its head
Saturday night when the Beavers (4-5 overall, 1-5 in Pac-12
play) play host to seventhranked Arizona State (8-1, 5-1)
in a 7:45 p.m. matchup at Reser
Stadium.
OSU’s defense seems the biggest concern. In consecutive
losses to Stanford, California
and Washington State, the
Beavers have
yielded an average of 40.7
points, 29.7 first
d ow n s , 3 4 5
yards passing
ALEXANDER
and 497 yards
total offense.
“The opposing offenses have
operated well,” says Mark Banker, in his 12th year as Mike Riley’s
defensive coordinator. “But we
haven’t answered the call.”
Banker’s appraisal of his defense in last Saturday’s 39-32 loss
to Wazzu starts with “two selfinflicted wounds” — Cougar
touchdown passes that erased an
early 10-0 Oregon State lead.
“The most embarrassing and
totally unacceptable one was just
before the half,” Banker said, the
reference to a 48-yard TD strike
from Luke Falk to Vince Mayle.
“We didn’t get lined up.
“I’m right in the crosshairs. I’ll
take the bullet on that one. We
have to have a sense of urgency
in that situation. What happened
INSURANCE
PROBLEMS?
WE CAN HELP.
&DOORUYLVLW
,QVXUDQFH2UHJRQJRY
who we are and what we are. We
have to keep our minds straight
and worry about ourselves.”
Arizona State brings to Corvallis a team in the driver’s seat to
represent the South Division in
the Pac-12 championship game
on Dec. 5. It isn’t out of the realm
of possibility the Sun Devils
could be one of four teams in the
national playoffs, too.
ASU averages 36.7 points and
475.7 yards total offense, led by
senior quarterback Taylor Kelly,
junior tailback D.J. Foster (821
yards, six TDs), and junior receiver Jaelen Strong (62 catches,
nine scores).
Banker compares the Sun Devils’ offense to that of Utah, “but
they have more of an ability to
get the ball downfield.”
“They’re pretty good,” Alexander says. “They’re 50-50 with the
run and pass, so we have to expect anything. Foster is a good
athlete, and their quarterback
can run and pass. It will be another good test for us.”
Is Banker discouraged?
“No,” he said. “Disappointed
in myself, because you always
look inward. I haven’t been able
to put a game plan together to
help these players win. The discouragement comes from not
being able to finish the game.
“I know the kids are trying
to do the things we’re asking
them to do. It comes down to
being solid in what we execute
and being able to make the
plays.”
Alexander says the Beavers
haven’t lost faith in themselves.
“Everybody’s energy is
good,” he says. “We’re all focused. We’re all hungry. Any
team can be beaten on a given
day. It depends on who wants it
more. On Saturday, it has to be
us. I believe it will be us.”
Sky mark.
Coach Tyler Geving, in his sixth
year at the helm, welcomes back
six players,
including senior
guards Tim
Douglas at the
point, Gary
Winston (42 percent on 3-pointers last season)
and DaShaun
Wiggins (co-Sixth
WHITE
Man of the Year
in the Big Sky).
Junior college transfers Bryce
White and Collin Spickerman are
expected to have a big impact.
White, a former Benson High star,
is a 6-5 guard who averaged 27.5
points and 7.2 rebounds per game
last year for Chemeketa Community
College. Spickerman, from Jesuit
High, is a 6-8 forward who went for
17.9 points and 9.1 rebounds last
season with Clark College.
Others to watch include 6-6
sophomore forward Braxton Turner
who had 16 points and five
rebounds in place of Spickerman
(sprained ankle) in last week’s
88-43 exhibition win over Linfield,
and senior Tiegbe Bamba, a 6-6
forward from France who has been
a project since arriving in 2013
and sitting out last season with an
Achilles heel injujry,
PSU’s home opener is Tuesday,
Nov. 18, against Willamette; tip-off
is 7 p.m. at Stott Center. Other preseason home games are Nov. 24
against SIU Edwardsville, Dec. 13
versus Cal State Bakersfield and
Dec. 22 with Walla Walla.
■ The PSU women open at
Seattle University at 5 p.m. Sunday,
then play host to South Dakota at
7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19.
The Vikings have been picked for
11th out of 12 teams in the Big
Sky. PSU went 8-21 overall and
6-14 in league last season.
Other Stott Center preseason
games of note include Nov. 29
against Long Beach State and Dec.
5 versus Navy.
The inner-city rivalry with
Portland is Dec. 12 at PSU, and the
Big Sky campaign begins at
Southern Utah on Jan. 1.
UO: Schneider, Wogan vie to kick
■ From page 12
each other. You can never be
comfortable, ‘cause there’s
another guy who wants your
spot.”
Schneider scored 15 points
at Utah with his field goals and
extra-point kicks, the most impressive being a 42-yard field
goal, which bested his 40-yarder from the Stanford game.
“I’m really confident,” he
says. “I’m kicking well in practice, getting my consistency
up. I know it’s going through
when I kick it.”
Schneider says the clutch
periods in practice, during
which he practices kicking
important field goals, make
him mentally tough. He says
he feels some pressure, but
not much. He appears pretty
relaxed. Tom Osborne, UO
special teams coach, says
Schneider has moxie and handles clutch periods well.
“I don’t feel a ton more pressure kicking in games than (in
clutch period during practice),”
Schneider says. “Because it
(practice) is so important. It’s
just like a game to us. We have
to get it right. We could potentially be in that situation (in a
game), and it’s really, really important to execute.”
Schneider says his range is
a little more than 50 yards,
and he wants to keep getting
the call to kick field goals.
“I definitely feel as I’m making more kicks, (and coaches)
are becoming more confident,” he says. “I just want to
show them what I can do, that
I can be a consistent kicker
here.”
The Ducks don’t know, yet,
how Schneider would respond
to a missed kick or two. Maybe
he won’t have to find out this
year, if Mariota and the offense keep generating touchdowns.
Or, maybe Schneider lines
up in the Pac-12 title game or,
possibly, a national playoff
game, for a field goal. That
would be interesting.
It’s already been a very interesting year, highlighted by
the Utah road performance,
for the rookie from Northeast
Portland.
“Pretty crazy,” he says.
“There’s really not a lot of time
to stop and think about that. I
wouldn’t have pictured myself
here at all, really.”
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By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
happened. It’s unacceptable.”
The Cougars gained 88 yards
and scored three points in the
third quarter. “For a while, we
played up to our capabilities,”
Banker said. But in the fourth
quarter, “we didn’t come up with
the plays we needed. We just
didn’t get it done.”
Falk and Cal’s Jared Goff
threw 108 combined passes with
nary an interception against the
Beavers, and the Cougars and
Bears were 19 for 32 on thirddown conversions.
“The big thing has been not
getting off the field on third
down,” Banker says.
Oregon State starts eight seniors on defense. Though the
Beavers still rank second in the
Pac-12 in total defense, the experience hasn’t seemed to help
through the last three games.
“It doesn’t matter whether
we’re true freshmen or seniors,”
Banker says. “We just need to
play better and coach better.”
Senior linebacker D.J. Alexander was asked if he is discouraged by the results of the past
month.
“Not at all,” Alexander says.
“It’s my senior year. We have to
go out with a bang. That’s my
mind-set. We have three more
games to prove who we are. I’m
not discouraged at all.
“We have a lot of seniors. We
all want to be that good team.
We’ve had a couple of tough losses, but we’ve put all the work in
for four years. Why can’t we have
a great end to the season?”
Alexander is not oblivious to
the criticism the Beavers have
taken through the last three
weeks.
“But you put that in the back of
your mind and play your game,”
Alexander says. “We know we
can do it. Nobody else can tell us
Basketball starts for real this
weekend for the Portland State
men, an intriguing mix of returnees
and newcomers, and the Viking
women, who are looking to make
strides after a subpar 2013-14
season.
The PSU men begin with a bang
— a trip to Los
Angeles to face
USC at Galen
Center, 7:30
p.m. Saturday.
It’s the first
meeting
between the
Vikings and Trojans in 27 years,
and the first of 10 preseason
games that should help the Viks
get ready for the Big Sky season
(conference coaches have picked
Portland State to finish fifth in the
12-team league, which now
includes Idaho).
The Vikings are coming off a
17-15 overall season and 11-9 Big
484915.070814
OSU needs to shore
up defense heading
into Saturday game
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496591.111314
B10 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
‘Giant Killers’: Rural towns yield talent
■ From page 12
The Beavers ran the option,
and quarterbacks Paul Brothers, Steve Preece and Steve Endicott were all excellent runners
— Preece the best of them —
and savvy in orchestrating Andros’s patented option play.
“Dee’s offense was no-frills,”
Enyart said. “It was a very basic
system, but it was an effective
system. We weren’t unexciting.
We were a very exciting team.
We had a great option quarterback, guys like Billy Main who
could pick up big chunks and
break it long, and we sprinkled
in a few passes. I wish we’d
have passed more. But it was
basic and it was emotional. Dee
was a fiery guy. With emotions,
it goes two ways. Some games
you win that you probably
shouldn’t have. You probably
lose some games you shouldn’t
have because you didn’t prepare
at a strategic level.”
Andros was always good with
his motivational talks. He
cranked it up a notch for the
Civil War. “His speeches were
better for the Ducks,” Enyart
said. “He always said the game
is for the right to live in the
state for one year. It’s metaphorical, but in a sense, it’s true. If
you live in the state, you’re either a Beaver or a Duck. After
the game, you’re either gloating
or you have your tail between
your legs. He conveyed that to
us. Nobody understood that
more than me. When we played
the Civil War game, it was more
than just another football game.
It was the most important thing
in the world.”
Preece — his teammates
called him “Fox” — was a fleet
quarterback from Boise with
limited passing skills but a perfect fit for Andros’ offense.
Recruited by every Pac-8
team except California and
UCLA, he took advantage of the
recruiting process. “In those
years, you could sign a letter of
intent with one school in each
league,” Preece said. “I signed
with Oregon State, Brigham
Young, Utah, Colorado and Columbia. I visited Washington.
On his visit to my home, (coach)
Jim Owens took us out to dinner and ordered a glass of wine.
My mom said, ‘You’re not going
there.’”
•••
COURTESY OF OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
Center John Didion was arguably the leader of a very disciplined Oregon State offensive line that paved the
way for a Power-T ground attack featuring the fullback and the option threat of halfbacks and q uarterback
Steve Preece during the Beavers’ “Giant Killer” years of 1967 and 1968.
Andros was an Oklahoma native. Enyart lived in Oklahoma
before moving to Medford at
age 11. The Enyarts loved Oklahoma coach Bud Wilkinson,
who had coached Andros with
the Sooners. Enyart’s father
knew Dee and his brother from
the Oklahoma days. There was
a strong connection.
The 6-3 1/2,
235-pound Enyart played fullback and linebacker on the
Rook squad in
1965. As a sophomore, he
PREECE
played weakside linebacker,
moving into the starting lineup
as a sophomore when starter
Jim Godfrey was injured in the
opener at Michigan. Enyart had
a great season on the defensive
side and had a big game in a 2015 victory over Oregon. “My
kids and I have watched film of
that game quite a few times,”
Enyart said. “I told them, ‘Guys,
the older I get, the better I used
to be.’ But I did have a pretty
good game. I caused a fumble
and made quite a few tackles.”
That spring, with Pifer having
graduated, Enyart moved to offense permanently. “Dee had
been a little resistant to me being a fullback,” Enyart said.
“Dee and Ed Knecht, my freshman coach, wanted me to stay
at linebacker. Dee and I had a
meeting. I told him, ‘Coach, I
want a shot at fullback. I love
playing linebacker, but I came
here to be a fullback.’ He gave
me a shot, and I think it worked
out pretty well.”
Enyart’s public nickname was
“Earthquake,” the result of
sports information director
John Eggers liking the alliterative sound in promoting the
Beaver fullback for All-America
consideration. But Enyart’s
teammates called him “Buffalo
Bill,” which was shortened to
“Buff.” He proved to be the right
guy to play fullback in Andros’s
offense. In the Power-T, an effective fullback was vital.
“We needed a blue-collar, durable fullback you could count
on,” Enyart said. “Dee would
roll over in his grave if he knew
you were going to throw the ball
on third-and-two. We made no
secrets we were going to run
Enjoy every moment this holiday season.
the ball, and you’re not going to
stop us. Our offensive line was
fantastic, incredibly disciplined
under coach (Sam) Boghosian.
We had a great quarterback in
Preece, too, and a lot of very
good halfbacks.”
The halfbacks on the ‘67 and
‘68 teams — Billy Main, Donny
Summers and Jerry Belcher —
were excellent blockers. “We all
had to block in our offense,”
Main said. “Our split end, Roger
Cantlon, was a great blocker.
Our offensive line was terrific —
guys like Lee Jamison, Dave
Marlette, Rocky Rasley, John
Didion, Clyde Smith and Roger
Stalick. Those teams had a tremendous rapport between the
backs and the linemen. We
loved those guys and they loved
us. As a team, we coalesced better than you could ever imagine.
I’ve never been in an environment where there was more
love or camaraderie.”
•••
The best of the linemen was
Didion, the 6-4, 255-pound center from Woodland, Calif., who
initially committed to Brigham
Young. “Their coach was Lavell
Edwards, a great guy and a very
successful coach,” said Didion,
who died of a heart attack in December 2013. “Then (OSU assistant coach) Rich Brooks came
to an all-star game I played in
Sacramento and offered me a
trip to Corvallis. I said, ‘Why
not?’ And I fell in love with the
school. It’s what a college campus is supposed to look like —
ivy-covered brick buildings.
Woodland is small. I didn’t want
to go to an urban area. I got to
talk to Coach Andros, and what
a great communicator he was. I
felt like I wanted to be part of
what they were building.”
As a sophomore in 1966, Didion played behind 6-6, 270-pound
Rockne Freitas, who went on to
an 11-year NFL career. “Rocky
was instrumental in my beginning weight training,” Didion
said. “I weighed 190 as a freshman, and about 205 as a sophomore. Having to go one-on-one
against him was like throwing a
BB against a wall. That was one
of the bigger keys to whatever
success I had, getting bigger
and stronger.”
Among the defensive stars
was junior tackle Lewis, who
had chosen Oregon State over
Washington and Oregon. Lewis
became one of the great twosport athletes in Oregon State
history, earning All-America
recognition in football and winning a pair of NCAA heavyweight wrestling championships in 1968 and ‘69. He finished
sixth in the 1968 Olympic
Games at Mexico City, earning a
draw in his match with the gold
medalist, Aleksandr Medved of
Russia.
•••
The 1967 Oregon State team
began the season with impressive wins over Stanford, Arizona State and Iowa. The Beavers
stumbled in Seattle, losing five
fumbles in a 13-6 loss at Washington in which the Huskies
scored the winning touchdown
with two minutes to play. Hangover from that loss played a part
in an ineffective performance
the next week at home in a 31-13
loss to Brigham Young.
The next week, Oregon State
paid a visit to Purdue, the nation’s No. 2-ranked team led by
All-America halfback Leroy
Keyes. The Beavers pulled off a
stunning 22-14 upset. Two
weeks later, OSU was facing another No. 2-ranked team on the
road, UCLA. The result was a
16-16 tie that could have been
another victory had not one of
Mike Haggard’s extra-point attempts bounced off an upright.
After that game, talk turned
to the Beavers’ next opponent
— top-ranked Southern Cal and
All-American O.J. Simpson.
“We’re tired of playing No. 2,”
Andros famously told reporters.
“Bring on No. 1.”
Haggard’s second-quarter
field goal held up in the Beavers’ 3-0 upset at Parker Stadium in what still remains on a
short list of great performances
in school history. Hence the
term “Giant Killers” was born.
Because of OSU’s loss to Washington and the tie with UCLA,
the Trojans were headed to the
Rose Bowl that season to face —
ironically — Purdue. In those
years, Pac-8 teams were prohibited from playing in any bowl
games other than the Rose
Bowl. So the Beavers, 6-2-1 and
ranked eighth nationally, had
only the Civil War game left to
play.
Birth of the ‘Fighting Ducks’
In Eugene, the Jerry Frei era
had begun. Len Casanova had
retired and been replaced by his
long-time assistant. Frei had
played at Wisconsin, then
moved to Oregon in 1949 to become an assistant coach at Portland’s Grant High. He served as
head coach at Portland’s Lincoln
High, was an assistant coach at
Willamette, and then joined Casanova’s Oregon staff in 1955.
“Jerry was one of those type
of people who was inspirational,
and he had visions of Oregon
becoming more than what we
had been,” said Claxton Welch,
a halfback from Portland’s David Douglas High. “He was the
one who came up with the nickname ‘Fighting Ducks.’ He saw
there was opportunity to become something special. We
would come out of the locker
room, jog over to our warm-up
position in single file, break into
four or five lines, and then you
would start your exercises. It
was something he picked up
when he visited Notre Dame
during spring practice. He wanted us to emulate the Fighting
Irish.”
•••
Oregon went into the 1967
Civil War game with a 2-8 record. The Ducks had played better in their last two games, a 1713 win over Washington State
and a 17-14 loss to Stanford, but
the Beavers were nationally
ranked and heavily favored
when they invaded brand-new
Autzen Stadium. Autzen opened
See CIVIL WAR / Page 11
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SPORTS B11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, November 13, 2014
Civil War: Beavers’ win christens Autzen
A Civil War record crowd of
CREATE A
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Bill “Earthq uake” Enyart, known as “Buffalo Bill” to his Oregon State
teammates, was the pounding fullback who carried much of the load
during the Dee Andros-coached glory years of 1967 and 1968.
40,100 — paying $6 for reserved
seats, $3 for general admission
and $1 for students — watched
the two-touchdown underdog
Ducks nearly pull off an upset
in 1967. Oregon led 10-0 going
into the fourth quarter before
Oregon State pulled out a 14-10
victory. Earlier in the day, USC
had beaten UCLA, clinching a
Rose Bowl berth.
Perhaps there was some
hangover on the Beavers’ part
from the emotional victory over
Southern Cal the week before.
Perhaps there was disappointment that there would be no
bowl game. Perhaps they overlooked the Ducks.
“We found out during warmups we were out of the Rose
Bowl picture,” Preece said. “I really feel we’d have been capable
of beating the Ducks by 30 if the
Rose Bowl had been on the line,
but we played pretty miserably.”
•••
Junior Enyart, whose fourthquarter work was the key to Oregon State’s comeback that day,
felt it was his coming of age as a
Beaver fullback.
“We were coming off the SC
win, and had a little bit of an
emotional letdown, and the Trojans can physically take a lot
out of you, too,” said Enyart,
who carried 35 times for 167
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es at Iowa and Kentucky, the latter after OSU’s final touchdown
and the Beavers behind 35-34.
Against USC, Scott missed fieldgoal attempts of 21, 30 and 32
yards in the first half.
“Had Mike Haggard been
back, we’d have been national
champions that year,” Enyart
said.
•••
Oregon had made strides in
Frei’s second season. The Ducks
went into the 1968 Civil War 4-5
with a chance to finish the year
at .500. Before the game, Frei
called Oregon State, ranked
16th nationally, “the finest college offensive football team I’ve
ever seen.” But, said Frei, “I’ll
tell Dee or anyone else we won’t
play this Saturday as we did
against Cal (a 36-8 loss), and
we’re not going to Corvallis to
concede.”
The Beavers, though, were
ready. “That game was the
crown for the Giant Killers
group,” Enyart said. “We had
struggled against the Ducks
the year before. They’d put up
a great effort against us. The
seniors knew this was the last
time we were putting on an
Oregon State uniform. It was
an emotionally charged time.
We always stayed together at
an Albany motel the night before a home game. We’d have
cookies and cocoa together
about 10 o’clock. Donny Summers read a poem to every-
body that he had put together
that day. I didn’t know Donny
had it in him. I swear we had
tears in our eyes listening to
him.”
The Ducks were no match for
the Beavers in a 41-19 loss at
Parker Stadium.
Oregon was poised to take
out Preece on Oregon State’s
patented option play. Preece
had broken a shoulder the previous season, and opponents
that year often took shots at it.
Early in the game, UO defensive
end Dennis Gassner coldcocked him. Main saw it.
“Billy told me, ‘Run that play
again,’” Preece recalled. “I ran it
again, and Main goes flying by
me and hits (Gassner) so hard I
thought he was going to kill
him. He’s standing over him,
screaming, ‘Don’t touch my
quarterback again.’”
Enyart rushed 37 times for
168 yards and three touchdowns.
“We were a really good team
— arguably better than the Giant Killers of the year before,”
said defensive tackle
Hanneman, a sophomore that
season.
“When we were clicking,”
Main said, “we were the No. 1
team in the nation in both ‘67
and ‘68.”
“That was a hell of an Oregon
State team,” Oregon tight end
Andy Maurer said. “They
should have beaten us a million
to nothing.”
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The 1968 season was a “couldhave-been” campaign for Oregon State. The Beavers were
ranked No. 2 nationally in Playboy magazine’s preseason
spread.
They wound up losing three
games by a total of six points in
a 7-3 season.
They dropped two of their
first four contests by a point
apiece — 21-20 at Iowa in the
opener, then 35-34 in the fourth
game at Kentucky. The only other loss came in the penultimate
game, a 17-13 defeat at Southern
Cal.
Oregon State and USC both
went into the game 4-0 in PAC
play, so in essence, the Rose
Bowl was on the line. The
Trojans, led by Heisman Trophy winner Simpson, were 8-0
overall and again ranked No. 1
nationally.
With Simpson carrying 47
times for 238 yards, the Trojans
scored 17 fourth-quarter points
to win.
The lack of a place-kicker had
been OSU’s Achilles heel all season. Highly regarded sophomore Pat Arnold had been in a
preseason automobile accident
and wasn’t able to perform. Larry Rich was called on to kick extra points, and tackle Kent Scott
handled field goals. Rich had
missed extra points in the loss-
Q
Fixed income for life
Q
Relief from taxes
Q
496001.111214
that season with a capacity of
41,698, more than double that of
old Hayward Field, which had
become a hindrance to the program’s progress.
In 1965, the Ducks had played
three of their five home games
at Portland’s Multnomah Stadium. Former athletic director
Leo Harris — then employed as
a part-time consultant by the
athletic department — considered the new facility a first step
toward joining the big time in
college athletics.
“From a cold, analytical
standpoint, football is the only
successful method to finance
the entire athletic program, and
our objective is to build a firstclass program,” Harris told the
Duck Club the week before the
Civil War.
“Our facilities at Oregon — I
think they are the best in the
PAC — will make a tremendous
contribution to our athletic program. But we must build with
football as the foundation. We
must field a representative
team every year, not every other year or every three years.
Money has never been the problem in the football program.
We’ve always had plenty of
money. Until this year, the Oregon athletic department has
never used all its aid money.
We’ve never had enough football players to warrant using it
all. The difficulty has been in
the area of recruiting. ... Football hasn’t seemed important. ...
There has been a general apathy toward football. Until you
solve this, it won’t make any difference whether or not you have
the money to get players. Football is important at Oregon, just
as all school-related activities
are important. I hope you as
alumni demand this. You have
been too complacent in the past,
but you have the ability, and I’m
sure the desire, to change this.”
•••
yards. “But I was feeling good.
That day was when I came into
my own as a fullback.
“Bud Wilkinson always said if
you make 3.4 yards a carry,
you’ll never get stopped. I averaged about five yards a carry.
With that in mind, if they gave
the ball to me, we were theoretically never going to get stopped.
That was Dee’s philosophy. I
knew I wasn’t going to break
long runs, so I was content to
get a lot of good short runs and
make the (defenders) pay a
price to tackle me and set up
the option for the bigger runs.”
•••
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Tribune’sATHLETESoftheWEEK
PRO
Blazers
Oregon
Warner Pacific
WESLEY MATTHEWS — The 6-5
guard averaged 17.0 points in a 3-1 week
for Portland. He hit for 21 in wins against
Cleveland and Denver. The 6th-year pro
from Marquette totaled 17 rebounds, 8
assists, 5 turnovers and 3 steals, shooting
24 of 50 on FGs and 12 of 31 on 3s.
Winterhawks
CRYSTAL FOSTER, soccer — The
6-4 junior QB continued his high-level play with 3 TD passes and 1 TD
run as UO won 51-27 at Utah. The
Honolulu native was 17 of 29 for
239 yards, with no interceptions. He
also ran 18 times for 114 yards.
Knights won their 1st-ever Cascade
Collegiate Conference playoff game,
beating host College of Idaho 2-0 in
WPC’s first postseason appearance
since 2007. Foster, a 5-4 junior F from
Redmond, had a goal and an assist.
Oregon State
TIMMY MUELLER, soccer — The
OLIVER BJORKSTRAND — The
Beavers knocked off No. 7 Cal 4-3 at
Berkeley, Calif., and Mueller, a 6-3
frosh F from Post Falls, Idaho, scored
the winner with 12 seconds to go. He
leads the Pac-12 with 11 goals for
OSU (10-7-1 overall).
native of Herning, Denmark, a 6-0,
170-pound RW, is 2nd on the team
with 20 points. He had a goal and 2
assists in a 4-3 OT victory at home
over Kamloops.
COLLEGE
Portland State
MARCUS MARIOTA, football — The
Lewis & Clark
COLIN BROWN, football — The 6-0,
150-pound sophomore from Granite
Bay, Calif., booted field goals of 29
and 21 yards as the Pioneers
dropped a 30-12 decision at George
Fox.
KASIMIRA “KASI” CLARK, volley-
ball — The 5-7 senior libero from
Riverside, Calif. — PSU’s all-time digs
leader — had 23 and 11 in a weekend split at home that included a
3-0 victory over Weber State.
Portland
Concordia
ARIEL VIERA, soccer — The 5-4
sophomore D from Scappoose
starred on defense and got her 1st
career goal with 14 seconds left in
the 1st half. The score gave UP a 2-0
lead en route to its 3-0 triumph over
Gonzaga.
ESVAN MIDDLETON, basketball
— The 23rd-ranked Cavaliers are 4-0,
and the 6-7, 225-pound senior F-C
from Culver City, Calif., combined for
27 points, 26 rebounds, 7 assists
and 4 steals in 2 wins over D-II
Alaska Anchorage.
SAM MALLOCH
GRANT SOCCER
A 5-5 junior
CMF, he had an
assist and a
penalty kick
goal as the
Generals beat
Lake Oswego
3-2 on PKs. He
then tied West
Linn with a
25-yard free
kick and assisted on the winner with 1:25
left in the 2nd
OT as Grant
advanced to
the 6A semis
with a 2-1 road
victory.
HIGH SCHOOL
GABE PARRISH, Central Catholic
soccer — The 6-1 senior MF had the
Rams’ 1st goal in a 3-1 6A OT playoff
victory over South Salem, then tallied
the winner as CC beat West Salem
1-0 in the state quarterfinals.
VICKY GAJDA
CENTRAL CATHOLIC VOLLEYBALL
The 5-11 senior
co-captain, bound
for Concordia
University, helped
the Rams place
second in the 6A
tournament and
defeat Southridge
and Clackamas
3-0 in the opening rounds. She
also was CC’s
player of the game
in the finals vs.
Jesuit, posting 7
kills and 5 service
disruptions to go
with her strong
passing in serve
receive.
337043.111314
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PAGE B12
MainEvents
Thursday, Nov. 13
College volleyball: Southern
Utah at Portland State, 7 p.m. ...
Oregon at Arizona, 5 p.m. (Pac-12
Networks). ... Oregon State at
Arizona, 6 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 14
6A football second round:
West Albany-Central Catholic at
Hillsboro Stadium, Clackamas at
West Linn, Lakeridge at Sherwood,
Oregon City at Sheldon, Lake
Oswego at Grants Pass,
Southridge at West Salem, North
Medford at Jesuit, Sunset at Tigard
(all 7 p.m.).
Winterhawks: Portland at
Everett, 7:30 p.m.
College men’s basketball:
Concordia at Portland, 7 p.m. ...
Coppin State at Oregon, 9 p.m.
(Pac-12 Networks). ... Rice at
Oregon State, 7 p.m.
College women’s basketball:
Portland at Oregon State, 4 p.m.
... Utah State at Oregon, noon.
Roller derby: Break Neck
Betties vs. Hellgate All-Stars
(Missoula, Mont.) at Oaks
Amusement Park, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 15
Blazers: Brooklyn at Portland,
7 p.m.
College football: Arizona
State at Oregon State, 7:45 p.m.
(ESPN). ... Portland State at
Sacramento State, 2 p.m. ...
TV&Radio
Thursday, Nov. 13
NFL: Buffalo at Miami, 5 p.m.,
NFL Network, KXTG (750 AM)
Pac-12 football: Cal at USC, 6
p.m., ESPN
NBA: Chicago at Toronto, 5 p.m.,
TNT. … Brooklyn at Golden State,
7:30 p.m., TNT
College football: East Carolina
at Cincinnati, 4 p.m., ESPN2. ...
Southern Miss at UTSA, 5 p.m.,
CBS Sports
College volleyball: Oregon at
Arizona, 5 p.m., Pac-12 Networks
Friday, Nov. 14
Prep football: Clackamas at
West Linn, KFXX (1080 AM), 7 p.m.
... Sunset at Tigard, 7 p.m., KUIK
(1360 AM)
Winterhawks: Portland at
Everett, 7:30 p.m., KPAM (860 AM)
College football: Tulsa at UCF, 5
p.m., ESPN2
College men’s basketball:
Concordia at Portland, 7 p.m., KMTT
(910 AM). ... Coppin State at
Oregon, Pac-12 Networks.
NHL: Arizona at Vancouver, 7
p.m., CSNNW
Saturday, Nov. 15
Blazers: Brooklyn at Portland, 7
p.m., CSNNW, KPOJ (620 AM),
KKRZ (102.3 FM)
OSU football: Arizona State at
Oregon State, 7:45 p.m., ESPN,
KEX (1190 AM)
Pac-12 football: Washington at
Arizona, 12:30 p.m., FOX (12). ...
Utah at Stanford, 3 p.m., Pac-12
Networks
PSU football: Portland State at
Sacramento State, 2 p.m., KPOJ
(620 AM)
Big Sky football: Idaho State at
Montana State, 12:30 p.m., Root
Sports
NWC football: Pacific at Linfield,
1 p.m., KPDQ (800 AM), KLYC
(1260 AM), KUIK (1360 AM).
College football: 9 a.m. — Ohio
State at Minnesota, KATU (2) or
ESPN3. ... Clemson at Georgia Tech,
ESPN. ... Temple at Penn State,
Birthday
Nov. 14,
1968: Kent
Bottenfield (age
47). ... A
Madison High
graduate, he
was a fourthround MLB draft
pick who spent
10 seasons in
BOTTENFIELD
the big leagues.
He was a National League All-Star
in 1999, when he won 18 games
for the St. Louis Cardinals. He is
head baseball coach at Palm
Beach (Fla.) Atlantic University,
where he succeeded the late Gary
Carter, his former major league
catcher, in 2012. Bottenfield also
has been a contemporary
Christian singer and songwriter.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014
Pacific at Linfield, 1 p.m. ...
George Fox at Pacific Lutheran, 1
p.m. ... Puget Sound at
Willamette, 2 p.m.
Prep soccer: The state championship matches are at
Hillsboro Stadium (6A and 5A
boys and girls) and Liberty High
(4A and 3A/2A/1A boys and
girls). Go to osaa.org for matchups and times.
Winterhawks: Everett-Portland
at Memorial Coliseum, 5 p.m.
College volleyball: Northern
Arizona at Portland State, 7 p.m.
... Oregon at Arizona State, 6
p.m.
College men’s basketball:
PSU at USC, 7:30 p.m. (Pac-12
Networks).
College men’s soccer:
Portland at Gonzaga, 1 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 16
College men’s basketball: UP
at San Jose State, 1 p.m.
College women’s basketball:
PSU at Seattle, 5 p.m. ... Utah
State at Oregon State, 2 p.m.
College men’s soccer: OSU at
UW, 1 p.m. (Pac-12 Networks).
College volleyball: OSU at
Arizona, 11 a.m. (Pac-12
Networks).
Portland Meadows: Horse
racing starts at noon at the
North Portland track.
Monday, Nov. 17
Blazers: New Orleans at
Portland, 7 p.m., CSNNW.
College men’s basketball:
Detroit at Oregon, 8 p.m.
(ESPNU).
ESPN 2. ... Virginia Tech at Duke,
ESPNU. ... Army at Western
Kentucky, CBS Sports. Noon — TCU
at Kansas, FS1. 12:30 p.m.
— Mississippi State at Alabama,
KOIN (6), KFXX (1080 AM). ...
Northwestern at Notre Dame, KGW
(8). ... Nebraska at Wisconsin, KATU
(2) or ESPN3. ... Oklahoma at Texas
Tech, ESPN. ... Georgia Southern at
Navy, CBS Sports. 4:15 p.m.
— Auburn at Georgia, ESPN. 4:30
p.m. — Texas at Oklahoma State,
FOX (12). 5 p.m. — Florida State at
Miami, KATU (2), KFXX (1080 AM).
... LSU at Arkansas, ESPN2. ...
South Florida at SMU, CBS Sports.
7 p.m. — North Texas at UTEP, FS1.
Winterhawks: Everett at Portland
(Veterans Memorial Coliseum), 5
p.m., KPAM (860 AM)
College men’s basketball:
Portland State at USC, 7:30 p.m.,
Pac-12 Networks
Sunday, Nov. 16
Seahawks: Seattle at Kansas
City, 10 a.m., FOX (12), KUFO (970
AM, 101.1 FM)
NFL: 10 a.m. — San Francisco at
New York Giants, KFXX (1080 AM),
KUIK (1360 AM). ... Houston at
Cleveland, KXTG (750 AM). 1 p.m.
— Oakland at San Diego, KOIN (6).
1:25 p.m. — Detroit at Arizona, FOX
(12), KXTG (750 AM). 1:30 p.m.
— Philadelphia at Green Bay, KFXX
(1080 AM). 5:30 p.m. — New
England at Indianapolis, KGW (8),
KXTG (750 AM)
College men’s basketball:
Portland at San Jose State, 1 p.m.,
KMTT (910 AM)
College volleyball: Oregon State
at Arizona, 11 a.m., Pac-12
Networks
College men’s soccer: Oregon
State at Washington, 1 p.m., Pac12 Networks
NASCAR: Ford Ecoboost 400, 1
p.m., KUIK (1360)
Monday, Nov. 17
Blazers: New Orleans at
Portland, 7:30 p.m., CSNNW, KPOJ
(620 AM), KKRZ (102.3 FM)
NFL: Pittsburgh at Tennessee,
5:30 p.m., ESPN, KXTG (750 AM)
College men’s basketball:
Detroit at Oregon, 8 p.m., ESPNU
History
Nov. 14, 2002
The Trail Blazers, despite
having shelved their Action
Sports Cable Network almost
before it even began, decide to
put more of their games on
local television. The team is off
to a 3-6 start and is being
plagued with negative publicity
due to the off-the-court problems of its players. To help
counteract that, the club
announces that 69 of its
remaining 73 regular-season
games will be televised, with
the bulk of those on Fox
Sports Net under terms of a
new deal. FSN is looking to
expand its Oregon audience
and presence.
COURTESY OF OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
To former Oregon State football coach Dee Andros, also known as “The Great Pumpkin,” the annual Civil War game against Oregon was a hugely
important contest and, as he was fond of saying, for the right to live in the state for the next year.
CIVIL WAR
‘MORE THAN JUST ANOTHER FOOTBALL GAME’
‘67-’68 ‘Giant Killers’
hit stride battling
‘Fighting Ducks’
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
T
he apex of Dee Andros’
11 years at Oregon
State came in his third
and fourth seasons,
1967 and ‘68. Some of the players were remnants of the Tommy Prothro era. More were Andros recruits who were big,
strong, farm-boy types who fit
perfectly into his “Power-T” offense and physical 6-2-3 defensive scheme.
Many of the stars on those
two great Beaver teams were
from small towns in the state of
Oregon. Defensive tackles Jess
Lewis and Craig Hanneman
played together at Cascade
High north of Salem.
“I came from a three-room,
eight-grade Cloverdale Grade
School near Turner,”
Hanneman said. “Jess came
from the big town of Aumsville.
I’ll bet they had four rooms in
their eight grades.”
Other key
players included Jon Sandstrom from
Sandy, Don
Whitney from
Pendleton, Larry Rich and Bill
Plumeau from
ENYART McMinnville,
and Bill Enyart
and Mark Dippel from Medford. There was also Scott Freeburn from Salem,
Donny Summers from Grants
Pass, Charlie Olds and Bob Jeremiah from Cottage Grove,
Clyde Smith and Mike Nehl
from Bend, and the Barton boys,
Duane and Gary, from Baker. If
you spread out a map of Oregon
and pinpointed every rural section of the state, you’d be well
Andros recruited fullbacks
and moved them to tackle or
linebacker. Lewis and
Hanneman were both fullbacks in high school. So was
Sandstrom.
‘Great Pumpkin’ takes charge
“The Civil War Rivalry ... Oregon
vs. Oregon State” is the newest
book by Portland Tribune sports
columnist Kerry Eggers. Here is
an excerpt; see more from the
book in future Tribune issues
leading up to the 118th football
meeting of the Ducks and Beavers
on Nov. 29.
represented on the Oregon
State football squads of those
years.
In 1967, the starting interior
defensive four were Lewis,
Sandstrom, Ron Boley — who
had been a quarterback at
Parkrose — and 6-7 1/2,
260-pound Bill Nelson from
Berkeley, Calif., who went on to
play five seasons with the Los
Angeles Rams.
The “Great Pumpkin” used
an offense featuring a full-house
backfield — a quarterback, two
halfbacks and a fullback.
Through his first seven seasons, the fullback was the focal
point, with Pete Pifer, Bill Enyart, Roger Smith and Dave
Schilling all taking on workhorse loads and having plenty
of success.
See ‘GIANT KILLERS’ / Page 10
Ex-Grant soccer star Schneider
answers Duck call to take kicks
Freshman walk-on
delivers field goals
and extra points
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Doesn’t everything point
back to Marcus Mariota?
O r e g o n k i c ke r A i d a n
Schneider, a walk-on true
freshman from Grant High,
had just booted three field
goals and scored 15 points to
help the Ducks beat Utah. After the game, somebody
asked UO coach Mark Helfrich whether Schneider’s
performance — which made
the kicker 5-for-5 this year on
field goals — would give the
coach confidence to go for
three points more often.
Like his predecessor, Chip
Kelly, Helfrich wants to be
aggressive, and stay aggressive. So, in a roundabout way,
the coach said no, that he
would prefer to keep thinking
touchdowns.
“I think you guys all know
my confidence in Marcus
Mariota,” Helfrich said of his
star quarterback and his
touchdown-making ability.
“I’m greedy. I want touchdowns.
“This game (vs. Utah, 51-27
win) lent itself to that back
and forth,” of scoring points
any way possible.
A n o t h e r q u e st i o n wa s
more direct: Does Helfrich
have more confidence in
Schneider now?
“I would have had confid e n c e i n ( k i c ke r ) M att
Wogan, too,” the coach added. But, “he (Schneider) has a
good little streak going.”
I t wa s n ’ t
the most ringing endorsement
of
Schneider as
the
coach
c o u l d g ive ,
but Schneider
u n d e r st a n d s
his situation
SCHNEIDER
as just one
part of the 9-1
Duck team. He’s still in competition with Wogan every
week to kick extra points and
field goals — and the runnerup in the competition has
been jettisoned to kickoff duty; Wogan kicked off at Utah.
Like any competition, neither player can get too comfortable; Helfrich doesn’t
want his kickers to get too
noticed him in their offseason prep specialists camp.
When Schneider decided to
accept UO’s walk-on offer,
Schneider set his mind to
playing for the Ducks, even
as some doubted him.
“All of us wished him luck,”
Grant soccer coach Manolis
Aidan Schneider, Tjuanakis told the Tribune in
September, after Schneider
a freshman
had his earned his spot on
walk-on kicker
from Grant High the team and kicked in
who was more of games. “To be honest, I
thought it was a long shot.
a soccer player
Usually the spots have to be
for the Generals,
recruited. So, I’m surprised
has made 5 of 5
and excited.”
field-goal
Schneider understood that
attempts for the he had to prove himself.
Oregon Ducks.
“Yeah, that’s the goal,” he
COURTESY OF
says now.
ERIC EVANS
Schneider expected to take
a redshirt season and get
comfortable.
With Mariota and his slew some experience.
“If I did end up playing,” he
of playmakers, the Ducks do
stand a good chance to con- says, “I didn’t think it’d be as
vert most any fourth-down extensive as this.”
He has participated in
play for a first down or a
touchdown — so the Ducks some form in every game.
don’t always have to settle for He’s 26 of 27 on extra-point
kicks. Wogan, a ballyhooed
field goals.
“We’ll still be aggressive,” kicker from North Carolina,
Helfrich reiterated the day has hit 4 of 6 field-goal atafter the Utah game. “(But) tempts and 29 of 31 extrawe have a ton of confidence point kicks. They have basically split kickoff duties.
in both those (kickers).”
Wogan has not participatAnd, it’s clear, the 6-4,
230-pound Schneider has ed in all the games, presummuch confidence in himself, ably for injury or team-relatone year removed from kick- ed matters. Helfrich never
ing for Grant and completing explains such things.
Schneider has gladly done
his more distinguished and
beloved soccer career. As the his part, and he likes the
story goes, Schneider adored competition.
“That definitely helps me a
soccer and started taking
football kicking seriously lot, having Matt there,” he
during his junior year at says. “We’re both pushing
Grant, after which the Ducks
See UO / Page 9

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