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GREATER PORTLAND EDITION
More than a Long shot
PSU running back tackles football after brain surgery — SEE SPORTS, B1
PortlandTribune
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Voters’
message?
Fix the
economy
Lawmakers from both
parties want to see
growth across state
By PETER WONG
Salem Bureau
Even as Oregon continues
its recovery from the downturn that started seven years
ago, for returning Gov. John
Kitzhaber and incoming lawmakers of both parties, it’s
still the economy, stupid.
While differences remain between Democrats and Republicans — and their allies in labor
and social services and businesses — they agree there’s more
work to be done on economic issues in the legislative session
that opens Jan. 12.
“The priorities we heard from
voters were the
economy and
education,”
says House
Speaker Tina
Kotek, D-Portland. “Not everyone is finding success in
our economic
recovery, so the
KITZHABER
question is how
we make sure
that people who are working
hard are getting ahead.”
Democrats will remain in
charge of the Oregon Legislature. They added one seat in the
House for a 35-25 majority over
Republicans, and at least one
seat in the Senate for a 17-12 majority. Undetermined is a Senate
seat held by Republican Bruce
Starr of Hillsboro. That race
seems to be breaking in favor of
Democrat Chuck Riley, who is
ahead by 221 votes.
“Democrats have enough
votes to pass things through
both chambers, so I look for
them to do quite well with what
they want,” says Ed Dover, a political scientist at Western Oregon University.
It will be only the second time
in Kitzhaber’s record tenure as
governor that Democrats will
have legislative majorities. Democrats are still short by one vote
in each chamber to approve higher taxes and fees without Republican support.
Kitzhaber will return for a
fourth nonconsecutive term with
just under 50 percent of the votes
tallied last week. Still, he defeated Republican Dennis Richardson by 5 percentage points, more
than his win four years ago of 1.5
percentage points against Republican Chris Dudley.
Sen. Jackie Winters, a Republican from Salem returning for
her fourth term, says there is already bipartisan support for economic action in the form of the
Oregon Business Plan.
“We cannot talk about how vibrant we are as a state without
creating economic growth in rural areas,” she says. “I am hoping
it will be high on everyone’s priority list.”
Among the plan’s goals are for
See ELECTION / Page 8
New street
tax price
tag hits
$46 million
A
mother’s
sorrow
Council plans hearing Nov. 20
on plan; critics rally opposition
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: CHASE ALLGOOD
Peroz Khoshnaw is dealing with two family tragedies at once, mourning a son who died fighting ISIS and a son
who is heading to prison after being convicted of a Forest Grove murder.
■ Five sons are dead, a sixth going to
prison, adding to Kurdish family’s grief
By BETTY CAMPBELL
Pamplin Media Group
Peroz Khoshnaw sat on a
wooden bench in a hallway of
the Washington County Courthouse Oct. 14, clutching her
prayer beads while awaiting
opening statements in the trial of Niaz Mohammed Khoshnaw, her youngest son. Three
of her grown children
watched over her.
Suddenly the tense mood was
broken by a phone call from
home.
For the Khoshnaws, home is
not Beaverton or Portland. It is
Kurdistan, a country that technically doesn’t exist because it
was divided after World War I
between Iraq, Iran, Syria and
Turkey. The Khoshnaws come
from Irbil in the Kurdistan re-
gion of northern Iraq.
escorted to his trial for the 2011
Peroz, 51, has a daughter and murder of a Forest Grove man,
a son still living in Kurdistan.
Luis Manuel Guzman.
The son — Khasro, her eldest —
Peroz was about lose another
had been battling ISIS
son — this time to pris(the Islamic State of Iraq
on.
and Syria) with the
“She was shaking like
Kurdish military force
crazy,” said daughter
known as the PeshmerBanaz, 24.
ga. The phone call was
“She basically
from one of his friends:
thought she was going
Khasro had been killed
to have a heart attack,”
— Rezan said Rezan, 29, another
while trying to evacuate
Khoshnaw, on her daughter. “She can’t
a village of Christians
before ISIS could attack. mother’s reaction handle all this pain anyOut of her 11 children, to bad news from more.”
family in Iraq
Peroz had already lost
The murder victim’s
four sons. Khasro would
mother declined to combe the fifth.
ment for this story. But
Listening, shocked, to
three of the Khoshnaw
this horrible news, the Khoshsiblings agreed to talk about
naws heard the jingle of chains
their mother’s path from Kurdin the courthouse hallway and
See SORROW / Page 2
looked up. Niaz, 21, was being
“She can’t
handle all
this pain
anymore.”
The City Council will hold a public hearing Nov. 20 on a revised street fee proposed
that could raise $46 million a year.
Mayor Charlie Hales and City Commissioner
Steve Novick announced the hearing Monday
morning. The City Council could vote on it as
early as Dec. 3.
The revised fee unveiled at a press conference is different from what Hales and Novick
first presented in May. It was revised after numerous public complaints with the help of three
work groups.
“No one loves a tax, but we think more people
will be willing to go along with what we’re putting on the table today,” Hales told reporters.
So far, no other city commissioner has publicly said he or
she will support the proposal.
Hales said he and Novick hope
all five council members will
vote for it.
Hales and Novick are still
not offering to place the fee on
a ballot for approval, however,
a sore point among many Portlanders. Commissioners Nick
Fish and Dan Saltzman have
both said they would not support the fee without it being
referred to the voters.
“We think this is a difficult
decision we are elected to
make,” Hales said. “Sometimes
you have to make decisions
that are unpopular, but you
have to do your job.”
The residential portion of
the revised fee is now a progressive personal income tax
instead of a flat monthly fee on
households. The business portion is a sliding fee based on
the number of employees,
square footage, and gross revenue of each businesses. The
original proposal was an estimate of motor vehicle trips
— Charlie Hales,
generated by each business.
mayor
And, the revised fee would
raise $46 million a year, not $53
million as first proposed.
But the funds would still be distributed
among street maintenance and safety projects,
as Hales and Novick have always insisted. Although they first proposed the fee in response
to a series of audits about Portland’s poorly
maintained streets, Hales and Novick have consistently said the city must also invest in safety
projects, such as sidewalks and better marked
crossing on heavily travelled streets, especially
in East Portland. The proposed split is 56 percent maintenance and 44 percent safety projects.
Under the proposal released Monday, the personal income tax is capped at $75 a month. It
also includes a $5,000-per-child deduction. Payments would also be deductible on state and
federal income tax forms.
According to the Portland Bureau of Transportation, a couple making $40,000 to $60,000 a
“We think
this is a
difficult
decision we
are elected
to make.
Sometimes
you have to
make
decisions
that are
unpopular,
but you
have to do
your job.”
See STREET TAX / Page 6
Faith groups look for
another ‘dream too’
Homeless ‘rest area’
could find a spot in
Clackamas County
By ELLEN SPITALERI
Pamplin Media Group
Trena Sutton has seen it all.
She has seen people living on the
streets lose it all — their tents,
sleeping bags, clothing and pets
taken from them. She has heard
Portland Tribune
Inside
stories of domestic violence and
cruelty, and now she wants to see
that change.
Sutton has a dream, and she is
determined to make it happen.
She and a group of supporters
want to establish a Right 2
Dream Too-style camp in Clackamas County or nearby in Southeast Portland.
The Portland Right 2 Dream
Too is a nonprofit organization,
operating a space that provides
refuge and a safe place to rest or
sleep in Old Town/Chinatown.
By using the Right 2 Dream
Too model, Sutton and others
want to create a place that “is not
just a place to flop.”
Calling it a “rest area,” and not
a traditional shelter, the site will
be set up with a code of conduct,
including a zero-tolerance policy
for drugs, alcohol and violence,
that will be enforced at all times.
The physical space will be fenced
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: ELLEN SPITALERI
Trena Sutton, volunteer kitchen supervisor for the Clackamas Service
See DREAM / Page 7 Center, chats with Tom Sawyer, a frequent visitor to the center.
NORTHSTAR SHINES
— SEE LIFE, PAGE B10
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
OWNER & NEIGHBOR
A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Sorrow: ‘We had no idea he joined gang’
■ From page 1
istan to Portland and the horrible price the family may
have paid for fleeing violence
in their homeland.
Fleeing Saddam Hussein
Peroz’s heartache began
long before the October trial.
In the late 1980s, her husband,
Mohammed, was a member of
the Peshmerga and was fighting against Iraqi President
Saddam Hussein during the
Iran-Iraq war when Hussein
began attacking the Kurds.
Peroz fled to the mountains
with her three young sons
and a daughter, placing them
on a donkey and walking beside them to what she hoped
would be safety. Instead, she
found herself with no food, in
frigid temperatures and snow.
For weeks, they huddled in
caves and behind rocks. When
Hussein began dropping toxic
chemicals on Kurdish villages, killing thousands of civilians (including Mohammed’s
father and other family members), Peroz and her children
were high enough in the
mountains to survive.
But they had to huddle under a wet blanket and use a
charcoal fire to keep the
chemicals at bay, she said.
Her respiratory system never
totally healed.
Although her three sons escaped the chemicals, they
died before they could return
to the village — whether by
freezing or starving Peroz
doesn’t know.
A few years later, during
the Gulf War, Mohammed
helped the Americans fight
against Hussein. In 1997, United States forces warned Mohammed that his aid to the
U.S. had put him and his family at risk. They offered him
political asylum in the U.S.
After stays in Turkey,
Guam and Texas, the family
ended up in Portland in 2001
and were there when terrorists attacked the United States
on Sept. 11.
Rezan remembers being
pulled out of class that day
because she was Muslim. She
was wearing her hijab and “I
could see the anger on the
students’ faces. It made me
feel horrible. I didn’t do anything wrong, you know?”
Although none of the 9/11
attackers were Kurdish, most
Americans know nothing
about Kurds, but simply lump
all Muslims together.
Niaz apparently was picked
on for the same reason. “His
name had a lot to do with it,”
said Benaz. “His name is Niaz
Mohammed Khoshnaw. As
soon as somebody hears the
name ‘Mohammed’ it’s like we
did something horrible to
eryone assumed it was to
being selfish to your entire
honor his brother.
family,” Saman said he’d tell
When his family learned
kids thinking about joining
police were investigating Ni- one. “You’re going to hurt
az’s role in shooting up a de- your family, you’re going to
serted gas station, Niaz inbe dead somewhere or you’re
sisted he had nothing to do
going to end up in prison.”
with it. “He said, ‘Go check
Rezan thinks things might
online if you don’t believe
have been different for Niaz
me,’” Saman remembers,
if their father, Mohammed,
shaking his head. “And I did, hadn’t walked out on the famand I found nothing.”
ily in 2007 or if they hadn’t all
None of Niaz’s family
had to leave Kurdistan.
members knew he had a gun.
“He never would have been
Nor have they seen the huel- in a situation like this if he
ga bird tattoo
was raised back
on his chest —
there,” she said.
an even higher
“I don’t think
gang-status
there is such a
sign than the
thing (gangs)
teardrop.
over there. I have
Prosecutors
never heard of
say Niaz got
it.”
the tattoo for
Years in prison
killing Guzlikely
man. Niaz
“I am proud of
claims he got it
for risking his
— Saman Khoshnaw my sisters and
mom,” said Salife by stepping
man, who is still
in front of a
glad they all came
friend and fellow gang member when Guz- to the United States. “I don’t
have to worry about being
man pulled a gun on them
taken by Saddam members or
months before the murder.
ISIS members at least.”
“We were shocked,” SaThe worst part, he said, is
man said of learning that
watching his mother in pain.
Guzman had threatened Ni“I’m lying here sometimes on
az with a gun. “He could
the couch and I can hear
have been (killed) then. He
mom crying in bed and it is
never told anybody. He just
heartbreaking. For the last
kept it to his gang friends, I
two years she has been prayguess.”
ing and waiting for Niaz to
Hard to believe
come home. Three days ago,
The image of Guzman
she got the worse news that
holding Niaz at gunpoint
my other brother was killed
helps the family cling to Niby evil ... People have no idea
az’s version of the murder — what my mom has been
that he killed in self-defense through. We have lost 12 fambecause Guzman became vi- ily members to Saddam Husolent due to the high level of sein and ISIS.”
drugs in his body, discovered
Through her tragedies,
during the autopsy.
Peroz has relied on her faith,
The Khoshnaws know a
says Rezan. “She has strong
12-member jury found that
faith in Allah, in God. That is
story unbelievable. And they what keeps her going. God
know Rodriguez Hernandez, promises us that the best
the eyewitness, put his life
things are at the end. He loves
in danger (from gang reprithe ones who suffer ... All the
sals) by testifying against
time she is praying. Thanking
Niaz when he could have
God for all these tests that are
kept quiet and stayed safe.
coming her way ... I mean it is
But they can’t match the
five sons already (that have
evil, cold-blooded murderer
died) and she is grateful. I
with the young man who
have never seen someone as
used to take his mother to
strong as her.”
doctor appointments and to
Peroz, who now lives in Tithe grocery store, who babgard, also prays for the seven
ysat his nephews at the drop children of Khasro, whose fuof a hat and drove them plac- neral in Kurdistan drew more
es for his sister, who doesn’t than 5,000 people, Banaz said.
drive.
According to reports from felNiaz, who has been in the
low Peshmerga, Khasro fought
Washington County Jail since bravely and managed to kill
his arrest, finally acknowlnine ISIS members before dyedged his gang activity to his ing himself. Those killings
family.
were celebrated at his funeral.
It’s full of cross-racial conPeroz mourns her hero
nections: a Kurdish Muslim
son, Khasro. And she mourns
youth joining a Latino gang
the convicted-murderer son,
— and now being defended
Niaz, visiting him in jail,
by a Jewish attorney.
pressing her hand against the
It’s also full of pain.
glass barrier as he tells her,
“Being a gang member is
“I love you. I love you.”
“Being a gang
member is
being selfish to
your entire
family.”
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP PHOTOS: BETTY CAMPBELL
Peroz Khoshnaw and daughters Rezan (left) and Benaz (right) hold a collage of photos showing their
brother, Khasro, who recently died fighting ISIS soldiers.
them or something. They look
at you with hate.”
Niaz later told his family
that when classmates were
picking on him the only kids
who stood up for him happened to be gang members.
That’s how he got involved.
And the gang is how he ultimately ended up in jail,
shackles and as a defendant
in a trial in a Washington
County courtroom.
Another grieving mother
Peroz Khoshnaw wasn’t the
only grieving mother in that
courtroom. Guzman’s mother
wept openly as well. Her
28-year-old son was shot to
death in November 2011 outside his Forest Grove home on
B Street, shortly after offering
his murderer a cigarette.
A year later, a young eyewitness with a haunted, remorseful conscience contacted police and identified the
murderer as Niaz Khoshnaw
in what witnesses described
in court as a Washington
County gang dispute.
‘Lovely to mom’
The Khoshnaw family can’t
picture this. The Niaz they
know has a great sense of humor, a knack for math and
loves playing with his preschool-age nephews.
Niaz Mohammed Khoshnaw sits with his lawyers in Washington County
Circuit Court last month at his trial for the killing of a Forest Grove
man during what was thought to be a gang conflict. He was convicted
of the murder.
“He was always lovely to
mom,” said Saman Khoshnaw,
32, now Peroz’s oldest living
son.
Since Niaz’s 2012 arrest,
however, his family members
have come to realize that he
misled them and hid huge,
dark parts of his life from
them.
“We had no idea he had
joined the gang,” Saman said.
“I’m not trying to sound stu-
pid, but I don’t know about
gangs. The last 10 days I’ve
been in court listening, that is
when I probably learned the
most about gangs.”
Before he was arrested,
Niaz had an explanation for
everything that might have
hinted at gang involvement.
He got his teardrop tattoo —
a gang status symbol — after
a brother died of a heart attack three years ago, so ev-
337042.111214
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©2014 Portland Tribune
NEWS A3
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Law firm hired to PDXBriefly
probe BES project
For Every Kid presses
for project funds
City OKs $60,000
contract to investigate
employees’ role
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
Portland is conducting a
personnel investigation into
cost increases at the controversial new Bureau of Environmental Services office
building.
The city attorney’s office has
signed a contract with the Barran Liebman law firm to “provide expert services services
and advice to the city regarding a Personnel investigation.”
The Portland Tribune obtained
the contract through a public
records request.
Although the contract does
not say who is being investigated, BES Director Dean Marriott has been placed on paid
leave by Commissioner Nick
Fish, who is in charge of the
bureau. When Fish announced
that Marriott had been placed
on leave, he said the city had
retained Barran Liebman to investigate the findings of an audit into the building.
The city auditor’s office released the audit of the Columbia Boulevard Waste Water
Treatment Plant in North Portland on Oct. 22, the same day
the city attorney’s office and
the law firm signed the contract.
According to the contract,
Managing Partner Edwin
Harnden and Parnter Paula
Barran will be paid $350 an
hour for the investigtion. Associate Sean Ray will be paid $225
an hour. Paralegals will be paid
$125 an hour. The maximum
payment is capped at $60,000.
The city attorney’s office and
Fish’s office both declined to
respond to requests for the
name, or names, of the employees being investigated. The
contact says all communication
between the city and the law
firm are confidential. City officials routinely decline to comment on personnel issues.
The cost of the office building increased from the first estimate of $3.2 million to $11.5
million by the time it was finished. The audit found BES employees violated city policies
and changed the construction
contract to create a conflict of
interest during the project. The
audit does not name specific
BES employees, however.
Among other things, the audit found that the building
costs increased because the
scope of the project changed
after it was first approved by
the City Council and BES decided to make it a “showcase”
of sustainable practices.
The Multnomah County district attorney’s office is deciding whether to refer the cost
increases to a law enforcement
agency for a criminal investigation. In response to a request
from Kent Craford and Floy
Jones, two longtime critics of
city utility spending, District
Attorney Rod Underhill has assigned a prosecutor to review
available project records.
WebSurvey
After Brittany Maynard’s decision to come to
Portland for her assisted suicide, is it time for
other states to follow Oregon’s lead with
death-with-dignity laws?
Yes, Oregon’s law should be a model for the nation
62 PEOPLE
No, the government should not encourage
people to take their own lives
18 PEOPLE
Local officials and community
health advocates launched Saturday a the new coalition, For Every Kid, to dedicate funding for
safe routes to schools for every
school district in Clackamas,
Multnomah and Washington
counties.
Saturday morning, on the
front steps of Linwood Elementary School, Milwaukie Mayor
Jeremy Ferguson joined local
leaders and parents to push for
sidewalks, crosswalks and bike
lanes to support a healthy childhood.
“It’s hard to deny the voice of
our children’s needs,” said Ferguson. “After all, they are our future. I support creating safe
routes to school to help protect
our children while building their
confidence, and at the same time
investing for a healthier and
more active community.”
In the coming months, the
Metro Council has the opportunity to dedicate funding that
could help shape a healthy future
for every child in the tri-county
area by funding projects such as
infrastructure improvements
within a mile around schools and
education and encouragement
programs for bicycle and pedestrian safety.
Advocates are also asking for
expanded support of the youth
pass for high school students, so
teenagers can benefit from the
physical activity associated with
public transit use to and from
school.
Whale watching volunteers
sought
Want to help people keep an
eye on whales along the Oregon
Coast? Oregon’s Parks and Recreation Department is looking
for volunteers to help the public
spot whales as part of its Whale
Watching Spoken Here program.
The program puts trained volunteers at 24 whale-watching
sites along the coast each year
during winter and spring watch
weeks, when Gray whales migrate to and from Alaska. This
year, the dates for the whale
watching weeks will be Dec. 27 to
31 and March 21 to 28.
Training is at:
■ Dec. 6: OSU Hatfield Marine
Science Center, Newport.
■ Jan. 10: Harris Beach State
Park, Brookings.
■ Feb. 7: Cape Lookout State
Park, Tillamook.
Volunteers who complete the
one-day training select two shifts
at whale-watching sites where
they will assist visitors in spot-
Supporters of the
new coalition For
Every Kid
gathered
Saturday in front
of Linnwood
Elementary
School to push for
safety and health
improvements
across the region
that would benefit
local children.
COURTESY OF
FOR EVERY KID
ting Gray whales and maintain a
whale count. Oregon State Parks
offer free camping to volunteers
the night before training and
during their shifts.
For information, call 541-7653304 or go to whalespoken.org
and click on the “Training dates,
agendas & registration form”
link.
TriMet ready to test
new e-fare system
TriMet is looking for riders to
help design a new state-of-the-art
electronic fare (e-fare) system
that will make riding easier.
Riders will use the e-fare system to pay by tapping a payment
device like a card or phone
against an electronic reader.
TriMet is launching a short online survey to find out how riders
would use the e-fare system, and
get opinions on possible names
vetted by rider panels.
Possible names: 1Pass; Indigo;
Umbrella; Via; or Lynx.
Take the survey at trimet.org/
efaresurvey.
TriMet employees will start
testing the e-fare system internally by next fall with the opening of the Portland-to-Milwaukie
light-rail transit project. In 2016,
TriMet plans to offer the program to a limited number of customers for testing, with the aim
to launch the e-fare system wide
in 2017.
The eFare system will cost up
to $30 million to implement, but
could reduce fare evasion, increase revenue and costs associated with ticket vending machines, cash purchases and collection processing.
Nominations sought
for heritage award
Nominations are open for the
Oregon Heritage Excellence
Award.
The award honors people and
groups that have made outstand-
ing contributions to preserving
Oregon’s heritage.
The awards are intended to
draw public attention to important heritage efforts in Oregon
and to raise the quality of heritage-oriented activities.
The deadline for nominations
is Jan. 16. The Oregon Heritage
Excellence Awards will be presented in the spring at the 2015
Oregon Heritage Conference in
Coos Bay.
For information, go to
oregonheritage.org.
Mission begins Paper Turkey
campaign
Union Gospel Mission is raising money through its annual
online Paper Turkey campaign.
Through the campaign, Union
Gospel Mission asks donors to
give $25. The mission can then
provide a Butterball turkey
voucher to put in Thanksgiving
food baskets for individuals and
families in need. Union Gospel
Mission’s goal is to provide 500
turkey vouchers for Thanksgiving food baskets by Nov. 21.
Donate to the Paper Turkey
campaign at ugmportland.org/
paper-turkey.
Meals on Wheels hosts
Thanksgiving dinners
Portland-area Meals on
Wheels People will deliver more
than 1,000 hot turkey dinners to
homebound seniors on Thanksgiving Day. The organization will
also host community Thanksgiving Dinners at several locations
in the Portland area.
Thanksgiving dinners will be
between 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. on
Nov. 27 at centers in Beaverton,
Portland, Hillsboro, Tigard and
North Plains. The menu includes
roast turkey and gravy, cranberry relish, bread stuffing, mashed
potatoes, yams, peas and pearl
onions, cranberry gelatin salad,
potato rolls and pumpkin pie
with whipped topping.
For more information about
the community dinners, call the
Meals on Wheels People, 503-7366325.
Ford Family grant aids OHSU
program
The Ford Family Foundation
has made a $5 million grant to
the Knight Cancer Institute at
Oregon Health & Science University to expand delivery of prevention and care expertise to rural
Oregonians. The grant will also
contribute to OHSU’s goal of raising $500 million in two years as
part of the $1 billion Knight Cancer Challenge campaign.
The Ford Family Foundation
grant will provide $2.5 million in
support for each of two initiatives
to serve rural communities
throughout Oregon. The first is
the creation of a statewide cancer prevention and outreach network that will provide community health care organizations
with access to OHSU Knight
Cancer Institute experts in cancer prevention, education, diagnostics, treatment and survivorship, as well as offer support in
directing patients to appropriate
clinical trials.
The Ford Family Foundation
grant will cover start-up costs to
develop and implement the program.
The second initiative will assist patients who must travel to
OHSU for care, and need affordable, temporary accommodations near OHSU clinics and hospitals. The grant will help pay for
costs associated with construction of guest housing for out-oftown patients and their families,
including family-friendly suites.
The guest housing facility is part
of a planned expansion of OHSU’s
South Waterfront campus, and
will be built with philanthropic
support.
County begins at-home colon
cancer tests
About 5,000 Portland-area residents served by community
health centers are receiving athome screening tests in the mail
as part of a program to boost colon cancer screening among lowincome, uninsured and Latino
patients.
The program, called Stop Colon Cancer, will give many patients their first opportunity to
be screened for this type of cancer, which kills about 52,000
Americans each year and in 2010
killed 645 Oregonians.
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{ INSIGHT }
A4 INSIGHT
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Portland
Tribune
FOUNDER
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
MANAGING EDITOR/
WEB EDITOR
Kevin Harden
VICE PRESIDENT
Brian Monihan
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Christine Moore
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Vance W. Tong
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
Kim Stephens
CREATIVE
SERVICES MANAGER
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SYSTEMS
MANAGER/WEBMASTER
Alvaro Fontán
NEWS WRITERS
Jennifer Anderson,
Peter Korn, Steve Law,
Jim Redden, Joseph
Gallivan, Kendra Hogue,
Peter Wong, Shasta Kearns
Moore
FEATURES WRITER
Jason Vondersmith
SPORTS EDITOR
Steve Brandon
SPORTS WRITERS
Kerry Eggers,
Jason Vondersmith,
Stephen Alexander
SUSTAINABLE LIFE
EDITOR
Steve Law
COPY EDITOR
Mikel Kelly
DESIGN
Keith Sheffield
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Jonathan House
Jaime Valdez
INSIGHT
PAGE EDITOR
Keith Klippstein
PRODUCTION
Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler
CONTRIBUTOR
Rob Cullivan
WEB SITE
portlandtribune.com
CIRCULATION
503-546-9810
6605 S.E. Lake Road
Portland, OR 97222
503-226-6397 (NEWS)
The Portland Tribune
is Portland’s independent
newspaper that is trusted
to deliver a compelling,
forward-thinking and
accurate living chronicle
about how our citizens,
government and
businesses live, work
and play. The Portland
Tribune is dedicated
to providing vital
communication and
leadership throughout
our community.
■ With the help of
the Oregon Outpatient
Surgery Center in
Tigard, doctors are
helping out by treating
veterans without charge
CARING FOR
WOUNDED WARRIORS
MYVIEW
challenged to provide critically important services to the men and women who
have made tremendous sacrifices for our
country. Health care professionals at the
VA are hardworking individuals. Our
surgery center, like others, has the
capacity and expertise to relieve their
burden.
While more must be done to address
veterans’ health care, that is not the only
issue. Many veterans struggle to find
good-paying jobs that capitalize on their
military training or to maximize
Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits to get
the skills or degrees required to achieve
By Richard Edelson
L
ike many World War II veterans,
my father, Capt. Zanly Edelson,
didn’t say much about his military service.
He graduated from the University of
Oregon Medical School in 1938 and became a general surgeon in the U.S. Army,
where he assisted many wounded soldiers in Europe. In 1944, he was injured
in a glider crash in Holland during Operation Market Garden, the largest airborne operation the world had seen.
Since my father passed away in 1996, I
take time each Veterans Day to remember and honor him and others who
serve our country. Early this year, in the
face of repeated news stories detailing
the difficulty our wounded warriors
have had in accessing the care they’ve
earned, I decided this wasn’t enough. So
with the Oregon Outpatient Surgery
Center in Tigard, I helped develop a
new initiative to donate free surgical
and after care to 15 veterans each quarter. We kicked off our campaign in June
and July by providing three veterans
with complimentary surgeries.
In the coming years, our nation will be
Seventy years ago, my father’s unit
helped countless wounded warriors as
they fought to bring an end to World War
II. When that war was over, America
invested in the health and education of its
veterans and in doing so helped lay the
foundation for future prosperity.
whether it is caring for our veterans’
health needs, making an effort to hire
veterans, volunteering with organizations that serve veterans and military
families or simply taking a moment to
thank someone for their service.
Seventy years ago, my father’s unit
helped countless wounded warriors as
they fought to bring an end to World
War II. When that war was over, America invested in the health and education
of its veterans and in doing so helped lay
the foundation for future prosperity.
On this Veterans Day, let’s recommit
ourselves to investing in the well-being
of our veterans, and as individuals each
make a commitment to recognize and
support veterans and military families in
our own communities.
Richard Edelson, M.D., is an orthopedic surgeon at the Oregon Outpatient Surgery Center
in Tigard. For more information about the Save
Our Veterans program, contact saveourvets@
oosconline.com, or call 503-207-5369.
— State Sen. Jackie Winters, a Salem Republican, on the general election outcome and plans for the
January legislative session
“It wasn’t all bad news for the Democrats. Down
in Florida they found some more Al Gore ballots.”
— David Letterman, on the Nov. 7 “Late Show,” joking about the Nov. 4 general election clobbering that
Democratic candidates took as the GOP took control of the U.S. Senate
Kevin Harden
managing editor,
Portland Tribune
503-546-5167;
kevinharden@
portlandtribune.com
The Portland Tribune
welcomes essays on topics
of public interest.
Submissions should be no
longer than 600 words
and may be edited.
Letters should be no
longer than 250 words.
Both submissions should
include your name, home
address and telephone
number for verification
purposes. Please send
submissions via e-mail:
tribletters@
portlandtribune.com. You
may fax them to 503546-0727 or send them
to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605
S.E. Lake Road,
Portland, OR 97222.
COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
“We cannot talk about how vibrant we are as a state
without creating economic growth in rural areas. I
am hoping it will be high on everyone’s priority list.”
J. Mark Garber
president,
Portland Tribune
and Community
Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714;
mgarber@
commnewspapers.com
SUBMISSIONS
U.S. soldiers marched through the Seigfried
Line in 1945, on their way into Germany
during the waning days of World War II.
Today, fewer than 1.6 million WWII veterans
are still living out of the 16 million people
who served during the war.
WEHEARDIT
PORTLAND TRIBUNE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Vance W. Tong
associate publisher,
Portland Tribune
503-546-5146;
[email protected]
their dreams. Other veterans struggle to
access the assistance they need to move
off the streets and into stable housing.
Thanks to effective veterans’ champions, like U.S. Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, and the support of the Oregon
congressional delegation, we have made
progress on veterans’ health care, employment, access to higher education
and homelessness. I hope Congress and
the Obama administration continue to
devote attention to these issues.
More needs to be done at the local level, too, and private citizens have a role to
play. We can all make a difference,
Momentum on falls project inspirational
MYVIEW
I
love the expression about
success having many parents, while failure is an orphan, it usually refers to
who claims credit or avoids
blame.
But real success actually requires many parents, strong
leaders, smart planners, willing
supporters, and yes, folks to
help pick up the check.
All these parents also must
be ready to do the hard and
sometimes courageous work
that gets the job done. That’s
why it’s so exciting to see the
Oregon City Commission moving forward with the next
phase of the redevelopment of
the Willamette Falls Legacy
Project.
The commission brought
this tremendous opportunity
to the region and stayed at the
head of the table throughout.
Commissioners knew that this
project will support the economic revival already underway in downtown Oregon City,
opening up the falls to visitors
and providing new land for
businesses and jobs in one of
our country’s most spectacular
settings.
If we’re successful here, it
will be because of courageous
“parents” that have spent the
last three years hammering out
a vision for one of the Northwest’s most important redevelopment sites.
The Oregon City Commis-
By Carlotta Collette
sion is set to officially adopt a
master plan for the Willamette Falls area, a vision that
includes jobs, housing and environmental stewardship. The
plan nearly doubles the size of
Oregon City’s downtown, giving the rebirth underway
there a chance to expand even
further.
It took all of us to make this
happen. Oregon City provided
critical leadership, ensuring its
community values would be
represented first and foremost
in the future of the Blue Heron
site. The state of Oregon, Metro
and Clackamas County recognized the importance of Willamette Falls early on, providing
financial and technical support
for Oregon City’s work.
Our private sector partners
have been important, as well.
The development team, led by
George Heidgerken, has helped
us keep our forward momentum, recognizing the significance of the Blue Heron site
and the potential Willamette
Falls provides. PGE has been a
great partner, as well, from day
one, offering technical expertise as the owner of the hydropower plant at the falls.
Willamette Falls isn’t just a
natural wonder. It’s an important
heritage site for the first people
who called the Willamette Valley
home. The insight and support
from the Confederated Tribes of
the Grand Ronde has been vital.
Oregon City’s vote to move
forward recognizes this shared
parentage — this huge success.
It also signals the start of the
rest of the project. We’re really
just beginning.
Together, we are about to introduce our very special place to
the rest of the region, the state,
and the country. We should all
feel like proud parents.
Carlotta Collette represents parts of
Clackamas County on the Metro
Council.
NEWS A5
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
OREGON CITY
Board says Metro’s
Climate Smart
strategy ill conceived
By SHASTA KEARNS MOORE
The Tribune
‘Broken model’?
Commissioner Paul Savas
complains that the Climate
Smart strategy lumps local
streets together with highways
and gives improvements to them
all the same low one-star rating
for their effect on greenhouse gas
emissions. Congested local
streets might encourage bike
trips, he says, but highway trips
can’t be as easily replaced by alternatives. Savas feels the biggest “bang” for Oregon’s buck is
reducing congestion on freeways
by adding more capacity.
“So it’s completely backwards
and I feel like it really does not
fairly and accurately or responsibly address the climate and the
CO2 reduction,” Savas says, “and
I think that’s fundamentally
wrong and I think if we start
wrapping policy around that,
then we are really building a broken model.”
Clackamas County Commissioners sent a letter to Metro to
that effect.
“...(I)ncreased highway and
road capacity has the most obvious co-benefits in terms of increased economic activity and
freight mobility. It also relies on
less behavior modification and
social engineering than other elements of the strategy.”
Metro questions road projects
Metro officials say they also
feel reducing congestion is key
to reducing greenhouse gas
emissions, but they disagree
that building roads is the best
solution.
Metro spokesperson Craig
Beebe says scientific studies
from California show that adding
more lanes to a freeway just
doesn’t work.
“In the long run, congestion
actually ends up being really bad
anyway because that lane fills up
with more cars.”
Beebe says Metro is placing
emphasis on using the existing
road network better, increasing
connectivity and boosting funding for the transportation plans
already approved by the 25 cities
and three counties within its
border.
Building wider freeways, Beebe adds, carries social, environmental and health costs, too. A
multi-prong strategy that encourages people to get out of
their cars is more effective, he
says.
“In the long-run, congestion
actually ends up being really bad
anyway because that lane fills up
with more cars,” Beebe says. “On
its own, it wouldn’t get us to the
goal that we need to get to.”
“So?” responds Ludlow. “For
20 years we’ll be able to move
more people, we’ll be able to
move more freight. It’s pretty
lame, I think, to say: well, why do
it at all, it’ll just fail eventually.”
Reporter Jim Redden contributed to
this report
Concerns echoed in
survey as fewer think
they have influence
An antidemolition sign
in front of a
house expressed
neighbors’
concerns about
demolition of old
homes across
the city.
Neighborhood
groups told city
officials last
week they
wanted the issue
addressed in the
comprehensive
land-use plan
update.
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
Portland officials like to
boast about the city’s commitment to process, saying
that residents are always
provided many opportunities to weigh in on important
decisions.
The process to update the
city’s comprehensive land-use
plan that determines where development occurs would seem
to be perfect example. It began
under Mayor Sam Adams as the
drafting of the conceptual Port- have probably not helped matland Plan and has already in- ters by declaring their controvolved dozens of public brief- versial street fee to voters, at
ings, open houses and formal least not right away.
hearings throughout the city. It
is scheduled to culminate with Neighborhood concerns
Ironically, other possible reathe City Council approving the
sons surfaced during the final
update next summer.
So, given all that, city leaders public hearing on the draft
should be concerned about an comp plan update before the
answer to a question in the re- Planning and Sustainability
cently released 2014 community Commission last Tuesday. The
survey. It shows that fewer Port- commission oversees the Bulanders believe they have ade- reau of Planning and Sustainquate opportunities to influence ability, which prepared the draft
government decisions than at update. It is scheduled to recommend a version of the plan to
any time since 2010.
The survey is conducted ev- the council by next May.
A large crowd attended the
ery year by the city auditor’s office to measure the satisfaction hearing and several who testiof Portland residents with city fied praised the plan’s efforts to
services. One question asks concentrate new development
in designated urban
residents to rate their
centers and along maopportunities to injor transportation corfluence government
ridors.
decisions. In this
“Overall, we are exyear’s survey, 22 percited and optimistic
cent of residents ratabout the plan,” said
ed their opportuniGustavo Cruz, presities as very good or
dent of the Northwest
good, down from the
District Association,
26 to 28 percent re— Wendy Chung, the neighborhood cocorded from 2010 to
Northwest District alition office in North2013.
Association board west Portland.
The same question
But others exrevealed that 41 perpressed frustration for
cent of residents rata variety of different
ed their opportunities to influence government reasons. Some said they were
decisions as bad or very bad. being forced to fight a battle
That’s up from the 29 to 33 per- that had already been won. Othcent recorded from 2010 to 2013. ers wanted the plan to superThere are several possible sede work being done by a difreasons increasing dissatisfac- ferent city bureau, which they
tion. Mayor Charlie Hales and did not trust. A number clearly
Commissioner Steve Novick struggled to understand the
“Demolitions
are a citywide
concern, not
just a
Northwest
NIMBY.”
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO:
JONATHAN HOUSE
complex approval process for
the update.
Several Hayden Island residents were angry about having
to oppose development on the
west half of the island by the
Port of Portland. Most talked as
though the commission had previously voted against the proposed marine terminal, and
they did not understand why
the site is still included in the
plan’s inventory of industrial
lands. Some accused commission staff of trying to reverse
the previous decision. In fact,
the commission voted in favor
of the project, but recommended so many expensive environmental and social mitigation
measures that the port withdrew its application.
A number of NWDA board
members wanted the plan to
strictly regulate the demolition
of older homes that contain asbestos and lead paint. An advisory committee to the Bureau of
Development Services is already studying such regulations. But neighborhood activists across the city‚ including
Northwest Portland — do not
trust the committee because it
includes several developers.
“Demolitions are a citywide
concern, not just a Northwest
NIMBY (not in my backyard),”
said NWDA board member
Wendy Chung.
And Southwest residents expressed frustration that some
details of the draft update have
not yet been written. It proposes
four zones where new development will be concentrated. They
are titled “Mixed-Use Dispersed,” “Mixed-Use Neighborhood,” “Mixed-Use Civic Corridor” and “Mixed-Use Urban Center.” Despite the specific names,
the details of the new zones are
still being written by a group
called the Mixed Use Zone Advisory Committee. It is not scheduled to release its concept plan
until January, two months after
last week’s final public hearing
on the draft update.
“We just want people to be
able to see the whole plan before
they testify on it,” said James
Pederson, chairman of the Multnomah Neighborhood Association Land Use Committee.
In response to Pederson’s
comments, commission staff
said the two-stage process was
mandated by state land use regulations. They require that the
Comp Plan update be approved
before the new zones. The employees noted that written comments will still be accepted until
March 13 of next year, two
months after the mixed zone
concepts are released.
That does not please the
Southwest residents, however.
He thinks the Planning and Sustainability Committee should
hold at least one more hearing
after the zones are defined to
take public testimony and respond to questions.
“We are not satisfied with
that schedule,” said Peterson,
who claimed it is impossible to
understand how the draft comp
plan update would work without knowing how the mixed use
zones are defined.
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©2006 Environmental Defense
The Clackamas Board of
County Commissioners has a
message for Metro regional
government as it prepares to
approve its Climate Smart
Communities Strategy: Don’t
forget about roads.
The five-member commission
expressed concern that the evolving plan to reduce motor vehicle
emissions by 20 percent by 2035
puts too much emphasis on new
public transit, bicycle and pedestrian solutions and not enough
on projects like adding lanes of
traffic to increasingly congested
Interstate 205.
“I-205 is not Clackamas County’s problem,” says Board Chair
John Ludlow, who wants a regional solution to the stateowned freeway that runs from
Interstate 5 near Tualatin to Vancouver, Wash. Ludlow says he
worries that Climate Smart will
be used to push funding for nonpassenger vehicle transportation
options.
“When they continue to pour
in money to bike paths they take
it away from roadways,” he says,
adding: “Freight can’t use a bike
path.”
Two important committees advising Metro on Climate Smart
aren’t listening, however. Commissioner Paul Savas repeatedly
brought up the need to add lanes
on I-205 and other highways to
reduce congestion when the Metro Policy Advisory Committee
and the Joint Policy Committee
on Transportation met last Friday to review the project’s progress. Only fellow commissioner
Jim Bernard and Port of Portland
representative Susie Lahsene
even agreed that such projects
could reduce congestion and motor vehicle emissions.
Savas and Bernard were
joined by several members of
both committees that criticized
proposals they thought required local governments to
adopt specific plans for reducing motor vehicle emissions.
Project staffers promised to rewrite them to stress compliance
is voluntary before the elected
Metro Council takes the final
draft up in December.
Ludlow says that Clackamas
commissioners don’t oppose all
of the proposal, and are supportive of unique public transit solutions for the county’s rural and
underserved areas — such as an
expansion of the Mt. Hood Express line — to take automobiles
off the roads.
“That alone will be addressing
the whole greenhouse gas problem,” Ludlow says. Though, Ludlow adds that he’s not sure it’s a
necessary endeavor anyway.
“I am a big-time skeptic of human-caused climate change,”
Ludlow says, adding that even if
Climate Smart is successful,
countries like China will quickly
counteract it. “It’s great to do this
if one believes in it, but it is just a
drop in the bucket on the world
scale.”
Commissioner Martha Schrader says there are other benefits to
be realized by improving transportation solutions, such as air
quality and economic inequity.
“I do think the climate’s chang-
ing, I don’t know if we’re causing
it or not, but oh well,” Schrader
said during an Oct. 21 board
meeting.
“I think that’s the issue,” replied Commissioner Tootie
Smith. “Whether it’s manmade
or not or would it happen anyway, despite our efforts?”
The Intergovernmental Panel
on Climate Change won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for its
work publicizing that there is a
“very high confidence” among
climate scientists that human activity has had a net warming effect on the planet.
City land plan update worries
some neighborhood leaders
496001.111214
Clackamas County:
build more roads
cross fingers
fight global warming.com
76638 10/2014
A6 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Street tax: Council vote set in December
■ From page 1
year will pay $5 a month. A couple making
$60,000 to $75,000 will pay $7.50 a month. A
couple making $75,000 to $100,000 a month
will pay $10 a month. And couples making
more than $350,000 a year will pay $75 a
month.
The income tax starts at $25,000 for a single person and $35,000 for a couple. It would
be collected every year along with the Arts
Tax the city is already collecting.
On the nonresidential side, businesses will
pay between $3 and $144 a month, with a 50
percent discount available for nonprofit organizations.
Many, if not most, of the original critics are
still organizing against the fee, however, including a number of activists operating a website
More online
called nostreetfee.com. In
addition, Southeast Uplift,
More details
the neighborhood coaliare available
tion office representing
at OurStreets
many southeast neighbor- PDX.com.
hood residents, recently
sent a letter to the council
outlining numerous objections to many elements in the revised proposal.
Hales challenged those considering
whether to refer the proposal to the ballot to
offer an alternative, however.
“There are three alternatives,” he told reporters. “We can do nothing, we can do
this, or we can do something else. If you
don’t want to do this, tell us what you are
proposing.”
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
Portland’s City Council could vote in December on a proposed street tax to raise $46 million for road repairs and safety improvements. The tax was originally planned
as a fee on households and businesses.
Memorial Tributes
Celebrating
the Lives
of Local
Residents
Ronald Anderson
March 28, 1959 - October 27, 2014
Portland
832 NE Broadway
503-783-3393
17064 SE McLoughlin Blvd.
503-653-7076
Tualatin
8970 SW Tualatin Sherwood Rd
503-885-7800
as he was known to his friends, is survived by his
wife, Kary, and son, Benjamin (9), parents Tom
and Ann Barrie, of Damascus, brother Brian Barrie
(Angela Barrie) of Damascus, sister Leighann
Barrie (Paul Delano) of Portland, and brother
Robert Barrie (Stephanie LH Barrie) of Gresham.
A memorial service will be held at 10:00 a.m. on
Saturday, November 15, 2014 at St Henry’s
Church, 346 NW 1st St, Gresham, OR. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to Oregon Public
Broadcasting (www.opb.org).
412210.012413
Traditional Funeral $$1,975
1,475
Immediate Burial $$550
500
No Hidden Costs, Guaranteed
Privately Owned Cremation Facility
Ronald was a skilled carpenter, craftsman, and
artist with a passion for trains, older homes, and
woodworking. He shared a love of antique cars with
his sons and traveling with his wife. He was a generous, gentle individual. He loved his family and
friends, and relished being a grandfather.
www.ANewTradition.com
James Clarence Cayton
Jan. 21, 1963 - Oct. 29, 2014
10/29/14 at his home in Portland. “Crazy Mike,”
Ronald was born March 29, 1959. He married
the love of his life, Lessie Ann Kelly, on July 7,
1990. Ronald and Lessie raised their three boys in
Portland, Oregon.
495
SIMPLE CREMATION $$545
Michael Shaune Barrie
Michael Shaune Barrie, 51, died suddenly on
Ronald Stanley Anderson died suddenly in
Portland, Oregon on October 27, 2014 at the age of
55. He is survived by his wife Lessie; parents James
and Cecilia Anderson; sons Jason, Jamal, and
James; six grandchildren and five siblings.
Milwaukie
A celebration of life is scheduled for 1:00pm,
November 8, at New Hope Ministry Baptist Church
3725 N Gantenbein Ave. Portland, Oregon.
February 5, 1918 - November 4, 2014
Family and friends grieve the
loss and celebrate the life of
Rev. James ‘Jim’ Cayton, who
died at home on November 4,
2014, at the age of 96 years.
Born February 5, 1918 in
Luana, Iowa, to Dewey and
Esther Cayton, Jim spent his
youth in Iowa and Colorado
where he met and married
Mildred ‘Lucy’ Louise Shaw.
Together
they
attended
the Moody Bible Institute. Jim continued his
education at Hastings and Wheaton Colleges and
McCormick Theological Seminary. Jim served
as pastor for Presbyterian churches in Nebraska,
Illinois and Minnesota and as organizing pastor of
the Calvin Presbyterian Church, Tigard, Oregon,
from 1964 to 1985.
Jim was preceded in death by his beloved life partner,
Lucy, and is survived by his four sons, Jay, Timothy,
Christopher and Whitney. A memorial service will be
held at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 15, 2014 at
the Calvin Presbyterian, Tigard, Oregon.
George (Bob) Robert Jones
April 27, 1935 to November 2014
George (Bob) Robert Jones was
born in Harrison, Arkansas on
April 27, 1935 and moved with his
family to Sunshine Valley, Oregon
when he was 18 months old. Bob
attended Hillsview Grade School,
Gresham High School, and
Portland State University. He
served in the Army National Guard
Artillery and the Army Reserves
for more than thirty years. Bob
worked as an electrician for Meier
& Frank department store and the state of Oregon and in
retirement was quick to volunteer to help anyone in need
with his electrician skills. His Christian faith was very
important to him and he was a member of Hillsview
Community Church from boyhood.
Celebrate
Bob loved to tease and had a great sense of humor.
Bob loved square dancing with his wife Mary at the
Country Cut-ups Square Dance Club, traveling
extensively, golfing with the Senior Men’s Club at
Mountain View Golf Course, and playing blackjack. He
was a sports enthusiast and family Scrabble champ. He
took great pleasure in walking friends and family through
his extraordinary garden to pick vegetables and berries to
share. Nothing was more important to Bob than his
family.
Their Life
He leaves behind his wife, Mary; children, Robert,
Charlita (Dan) Farrester, Angela (Gary) Bridges, Tamara
(Rebecca) Jones-Childs, Cheryl (Scott) Marshall,
Matthew (Melia) Douglass; brother Lloyd (Diane), sister
Juanita, sister Carole (Don Dahlke) Whitney; eight
grandchildren; and many extended family members and
friends. He was predeceased by his parents, Andy and
Florence, his brothers, Donald and Larry, and his son
Brian.
Placing an obituary is a final keepsake
of a loved one and provides a memorial
tribute to their life.
The Pamplin Media Group offers both paid tributes and
death notices as a service to the community.
Please feel free to contact any of our newspaper
representatives with any questions.
458560.020614
You can also email your tribute and photo to the
appropriate newspaper.
Donations in lieu of flowers may be sent to Mt. Hood
Hospice, P.O. Box 1269, Sandy, OR 97055. Celebration
of Life will be held on Friday Nov 14th @ 2:00pm @
Hillsview Community Church 23225 SE Borges Rd.
Damascus. Pvt interment Damascus Pioneer Cemetery
478989.111114
After a long battle with cancer, Bob died peacefully at
home at the age of 79 surrounded by his family. An
amazing man with a warm smile, an enthusiasm for life
and a generous heart, Bob will be greatly missed by all
who knew him.
To place a tribute, please go online to any of our
newspaper websites and fill out our easy to use tribute
form.
NEWS A7
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Dream: Local movement building support
■ From page 1
A safe place
Contact the Clackamas Service
Center at 503-771-7914 to make
donations or for more information.
Visit the website at cscoregon.org.
Contact Pastor Michael Davis at
the Knowing Me Ministries at 503310-0966, or visit the website at
knowingmeministries.org.
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: NICK FOCHTMAN
Residents Carey White (right) and Amber Dunks (left) pet Paige, who was the defacto “mascot” of the Right
To Dream Too encampment.
‘Dual-county problem’
Brenda Durbin, director of
Clackamas County Social Services noted that the most current
statistics identifying the homeless in the county date back to
January 2013, when 2,070 people
were identified as having no safe
place to sleep.
The county “is ramping up
now” for the next count on Jan.
29, 2015, Durbin said.
There is a definite need in
Clackamas County for “affordable housing, emergency shelters, transition housing and rapid re-housing for getting the
homeless into an apartment,”
she added.
Sutton said that in nearby
Multnomah County the official
homeless count is 2,760, but “you
should double that; people don’t
want to be counted, they don’t
want to be identified.”
She added, “This is a dualcounty problem and needs a dualcounty solution. There is no borderline on human misery.”
Durbin said she admires “people like Trena, who are so passionate about the homeless. We
need more people willing to help
move the discussion forward.”
Sutton is in contact with officials in the Lents area of Portland
about finding a site for a rest area, but she is still holding out for
a place in Clackamas County.
She has met with county government officials, and there is the
prospect of a “special area owned
by a special governmental agency,” she said.
“We need at least a third of an
acre that is zoned for multi-use,
so we can tap into sewer, water
and electricity,” Sutton said, adding that having a plan to dispose
of trash also is needed.
Advantages for those using the
rest area are many.
“We will have security, so they
will have a safe area to put things.
This will also give people a sense
of community and mutual respect and empathy for others.
They will have access to showers
and laundry facilities — how can
anyone get a job if they are
dirty?”
Sutton knows she is going to
need support of others to make
the dream happen. “We will be a
nonprofit, under the umbrella of
Right 2 Dream Too or a church
ministry. We need the faith-based
community to step forward and
help. Once we are set up, we will
have strict guidelines and board
members who will be good stewards for donations,” she said.
And, speaking of money, Sutton said that in talking to government officials she quotes statistics showing how expensive it is
to not solve the problem of people
living on the street.
“It costs taxpayers around
$14,000 per year — there is money
spent on police involvement, drug
and alcohol treatment, mentalhealth admissions, and other
medical costs. The financial cost
is astronomical, and the human
cost is astronomical,” she said.
“And if we don’t address the root
causes of houselessness, they’ll
be back on the street.”
What are those causes? “The
mental-health system is underfunded, and then add in criminality and drug and alcohol addiction. They have no means to get
cleaned up and no transportation
to try to find a job. It’s a vicious
loop, and until we break that cycle and give them a safe place to
live, food and a sense of community, that loop will continue.”
Sutton added, “Most people are
redeemable if given a hand up
and not a handout.”
Changing minds
Sutton knows that the public
doesn’t mean to be cruel to those
less fortunate, but the media promotes the problem by focusing on
the predatory ones, the 10 percent of those on the street who
cause problems.
She knows that she and her
supporters need to work on
changing the mind-set of the public in regard to houselessness,
and she knows this can be done
because she used to “walk across
the street to avoid a houseless
person.”
Then she encountered a man
who was eating out of a garbage
can. She discovered that he had
been a college professor, whose
wife was diagnosed with cancer.
“He fell into a scheme to get
help for his wife in a clinic in
South America. It turned out to
be a scam, and she died. When he
came back to this country, he got
into alcohol and drugs. He’s the
one who taught me the love for
the houseless.”
She and her sister then began
making sandwiches to hand out
to people on the street, and then
Sutton found herself trying to
solve problems for people.
At that point she partnered
with some law enforcement professionals at the Southeast Police
Precinct in Portland, and with
Pastor Michael Davis, of Knowing
Me Ministries.
Although Knowing Me is
based in Portland, Davis has
worked with the homeless along
the Springwater Corridor and
82nd Avenue. He also has worked
in Clackamas County court to
help the homeless find more success with their probation. He has
worked with the homeless population for 22 years.
Davis supports Sutton in her
effort to get a rest area set up because he knows firsthand what it
is like to live on the street.
“I was homeless for a year
and a half. When someone is
experiencing homelessness
they spend each day just trying to survive, therefore they
can’t really concentrate on
getting off the streets. For
those seriously wanting off the
streets, they struggle to do so
due to being constantly moved
and dealing with all the negative influences of the streets,”
he said.
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DATED this 4th day of November, 2014.
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Publish 11/11, 11/18, 11/25/2014.
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A rest area would “allow people to get off the streets immediately and get adequate sleep so
that they can think clearly. It allows them to focus on overcoming the obstacles they face rather
than having to focus on survival,
Davis said.
He also is involved in the process because he believes that the
rest area and “projects like R2D2
are a great alternative to the conventional approaches to homelessness that have not worked.
This type of approach works.”
People should support
this rest area for a number of
reasons.
“Many of the homeless came
from comfortable lifestyles, but
due to circumstances often beyond their control, they ended up
homeless. Therefore they are no
different than us, and it could
happen to any of us. If it happened to us we would want compassionate support from others,”
Davis said.
“People are dying on the
streets and being pushed down
every time they try to get up.
This would provide a place
where they can find refuge and
resources,” he said.
Sutton said people can donate food, gently used clothing,
and hygiene items to the Clackamas Service Center. They also
can send monetary donations
there.
“People can help support this
effort by getting behind it and
getting their neighbors behind it.
We can give financially on an ongoing basis to get it started and
keep it going. We can volunteer
labor to help set up the rest area,
supplies to build, and supplies
for people to be safe and warm,”
Davis said.
“We can get to know the homeless and discover that they are us
— human, loving people who
have dreams, emotions and skills
just like us. This is our chance to
turn the tide. We hear a lot of
complaining from the public
about the homeless, but not a lot
of people are stepping up to make
a difference. The homeless are
our neighbors and fellow citizens. Let’s back them up and
cheer them on by supporting this
project.”
PORTLAND TRIBUNE PUBLIC NOTICE 111114
Info Box 02-09
in, and tents will house men,
women and couples, with a separate area for victims of domestic
violence.
People can come in for 12
hours, and then must leave for
12 hours. They may leave their
belongings and even their pets
at the site, and security personnel will make sure that everything is safe.
Security, Sutton said, is a
huge factor. If people don’t
have a safe place to live, then
they are in survival mode, and
“you can’t plan for tomorrow if
you are just trying to survive
today. We want to get them out
of survival mode and into prosperity mode. We want to give
them some way to improve
themselves.”
Sutton does not like the term
homeless camp, preferring to
call the Right 2 Dream Too site
a “rest area,” and in fact, she
deplores the use of the word
homeless.
“Homeless has a negative
connotation. I prefer to use
houseless,” she said.
As for why a rest area is
needed in the county, Sutton
said there are no shelters that
are really accessible for the
large houseless population in
Clackamas County, so many of
them form illegal camps in various areas around the Springwater Corridor and other sites
near Southeast 82nd Avenue.
There are, she added, shelters for families and women
and children in the county, but
all of them are booked and have
waiting lists.
Sutton is familiar with what
is happening in the county
since she works with members
of the faith-based community
handing out food to people in
the camps, and most importantly, she is the volunteer
kitchen supervisor for the
Clackamas Service Center, located at 8800 S.E. 80th Ave., just
off of Southeast 82nd Avenue,
near the Johnson Creek Fred
Meyer.
The center is a donation-supported, nonprofit organization
that provides services, including food and clothing, to homeless and low-income individuals and families in the area.
Sutton has volunteered there
for 19 months, sometimes
working more than 40 hours a
week at the site.
Support the process
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A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Election: Minimum wage will get attention
■ From page 1
Oregon to create 25,000 jobs annually through 2020, raise percapita income to the national average and reduce to 10 percent
the number of people under the
federal poverty level. It also acknowledges that the latter two
goals cannot be achieved through
economic recovery alone.
“Employment hasn’t yet returned to pre-recession levels in
most parts of Oregon and our incomes remain stubbornly below
the national average,” according
to the plan. “Perhaps most important, far too many Oregonians —
including nearly one quarter of
children — are living in poverty.”
Oregon’s poverty rate is 16.7
percent.
Although overshadowed by
the controversies about the
role of his fiancée, Cylvia
Hayes, Kitzhaber drew clear
differences with Richardson on
how he would take on many of
these issues.
He says that starting his final
term, he’s ready to move forward.
“I know most legislators personally, and I have worked with many of them over the years, so I
believe it’s not going to affect my
ability to move an agenda,” he
says.
Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, says: “He has been
chosen to be governor again, and
he takes that responsibility seri-
House Speaker
Tina Kotek, a
Portland
Democrat, said
voters were
worried about
the economy and
education
system, issues
the Legislature
will tackle in
January.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
ADAM WICKHAM
ously. Whether the questions are
cleared up or not, he’s going to
have to decide them in his own
way.”
Courtney says he does not
want to say too much about policy issues or political relationships until his Democratic colleagues meet this weekend, and
until the legislative leaders
meet with Kitzhaber to get an
advance look at his next twoyear state budget, which Kitzhaber will unveil Dec. 1.
“We’re in pre-season practice,
so it’s hard to tell what our teams
are going to look like and how
they are going to relate to each
other,” he says.
Specifics still lacking
Oregon’s minimum wage in
2015 will be $9.25 per hour, second only to Washington state’s
$9.47. Voters in both states approved linking annual increases
to inflation.
“I believe that after 12 years of
having our minimum wage tied to
the Consumer Price Index, it’s
time for us to have another discussion about an increase in the
minimum wage that would be
good for Oregon,” Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian says.
Avakian says he’s not ready to
put forth a specific proposal, but
there is talk about linking future
increases to the federal poverty
level.
“If you want to lift most people
out of poverty, that is the way to
do it,” says Chuck Sheketoff, executive director of the Oregon
Center for Public Policy, a think
tank based in Silverton that advocates for low- and moderate-income people. “We ought to pay
them more so that they are not
poor.”
But Kitzhaber says though he
favors an increase, it would not be
enough in itself.
“If all you do is raise the mini-
mum wage and do not address
the relationship between higher
income and (eligibility for) support services such as employment-related day care, they actually lose ground,” he says.
People used to lose state-supported care under the Oregon
Health Plan when their incomes
rose, but Kitzhaber says that
problem was resolved by the national health care overhaul and
subsequent expansion of state or
private coverage to 95 percent of
Oregonians.
Lawmakers also are expected
to debate a requirement for paid
sick leave, which they heard in
2013 but did not advance. California, Connecticut and Massachusetts have adopted such requirements, as have Portland and Eugene among U.S. cities; Eugene’s
will take effect in July.
The Oregon Business Plan
avoids mention of those specifics,
but says that support services are
needed for lower-income working
families.
The plan emphasizes education and training to improve the
skills of current and future workers, and job-creating programs
tailored to those not sharing in
Oregon’s economic recovery.
“I am hoping we look at ways
to improve the economy for
them,” Winters says.
Kotek says state support of
public schools, community colleges and state universities —
education accounts for half the
state’s tax-supported general
fund — will be a continuing
concern.
A coalition is also preparing to
offer a financing plan for transportation improvements, and not
limited to roads and bridges.
Tax talk again
Kitzhaber once foresaw that
the 2015 session would be the one
for an overhaul of Oregon’s finances. State services and public
schools rely on state income taxes, and local services on voterlimited property taxes.
“I think it’s important that we
not waste an opportunity to have
a conversation about our tax
code,” Kitzhaber says.
But according to the 2013 Oregon Values & Beliefs Project, conducted by DHM Research of Portland for a coalition of public and
nonprofit organizations, the public remains split over whether
Oregon’s system is too “unstable”
and should be supported by a
general sales tax — which Oregon and four other states do not
have. Voters have rejected sales
tax proposals nine times, most
recently in 1993.
While 63 percent of those sampled say Oregon’s tax system is
not fair, 64 percent concluded
they do not trust government to
spend tax money wisely.
In addition to Kitzhaber’s suggestion for lawmakers to look at
the “benefits cliff,” Kitzhaber
says he’s still interested in consid-
ering a limited tax cut on capital
gains — profits from the sale of
assets such as stock — if the proceeds are reinvested in Oregon.
His proposal to do so in 2011
went nowhere in the Legislature.
“Such talk ought to be
banned from the (legislative)
caucus room,” says Sheketoff,
whose think tank opposes tax
cuts benefiting higher-income
households. “The first rule is
do no harm — don’t exacerbate
income inequality by enriching
the coffers of the wealthiest
Oregonians.”
Lawmakers will review some
tax breaks, including a tax credit
for child-care costs, that will expire in 2016 unless they renew
them.
They also are likely to re-examine the Gain Share program,
under which the state makes
payments to counties that grant
some property tax breaks for
businesses, linked to a portion of
state income taxes generated by
the new workers hired by those
businesses. Washington County,
which received $38 million earlier this year, is the largest recipient.
“My general take is that let’s
not do reform just to do reform,”
Kotek says. “We should ask ourselves what we are trying to
achieve. For me, it’s about helping
families get ahead.”
[email protected]
twitter.com/capitolwong
Re-elected Kitzhaber still a ‘power broker’
Ethics questions,
tough issues mark
governor’s final term
By HILLARY BORRUD
Salem Bureau
Gov. John Kitzhaber survived a bruising campaign to
win an unprecedented fourth
term. Now, as Kitzhaber prepares for his second turn as a
lame-duck governor, political
insiders are watching to see if
the governor still has the political capital to broker the
type of high-profile agreements that characterized his
third term.
Kitzhaber and his fiancée,
first lady Cylvia Hayes, could
still face ethics investigations after questions arose late in the
race regarding Hayes’ private
consulting role.
Hayes stopped serving as an
unpaid policy adviser to the
governor while the Oregon Government Ethics Commission
looks into her role, and she was
absent election night during the
governor’s victory speech.
The commission will consider some of those questions Friday at its regular meeting.
Kitzhaber said in a Nov. 4
statement that he was “keenly
aware that I stand here tonight
because Oregonians stuck with
me under difficult circumstances. I do not take that for granted,
and I will not let you down. During this campaign you have risen above the noise and distrac-
tions and chosen to focus on the
real challenges facing Oregon.”
The governor’s victories during his third term included a
package of bills known as the
“grand bargain,” which cut public pensions and raised taxes, that
state lawmakers passed after the
governor called them back for a
special session in fall 2013.
Kitzhaber has talked of an
even more ambitious goal for his
fourth and last term: an overhaul
of the state’s tax system, which
he started discussing with business and labor groups even before he announced last winter
that he would seek a fourth term
as governor. The governor successfully worked with labor and
anti-union interests earlier this
year to keep opposing measures
off the ballot this fall, in an effort
to prevent an acrimonious fight
that could have undermined discussions of tax reform.
“The governor has shown a
real ability to pull people in to
work across the aisle,” said Phil
Keisling, a former Oregon secretary of state and director of the
Center for Public Service at the
Mark O. Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University. “I think he will continue
to be a pretty vigorous chief executive. But he will be a lame
duck, for a second time.”
Governors draw power from
the fact they are elected by the
entire state said Len Bergstein,
a political consultant who owns
Northwest Strategies Inc. Although Bergstein would not
rule out Kitzhaber’s ability to
achieve another “grand bargain,” Bergstein said the closeness of this election left Kitzhaber without a clear mandate.
“I can’t imagine that anybody
can say with a straight face that
there’s any mandate that’s
come from Oregon voters,”
Bergstein said.
One aspect of the election that
could help the governor is his
party’s stronger majority in the
Oregon Senate, where Democrats gained an edge of at least
17 to 12 on Tuesday night. One
race, District 15 in Washington
County, remained too close to
call Wednesday between incumbent Republican Sen. Bruce
Starr and Democrat Chuck Riley.
The Democrats’ 16-14 majority in the 2014 session meant
the party sometimes fell short
of the votes it needed to pass
priority legislation, when powerful Scappoose Democrat Sen.
Betsy Johnson crossed the aisle
to vote with Republicans on key
legislation.
However, it is unclear if Democratic lawmakers will be willing to expend much of their political capital on major initiatives from a lame-duck governor when lawmakers have their
own priorities, such as cleanfuels and expansion of early
childhood education.
Democrats also gained one
seat in the House, which they
will lead over Republicans, 35-25.
[email protected]
twitter.com/hborrud
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NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
‘Mr. Playground’ earns volunteer honors State hits
TIGARD
firm with
fine for
oil waste
BEAVERTON
Burgess lent skills to
dozens of THPRD
projects since 1979
By SHANNON O. WELLS
Pamplin Media Group
When Jerry Burgess started his career with Tualatin
Hills Park and Recreation District in 1979, it wasn’t long before his design and building
acumen got in the way of his
grass-cutting duties.
“I started tractor mowing, but
we’d get pulled off of mowing to
go down to the lumberyard,” he
said.
That’s where Burgess, as a
fledgling park technician,
found the goods to do what he
does best: conceptualize, design and build playground
equipment by combining just
the right ingredients of fun and
safety. Since those early days of
mixed duties, Burgess, 56, has
become the park district’s unofficial — yet uncontested —
“playground guru,” while lending his time, expertise and passion to no fewer than 17 volunteer playground installation
projects around the state on
behalf of the Oregon Recreation and Park Association.
For his efforts, the association
gave Burgess, a longtime Beaverton resident, the Distinguished Service Award at its annual conference in Seaside in
early October. Stephanie Redman, the association’s executive
director, said Burgess was singled out “in recognition of his
years of dedication to assisting
agencies install, maintain and
ensure the safety of playgrounds
for the children of Oregon.”
Widespread play
In his 35-year career with the
district, Burgess had a hand in
dozens of THPRD playground
and park projects. On his “free
time,” he organizes volunteer
professionals to spend two to
four days at various community
sites, assembling and installing
playground structures for the
park association’s Maintenance
and Construction Section, commonly known as MACS.
“Jerry’s work to install, enhance and make Oregon’s playgrounds safe for its children really defines the spirit and intent
of this award,” Redman said.
Jerry Burgess,
THPRD’s capital
project manager,
watches as
Hunter
Oberdick,5,
climbs a
playground that
was recently
installed at
Wonderland
Park.
PAMPLIN MEDIA
GROUP PHOTOS:
JAIME VALDEZ
“His service in the area of playground maintenance and safety
is phenomenal. Jerry has volunteered to help ORPA conduct
countless playground maintenance trainings and certification classes, which ensure that
Oregon’s park and recreation
professionals have the best
tools and techniques to install
and maintain safe playgrounds.”
Burgess’ freelance installation credits include Metzger
Park in Tigard, Camp Rivendale
at the Jenkins Estate near Aloha, Fern Park in Veneta near
Eugene and playgrounds as far
flung as Ontario and Medford.
Not one to draw attention to
himself, the soft-spoken Burgess Jerry Burgess is THPRD’s capital
chalks up his volunteer commit- project manager.
ments less to burning ambition
than the fact he just doesn’t
know another way of life.
Wayt noted. “The district is
“I like to keep busy with proj- very fortunate to have a man
ects,” he said. “I’m pretty pas- like Jerry. To think his expersionate about what I do. I like tise has helped others in the
helping and doing things in the state makes it all the better.”
community that benefit people.
Burgess, who was certified
As far as playground installs, by the National Playground
I’ve always taken the lead.”
Safety Institute in 1997, said he
Bob Wayt, the park district’s has the installation process
communications director, said down to a fine science.
Burgess’ efforts include nu“I could put these together in
merous projects financed by my sleep. I’ve done so many
the $100 million bond measure projects, I have a system for orvoters approved in 2008.
ganizing on an install. I copy
“All the play equipment the plans and start pairing off
that’s been installed through folks, six to eight people in
the bond measure are our proj- groups,” he said. “We try to get
ects that Jerry managed,” a good system together.”
‘Mr. Playground’ strikes again
Now a grandfather of two
toddlers, Burgess traces his
playground passion to the
parks he would frequent while
growing up in Tillamook.
“I remember they replaced
the swingset I was on all the
time,” he recalled. “That kind
of set the tone. I loved the way
they kept it up.”
Always keeping a childlike
eye to maximize a playground’s
fun factor, Burgess always
makes safety — from the sturdiness of a jungle gym to the
softness of the landing surface
below — a top priority.
“I’m pretty nit-picky,” he
said. “I check every nut and
bolt and dry rivet in there. And
that’s what I preach to everybody else, to include as part of
the job to sign off on safety.”
Wayt vouches for Burgess’
devotion to getting equipment
ready to be commandeered by
the kids.
“When Jerry says a new
piece of play equipment is
ready to open to the public, we
know it’s ready,” he said. “We
don’t worry. All that’s left is for
kids to have fun.”
As part of Burgess’ Distin-
guished Service Award recognition, Redman simply called
Burgess “Mister Playground.”
“If there is something that
he doesn’t know about playground equipment and safety,
it’s probably not worth knowing,” she said. “Even better,
Jerry is always ready to lend a
hand to other professionals
and agencies to answer questions and to lend advice about
their particular situations. We
are so fortunate to have him
involved with our association
and as a resource within our
state.”
Burgess is quick to credit the
park district crews he collaborates with and volunteers who
gladly donate their time and
energy.
“I have a great group of guys,
(and) we work great together,”
he said. “I’m fortunate to have
their expertise. One guy can’t
do it alone.”
Despite his intention to keep
doing what he does as long as
he’s able, Burgess admitted he
does have limitations as far as
taking on new outside projects.
“I run it by my wife first,” he
said with a grin. “You can only
do so much.”
DEQ says Agilyx has
since corrected many
of its cited offenses
By GEOFF PURSINGER
Pamplin Media Group
A Tigard corporation has
been fined nearly $50,000 after
hazardous waste was found at
its facility near a local dog
park.
Agilyx converts waste plastics
into synthetic crude oil. They operate a research facility at 7904
S.W. Hunziker St. next door to
Potso Dog Park.
On Monday, the Oregon Department of Environmental
Quality issued a $49,702 penalty
against the company. Agilyx has
until Tuesday, Nov. 11, to file an
appeal to the decision to DEQ.
According to DEQ officials,
the company improperly managed its hazardous waste, failed
to keep up-to-date contingency
plans and did not properly train
its employees responsible for
managing the hazardous waste.
The company also reportedly
didn’t label its hazardous waste
containers.
“DEQ issued this penalty because the improper management of hazardous waste
threatens public health and the
environment,” DEQ officials
said in a statement.
Agilyx opened in 2004 under
the name Plas2Fuel. It changed
its name in 2010 after opening
its research facility on Hunziker Street.
This isn’t the first time Agilyx has been in trouble for the
way it handles hazardous
waste. Similar violations were
identified during an audit in
2011.
DEQ conducted a two-day inspection of the facility on Oct.
14 and 15, 2013.
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Growing your own veggies? Upgrading your water
heater? Riding your bike to work? We recognize that
Oregonians are eager for information about living more
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Sustainable Life, a monthly special section appearing
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A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Inventor’s collars keep Riverkeeper asks for
EIS on industrial site
tabs on noisy pups
Beaverton man raises
funds to market dog
collar ID accessory
By SHANNON O. WELLS
Pamplin Media Group
Necessity, as they say, may
be the mother of all invention,
but the inspiration to create a
new gadget sometimes also
involves a sister, a baby and
even a dog or two.
That’s the case with Tom Normandin, a Beaverton manufacPAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
turing engineer whose sister
Anne Keeler’s noisy dogs — Tom Normandin pets his dog, Jax, who wears a noiseless pet
along with his own experiences identification tag that he created in his garage in Beaverton.
with losing track of Jax, his own
canine — led him to create a the collar. “It folds like this and
unique identification bracelet that. It will not fall off, ever.”
that provides dog owners peace
Normandin created a proto- What: Kickstarter online funding
and quiet as well as peace of type of Collar ID three years ago campaign for “Collar ID,” a durable,
noiseless dog collar identification
mind.
and tested its durability and reli- accessory designed to stay in place
“My sister has two noisy dogs ability extensively on Jax, his on a collar or harness
that always ran around jingling,” energetic black labrador.
Inventor: Beaverton resident Tom
the Portland native explained of
“We’d go to the beach a few Normandin
their metal ID tag-bearing col- times a week, particularly in Retail price: Around $20 per collar
lars. “They would always wake summer. He’s been wearing it Website: TheCollarID.com
her baby up. She just got excited when he’s swimming in the Kickstarter web page: kickstarter.
about it.”
ocean, with the salt water and com/projects/collarid/collar-idSensing an entrepreneurial sand. He chases me when I’m on noise-free-custom-interchangeableopportunity amidst his sibling’s my mountain bike, and it hasn’t pet-id
concern, Normandin, 34, chan- worn out a bit,” he said. “It does
neled his experience as a manu- get full of mud, but you just take ing to do with the money from
facturing engineer into “Collar it off and wash it.”
that is buy more cuffs and more
ID,” an invention he’s marketing
All the materials in Collar ID tabs to make more of these
online with help from a Kick- are made in the Portland area, things. We want to upgrade later
starter campaign whose e-com- including sewn cuffs by the Port- to a more commercial, quicker
merce section launched last land Garment Factory in South- (production) time. We can open
week.
east Portland and CRB Manufac- up our ability to put extra things
The colorful, stylish and dura- turing in Clackamas, which pro- on the tag, like a dog name with
ble device, which is interchange- vides the metal tabs. Normandin a flower or a caricature.”
able with any strap-based collar assembles the finished product,
In addition to offering disor harness, comes with a small which comes in a variety of col- counts on the product, Normanmetal plate bearing the pet’s ors and retails for around $20 din, in return for local support of
name and owner’s phone num- each, in his Beaverton garage us- Collar ID, also hopes to give back
ber. It includes a double-back ing a laser engraver, black rivets, to the pet community. He plans
Velcro-sealed pocket just big a soldering iron and basic hand to use a portion of the Kickstartenough to hold pet license and tools.
er funds to make samples for
rabies shot information that
To help spread the word about shelters and other organizations
most municipalities and counties the importance of pet identifica- that help rescue pets lacking
require.
tion, Normandin and business identification.
Normandin, an avid surfer partner Kim Regelano are hopeWhile he plans to continue his
who works for Oracle Hardware ful the Kickstarter campaign will role as a manufacturing engiand Software in Hillsboro, mod- help recruit backers who believe neer with Oracle, Normandin is
eled Collar ID after the leash he in the product and are willing to willing to follow his creative imuses to keep his surfboard from support a budding small busi- pulses and entrepreneurial indrifting away.
ness. About 90 supporters have stincts where they lead.
“Part of the design was think- so far pledged about $2,500 to“I would love to see this grow
ing about the tail end of a surf- ward his $15,000 goal.
into something solvent at least,”
board leash. It kind of has the
“We have about 16 days left of he said. “We talk about innovasame idea,” he said, demonstrat- the Kickstarter campaign,” he tions with this, like incorporating
ing how his invention is affixed to said last week. “What we’re try- GPS and how to make that work.”
Rings around the collar
GET OUT. Get
Port of St. Helens
awaiting approval
for ‘feasibility study’
conversations about what physically makes sense, and then
the next (step) would be what
makes sense with the community. And that’s all part of the
study.”
By MARK MILLER
AND COURTNEY VAUGHN
Pamplin Media Group
Off the board
A Hood River environmentalist group is asking the federal government to commission what promises to be a
lengthy study into the environmental impact of potential
development at a Port of St.
Helens property in Columbia
City before awarding a grant
to the port.
The port has requested federal funding for a “feasibility
study” to determine what can be
done with the Columbia City Industrial Park, located in the
northern portion of the city. The
prospect of development is opposed by Columbia Riverkeeper,
which wrote in a Friday, Oct. 31,
letter to the Economic Development Administration that the
federal agency should prepare
an environmental impact statement, or EIS, before making a
decision on whether to grant
money for the port’s project.
“As a federal agency with authority over the ‘Columbia City
Industrial Park Maritime Feasibility Study,’ EDA has the responsibility to prepare an EIS
pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act before deciding whether to fund this
project,” according to the letter
from Columbia Riverkeeper attorney Miles Johnson.
Officially, the feasibility study
is meant to determine how the
port can best use the 93-acre industrial property, which currently houses the manufacturing business West Oregon
Wood Products, as well as the
port’s administrative office.
“The idea is to look at our Columbia City Industrial Park
property and all of its advantages, all of its challenges,” said
Scott Jensen, planning coordinator for the port. “There’s no
project at this time, and there’s
no project waiting in the wings.
This is a purely data-driven
study. We want to see what
makes sense, and then have
Answers.
A March 6 email sent by an
EDA official to a Seattle attorney, however, raised questions
about whether the port does
have other plans in mind. “My
concern is that the Port has
plans, that they are not sharing
with us, to develop either a
methanol plant or coal export
terminal at the Columbia City
site,” wrote Shannon FitzGerald in the email.
FitzGerald’s email cited unnamed port staff she said indicated the port would relocate its
current tenants from the Columbia City Industrial Park if it
landed “a contract for a $1 billion project,” which she suggested could be a methanol production facility sponsored by
the Chinese government.
Beijing-backed Northwest Innovation Works LLC already
has a $1 billion contract with
the port for a methanol plant at
Port Westward, the large industrial park north of Clatskanie. It
is one of several sites in the Pacific Northwest where Chinesebacked developers are looking
at building methanol plants.
In its letter to the Economic
Development Administration,
Columbia Riverkeeper said the
port’s application and the potential to develop more industrial fossil fuel export operations along the Columbia River
deserves “the most searching
and transparent environmental
review possible: an EIS.”
Johnson said Columbia
Riverkeeper’s letter was sent in
response to a legal notice requesting public comments on
the port’s application.
Johnson said the organization wanted to “remind the EDA
of the scope of their responsibility to consider the full range of
possible impacts.” While he declined to comment on the email
exchange between FitzGerald
and the attorney, he said the
email highlights many of the
same concerns echoed by Columbia Riverkeeper and hundreds of other public comments
submitted on the matter. Johnson said his feeling was “this
project is going to be eventually
much bigger than a feasibility
study,” and said the federal environmental review process
must be followed.
Jensen said the port is “not entertaining” the idea of a coal facility at the Columbia City Industrial Park.
“It’s not going to be a coal terminal,” said Jensen. “That’s been
off the board since day one.”
Jensen also said the industrial park has not been evaluated as a potential methanol facility site, unlike the port property
north of Clatskanie.
“I’m sure that they would have
considered this one too, if it was
suitable,” said Jensen.
Jensen stressed that the port
wants to work with Columbia
City on the feasibility study.
“We don’t want to propose
something or work with ... a potential tenant to find out, ‘Oh, the
city doesn’t like that,’” said Jensen. “We want to have the city
engaged as early as possible.”
But for now, the study is in
limbo. Although the EDA tentatively approved a $75,000 grant
for the project last year, it has
not been officially awarded; it is
unclear whether the EDA can
make the grant, which is supposed to go toward “technical
assistance,” if the port’s scope
of work is broader than that.
The federal agency is working through the NEPA process.
Currently, it is soliciting public
comments on potential environmental and cultural impacts
that the study might have. Columbia Riverkeeper’s letter was
submitted as such a comment.
The process of producing an
environmental impact statement, which is what Columbia
Riverkeeper is arguing the EDA
should conduct before awarding
money for the port’s study, can
take up to several years.
Asked about Columbia Riverkeeper’s argument that an environmental impact statement
should be required before the
study proceeds, Jensen hesitated for several seconds.
“As a feasibility study, it’s difficult to see how an environmental impact statement is possible,” he said. “It’s meant to measure what can be measured.”
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SportsTribune
PAGE B1
MainEvents
Tuesday, Nov. 11
Blazers: Charlotte at Portland, 7
p.m. (CSNNW).
Prep soccer: It’s state semifinals day for Class 6A, 5A and
3A-2A-1A boys and girls. The 6A
boys pairings are Jesuit at Central
Catholic, and Grants Pass at
Grant. In the 3A/2A/1A boys tourney, Creswell visits Oregon
Episcopal School, while Blanchet
Catholic goes to Portland Adventist
Academy. The 3A/2A/1A semis
have Catlin Gabel at Oregon
Episcopal.
College men’s soccer: It’s the
semifinals of the Cascade
Collegiate Conference tournament.
Concordia is at home against
Corban, 4 p.m. Evergreen kicks off
at Northwest at 1 p.m.
College women’s volleyball: The
Cascade Collegiate Conference
tournament has two quarterfinal
games — Oregon Tech at
Concordia, 7 p.m., and Northwest
at College of Idaho, 2 p.m. PT.
College men’s basketball:
Multnomah at Oregon Tech, 7:30
p.m.
College women’s basketball:
Concordia at Portland, exhibition, 7
p.m.
PortlandTribune
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014
TAKING
THE LONG
ROUTE
Wednesday, Nov. 12
Blazers: Portland at Denver, 6
p.m. PT (KGW 8)
College men’s basketball: New
Hope Christian at Warner Pacific,
7:30 p.m.
College women’s basketball:
New Hope Christian at Warner
Pacific, 5:30 p.m.
Portland Meadows: First post is
noon for live horse racing at the
North Portland track.
TV&Radio
Tuesday, Nov. 11
Blazers: Charlotte at
Portland, 7 p.m., CSNNW,
KPOJ (620 AM), KKRZ (102.3
FM)
NHL: Buffalo at St. Louis,
5 p.m., NBC Sports
College football: Toledo at
Northern Illinois, ESPN2
Wednesday, Nov. 12
COURTESY OF PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY
Steven Long, who graduated from Lake Oswego High, has bounced back from brain surgery to become a contributor at running back as a freshman for the Portland State Vikings.
■ Vikings freshman gets a fresh head start on college football career
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
From his time as a 2-yearold orphan in Haiti through a
variety of medical ordeals,
Steven Long has been the picture of resilience.
“There could be a nuclear
war, and everybody gets
smoked, and he’ll be the one
guy still standing to repopulate,” Portland State coach Nigel Burton says. “That’ll be Steven. We’ll all be dead. He’ll find
a way to survive.”
And thrive. The 5-7,
180-pound running back has
made his mark as a redshirt
freshman for
the Vikings,
wh o v i s i t
Sacramento
State Saturday
for their final
road game of
the season
and will end
their season at
Providence
Park Nov. 21
versus Eastern
Washington.
After playing a bit role in
Portland State’s first six games,
the Lake Oswego High grad
burst onto the scene against
Northern Arizona, carrying 16
Viking
Watch
times for 253 yards and a touchdown in a 21-17 loss. It was the
ninth-most rushing yards by a
player in Viking history.
“I thought he would play for
us this year,” Burton says. “Did
I think he would run for 250
yards against of the best defenses in the conference? That
might be a stretch.
“But I’ve always believed in
the kid, from the time I met him
to the times I watched him in
high school. The bigger the
stage, the bigger he plays. Anybody who bets against him
doesn’t know very much.”
Colossal rushing games
aren’t unusual for Long, who
Blazers: Portland at
Denver, 6 p.m., KGW 8, KPOJ
(620 AM), KKRZ (102.3 FM)
NBA: Indiana at Miami,
4:30 p.m., ESPN; Houston at
Minnesota, 7 p.m., ESPN
N
Blazers: Portland continues its
home-heavy schedule this week
and will play four of its next five
games at Moda Center. Charlotte
visits Tuesday night. After a
Wednesday game at Denver, the
Blazers will welcome Brooklyn on
Saturday, New Orleans on Monday
and Chicago on Nov. 21.
Winterhawks: Portland (8-110-2, 18 points) is last in the WHL
U.S. Division. The Hawks meet
division leader Everett (12-2-2-1,
27 points) Friday at Everett and 5
p.m. Sunday at Memorial
Coliseum.
Nov. 12,
1970: Tonya
Harding (age
44). ... The 5-1
Portland native
became a U.S.
champion figure
skater and
Olympian, placing second in
the world championships in 1991.
HARDING
History
Nov. 12, 2011: Central Catholic
High completes a dominant volleyball season with a straight-sets
victory over rival Jesuit in the state
championship match at Liberty
High. Martenne Bettendorf, a
University of Oregon-bound senior,
totals 27 of her team’s 41 kills in
the 25-19, 25-17, 25-19 victory
— the third year in a row that the
Rams have topped the Crusaders
in the finals. Central Catholic finishes 33-0, with an 83-3 record in
sets. It’s the 10th state title for
coach Rick Lorenz, who wins his
sixth at Central Catholic after collecting four at St. Mary’s Academy.
2013. Then in March of that
year, he suffered a pair of seizures during the longest early
morning of his life.
After an ambulance ride to
Oregon Health & Science University, a CAT-scan revealed a
growth on the right side of the
top of his brain against the
skull. He was immediately
scheduled for surgery.
PSU teammate Stevie Coury
— a close friend since they
played together at Lake Oswego
— received a call from his father, Lakers coach Steve Coury.
“Dad said Steven had suf-
See VIKINGS / Page 2
A boyhood bond
among NBA stars
StatusReport
Birthdays
picked up 322 yards and four
TDs in the state championship
game for the Lakers as a senior.
He had gone for 424 yards and
seven scores in a win over Skyline (Wash.) earlier that season.
There’s always been something special about the son of
Jeff and Angie Long, who adopted him as a toddler and
watched him blossom into a star
on the gridiron.
But there have been obstacles
along the way. After signing
with PSU in February 2012,
Long tore an Achilles’ tendon,
which resulted in a greyshirt
year in which he didn’t enroll in
school at PSU until January
...
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
University of Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota says the Ducks are motivated to keep winning in spite of
key injuries. The Ducks play host to Colorado on Nov. 22.
Motivation key, as
UO injuries pile up
More gut checks in
store for wounded
Oregon Ducks
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Coming from the Heisman
Trophy candidate and arguably the best quarterback in
Oregon history were some
very strong words after the
Ducks beat Utah last weekend
— good, positive, strong
words.
The Ducks had just lost starters Ifo Ekpre-Olomu, Hroniss
Grasu and Pharaoh Brown to injury — Brown for the rest of the
season with a severe right leg
injury — but quarterback Marcus Mariota said the Ducks responded very well in the locker
room after the 51-27 win at Salt
Lake City.
“Guys are motivated,” said
Mariota, whose Heisman resume
and place in UO history continues to be built. “Once this (game)
was done, guys were talking
about getting right to it (in practice), get ready for Colorado
(Nov. 22 in Eugene). That says
something about this team and
the character of these guys.”
The Utes, backed by an enthusiastic home crowd, challenged
the Ducks, who scored the
game’s final 21 points. If not for
Kaelin Clay’s epic fail, maybe
Utah keeps on top of the Ducks
and pulls off the upset. Clay’s tooearly celebratory drop of the ball
at the 1-yard line on a sure-touchdown for Utah will be a play that
goes down in UO lore, with footage of Joe Walker picking up the
loose ball and returning it 100
yards for an Oregon touchdown.
(Somebody in Hollywood has to
put that play in a script, because
it’s almost the stuff of fantasy).
But the Ducks (9-1, 6-1 Pac-12,
North Division champ) persevered, and will enjoy a bye week
before playing Colorado and Oregon State to finish the regular
season. A date with the Pac-12
South champ — Arizona State?
— awaits in the league championship game, Dec. 5 at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif.
The Utah game was another
gut check for the Ducks, once
See UO / Page 2
otes, quotes and anecdotes about what’s
happening on the
Portland sports scene
■ Moda Center denizens got
the opportunity to watch a pair
of All-Stars last week who spent
plenty of time together as kids
— Golden State guard Klay
Thompson and Cleveland forward Kevin Love.
The sons of ex-NBA players
Mychal Thompson and Stan
Love were playmates growing
up in Lake Oswego in the late
1990s and early 2000s. Kevin
Love, 26, was two years older
than Klay Thompson, the middle son of
Mychal’s three
boys. Older son
Mychel, 26,
played five
games for the
Cavaliers in
2011-12 and is a
member of the
D-League Santa
Cruz Warriors.
LOVE
Younger son
Trayce, 23, is a center fielder in
the Chicago White Sox system.
“The boys played Little
League baseball together,” recalls Mychal, whose family lived
in Lake Oswego from 1992-2004.
“Kevin would come over to the
house almost every weekend.
We were very close to the
Loves.”
The Loves stayed in Lake Oswego, Kevin leading the Lakers
to the state prep championship
as a senior in 2006. The Thompsons moved to Los Angeles,
where Mychal has a morning
radio talk show and serves as
radio analyst for the Lakers.
Kevin Love has become one
of the premier players in the
game, a three-time NBA AllStar and a member of the U.S.
team that won gold at the 2010
world championships and 2012
Olympic Games.
“By the time Kevin got to
KerryEggers
ON SPORTS
high school and the AAU ranks,
you could see he had those oldschool basketball skills to take
him to the Hall of Fame,”
Mychal Thompson says. “That’s
a no-brainer — first ballot, as
long as he stays healthy.”
Klay Thompson, a member of
the U.S. team that won gold at
the 2014 World Cup, joins Stephen Curry to form the premier
backcourt in the NBA.
“That’s really wild, isn’t it?”
Stan Love marvels. “Two kids
who played together in Lake Oswego wound up doing pretty
well for themselves.”
“It’s something our family is
proud of,” Mychal Thompson
says. “The Lake Oswego area is
our favorite. We still miss it. The
boys did not want to move. I felt
really guilty about that. Lake
Oswego will be always be considered
More online home.”
■ Mychal
Read other
Thompson,
Kerry Eggers
columns during on the Warthe week at portland riors:
“They’re deep
tribune.com
at every position, very
well-coached. If this team
doesn’t win the championship,
they should consider this season a bust. This team is loaded
and ready to win a title.”
On the Trail Blazers:
“They’re really good. They
could be in the top four in the
West. They have everything
See EGGERS / Page 3
B2 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
No sugar-coating Viking: Playing time still limited
latest OSU defeat
■ From page 1
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
From a Sunday conversation
with Oregon State coach Mike
Riley, whose Beavers (4-5 overall, 1-5 in Pac-12 play) play host
to seventh-ranked Arizona
State (8-1, 5-1) Saturday night
at Reser Stadium ...
■ There is no sugar-coating
Oregon State’s 39-32 home
loss to Washington State last
Saturday.
The Beavers’ defense, strong
through the early part of the
season, has regressed. The
Beavers let a quarterback making his first career start, redshirt freshman Luke Falk,
throw for 419 yards and five
touchdowns.
The OSU offense wasn’t bad,
with Sean Mannion throwing
for 419 yards, Victor Bolden
hauling in 10 receptions and
Terron Ward and Chris Brown
combining for 73 yards on 16
rushing attempts. But the Beavers were only 4 for 12 on thirddown conversions — a problem
all season — and settled for
field goals four times on drives
inside the Wazzu 30-yard line.
The Beavers will be underdogs in their final three regular-season games — two
against top-10 teams in ASU
and Oregon — and have lost
four in a row.
“I’m very disappointed in
losing the games,” Riley said.
“We have three games left. Our
coaches have to in every way
get these kids ready to play.
We have to play smarter and
play more physically than we
played defensively. Our inability to convert third downs has
been critical.
“Our biggest downfall
(against the Cougars) was not
executing and finishing drives
and kicking field goals. We’re
not scoring enough points to win
these games in this conference.”
■ Falk completed 44 passes,
the most ever by a player at Reser and the most ever against
an Oregon State defense. The
Cougars — who were 8 for 13
on third down — didn’t go deep
often, opting to throw the ball
into the flat, to open spots
short in OSU coverage and on
inside screen plays in which
they were able to get wideouts
and backs blocking downfield.
“The things we were doing
pretty darn well earlier in the
season — getting people out on
third down, tackling well —
we’re not doing at as high a
level as we once were,” Riley
said. The Cougars “ran a lot of
bubble-type screens where
they take a back out of backfield and have him block out
(on a defender). We’re not attacking that as well as we once
did, and not making enough
tackles once we get there.
Those eat you up. They had
pretty good (short-yardage)
third-down situations and hit
on a high percentage.”
■ Defensive coordinator
fered seizures, and they thought
he had a brain tumor,” says Stevie, who began his college career at Oregon State before
transferring to PSU this term. “I
just about fainted. I was all
teary-eyed. I was so scared for
him. I prayed to God he was going to be OK.”
Coury phoned Long soon after he got the news.
“He acted like nothing was
wrong,” Coury says. “He’s one
of the toughest guys I know. He
thinks every outcome is going
to be OK. I probably was more
scared than he was.”
During a 2 1/2-hour operation,
surgeons removed an infectious
lesion on the brain. It was good
news it wasn’t a tumor, but it
was still a serious condition that
placed Long’s football career in
jeopardy.
“I was just hoping he could
come through it to be healthy
enough to have a normal life,”
Coury says. “I wasn’t worried
about football.”
Long looked at it the same
way — sort of.
“The first thing you think of
is, get your health back,” he
says. “Your head is nothing to
play around with. No. 1 was
make sure doctors are OK with
it.
“Second, I wanted to play
football again. I knew it was going to take some time. I just had
to be patient.”
Long sat out spring practice,
giving the brain time to heal
and the body to recover. Meanwhile, Burton was relying on
one of the team doctors, Charles
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
Running back Steven Long, shown
shortly after his 2013 brain
surgery, knew he had to be
patient before he could return to
the football field as a Portland
State Viking.
Webb, for direction on Long’s
football future. When Webb
gave clearance for Long to participate in August training
camp, Burton welcomed the
youngster into the fold.
“Dr. Webb did a lot of research and was very thorough
in review of Steven’s situation,”
Burton says. “I have full confidence in him knowing what he
was talking about.”
Long redshirted last season,
playing with the scout team and
enjoying his rebirth as a football
player.
“I was excited to get back on
the field, to be back with the
boys,” he says. “I really missed
it. I didn’t know if I was going to
redshirt, but I wanted to get
back and see what I could do,
see how my body felt.
“It felt good. I took some good
hits, and everybody was worried about it at first. After a
while, it wasn’t a big thing anymore. It was just part of the
■ From page 1
thought for dead by some media
skeptics after the Arizona game,
and the Mariota-led team came
through.
“Our team believes in each
other,” Mariota says. “Even when
the game gets close, everyone
looks at each other and, ‘We can
do this.’ That’s awesome to be a
part of.”
The Ducks also will likely stay
in the four-team College Football
Playoff picture along with Mississippi State, Florida State, Alabama and TCU. And one SEC
team probably will fall out of the
picture after Saturday when Alabama plays Mississippi State.
■ Mariota’s accomplishments
keep adding up. At Utah, he went
17 of 29 for 239 yards and three
TDs passing while rushing 18
times for a net 114 yards and another score.
He became the first UO quarterback to top 9,000 career passing yards.
His 18 carries were a career
high.
He topped 100 yards rushing
for the fifth time.
He passed for a touchdown for
the 36th consecutive game (every
game of his UO career, in which
he has a 32-4 record), tied for
third-longest in NCAA history
with Graham Harrell of Texas
Tech.
He has passed for multiple
TDs in 10 consecutive games.
And Oregon improved to 17-0
when Mariota runs for at least
one score.
The weekly Mariota stat update:
Season (through 10 games) —
186-277 passing (67.1 percent),
2,780 yards, 29 TDs, two interceptions; 89 carries, 524 yards, eight
scores; one reception, 26 yards,
TD
Career — 661-999 passing (66.2
percent), 9,122 yards, 92 TDs, 12
interceptions; 291 rushes, 1,991
yards, 22 TDs; two receptions, 28
yards, one TD
His next pass attempt will be
the 1,000th of his career, and he
needs nine yards to reach 2,000
yards rushing.
■ Mariota’s running ability
continues to be something to behold, and it makes him the best
dual-threat quarterback in the
country. He’s so fast and, 36
games into his career, it still
seems that opponents don’t get
how to stop him.
How many times has Mariota
faded back to pass on secondand-long or third-and-long or
even fourth down and, with the
left side or right side of the field
opening up, sprinted into the
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PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, MAY 1, 2014 • TWICE
CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST
69
$
BIG MAN, little playing time
— SEE SPORTS, B8
NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUN
E.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND
THURSDAY
Food cart culture digs in,
grows up, has a few drinks
■ Not
longer
seen as
just a fad,
customers
relish new
options
Brett Burmeister waits to dig
PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
into his burger at Cartlandia,
the 30-food cart pod on
Southeast 82nd Avenue that
was the first in the city to get
a liquor license. Now a dozen
others have followed suit.
TRIBUNE
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
A couple of years ago, Portland’s food carts — beloved
by hipsters, downtown business people, neighborhood
folks and tourists alike —
offered strictly PG fare.
Now, they’re all grown up.
Nearly a third of the city’s
food cart pods now serve
beer,
wine or cocktails.
Thirteen of the 36 food
cart
pods citywide have in the
past
two years sought and received
liquor licenses from the Oregon
Liquor Control Commission.
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014 •
TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S
Bike
envoy
gears up
for fun
Yikes!
Film festival, other
events lighten up
city’s bike culture
11
WHAT
THE HECK
ARE WE SO
AFRAID OF?
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
There used to be a time
when cyclists in Portland
would whoop and holler
during videos of other cyclists
blowing past stop signs,
weaving in
and out of
traffic and
disobeying
the rules of
the road.
Not anymore, says
Ayleen Crotty,
a self-proclaimed “bike
culturalist”
who’s produced dozens
of bike-themed
events, rides
— Ayleen Crotty and festivals
in Portland
since 2002.
“We don’t do that here,”
Crotty says. “We share
the
road. It’s actually how
we’re
living, staying alive, getting
around to our friends’
houses,
school and work. Nowadays
don’t have that in Portland, we
and we don’t need it.”
here are days, more than
That’s not to say that
a few,
when Susan Lehman
bike-obsessed in Portland the
feels, if not
take
Story by Peter Korn
torn, at least tugged by
their cycling too seriously.
the possibility of what could
To the contrary, 38-year-old
Photos by Jaime Valdez
Lehman works as a Portland be done.
Crotty, who lives in Woodlawn,
Police Bureau sex abuse victim
has made it her mission
advocate. Her job
“I have thought to myself,
is to help women who
make Portland’s bike culture to
have been raped.
I would like
to get this bad guy off
fun and quirky as possible. as
On the job, she is as likethe street,” Lehman
says.
While advocates lobby
ly to hug a teenage
girl
Lehman is one of two
more bike infrastructure for
who has been sexually
victim advocates
and
funding and entrepreneur
abused as she is to spend hired five years ago by the Portland Police
s
come up with new
an entire afternoon lining Bureau after a 2007 city audit determined
cyclistthat Portland had a remarkably
friendly innovations, Crotty
up shelter for a victim
low rate
has
who of conviction in
found her niche.
sexual assault cases.
is homeless. At night,
FIRST OF
Too
she many victimized
“I stay focused on the fun
women,
occasionally finds herself
TWO PARTS
the audit noted,
and
flair, and leave the advocacy
in tears, having success- were not coming forward to work with police, and not following
and politics to others,”
fully maintained the
through to testify
she
pro- after their assailant
fessional barriers her
says.
was arrested.
job requires, saving
It was hoped that advocates
emotional reaction for
Working as a photographer
her private time. with
working
And sometimes, in her
assaulted women might
and event marketer
private moments, cutors
help
by day,
Lehman gives way to
achieve a higher conviction proseCrotty has founded
the feelings she is
rate, as
many of
not allowed to voice on
the job.
See RAPE / Page 2
See BIKE / Page 13
“I feel like
we’re
capturing
an
important
time in bike
history in
Portland
and the
U.S.”
J TUESDAY EDITION
ay Harris is an intelligent
man,
snap judgments or irrational not given to
beliefs.
There’s a Ph.D. in his closet
and a lifetime of
teaching in his past. And
to his sense of personal safety, yet, when it comes
Harris willingly
confesses that how he feels
makes no sense.
Harris says he feels less
safe, more vulnerable to
Crime fear stats
crime, than he did 20 years
“All I know is my
■ Portland murders
ago — even though he
house got broken
declined by 49 percent
knows statistically he’s
into, and every week
from 1995 to 2010.
safer. He has lived in the
■ Portland aggravated
one of my neighbors
Northeast Portland Kerns
assaults declined 70
tells me about a
neighborhood since 1981.
percent from 1995 to
property crime,”
He’s not alone.
2010.
says Kerns
“People are basically
■ Portland robberies
neighborhood
declined 56 percent
afraid,” says Portland
resident Jay Harris
from 1995 to 2010.
State University criminol(top)
to explain what
■ 52% of Oregonians
ogist Kris Henning, who
he knows is an
believe Oregon crime
has been studying people’s
is increasing.
irrational fear of
attitudes toward crime.
■ 10% of Oregonians
crime. PSU
“Most people believe
believe Oregon crime
ciminologist Kris
(crime) has gone up, that
is decreasing.
Henning (left) says
we’re at epidemic levels,”
■ 25% of Oregonians
TV news conveys an
he adds.
believe local crime is
outsized picture of
What Henning knows is
increasing.
crime in Portland.
that crime in Portland is at
■ 12% of Oregonians
a historically low level. Vibelieve local crime is
TRIBUNE PHOTOS:
decreasing.
JAIME VALDEZ
olent crime is about half
often the perception affects
■ Two out of three
what it was 25 years ago.
reality.
Portland economy and makes
People who feel unsafe develop
Americans think crime
In Henning’s view, it’s imeveryone less safe
attitude toward police, according a more negative because street activity is a crime
overall is getting worse.
portant to figure out why
deterrent.
to Henning, and
Jay Harris and his wife haven’t
are less likely to assist police
in fighting crime in the
stopped leaving
Data from: PSU Criminal Justice there’s such a disconnect their
house. But a year ago, the
neighborhoods. People who
Policy Research Institute, 2011 between reality
two of them
feel unsafe, Hen- for a short
and peo- ning says, don’t
Gallup poll
walk and when they returned went out
visit downtown or they venture
ples’ perceptions, because
they found
out
from their homes less frequently,
which hurts the
See CRIME / Page 2
“Criminologists
are screaming
at the top of
our lungs that
we’ve been
experiencing a
crime drop, but
we get outscreamed by so
many other
outlets, and a lot
of it is TV news.”
TRIB
SERIES
After failed mayoral
bid, politico seeks
county chair post
Bill my:
Visa
IT’S A LAUGH RIOT!
— SEE LIFE, PAGE B1
MC
Discover
AmEx
Check
how she knew the man.
He
had raped her just a few
blocks away.
Kim (not her real name),
says she hardly reacted
to the
hug. What could she do?
After
the rape she had felt the
same
sense of impotence. Convinced
nothing would be done
to the
man, she had not bothered
to
See HOMELESS / Page 2
BONUS!
might well wonder which
Francesconi will show up to
run the
county if he wins.
Will it be the activist Catholic
committed to workers,
the poor
and dispossessed? Or
will it be
the friend of Portland’s
business
elite known to some as
the “$1
million man?”
When Jim Francesconi
first
Right out the gate in this
ran for Portland City
race,
Council
Francesconi adopted a
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN
message
HOUSE in 1996, he was the social jusFilmed by Bike founder Ayleen
sounding like his old self,
— Jim Francesconi
tice-minded community
saying
orga- the rising gap
Crotty launched the iconic
between rich and
nizer, the friend to the
Former City
event
injured poor is the key
in Portland 12 years ago.
By JOSEPH GALLIVAN
worker and disadissue of our time.
Commissioner
The
the smaller lot next door, four-day
youth and others, working
The Tribune
he
“We’re leaving a
festival kicks off April
vantaged, the outJim Francisconi
out of
proposed to demolish the
at the Clinton Street Theater. 19 sider pounding
1902
lot of people behind,”
is tackling social St. Andrew Catholic Church on
Queen Anne Victorian
on
Northwest Portland’s old
home
Northeast Alberta Street
Francesconi told
the doors of City
issues head-on
and build seven townhouses.
and
Goldsmith house may yet
Eighth Avenue. Francesconi
community leaders
Hall.
be The Northwest District
in his campaign
saved from the bulldozer.
Assomet his wife and lifelong
in Gresham’s RockBut after eight
to be the next
partner
Developer Marty Kehoe’s ciation heard about the plan
in
the
wood
Jesuit
years
neighborhood
program,
on
too late and tried to stop
the City
Multnomah
and
company bought the site
him.
joined the St. Andrew
at a recent roundtaCouncil, Francescoat
congregaCounty chair.
1507 N.W. 24th Ave. in March But Kehoe’s crew was already
tion, where he remains
ble discussion. “We
ni’s political career fizzled
an
active
PAMPLIN
for $1.5 million. Adding
after
MEDIA
need to talk about the
member.
it to
he cozied-up to downtown
fact that run for offi
GROUP: JIM CLARK
See HOUSE / Page 15
busi- poverty’s almost
ce again, finally reYears later, Francesconi’s
ness leaders, raising an
doubled in the laxed
Caunprec- last 11 years
that stance, Francesconi student at St. Bernard’s High tholicism
in
factored
edented
the
county.”
School, Francesconi
into the 2004
$1 million in an unsuc“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge
says. “I think she realizes
Francesconi’s failed
is to
that first from the Catholic was the mayor’s race, when he came out
cessful bid for mayor.
bid
deliver balanced news that refl
school
ects the
mayor led to some deep for public service is who I am.”
A decade after that
attend Stanford University. to in favor of civil unions for samestories of our communities. Thank
soulFrancesconi, 61, likes
embaryou
sex couples, but not
to derassing defeat, Francesconi searching, he says. “It made me scribe
for reading our newspapers.”
Francesconi identified
gay marhimself as “100 percent
with riage. That same
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN
is back seeking the Multnomah wiser and stronger and clearer Catholic,
the ascendant liberal
year, DemoJR.
wing of cratic standard-bear
100 percent Italian.” He
about what I care about.”
OWNER & NEIGHBOR
County chair post, one
the 1960s-era Catholic
er John
grew up in Eureka, Calif.,
of two
Church, Kerry, a Catholic
As his decades-long record
main contenders along
running for
of est lumber and fishing a mod- inspired by Robert Kennedy,
with for- community
president, staked out
town not
activism attests, far
mer county commissioner
the same
from the Oregon border, Dorothy Day and the anti-war position.
Francesconi has never
and state lawmaker
Berrigan brothers. After
been close to his extended
Deborah content to
Stanfamily. His ford, he
But that was a year
just practice law and
Kafoury.
moved to Portland to
when
dad tended bar and
retreat
some local governments,
his mom join the Jesuit
to private life. His wife,
Multnomah County
includVolunteer Corps. ing
was a bank teller, and
voters who initially
his grand- His assignment:
Multnomah and Benton
didn’t want him to parents
recreation
lived next door. A star
work with inner-city
black
See FRANCESCONI / Page 14
Portland Tribune
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
One year $69 *MUST BE PREPAID -Inside
LOCAL SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Portland Tribune
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
Kim was walking in Old
Town recently when
a man
came up and gave her
a big
bear hug before stepping
back and continuing
on his
way. Later, Kim, a tiny
sprite
of a woman who has
been
homeless on and off in
Old
Town for years, explained
Can Francesconi be the com
eback kid?
— Charis Kubrin,
University of California
criminologist
City_____________________________________ Zip__________________ Email_________________________________________________
Payment enclosed
For many women on street, rape
is fact of life, goes unreported
THURSDAY EDITION
NW
neighbors fume as
Address_______________________________________________________________________________________ Apt
___________________
old house faces last days
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JOSEPH GALLIVAN
Susan Lehman, a
Portland Police Bureau
advocate for sex assault
victims, talks with a
former homeless woman
who has been victimized
several times on the
streets.
Homeless, mentally
ill most vulnerable
T
Name ____________________________________________________________ Phone __________________________________
■ Builder
struggles
with plans
for 1902
home as
opposition
looms
FOR RAPE VICTIMS –
A LIGHT IN DARKNESS
■ Police Bureau advocate Susan
Lehman helps sex
assault victims recover from crisis
STORY BY
PETER KORN
The Goldsmith
house at 1507
N.W. 24th Ave.
awaits its fate:
deconstruction
and replacement
by townhouses
or a last-minute
reprieve from
the wrecking
ball.
BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIB
UNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY
AND THURSDAY
approved the restrictions
as permanent rules last Friday,
for the
first time differentiating
food
carts from other outdoor
areas
like patios and sidewalk seating.
The rules limit customers
to
— Steven Shomler no more than two drinks at a
time (16 ounces of beer or
cider,
6 ounces of wine, or 2 ounces
of
distilled spirits); except to
Thanks to a set of OLCC
allow
re- two people to share
a standard
strictions on the licenses,
the 750-ml bottle of wine,
and
infusion of alcohol hasn’t
had people to share a 64-ounce three
any ill effect on the industry.
pitch“We haven’t seen any public- er of beer.
“No minors” signs must
safety impact at these businessbe
posted, and there’s no drinking
es,” says Christie Scott, an
OLCC
spokeswoman. The OLCC
board
See FOOD CARTS / Page 14
“People are now opening
food carts with the
intention of it being a first
step in being a brand.”
■ Crime is down just about everyw
here. Fear is on the rise. Details at
Subscribe today and get your Tuesday and Thursday
Portland Tribune mailed* to you each week!
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spot in UO’s offense and respect
for his work ethic.
The tight end job likely will
fall to Evan Baylis and Johnny
Mundt. They have combined
for three receptions for 39
yards this season. Brown, who
had 25 catches for 420 yards
and six TDs, also had been a
great blocker.
■ There were other injuries,
which Helfrich will never discuss.
Suffice it to say, a bye week has
come at the right time for the
Ducks.
Grasu was wearing a brace on
his left leg after the Utah game.
Ekpre-Olomu hurt his toe, but he
could have returned to the game,
he claims. Defensive lineman Alex Balducci hobbled off the field
at one point. And, the Ducks are
still down offensive linemen Matt
Pierson and Andre Yruretagoyena. All in all, the Ducks’ ability to
run and pass protect could be in
question again.
■ Grasu made his team-leading 50th career start at Utah. If
Grasu can’t play against Colorado, the center duties would fall to
redshirt freshman Doug Brenner
from Jesuit High. Brenner had a
couple low snaps and one that a
bit high and through Mariota’s
hands at Utah.
“Doug did a good job stepping
up,” Mariota says. “We’ve got a
lot of trust in him. We’ve got to
roll with what we have. ... There’s
a little difference in the way they
snap. That’s all on us as quarterbacks; we’ve got to make sure we
catch and make sure we see the
ball into our hands, just like a receiver does.”
Says Helfrich: “Doug played really well. He had a couple of low
snaps, and one that went right
through Marcus’ hands. We have
a ton of confidence in Doug. He
played very well with the exception of the low snaps, against a
very, very good front.”
— SEE SPORTS, B8
Getting your Portland news is easier than you think.
YES! Please
space for a first down? It’s almost
become his signature play. It’s
almost like he and UO coaches
plan on it, although Mariota says
“not necessarily.”
Utah was the latest victim.
“Utah’s defense plays a lot of
man (coverage),” he says,
“and what happens with man
defense is everyone’s running down field,
and a couple of
times I was able
to escape the
BRENNER
pocket and create a little. The
receivers did an awesome job
blocking.”
■ Royce Freeman had 99 yards
on 15 carries, following up his
98-yard performance against
Stanford and three consecutive
games before that with 100 or
more. He also had a touchdown,
giving him 14. He has 945 yards
rushing (5.6 per carry).
■ Brown was carted off the
Rice-Eccles Stadium field on Saturday and taken by ambulance to
a Salt Lake City hospital, where
he stayed through Sunday and
where coach Mark Helfrich expected him to be for several more
days. Oregon doesn’t disclose
any information about injuries,
but Helfrich conceded that
Brown was out for the year. (Remember, UO coach Chip Kelly
rarely talked about even UO career-ending injuries, such as the
ones to John Boyett and Carson
York).
“We’re doing everything we
can for him,” Helfrich says. “It’s a
long-term process. But he’s a
competitive guy. ... It’s already
galvanized our team.”
Brown had recovered from his
snow throwing/dumping incident and Alamo Bowl suspension last December to earn his
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UO: It’s next men up at tight end
484915.070814
Bob’s
Mark Banker knew pressure
would be an important asset
against Falk. The Beavers
blitzed “maybe 40 percent of
the time,” Riley said. Four
times, they got to Falk for
sacks. It wasn’t enough.
“Our biggest issue — probably the biggest of the game —
was we couldn’t do much with
a four-man rush,” Riley said.
“When we did blitz, our coverage guys were isolated and
(the Cougars) made the plays.”
■ On the game’s first play
from scrimmage, Mannion
went deep to Rahmel Dockery
for 49 yards. On the play, Dockery — Bolden’s backup at
flanker — lined up at split end
instead of Villamin. Bolden had
a great game,
but Dockery
never had another pass
thrown to him
all day. Villamin had a nice
game, too, with
five receptions
for 84 yards,
DOCKERY
but it would
seem Dockery
warranted more action.
“Probably,” Riley said, “but
both Victor and Jordan were
having plenty of success. With
Hunter Jarmon and Dockery,
we have a lot of receivers who
are growing week to week.”
■ The Beavers have led in
the fourth quarter of their last
three home losses, to Utah,
California and Washington
State.
“We’ve had too many opportunities in the fourth quarter of
games that have gone by the
wayside,” Riley said. “It’s all of
our fault — the coaches, the
players. We all take responsibility for it. We are doing everything we can to straighten
this thing out, to play good
football and to execute. We’re
trying to cover every base.
We’re all in it together.
“It’s going to be a big job for
our coaches, for our leaders.
We can get this thing ready to
go.”
■ Arizona State will be the
best opponent Oregon State
has seen all season. The Sun
Devils have a veteran quarterback in senior Taylor Kelly, an
excellent runner in junior D.J.
Foster (821 yards, six TDs) and
a top receiver in junior Jaelen
Strong (62 catches, nine
scores). The Devils rank third
in the Pac-12 in total defense
(396.6 yards allowed per game)
behind Stanford (281.1) and Oregon State (384.7).
“Kelly is a very efficient operator,” Riley said. “He executes their offense very well.
Strong is a terrific receiver,
and they run a variety of stuff,
a multiple offense with a lot of
play-action and some zone
read plays. Their defense has
gotten better as the year’s gone
on. They’ll blitz a lot, and they
have a lot of speed on the defensive side of the ball.
“They’re on a very good run.
It’s going to be a very tough
game. We’re going to have to
play better than we’ve been
playing to have a chance to
win.”
than whoever’s chasing him. You
put all those things together,
that’s how you have those days
like he had against Northern Arizona.”
With limited opportunities,
Long is having a very good rookie
campaign.
“It’s gone better than I had
imagined,” he says. “I’m happy,
but not content. Still working
hard to find areas to improve on.”
Coury looks at what his friend
has accomplished with admiration.
“I wasn’t shocked with (the
Northern Arizona) game,” he
says. “I knew as soon as he got his
shot, he’s made it.
“I don’t think anyone’s gone
through perseverance any more
than Steven. He deserves everything he gets. he’s one of the
hardest-working kids I know.
Great attitude. Always has a
smile on his face. He feels he’s
blessed to be here.”
How does Long look at the
hurdles he has faced?
“That’s life,” says Long, a communications major (minor in
marketing) who hopes for a career with Nike some day. “Ever
since I was brought into this
world, there have been ups and
downs. It’s never been a steady
path. You have to work with it
and make the best of your opportunities.”
Burton says the future is bright
for Long.
“He’ll have a good career
here,” the PSU coach says. “But
to me, the most important thing
is, he embodies everything we
want in our program.”
Inside
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of workers. Most trial
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them because it’s not
lucrative.”
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473187.051414
Defense gives up
too many big plays;
penalties hurt, too
game.”
Long played only special
teams in Portland State’s first
two games this season, running
third string behind senior Shaquille Richard and sophomore
Nate Tago. Long made his debut
in the backfield against Washington State, carrying nine times
for 36 yards. He had only a dozen
attempts in the next three
games, then exploded with his
performance against Northern
Arizona that was the most rushing yards by a freshman in the
FCS ranks all season.
Against the Lumberjacks,
Long and runs of 66, 62 and 61
yards — likely the only time in
school history a player has had
three totes of 60 or more yards
in a game.
The next week, Long rushed
for 118 yards on 21 attempts in a
30-17 win at Weber State. He
gained 21 yards on only six attempts against Idaho State, then
had only two carries on last Saturday’s loss at Montana State.
“All three of our backs are
pretty good,” Burton says. “The
guy who was hitting (against the
Bobcats) was Shaq.”
For the season, Long has 512
yards and two touchdowns. He
ranks second on the team behind
Richard, who has 613 yards and
two scores. Long’s 7.5-yard-percarry average is the best in the
Big Sky.
“Steven has great feet, great vision,” Burton says. “He’s not little,
he’s just short. At running back,
that’s an advantage. You can hide
behind people.
“And he’s really strong. You
add in quickness, and he’s faster
than people think. He has football
speed. He just seems to be faster
SPORTS B3
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Eggers: Clopton calls
for his own reliever
■ From page 1
TRIBUNE PHOTOS: JONATHAN HOUSE
Jesuit High players celebrate their Class 6A volleyball championship after beating Central Catholic 3-1 in the state final Saturday at Liberty High.
The Crusaders were undefeated this season.
PrepWatch
Jesuit and Central Catholic
returned to their customary spots
as rulers of Oregon prep volleyball
this season, and the Crusaders
beat the Rams 3-1 in Saturday’s
Class 6A final at Liberty High.
In the past 11 years, Jesuit has
won four state titles, Central
Catholic three.
The Rams took the first set
25-15 in the championship
match, but Jesuit’s tall front line
then took control, and the
Crusaders won sets 2-4 25-18,
25-11 and 25-15 to cap a 31-0
season. Central finished with a
25-5 record that included four
losses to the Crusaders.
Jesuit junior Nicole Peterson
and senior Symone Tran made
first-team all-tournament, along
with Central Catholic senior Kealia
Rosa.
■ La Salle Prep finished second in the 5A volleyball tourney at
Liberty. The Falcons lost 3-1 to St.
Helens in the final. La Salle senior
Marlie Norman made the all-tournament team.
■ Oregon Episcopal School lost
3-1 to both Santiam Christian and
Salem Academy after reaching the
3A/2A/1A quarterfinals at Lane
Community College.
Football
No. 1-ranked Central Catholic
will face No. 16 West Albany in a
Central Catholic cheer a point as the Rams take the
first set in the 6A volleyball title match against Jesuit.
6A second-round playoff game
Friday night at Hillsboro Stadium.
The Rams advanced last week by
beating Thurston 70-19. CC is
9-1; West Albany is 7-3.
Jesuit, ranked seventh by the
Oregon School Activities
Association, also is in the second
round. The Crusaders will be home
Friday night against No. 10 North
Medford (8-2). Jesuit won last
week 41-14 against Gresham.
■ The Portland Interscholastic
League had no one get past the
round of 32. Wilson and
Roosevelt, who both moved up
from 5A this year, lost by a combined 90-23; Wilson fell 41-7 to
North Medford, and Roosevelt got
Central Catholic’s Ronnie Rust (left) and LaMar
Winston get happy after a touchdown in the Rams’ 70-19
first-round football playoff victory against Thurston.
bounced by West Linn 49-16. PIL
champ Grant, ranked one spot
below West Albany, lost 16-6 to
the Bulldogs. Clackamas built a
21-0 lead and was never headed
in beating Lincoln 28-21.
A PIL team hasn’t gotten out of
the round of 32 in 6A football
since 2011.
Boys soccer
Grant, Jesuit and Central
Catholic, all top-six teams in
the 6A rankings, are in
Tuesday’s state semifinals. The
Generals (13-2-2) will play
host to No. 15 Grants Pass
(12-4-1). No. 1-rated Central
Catholic (15-1-1) is the home
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
team against No. 5 Jesuit (133-1).
■ In Tuesday’s 3A/2A/1A
semis, No. 1 Oregon Episcopal
will play host to No. 5 Creswell,
and No. 2 Portland Adventist
Academy will be at home
against Blanchet Catholic.
Girls soccer
League rivals Catlin Gabel
and OES are paired in
Tuesday’s 3A/2A/1A semifinal
at OES. The host Aardvarks are
ranked No. 1 in the state and
have a 12-1-3 record. Catlin
Gabel, fifth-ranked, is 13-3-1.
OES won both regular-season
meetings 2-1.
they need — a couple of AllStars in LaMarcus (Aldridge)
and Damian (Lillard), and the
addition of (Steve) Blake and
(Chris) Kaman takes their collective basketball IQ to an even
higher level. They’re ready to
take another step.”
■ Bill
Schonely is a
state-of-Oregon
icon and a
member of the
Naismith Basketball Hall of
Fame, and now
the legendary
broadcaster
has the ultiSCHONELY
mate honor: A
beer in his name.
Pyramid Breweries has introduced the “Schonz’ Red Session
Ale” that will be marketed
throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. I had a couple
of glasses of it and it’s good —
flavorful and full-bodied.
“It’s nice,” observes Schonely,
85 years young. “I guess I’ve
made it now, eh?”
■ Veteran agent Aaron Goodwin, who reps Damian Lillard,
had a curious choice of shoes
with his suit at the Blazers-Cavaliers game — a pair of black
LeBron James Lifestyle Nikes.
Lillard, of course, is an Adidas
guy. But Goodwin was the first
agent for James, Nike’s biggest
star these days. And Goodwin
chose to pay tribute to his good
friend and former client.
“Just for one night,” Goodwin
said with a laugh. “I’ll put these
shoes in the closet after tonight.”
■ New Cavaliers general
manager David Griffin went outside the box to hire David Blatt
as head coach. Blatt, a Boston
native, played and coached in
Europe for more than 30 years
— he coached Russia to the
bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics — but had never coached in
the NBA.
Blatt did not step into the easiest of situations. Expectations
are through the roof for a team
featuring James, Love and Kyrie
Irving. At least Blatt has a sense
of humor about it when asked
how the transition has been.
“I feel comfortable,” Blatt
says. “One thing I’m doing real
well with is the language. I’ve
been on top of that.”
But the jury will be out for a
while on the David Blatt Experi-
ment. He’ll have to gain the respect of his stars, and that won’t
be easy.
■ Sacramento has optioned
former Oregon State forward
Eric Moreland to its D-League
affiliate in Reno.
■ Mike Clopton and his wife,
Gayle, are in the midst of a road
trip that will carry them to NHL
games in Denver, St. Louis, Detroit, Buffalo and Columbus as
well as the Baseball Hall of
Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. It’s a
well-deserved respite for one of
the best baseball coaches in Oregon prep history, who recently
announced his retirement.
Clopton, who turns 68 next
month, coached 38 years in the
PIL — six at Jackson, 32 at Wilson — and guided the Trojans to
the state championship game
three times, winning in 2006 and
‘12.
“It was time,” Clopton says. “I
have some things to do. I want
to play a little more golf, read
more books, spend more time
with our four grandkids. And
(long-time assistant coach) Jeremy Shetler is the right guy to
take my place.”
Clopton started coaching as a
17-year-old high school junior
when he and boyhood pal
Dwight Jaynes, the Comcast
SportsNet Northwest columnist/
commentator,
served as
Babe Ruth cocoaches for
the Cleveland
Indians.
“I really enjoyed coaching
more than I enjoyed playing,”
Clopton says.
CLOPTON
Clopton did a
marvelous job of it, amassing a
high school record of 613-438 to
rank third on the Oregon bigschool win list behind only Dave
Gasser and Tom Campbell.
Clopton also coached 40 years of
American Legion summer ball.
“Never took a summer off,” he
says. “Missed a couple of games
for weddings. I coached more
than 2,000 Legion games, more
than 1,000 high school games
and more than 200 Babe Ruth
games.
“The highlight for me was the
opportunity to work with the
kids and coaches. There were so
many great friendships that developed over the years. That’s
what I’ll miss the most.”
[email protected]
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H E L P WANTE D
Radio Advertising Sales
HUMAN SERVICES SPECIALIST 3
St. Helens & Hillsboro
The Department of Human Services branch office within
the Children, Adults and Families Program is seeking to
fill two Human Service Specialist 3 positions to provide
and determine eligibility services for Self Sufficiency
programs. These positions are permanent, full time,
bilingual and are located in St. Helens and Hillsboro.
This is an opportunity to join a team committed to
providing excellent services and to follow your interests
in a large, diverse organization. Benefits include a
competitive salary and family health benefits.
Application information and a detailed job
announcement are available at website
http://www.oregonjobs.org (search for job posting
DHS14-1326 and DHS14-1369A). DHS is an AA/EOE.
REPORTER
The Gresham Outlook has an immediate opening for a
reporter covering Troutdale, Fairview, Wood Village
and Corbett. The Outlook is a twice weekly newspaper,
which took first place in the 2014 general excellence
category of the ONPA Better Newspapers Contest.
We are seeking a reporter who enjoys enterprise
journalism and who demonstrates a commitment to
community-based journalism. This reporter also will
write features, and cover general news and breaking
news. This reporter also will embrace online and social
media. The ideal candidate will have a four-year
degree in journalism and three years newspaper reporting experience. Strong writing and editing skills are a
requirement, as is the ability to meet deadlines and
manage several projects at one time. We are looking
for a team player with a passion for accuracy, a sense
of curiosity and the proven ability to turn out a large volume of compelling news content each week. Please
email a short letter of interest, resume and at least
three samples of your published work to Steven Brown,
executive editor, at [email protected] No
phone calls please. To learn more about our newspaper, visit www.greshamoutlook.com or check out our
Facebook page at
www.facebook.com/TheGreshamOutlook.
Use the words “Outlook Reporter” in the subject line.
The application deadline is Oct. 17.
_____________________________________
Marketing Consultant
Lost & Found
The Gresham Outlook, a twice-weekly newspaper, is
seeking a high energy, motivated salesperson to join
our sales team as an outside Marketing Consultant. We
are looking for someone with previous advertising
experience, a proven track record of success, a strong
prospector, organizational and computer skills. An
existing account base will be provided, but our new
team member will be required to contact and create
new accounts. Must have reliable transportation and a
clean driving record. Pre-employment drug screen and
good references required. This is a full time position
with commission on all sales, a base salary, mileage
expenses and full benefits that include health care and
vacation. If you have a passion for sales and are
committed to success, send your resume and cover
letter to Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director –
[email protected]
Oregon’s 2014 Radio Station of the Year, KPAM 860,
and sister station Sunny 1550, are seeking Portland’s
next great radio Account Executive. If you know how to
build long-term relationships with small to mid-size
business owners, care about bringing results to those
businesses, and can do it without ratings, then KPAM
and Sunny could be your next home. The successful
candidate will be motivated with high integrity and a
strong desire to win and make a good living. Extensive
experience in broadcast media sales is necessary.
KPAM and Sunny are two locally-owned radio stations
offering excellent benefits and above average compensation plans in an employee focused environment.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Please send resume to:
General Sales Manager
Email: [email protected]
No phone calls please
Line Cooks (Sautee, Grill, Pizza & Salad)
Bugatti’s Family of Restaurants is Oregon owned and
operated since 1991. We have the distinctive dinner
house Ristorante in West Linn on Hwy. 43, and three
family style Italian restaurants in Beaverton,
Tanasbourne, and Oregon City. We are currently
looking for cooks (sauté, grill, pizza & salad) for our
Cedar Hills and Oregon City locations.
We are looking for individuals who want long term
positions with the opportunity to grow within the
company. Must be a team player and available to work
a flexible schedule.
To Apply: www.bugattisrestaurant.com
Download, print and complete an application and email
to the General Manager of the restaurant in which you
are interested in becoming a team member. You may
also stop by the restaurant in person between the hours
of 2 pm to 4 pm.
All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment
criminal background check and drug test.
Bugatti’s is an equal opportunity employer.
✵
We Want Your
Newspapers!
King City Lions Club
Call Brad today at 503.381.6239 and arrange
for a pick-up of your newspapers. Benefits King
City Lions Club charities.
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
Help
Wanted
✵
Black, short-haired,
domestic,
slightly-built, 5 years old,
9 pound, neutered male,
no distinctive markings,
no collar or microchip.
Went missing
October 27, 2014. His scent
was tracked by a
professional
Search and Rescue team
along Tacoma’s south-side
sidewalk to a spot at
10th and Tacoma.
There, his scent abruptly
ended, indicating he was
grabbed and carried off by
either a person or a
predator(coyote?).
Announcements/
Notices
CDL Bus Drivers
Seeking CDL Bus Drivers,
Sandy, Oregon. For more
information, please email
[email protected]
Call 503-337-2222 x1313
Newberg Graphic
Seeks Reporter
Thanksgiving
Holiday
Deadline
The Newberg Graphic, a
member of the Pamplin
Media Group of newspapers, is seeking a seasoned reporter to fill a position that will open in November. This reporter is
responsible for a variety
of beats, including business, arts & leisure, government and general assignment. The newspaper, located 25 miles
southwest of Portland in
the beautiful Chehalem
Valley, is looking for a reporter with two or more
years of experience working
at
a
weekly,
twice-weekly or small
daily newspaper, someone capable of producing
12 to 17 stories weekly,
with good interviewing
and time management
skills. Salary is at the industry standard for small
newspapers and there is
a benefit and 401(k)
package as well. Experience with Twitter and updating the newspaper’s
Facebook page are a
plus. Submit a resume,
cover letter, references
and about a dozen clips
of a variety of stories via
email to Managing Editor
Gary Allen at
The Portland Tribune
We will have the following
early deadlines:
11/27 edition
LineCopy, Mon,11/24 at
Noon
Display, Fri, 11/21 at
Noon
NEED HELP
WITH YOUR
CLASSIFIED
AD?
✵
Business
Opportunities
Call Mindy!
503-546-0760
for ad rates, general
information or help
writing your ad in any one
of our
Community Newspaper
Publications
and get the RESULTS
you want!
PLEASE NOTE:
Abbreviations destroy the
intent of your advertisement. Your advertisement
should be attractive and
easy to read. Let us help
you put together your advertisement. Call us today
at:
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community-classifieds.com
503-620-SELL (7355)
If you have any information
specific to the abduction (did
you hear or see anything?),
please contact me. Reward
for return, no questions
asked:
Contact: Elizabeth at
949-545-8169 or Dan at
585-269-1670.
Community Classifieds
office will be closed on
Thursday, November 27th
[email protected]
com.
326270.040110 RC
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
Lost cat in
Sellwood
[email protected]
papers.com
SELL your unwanted items in
the classifieds. Call today.
503-620-SELL
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
FOR SALE: E-Commerce
website & wrestling singlet
mfg. business. Included:
singlets.com domain
name, 5 ind. sew mach. 3
Juki over seamers, 2400 &
3600 series, Kansai
cover-stitch. Pegasus
binder, Chickadee hand
held cutters. Inv. of 300+
completed singlets, 250 +
yds fabric, patterns &
thread, as well as 30 yr client list, art work & vendors.
For assistance in placing
YOUR CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENT,
please call
the experts at
Community Classifieds
503-620-SELL (7355)
community-classifieds.com
Antiques/Collectibles
SALE
Grand
Re-Opening!
First, we would like to
apologize for going out
of business. But our
son, John, came down
with Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS.) We rented
out 2 portions of our
shop but we still have
the good stuff you want.
Formal Dining sets,
china cabinets, hall
trees, bookcases, secretaries, cedar chests,
sets of chairs, lots of
clocks, dishes, jewelry
and off the wall stuff!
Thank you for 35 years
in the business, hope to
see you soon.
-----------------6712 NE SANDY BLVD
503-287-8796
PONY EXPRESS
ANTIQUES
Appliances
WASHER/DRYER
$125/set. Fridge $150.
503-723-9227
FAX
Your classified ad :
(503) 620-3433
24 Hours per day
For personal
assistance, call
(503) 620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
B4 SPORTS
Bazaar
B
outique
November 15th 11-5
November 16th 12-2
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
DAYBED
Gold
&
white
frame
w/mattress.
Floral
bed
spread
&
bed
skirt,
w/blankets & sheets. $200
LAZ-E-BOY RECLINER
All leather, tan, 100%
warranty, like-new, hardly
used. $800 503-668-4975
Lawnmowers
5HP Troybilt CHIPPER
VAC, $300.
(503) 246-2866
FOOD LOCAL CRAFTS MUSIC ELVES!
Atkinson Memorial Church, 710 Sixth St., Oregon City 97045
www.AtkinsonChurch.org
28232.111114 c
Machinery & Tools
Pets & Supplies
Pets & Supplies
DUKE:
The Jewelry Buyer
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
C Standard
I’m the one-of-a-kind cat
you’ve been looking for! I
have a great big personality and I’m not shy about
showing my affection. Did
you notice that my eyes
are two different colors
yet? It’s true! I have a fractured pelvis which is healing with time and I have
some nerve weakness in
one leg giving me a swagger just like the Duke, John
Wayne! I have bounds of
energy and you’ll be
amazed at how agile I am,
considering my injuries.
Come visit me, Duke, at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday
or
call
503-292-6628 for info.
Poodle Puppies
Brown, red & black- male
& females available,
Ready Now!
Go to our Web site:
www.ourpoeticpoodles.net
or call (509)582-6027.
AUSTRALIAN
LABRADOODLES
Miscellaneous for
Sale
Miscellaneous
Wanted
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
Wanted small older
Crawler (bulldozer), any
model/condition running or
not or related equipment,
Skidsteer farm tractor. Any
old small track machines.
Also wanted old gas
pumps, advertising signs,
vending machines, cigarette, candy slot machines.
Any old novelty items. Private Party Cash. (360)
204-1017 or e-mail:
[email protected]
Sheds/Outdoor
Buildings
C STO POLE
B LD NGS
R D NG REN S
Bazaars/Flea
Markets
ting
“Celebra
!”
27 years
ADVERTISE YOUR
HOLIDAY SALE
IN OUR
BAZAAR BOUTIQUE!
28230.110414c
Weekdays:
10am - 8pm
Saturday:
10 am- 5pm
November 17th, 5-8pm
Call Today for
Pricing and Options!
Mindy • 503-546-0760
[email protected]
BE
rena
Barn etal
Siding
Replacement
Call red
.
.
or visit
barnsrusonline.com
Preview Night
with a $3 donation going to Love Rocks
(Memorial Fund for Anna & Abigail)
Jackie Lee - 503-327-4113
www.nightmarebazaar.com
Free admission
& parking
ccb# 117653
GRESHAM
HOLIDAY BAZAAR
Nov 14 & 15: 9 – 4
Clackamas Park
Friends Church
8120 SE Thiessen Rd
Vendors, Door Prizes,
Raffle, Baked Goods,
Homemade Candy, Snack
& Lunch Bar.
503.722.4047
45 Vendors, Homemade &
Boutique items, Lunch
served all day. Admission:
3 cans of food or donation.
MILWAUKIE
SE Linwood v
Exquisite handcrafted
Holiday and non-holiday
gifts, items & yummy
baked goods. $ to local
charities
Christmas items, jewelry,
dolls, candles, and much
more; plus lunch on Sat.
Proceeds to send kids to
camp.
C S
OR G NS
SELL NG
COLLECT ON OR
S NGLE P ECES
-
Reserve your beautiful
red, apricot or cream
medium / mini Labradoodle Puppy TODAY!
Eeyore is a calm and
cuddly cat who spends his
time waiting in anticipation
of his next meal. His last
family surrendered him to
the shelter because they
couldn’t care for him any
longer. Now, Eeyore is patiently waiting for his next
home – and hopefully that
home comes fully stocked
with toys and cat treats!
Eeyore can be visited at
the Cat Adoption Center in
the Tualatin Petco: 8775
Tualatin-Sherwood Rd
503-885-9224
catadoptionteam.org
Sat and Sun, 12 pm-4 pm
Learn about our GUARDIAN HOME PROGRAM
trailsendlabradoodles.com
-
facebook.com/trailsendlabradoodles
[email protected]
BALDWIN:
PORTLAND N:
“Original” Rose City
GUN SHOW
Nov 22nd, 9am-6pm
Nov 23rd, 9am-4pm
Portland EXPO Center
Admission $10
503-363-9564
wesknodelgunshows.com
Cherr ood
illage Ba aar
ed Nov
am- pm
SE
th ve
Arts, Crafts, Jewelry, 2
rooms full of wonderful gift
ideas. Lunch available in
our restaurant!
503-546-7924
NOV 21st & 22nd: 9-4
Westmoreland Union
Manor
6404 NE 23rd Ave
Handmade gifts & food
Vendors Welcome!!!
Timber
LUMBER:
Western Red Cedar, 1”x6”
chip lap, random lengths,
approx 1,700 board ft.
Mixed, clear & knotty.
Excellent for interior
panelling. $1200.
For info call 503-630-7366
or 505-720-0703
STORAGE
PROBLEMS??
istoric Overlook
ouse - olida
Cra t Ba aar
Nov
- pm
Nov
- pm
N elrose Dr
Local artisans and crafters,
bake sale, over 30
vendors.
historicoverlookhouse.org
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a Marketplace
ad to sell your overstock
items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
Food/Meat/Produce
B
P
T
R
•Apples - MANY Varieties
•Bartlett Pears •Onions
•Peppers •Veggies
•Winter Squash & MORE!
Stand open 1:30 - 5:30
Closed Monday
503-982-9307
14070 Wilco Hwy
Woodburn
I’m a happy-go-lucky kitty
who is looking for my forever home. I’m a young
boy who enjoys exciting
games like chase the toy
mouse and follow the string. My outgoing personality will win you over! Stop
by Animal Aid’s Show &
Tell Saturday and and ask
for me, Baldwin! Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Belle The Ball Player
3 and 1/2 year old golden
chestnut colored, smart,
sensitive, loving 40 pound
spayed female mystery
hound dog mix, loves to
run, play and explore. Belle
will play ball until the cows
come home keeping you
quite fit. Fine with calm dog
companions. Very strong
work ethic, Intensely focused on people, has beginning obedience commands, did really well as a
demonstration dog in adog
obedience class. comes instantly with a whistle,
seeking calm quiet household : foster or foster to
adopt. For more info, call
503.625.4563
E-mail:
[email protected]
Gino’s gentle personality
emerges after he has had
an opportunity to relax and
become comfortable in a
new environment. This
sweet cat thrives on attention and will flourish in a
home with regular activity.
Gino loves to chase string
toys and to receive chin
scratches. Gino is waiting
at Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter: 14175
SW Galbreath Drive
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sun, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
Hi, I’m Suz, the beautiful
smoke and white colored
DSH kitty. My fur is very
soft and, compared to my
size, so is my purr! The
markings on my face almost make me look like I’m
wearing a mask – maybe I
can be your very own Supercat? I adore attention
and getting pets and hanging out with people. Right
now, I prefer to be a solo
cat, so I’m looking for a
home where I can be the
queen. Come visit me at
Animal Aid’s Show & Tell
Saturday
or
call
503-292-6628 option 3 for
more information.
LAVENDER: Is 13 years
old and she is healthy and
is doing well. This kitty is
sweet, snuggly and a lap
cat. She would love to
hang out with you and sit
and look out the window.
Please call Cat’s Cradle
Rescue 503.312.4296 for
further information or to
schedule a visit.
CHIHUAHUAS: Puppies,
Call for pricing. Financing
avail. Adult adoptions
also. Reputable Oregon
Kennel. Unique Colors,
Long & Short Haired, Tiny
to Hearty sizes. Health
Guaranteed, UTD Vaccinations/ Wormings, Litterbox
Trained, Socialized.
Video/Pictures/ Info/Virtual
Tour:
www.chi-pup.net
References Happily Supplied! Easy I-5 Access.
Drain, Oregon. Umpqua
Valley kennels, Vic & Mary
Kasser, 541-459-5951.
Clausine
LUCY: I am a beautiful little
girl who loves to cuddle
and be loved on by my person.
I look forward to
meeting you and hope we
can have lots of “snuggle
time soon.” For information
on how to help this cat and
perhaps adopt her please
contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue at 503.312.4296 and
we will put you in touch
with her owner. Cat’s Cradle is an all-volunteer,
non-profit
foster-home
based rescue serving Oregon cats who need new
homes. 100% of your
adoption fee goes to provide for the medical and
physical needs of the cats
in our care. We invite you
to become a foster parent
and experience the great
satisfaction of helping a cat
or kitten in need.
In a calm and attentive
home, Clausine is talkative, friendly, and adventurous. Clausine has a confident and lively personality
when she’s around patient
and slow-moving adults,
but the fast movements of
younger children can
sometimes make her nervous. Clausine adapts
quickly to a new environment and she likes attention. Clausine spends her
time at the Washington
Square PetSmart:
8825 SW Cascade Ave
503-644-3091
catadoptionteam.org
Sat and Sun, 12 pm-4 pm
Corrine
Pets & Supplies
PLEASE NOTE:
Abbreviations destroy the
intent of your advertisement. Your advertisement
should be attractive and
easy to read. Let us help
you put together your advertisement. Call us today
at:
503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
Pets & Supplies
N T RE
STR L N
S EP ERD
PUREBRED PUPPIES
FAMILY RAISED
Parents Onsite are Family
Pets, 1st shots, wormed,
dew claws & tails removed.
weighs between 15-25lbs,
$450 & Up
-
-
Have you ever seen such a
cute kitty smile?! I’m
Corrine the Lynx point Siamese and not only am I
adorable, I’m sweet, affectionate, and looking for my
purrfect match. I love to be
brushed more than anything and a nice warm lap,
it’s my favorite place to be!
Stop by Animal Aid’s Show
& Tell Saturday and and
ask for me, Corrine! Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or visit our website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
Hello there! I’m Murray, the
big, mellow orange and
white cat! Although I’m a
big guy, I’m a softie at
heart. I love nothing more
than curling up and taking
a nice long nap. When I’m
awake, I appreciate head
rubs. I’m not at all shy
about talking to you! My
raspy meow is just like me
– one of a kind! Please call
503-292-6628 option 3 or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
Malone is a big bundle of
energy and movement
wrapped in a tiny cat package. An active, busy
household where he can
get lots of attention and exercise would be the best
match. Malone is playful
and tolerant with children
over the age of ten; however, he doesn’t much like
other animals (especially
cats) and would be best as
the only pet in the home.
Malone will be an energetic, affectionate, and
talkative companion. Malone can’t wait to meet you
at Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter: 14175
SW Galbreath Drive
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Sat-Sun, 12-6 pm;
Closed Monday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
FACTORY SPECIAL
IS BACK!!!
NEW HOME 3 bdrm, 2 ba
$49,900 finished on site
JandMHomes.com
(503) 722-4500
WrightChoiceHomes.com
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
-
-
wrightchoicehomes.com
ROBIN
A home for the holidays
Apartments for Rent
bphitzapples.com
ADORABLE SIBERIAN
HUSKY/RED-NOSED
PITBULL PUPPIES for
sale. 8 wk+. $300 male,
$350 female. Loving purebred parents on site.
(503)666-7666
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
FOUND Near NE Springbrook, Siamese Cat
Call to identify.
(503) 537-9988
[email protected]
CHRISTMAS CRAFT
BAZAAR
PORTLAND
St Paul s
th nnual
Nov
-
ern Park olida
Ba aar
Nov
- pm
ern Park
Christian Church
SE olgate
SE PORTLAND:
PORTLAND
Gresham omen
o Elks
Christmas Ba aar
Nov
- pm
NE Division
th
ane
Sporting Goods
PORTLAND
MILWAUKIE:
Gifts, unique items,
gourmet foods, services
and travel. Local artisans &
merchants. Shop, eat,
enjoy live music & visit with
Santa!
ehicle
Storage
ERTO
Beaverton S
olida Ba aar
Nov
am- pm
S
ND ST
Ready for Christmas!
Gifts, Décor & Collectibles Bazaar
Washington County
Fair Complex
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
MURRAY:
Every Husband’s Nightmare
November 18-22
WE BUY GOLD
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
Model 1920 4x4
TRACTOR
w/front bucket &
accessories. 920 hours.
503-266-8480 8-5pm
FOOT PAIN?
Good Feet Service Plan
Complete package, must
sell, $295. Call For Details,
503-784-3309.
A P PAR E L / J EW E L R Y
Robin believed he was finally at home but
life
changed quickly. His new
owner must travel now, is
often gone from home on
business, and no longer
can take care of
him.
Robin must find a new
home or foster by December 03. He is a young,
healthy, 70 pound, neutered, American Bull dog,
handsome,
loving,
extremely personable and
athletic. He knows multiple
commands, is crate trained
and is continuing his training lessons. He is best as
an only dog until his training is completed. Seeking
committed, kind, experienced individual to adopt
or foster to adopt. His training resources come with
him. We all love him. For
more information call (503)
625-4563
or
e-mail
[email protected]
ROSCOE
Tan and white 1 and 1/2
year old short coated 62
pound American Shelter
dog, Roscoe lost his family when his owner became
too ill to care for him; Now
at a public shelter missing
home; bottle fed since he
was 3 days old; likes to
sleep under the covers
with you; house trained;
comfortable with adults
and
children;
lived
peacably with cats; loves
to play fetch; a little insecure around strangers and
other dogs. For more information call 503.625.4563;
E-mail
[email protected] .
Seeking fosters for all
breeds and sizes.
THOMAS & ALICE:
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $767, 2 Bed: $913!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
www.gslwestridgemeadows.com
PORTLAND NW:
Located near MAX,
Portland Streetcar & Bus.
Beautiful courtyards,
downtown view,
close to Waterfront Park
and the Pearl District.
Great amenities!
The Yards at
Union Station
815 NW Naito Pkwy
503-478-1695
gsltheyards.com
TUALATIN:
1 bdrm/1ba: $767
2 bdrm/2ba: $913
3 bdrm/2ba: $1051
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
Condos/Townhouses
For Rent
This sweet pair is Thomas
(6 years) and Alice (4
years). They are offered for
adoption by their owner
who has been evicted and
has no home for herself
and no home for the cats.
This is a dire situation.
Contact Cat’s Cradle Rescue at 503.312.4296 if you
can adopt or foster these
two who are soon to be totally homeless. Please
complete the adoption application at our website:
catscradlerescue.com/adopt
WINSTON:
SCAPPOOSE, Oregon
SW 1st Street
New Townhomes, 3 Bdrm,
2½ Bath, Single Car Garage, W/D Hookups. $1095
per month, includes Water/
Sewer/Garbage & Landscape Maintenance,
$1200 sec dep. Quick
and easy commute to
Portland Metro area.
Call 503-543-8985
Houses for Rent
ESTACADA
I’m a stunning cat from the
white tip of my tail to my little white mustache! I’m a
kitty that’s always dressed
up in a tux although I’m far
from a formal guy! I love to
play, I love to snuggle, I
love people! I’m not shy,
and I quickly warm up to
new people and cats.
Come hang out with me
and you’ll agree. Why don’t
you come visit me, Winston, so you can see my
great personality firsthand?
C’mon, let’s play at Animal
Aid’s Show & Tell Saturday
from 12PM to 4PM. Please
call 503-292-6628 option 3
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
GET
FAST
RESULTS
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
S
BO T O R
NO DEPOS T
OPT ON
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
applces. Storage shed.
Includes water & sewer!
Sec.
O
[email protected]
E-mail or
details.
NEWBERG:
Townhouse or
Rent
2 story, 2 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath,
enclosed one-car garage,
refrigerator, electric range,
microwave,
dishwasher,
gas furnace. New carpet &
paint.
No pets, no smokers, no Section 8; Reference and $800 deposit required.
$800 per mo.
Available now.
Call 503-338-9310
PLEASE NOTE:
ABBREVIATIONS destroy the
intent of your ad. Your ad
should be attractive and easy
to read. Let us help you put together your ad. Call us today at
(503) 503-620-SELL
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
SPORTS B5
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Service Directory
Automotive Services
R
NORT
Air Conditioning
& Heating
rank s eating
Cooling
Service Call $79.00!!
Family Owned & Operated
•Honest Repairs & Fair
Prices
•HVAC Repairs & Installs
•We also service
Manufactured Homes
Call(503) 512-8430
CCB#202626
GET
FAST
RESULTS
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
EST
Located in Tigard
RV Northwest rents,
sells, buys and consigns
RVs and travel trailers.
We have been in
business since 2004
and have a 5 star rating
with the
Better Business Bureau.
We have a full service
department and a new
parts department and
have recently added a
sales department. We
also provide temporary
housing if you are
remodeling your home,
are between residences,
or have suffered some
sort of natural disaster
(often with your
insurance company
covering the costs).
We also rent for remote
job sites, events etc.
Check out our website:
rvnorthwest.com
for more details or call
us at 503-641-9140.
Need a new employee?
Advertise it in the
classifieds. Call now!
Call 503-620-7355
C L EAN I N G & O RGAN I Z I N G
Building &
Remodeling
Chimney Services
Fences
Landscape
Maintenance
BIRDS CHIMNEY
SERVICE
1-800-CHIMNEY
Cleaning & Repairs
503-653-4999
CCB# 155449
Handyman Services,
Roof & Gutter Cleaning
Debris Removal, Pressure
Washing & more!
CCB# 118609
503-734-7172
T S T E OR
LL
NTER
CLE N- PS!!!
Concrete/Paving
Hawke Fence & Deck
•Fences •Decks •Gates
•Arbors •Retaining Walls
ccb#191476 503-941-8844
CONCRETE FLATWORK
Everything Concrete
Excavation/Retaining Wall
ccb#158471 503.297.6271
www.PDXconcrete.com
Handyman/
Handywoman
JAMES F.
WIEDEMANN
CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling, Windows,
& Doors, Decks,
Fences, Sheds. 20 yrs
exper. L/I/B CCB
#102031.
503-784-6691
ames ramer
Const.
Locally since 1974!
Kitchen, bath, walls,
ceilings, additions,
counters, cabinets,
decks, drywall, tile,
granite, windows and
doors, etc.
Reasonable.
CCB#11518. Jim
503-201-0969,
503-625-5092.
ameskramerconstruction.com
Decks
DECKS: New install, deck
repair & removal, pressure
washing & staining.
CCB# 118609,
503-734-7172
Remodeling all phases.
Over 30-years of service.
503-658-7012.
CCB#37169
Sell it today
in the
Classifieds.
Landscape
Maintenance
CHECK US OUT!
Bring Quick Results!!!
Whatever service you offer, I have the
readers to call you.
Call Mindy Johnson
at 503-546-0760
for information, rates, special promotions or for help in
writing an ad (from 3 lines to a display ad).
I can help!
G RC
can help with all
o our ard care
needs!!!
Owner-operated. 13-yrs
exper. Call Laura,
Pickups
Mini Vans &
Passenger Vans
1975 FORD F-250
REDDING FLATBED
20,000 lb PTO winch, 390,
4x4,$5000 503-266-2319
H O M E S W ITH A C R EA G E
AURORA:
43 acre HORSE BOARDING FACILITY w/ 72’x156’
COVERED ARENA, 32 matted stalls, OUTDOOR
ARENA area, 4 BAY SHOP, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath HOME,
& year round CREEK. Level and sloping terrain, excellent for trail course! Great location just 3 minutes to I-5
and 20 minutes to Portland. Very low taxes!
Priced to move at $745,000!
Horsepower Real Estate
Peggy Kernan, Broker
503-931-9751
Lisa Johnson, Broker
541-510-4601
WesternOregonHorseProperties.com
Cars For Sale
‘55 WILLY’S JEEP
Antique & Classic
Autos
Pontiac
Catalina Speed
Attention Rebuilders!!
Includes the following:
• Title,
• New 383 Stroker motor,
• New bed & bumper,
• Fresh bodywork
Some parts missing.
$6,768 | 503-984-3868
2001 CHEVROLET
VENTURE LT EXTENDED
VAN - $3800
78,729 actual miles, very
good condition, tan color,
clean title. Non-smoker,
no pets. 6 cyl Automatic
transmission. Front & rear
air/heat, pwr steering &
brakes, dual pwr windows,
driver pwr seat, pwr door
slide, cruise control, seats
8 passengers, alloy
wheels, roof rack, AM/FM
& CD, back up alarm,
security alarm, On Star.
Contact Tim Edington
503-568-6843
WHEELCHAIR VAN: 2003
Chevy Express, full size,
BRAUN lift, high top conversion, hand controls, 19K
miles, $20,000 Please call:
406-334-0143.
Motorcycles
Scooters/ATVs
2000 YAMAHA, V-STAR,
1100CC, like new, $2565
503-397-1507 - St. Helens
CHEVROLET CAMARO
Z28 2001: Black 6 spd,
10,000 miles, Best Offer
503-786-2943.
2 door hard top, low miles,
dual exhaust, wide white
walls, original door panels,
updated yellow & black
paint, seats and headliner,
carpeted trunk, CB radio
and cassette deck.
$18,000 503-982-5667 or
971-338-3143
OL S
GON
BEETLE
S PER
Restored ground up.
$25,000 invested. All work
done by specialized VW
classic mechanics.
$12,000 OBO
503-435-7268
2009 KAWASAKI Ninja
250r: 16,757 miles on it.
Selling because I need a
car. Second owner, well
maintained and runs great!
Call or text 503-419-8748.
Location: West Linn.
Cars For Sale
2002 SUBARU OUTBACK
WAGON
4 cyl., classic green/tan,
still purrs like new, $3800.
503-434-5463
2012 HONDA Accord
EX-L V6, 4 Door Sedan,
Excellent condition.
35,000 miles.
Airbags NOT on recall list.
For Sale by original owner.
$16,500 firm.
Call 503-651-3873
to see car.
-
VOLVO S60 2008: $8,800
Well maintained, one
owner, nonsmoker, no
pets, 93k miles, NEW
TIRES, Automatic, AC,
Cruise Control, AM/FM/CD
audio, 5-Cyl, LP Turbo,
2.5L., Leather, 19 MPG
City and 27 MPG Highway,
Premium Pkg, Heated
Front Seats, Moon Roof.
Call fo more info:
503-351-1094
2015 VESPA Primavera
150; Red, practically new,
300 miles, great for
commuting. Price includes
destination fee, setup,
fresh 4 year tags, high
friction brake pads, aux
12V outlet and euro
luggage compartment
(holds full-face helmet).
$4,399
Call 503-344-4473 or
503.781.2529
‘82 FORD, F-150, PICKUP
110K miles, needs repair,
not running. Comes with a
fifth wheel trailer hitch,
good tires, good brakes,
FWD, dual gas tanks.
Needs tags.
$760 / OR BEST OFFER!
(503)630-4770 - evenings.
RVs & Travel
Trailers
2004, SEA BREEZE LX36ft:
Workhouse chassis,
powered by Vortec 8100,
2 slides, 36’, low miles,
excellent condition.
$53,950.
503-970-2991
2012 CREEKSIDE
TRAVEL TRAILER
23.5’, w/slide, power hitch,
power awning. Pristine
conditon! $16,500.
503-829-4299
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See the Classified
Service Directory!
To place your ad,
call (503) 620-SELL(7355).
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-
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Senior Discount
CCB#194308
You can find just about
anything in the
Classifieds.
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-9797)
503-620-SELL (7355) • www.community-classifieds.com
Home & Professional Services
RVs & Travel
Trailers
WHY STORE YOUR
RV ~ LET US TURN IT
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Northwest RV offers one
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Here at Northwest RV we
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buyers of all ages! We
advertise not just locally
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Call Jasmine at
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RV CONSIGNMENTS
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and find out what the consignment value is for your
•Fifth Wheel •Motorhome
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• • •
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B U I L I D I N G M ATE R IAL S
SOMETIMES MY
HUMAN DOESN’T
WEAR PANTS AT
HOME. IT’S A RIOT.
— COLBY
adopted 06-18-11
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
503-620-SELL (7355)
✵
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
B6 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
SOLUTIONS
“BOARDER STATES” ByMatt Skoczen Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Manhattan
91 Wee
92 Orbital extreme
94 Una y __ vez:
time after time
95 Grabbed the
chance
97 Golfer Aoki
98 Yukon winter
hrs.
101 Smaller
serving
103 Learned
104 Rioter’s
weapon
109 City on the Po
112 California city
associated with
the founding of
Hells Angels
113 Normandy
river
114 “Friend __?”
115 Not vulnerable
(to)
118 Score symbol
120 Ford and
others
122 Macro, e.g.
127 Bedtime in
Burgundy
128 Music-licensing
org.
129 Affectedly
quaint, in
Colchester
130 “Great show!”
in headlines
131 Theater
132 Utmost
133 Word often
written
diagonally on
signs
134 Taboo
135 River in central
Germany
13 Kitchen cooker
14 Upstairs
neighbor of
Ralph and Alice
15 Sears
16 “Queen Zixi of
Ix” author
17 Not going
18 Brews for parties
25 Gourd fruits
26 Got fresh with
28 Thing to
mind, on train
platforms
33 Captain Kidd’s
negative
34 DuPont acrylic
35 Cheerful
37 Amt. after a
period
40 Smart ones?
41 Due
42 Stamp on a
packing list
43 Peeves
45 Catch
49 Sour __
50 Worshipper of
the sun god Inti
51 Hooey
53 Hacks
54 CN Tower prov.
55 Stooge chuckle
58 Zhou of China
59 He played
DOWN
1 Linzer treats
2 Biblical landfall
3 She voiced
Princess Fiona
in “Shrek”
4 Policing the
area
5 Future MD’s
course
6 Bad news at
the inn
7 Altar
constellation
8 N.T. epistle
9 Actor Wallach
10 Myth ending
11 Philosophy
espousing a
single reality
12 Like some auto
leases
Clubber Lang in
“Rocky III”
60 Vichy verse
61 Temple
Grandin’s
disorder
64 Below zero:
Abbr.
67 Stomach part?
69 Actor Rob
71 Bowl over
72 Lamebrain
75 Under-the-hood
cleaner
76 Culinary author
Rombauer
77 Fix, as a pet
79 TV’s “Science
Guy”
80 Ukraine city
82 Eat away
84 Seriously injure
85 __ facto
86 Stove fuel
88 It can be dipped
in dip
89 Meteorologist’s
tool
90 73-Across writer
93 Err
96 Allstate online
subsidiary
98 Many a GI
99 Like Capone’s
face
100 Moderates, with
“down”
102 A, in Augsburg
105 From soup __
106 Punch combo
107 Make bread
from chips?
108 “Earthsea”
series author
Ursula
110 First-aid kit
staple
111 Empty __
115 SALT weapon
116 NYC cultural
center
117 International
Year of
Astronomy year
119 Dog who
reveals he can
speak in “TikTok of Oz”
121 Kitchen add-on?
123 Sushi selection
124 What U can
follow
125 Mite
126 Sulu player
John
Sudoku
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Sudoku
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
Crossword
Answers
Family Style Customer Service
Delivery Service • Custom Cutting • Special Orders
Puzzle 2
YOUR AD
COULD BE HERE!
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Mrplywoodinc.com
Reach more than 200,000 readers every week!
CROSSWORD
Keeping minds
& bodies ACTIVE
for 47 years!
1400 NE Second Ave.
Portland, OR
503.736.3642 | www.pacificacalaroga.com
by Eugene Shaffer
484921.070814
©2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
[email protected]
447570.061114 Mkt
11/11/14
480263.030414
ACROSS
1 Filled fast food
5 Orange County
city
12 Picks, with “for”
16 Improv piece
19 Algerian seaport
20 Brand formerly
marketed as
Philishave
outside the U.S.
21 __-mutuel
22 Fruity finish?
23 Way off the
highway
24 Land on the
Red Sea
27 Pick up the tab
for
29 Homeowner’s
burden
30 They include
skateboarding
and
snowboarding
31 “__ Angel”: doowop classic
32 __ about
36 Genus
subdivision
38 Mall unit
39 Eponymous
Italian educator
44 Yule quenchers
46 Ben Gurion
airline
47 ’60s activist gp.
48 Fancy pitcher
49 Laura Bush’s
birth city
52 Turow work
about first-year
law students
54 About to come
up
56 “I’d like to buy
__”
57 Time Warner, to
CNN
62 Driller’s deg.
63 Diagnostic test
65 Sling spirits
66 Rise
dramatically
68 Driver’s license
word, maybe
70 “Horton Hears a
Who!” villain
73 “Don’t change
that”
74 New Zealand
exports
78 Wrongly left the
base
81 Russian fighter
83 Rain block
84 MC’s aid
87 Periodic “Top
Chef” judge with
a restaurant in
SOLUTIONS
Answer
7/11
CRYPTOQUIP
7/11
7/11
7/11
WHEN PEOPLE’S
WRIST BONES GET
BADLY DAMAGED.
PHYSICIANS MAY
WANT THEM TO TRY
CARPALS THERAPY.
Cryptoquip solution:
Getting your Portland news is easier than you think.
Published every Tuesday and Thursday | www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
447587.041514
HOME DELIVERY coming to a mailbox near you!
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Ballard Street
Portland!Life
Scary Gary
LIFE B7
Free Range
Dog Eat Doug
Strange Brew
Nest Heads
Dogs of C Kennel
Beaverton / Cedar Hills
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503.626.1400
Hillsboro / Tanasbourne
2364 NW Amberbrook Dr.
503.352.5252
Oregon City / Hilltop
334 Warner Milne Rd.
503.722.8222
437753.060613 ENT
West Linn / Ristorante
18740 Willamette Dr.
503.636.9555
B U G AT T I S R E STA U R A N T . C O M
Portland!Life
B8 LIFE
TribuneHealth
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Waiting for the Myths and facts about the flu vaccine
weight to go F
F
or every earnest dieter,
there is this eternal conundrum: Which way
is better for keeping
lost pounds off, losing them
fast or losing them slowly?
Scientists at the University
of Melbourne investigated.
Their conclusion: Losing
weight gradually doesn’t
change the amount or rate of
weight regained compared
with more rapid weight loss.
But if you want to lose a lot of
weight, you’re likelier to do so
if you do it
quickly.
“Global
guidelines recommend gradual weight loss
for the treatment of obesity, reflecting
the widely
held belief
that fast
WELLNEWS
weight loss is
more quickly
regained,”
said study co-author and dietitian Katrina Purcell. “However,
our results show that an obese
person is more likely to
achieve a weight-loss target of
12.5 percent weight loss and
less likely to drop out of their
weight-loss program if losing
weight is done quickly.”
But here’s the bad news. You
knew there would be bad news.
The researchers found that
three-fourths of the dieters, regardless of whether they lost
weight quickly or they lost
weight slowly, regained all of
the pounds within three years.
Never say diet
The speed-eating record for
potato latkes is 46 in eight
minutes, held by Pete Czerwinski. Warning: Most of
these records are held by professional eaters; the rest are
held by people who really
should find something better
to do.
Hypochondriac’s guide
ScottLafee
Stories for the waiting room
Researchers in New York
City conducted a survey of the
metropolis’s notorious rat population, estimated to be about
double the number of human
residents, or about 17 million
rodents. The researchers wanted to get a better idea of the
number and types of pathogens a rat might carry — and
possibly transmit to people.
So they trapped 133 Norway
rats throughout the city’s five
boroughs, focusing on rats living inside residential buildings.
They found that the rats carried 15 of 20 known bacterial
and protozoan pathogens.
They also identified 18 viruses
never seen before.
Phobia of the week
Coulrophobia: fear of clowns
(but not restricted to evil
clowns).
YOU!
Observation
“It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.”
— author Philip K. Dick
(1928-82)
Medical history
This week in 1958, the first
coronary angiogram was unintentionally performed by
Dr. F. Mason Sones Jr., a pediatric cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic. This diagnostic Xray procedure uses dye injected to visualize blockages of
the small nutrient arteries of
the heart. Animal studies had
shown that the dye in coronary arteries caused heart fibrillation, so it was never
tried on humans. Sones was
using the method to dye only
the openings of a patient’s
diseased vessels but inadvertently injected dye into the
patient’s coronary artery. No
heart fibrillations occurred,
eventually leading to the safe
use of dye for multiple imaging procedures.
Last words
“June 3. Cold Harbor. I was
killed.”
— That was from a note
found in the bloodstained diary of a dead Union soldier at
the Battle of Cold Harbor,
which was in 1864.
To find out more about Scott LaFee
and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at: creators.com
CHANGE YOUR BEHAVIOR
AND CHANGE YOUR LIFE.
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strengths and resources, with behavioral
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AFTERCARE SUPPORT, FOR
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1. “Flu shots give you a case
of the flu.”
This isn’t possible, because
the virus in flu vaccine is either killed or inactivated. A
few people may feel achy or
feverish for several days after
vaccination, but that’s a result
of the healthy immune system
being stimulated and developing protection against influenza infection. When someone
truly has the flu, their symptoms are more severe, last
longer, and may be complicated by pneumonia and the
need for hospitalization.
2. “I got the shot last year
so I’m OK.”
Flu viruses mutate every
year, and a person’s immune
protection from vaccination
declines by the next flu season. An annual flu vaccination
is needed to get the best protection.
3. “One year I had a flu shot
and got the flu anyway.”
You may have been exposed
to influenza before the vaccine provided immunity; the
vaccine takes about two
weeks to protect you. Or you
may have contracted another
virus that causes flu-like
symptoms. Although influenza vaccine is not 100 percent
COURTESY: LEGACY HEALTH
Legacy Health provided free flu vaccines in January at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. On Tuesday,
Nov. 11, Legacy will provide free flu vaccines on all five hospital campuses.
Influenza: separating fact from fiction
T
he term “flu” is generically used so often to
describe a wide range of health issues —
from upset stomachs to colds — that the
true impact and risk the influenza virus
poses is misunderstood by most of the public.
Influenza is actually a contagious disease that
can infect the nose, throat and lungs, and lead to
life-threatening health complications.
Fact or fiction? Healthy people don’t get the flu
Fiction. Everyone is susceptible to catching the
flu.
“When people think about the severity of influenza they think typically that it’s just something that
affects the very old and the very young,” says infectious diseases expert, Eric Chang, M.D. of Legacy
Health. “However, I tell them that in my experience
even young, healthy people can get extremely sick
and die from influenza. Everyone is at risk to catch
the flu.”
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) recommend everybody older than six months
be vaccinated against the seasonal flu. Dr. Chang
agrees, “Everybody who can get a flu shot should
get a flu shot. If you have concerns or questions
about getting vaccinated, you should see your regular doctor.”
effective, it’s the most effective way to reduce influenza
illness and complications and
the spread of influenza to other people.
4. “Once I had the shot and
still got stomach flu.”
So-called “stomach flu,”
which is associated with nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea,
is caused by viruses other
than influenza and is not prevented by influenza vaccination.
5. “Once you get to
Thanksgiving, it’s too late to
get a flu shot.”
Free flu shots
There are many options for getting your flu
shot. Legacy Health is offering FREE flu
shots to people age six months and older
on Tuesday, Nov. 11, Veterans Day. Shots
will be available on all five hospital campuses during the listed times while supplies last.
■ Legacy Emanuel Medical Center
2801 N. Gantenbein, Portland
7 a.m.-11 a.m.
■ Legacy Good Samaritan Medical
Center
1015 NW 22nd Ave., Portland
3 p.m.-7 p.m.
■ Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center
19300 SW 65th Ave., Tualatin
7 a.m.-11 a.m.
■ Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center
24800 SE Stark St., Gresham
3 p.m.-7 p.m.
■ Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center
2211 NE 139th St., Vancouver
3 p.m.-7 p.m.
The clinics are sponsored in part by
Legacy Health Foundations and in partnership with Immunize Oregon.
multi-dose vaccine vials by
germs including bacteria and
fungi. The safety of thimerosal use in vaccine has been
confirmed by the CDC, Food
and Drug Administration and
National Institutes of Health as well as the nongovernment
Institute of Medicine of the
National Academy of Sciences, the Advisory Committee
on Immunization Practices
and the American Academy
of Pediatrics. There is no evidence that thimerosal preservative - or any other component of influenza vaccine causes autism.
7. “I can’t get a flu shot
because I’m allergic to eggs.”
The vaccine is beneficial as
long as flu viruses are circulating in our communities,
which in the Pacific Northwest is usually November
through May. Although it’s
best to be vaccinated before
the flu appears in autumn, the
vaccine is still effective in preventing influenza in the
spring.
Most people who have mild
reactions to eggs can be safely given influenza vaccine,
which has egg components.
For people with serious allergic reactions to eggs, there is
an influenza vaccine that has
no egg components. Ask your
health care provider.
6. “Flu vaccine can cause
autism in children.”
8. “I’ve never had the flu, so
I don’t need a flu shot.”
This mistaken belief is
based on a concern about thimerosal, a mercury-based
preservative. For decades, an
extremely small amount of
thimerosal has been used to
prevent the contamination of
You may have been lucky
in the past, but that’s no
guarantee for the future. And
protecting yourself from the
flu also helps to safeguard
the vulnerable people around
you. Besides, you may have
had the flu without showing
symptoms. Up to 25 percent
of people infected with the
flu virus may have minimal
symptoms or none at all.
Yet they can still transmit
the virus, and because they
don’t know they’re contagious they don’t stay home
from work or school. Look at
this way: Many of us have
never had a car accident, but
we still buckle our seat belts
to protect ourselves and stop
at red lights to protect other
people.
There are a few genuine
reasons to delay or avoid the
flu vaccine. If you’re moderately or seriously ill already,
you should wait to be vaccinated until you recover. And
people with a history of
Guillain-Barre syndrome, a
severe neurologic disorder,
should talk with their health
care provider about the best
course to take.
For the rest of us, flu vaccine is safer, cheaper and far
less unpleasant than suffering through the flu and exposing other people to possible infection. Vaccination is
one of the major medical advances of the last 100 years,
and flu vaccination is an important way to safeguard
ourselves, our families and
the people around us.
FREE Vein Screening Offered Nov 15th & 22nd
Are you experiencing leg discomfort, swelling
or varicose veins?
You may be at risk for venous reflux disease. We can help you
feel better quickly-without surgery!
the doctor will
hear you now
• In-office treatments available
• No downtime or recovery period
• Covered by Medicare & most insurance plans
CALL NOW
503.292.9565
to book your FREE appointment
want better health care? start asking more questions. to your doctor. to your pharmacist.
to your nurse. what are the test results? what about side effects? don’t fully understand your
prescriptions? don’t leave confused. because the most important question is the one you should
have asked. go to www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer or call 1-800-931-AHRQ (2477)
for the 10 questions every patient should ask. questions are the answer.
FREE VEIN SCREENING
Before
After
By Appointment Saturday November 15 and 22nd 9am – 2pm
9701 SW Barnes Rd, Suite 140 Portland, OR 97225 Peterkort Building
489023.102814
CREATE A
HEALTHIER
Blue rubber bleb nevus
syndrome is a rare condition
involving malformation of the
venous system, both in
the skin and
visceral organs. Patients
end up with
extremely
painful, constantly bleeding lesions.
lu season is right
around the corner, and
you’re already hearing
about the importance
of getting yourself and your
family vaccinated.
However, you might also
hear worries about the flu
vaccine. As the influenza immunization expert for Kaiser
Permanente Northwest, Joseph Kane, MD, wants people
to understand the myths versus the facts.
“Influenza is a serious illness,” says Dr. Kane. “Every
year in the United States
about 226,000 people are hospitalized and
between 3,000
and 49,000
people die
from complications of influenza. The
deaths include
not only
young chilKANE
dren, people
over 65, and
people with chronic health
conditions such as asthma,
heart disease, or diabetes, but
also otherwise healthy children and younger adults.”
That’s why the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that
almost everyone over the age
of 6 months be vaccinated as
soon as the flu vaccine becomes available each fall season. Exceptions may include
people with a severe allergy
to flu vaccine or who have experienced severe complications from previous vaccinations. These individuals
should consult their health
care provider.
Influenza vaccination of
pregnant women is safe and
highly recommended. It provides protection not only for
the women but also for their
infants, who cannot receive
flu vaccination until 6 months
of age. Flu vaccination for everyone else in the household
also provides protection
against influenza for infants
younger than six months old
by reducing their risk of exposure.
Here are Dr. Kane’s responses to some common
myths about flu vaccine:
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, November 11, 2014
MovieTime
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Portland!Life
LIFE B9
Book:
Says
Newman
good guy
A Missus with a cause
The big screen
Last week
“Interstellar”; “Big Hero 6”;
“Citizenfour”; “Laggies”
This week
Nov. 14
“Rosewater” (Open Road),
R, 165 minutes
About — It’s directed and
written by comedian Jon Stewart, and it’s based on a true story about a journalist detained
and interrogated in Iran, based
on the New York Times bestseller “Then They Came for Me:
A Family’s Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival” by BBC
journalist Maziar Bahari.; Stars
— Gael Garcia Bernal, Shohreh
Aghdashloo, Claire Foy; Director — Jon Stewart (also screenplay)
Next week
Nov. 21 — “The Imitation
Game”; “Keep on Keepin’ On”;
“Low Down”
It’s not the big screen, it’s actually an “Oregon Experience”
program on OPB TV, but it
should be an interesting documentary. The half-hour show, 9
p.m. Nov. 17, explores the history and roots of the proposed
U.S. state of Jefferson — which
would have been rural area of
Southern Oregon and Northern
California. As far back as 1852
there were efforts to create a
new, independent state in the
area, and there have been numerous secession attempts
throughout the region — the
most famous in 1941. There’ll
be historical film, photos and
interviews. For info: oregon
experience/segment/state-ofjefferson/.
Upcoming event
■ It’s tabbed the world premiere of “Blood Creek Woodsman,” a Northwest indie horror
film, 4 p.m. Nov. 16 at Clinton
Street Theater, 2522 S.E. Clinton
St. Director Joe Sherlock’s
“body count,” B-horror movie
features the exploits of a hooded killer on the loose in a small
rural town as the sheriff and reporter investigate. It was shot in
Marquam and Silverton, with a
few scenes shot in Portland,
Keizer and Corvallis. It’s $5 admission. For info: skullface
astronaut.com/bloodcreek
woodsman.html.
■ It’s not a movie, but a stage
event inspired by quite a memorable flick. “Flash Ah-Ahhh!!” is
a rock ‘n’ roll musical parody of
the 1980s cult film “Flash Gordon.” The details: 2 p.m. and 7
p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov.
22 and 23, Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 N.E Alberta St., 503764-4131, $18-$20 matinees, $20$23 evening.
Northstar. Watching the evolution for that new moment in
style is a smile to carry with us.”
Hager’s mission to carry on
the Native heritage that came
from her father, who was
French Candadian Cree. Before he died, she promised “to
bring Native into the light
through ‘The Dance.’” She
teamed up with Arlie Neskahi
of the Diné Nation, whose father had made a similar prediction involving music. Lastly,
a partnership occurred with
another father/son duo, who
helped back the endeavor and
joined the board.
“The three fathers (came)
from an era when standing for
your heritage was fought (for)
in World War II in other lands,
and even here on this soil,”
Hager says. “(They) gave
through their words the path,
wisdom and strength to keep
the promise and keep on moving forward. Words that are always with us each day.”
In order to carry on the
promise of sharing Native
American culture through
dance, Northstar needed a
dance director. Ultimately, this
rested on Damon Keller, who
has been with the company
since the beginning. A tap, hiphop and contemporary dancer,
Keller openly admits that in
the beginning, he “knew nothing about Native dancing.”
A decade later, however, he
describes himself as “the
glue,” while Hager describes
him as the voice, the patience,
the bridge and the mentor.
“Now, they’re starting to get
used to me after 10 years.
They know where I’m going, I
guess,” says Keller, the lead director and coordinator, who also teaches dance for Portland
Public Schools and owns a studio in Beaverton. “You’re
around somebody, you know
their ins and outs, you know
their quirks and their isms. So,
I can ask them to do more.”
One instance of this was last
year, when the company was
on a plane headed to a performance in St. Louis. Keller was
Matthew
Clements follows
through his
routine at the
Garden Home
Recreation
Center.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JAIME VALDEZ
inspired by a song, and began
asking his dancers if they
thought they could dance to it.
By the end of the flight, they’d
revamped their show and added hip-hop to their performance. While Northstar focuses on sharing Native American
culture, the company also
strives to show how different
cultures don’t have to stand
apart from one another.
“Everybody that you perform for, mostly in the cities,
this is something that’s new to
them,” says Mary Bodine, who
joined Northstar in the beginning, when she was 16 years
old. “I think it’s just being able
to teach and show other people what we do, and explain it
and talk to them, and remind
people that Indians still exist.
You’d be surprised how often
we get asked if we’re real Indians. We get asked every (performance).”
Colt Nicol, another dancer
who’s been involved since the
beginning and who is Hager’s
son, shared similar feelings. In
fact, many of the dancers discussed that much of their passion for performance comes
back to the hope that it might
break stereotypes.
“That’s the thing about it, is
being consciously aware that
we’re still here, and we’re not
hiding. We’re right out in the
open,” Nicol says. “That’s why
we do this dance, and that’s
why we’re a part of this company. We mix with hip-hop,
modern and contemporary, to
show that the new generation
and the old generation can
find its way in the middle, and
then, throughout the entire
planet, we can find peace.”
After the dancers finished
what appeared to be a more
traditional piece, there was
some brief discussion before
music from Rihanna and Drake
began blasting through the
speakers. The dancers maintained their styles but adjusted
to the song, and Keller came in
part way through, incorporating break dancing into the
piece. While the styles differed,
they were also somehow very
much the same.
“I just like the feeling of us
getting out there and sharing
the heritage. It doesn’t just
have to be traditional ways, we
move on in our ways of dancing
— we evolve with the world
that surrounds us,” says Matthew Clements, who’s been a
Northstar dancer for four years
after moving from the Warm
Springs Reservation. “We’re
still here, we’re still Natives,
and we like to get out and show
that we, too, can still survive in
man. My God, people don’t
come much better than Paul
Newman. It was almost like in
the writing I had to ratchet back
describing his looks, his charity,
his auto racing, his sense of humor. I was like a starstruck kid.
With De Niro, I knew there
were dark aspects to him. I was
edgy about getting close to him.
But when I was trying to end
the book, I realized that I admired him a great deal. He’s
played all these tough guys, but
he’s also got this strong and
warm sense of family commitment. In the end, I came to like
him more than when I started,
which was a nice surprise.
Tribune: What makes a
good biography as opposed to
a bad one or an average one?
Levy: You always have two
things going on in a biography. You have a chronology,
which is unavoidable. You
can’t, alas, write about Robert
De Niro without mentioning
“Little Fockers.” You’re responsible to the chronology. I
think of that chronology as a
clothing line — it goes from
one wall to another. Then you
hang things off that clothing
line. That’s what’s interesting
to me in a biography. In De
Niro’s case it’s his upbringing,
the method acting, the relationship with Martin Scorsese, his business decisions, his
filmmaking decisions. They’re
the things that draw your eye.
With Jerry Lewis, Paul Newman and I think with De Niro,
there’s enough hanging off
the clothes line to make it attractive. I’d rather read a
book filled with that sort of
stuff about someone I wasn’t
interested in than a long factual (book) about someone
whose work I admire.
Tribune: What’s next for
you?
Levy: I’m already at work.
Now that I don’t have a fulltime job I play leapfrog with
myself. I’m working on a book
about Rome in the era of the
1950s and early 60s. It’s just a
big juicy, gossipy, rich story
about fashion and movies and
celebrity and Ferraris and Euro-trash, some society scandals, a couple of murders. It’s
got the making of “Cleopatra”, the beginning of Formula
One. That’s a good thing to
hang off a clothes line.
See
online
Fresh new classifieds every day –
all day and night!
www.PortlandTribune.com
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Skippyjon Jones
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INNING
JAN 17 – FEB 15, 2015
TH
Timmy Failure:
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NEWS.
this kind of world. It’s like a
voice. This is our tradition, our
heritage, and it has been for
years. We just like sharing it
with everyone out there.”
Nearly 10 years old, Northstar is observing Native American Heritage Month in November. For more info: www.
paintedsky.org/northstar.
RD
“State of Jefferson”
■ From page 10
373494.060911
Doc spotlight
Northstar: Group nears its 10th anniversary
481148.101414
The top 10 digital movie purchases based on consumer
transaction rate, by Rentrak:
1. “X-Men: Days of Future Past”
2. “Live Die Repeat: Edge of Tomorrow”
3. “Mr. Peabody & Sherman”
4. “Tammy”
5. “Transformers: Age of Extinction”
6. “Million Dollar Arm”
7. “The Fault In Our Stars”
8. “Godzilla”
9. “Captain America — The
Winter Soldier”
10. “Blended”
Other favorites recently: “They
Came Together”
Source: Rentrak Digital
Download Essentials Industry
Service
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: VERN UYETAKE
The Mrs. Oregon America Pageant will be held in West Linn in February, and the hometown woman has started her campaign. The cause of
Jessica Christopherson, Mrs. Clackamas County and real estate agent and wife of an airline pilot, deserves applause: “I wanted to do this for my
best friend’s daughter (Izzy Ludemann, 6, in above photo with Jessica). I want to be in this contest as a way to raise money to fight juvenile
diabetes. … For me it was a no-brainer to take the chance to help Izzy. I thought that since I’ve been given the gift of gab, maybe I could use it
for good. Izzy is the sweetest little girl in the world.” Christopherson has been busy raising funds for JDRF (the Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation). The rest of the 16-person field for Mrs. Oregon America is still being determined; Mrs. Multnomah County is Dr. Beenish Khwaja, a
Gresham neurologist. For more info: mrsoregon.net.
AWA
Home rentals
■ From page 10
FEB 28 – MAR 22, 2015
Schoolhouse Rock
Live!
MAR 28 – APR 26, 2015
Ramona Quimby
MAY 9 – MAY 31, 2015
419020.021413 SL
OCT 25–NOV 23
NEWMARK THEATRE
Tickets start at just $15
GRANDPARENT DAYS!
OCT 26 & NOV 23
Seniors enjoy special savings
Tickets just $13-$20
www.octc.org
Join us for this hilarious musical based on the New York Times bestselling series Ivy + Bean by Annie Barrows
Portland!Life
PAGE B10 PortlandTribune
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014
BELOW: Colt Nicol of
Portland puts on an
Indian roach
headdress before
Northstar Dance
Company’s
rehearsal.
RIGHT: Betty
Stephens dances
during Northstar
Dance
Company’s
rehearsal
recently at the
Garden Home
Recreation
Center.
George Clements is
a blur of motion
and vibrant colors
as he rehearses his
routine.
TRIBUNE PHOTOS:
JAIME VALDEZ
Members of the
Northstar Dance
Company pause
during rehearsal.
Blending
the
cultural divide
Northstar Dance Company celebrates Native
American Heritage Month by educating public
By CAITLIN FELDMAN
Pamplin Media Group
Inside a studio in the Garden Home
Recreation Center, dancers dressed in
vibrant regalia sway and bounce and
turn to the music.
Some of the dancers’ movements are
sharp and springy, while others are soft
and seemingly melt into the ground.
They all have their own styles, varying based on the nations they descend
from.
When Northstar Dance Company
formed in 2005, it came out of Painted
Sky, an organization that formed in 1995
to provide Native American education
and awareness through music. Northstar accepted the same challenge
through dance.
“The dance company had all the challenges of living in two worlds with heritage and urban in pushing the boundaries (of) music and dance to be more
when starting out,” says Mary Hager,
founder and president. “The best part of
dawn is waiting to see what new happening will occur — the same is true for
See NORTHSTAR / Page 9
Levy examines De Niro
the man, admires him
By STEPHEN ALEXANDER
The Tribune
Robert De Niro has played some
of the most iconic film characters of
all time, from young Vito Corleone
in “The Godfather Part II,” to Jake
La Motta in “Raging Bull.”
In his latest biography, “De Niro: A
Life,” Portland author Shawn Levy examines the man behind the characters.
Levy, one of the nation’s foremost film
buffs, is the former
movie critic for The
Oregonian. He has
achieved extraordinary success as an author, including becoming a New York
Times bestseller with “Rat Pack Confidential” and “Paul Newman: A Life.”
The 608-page “De Niro: A Life” (Random House. $32.50) debuted late last
month. Levy will be at Powell’s City of
Books at 7 p.m. Nov. 11 to discuss the
book.
The Portland Tribune caught up
with Levy to talk about the complicated subject of his biography, why De
Niro refused to help out with the book
and what makes a good biography:
&
qa
Portland Tribune: Your books feature an eclectic array of subjects. Why
did you want to write about De Niro?
Shawn Levy: There are a number of
reasons why I would choose any subject. One is the simple
fact that there’s not a
recent book, or a good
book out there, at the
time I make the choice.
So there’s a hole on the
library shelf. I’ve written about older performers, Jerry Lewis,
Paul Newman, the
swinging 60s, the Rat Pack. De Niro is
later than that. Part of me thought it
was time to move forward. But also, I
grew up loving his work. He was the
great actor of the time that I was
becoming a film buff. And then, at the
time I was considering it, I learned
about his archive at the University of
Texas. There was a treasure trove of
never-before-seen stuff. It went, then,
from something I’d want to do to something I could do.
Tribune: What was the process of
writing the book like?
Levy: This was the longest period of
research and writing that I’ve ever un-
The actor declines
requests for interviews,
but author pushes on
dergone. Partly because of the things
that happened in my life. The book was
supposed to be out a year ago and it
got delayed. I was employed full-time
when I began. My pattern then was to
use vacations and flex time to do research. My process is that I gather
anything I can possibly get my hands
on, organize it and then keep sorting
through it and sifting through it until I
know it. Then, writing a biography is
pretty straightforward because you
have the chronology of the life. You
never have to wonder what comes
next.
Tribune: What was the cooperation
like from De Niro?
Levy: Zero. Zero cooperation. From
the time De Niro first got into the limelight, he was a lousy interview. He’s always been that way. He’s an introverted person, he’s watchful. He’s always
avoided interviews. He went from being so embarrassed to talking with the
press, to being someone reluctant, to
being someone suspicious of the press.
He had no interest in cooperating. Because his nature is so well known, many people close to him had no interest
in cooperating. But, I had this archive
in Texas where I’m working in 2012
and I’m looking at a paper he wrote in
1972 about preparing to play Bruce
Pearson in “Bang the Drum Slowly.”
He could reflect on it now and say
something interesting. But he
could never fetch that frame
of mind he had been in 40
years earlier. In some
regards, the original
material is more valuable than the reflection of the living man.
Also, being told no
just makes you
work harder.
Tribune: As a
journalist, you
approach a story and a subject objectively.
When you are
writing a biography, do you have
to be objective, or do
you wind up liking the
people you write about?
Levy: Liking or disliking,
I’ve had both. The previous book
I wrote was about Paul New-
See BOOK / Page 9
Shawn Levy,
former film
critic for The
Oregonian, has
started a new
project about
Rome of the
1950s and ‘60s.
COURTESY OF
SHAWN LEVY

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