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MONDAY
November 3, 2014
129th Year, No. 141
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEOS AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
SHS, Big Horn
earn regional
titles, B1
Attorneys ask Ernst murderer’s case to be sent back to district court
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — At least one of the three
men convicted of murder in the 2009 homeinvasion killing of Sheridan businessman
Robert Ernst is set to be re-sentenced in
coming months following orders from the
Wyoming Supreme Court.
Friday, the attorneys for state and defendant filed a motion to remand the case of
Dharminder Vir Sen back to 4th Judicial
District Court for re-sentencing.
The motion to re-sentence Sen was filed
even though Sen was already scheduled for
oral arguments Dec. 10 in his appeal of his
recent re-sentencing that made him eligible
for parole after 35 years.
The motion to remand stated that Sen
and the state believed it was unnecessary
to continue the appeal process. Both agreed
that Sen should receive a new sentencing
hearing that takes into account another
recent high court ruling about Wyatt Bear
Cloud, one of the other teenagers convicted
in the Ernst murder.
On Sept. 10, the Wyoming Supreme Court
published an opinion in Bear Cloud v. State
that said Bear Cloud should have been resentenced after considering his murder,
aggravated burglary and conspiracy convictions as a package rather than based
just on his murder conviction.
Essentially the high court ruled that a
juvenile defender should receive an individualized sentencing hearing that will
determine the juvenile’s prospects for
reform when aggregate sentences result in
the functional equivalent of life without
parole.
The motion to remand said that 4th
Judicial District Court Judge John Fenn
did not apply individualized sentencing
based on prospects for reform to the entire
sentencing package for Bear Cloud.
Preparing students for the future
SHS, FMHS
classes help
kids research
careers, colleges
UW professor
discusses
threat of
censorship
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — College and
career readiness is more
than just a goal in Sheridan
County School District 2, it’s
a class.
Sheridan High School and
Fort Mackenzie High School
each offer a course in the
cluster of Career and
Technical Education that
takes their students beyond
discussing their next step in
life to doing a deep dive of
research on the topic.
Career Development is an
optional class at SHS —
though about 75 percent of
the student body chooses to
enroll — and a mandatory
course at FMHS, that
expands upon the student
portfolio that is required for
graduation.
By taking the class, students not only have help
completing their portfolio
but also earn one credit
from Sheridan College
through the introduction to
online learning component,
complete a finance unit, get
all six of the CTE standards
tested and learn skills that
SHS teacher Sharon
Deutscher and FMHS
teacher Kathleen Pilch say
will stay with the students
for the rest of their lives.
One of the most important
of these skills, they say, is
the ability to research
careers and/or colleges
before selecting them.
Students in the course
complete a personality
assessment, learning things
including their learning
style, their interests and
what may be a good career
for them.
Next, they will research
careers they are interested
in, learning things like the
salary range, required training or certification, job
longevity and outcome,
what tasks are involved and
more.
“We’re not telling them
you’re going to take Careers
Class in high school and
choose your career for the
SEE SENTENCE, PAGE 2
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Fort Mackenzie High School junior Bethany Freesene, left, and teacher Kathleen Pilch practice giving a firm handshake during
Career Day on Oct. 24 at Fort Mackenzie High School on Highland Avenue.
rest of your life, but we’re going to
teach you how to explore careers
realistically,” Pilch said. “We tell
them that it’s a lifelong process. We
as adults may still be doing it. As
adults, we know if we’re going to
change careers we’ll do our
research and I think a lot of it is
just once you’ve gone through that
process, regardless of the career
you pick, you can use that process
for the rest of your life, because
people change jobs and careers
often.”
“Instead of using the television to
make a career choice, they are
learning how to go through it and
take the right steps to making an
informed decision,” Deutscher
added. “They say people change
their careers seven times. And we
don’t just do research on one career.
We do research on many different
careers.”
Once the student has an idea of
the career cluster that may be right
for them, they begin researching
the college component required for
that career.
However, Deutscher said when
they discuss “college” they are not
necessarily talking about a fouryear institution.
“Not every student is meant to go
to college, so we don’t force them to
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
Fort Mackenzie High School junior Sarah Hartman listens to Staff Sergeant Allen
Price during an interview and presentation for Career Day on Friday, Oct. 24, at Fort
Mackenzie High School.
do just college research,” she said.
“I think any type of education is
going to better a person. Whether
they go straight into the workforce,
they’re still going to get some education there because employers
have them go get trained. There are
those who want to go into the military, but military is just another
name for college to me, because you
learn. It’s a hands on college.”
“I think that’s why we try to use
the terminology ‘expect post-secondary education and or training,’
rather than just saying ‘college,’”
Pilch added. “I think kids these
days need to know to expect to need
more after high school and there
are a lot of ways to get that.”
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
SHERIDAN — Jeffrey
Lockwood, professor of natural science and humanities
at the University of
Wyoming, spoke to a group
of more than 120 people
about instances of censorship, particularly in the
arts, by institutions in
which members of the fuel
economy are major donors.
Lockwood is currently
writing a book titled
“Behind the Carbon
Curtain: The Energy
Industry, Political
Censorship and Free
Speech.” In the book, he
details instances where
works or displays of art
were either removed or canceled due to their anti-fuel
industry content.
Lockwood cited the
removal of Chris Drury’s
piece “Carbon Sink” from
the UW campus two years
ago. The sculpture was a
large circle of trees killed
by pine beetles spiraling
inward to a large pile of
coal. It was meant to suggest
that coal emissions contributed to climate change
and the blight of pine beetles. While the university
claimed the sculpture was
removed due to water damage, a collection of emails
pointed to pressure by the
coal industry to remove the
piece.
The main focus of
Lockwood’s talk, though,
was the halting of a photographic display meant for a
Casper museum six years
before the controversy with
“Carbon Sink.”
“The New Gold Rush:
Images of Coalbed
Methane” was scheduled to
show in the Nicolaysen Art
Museum and Discovery
Center Sept. 8 to Nov. 5, 2006.
The display was comprised
of a series of photographs
by four different photographers that depicted the
methane industry, including
before and after aerial photos of the Powder River
Basin by Ted Wood.
SEE FUTURE, PAGE 2
Today’s edition is published for:
Kirstie Auzqui
of Sheridan
SEE CENSOR, PAGE 2
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4 SPORTS
6 COMICS
7 CLASSIFIEDS
B1
B4
B5
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
U of Wyoming student dies
after off-campus fight
LARAMIE (AP) — A 21-year-old
University of Wyoming student died
Saturday following a fight shortly after
midnight in an off-campus home, and
another student was seriously injured in
an unrelated altercation, authorities said.
Joseph M. McGowan, 21, of Lander, died
after he was taken to the Medical Center of
the Rockies after a fight in the home on the
700 block of North 7th Street, Laramie
police and the university said in a statement.
McGowan was hit when he tried to break
up the fight, said police, who added that
alcohol was a factor in the fight.
Dalton Williams, 20, has been charged
with second-degree murder in connection
with the incident, police said.
“We are shocked and deeply saddened by
this tragic event, and offer our thoughts
and prayers to Joe’s family and friends,”
university President Dick McGinity said in
a statement. “The depth of their sorrow is
unimaginable. The University of Wyoming
community will do whatever we can to ease
their burden at this difficult time.”
About the same time as the North 7th
Street incident, another university student
was seriously injured in a fight involving
several people in the 1100 block of Flint
Street, police said. Others were also hurt.
Police are seeking a suspect in the Flint
Street incident. He is described as between
5 foot 8 and 5 foot 10 inches tall.
CENSOR: Fears self-censorship for artists
FROM 1
Holly Turner, the museum director at the
time of the cancellation, said she informed
the board that she alone chose to cancel the
exhibit, but Ben Mitchell, the curator who
had planned the exhibit, told Lockwood
that the display was canceled under pressure from the donors who made their
money through fuel energy.
For his talk, Lockwood read from an
abridged selection of the first two chapters
of his book.
Lockwood said that he is concerned about
the “atmosphere of fear” that pushes people into self-censorship rather than action
for fear of the repercussions. He told his
listeners that while his book has not come
under direct attack, there have been what
he called “passive-aggressive whispers”
that some of the UW programs he’s
involved with might lose funding if he goes
through with its publication. As of his talk,
he said the book has more than 700 end
notes to keep it from becoming fodder for
lawsuits.
Lockwood’s book is scheduled to be published in 2016.
Lockwood’s presentation was part of the
Powder River Basin Resource Council’s
annual dinner and auction held Saturday at
the Sheridan Holiday Inn.
SENTENCE: Cases playing off each other
FROM 1
The high court has decided he should
have done so.
Sen was re-sentenced on his three
charges but the ban on life sentences without parole and consideration of prospects
for reform was only applied to his murder
conviction. When he is re-sentenced, the
terms of all three of his convictions will be
considered as a package since in aggregate
they are the functional equivalent of life
without parole.
Sen was 15 when he, Bear Cloud and
Dennis Poitra Jr. broke into Ernst’s home
and shot him. Sen was the triggerman.
In September, the high court ordered
Fenn to re-sentence Wyatt Bear Cloud after
considering his murder, aggravated burgla-
ry and conspiracy convictions as a package.
Fenn held a status hearing Thursday to
determine the re-sentencing date for Bear
Cloud, but no specific date was set as of
this morning.
Fenn had already re-sentenced Bear
Cloud in August 2013 on his murder conviction following a 2012 ban by the U.S.
Supreme Court on mandatory life sentences for juveniles and a change in
Wyoming law in early 2013 that specified
juveniles convicted of murder will be eligible for parole after serving 25 years if they
don’t commit any other crimes in prison.
Following that ruling, Bear Cloud was
given life in prison on the murder charge
with a chance for parole after 25 years. He,
like Sen, was facing about 35 years in
prison.
FUTURE: Allows kids to explore options
FROM 1
But whether the student intends to attend
a university or go straight into the workforce, the teachers say both kinds of students are prepared for both kinds of paths.
In looking at universities, they go beyond
reviewing what they’ve heard to researching what they really need to know.
From proximity to home, to true cost of
attending and how they will pay for it, to
school safety ratings and student reported
on-campus “vibe,” the high schoolers look
at every aspect of at least three universities.
The students study scholarships — different options outside the Hathaway which is
discussed in the district’s middle schools —
and learn how to ask for money.
They even project their success curve
were they to attend the school they selected, based on their current study habits and
grades.
In preparing for the workforce, they practice things like a solid handshake, asking
for letters of recommendation and even go
through several mock interviews.
Deutscher says the class is just the beginning of the learning opportunities as when
the self-paced class is over and each student
has a unique portfolio representing their
skills, interests and research, they can
move on to other resources in the school
like PACE.
The PACE Internship program places students in the community to gain hands on
experience in careers. In order to be eligible to apply for the program, students must
have a completed portfolio and be in their
senior year.
There are currently almost 40 students
interning and Pilch said this is another
way students can learn if their chosen path
is right for them or not.
Pilch has been the PACE coordinator at
SHS and in her first year also working at
Fort Mackenzie, the program is now available to FMHS students as well.
Deutscher said she is passionate about
this class because of her own life experience and knowing she would have benefitted from having this available to her.
‘If I would have had this it would’ve
saved me a lot of money because I would
have known that my career cluster was
nothing in medicine.’
Sharon Deutscher
SHS teacher
“I went off to college and went into nursing. I spent all this money on the little hat
and pumper and stethoscope thing and
made it six weeks and I dropped out of the
program because I was not meant to be a
nurse,” she said.
As she learned she did not like blood or
surgery, Deutscher reinvested in schooling
for archeology, which she ended up dropping as well.
After some time as a general studies student, and some pressure from her dad, she
landed on business as a major.
“If I would have had this it would’ve
saved me a lot of money because I would
have known that my career cluster was
nothing in medicine,” she said. “I’ve always
wanted to be a teacher and if I would have
taken any of these tests I bet I would’ve
seen that was my intent, to be a teacher.”
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
US approved Ferguson no-fly area to keep press out
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government allowed police in Ferguson, Missouri,
to restrict more than 37 square miles of
airspace for nearly two weeks in August for
safety reasons, but audio recordings show
that local authorities instead wanted to
keep news helicopters away during violent
street protests.
On Aug. 12, amid demonstrations following the shooting death of 18-year-old
Michael Brown, Federal Aviation
Administration managers struggled to
redefine an earlier flight ban so police helicopters and commercial flights at nearby
Lambert-St. Louis International Airport
could fly through the area — but not others.
“They finally admitted it really was to
keep the media out,” said one FAA manager about the St. Louis County Police
Department in a series of recorded tele-
phone conversations obtained by The
Associated Press. “But they were a little
concerned of, obviously, anything else that
could be going on.”
At another point, a manager at the FAA’s
Kansas City center said police “did not
care if you ran commercial traffic through
this TFR (temporary flight restriction) all
day long. They didn’t want media in there.”
The conversations contradict claims by
the St. Louis County police, which said the
restrictions had nothing to do with limiting the press and instead were imposed
because of gunshots fired at a police helicopter.
But county police officials told the AP
recently there was no damage to their helicopter, and they were unable to provide a
report on the shooting. On the tapes, an
FAA manager described reports of the helicopter shooting as unconfirmed “rumors.”
Fall chores
The AP obtained the recordings under
the U.S. Freedom of Information Act. They
raise serious questions about whether
police were trying to suppress aerial
images of the demonstrations and the
police response by violating the constitutional rights of journalists with tacit assistance by federal officials.
Such images would have offered an
unvarnished view of one of the most serious episodes of civil violence in recent
memory. The recordings also offer a rare
look into government operations, especially as local public-records requests to
Ferguson officials by the AP and other
news organizations were denied or met
with high processing fees.
“Any evidence that a no-fly zone was put
in place as a pretext to exclude the media
from covering events in Ferguson is
extraordinarily troubling and a blatant vio-
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Wade Frieboth uses a leaf blower to clean his yard Saturday afternoon in Sheridan.
WYOMING BRIEFS |
Grizzly acclimated
to humans put down
JACKSON (AP) —
Wildlife managers in
Wyoming have euthanized a
young male grizzly bear
that became habituated to
humans.
The bear had been a
favorite of Jackson Hole
wildlife photographers for
the past two years.
Wyoming Game and Fish
Department large carnivore
supervisor Dan Thompson
says people near the small
town of Clark, which is
north of Cody, had seen the
bear in their yards.
Thompson says the grizzly had not gotten into trouble in Clark, but was all too
comfortable around people
and seemed to seek out
houses and other structures.
Thompson says wildlife
managers had twice relocated the bear before in an
attempt to keep it away
from developed areas.
He tells the Jackson Hole
News & Guide that all
options for keeping the bear
alive were exhausted.
Snow in southeast
Wyoming
CHEYENNE (AP) — A
winter weather advisory is
in effect for southeast
Wyoming where snow has
caused some slick driving
conditions.
No roads have been
closed, but the Wyoming
Department of
Transportation advised no
unnecessary travel on state
highway 210 between
Cheyenne and Laramie.
Traffic speeds along the
Interstate 80 between the
two cities was slowed.
The National Weather
Service says between 3 to 6
inches of snow was possible
in the area between
Cheyenne and Laramie.
Some mountain areas could
see up to 10 inches.
MN man arrested in
WY with 3.6 pounds
of marijuana
GILLETTE (AP) — A 53year-old Minnesota man
was arrested after Wyoming
Highway Patrol troopers
found 3.6 pounds of marijuana in his rental car during a traffic stop.
The Gillette News Record
reports officers stopped
Timothy J. Otis on Tuesday
night for speeding on
Interstate 90 about six miles
east of Gillette.
Charging documents say
Otis told a trooper he was
headed home to Minnesota
and had been driving for 20
hours straight.
The officer felt Otis was
acting nervously so called
for a drug detection unit.
Court records say Otis
acknowledged having a bag
of marijuana in a cooler in
the car. Officers also cut
open a 4-foot-long, black
PVC pipe, where they found
another six bundles of marijuana.
Otis was charged
Wednesday with felony possession of a controlled substance.
UW works out
agreement with
Shanghai college
LARAMIE (AP) — The
University of Wyoming
College of Arts and
Sciences has entered into
an agreement with China’s
Shanghai University on
academic study and
research for students and
faculty.
The agreement paves the
way to formally promote
academic cooperation
through UW Departments
of Anthropology and
History faculty and student
exchanges for workshops,
symposia and seminars of
mutual interest.
In addition, there can be
short-term agreements to
allow exchanges in archaeological field work.
UW College of Arts and
Sciences Dean Paula Lutz
says these kinds of relationships serve to promote
international dialogue and
understanding.
Shanghai University consists of 26 colleges and
schools. It has more than
24,000 undergraduates and
11,300 graduate students in
67 majors.
2nd scenic flight
firm offers tours of
Tetons
JACKSON (AP) — A second commercial operation
has been permitted to conduct scenic air tours based
out of the Jackson Hole
Airport in Grand Teton
National Park.
For years the commercial
activity was absent from
the airport, but Fly Jackson
Hole and now New Flight
Charters are authorized to
do business.
Airport Director Jim
Elwood told the airport’s
board of directors that he
lacks legal authority to prohibit or regulate scenic
flights.
The Jackson Hole News &
Guide reports that aerial
tours over almost all of
Grand Teton National Park
are prohibited. But the
flights can take off and land
at the Jackson Hole
Airport, which is the only
commercial airport in a
national park.
lation of the press’s First Amendment
rights,” said Lee Rowland, an American
Civil Liberties Union staff attorney specializing in First Amendment issues.
FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said
in a statement Sunday his agency will
always err on the side of safety. “FAA cannot and will never exclusively ban media
from covering an event of national significance, and media was never banned from
covering the ongoing events in Ferguson in
this case.”
Huerta also said that, to the best of the
FAA’s knowledge, “no media outlets objected to any of the restrictions” during the
time they were in effect.
An FAA manager, in the recordings,
lamented that procedures for defining a nofly area didn’t have an option that would
accommodate only excluding news helicopters.
A4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN FIRE-RESCUE
Friday
• Rocky Mountain Ambulance
assist, 2800 block Coffeen Avenue,
8:03 a.m.
Saturday
• False alarm, 1500 block
Hillcrest Drive, 8:48 a.m.
Sunday
• RMA assist, 1000 block
Florence Avenue, 12:07 a.m.
• RMA assist, 1200 block
Illinois Street, 5:38 a.m.
• RMA assist, 1300 block
Woodworth Street, 10:45 a.m.
• RMA assist, 900 block
Florence Avenue, 2:45 p.m.
• RMA assist, 400 block North
Jefferson Street, 6:42 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• Event standby, 1000 block
Long Drive, 8:21 a.m.
• Trauma, 100 block Sherri
Find us online at thesheridanpress.com.
View Drive, 7:37 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West Fifth
Avenue, 9:44 p.m.
Tuesday
• Medical, 2500 block East 15th
Street, 9:35 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block Burton
Street, 1:30 p.m.
• Trauma, intersection of
Gould Street and Mandel Street,
4:16 p.m.
• Trauma, intersection of
Gould Street and Mandel Street,
4:16 p.m.
• Medical, intersection of Fifth
Street and Long Drive, 4:38 p.m.
• Medical, 2100 block West
Sunset Drive, 4:41 p.m.
• Medical, 200 block North
Main Street, 6:40 p.m.
• Medical, 300 block College
Meadow Drive, 10:07 p.m.
• Law enforcement standby,
Dayton Road and Ohlman Road,
10:31 p.m.
Wednesday
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 10:24 a.m.
• Medical, 1700 block Parkside
Court, 10:44 a.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90, 12:11
p.m.
SEE REPORTS, PAGE 7
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
Pace of US factory activity picks up in Oct.
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factories
were busier in October, a sign that manufacturing is on sound footing despite
growing concerns about the global economy.
Orders, productivity and hiring all
grew faster than they did in September,
according to a private survey.
The Institute for Supply Management,
a trade group of purchasing managers,
reported Monday that its manufacturing
index rebounded to 59 last month from
56.6 in September. Any reading above 50
signals expansion.
The result matches a three-year high
hit in August and reverses a September
drop.
“Today’s report suggests that the manufacturing sector is expanding and will
likely continue at a healthy pace in the
coming quarter,” Bricklin Dwyer, an
economist at BNP Paribas, wrote in a
research note.
Sixteen of 18 manufacturing industries grew last month, and new orders
accelerated. Only petroleum and coal
reported a decrease in activity.
Manufacturing exports grew last month
but at a slower pace than they did in
September.
The “weakening in overseas demand
was more than offset by a strengthening
in demand at home,” said Paul Dales,
senior U.S. economist with Capital
Economics.
Indeed, the U.S. economy is showing
promising strength. The Commerce
Department reported last week that the
U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of
3.5 percent from July through
September. The third-quarter growth
was driven by gains in business investment, exports and increased military
spending.
Employers are adding nearly 227,000
jobs a month this year — on pace to
make 2014 the best year for job creation
since 1999. The unemployment rate has
tumbled to a six-year low 5.9 percent in
September from 7.2 percent a year earlier.
In a sign of increased confidence in
the economy, the Federal Reserve this
month ended a bond-buying program
intended to push long-term interest
rates lower and encourage more spending and borrowing. The Fed still plans
to keep short-term rates near zero —
where they’ve been since 2008 — for a
“considerable time.”
PEOPLE
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Archaeological Society presentation to focus on Little Big Horn battle
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan-Johnson County
chapter of the Wyoming Archaeological Society
will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Sheridan
Holiday Inn, in the Le Gourmet room.
Dinner will be ordered from the menu, however it is not necessary to order dinner to attend
the free program.
Following dinner, at approximately 7:15 p.m.,
Little Big Horn Historian Marvin Dawes will
present a program on the Little Big Horn battle.
Dawes began work in 1998 as a seasonal park
ranger at Little Big Horn National Historic
Monument. Dawes took courses at Little Big
Horn College at Crow Agency, Montana, and
worked there as a tour guide coordinator in
1997-98.
He has an Associate of Arts degree in liberal
arts and an Associate of Arts degree in Crow
studies/Native American studies. He currently
teaches Crow history and interpersonal commu-
Christmas craft bazaar
set for Saturday in Story
FROM STAFF REPORTS
STORY — The Story sorority and
Story Elementary School PTO will
host a Christmas craft bazaar
Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The event will feature various
crafters with hostess gifts, jewelry,
stocking stuffers, goodies and more.
Lunch will be available beginning
at 11 a.m.
The bazaar will be held at the
Story Woman’s Club, located at 28 N.
Piney Road in Story.
For more information, contact
Joann Marquiss at 680-2451.
nication at Little Big Horn College. In addition
to being a full-time park ranger at Little Big
Horn National Historic Monument, Dawes is the
Crow tribal tourism director and an advisor at
Little Big Horn College.
Reservations are not necessary, and the public
is invited to attend.
The Holiday Inn is located at 1809 Sugarland
Drive.
For more information, contact Scott Burgan at
673-5997.
SCSD2 to release students
early Thurs. for conferences
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
County School District 2 will
hold parent/teacher conferences Thursday and Friday.
Students will be released
early Thursday and there will
be no school on Friday.
The following are the early
dismissals times:
• Kindergarten: 11:25 a.m.
• Elementary schools: 12:35
p.m.
• Sheridan Junior High
School: 1:10 p.m.
• Ft. Mackenzie/Wright
Place: 1:10 p.m.
• Sheridan High School: 1:15
p.m.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
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P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
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Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
‘Tis the season of craft bazaars
Jeanne Roelfsema folds one of her hand-painted shirts at her booth during the Christmas Bazaar Saturday at the Big Horn Woman’s Club in Big
Horn.
Fairgrounds
to host vintage craft
market Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — A vintage craft
market will be held from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Sheridan
County Fairgrounds on
Saturday.
The market will feature more
than 45 arts and crafts booths,
repurposed furniture, home
and garden decor, cupcakes
and vintage and retro finds.
The event is sponsored by
Red Shed Redos and will be
held in the Exhibit Hall, located at 1753 Victoria St.
For more information, contact Terri Walton at 674-6023.
Lost Purple Heart returning to NY soldier’s family
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Just a toddler when her father was
killed in Vietnam, Robyn DeCuffa was devastated when his
Purple Heart medal disappeared from her Syracuse-area
home years ago.
“The medal was really all that I did have from my
father,” said DeCuffa, a 51-year-old mother of eight from
Cortland in central New York.
On Tuesday, DeCuffa and her mother will be reunited
with Pfc. Thomas McGraw’s Purple Heart, awarded after
his death in an ambush in Vietnam on Feb. 1, 1966, while
serving in the Army’s 1st Cavalry Division.
Sarah Dallas, McGraw’s widow, gave DeCuffa her father’s
Army medals and a photo album from his military service
when she was 18. Years later, the Purple Heart disappeared
while she was living outside Syracuse, where her father
grew up. DeCuffa said someone likely stole the medal, but
she wouldn’t elaborate.
“It was a part of him I could physically hang on to,” she
said. “It was devastating when it was missing.”
In the early 1990s, Jason Galloway found a Purple Heart
on the playground at his suburban Syracuse elementary
school. He later handed it in to the front office. Although
McGraw’s name was engraved on the back, apparently no
effort was made to return it to its owner. When school
ended for the year, the medal was given back to Jason, who
brought it home.
Karen Galloway, Jason’s mother, said the medal mostly
sat in a drawer in the kitchen of her family’s home in
Liverpool. Every now and then, her husband would search
the Internet in an effort to locate McGraw and return the
medal, but had no luck finding any information. “We
didn’t put tons and tons of effort into it,” she said.
Office Manager
Production Manager
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about today:
1. FOCUS SHIFTS TO
TURNOUT IN LAST HOURS
OF CAMPAIGNING
The president still looms
large over the midterm
elections as the GOP and
Democrats clash over his
legacy.
2. WHO IS PAYING FOR
CAMPAIGN ADS
In eight of the 12 most
competitive races in the
midterm elections, outside
groups outspent the actual
people on the ballots.
3. HOW TERMINALLY-ILL
ADVOCATE ENDED HER
LIFE
Brittany Maynard, a 29year-old brain cancer
patient, took lethal drugs
prescribed by her doctor
after campaigning for
months for the expansion
of assisted-suicide laws.
4. VIRGIN SPACESHIP’S
DESCENT SYSTEM
DEPLOYED EARLY
The NTSB finding doesn’t
fully explain why
SpaceShipTwo disintegrated in flight.
5. ISRAEL DENIES ENTRY
TO RELEASED 1982 PLANE
BOMBER
Documents released to
the AP show that
Washington has been trying to deport the
Jordanian-born Palestinian
terrorist to the West Bank
for over a year.
6. WHERE COPS IN
FERGUSON DIDN’T WANT
THE MEDIA
The federal government
restricted more than 37
square miles of airspace
for safety, but audio recordings show that local authorities privately acknowledged the purpose was to
keep away news helicopters
during protests.
7. BRITISH MAN CHARGED
WITH KILLING TWO
WOMEN IN HONG KONG
One of the victims was
found dead inside a suitcase on the balcony of the
29 year-old’s upscale apartment in the Asian financial
hub.
8. SESAME STREET TURNS
45
TV’s longest-running children’s program has managed to stay on the air by
adapting to technology and
changes in society—now
the Cookie Monster sometimes eats fruits and vegetables.
9. ROBOTIC PENGUIN
DESIGNED TO SPY ON REAL
ONES
It’s pretty darn cute, and
so convincing that penguins essentially talk to it,
as if it is a potential mate
for their chicks.
10. BLINDFOLDED MAN
WALKS TIGHTROPE
BETWEEN SKYSCRAPERS
High-wire artist Nik
Wallenda, great-grandson
of Karl Wallenda of the
famous Flying Wallendas
circus family, made the
nail-biting walk in Chicago
with no harness or net.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Picking out goodies
Judy Pearson picks up a tray of goodies at the request of her granddaughter Ava VanHallen, 5, during the Christmas Bazaar
Saturday at the Big Horn Woman’s Club in Big Horn.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BHHS to host fall concert Wednesday
BIG HORN — The Big Horn High School band
will present a fall concert Wednesday at 7 p.m. in
the high school’s auditorium.
This year’s concert differs from previous concerts performed by the school band. The Music
Technology Ensemble will show the 1931 classic
“Dracula,” while performing the film soundtrack
live.
The BHHS band has composed a soundtrack for
the film and will play this music live, using selected electronic tablet apps and smartphone apps as
musical instruments. The music will be amplified
and playback will be through powered speakers on
the stage, coordinated with the dialogue and
action found on the film, via the auditorium sound
system.
BHHS band director Ariel Downing is the project
coordinator and will direct the students in the concert.
The public is invited to attend this free event.
For additional information, contact Downing at
BHHS 674-8190.
The high school is located at 333 U.S. Highway
335 in Big Horn.
Polls open at 7 a.m. Tuesday
for general election
SHERIDAN — Rebroadcasts of the two-part candidate forum held Oct. 14-15 are now available.
Videos of the forum may be found on Charter
Cable channel 190, on ACT’s website www.actaccess.tv and on the Sheridan County Chamber of
Commerce website,
sheridanwyomingchamber.org.
Voters will take to the polls between 7 a.m. and 7
p.m. Tuesday for the 2014 general election.
Contested races include those for statewide
offices, local city and town councils and local
school boards.
Individuals may register at the polls and can
vote through absentee ballots through today.
For additional information on poll locations or a
full list of candidates, see the county election
office website at
sheridancounty.com/info/eo/overview.php.
TUESDAY EVENTS |
• 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Election Day, various polling locations in the county
• 5:30 p.m., “Jentel presents,” Sagebrush Community Art Center, 201 E. Fifth St.
TIPPED OVER |
Ex-Michael Jackson prosecutor Tom
Sneddon dies
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — Tom Sneddon,
the former district attorney who sought twice to
try Michael Jackson on child molestation charges
and was disparaged in one of the pop star’s songs,
has died.
Sneddon died Saturday at Santa Barbara Cottage
Hospital after a battle with cancer, said Patrick
McKinley, a retired assistant district attorney for
Santa Barbara County. Sneddon was 73.
“I don’t think you will find a prosecutor in the
district attorney’s office who worked for him who
has one bad thing to say about him. He was just a
helluva boss,” said McKinley, who worked with
Sneddon for more than three decades.
“He wasn’t afraid to make a decision,” he said.
“He would make a decision and away we’d go.”
McKinley said he learned of Sneddon’s death
from Sneddon’s wife.
News of Sneddon’s death was first reported by
the Santa Barbara News-Press.
Sneddon investigated Michael Jackson on child
sexual abuse allegations in 1993 and again a
decade later. The first case fell apart after a young
boy’s family accepted a multimillion dollar settlement from Jackson and declined to testify against
him.
The probe closed with no charges. Jackson shot
back in a thinly disguised swipe at the prosecutor
in a song called “D.S.” on the “HIStory” album.
The song contains the lyrics, “Dom Sheldon is a
cold man.”
A second set of allegations against Jackson
made by a young cancer survivor resulted in a televised trial in 2005 which ended with Jackson
being acquitted.
Jackson’s defense attorney, Thomas Mesereau
Jr., painted Sneddon as an overzealous prosecutor
who had a “personal vendetta” against Jackson
after the first case fell apart.
Sneddon continued to insist that he believed
Jackson could be a danger to children and said he
would have considered a conviction tragic, considering Jackson’s accomplishments.
“If he had been convicted I think that part of it
would have been a tragedy — like a Greek tragedy
play of a person who obviously can bring great joy
and entertainment to the people around the world,
(who was) obviously a great entertainer at one
point in his career, (who) could end up this way for
whatever reason,” he told the Associated Press in
an interview after the verdict.
Sneddon retired in 2006.
Joyce Dudley, Santa Barbara County’s current
district attorney, said Sneddon’s expectations of
his prosecutors were always clear.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Nov. 3, 1964, President
Lyndon B. Johnson soundly
defeated Republican Barry
Goldwater to win a White
House term in his own right.
On this date:
In 1852, Emperor Meiji of
Japan was born in Kyoto.
In 1903, Panama proclaimed its independence
from Colombia.
In 1911, the Chevrolet
Motor Car Co. was founded in
Detroit by Louis Chevrolet
and William C. Durant. (The
company was acquired by
General Motors in 1918.)
In 1936, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt won a landslide
election victory over
Republican challenger Alfred
M. “Alf ” Landon.
In 1954, the Japanese monster movie “Godzilla” was
released by Toho Co.
In 1957, the Soviet Union
launched Sputnik 2, the second manmade satellite, into
orbit; on board was a dog
named Laika who was sacrificed in the experiment.
In 1960, the Meredith
Willson musical “The
Unsinkable Molly Brown”
opened on Broadway with
Tammy Grimes in the title
role.
In 1970, Salvador Allende
was inaugurated as president
of Chile.
In 1979, five Communist
Workers Party members were
killed in a clash with heavily
armed Ku Klux Klansmen and
neo-Nazis during an anti-Klan
protest in Greensboro, North
Carolina.
In 1986, the Iran-Contra
affair began to come to light
as Ash-Shiraa, a pro-Syrian
Lebanese magazine, first
broke the story of U.S. arms
sales to Iran.
In 1994, Susan Smith of
Union, South Carolina, was
arrested for drowning her two
young sons, Michael and Alex,
nine days after claiming the
children had been abducted by
a black carjacker.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush claimed a reelection mandate a day after
more than 62 million
Americans chose him over
Democrat John Kerry; Kerry
conceded defeat in make-orbreak Ohio rather than
launch a legal fight reminiscent of the contentious
Florida recount of four years
earlier. Hamid Karzai was
declared the winner of
Afghanistan’s first-ever presidential election after a threeweek probe into vote fraud
found no grounds to invalidate his triumph.
Five years ago: In the 2009
elections, Chris Christie, a
Republican former U.S. attorney, unseated New Jersey
Democratic Gov. Jon Corzine
while in Virginia, Republican
Bob McDonnell beat Democrat
R. Creigh Deeds. German
Chancellor Angela Merkel
marked the 20th anniversary
of the fall of the Berlin Wall
with a speech to the U.S.
Congress by exhorting the
world to “tear down the walls
of today” and reach a deal to
combat global warming.
Actor-comedian Carl
Ballantine (“McHale’s Navy”)
died in Los Angeles at age 92.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama stepped into
Virginia’s gubernatorial race,
throwing the political weight
of the White House behind
Democrat Terry McAuliffe,
who ended up defeating
Republican Ken Cuccinelli. In
a double victory for Kenya,
Geoffrey Mutai successfully
defended his New York City
Marathon title and Priscah
Jeptoo rallied to win the
women’s race amid heightened security after the Boston
Marathon bombings.
Thought for Today:
“Among these things but one
thing seems certain — that
nothing certain exists, and
that nothing is more pitiable
or more presumptuous than
man.” — Pliny the Elder,
Roman scholar.
ALMANAC
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS CONTINUED |
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 1:54 p.m.
• Medical, 400 block North
Jefferson Street, 3:58 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 4:11 p.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 5 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 8:25 p.m.
• Trauma, 600 block North
Main Street, 11:28 p.m.
Thursday
• Trauma, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 3:44 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 5:21 a.m.
• Medical, 100 block West 13th
Street, 5:55 a.m.
• Medical, 500 block Lewis
Street, 11:08 p.m.
• Medical, Highway 345, 12:18
p.m.
• Medical, 400 block South
Brooks Street, 4:48 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 5:45 p.m.
Friday
• Medical, 1900 block West
Loucks Street, 1:10 a.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 1:36 a.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 1:38 a.m.
• Medical, 600 block Mountain
Shadows Boulevard, 2:49 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 4:15 a.m.
• Medical, 500 block West
Loucks Street, 6:06 a.m.
• Trauma, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 7:33 a.m.
• Medical, 2800 block Coffeen
Avenue, 8 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 9:10 a.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 11:17 a.m.
• Trauma, 700 block West 15th
Street, 11;50 a.m.
• Trauma, 1700 block
Sagebrush Drive, 12:23 p.m.
• Trauma, 300 block Alger
Street, 12:40 p.m.
• Trauma, 2000 block
Sugarland Drive, 2:31 p.m.
• Trauma, 2000 block
Sugarland Drive, 2:31 p.m.
• Trauma, 2000 block
Sugarland Drive, 2:33 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 2:51 p.m.
• Event Standby, 1000 block
Long Drive, 6 p.m.
• Trauma, 500 block West
Fifth Street, 7:45 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday
• Reports not available by
press time.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Sunday
• Dismissals — Hayden James
Pearce, Ranchester
• No admissions reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the SPD
website.
Friday
• Suspicious vehicle, South
Brooks Street, 12:14 a.m.
• Suspicious vehicle, West
Alger Avenue, 12:21 a.m.
• DUI, North Jefferson Street,
12:37 a.m.
• VIN inspection, West 12th
Street, 12:54 a.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 1:39 a.m.
• Accident, Smith Street, 7:03
a.m.
• Civil dispute, Meridian
Street, 8:45 a.m.
• Agency assist, North Main
Street, 9:12 a.m.
• Cat trap, South Tschirgi
Street, 10:03 a.m.
• Warrant service, North
Main Street, 10:08 a.m.
• Traffic complaint, Coffeen
Avenue, 10:59 a.m.
• Theft, Sheridan Area, 11:18
a.m.
• Dead animal, Mydland Road,
12:15 p.m.
• DUI, West Alger Avenue,
12:59 p.m.
• VIN inspection, West 12th
Street, 1:17 p.m.
• Minor in possession, Long
Drive, 2:17 p.m.
• Accident, Sugarland Drive,
2:21 p.m.
• Trespass in progress,
Wyoming Avenue, 3:48 p.m.
• Accident, Fifth Street, 4:22
p.m.
• Accident, Coffeen Avenue,
5:31 p.m.
• Traffic complaint, South
Brook Street, 7:03 p.m.
• Fire, Third Avenue East, 7:54
p.m.
• Dog at large, Sumner Street,
7:58 p.m.
• Animal found, Olympus
Drive, 8:09 p.m.
• Accident, Wyoming Avenue,
8:11 p.m.
• DUI, Broadway Street, 8:40
p.m.
• DUI, Coffeen Avenue, 8:40
p.m.
• Suspicious person, Victoria
Street, 8:46 p.m.
• Damaged property, Park
View Court, 8:24 p.m.
• Careless driver, Long Drive,
10:06 p.m.
• Warrant service, West Third
Street, 10:48 p.m.
• Criminal entry, Bluebird
Lane, 11:01 p.m.
• Burglary occupied, Bluebird
Lane, 11:02 p.m.
• Urinating in public,
Broadway Street, 11:16 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 11:43 p.m.
Saturday
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 12:02 a.m.
• Bar check, Broadway Street,
12:34 a.m.
• Drug activity, Wyoming
Avenue, 1:09 a.m.
• Court violation, Broadway
Street, 1:24 a.m.
• Bar check, Broadway Street,
1:47 p.m.
• Burglar alarm, Coffeen
Avenue, 2 a.m.
• Assault in progress, North
Main Street, 2:28 a.m.
• Drugs/possession, Broadway
Street, 2:43 a.m.
• Warrant Service, North
Main Street, 2:58 a.m.
• DUI, Broadway Street, 3:41
a.m.
• Warrant service, West 12th
Street, 8:19 a.m.
• Barking dog, East Burkitt
Street, 8:31 a.m.
• Shots fired, Highway 14
East, 9:14 a.m.
• Theft, Scott Drive, 9:31 a.m.
• Dead animal, Dana Avenue,
10:16 a.m.
• Animal found, West 12th
Street, 10:41 a.m.
• Malicious destruction,
TUESDAY
Broadway Street, 10:47 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, South Main
Street, 11:29 a.m.
• Welfare check, East
Brundage Street, 11:36 a.m.
• Dog at large, Ponderosa
Drive, 12:08 p.m.
• Abandoned vehicle, West
Burkitt Street, 12:12 p.m.
• Lost property, Long Drive,
12:42 p.m.
• Animal dead, South
Thurmond Street, 1:34 p.m.
• Juvenile out of control,
Park View Court, 1:44 p.m.
• Barking dog, Bruce
Mountain Drive, 1:54 p.m.
• Warrant service, Mydland
Road, 2:38 p.m.
• Barking dog, Second Avenue
East, 2:39 p.m.
• Animal found, Sherman
Avenue, 3:27 p.m.
• Accident delayed report,
Mydland Road, 5 p.m.
• Medical, North Main Street,
5:09 p.m.
• Fight, North Main Street,
6:04 p.m.
• Domestic, Mydland Road,
6:14 p.m.
• Accident, North Gould
Street, 8:35 p.m.
• DUI, Arlington Boulevard,
10:35 p.m.
• DUI, North Main Street,
10:39 p.m.
• Burglar Alarm, East
Brundage Lane, 10:55 p.m.
• Damaged property, Coffeen
Avenue, 11:19 p.m.
• Public intoxication, Sixth
Street, 11:55 p.m.
Sunday
• Reports not available by
press time.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
Friday
• Suspicious circumstances,
Banner, 6:24 a.m.
• Fraud, Banner, 10:38 a.m.
• Animal incident, Owl Creek
Road, 11:10 p.m.
• Warrant service, Burton
Street and Idaho Avenue, 3:06
p.m.
• Accident, Beaver Creek
Road, 3:44 p.m.
• Air gun shooting, Dayton,
7:51 p.m.
Saturday
• Reckless driver, Red Grade
Road, 12:17 a.m.
• Shots fired, Highway 14
East, 9:14 a.m.
• Civil dispute, Coffeen
Avenue, 12:55 p.m.
• Shots fired, Banner, 2:28 p.m.
• DUI, Interstate 90
Eastbound, 4:40 p.m.
• Trespass, Bird Farm Road
and Island Road, 5:41 p.m.
• Damaged property, Center
Road, 9:44 p.m.
• Road hazard, Beaver Creek,
9:57 p.m.
Sunday
• Minor in possession, North
Main Street, 1:35 a.m.
• DUI, US Highway 87, 2:46
a.m.
• Suicidal Subject, North Park
Road, 6:49 a.m.
• Road hazard, Dayton, 1:10
p.m.
• Theft, Lower Prairie Dog
Road, 1:36 p.m.
• Warrant service, Ranchester,
1:43 p.m.
• Court violation, Ranchester,
2:17 p.m.
• Battery, Leopard Street, 10:33
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
22
60
Mostly sunny
and breezy
37
56
Almanac
Warmer with
clouds and sun
27
66
39
58
Temperature
High/low .........................................................63/31
Normal high/low ............................................53/25
Record high .............................................77 in 1965
Record low ............................................... -5 in 1995
Precipitation (in inches)
Sunday............................................................ 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.00"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.05"
Year to date ...................................................12.86"
Normal year to date ......................................12.94"
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
6:48 a.m.
6:50 a.m.
6:51 a.m.
4:54 p.m.
4:53 p.m.
4:51 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
3:12 p.m.
3:45 p.m.
4:21 p.m.
2:52 a.m.
4:04 a.m.
5:15 a.m.
Full
Last
New
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
26/55
Basin
24/56
22/60
Nov 6
Nov 14
Nov 22
Nov 29
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Call
The Press
at
672-2431
Winning numbers:
1-3-13-25-38;
Powerball 17
Powerplay 2X
Estimated jackpot:
$178,000,000
Shown are
Tuesday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Gillette
30/57
Wright
29/55
Kaycee
28/55
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
64/45/pc
61/39/pc
55/33/s
62/42/pc
59/35/s
64/43/pc
58/31/s
53/28/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
42/24/c
55/36/pc
44/28/s
53/32/pc
45/31/c
52/31/s
53/36/pc
36/25/c
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Regional Cities
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
57/37/s
56/28/s
51/27/s
55/35/pc
51/30/pc
53/34/s
54/27/pc
47/23/pc
Having
delivery
issues?
Here are the results
of Saturday’s
Powerball
lottery drawing:
Buffalo
31/57
Worland
21/56
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
58/41/c
53/32/s
48/35/s
51/39/c
46/29/pc
57/37/pc
51/29/c
43/31/pc
Smoothies
Clearmont
27/59
Story
26/55
Thermopolis
23/56
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Cody
31/51
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Ranchester
24/60
First
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Sunday ...................... 0.00"
Shown is Tuesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Tuesday's highs.
Hardin
29/61
Parkman
25/58
Dayton
25/60
Lovell
25/54
Alec C. Olson, 26, of
Sheridan, passed away on
Sunday, November 2, 2014, at
his residence.
Online condolences may
be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has
been
entrusted
with
arrangements.
National Weather for Tuesday, November 4
Broadus
28/60
28
Alec C. Olson
JAIL
Monday
Daily inmate count: 79
Female inmate count: 17
Inmates at treatment facilities
(not counted in daily inmate
count): 0
Inmates housed at other facilities (not counted in daily
inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for the
previous day: 4
Number of releases for the
previous day: 2
Number of book-ins for the
weekend: 17
Number of releases for the
weekend: 9
Highest number of inmates
held over the weekend: 79
Mostly cloudy;
breezy, cooler
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Sunday
ARRESTS
Names of individuals arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will not be released
until those individuals have
appeared in court.
Friday
• Kalee Marie Irish, 31,
Sheridan, possession controlled
substance without valid prescription, circuit court,
Arrested by SPD
• Tia Marie Wells, 36,
Sheridan, warrant (child endangering, felony), possession controlled substance without valid
prescription, possession
amphetamine/stimulant, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• Aileen Danielle Butterfield,
57, Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
• Cody Michael Hancock, 23,
Sheridan, bench warrant (contempt of court), circuit court,
arrested by SCSO
• Cory Eugene Mehringer, 29,
Sheridan, check fraud over
$500, circuit court, arrested by
SPD
• Cody Wayne Porch, 22,
Sheridan, expired registration,
bench warrant (contempt of
court), municipal court, arrested by SPD
Saturday
• Shannon Nichole Nesheim,
35, Banner, probation violation/revocation, out of county
court, arrested by SPD.
• David Lee Cooley, 26,
Sheridan DWUI, circuit court,
arrested by SPD.
• Nichole Kaye Patterson, 20,
Parkman, bench warrant (contempt of court), municipal
court, arrested by SPD.
• Christopher John Bowen, 20,
Sheridan, bench warrant (contempt of court), circuit court,
arrested by SPD.
• Tyler Michael Bennett, 32,
(no charge listed), Sheridan, circuit court, arrested by SPD.
Sunday
• Scott Clayton Mines, 33,
Sheridan, warrant (2), criminal
entry, circuit court, arrested by
SPD.
• Taylor Rose Peplinski, 21,
Sheridan, DWUI, circuit court,
arrested by SCSO.
• Matthew Peter Gravestock,
31, Sheridan, compuls auto
insurance, DWUI, DWUS, circuit court, arrested by SPD.
• Tavonne Lee Dillon, 25,
Ranchester, warrant (probation
violation, revocation), circuit
court, arrested by SCSO.
FRIDAY
Billings
35/58
Turning cloudy
and warmer
p.m.
• DUI, Ranchester, 10:46 p.m.
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
Clear
A7
DEATH NOTICE |
From Page 4
TONIGHT
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
SPORTS
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Hill sets records, Wyoming routs Fresno State 45-17
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Freshman Brian
Hill had 281 yards rushing and 106 yards
receiving in his first career start and
Wyoming got its first road win of the season 45-17 over Fresno State on Saturday
night.
Hill’s 387 yards from scrimmage set the
Mountain West and Wyoming single-game
records for all-purpose yards. It was also
second-best rushing performance in program history behind Kevin Lowe’s 302
SC men’s
basketball
tops N. Idaho
yards against South Dakota State in 1984.
Hill scored on touchdown runs of 32 and
66 yards and capped his night early in the
fourth quarter with an 89-yard run that set
up the first of Joshua Tapscott’s two touchdown runs.
He posted five runs of 20 or more yards.
It was Hill’s second-straight game that he
eclipsed the 100-yard rushing mark. He is
the first freshman running back for UW to
post multiple 100-yard performances in the
same season since Wynel Seldon, who had
three 100-yard efforts in 2005.
Colby Kirkegaard was 19 of 28 for 320
yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions, and the Cowboys (4-5, 2-3 Mountain
West) outgained Fresno State 696-318.
The Pokes kept possession of the ball for
13:04 of a possible 15 minutes in the first
quarter and 18:22 of a possible 30 minutes
in the first half. UW possessed the ball for
nearly 37 minutes in the game.
The Wyoming defense also had a stellar
performance with two interceptions, two
sacks and limiting Fresno State to just 149
yards through the air. Redshirt junior cornerback Tyran Finley had two picks, while
junior defensive end Eddie Yarbrough had
six tackles, one sack and two tackles for
loss.
Marteze Waller had 18 carries for 116
yards and a touchdown for the Bulldogs (36, 2-3).
SHS, Big Horn earn regional titles
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Matt
Hammer questioned his
teams’ work ethic after a
preseason loss at Rocky
Mountain College on Oct.
21, and since then, his team
has responded in a positive
way.
The Sheridan College
men’s basketball team
opened the regular season
with two wins at the
Holiday Inn Tournament
this weekend, including an
89-85 victory over No. 21
North Idaho on Saturday.
The Generals dominated a
struggling Great Falls JV
team Friday night before
facing off against one of the
toughest opponents on their
schedule in only their second game of the season.
Like the ladies playing
before them, the men’s team
used their size and athleticism to create open shots.
The Generals shot 54 percent in the first half, led by
the hot hand of sophomore
guard Kyi Thomas.
Although his coaches
weren’t shy to point out that
Thomas isn’t typically
known for his shooting, the
guard definitely had his
stroke Saturday. Thomas
dropped in 20 points in the
first half on eight of 10
shooting.
Jamir Andrews added
nine first half points as the
Generals took a 49-3 lead
into halftime.
While the Generals held
their lead for the entire second half, it was their lack of
patience, something that
Hammer has stressed as the
main problem his team
needs to work on, that
allowed the Cardinals to
chip away at the Sheridan
lead and put pressure on the
Generals down the stretch.
Despite a nine-point lead
with less than a minute to
go, a Tyler Hopkins foul on
a 3-pointer and an and-1
brought the lead down to
four. Sheridan found Bennie
Lufile for a dunk to stretch
the lead to six, but the
Cardinals answered with a
quick 3-pointer in the corner to cut it back to three
with 16 seconds left.
“We get a little jittery, we
get a little nervous and anxious and start making mistakes,” Hammer said.
“Instead of just being solid,
we’re out there trying to
jump the passing lane or
closing out and getting into
them, so patience is the
biggest thing we’re going to
be stressing on offense and
defense.”
Despite a 63 percent freethrow shooting night by the
Generals, Thomas added to
his game-high 27 points by
going two for two from the
line with two seconds left to
seal the deal for the
Generals.
SEE GENERALS, PAGE B2
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Jamy Shassetz, left, and Adriane Anderson, center, embrace after the Lady Broncs defeat Cheyenne Central in the class 4A East regional volleyball championship
game Saturday at Sheridan High School. Sheridan defeated the Lady Indians in a five-set match.
Lady Broncs battle through bracket to take title
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — It wasn’t an easy road to get
there, but the Sheridan High School girls volleyball team will enter the state tournament
this weekend as the No.1 seed out of the East
region after defeating Cheyenne Central in the
title match Saturday.
The Lady Broncs topped Laramie before losing to Campbell County and beating Cheyenne
South on Friday. That evening of play earned
the Lady Broncs a 10 a.m. matchup against
No. 1-ranked Cheyenne East on Saturday.
The girls from Sheridan battled through to
win in four sets (25-16, 17-25, 25-11, 25-20).
That victory propelled the Lady Broncs into
the regional championship where they faced
No. 2-ranked Cheyenne Central.
They battled through five sets (17-25, 19-25,
25-20, 25-18, 19-17) to earn the 4A regional title.
Sheridan will kick off the state tournament
in Casper on Thursday with a 6 p.m. game
against Green River. If they win that matchup,
they’ll face the winner of the Natrona County
(No. 2 West) versus Cheyenne East (No. 3 East)
battle, on Friday at 6 p.m.
The 4A state title game will be played at 4
p.m. Saturday.
COURTESY PHOTO |
The Lady Rams stand for a picture after earning the 2A East regional championship. Pictured, from left, are assistant coach Tina Melin, head coach Leigh
McLaughlin, Kristen Carlson, Sydney Atkinson, Mollie Caiola, Lauren Passini, Emily Blaney, Cassidy Enloe, Abby Buckingham, Saije Pollard, Bailey Bard,
McKinzie Taylor, Kayla Crouse and Morgan Nance.
Lady Rams earn
third regional title
FROM STAFF REPORTS
BIG HORN — Revenge has never tasted so
sweet for the Big Horn Lady Rams volleyball
team as it did Saturday in Torrington.
The Lady Rams faced Wright in the 2A
regional championship, earning a victory in
four sets (25-18, 26-24, 17-25, 25-19).
Wright defeated Big Horn three times in regular season play, but the Lady Rams won when
they needed to, taking the regional title for the
third year in a row.
SEE LADY RAMS, PAGE B2
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
Brady outplays Manning
in Patriots’ 43-21 victory
Lady Generals topple No. 18 N. Idaho
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sierra Toms draws contact with a defender on her way to the basket Saturday at Sheridan College.
Toms led the team in scoring with 22 points in the win against North Idaho.
Toms leads team in
scoring with 22
exactly what McCarthy thought and made a
run in the second half.
The Cardinals put the pressure on
Sheridan, diminishing the Lady Generals’
numbers to 28 percent from the field with
zero 3-pointers. North Idaho also attacked
the basket more in the second half, upping
their free-throw attempts from seven in the
BY MIKE PRUDEN
first half to 22 in the second.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Although the Cardinals outscored the
Lady Generals 44-29 in the second half, it
SHERIDAN — The size and depth of the
wasn’t enough to surmount the massive
Sheridan College women’s basketball team
first-half lead Sheridan had built itself, and
was too much for 18th-ranked North Idaho
the Lady Generals came out on top, 81-71.
to handle on Saturday, allowing the Lady
It was the Sheridan post players that sepGenerals to dominate the floor on their way
arated McCarthy’s team from their oppoto a clean sweep at the Holiday Inn
nent. As North Idaho pressured the smaller
Tournament.
Sheridan guards, Katie Kuhn and Sarah
After coasting to a win against Great
Rawlings, the Lady Generals were able to
Falls Friday, Sheridan faced a North Idaho
use their size and athleticism to counter
team just three years removed from a
the Cardinals pressure and outrebound
national title in Saturday’s matchup. But
them 54-31.
the Lady Generals looked like the ranked
Tiana Hanson, a 6-foot-1 forward, spent
team Saturday night.
much of her night relieving Kuhn and
Frank McCarthy’s squad came out firing
Rawlings of the pressure, using her diverse
on all cylinders, running the floor and
skillset to bring the ball up the floor
using their size to outwork the Cardinals.
The Lady Generals shot 52-percent from the against her less-nimble defenders. Hanson
also used her length and athleticism to run
field in the first half, including six of 11
the floor and corral offensive rebounds,
from 3-point range. Defensively, they held
eight of them, on her way to 20 points and
the Cardinals to 31 percent and 13 percent
17 rebounds. She also got to the line 15
from the 3-point line. Sheridan also got to
times, knocking down 12 of them.
the free-throw line 20 times on their way to
Sierra Toms kept up with her team-leada 52-27 halftime lead.
ing pace from a season ago, scoring 22
“We wanted to protect our home court,”
points while chipping in 10 rebounds.
McCarthy said of the fast start. “We came
out aggressive. We weren’t intimidated, but Freshman Tamara Brine, who led the Lady
Generals with 22 points in Friday’s win,
the scary thing is, we knew they were
added 15 on Saturday, and Shae Bruursema
going to make a run.”
scored 10.
North Idaho wasn’t ranked in the presea“As long as I’ve been here, we’ve played
son top-25 for nothing, though, and they did
them every year, that’s the
first time we’ve ever beat
them,” McCarthy said of
North Idaho. “It’s a solid
Basketball season is right around the corner. Compete and have fun with a
team, good program, well
reenergized league this year. Some new features this year include: stat keeping,
coached, so it was a great
an established website for league leaders, individual and team awards, and more.
win for us.”
Registrations: October 20th - November 7th
The Lady Generals (2-0)
How: Sign up online at www.sheridanrecreation.com or sign up in person
will travel to Colorado
at 1579 Thorne Rider Park
Springs, Colorado, to comCost: $540 Where: Games will be played at Sheridan Jr. High Old Gym
pete in the Air Force Classic
Games: Games will begin November 18th
beginning Thursday.
2014 Adult Basketball League
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — The
reviews came quickly and unanimously.
“Brady’s Better!” the crowd chanted
midway through the fourth quarter.
“I stunk,” Peyton Manning said minutes after struggling through the 16th
meeting between two of the greatest
quarterbacks in NFL history.
All that was true Sunday in the meeting between the AFC’s two top teams.
Tom Brady outplayed Manning and
the New England Patriots won 43-21 for
their fifth straight victory, ending the
Denver Broncos’ winning streak at
four.
The lopsided loss by the favored
Broncos was a surprise. Another Brady
victory over Manning in Foxborough
wasn’t.
Manning is 0-4 at New England over
the past five seasons. The Patriots have
won their past 14 home games, the
longest current streak in the NFL, and
34 in a row over AFC teams.
“The crowd didn’t play,” Broncos
defensive tackle Terrance Knighton
said. “It is 11-on-11 and their 11 played
better.”
Make that 22.
The Patriots (7-2) were better on
offense, especially when converting on
third and fourth downs. And they were
better on defense, holding the Broncos
(6-2) to their second lowest points total
of the season.
“We knew if we executed well how
the game would turn out, so we weren’t
surprised,” New England defensive
tackle Vince Wilfork said. “It wasn’t
about Peyton Manning and the Denver
Broncos. It was about making sure we
knew what we’re doing.”
Brady threw for 333 yards, four touchdowns and his first interception in five
games. Manning piled up 438 yards
passing, most after the Broncos trailed
27-7 at halftime, with two touchdown
passes and two interceptions.
“The quarterback stinks, usually
you’re not going to win many games,”
Manning said. “I don’t make any excuses.”
‘Incredible. That was one of the
best catches I’ve ever seen.’
Tom Brady
Patriots quarterback
Brady is 11-5 against Manning with
one of those losses coming last season
in the AFC title game.
“He has always set a real high bar for
how to play and I have tried to do the
same through my efforts with my
team,” Brady said about Manning.
“The only thing I really care about is
the respect from my team, going out
there and trying to earn it. “
Some more highlights of the Patriots’
victory:
THE OTHER MATCHUP: Just as
Brady outplayed Manning, New
England’s Rob Gronkowski beat
Denver’s Julius Thomas in a matchup
of two of the NFL’s best tight ends.
Gronkowski had nine catches for 105
yards and a 1-yard touchdown, while
Thomas finished with two receptions
for 33 yards, with an 18-yard score.
Gronkowski made a spectacular onehanded grab early in the fourth quarter
and was tackled at the 1.
“Incredible,” Brady said. “That was
one of the best catches I’ve ever seen.”
Thomas’ touchdown cut the lead to
27-14 early in the third quarter before
the Patriots scored 10 points in a 17-second span on Stephen Gostkowski’s 45yard field goal and Brady’s 10-yard
scoring pass to Brandon LaFell.
Semifinal matchups set for
Big Horn, Sheridan teams
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The matchups are set
for the Wyoming high school football
semifinals.
The Sheridan Broncs, who beat
Cheyenne Central in the opening
round, will have a rematch against
No.1 Natrona this Saturday starting at
1 p.m. at Natrona County High School.
Natrona beat the Broncs 24-0 in their
regular season matchup.
The Big Horn Rams, the 1-seed in the
2A East, will host a semifinal rematch
with Wheatland this Saturday at 2 p.m.
The Rams defeated Wheatland 19-6 just
two weeks ago to finish the regular season undefeated.
The winners of both games earn
trips to Laramie for the State
Championship next week.
Lady Eagles end season at regionals
FROM STAFF REPORTS
DAYTON — The Tongue River High
School girls volleyball team wrappedup
the 2014 season at the 2A regional tournament Saturday.
In the team’s final game of the season, the Lady Eagles fell to Southeast,
the team that went on to take third
place in the tournament.
The Lady Eagles battled through
three sets (25-18, 26-24, 25-12).
Manager’s Meeting: Thursday October 30th, 6 PM at Sheridan Jr. High School
If you attend the manager’s meeting your team will be rewarded a
$20 discount towards your team’s fees this year. Individuals wishing to
play this year but might not have a team is also encouraged to come so
that we can place you with a team.
Contact Robbie Spencer at the Sheridan Recreation District
office at 674-6421 for more information.
LADY RAMS: Heading to state tournament this week
FROM B1
“We did our homework, and we came out prepared to
handle all that Wright had to offer,” Big Horn coach Leigh
McLaughlin said. “We came out mentally prepared as a
team and went after each and every point as if it were our
last.”
McLaughlin added that her team lost some mental focus
in the third game, but fought hard to hold Wright at 24
points while they racked up eight. In game four, she said
her team went point for point with Wright, but gained
momentum as the game continued.
“The consistency of our team attitude, and the consistency of our skills is what carried us through this match,”
McLaughline said.
She added that Kayla Crouse, Morgan Nance and Saije
Pollard led the team with crucial blocking, while Bailey
Bard led the team with kills including the match-ending
no-touch kill.
McLaughlin added that McKinzie Taylor did a great job
getting the ball to her hitters, while the passers Lauren
Passini, Emily Blaney and Cassidy Enloe did a tremendous
job getting the ball to the setter to set up the offense.
“It was an overall whole team effort and I am extremely
proud of everyone including those who were on the bench
cheering for their team — Mollie Caiola, Sydney Atkinson,
Kristen Carlson and Abby Buckinham,” McLaughlin said.
“We are peaking at the right time which is exactly what we
want to see.”
The Lady Rams will enter the state tournament as the
No. 1-ranked team from the East. They will take on Wind
River at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Casper Events Center.
The championship game for 2A volleyball will be played
at 4 p.m. Saturday.
GENERALS: Coach urges team not to be satisfied
FROM B1
“Anybody out there that’s got any tips,” Hammer joked
about his team’s free-throw shooting woes. “We’ve just got
to step up and knock it down.”
To go along with Thomas’s 27, Andrews contributed 21,
Lufile added 14 and Pablo Rivas chipped in 11.
The Sheridan Generals won’t have much time to rest as
they turn right around and play Tuesday night against
LCCC at the Golden Dome at 7:30 p.m.
“We can’t be satisfied,” Hammer said. “Starting the year
2-0, that’s great; beating a team that’s as talented as North
Idaho is great; but we can’t be satisfied. We’ve got to keep
wanting more.”
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
YOUNG GUNS WRESTLING |
2014 Loren Jackson Memorial
Twin Spruce Jr. High School - Gillette
7th and 8th Grade 76-79
Round 1 - Reese Osborne (Sheridan JH) won by
fall over Charlie Koss (Douglas MS) (Fall 1:47)
Round 2 - Osborne won by fall over Trent
Pennington (Twin Spruce) (Fall 1:01)
Round 3 - Osborne won by fall over Reid Holmes
(Newcastle MS) (Fall 2:51)
7th and 8th Grade 84-87
Round 1 - Garrett Avery (Sheridan JH) won by fall
over Nyjah Lawrence (Sage Valley) (Fall 1:35)
Round 2 - Preston Seamands (Wright JH) won by
decision over Avery (Dec 2-1)
Round 3 - Avery won by decision over Devon
Swisher (Douglas MS) (Dec 3-2)
7th and 8th Grade 90-91
Round 1 - Tristan Little (Sheridan JH) won by fall
over Liam Greenelsh (Big Horn) (Fall 1:17)
Round 2 - Dakota Reinolds (Glenrock) won by fall
over Little (Fall 2:30)
Round 3 - Little won by fall over Jaron Glasscock
(Twin Spruce) (Fall 1:00)
7th and 8th Grade 107-110
Round 1 - Kyle Breen (Tongue River) won by fall
over AJ Lawrence (Sage Valley) (Fall 2:46)
Round 2 - Ian Nemec (Wright JH) won by fall over
Breen (Fall 1:19)
Round 3 - Robert Woodward (Sage Valley) won by
fall over Breen (Fall 2:41)
7th and 8th Grade 113-115
Round 1 - John Zorbas (Buffalo) won by fall over
Lakota Schindler (Sheridan JH) (Fall 1:09)
Round 2 - Garrett Strohschein (Wright JH) won by
fall over Schindler (Fall 0:20)
Round 3 - Pearce Jones (Moorcroft JH) won by fall
over Schindler (Fall 1:09)
7th and 8th Grade 145-147
Round 1 - Tristan Scheeler (Sheridan JH) won by
fall over Tyler Stempeck (Twin Spruce) (Fall 1:11)
Round 2 - Scheeler won by fall over Nash Dierman
(Big Horn) (Fall 1:18)
Round 3 - Scheeler won by fall over Parker
Boultenhouse (Sage Valley) (Fall 0:37)
6th Grade 68-69
Round 1 - Gabe Bland (Sheridan JH) won by fall
over Zack Torrez (Sage Valley) (Fall 1:08)
Round 2 - Bland won by fall over Dalton Lason
(Niobrara County) (Fall 0:25)
Round 3 - Bland won by fall over Kacy Jones
(Newcastle MS) (Fall 0:53)
6th Grade 88-90
Round 1 - Devin Carr (Douglas MS) won by decision over Oliver Bartel (Sheridan JH) (Dec 6-5)
Round 2 - Bartel won by fall over Paden Hulet
(Buffalo) (Fall 3:16)
Round 3 - Bartel won by fall over Lane Gill
(Sundance JH) (Fall 3:13)
6th Grade 90-93
Round 1 - Hunter Goodwin (Sheridan JH) won by
fall over Hunter Stone (Buffalo) (Fall 1:10)
Round 2 - Goodwin won by fall over Dustin
Simmons (Glenrock) (Fall 0:22)
Round 3 - Goodwin won by fall over Max Kessler
(Buffalo) (Fall 0:52)
6th Grade 92-93
Round 1 - Hayden Crow (Sheridan JH) won by fall
over Olie Wagner (Buffalo) (Fall 0:56)
Round 2 - Crow won by fall over Gavin Gates
(Glenrock) (Fall 0:41)
Round 3 - Crow won by fall over Calvin Rule
(Buffalo) (Fall 0:44)
6th Grade 95-98
Round 1 - Isaiah Huus (Sage Valley) won by fall
over Caleb Johnston (Sheridan JH) (Fall 0:39)
Round 2 - Lane Rainy (Glenrock) won by fall over
Johnston (Fall 1:07)
Round 3 - John Wonka (Buffalo) won by decision
over Johnston (Dec 9-5)
WSWL-Saints Throwdown
Jefferson High School - Edgewater, Colorado
6 & Under NOVICE 60
Round 1 - Anthony Rodriquez (Sheridan) won by
fall over Jordan Lopez (JR. TROJANS) (Fall 0:39)
Round 3 - Rodriquez won by fall over Edward
Gonzales (JEFFERSON) (Fall 0:13)
Round 4 - Rodriquez won by decision over Javon
Harms (JEFFERSON) (Dec 5-0)
Round 5 - Rodriquez won by decision over Archer
Sanchez (Chaparral Youth Wrestling Club) (Dec 50)
PREP FOOTBALL |
Saturday's Scores
The Associated Press
Lusk 55, Riverside 0
Friday's Scores
FOOTBALL
State Playoffs
Class 4A
Quarterfinal
Campbell County 48, Laramie 3
Casper Natrona 55, Evanston 12
Cheyenne East 57, Casper Kelly Walsh 27
Sheridan 28, Cheyenne Central 7
Class 3A
Quarterfinal
Cody 61, Rawlins 6
Douglas 38, Star Valley 13
Riverton 42, Powell 26
Torrington 41, Jackson Hole 14
Class 2A
Quarterfinal
Big Horn 23, Lovell 12
Mountain View 60, Thermopolis 0
Newcastle 38, Greybull 14
Wheatland 52, Lyman 6
Class 1A 11 Man
Quarterfinal
Cokeville 55, Tongue River 0
Lingle-Fort Laramie 28, Shoshoni 0
Upton 48, Rocky Mountain 14
Class 1A 6-Man
Quarterfinal
Dubois 74, Midwest 14
Guernsey-Sunrise 65, Farson-Eden 8
Little Snake River 57, Hanna-Elk Mountain 34
Meeteetse 45, Kaycee 20
NFL |
National Football League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Pct PF
New England
7
2
0
.778 281
Buffalo
5
3
0
.625 178
Miami
5
3
0
.625 211
N.Y. Jets
1
8
0
.111 154
South
W
L
T
Pct PF
Indianapolis
5
3
0
.625 250
Houston
4
5
0
.444 206
Tennessee
2
6
0
.250 137
Jacksonville
1
8
0
.111 141
North
W
L
T
Pct PF
Cincinnati
5
2
1
.688 194
Pittsburgh
6
3
0
.667 248
Cleveland
5
3
0
.625 185
Baltimore
5
4
0
.556 240
West
W
L
T
Pct PF
Denver
6
2
0
.750 245
Kansas City
5
3
0
.625 200
San Diego
5
4
0
.556 205
Oakland
0
8
0
.000 129
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T
Pct PF
Philadelphia
6
2
0
.750 234
Dallas
6
3
0
.667 230
N.Y. Giants
3
4
0
.429 154
Washington
3
6
0
.333 197
South
W
L
T
Pct PF
New Orleans
4
4
0
.500 227
3
5
1
.389 177
Carolina
Atlanta
2
6
0
.250 192
Tampa Bay
1
7
0
.125 150
North
W
L
T
Pct PF
Detroit
6
2
0
.750 162
Green Bay
5
3
0
.625 222
Minnesota
4
5
0
.444 168
Chicago
3
5
0
.375 180
West
W
L
T
Pct PF
Arizona
7
1
0
.875 192
Seattle
5
3
0
.625 202
San Francisco 4
4
0
.500 168
St. Louis
3
5
0
.375 149
___
Thursday’s Game
New Orleans 28, Carolina 10
Sunday’s Games
Arizona 28, Dallas 17
Philadelphia 31, Houston 21
Kansas City 24, N.Y. Jets 10
Minnesota 29, Washington 26
Cleveland 22, Tampa Bay 17
Cincinnati 33, Jacksonville 23
Miami 37, San Diego 0
St. Louis 13, San Francisco 10
Seattle 30, Oakland 24
New England 43, Denver 21
Pittsburgh 43, Baltimore 23
Open: Atlanta, Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Green
Bay, Tennessee
Monday’s Game
Indianapolis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 6
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 9
San Francisco at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Dallas vs. Jacksonville at London, 1 p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, New
England, San Diego, Washington
Monday, Nov. 10
Carolina at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
NCAA FOOTBALL |
Saturday’s College Football Scores
The Associated Press
EAST
Air Force 23, Army 6
Albright 36, Wilkes 35, OT
Alderson-Broaddus 62, Va. Lynchburg 21
Alfred 23, Salisbury 21
American International 24, Merrimack 21
Amherst 7, Trinity (Conn.) 6
Bates 10, Bowdoin 7
Bethany (WV) 34, Grove City 9
Bloomsburg 34, East Stroudsburg 13
Bowie St. 28, Lincoln (Pa.) 14
Brown 21, Penn 13
Bryant 31, CCSU 3
Bucknell 27, Lafayette 24, OT
California (Pa.) at Gannon, ccd.
Castleton 30, SUNY Maritime 24
Charleston (WV) 42, West Liberty 13
Charleston Southern 27, Monmouth (NJ) 0
College of NJ 20, Kean 10
Curry 7, W. New England 0, OT
Delaware 28, Rhode Island 13
Delaware Valley 24, King’s (Pa.) 21
Duke 51, Pittsburgh 48, 2OT
Fordham 37, Colgate 13
Framingham St. 45, Mass. Maritime 0
Franklin & Marshall 13, Susquehanna 8
Frostburg St. 35, Hartwick 21
Harvard 23, Dartmouth 12
Husson 42, Anna Maria 20
Indiana (Pa.) 31, Clarion 0
Ithaca 24, Brockport 14
Johns Hopkins 42, Ursinus 14
Juniata 56, McDaniel 31
Kutztown 17, Lock Haven 0
LIU Post 28, S. Connecticut 3
Lebanon Valley 63, FDU-Florham 21
Lehigh 27, Georgetown 19
Lycoming 28, Misericordia 14
MIT 34, Endicott 29
Marist 17, Jacksonville 16
Maryland 20, Penn St. 19
Mercyhurst 49, Seton Hill 32
Middlebury 37, Hamilton 9
Montclair St. 30, Cortland St. 20
Moravian 34, Gettysburg 14
Morrisville St. 38, William Paterson 14
Mount Ida 22, Becker 0
Muhlenberg 34, Dickinson 20
NC State 24, Syracuse 17
New Hampshire 49, Albany (NY) 24
New Haven 40, Pace 0
Norwich 19, Gallaudet 9
Notre Dame 49, Navy 39
Princeton 38, Cornell 27
Rowan 25, S. Virginia 6
Sacred Heart 23, Wagner 7
Salve Regina 21, Maine Maritime 19
Shepherd 37, Glenville St. 14
Shippensburg 60, Millersville 16
Slippery Rock 29, Edinboro 7
St. Francis (Pa.) 26, Duquesne 16
St. John Fisher 35, Buffalo St. 25
St. Lawrence 20, WPI 7
Stonehill 23, St. Anselm 16
TCU 31, West Virginia 30
Temple 20, East Carolina 10
Thiel 40, Carnegie-Mellon 27
Thomas More 21, Waynesburg 14
Towson 21, Elon 19
Tufts 28, Colby 7
UConn 37, UCF 29
W. Connecticut 30, Mass.-Dartmouth 14
WV Wesleyan 34, Fairmont St. 13
Washington & Jefferson 51, Geneva 12
Wesleyan (Conn.) 22, Williams 0
West Chester 58, Cheyney 0
Westfield St. 28, Fitchburg St. 14
Westminster (Pa.) 28, St. Vincent 14
Widener 34, Stevenson 23
Wisconsin 37, Rutgers 0
Worcester St. 36, Plymouth St. 3
Yale 25, Columbia 7
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 25, Jackson St. 14
Albany St. (Ga.) 40, Benedict 14
Appalachian St. 44, Georgia St. 0
Auburn 35, Mississippi 31
Ave Maria 30, Edward Waters 7
Averett 31, Methodist 21
BYU 27, Middle Tennessee 7
Bethel (Tenn.) 49, Cumberland (Tenn.) 14
Bethune-Cookman 34, NC Central 20
Boston College 33, Virginia Tech 31
Bridgewater (Va.) 34, Hampden-Sydney 9
Campbellsville 58, Cumberlands 12
Chattanooga 51, W. Carolina 0
Christopher Newport 45, LaGrange 26
Clark Atlanta 34, Paine 0
Coastal Carolina 38, Gardner-Webb 14
Concord 30, Virginia-Wise 13
Delta St. 33, North Alabama 28
E. Illinois 41, Tennessee Tech 10
E. Kentucky 56, Tennessee St. 42
Emory & Henry 36, Washington & Lee 9
Faulkner 55, Belhaven 14
Fayetteville St. 31, Livingstone 28
Florida 38, Georgia 20
Florida Tech 34, Shorter 30
Georgetown (Ky.) 37, Bluefield South 20
Georgia Tech 35, Virginia 10
Greensboro 19, Ferrum 17
Guilford 42, Catholic 21
Houston 27, South Florida 3
Howard 17, Delaware St. 10
Incarnate Word 38, Nicholls St. 20<Jacksonville St.
56, Austin Peay 0
James Madison 31, William & Mary 24
Johnson C. Smith 14, St. Augustine’s 10
Kentucky St. 47, Lane 14
Kentucky Wesleyan 43, Limestone 41
Lenoir-Rhyne 35, Carson-Newman 32
Liberty 28, Presbyterian 7
Lindsey Wilson 49, Union (Ky.) 10
Louisiana Tech 59, W. Kentucky 10
Louisiana-Lafayette 19, South Alabama 9
Maryville (Tenn.) 42, NC Wesleyan 28
McNeese St. 35, Northwestern St. 28
Floor battle
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan General Abednego Lufile looks for a pass during Saturday’s game against
North Idaho College at the Sheridan College Golden Dome.
Miami 47, North Carolina 20
Miles 26, Stillman 22
Mississippi St. 17, Arkansas 10
Morehouse 24, Fort Valley St. 21
Morgan St. 38, Hampton 35
Newberry 34, Brevard 14
Norfolk St. 12, Florida A&M 10
North Greenville 24, Wingate 14
Pikeville 28, Kentucky Christian 17
Randolph-Macon 47, Shenandoah 23
Rhodes 20, Birmingham-Southern 10
Rice 31, FIU 17
Richmond 10, Villanova 9
SC State 59, Savannah St. 7
Samford 55, Concordia-Selma 0
Southern U. 28, Alabama St. 21
Stetson 28, Campbell 24
Tennessee 45, South Carolina 42, OT
The Citadel 28, Mercer 26
Tusculum 20, UNC-Pembroke 17, OT
UAB 31, FAU 28
UT-Martin 62, Murray St. 38
VMI 31, Furman 15
Valdosta St. 24, West Alabama 17
Vanderbilt 42, Old Dominion 28
Virginia St. 40, Chowan 7
Virginia Union 14, Elizabeth City St. 7
Webber 28, Southeastern (Fla.) 21
Wesley 62, College of Faith 0
West Georgia 55, Mississippi College 14
Winston-Salem 61, Shaw 10
MIDWEST
Adrian 27, Hope 19
Albion 30, Olivet 28
Ashland 37, Grand Valley St. 14
Augustana (Ill.) 26, North Park 20
Augustana (SD) 33, Winona St. 8
Baldwin-Wallace 48, Capital 14
Benedictine (Ill.) 33, Concordia (Wis.) 6
Benedictine (Kan.) 35, Avila 14
Bethel (Minn.) 30, Gustavus 23
Briar Cliff 27, Midland 21
Butler 62, Morehead St. 52
Carthage 28, Millikin 22
Cent. Methodist 34, Evangel 10
Cent. Michigan 38, E. Michigan 7
Cent. Missouri 48, Lindenwood (Mo.) 28
Central 17, Simpson (Iowa) 0
Coe 35, Luther 14
Concordia (Ill.) 14, Aurora 13
Concordia (St.P.) 38, SW Minnesota St. 20
Cornell (Iowa) 31, Lake Forest 3
Crown (Minn.) 31, Martin Luther 13
Culver-Stockton 38, Baker 24
Dakota St. 51, Waldorf 41
Dayton 42, Valparaiso 19
DePauw 42, Wooster 13
Defiance 48, Anderson (Ind.) 7
Denison 34, Oberlin 7
Dickinson St. 42, Presentation 35
Doane 33, Dordt 7
Dubuque 34, Loras 7
Ferris St. 66, Lake Erie 56
Fort Hays St. 24, Nebraska-Kearney 17
Greenville 42, Westminster (Mo.) 14
Hamline 23, St. Olaf 17
Hanover 49, Earlham 34
Heidelberg 53, Wilmington (Ohio) 10
Hillsdale 24, Saginaw Valley St. 17
Illinois College 57, Knox 14
Indiana St. 20, Missouri St. 18
Indianapolis 36, St. Joseph’s (Ind.) 33
Iowa 48, Northwestern 7
Iowa Wesleyan 36, Eureka 28
John Carroll 62, Muskingum 14
Kansas St. 48, Oklahoma St. 14
Kenyon 35, Allegheny 24
Lakeland 20, Alma 17
Macalester 34, Carroll (Wis.) 17
Marian (Ind.) 55, Taylor 14
McKendree 41, William Jewell 20
Michigan 34, Indiana 10
Michigan Tech 37, Tiffin 17
Mid-Am Nazarene 40, Peru St. 0
Minn. Duluth 77, Minn.-Crookston 3
Minn. St.-Mankato 27, Sioux Falls 14
Minn. St.-Moorhead 52, Minot St. 7
Missouri 20, Kentucky 10
Missouri Baptist 34, Haskell Indian Nations 10
Missouri Valley 47, Graceland (Iowa) 16
Monmouth (Ill.) 38, Grinnell 3
Morningside 44, Concordia (Neb.) 21
Mount St. Joseph 33, Bluffton 24
Mount Union 66, Otterbein 7
N. Dakota St. 37, S. Dakota St. 17
N. Iowa 42, Illinois St. 28
NW Missouri St. 40, Missouri Western 3
Nebraska 35, Purdue 14
Nebraska Wesleyan 24, Dakota Wesleyan 7
North Central (Ill.) 45, Illinois Wesleyan 24
Northern St. (SD) 42, Mary 33
Northwestern (Iowa) 21, Hastings 7
Northwestern (Minn.) 49, Mac Murray 13
Notre Dame Coll. 41, W. Virginia St. 10
Ohio Dominican 49, Northwood (Mich.) 21
Ohio Northern 23, Marietta 14
Ohio St. 55, Illinois 14
Oklahoma 59, Iowa St. 14
Ottawa, Kan. 48, Kansas Wesleyan 20
Pittsburg St. 41, Missouri Southern 10
Quincy 20, Missouri S&T 13
Ripon 35, Beloit 28
Robert Morris-Chicago 37, Lindenwood (Ill.) 7
Rose-Hulman 38, Manchester 37
San Diego 17, Drake 14
Siena Heights 19, St. Francis (Ill.) 14
St. Cloud St. 30, Bemidji St. 27
St. Francis (Ind.) 30, Concordia (Mich.) 14
St. John’s (Minn.) 24, Augsburg 7
St. Mary (Kan.) 15, Southwestern (Kan.) 13
St. Norbert 42, Lawrence 0
St. Scholastica 40, Minn.-Morris 2
LaBarbera helps Ducks to 3-2 win over Avalanche
DENVER (AP) — One moment, Jason
LaBarbera was heading to a Halloween
party with his minor-league teammates.
Two hours of sleep and two long flights
later, he was in Denver to serve as a backup for the Anaheim Ducks.
And then, just before the opening faceoff, he was told he would be starting in net
— his first NHL game since last
December.
The emergency goalie came to the rescue, too, stopping 16 shots as the Ducks
beat the Colorado Avalanche 3-2 on
Sunday night.
This wasn’t exactly what LaBarbera was
envisioning even 12 hours earlier.
“All of it is kind of goofy,” LaBarbera
said. “I’ve been around a lot, but I’ve
never had to deal with something like
this.”
LaBarbera made an unexpected start
after he arrived earlier Sunday from
Norfolk of the AHL. He was supposed to
be the backup in place of Frederik
Andersen, who was scratched due to leg
tightness.
He got the start when John Gibson sustained a lower-body injury in warmups.
Things got so crazy that goaltending consultant Dwayne Roloson even dressed, and
was the backup in case something happened to LaBarbera.
No need to worry, though. LaBarbera
was on his game, even if he allowed a
fluky goal early. That was just nerves.
LaBarbera showed no signs of fatigue,
even if he was playing for a third straight
night. He made 36 saves and earned two
wins for Norfolk over the weekend. He
carried that momentum to Sunday and
earned his first NHL victory since Oct. 7,
2013, when he was with Edmonton.
“I’m still in la-la land,” LaBarbera said.
Defensemen Hampus Lindholm and
Cam Fowler scored their first goals of the
season 1:44 apart in the second period to
give the Ducks a lead that LaBarbera protected. Corey Perry also scored for the
Ducks, who went 3-1 on a four-game trip.
Dennis Everberg scored his first NHL
goal, and Nathan MacKinnon added
another for weary Colorado, which also
lost at St. Louis in a shootout on Saturday.
Colorado didn’t really challenge
LaBarbera all that often, especially in the
second period when the team was outshot
12-2.
“Two shots on a guy, who obviously got
called up at the last second, isn’t good
enough,” forward Matt Duchene said. “We
just lost the game in the second period.”
The Avalanche had their chances to tie
it late. Anaheim’s Francois Beauchemin
drew a high-sticking penalty with 3:07
remaining, and Semyon Varlamov went to
the bench for an extra skater, giving the
Avs a 6-on-4 opportunity. But Colorado
couldn’t capitalize.
“It’s not always going to go our way, and
it’s when things are not going our way we
try to force plays, push plays,” coach
Patrick Roy said. “This is where we get
into trouble.”
Varlamov was kept busy all night, making one sprawling save after another. He
couldn’t help the Avalanche procure a
point, though, the first time in seven
games the Avalanche failed to get at least
one.
Varlamov finished with 30 saves.
Anaheim dominated the second period,
with Lindholm scoring on a pass from
Patrick Maroon, who was behind the net.
Moments later, Fowler gave the Ducks a
3-2 lead by driving in on Varlamov, faking
one way and tapping the puck into the net
with the goalie on the ice.
Colorado got on the board 2:18 in when
Everberg banked a shot off the boards and
back to himself in order to get around a
defenseman. He then lined a shot that
squeezed past LaBarbera’s pads.
A quirky goal that could have rattled
LaBarbera, but didn’t.
“I’ve been around enough. You just kind
of realize the circumstances and go, ‘OK,
whatever. This is really goofy, but keep
playing. Don’t worry about it,’” LaBarbera
said.
As for what is next with LaBarbera,
well, he wasn’t quite sure. Is he heading
back to Anaheim with the team?
“I’m assuming so. But I don’t know,” he
said.
Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau eased his
mind.
“Until we get both goalies healthy, he’s
with us,” Boudreau said.
NOTES: Anaheim D Bryan Allen (lowerbody injury) joined the team, but remains
on the injured list. He has been in Norfolk
on a long-term injury conditioning assignment. ... The Ducks open a four-game
homestand Wednesday against the New
York Islanders. ... Perry leads the league
with 11 goals. ... The Avalanche turned
aside five power plays, stretching their
streak to 25 straight kills. ... MacKinnon
has four goals in three games after starting the season in a slump.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
FOR BETTER REHAB,
TRY PREHAB
BY MICHAEL ROIZEN,
M.D., AND MEHMET OZ,
M.D.
When "This is Where I
Leave You" hit theaters
recently, 76-year-old Jane
Fonda was as fit as ever -- and
that's after a knee replacement, which followed a hip
replacement (and major back
surgery). Her unbelievable
turnaround time is due in
large part to her lifelong role
as a physical-fitness guru;
she was in great shape before
each of her surgeries.
Now we have a name for
that: PREhab. And you don't
need to be as fit as Fonda to
get its benefits. If you're one
of the more than 1.4 million
North Americans who are
going to get a total knee or
hip replacement in 2015, seeing a physical therapist in
the months or weeks before
your operation can slash
your need for post-op care
from a home health agency
or in an inpatient facility by
almost 30 percent! That
means you'll be back on your
feet faster!
So, consider making an
appointment with a PT; you'll
learn exercises that strengthen leg muscles and increase
flexibility. For knees, they
may include the Quad Build:
Lying on your back, extend
your legs. Tighten your quad
on the affected leg; push your
knee toward the surface
below you; hold for 5 seconds;
repeat 5-10 times. Build up to
2-3 sets. Or, for hips, the
Lying Kick: Lie on your back;
place a blanket roll under the
knee on your affected leg.
Straighten your leg. Keep
knee in contact with the blanket. Hold for 5 seconds; relax.
Repeat 5-10 times; up to 20
reps.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
GRANDFATHER'S TO-DO
LIST CREATES SPECIAL
FAMILY DAY
DEAR ABBY: I am a 62year-old grandfather of a 5year-old granddaughter. The
other day I had her for the
entire day. I decided to make
a list of the things we were to
accomplish throughout the
course of the day. It turned
out to be a great success.
After completing each task,
she would ask, "What's next
on the list?"
The first item, No. 1, was to
do our "strong" (that's what
we call exercise). No. 2 was to
write her alphabet and numbers. No. 3 was to "go on an
adventure" (that's what we
call walking the dog and
exploring the nearby field).
Nos. 4, 5 and 6 -- go to the
bank, get the car washed,
then go to the park to swing,
slide, etc. After the park, she
asked if we could go to our
favorite restaurant across the
street. I replied, "How did you
know that was next on the
list?" Her expression was
priceless.
After lunch we went home
and did No. 8 -- another
adventure, which was take
the dogs for a walk again. No.
9 was painting time (what 5year-old doesn't like to
paint?). After cleaning up it
was time for No. 10, wash the
dishes and Swiffer the floor.
No. 11 she could choose something to do. We spent the next
two hours playing with her
dolls.
At about 5:30 my daughter
came to pick her up from an
exhausted grandpa. Lists will
be part of our routine from
now on. I slept like a log that
night and hope to have many
nights and days just like it in
the future. -- GRANDPA
ROBERT IN LEXINGTON,
KY.
DEAR GRANDPA ROBERT:
Your grandchild is lucky not
only to have such a loving
and dedicated grandpa, but
also one with your stamina. I
sometimes hear from grandparents -- and other adults -who ask me for suggestions
about how to better connect
with their young children.
Your letter is a road map that
will take them in the right
direction.
DEAR ABBY: During one of
their "stay up all night drinking beer and talking" sessions six months ago, my
husband, "Ralph," and his
best friend of more than 20
years, "Jim," had a huge
fight. They haven't spoken
since.
Ralph has tried at least
three times to contact Jim by
phone and email with no
response. If Ralph's version
of the story is true, they both
behaved badly. Ralph has sincerely tried to apologize, but
Jim refuses to speak to him.
It breaks my heart to see
how much this has upset my
husband. I am still Facebook
friends with Jim, and every
time I see him online I'm
tempted to say something to
him, but so far I have resisted. Would it be crossing the
line for me to reach out and
see if he'll talk to me about
this? Or should I stay out of
it? -- HOPEFUL PEACEMAKER IN ARIZONA
DEAR HOPEFUL PEACEMAKER: I know you mean
well, but it would be a mistake to put yourself in the
middle. Whatever happened
between your husband and
his friend must have been a
doozy.
You state that this happened during one of their allnight drinking and talking
sessions. To me this indicates
that one or both of them may
have alcohol issues that need
to be addressed. This is what
should be mentioned, but
only to your spouse. If the
loss of his long-standing
friendship has been painful
enough, he may be willing to
listen.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Abby shares more than 100
of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: "Abby's Favorite
Recipes" and "More Favorite
Recipes by Dear Abby." Send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $14 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B5
Pernice wins playoff in Champions Tour finale
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) —
Tom Pernice Jr. won the Champions Tour’s season-ending Charles
Schwab Cup Championship on
Sunday, beating Jay Haas with a
birdie on the fourth hole of a playoff.
The 55-year-old Pernice got upand-down from the left bunker on
the par-5 18th, holing a 6-foot putt
after Haas made a 12-footer for
par.
“I just said, ‘He’s going to make
it, so you need to be prepared to
play it on the right edge. And it
rolled right in,” Pernice said. “It
was pretty scrappy. I hung in
there. Short game is part of it as
well and my short game held up
and carried me through.”
Pernice closed with a 3-under 67
— also making a 6-foot birdie putt
on 18 — to match Haas at 11-under
269 on Desert Mountain’s Cochise
Course. The 60-year-old Haas had
a 66.
“Jay and I have become good
friends,” Pernice said. “I’ve gone
back and played in his charity
event in Greenville. I hate for anybody to lose.”
Pernice earned $440,000 in the
event limited to the top 30 on the
money list. He also won a playoff
in Iowa in June and has four career victories on the 50-and-over
tour after winning twice on the
PGA Tour.
“I was just thinking last night,
it’s such a privilege to be able to
be out here, first and foremost, to
be out here playing with Freddie
Couples and Jay Haas and Kenny
Perry and Bernhard Langer and
Hale Irwin and Tom Watson,” Pernice said. “To be able to do that
and compete and do what we do at
our age is pretty amazing that this
is here for us.”
Haas had birdie chances to win
on the second and third playoff
holes, but missed both to the
right.
“It was a long day, longer for the
team that loses in extra innings,”
Haas said. “Tom’s such a beautiful bunker player and pitcher of
the ball and everything. I knew I
was going to have to make a
birdie to beat him.”
On the third on the par-3 17th,
Haas missed a 15-foot birdie putt.
Pernice made a 6-footer after
missing the green to the left and
hitting a flop shot.
On 18 on the second extra hole,
Haas’ 8-foot birdie also slid right,
and Pernice made a 4-footer for a
scrambling par. He drove right
into a narrow wash channel in the
desert, slashed backward to the
fairway, hit his 246-yard approach
to the right of the green and set up
the par putt with a long pitch.
“Just hit a bad drive,” Pernice
said. “I had been aiming down the
left side and kind of cutting with
the wind and came up and out of it
and blocked it and so the wind got
it. .... Luckily, I had a shot, but I
had to go backwards quite a ways
because I was going in the direction of the washout.”
Haas made a 6-foot birdie putt
on 18 on the first extra hole after
Pernice’s two-putt birdie.
In regulation on 18, Haas holed a
35-foot birdie putt from the fringe
to take the lead at 11 under. Pernice — playing a group behind —
forced the playoff with his 6-foot
birdie putt.
Haas opened with rounds of 66
and 62 to take a four-stroke lead
and break the tour record for consecutive rounds of par or better at
38, then shot 75 on Saturday to fall
a stroke behind Pernice and
Perry.
Haas won two weeks ago in
North Carolina to become the 18th
player to win a Champions Tour
event at 60 or older. He has 17
Champions Tour victories after
winning nine PGA Tour titles.
“It’s been a wonderful year and,
you know, just a shot here or
there,” Haas said. “Yesterday just
was pretty awful, but today came
back on a pretty tough day to have
a chance there.”
Perry eagled the final hole for a
68 to finish a stroke back.
Langer closed with a 65 to tie for
fourth with Colin Montgomerie at
9 under.
Langer wrapped up his second
Charles Schwab Cup points title
last week and earned $158,000 on
Sunday to break Hale Irwin’s tour
record with $3,074,189. Irwin made
$3,082,304 in 2002.
The 57-year-old Langer topped
the money list for the sixth time
in seven years.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TO PLACE YOUR AD
Fax: (307) 672-7950
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Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
ADOPT:
A loving, devoted
married couple longs to
adopt your newborn into
a home filled with love,
warmth & financial
security. Expenses
paid. Stephanie &
Jason @ 1-800-6728514.
WE WILL welcome your
baby into our hearts &
home with lots of love
for a bright future.
Expenses paid. Please
call/ text Shannon
& Steve 347-243-6139
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR, 2BA townhome
w/garage, appl, new
carpet and paint.
$900mo + util. Lease
& dep. No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
LOVELY COTTAGE in
Big Horn, 2BD 1BA, XLg
garage,
W/D,
includes all util & lawn
care. $1250/mo, no
smok/pets, 674-7718
LOG CABIN in Story.
3 acres. 1 BR/sleeping
loft/1 ba. W/D. No
Computers, Accessories Smoking. Pets ?.
MAC BOOK Air w/ soft $975/mo + util
case. 11" Brand new. 307-751-7794.
$1200. 673-5271.
UNIQUE VICTORIAN,
west of Sheridan. 3-4
For Lease
BR. 2 ba. $1400 + utils.
& deposit. 655-9225.
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
ROCKTRIM $500. WiFi/ Cable incl. 752-8783
WKLY FR $210. Mnthly
fr $630 Americas Best
Value Inn 672-9757
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
AVAILABLE IN
RANCHESTER:
2 Studio apts.,
$400/mo. ea. & 2 bdrm
apt. $600/mo. + dep.
& heat, util. pd., pets?
Laundry rm. incl. No
smk. 751-4060
STADIUM PLACE
TOWNHOMES
3 Bedroom $695/month
Available NOW
• Attached Garage
• Washer & Dryer
• Dishwasher
For showing call 307.763.2682
Income restrictions apply
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
2BR, 1BA townhome
w/appl, new carpet
and paint. $900mo
+ util. Lease & dep.
No smk/pets.
Includes lawn care
& snow removal.
307-751-6772
HOUSE ON Ranch.
3 BR 2 ba. Mtn. View.
Deck. $1200 + utils.
& deposit. 655-9225
2BR. 1BA $800 mo.
+ util. Close to
downtown. No
Smk/Pets Dep.
+ lease. 752-2090
SHERIDAN COZY 1BR
house. screened in
porch, nice location,
new carpet, paint &
windows, W/D, A/C. no
smk/pets. $600 + dep.
& util. 655-9350 leave
msg.
Mobile Homes for Rent
3BR. $650 mo + dep &
references. Call before
5pm. 672-3077
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
By day, month or year.
674-7718
Office Space for Rent
2 BEAUTIFUL SUITES
for lease. (One with
kitchen area). Security,
janitorial, & utilities
included. Conference
room avail to tenants.
672-8700 or 751-3828.
25'X80' BUILDING.
Office/Storage.
Overhead door.
$400/mo. 307-256-6170
Storage Space
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
E L D O R A D O
STORAGE Helping you
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
CROWN STORAGE Inc
KROE Lane 674-9819.
Storage Space
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
LOST
PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
Child Care
SMART START
CHILDCARE now
enrolling. Infant-5 yrs
Mon-Fri. Well rounded
preschool curriculum,
breakfast, lunch &
snacks. Call 307-6602502
Work Wanted
PRIVATE NANNY
available. FT or PT.
Any day, any time.
Great references.
763-2163.
Help Wanted
NWCCD JOB
Openings
Sheridan College
• Information Systems
Developer
• Enterprise Systems
Administrator
• Computer Specialist
• Athletic Trainer (PT)
• Math Tutor (PT)
Gillette College
• Records Specialist
• Coordinator,
Academic Success
Center
• Diesel Technology
Instructor
• Facilities Specialist
• OSHA Instructor (PT)
Full-time positions
include outstanding
benefits.
On-line postings and
application at:
https://jobs.sheridan.ed
u
EOE.
PT SPEECH
Language Pathology
Position in Northeast
WY Children’s Clinic
Speech Language
Pathology job in
Sheridan WY. This is
a part-time job with
flexible hours &
competitive pay.
Wyoming SLP
license required. For
more information call
Matt at
(307) 217-0681.
Help Wanted
Sheridan County
Administration
Job Title: Human Resource Coordinator/Full-time Grade 20
Salary Range: $49,100 to $60,000 annual DOE
Benefits: Medical insurance and prescription drug coverage, dental insurance,
term life insurance, Wyoming Retirement Program, vacation and sick leave, paid
holidays.
Hours of work are from 8:00AM to 5:00 PM, Monday-Friday.
Minimum Job Requirements: Knowledge and level of competency commonly
associated with the completion of a baccalaureate degree in a Human Resource
course of study or similar study related to the occupational field. Sufficient
experience to understand the basic principles relevant to the major duties of the
position usually associated with the completion of an apprenticeship/internship or
having had a similar position for one to two years. PHR certification preferred,
but not required. Possession of a valid driver’s license issued by the State of
Wyoming.
Application deadline is November 24, 2014. To apply submit a letter of interest, a
current resume, and three work related references, to Renee’ Obermueller,
Administrative Director, 224 S Main, Suite B-1, Sheridan, WY 82801. Job
description is available at www.sheridancounty.com/current job openings.
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
Vacutech is hiring for the following positions:
Welder – Contact Scott
• MIG process for
stainless steel
• Perform detailed welding techniques
• Position, clamp or assemble work piece prior
to welding
• Read technical drawings
• Set up welding equipment
• Use acetylene welding/cutting torch
• Use arc welding equipment
• Knowledge of welding filler rod types
• Thermal-cutting equipment
• Weld in flat, horizontal, vertical or
overhead positions
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Shipping Coordinator – Contact Denise
Schedules pick up and arrival of inbound and
outboard shipments. Schedules and executes loading
activities. Coordinates quality control on outgoing
orders. One year experienced required.
Rating: BRONZE
Solution to 11/1/14
Palleting – Contact Scott
Individual will be responsible for building
multiple sized pallets for shipping of large product.
Knowledge of hand tools and carpentry a plus.
© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Adoption
CAD – Contact Scott
AutoCAD experience, computer literacy, ability
to learn quickly, work under pressure, ability to
complete tasks in a timely manner, time
management skills.
Painter/Bondo/Powder Coat – Contact Scott
Painter wanted - looking for a painter/bondo/
powder coater.
Please email resume to Scott at [email protected]
or Denise at [email protected]
or fax to 307-675-1972
11/3/14
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Busy restauranti
n searchof
M AN AGERS.
M u s tha ve experience in f o o d
s ervice m a na gem ent& a ble to
w o rk nights & w eekend s .
Interested appli
cants send resum es to:
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
WE ARE currently
seeking vacuum truck
drivers to join our team
in Wyoming. We
provide 24/7 service.
He or she must have
class A CDL, with
tankers endorsement.
Housing available! We
also offer Insurance!
$18-$22 starting pay!
Contact our office in
Wright, WY 307-4641146. Contact: Gilbert
Moncibaiz at 307-2999200. Email:
g.moncibaiz10services
@gmail.com
SHERIDAN ICE has the
following open
positions: Adult Figure
Skating Instructor! Must
have figure skating
experience. $15/hour
on Tuesdays,
Thursdays and
Saturdays.
Adult Skating Guards!
Skating experience a
must! Mainly weekend
shifts. $9/hour. Pick up
applications at the rink
located at 475
Brundage or online at
www.sheridanice.org.
SEEKING INDIVIDUAL
to wash vans at the
UPS
location
in
Sheridan. Please call
Tony at 801-634-8465.
Must be able to pass
background check.
GREAT
TALENT
makes good business!
Kmart
is
seeking
talented
associates
wanting to build a
career in retail. Flexible
scheduling, employee
discount
and
opportunity
for advancement!
Currently recruiting for:
Cashiers
Pricing Specialist
Service Desk
Associates
Little Caesars
Associates
Data Integrity
Specialists
Reset Specialists
Merchandisers
Join our team of
dedicated,
talented
associates and build an
exciting career with
Kmart! Apply on line at
kmart.jobs.com Kmart is
a drug free work place
and
an
equal
opportunity employer.
COUNSELOR AT
Tongue River High
School needed.
Applicant must hold a
WY license. Willing to
consider both part-time
and full-time applicants.
To apply please call
Brandi Miller at 307655-9541 or
[email protected]
wy.us or visit
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us Position open until
filled. E.O.E.
Blind Bo x 214,
C/ O The S herid a n Pres s
P.O . Bo x 2006
S herid a n, W Y 82801
84 East Ridge Road
Can You Say
I’m Lovin’ It
McDonald’s
Cats
Employees Can.
Now hiring:
Night Shift
Team Members
4p.m. - Midnight
FULL-TIME POSITION
available for
Farm/Ranch hand.
Some equipment
experience preferred,
benefits including
housing and more.
Call 406-679-1796,
Position currently open.
These Animals are Available
at the Dog & Cat Shelter
Dogs
At Your Job?
“Junior”, 1 yr. old, NM, black & tan, Min Pin
“Colton”, 2 yr. old, NM, black, Retriever mix
“Chief”, 1 yr. old, NM, black, Lab mix
“Brut”, 2 yr. old, NM, black & brown, brindle Mastiff
“Jax”, 1 yr. old, NM, white & tan, Terrier mix
“Franny”, 2 yr. old, SF, black & white, Border Collie
“Jojo”, 2 yr. old, SF, black, Retriever/Heeler mix
“Bear”, 5 yr. old, NM, black, Chow Chow mix
“Tango”, 8 mo. old, NM, brown, Retriever mix
LOOKING FOR
Full Time
Farm Mechanic
“Bobert”, 7 yr. old, NM, grey & brown, tabby, DSH
“Stubby J”, 8 yr. old, NM, gray & white, bobtail, DLH
“Juan”, 2 yr. old, NM, gray tabby, DSH
“Muggs”, 6 yr. old, SF, gary, Persian
“Eva”, 4 yr. old, SF, black & white, DSH
“Annie”, 3 yr. old, SF, black & white, DMH
“Leticia”, 4 yr. old, SF, black, DSH
“Bean”, 17 yr. old, NM, cream & brown, Siamese mix
“Bill”, 3 yr. old, NM, Grey, DSH
DSH = domestic short hair DMH = domestic medium hair DLH = domestic long hair
NM = neutered male • SF= spayed female
We have 46 cats and 4 kittens, 17 dogs up for adoption!!
Come up and see what we have for you!
Apply online at
mcwyoming.com/4206
or in person.
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the Shelter
gates or to our can trailer at Scotty’s Skate Castle. Recycling proceeds are
used to care for the animals.Thanks for your support.
N ow online...
ww w.D est i n at io nSher ida n.co m
Hints from Heloise
The Gift of No
Return?
Dear Readers:
Here is this
week's SOUND
OFF, about using
gift cards:
"I have used
five gift cards in the past couple
of months. I have had to ask for
the card back on all but one.
The clerks act surprised and
say, 'I am sorry, I didn't realize
there was a balance.' Had I not
said anything, the money on
the card would have been lost.
They always hand you back
your credit card, why not the
gift cards?" -- Elaine in California
Good question. Some cards
will show a remaining balance;
others will not. On some cards
I've used, the store has not been
able to determine what the balance left is until it is swiped.
Just always ask for the card
back. -- Heloise
FAST FACTS
Dear Readers: Uses for paper
plates:
* Catch potential spills in the
refrigerator.
* Under a pet dish to keep the
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
Heloise
floor clean.
* Under a coffee cup to protect
a table.
* Under a soup bowl to catch
drips.
* As a quick cutting surface
for a piece of fruit.
-- Heloise
SWIMSUIT RESIDUE
Dear Heloise: I recently purchased a new bathing suit. I removed the "sanitary liner" in
the bottom of the suit, and even
after washing it, there's still
sticky stuff on my suit. Any
ideas how I can remove this? -M.S. in Chicago
Yes, I do have a few hints for
you to remove the sticky
residue. First, try a little petroleum-based prewash spray or
dry-cleaning fluid/spot remover. Apply to the area, let it
sit a few minutes to loosen the
residue, then scrape off with a
dull knife. There are many
products out there that do remove adhesive, and this is really the easiest way to get rid of
the sticky stuff without harming the material. Then wash as
usual. To find out how to remove other tough stains, order
my pamphlet Heloise's Handy
Stain Guide for Clothing. Send
$5 and a long, self-addressed,
stamped (70 cents) envelope to:
Heloise/Stain Guide, P.O. Box
795001, San Antonio, TX 782795001. To prevent "pilling" on
swimsuits, wash them inside
out and hang to dry. Don't put
them in the dryer. -- Heloise
THREADING NEEDLES
Dear Heloise: My mother
likes to hem and fix her own
clothing but began having a
hard time threading the needles. On a recent visit, I
threaded a whole bunch for her
and stuck them in her pincushion. They are ready to go, and
she doesn't have to worry about
threading them anymore. -Cynthia in San Antonio
How nice of you to help out! I
try to keep a few needles prethreaded (basic colors like
black, brown and white) to
quickly fix a small tear,
dropped hem or a button that is
about to come off. -- Heloise
TOILET BRUSH
Dear Heloise: When I use the
toilet brush, I hold it in the toilet and flush a time or two. No
chemicals to drip in the holder.
-- Suzette in Gainesville, Fla.
responsibility include
equipment
maintenance and
repair, some other
farm duties included,
open immediately.
Benefits include
housing. Call
406-679-1796
LOCAL BUSINESS
looking for Office
Assistant. Must have
valid DL. Background
check
will be required.
Great personality,
dependability and multitasking a must.
Mon-Thurs 9-4.
Please stop by to pick
up application at
5211 Coffeen Ave
during business hours
ONLY!
No phone calls.
BIG BROTHERS BIG
SISTERS is growing.
Now accepting resumes
for a part-time case
manager. Responsible
for intake of youth and
volunteers, coordinating
and providing ongoing
support of mentoring
relationships. Flexible
hours, Bachelor's
degree required. Send
over cover letter and
resume to
[email protected]
TACO JOHN'S/GOOD
TIMES is looking for F/T
& P/T employees for all
shifts.
Clean
cut
appearances & pleasing
personality
are
essential. Stop by our
store for application and
your
interview.
References.
$10.00+
per hr DOE.
SEEKING
KNOWLEDGEABLE
bookkeeper with
experience and
understanding of
Quickbooks and
payroll reporting a must.
Retirement plan & flex
scheduling available.
Send reply to box 216,
c/o The Sheridan Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't be afraid to spread
your wings and explore limitless possibilities. You
have the drive and ambition to make the changes
necessary to succeed. A
trustworthy partner will be
by your side to help you
achieve your goals.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
If you hope to impress people with a presentation, or
improve your reputation,
you're in luck. This is an excellent time to appear in
public or push for career
advancement. Grab a
chance to flaunt your funloving side.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Money is a tool. Money
itself might be the root of all
evil, but it's the basis of all
good if you use it to support
your family or plan ahead
for retirement. This is a
good time to put financial
ideas into motion.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): To
love you is to trust you. Expect to receive positive feedback. This is a great time to
take advantage of opportunities to implement a
change, perhaps by interviewing for a new job or
starting a new business or
project.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You feel safe and secure
when dealing with family
members and people closely
linked to you within the
community. Let the advice
of those you trust guide you
where investments or major
purchases are concerned.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Let yourself be known.
Share your views and speak
your heart and doors will
open. You may be attracted
to new ideas that lead to
Delivery
problems?
Call
The Press
at 672-2431
Real Estate
FSBO, 1368 Yonkee
Ave., 7380 SF lot,
942 SF house, 2 BR
1 ba., excel. cond.,
w/lots
of
extras.
Ready to Move in.
call for more info.
Amy or Tim at 6725293.
LGE HOME near
Highland Park School.
4 br/3 ba. Office,
finish basement,
2 car garage, large
private yard, beautiful
finishes, abundant
storage & much more.
752-3452.
2003 AUDI A6 Quattro.
2.7 Turbo Excellent
condition. 120K miles.
Asking $5500.
673-5271
2007 SAAB 93 Aero.
2.8 Turbo Fully Loaded.
78K miles. $9500 OBO.
970-371-5361
Motorcycles
2006 YAMAHA R6. All
new plastic. 10K miles.
$4500 OBO.
970-371-5361
Phillip Alder
HOW TO
TELL PARTNER WHICH
SUIT TO
LEAD
Raymond
Teller wrote in a letter,
"We did not start as
friends, but as people
who respected and admired each other. Crucial, absolutely crucial
for a partnership."
He was talking about
Penn Jillette and himself, but he could have
been discussing bridge
players. In particular, it
is important to trust
your partner's cards
when you are on defense.
How should East-West
card to defeat three
spades? What do you
think of the auction?
In the bidding, South
sensibly overcalled one
spade. (A few players
would have intervened
with one no-trump to describe their hand
strength. It is much better to look for a spade fit
first and keep no-trump
on the back burner.)
Over one spade, West
should have made a negative double to show his
minor-suit length. When
he passed, North made a
pre-emptive jump raise
to show four-card support and a weak hand.
(With at least game-invitational values,
North would have
cue-bid two hearts.)
South was tempted to
bid higher, but with
those potentially useless diamond honors,
he wisely passed.
Against three
spades, West led his
heart. East wasn't
sure that it was a singleton, but just in
case, she won with
her ace and returned
the queen, her highest heart being a suitpreference signal for
diamonds, the
higher-ranking of the
other two side suits.
West ruffed away
declarer's heart king
and shifted to his dia-
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Travis Van Winkle was
born in Victorville, Calif.,
today in 1982. This birthday
guy currently co-stars as Lt.
Danny Green on the series
"The Last Ship" and plays
the recurring role of Jonah
Breeland on "Hart of Dixie."
He's also appeared on
episodes of "Raising Hope,"
"CSI: Miami" and "Two and
a Half Men." Van Winkle's
film work includes roles in
"Rites Of Passage," "Friday
The 13th" and "Transformers."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): A romantic partner
could be in the mood for
love, so make plans for a
quiet evening and don't be
surprised if passionate fireworks go off. Don't let the
past dictate the future
where your cash is concerned.
SEEKING QUALIFIED
tax preparer for long
standing CPA firm.
Experience a must.
Salary DOE. Retirement
plan and flex scheduling
available. Send reply to
box 215, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan,
WY 82801
Autos-Accessories
Help Wanted,
Professional
Bridge
Help Wanted,
Professional
mond five, low guaranteeing at least one honor
in the suit. East won
with her ace and cashed
the heart jack, West discarding the club two.
Now East returned a diamond to defeat the contract, although a fourth
heart would have
worked also.
Jeraldine Saunders
success. The stars are shining brightly for amorous activities, so don't be bashful.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Under these stars, it's
possible to be obsessed by
your passions. Go ahead
and gamble on love without
worrying that the stakes
are high. You can win at
any romantic or financial
game by following your instincts.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Your intense ambition to succeed can put the
wings on your feet and send
you off in search of greener
pastures. Much can be accomplished if you rely upon
sound principles and accurate information.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You could be misled by
wishful thinking. But remember, wishful thinking
won't make your bank ac-
count grow larger or a loved
one any more loving. Ask
for some feedback from a
trusted friend before taking
major steps.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Your boundless enthusiasm may cause people to
look to you as a mediator.
Just remember that an umpire cannot compete in the
game. Become an avid student of human nature and
learn everything you can.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): The depth of your feelings sends out an invisible
net that can capture the
heart of someone special.
Your charming ways can
help you make money, and
your magnetic attractiveness can lead to happy romantic encounters.
IF NOVEMBER 4 IS
YOUR BIRTHDAY: A romance, vacation break, or
compelling business
arrangement could be the
most important thing on
your mind during the next
4-6 weeks. Your mind is at
an apex for pursuing financial and career success if
you don't let yourself become distracted by pipe
dreams and romance.
Friends and organizations
could come into the spotlight by December. After
the first of the year, you'll
be filled with wisdom and
can get your priorities
straight. Lucky breaks may
offer encouragement and a
way to expand your influence. Don't fall back into old
habits in February or allow
doubts to undermine your
confidence. You're sensitive
to others and must surround yourself with upbeat
companions.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sheridan Area Water Supply Joint Powers Board Briefing
and Agenda Setting Session
Time: 9:00 A.M., Thursday, November 6, 2014
Place: Sheridan County Commissioner’s Library on the
2nd floor of the Sheridan County Courthouse Addition
SAWSJPB staff will brief members of the board and
present a draft agenda for the November 12, 2014
regular meeting of the board.
Dan Coughlin
Sheridan Area Water Supply Project Manager
Publish November 3, 2014.
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Your Right
To Know
and be informed of
government legal
proceedings is
embodied in public
notices. This
newspaper urges
every
citizen to read and
study these
notices.
We strongly advise
those seeking
further information
to exercise their
right of access to
public records and
public meetings.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing information are required with
each legal notice. A PDF is required if there are any signatures, with a Word
Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause delay in publication. All legal
notices must be paid in full before an "AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION" will be
issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal advertising department at 672-2431 if
you have questions.
The Sheridan Brewing
Company Stockhouse
is in process of demolition in 1991. The building was used for
storage purposes for
some time after the
brewing company was
closed. The photo is in
the Lenz collection in
the Sheridan County
Museum's Memory
Book project.
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
O U TD O O R S
TO M
M C IN TY R E i
s a noveli
st w hose book,‘
The
S now Leopard’
s Tale,
’w as publi
shed i
n S eptem ber
by B angtai
lP ress.He i
s also a contri
buti
ng edi
tor to
S ports A fi
eld and Fi
eld and S tream m agazi
nes.Hi
s
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Every Thursday,The S herid a n P res s publi
shes i
ts O utdoors page as
a com pli
m ent to i
ts sports secti
on.I
ni
t,you’
llfi
nd fi
rst-hand hunti
ng
and fi
shi
ng experi
ences by tw o ofthe m ost accom pli
shed
book,‘
S hooters B i
ble G ui
de to O pti
cs’w as
outdoorsm en i
n our area – G ordon R ose and Tom M cI
ntyre.These
publi
shed by S kyhorse P ubli
shi
ng.Follow Tom on
di
sti
ngui
shed w ri
ters reach deeply i
nto subject m atter that affects
Tw i
tter @ m ci
ntyrehunts.
de audi
ence i
n S heri
dan C ounty and beyond.
and i
nterests a w i
To m M cIntyre
Too,there are new s releases from the W yom i
ng G am e and Fi
sh
Departm ent,new s that every localhunter and fi
sherm an can use.
GO R D O N R O S E i
s an attorney w ho w orks as a
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
com m erci
alfly ti
er and operates the S heri
dan W YO
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Heali
ng W aters,w hi
ch i
s part ofa non-profi
t
organi
zati
on w hi
ch teaches di
sabled m i
li
tary
veterans fly fi
shi
ng,fly tyi
ng and fly rod bui
ldi
ng as
part ofthei
r therapy.
G o rd o n R o s e
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
INVITATION FOR BID
Northern Wyoming Community College District, State of
Wyoming, operating as Sheridan College, will receive
bids for the construction of the following:
1. 50’ x 70’ pole barn storage
building
Bids will be received until 1:00 p.m., November 24th,
2014 at the Physical Plant Conference Room, Physical
Plant Building. Bids will be opened at this time and
place. A pre-bid conference and site inspection will be
conducted at 1:00 p.m. November 10th, 2014 at the
Sheridan College Physical Plant. All proposals shall be
clearly marked with the wording “Sheridan College
Storage Building” and information identifying the
bidding firm on the outside of the envelope. Contractors
must be licensed to do business in the state of
Wyoming. Sheridan College reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bids, but will award based on the best
interest of the institution. Preference shall be given to
Wyoming contractors, sub-contractors, laborers, and
materials. For additional information or for copies of
the construction documents, contact James Lollar at
Sheridan College Physical Plant (307-674-6446 ex
2907), 3059 Coffeen, PO Box 1500, Sheridan, Wyoming
82801.
DATED this 30th day of October, 2014
/S/ Kati Sherwood
Chairperson
Board of Trustees
Northern Wyoming
Community College District
Publish: November 3, 5, 7, 2014.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Content matters.
144 G ri
nnell•Sheri
dan,W Y •672-2431
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
© 2014 by Vicki Whiting, Editor
Jeff Schinkel, Graphics
Vol. 30, No. 48
Color this
World War I
soldier.
Then look for
photos of modern
military uniforms
in the newspaper
or online. What is
similar? What
is different?
Yuval weitzen/Wikipedia
2014 is the 100th Anniversary of the outbreak
of the first World War. People all over the
world have been buying little ceramic poppies
to “plant” outside the Tower of London.
The goal is to “plant” one for every
British or Commonwealth soldier
killed in World War I.
How many poppies
would that be? Do
the math to discover
the answer:
oppies were
the flowers that
grew on the battlefields
and they became a symbol to
remember fallen soldiers. In
Britain and the United States,
people wear poppies on
November 11th, the day that
soldiers on both sides of World
War I stopped fighting and had
what is called an armistice.
Armistice means a pause in
fighting agreed upon by the two
sides in a conflict.
Today, people in Britain call
November 11th Remembrance
Day. In the United States, this day
y
is called Veterans Day. In both
countries it is a day to remember
those who served their countries
in the military.
Replace the
missing
words.
Are you an eagle-eyed reader?
Circle the seven errors in the
article below. Then, rewrite it
correctly.
On the 11th hour of the 11th
day of the 11th month of
1918, a peace agreement
ended Wurld War I. The first
remembrance of the event was
on this day in 1919 when
President Woodrow Wilson
announced that the day should
be “filled with solemn pride in
the heroism of those who died
in the country’s survice and
with gratitude for the victory.”
Although there have bean
wars since then, this day is
still set aside and what is now
called Veterans Day is
officially observed on
Novimber 11th. In parade, at
church services and war
memorials, we onor and
thank all the military
servicemen and women who
have served America and
especially veterans living
today. In many places the
American flag will be hung at
half mast and people
everywhere participate in a
moments of silence at 11 a.m.
444,123
+ 444,123
Countries joined
one of two sides in
WWI. On one side were
France, Russia and Great
Britain. They were the Allied
Powers. The United States
joined the Allied Powers in 1917.
On the other side were Germany,
Austria-Hungary, Italy, the Ottoman
Empire and Bulgaria. They were
called the Central Powers.
How many WWI airplanes
can you find on this page?
Have a friend try. Who
found the most?
For the first time ________, machine guns, poison gas and airplanes
were used in __________. Photography changed how people
connected with wars. Pictures from the war zones were published
and people thousands of miles away could see the _____________
of the war. Aerial photography was used to survey troop positions
and watch their ________________.
Because so many men went to fight in the war, women starting
_____________ in jobs that had previously been “men’s jobs.”
These jobs included working in factories, delivering mail and more.
After reading the article A Christmas Truce,
what do you think the word truce means?
diers from
On Christmas Day in 1914, sol at was called
both sides stepped out into wh tlefield
“no man’s land” between the bat
ke hands
trenches to greet each other, sha
and sing Christmas carols.
re exchanged
In some places, small gifts we a quick game
and there were even reports of
of soccer between troops.
Use pictures and
words cut from the
newspaper to design
your own Veterans
Day flag. Display
your flag in your
classroom or in a
window at home.
a. Giving gifts to someone you don’t like or
know very well.
b. An agreement between enemies to stop
fighting for a certain amount of time.
c. An unscheduled soccer match.
Standards Link: Visual Art:
Know how subject matter,
symbols and ideas are used
to communicate meaning.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Use the skills and strategies of the reading process to follow written directions.
Draw a line connecting two syllables to make a
WWI word from this page.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Follow simple written directions.
Memorial Poem
Write a poem about war that expresses
your feelings and opinions or how you would
honor the memory of fallen soldiers. Use the
newspaper to find words to use in your poem.
Standards Link: Research: Use the newspaper to locate
information.
•
•
•
•
•
•
VETERANS
TRENCHES
MEMORIAL
POPPIES
ALLIED
SYMBOL
PHOTOS
WORLD
PEACE
TROOP
TRUCE
ZONES
SING
MAIL
GOAL
Find the words in the puzzle. Then
look for each word in this week’s
Kid Scoop stories and activities.
T S O T O H P V H O
Standards Link: Language Arts: Use nouns,
adjectives and verbs correctly.
R N T R U C E A E L
E O G R S T L C A A
N V E N E L A O T
C Z E R
I
I
E G D R R
H O A E P S L A N O
E N D S
P R L
I
A M
S E D L O B M Y S E
A S Y W P O O R T M
Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical
words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.
Dogs and pigeons were used to carry messages
First major war to use airplanes and tanks
Battles took place on land, on the sea and in the air
More than 9 million soldiers died
Seven million civilians died
Twenty-one million people were wounded
This week’s word:
PAUSE
The noun pause means
to stop temporarily.
During P.E., I decided to
pause for a drink of water.
Try to use the word pause
in a sentence today when
talking with your friends
and family members.
Thank a Veteran
November 11th is
Veterans Day. Write a
short note to say thank
you to the many
veterans who have
served our country.
Teacher name: _____________________________
School name:_______________________________
NIE is a national, non-profit service that provides teachers with free
local newspapers and materials for use in the classroom. We partner
with local businesses and organizations to underwrite the cost of
classroom subscriptions. If you teach in a accredited school. K college, and would like to receive The Sheridan Press in your
classroom please send in the form at the right.
Return form to:
The Sheridan Press
Attn: NIE
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wy 82801
or fax to 672-7950
For more information
call 672-2431
Grades taught:___________ Phone:____________
E-mail:_____________________________________
Number of papers wanted
Mon ___ Tues ___ Weds ___ Thurs___ Fri___

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